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1

Post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent in an integrated duckweed and stabilization pond system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-treatment of effluent from an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor, that was fed with domestic sewage, was conducted in an integrated pond system. The system consisted of a series of shallow duckweed and stabilization ponds. The main objective of post-treatment is removal of bacterial pathogens and further polishing of effluent quality. Rapid and efficient pathogen removal can be achieved

Peter van der Steen; Asher Brenner; Joost van Buuren; Gideon Oron

1999-01-01

2

ANAEROBIC SEWAGE TREATMENT IN A ONE-STAGE UASB AND A COMBINED UASB-DIGESTER SYSTEM  

E-print Network

The potential of a novel technology consisting of a UASB complemented with a digester (UASB-Digester) for mutual sewage treatment and sludge stabilisation under low temperature conditions was investigated. The performance of the UASB-Digester system was compared with a one stage UASB. The UASB reactor was operated at a HRT of 6 hours and controlled temperature of 15°C, the average sewage temperature in the Middle East countries during wintertime, while the digester was operated at 35 °C. The UASB-Digester provided substantially better removal efficiencies and conversion than the one stage UASB reactor (p<0.05). The achieved removal efficiencies in the UASB-Digester and the one stage UASB for

Nidal Mahmoud; Grietje Zeeman; Huub Gijzen; Gatze Lettinga

3

Full scale UASB reactor performance in the brewery industry.  

PubMed

In this paper the 7 year experience of the Oriental Breweries, located in Kumi, Korea utilizing a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for the anaerobic pretreatment of brewery wastewater is presented. The anaerobic pretreatment system selected has successfully achieved the desired treatment efficiency for the brewery wastewater during that period and it has also continued operation even with low wastewater concentrations (average CODcr 1,400 mg l-1) and lower flow rates than specified by the design parameters. The CODcr removal of the UASB reactor averaged over 80% throughout the entire period, incurring normal running expenses of only $0.20-0.31 m-3 of treated water. In addition a further economical feature of the process was the utilization of the gas digester production as the municipal gas source, reducing total operating expenses around 30 to 45% and costing the plant only $0.1 m-3. Maintenance of good granule production, which is always a key issue in operating UASB systems, was not possible by this installation, however, so frequent expensive reseeding of the reactor was often necessary due to biomass washout. The full scale and lab scale research revealed that underloading can be as detrimental as overloading, due to excessively long retention time in the UASB system for the overall operating period and to excessive pre-acidification and/or incorrect reactor configuration of the completely mixed type. To enhance the sludge granulation, therefore, the installation of a pre-acidification reactor in the UASB system treating easily biodegradable substrates such as brewery wastewater is not necessary because adequate pre-acidification can occur in the equalization tank. PMID:11329809

Ahn, Y H; Min, K S; Speece, R E

2001-04-01

4

The influence of physical–chemical and biological factors on the removal of faecal coliform through down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) system treating UASB reactor effluent  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanism of faecal coliform removal in down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) system treating up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor effluent was the subject of this study. The results obtained revealed that the most important removal mechanism of faecal coliform in the DHS system is adsorption, followed by predation. Die-off is a relatively minor removal mechanism in the DHS system. The

A. Tawfik; F. El-Gohary; A. Ohashi; H. Harada

2006-01-01

5

A model to describe the performance of the UASB reactor.  

PubMed

A dynamic model to describe the performance of the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor was developed. It includes dispersion, advection, and reaction terms, as well as the resistances through which the substrate passes before its biotransformation. The UASB reactor is viewed as several continuous stirred tank reactors connected in series. The good agreement between experimental and simulated results shows that the model is able to predict the performance of the UASB reactor (i.e. substrate concentration, biomass concentration, granule size, and height of the sludge bed). PMID:23877239

Rodríguez-Gómez, Raúl; Renman, Gunno; Moreno, Luis; Liu, Longcheng

2014-04-01

6

Ozone Application for the Improvement of UASB Reactor Effluent I. Physical-Chemical and Biological Appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ozonation can improve the effluent characteristics of UASB (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket) reactors treating domestic sewage, by removing organic matter, solids, surfactants, color and microorganisms. In Brazil, part of the effluent of a 120 msup3; UASB reactor, fed with screened domestic sewage at an hydraulic retention time of 7 hours, was post-treated in a two-column ozonation system of 300 liters

T. M. T. Gasi; L. A. V. Amaral; C. E. M. Pacheco; A. G. Filho; A. D. Garcia Jr; S. M. M. Vieira; R. Francisco Jr; P. D. Orth; M. Scoparo; M. S. R. de S. Dias; M. L. Magri

1991-01-01

7

A dual purpose packed-bed reactor for biogas scrubbing and methane-dependent water quality improvement applying to a wastewater treatment system consisting of UASB reactor and trickling filter.  

PubMed

A wastewater treatment system employing a UASB reactor in temperate regions requires biogas as a heat source for the UASB reactor during low temperature seasons. In this case, removal of H2S in the biogas by means of a scrubber before burning is necessary in order to prevent the boilers from corroding. Heating of the UASB reactor is, however, unnecessary in a warm season, and the scrubber and biogas become useless. Methane-dependent water quality improvement using the scrubber and biogas would be one way to use them efficiently during the warm season. The possible dual-purpose use of a packed-bed reactor was examined, with one of its uses being the scrubbing of biogas during the cold season and the other being the methane-dependent improvement of effluent water quality during the warm season. A bench scale packed-bed filled with plastic latticed-ring media was installed in a livestock wastewater treatment plant consisting of a UASB reactor and a trickling filter for post-treatment. The packed-bed was operated with biogas flowing at a superficial velocity of 0.14-0.39 m h(-1) and the hydraulic loading of trickling filter effluent sprayed onto the media 9.4-26.1 m3 m2 day(-1). H2S in the biogas from the UASB reactor was reduced from 1,200-2,500 ppm to less than 2 ppm by the reactor. Methane-dependent water quality improvement was examined using a laboratory scale reactor to which methane and/or air was supplied from the bottom, while plant effluent was spread from the top of the reactor. When the mixture gas of methane and air (volume ratio 1:3) was added to the reactor, biofilm grew on the surface of the media. Accompanying this growth, ammonium and phosphate in the spread water decreased, probably due to assimilation by the methane-oxidizing bacteria. Though assimilation activity dropped after the accumulation of biomass, it could be reactivated by washing out the excess biomass. Periodical backwash at a rate of more than once a week seemed to efficiently maintain the removal activity. The dark brown color of the wastewater could be also reduced in concert with methane oxidation. It seemed that methane-oxidizing bacteria degraded color-causing compounds. These results suggest that the packed-bed reactor is useful for both H2S purification of biogas and methane-dependent effluent water quality improvement. PMID:12137264

Tanaka, Yasuo

2002-08-01

8

Maximum COD Loading Capacity in UASB Reactors at 37°C  

Microsoft Academic Search

The maximum capacity chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors is evaluated using three 8.5 L reactors and high-strength synthetic wastewaters composed of milk and sucrose at 37~ The study was conducted over a wide-range COD loading rate (18-260 g.L-l.day 1), by varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) (1.8-10 hr) and COD levels in wastewater (6,000-20,000

Herbert H. P. Fang; H. K. Chui

1993-01-01

9

Combining UASB and the "fourth generation" down-flow hanging sponge reactor for municipal wastewater treatment.  

PubMed

A "fourth generation" down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) Reactor has been developed and proposed as an improved variant of post-treatment system for UASB treating domestic wastewater. This paper evaluates the potential of the proposed combination of UASB and DHS as a sewage treatment system, especially for developing countries. A pilot-scale UASB (1.15 m3) and DHS (0.38 m3; volume of sponge) was installed in a municipal sewage treatment site and constantly monitored for 2 years. UASB was operated at an HRT of 6 h corresponding to an organic load of 2.15 kg-COD/m3 per day. Subsequently, the organic load in DHS was 2.35 kg-COD/m3 per day, operated at an HRT of 2 h. Organic removal by the whole system was satisfactory, accomplishing 96% of unfiltered BOD removal and 91% of unfiltered COD removal. However, nitrification decreased from 56% during the startup period to 28% afterwards. Investigation on DHS sludge was made by quantifying it and evaluating oxygen uptake rates with various substrates. Average concentration of trapped biomass was 26 g-VSS/L of sponge volume, increasing the SRT of the system to 100-125 d. Removal of coliforms obtained was 3-4 log10 with the final count of 10(3) to 10(4) MPN/100 ml in DHS effluent. PMID:16605034

Tandukar, M; Uemura, S; Ohashi, A; Harada, H

2006-01-01

10

TREATMENT OF METHANOLIC WASTEWATER BY ANAEROBIC DOWN-FLOW HANGING SPONGE (ANDHS) REACTOR AND UASB REACTOR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anaerobic down-flow hanging sponge (AnDHS) reactor and UASB reactor were operated at 30℃ for over 400 days in order to investigate the process performance and the sludge characteristics of treating methanolic wastewater (2 gCOD/L). The settings OLR of AnDHS reactor and of UASB reactor were 5.0 -10.0 kgCOD/m3/d and 5.0 kgCOD/m3/d. The average of the COD removal demonstrated by both reactors were over 90% throughout the experiment. From the results of methane producing activities and the PCR-DGGE method, most methanol was directly converted to methane in both reactors. The conversion was carried out by different methanogens: one closely related to Methanomethylovorans hollandica in the AnDHS retainted sludge and the other closely related to Methanosarcinaceae and Metanosarciales in the UASB retainted sludge.

Sumino, Haruhiko; Wada, Keiji; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Harada, Hideki; Ohashi, Akiyoshi

11

EFECTOS DEL AMONIO Y DEL pH SOBRE EL CRECIMIENTO DE LA Spirodela PolyrrhizaCULTIVADO EN EFLUENTES DE REACTORES UASB INFLUENCE OF AMMONIUM CONCENTRATION AND pH ON GROWTH OF Spirodela PolyrrhizaCULTIVATED IN EFFLUENTS OF UASB REACTORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wastewater treatment, using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors (UASB), normally achieves 60 - 65% organic matter removal. For removal of the remaining organic matter, nutrients, and pathogens, the UASB effluents require post-treatment. Natural systems, such as duckweed lagoons, due to their capacity to remove nutrients like nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P), have been reported to present excellent economical alternatives for

Omar Arce García; Julia Rosa Caicedo

12

Performance and behaviour of planted and unplanted units of a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland system treating municipal effluent from a UASB reactor.  

PubMed

A system composed of two horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands operating in parallel was evaluated for the post-treatment of UASB (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket) reactor effluent, for a population equivalent of 50 inhabitants per unit. One unit was planted with cattail (Typha latifolia) and the other was unplanted. The study was undertaken over a period of 4 years, comprising monitoring of influent and effluent constituents together with a full characterization of the behaviour of the units (tracer studies, mathematical modelling of chemical oxygen demand (COD) decay, characterization of solids in the filter medium). The mean value of the surface hydraulic load was 0.11 m(3)m(-2)d(-1), and the theoretical hydraulic retention time was 1.1 d in each unit. Using tracer tests with (82)Br, dispersion number (d) values of 0.084 and 0.079 for the planted and unplanted units were obtained, indicating low to moderate dispersion. The final effluent had excellent quality in terms of organic matter and suspended solids, but the system showed low capacity for nitrogen removal. Four-year mean effluent concentration values from the planted and unplanted units were, respectively: biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)): 25 and 23 mg L(-1); COD: 50 and 55 mg L(-1); total suspended solids (TSS): 9 and 9 mg L(-1); N-ammonia: 27 and 28 mg L(-1). The COD decay coefficient K for the traditional plug-flow model was 0.81 and 0.84 d(-1) for the planted and unplanted units. Around 80% of the total solids present in the filter medium were inorganic, and most of them were present in the interstices rather than attached to the support medium. As an overall conclusion, horizontal subsurface flow wetlands can be a very suitable post-treatment method for municipal effluents from anaerobic reactors. PMID:24135097

da Costa, Jocilene Ferreira; de Paoli, André Cordeiro; Seidl, Martin; von Sperling, Marcos

2013-01-01

13

Anaerobic degradation of coconut husk leachate using UASB-reactor.  

PubMed

Reffing of coconut husk, the majorprocess in quality coir fibre extraction, causes serious pollution with brackish water lagoons of Kerala. An attempt is made to treat the coconut husk leachate by using a laboratory scale UASB-reactor The experiment was conducted with loading of leachate from 1 kg of fresh coconut husk. The anaerobic treatment was done continuously The parameters like VFA, pH, COD and polyphenols were analysed regularly during the evaluation of the reactor performance. The polyphenol, VFA and COD were diminished gradually with time. The pH of the reactor during the study was found to be in the range of 6-8. The biogas production was increased with loading and about 82% of the total COD/kg husk could be converted to biogas. The maximum polyphenol loading in the reactor was reached to about 298.51 mg/l of husk. PMID:18380084

Neena, C; Ambily, P S; Jisha, M S

2007-07-01

14

Comparative toxicological studies of distillery effluent treatments such as UASB reactor followed by an oxidizer unit using Cyprinus carpio fish  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of anaerobically treated distillery effluent and oxidized effluent on freshwater fish, Cyprinus carpio. The untreated distillery effluent (Sample A) was treated with up?flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor (Sample B) and followed by an oxidizer system (Sample C and D) under optimized conditions. The comparative acute toxicity of

Vandana Patil; Vikram Ghole

2010-01-01

15

Syntrophic propionate degradation response to temperature decrease and microbial community shift in an UASB reactor.  

PubMed

Propionate is an important intermediate product during the methane fermentation of organic matter, and its degradation is crucial for maintaining the performance of an anaerobic digester. In order to understand the effect of temperature on propionate degradation, an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with synthetic wastewater containing propionate as a sole carbon source was introduced. Under the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 h and influent propionate of 2,000 mg/l condition, propionate removal was above 94% at 30-35°C, whereas propionate conversion was inhibited when temperature was suddenly decreased stepwise from 30°C to 25°C, to 20°C, and then to 18°C. After a long-term operation, the propionate removal at 25°C resumed to the value at 30- 35°C, whereas that at 20°C and 18°C was still lower than the value at 35°C by 8.1% and 20.7%, respectively. Microbial community composition analysis showed that Syntrophobacter and Pelotomaculum were the major propionate-oxidizing bacteria (POB), and most POB had not changed with temperature decrease in the UASB. However, two POB were enriched at 18°C, indicating they were low temperature tolerant. Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum were the dominant methanogens in this UASB and remained constant during temperature decrease. Although the POB and methanogenic composition hardly changed with temperature decrease, the specific CODPro removal rate of anaerobic sludge (SCRR) was reduced by 21.4%-46.4% compared with the control (35°C) in this system. PMID:23462012

Ban, Qiaoying; Li, Jianzheng; Zhang, Liguo; Jha, Ajay Kumar; Zhang, Yupeng; Ai, Binling

2013-03-01

16

Use of UASB reactors for brackish aquaculture sludge digestion under different conditions.  

PubMed

Treatment and disposal of high volume of salty waste production in recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs) is a major challenge and the sludge is often a source of environmental pollution and salinization of receiving soils and water bodies. Anaerobic digestion is an efficient mean for the treatment of wastes of different origins and might serve a useful tool for the reduction of salty aquaculture discharge load. Use of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for digestion of brackish aquaculture sludge from RASs under different C:N ratios, temperatures, and hydraulic retention times demonstrated high removal efficiencies of over 92% as volatile solids (VS), 98% as chemical oxygen demand and 81% as total suspended solids in all reactors. Methane production topped 7.1 mL/gVS d and was limited by low C:N ratio but was not influenced by temperature fluctuations. The treated liquid effluent from all reactors was of sufficient quality for reuse in the RAS, leading to significant water recycling and saving rates. UASB may be an attractive solution for brackish sludge management in RASs. PMID:23528783

Mirzoyan, Natella; Gross, Amit

2013-05-15

17

Quantification of dissolved methane in UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater under different operating conditions.  

PubMed

This paper aimed at measuring the concentration of methane dissolved in effluents from different UASB reactors (pilot-, demo- and full-scale) treating domestic wastewater, in order to calculate the degree of saturation of such greenhouse gas and evaluate the losses of energetic potential in such systems. The results showed that methane saturation degrees, calculated according to Henry's law, varied from ?1.4 to 1.7 in the different reactors, indicating that methane was oversaturated in the liquid phase. The overall results indicated that the losses of dissolved methane in the anaerobic effluents were considerably high, varying from 36 to 41% of total methane generated in the reactor. These results show that there is considerable uncontrolled loss of methane in anaerobic wastewater treatment plants, implying the need of research on technologies aimed at recovering such energetic greenhouse gas. PMID:22156131

Souza, C L; Chernicharo, C A L; Aquino, S F

2011-01-01

18

Nutrient recovery from domestic wastewater using a UASB-duckweed ponds system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pilot-scale wastewater treatment system used in this study comprised a 40-l UASB reactor (6-h HRT) followed by three duckweed ponds in series (total HRT 15days). During the warm season, the treatment system achieved removal values of 93%, 96% and 91% for COD, BOD and TSS, respectively. Residual values of ammonia, TKN and total phosphorus were 0.41mg N\\/l, 4.4mg N\\/l

Saber A. El-Shafai; Fatma A. El-Gohary; Fayza A. Nasr; N. Peter van der Steen; Huub J. Gijzen

2007-01-01

19

Comparison of UASB and EGSB reactors performance, for treatment of raw and deoiled palm oil mill effluent (POME).  

PubMed

Anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent (POME) and deoiled POME was investigated both in batch assays and continuous reactor experiments using up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors. The methane potential determined from batch assays of POME and deoiled POME was 503 and 610 mL-CH(4)/gVS-added, respectively. For the treatment of POME in continuously fed reactors, both in UASB and EGSB reactors more than 90% COD removal could be obtained, at HRT of 5 days, corresponding to OLR of 5.8 gVS/(L-reactor.d). Similar methane yields of 436-438 mL-CH(4)/gVS-added were obtained for UASB and EGSB respectively. However, for treatment of deoiled POME, both UASB and EGSB reactors could operate at lower OLR of 2.6 gVS/(L-reactor.d), with the methane yield of 600 and 555 mL-CH(4)/gVS-added for UASB and EGSB, respectively. The higher methane yield achieved from the deoiled POME was attributed to lower portion of biofibers which are more recalcitrant compared the rest of organic matter in POME. The UASB reactor was found to be more stable than EGSB reactor under the same OLR, as could be seen from lower VFA concentration, especially propionic acid, compared to the EGSB reactor. PMID:21377272

Fang, Cheng; O-Thong, Sompong; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

2011-05-15

20

Biodegradation of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane in Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the performance of bench-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor in treating simulated wastewaters containing 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA). Reactors R1 (control) and R2 (containing TeCA) were operated at Hydraulic Retention Times (HRTs) of 36, 30, 24, 18 and 12h. The removal of TeCA decreased from 99.85% to 98.40% as the HRT was lowered down from 36 to 12h.

Debolina Basu; S. K. Gupta

2010-01-01

21

Long-term competition between sulfate reducing and methanogenic bacteria in UASB reactors treating volatile fatty acids  

Microsoft Academic Search

The competition between acetate utilizing methane-producing bacteria (MB) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was studied in mesophilic (30 C) upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors treating volatile fatty acids and sulfate. The UASB reactors treated a VFA mixture (with an acetate:propionate:butyrate ratio of 5:3:2 on COD basis) or acetate as the sole substrate at different COD:sulfate ratios. The outcome of the

F. Omil; P. Lens; A. Visser; L. W. Hulshoff Pol; G. Lettinga

1998-01-01

22

The effect of operational conditions on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the sludge bed in UASB reactors.  

PubMed

This work aims to evaluate the hydrodynamic properties of the sludge bed of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors based on its settleability and expansion characteristics. The methodologies used for the evaluation of the settleability of aerobic activated sludge, and for the expansibility of a sludge bed of Expanded Granular Sludge Bed reactors and Fluidised Bed Reactors were adapted and applied to the particular characteristics of the sludge of UASB reactors. An easy-to-build experimental set-up was developed to assess the parameters necessary for the equations of settleability and of expansibility. The results obtained from the sludges of seven differently operated reactors show that, for the treatment of low strength wastewater, settleability increased and expansibility decreased at decreased hydraulic retention time, from 6 to 1 h, and/or increased influent concentrations, from 136 to approximately 800 mg chemical oxygen demand/L. The results also show that it is useless to design an UASB reactor with a longer hydraulic retention time to cope with hydraulic shock loads, as a more expansible sludge will develop at such condition. PMID:22020490

Leitão, R C; Santaellla, S T; van Haandel, A C; Zeeman, G; Lettinga, G

2011-01-01

23

Comparative performance of a UASB reactor and an anaerobic packed-bed reactor when treating potato waste leachate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results presented in this paper are from studies on a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and an anaerobic packed-bed (APB) reactor treating potato leachate at increasing organic loading rates from 1.5 to 7.0gCOD\\/1\\/day. The hydraulic retention times ranged from 13.2 to 2.8 days for both reactors during the 100 days of the experiment. The maximum organic loading

W. Parawira; M. Murto; R. Zvauya; B. Mattiasson

2006-01-01

24

Co-degradation of phenol and m-cresol in a UASB reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

An upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor operated at 37°C, one-day hydraulic retention plus effluent recycle, was able to degrade up to 98% of phenol and 20% of m-cresol without a carbohydrate co-substrate, for wastewaters containing up to 900 mg\\/l of phenol and 320 mg\\/l of m-cresol. Further increases of phenol and m-cresol concentration in wastewater impaired the phenol-degrading of

Gong-Ming Zhou; Herbert H. P. Fang

1997-01-01

25

Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor  

PubMed Central

Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in agriculture without the risk of polluting soil, underground water or crops. In this sense, treatment of vinasse combines the elimination of organic waste with the formation of methane. Biogas is considered as a promising renewable energy source. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum organic loading rate for operating a modified UASB reactor to treat vinasse generated in the production of hydrous ethanol from sugar cane molasses. Results The study showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was 69% at an optimum organic loading rate (OLR) of 17.05 kg COD/m3-day, achieving a methane yield of 0.263 m3/kg CODadded and a biogas methane content of 84%. During this stage, effluent characterization presented lower values than the vinasse, except for potassium, sulfide and ammonia nitrogen. On the other hand, primers used to amplify the 16S-rDNA genes for the domains Archaea and Bacteria showed the presence of microorganisms which favor methane production at the optimum organic loading rate. Conclusions The modified UASB reactor proposed in this study provided a successful treatment of the vinasse obtained from hydrous ethanol production. Methanogen groups (Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales) detected by PCR during operational optimum OLR of the modified UASB reactor, favored methane production. PMID:23167984

2012-01-01

26

Kinetic analysis of anaerobic digestion of cattail by rumen microbes in a modified UASB reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetics of anaerobic digestion of cattail by rumen microbes in a modified upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was systematically analyzed in this study. The Monod and first-order equations were combined to develop kinetic models to describe the substrate degradation, microbial growth and product formation. At an influent cattail concentration (volatile solids) of 12.1g\\/L, hydraulic retention time of 0.75

Zhen-Hu Hu; Han-Qing Yu; Zheng-Bo Yue; Hideki Harada; Yu-You Li

2007-01-01

27

Kinetics of biotransformation of 2,4-dichlorophenol using UASB-reactor.  

PubMed

Chlorophenol compounds are environmental pollutants that are both anthropogenic and xenobiotics. Some of these chemicals are carcinogens and are both toxic to a number biochemical processes. Biotransformation of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was studied in the presence of glucose on an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) using mixed culture. A continuously operated UASB reactor was employed using mixed synthetic wastewater. Results obtained from the 1.8 L volume capacity UASB reactor were subjected to kinetic evaluation constants. Results indicate that the degradation of 2,4-DCP in the presence of glucose was strongly influenced by the concentration of the compound. High degradation levels were observed when the concentration of 2,4-DCP was in the range of 50-150 mg L(-1). Concentrations of 2,4-DCP above 160 mg L(-1) were toxic to microbes even in the presence of glucose. The maximum degradation of 2,4-DCP was found to be 70.4% when initial concentration of 2,4-DCP was 124 mg L(-1) and glucose concentration of 500 mg L(-1) at hydraulic retention time of 13.2 hr. The biodegradation followed first order reaction kinetics with a rate constant (K) of 0.67, Vmax of 0.244 kg m(-3) day(-1), Ks of 0.117 kg m(-3) day(-1) and correlation coefficient of 0.766. PMID:15327153

Atuanya, E I; Chakrabarti, T

2004-01-01

28

Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors operated under high salinity conditions.  

PubMed

Considering the importance of stable and well-functioning granular sludge in anaerobic high-rate reactors, a series of experiments were conducted to determine the production and composition of EPS in high sodium concentration wastewaters pertaining to anaerobic granule properties. The UASB reactors were fed with either fully acidified substrate (FAS) consisting of an acetate medium (reactor R1) or partly acidified substrate (PAS) consisting of acetate, gelatine and starch medium (reactors R2, R3, and R4). For EPS extraction, the cation exchange resin (CER) method was used. Strength and particle size distribution were determined by assessing the formation of fines sludge under conditions of high shear rate and by laser diffraction, respectively. Batch tests were performed in 0.25L bottles to study Ca(2+) leaching from anaerobic granular sludge when incubated in 20g Na(+)/L in the absence of feeding for 30 days. Results show a steady increase in the bulk liquid Ca(2+) concentration during the incubation period. UASB reactor results show that the amounts of extracted proteins were higher from reactors R2 and R3, fed with PAS compared to the sludge samples from reactor R1, fed with FAS. Strikingly, the amount of extracted proteins also increased for all reactor sludges, irrespective of the Na(+) concentration applied in the feed, i.e. 10 or 20gNa(+)/L. PAS grown granular sludges showed an important increase in particle size during the operation of the UASB reactors. Results also show that, addition of 1gCa(2+)/L to the high salinity wastewater increases the granules' strength. PMID:20015531

Ismail, S B; de La Parra, C J; Temmink, H; van Lier, J B

2010-03-01

29

Effect of shock and mixed nitrophenolic loadings on the performance of UASB reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of nitrophenolic shock loads on the performance of three bench-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors was studied using synthetic wastewater. Reactors R1, R2 and R3 were fed with 30mg\\/L concentration of 2-nitrophenol (2-NP), 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), respectively, along with methanol (COD=2000mg\\/L), sodium nitrate (NO3?-N=200mg\\/L), and other nutrients. The reactors were in continuous operation for more

Khursheed Karim; S. K. Gupta

2006-01-01

30

Performance assessment of different STPs based on UASB followed by aerobic post treatment systems.  

PubMed

This paper present the experiences gained from the study of ten up flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) based sewage treatment plants (STPs) of different cities of India. Presently 37 UASB based STPs were under operation and about 06 UASB based STPs are under construction and commissioning phase at different towns. The nature of sewage significantly varied at each STP. Two STP were receiving sewage with high sulfate and heavy metals due to the mixing of industrial waste. The treatment performance of all UASB reactors in terms of BOD, COD and TSS were observed between 55 to 70% respectively. The post treatment units down flow hanging sponge (DHS) and Aeration followed by activated sludge process (ASP) at two STPs were performing well and enable to achieve the required disposal standards. Results indicate the effluent quality in terms of BOD and SS were less than 30 and 50 mg/L and well below the discharging standards. PMID:24468307

Khan, Abid Ali; Gaur, Rubia Zahid; Mehrotra, Indu; Diamantis, Vasileios; Lew, Beni; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

2014-01-01

31

Understanding the removal mechanisms of PPCPs and the influence of main technological parameters in anaerobic UASB and aerobic CAS reactors.  

PubMed

The removal of 16 Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) were studied in a conventional activated sludge (CAS) unit and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Special attention was paid to each biomass conformation and activity as well as to operational conditions. Biodegradation was the main PPCP removal mechanism, being higher removals achieved under aerobic conditions, except in the case of sulfamethoxazole and trimetrophim. Under anaerobic conditions, PPCP biodegradation was correlated with the methanogenic rate, while in the aerobic reactor a relationship with nitrification was found. Sorption onto sludge was influenced by biomass conformation, being only significant for musk fragrances in the UASB reactor, in which an increase of the upward velocity and hydraulic retention time improved this removal. Additionally, PPCP sorption increased with time in the UASB reactor, due to the granular biomass structure which suggests the existence of intra-molecular diffusion. PMID:25010455

Alvarino, T; Suarez, S; Lema, J M; Omil, F

2014-08-15

32

On-site treatment of high-strength alcohol distillery wastewater by a pilot-scale thermophilic multi-staged UASB (MS-UASB) reactor.  

PubMed

A pilot-scale multi-staged UASB (MS-UASB) reactor with a working volume of 2.5 m3 was operated for thermophilic (55 degrees C) treatment of an alcohol distillery wastewater for a period of over 600 days. The reactor steadily achieved a super-high rate COD removal, that is, 60 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) with over 80% COD removal. However, when higher organic loading rates were further imposed upon the reactor, that is, above 90 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) for barely-based alcohol distillery wastewater (ADWW) and above 100 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1) for sweet potato-based ADWW, the reactor performance somewhat deteriorated to 60 and 70% COD removal, respectively. Methanogenic activity (MA) of the retained sludge in the thermophilic MS-UASB reactor was assessed along the time course of continuous run by serum-vial test using different substrates as a vial sole substrate. With the elapsed time of continuous run, hydrogen-utilizing MA, acetate-utilizing MA and propionate-fed MA increased at maximum of 13.2, 1.95 and 0.263 kgCOD kgVSS(-1) d(-1), respectively, indicating that propionate-fed MA attained only 1/50 of hydrogen-utilizing MA and 1/7 of acetate-utilizing MA. Since the ADWW applied herewith is a typical seasonal campaign wastewater, the influence of shut-down upon the decline in sludge MA was also investigated. Hydrogen-utilizing MA and acetate-utilizing MA decreased slightly by 3/4, during a month of non-feeding period, whereas propionate-fed MA were decreased significantly by 1/5. Relatively low values of propionate-fed MA and its vulnerability to adverse conditions suggests that the propionate degradation step is the most critical bottleneck of overall anaerobic degradation of organic matters under thermophilic condition. PMID:16605014

Yamada, M; Yamauchi, M; Suzuki, T; Ohashi, A; Harada, H

2006-01-01

33

Development of a sixth-generation down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor using rigid sponge media for post-treatment of UASB treating municipal sewage.  

PubMed

A sixth-generation down-flow hanging sponge reactor (DHS-G6), using rigid sponge media, was developed as a novel aerobic post-treatment unit for upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) treating municipal sewage. The rigid sponge media were manufactured by copolymerizing polyurethane with epoxy resin. The UASB and DHS system had a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10.6 h (8.6 h for UASB and 2 h for DHS) when operated at 10-28 °C. The system gave reasonable organic and nitrogen removal efficiencies. The final effluent had a total biochemical oxygen demand of only 12 mg/L and a total Kjeldahl nitrogen content of 6 mg/L. The DHS reactor gave particularly good nitrification performance, which was attributed to the new rigid sponge media. The sponge media helped to provide a sufficient HRT, and retained a high biomass concentration, extending the solids retention time. The DHS reactor maintained a high dissolved oxygen concentration under natural ventilation. PMID:24291312

Onodera, Takashi; Tandukar, Madan; Sugiyana, Doni; Uemura, Shigeki; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Harada, Hideki

2014-01-01

34

Mesophilic biomethanation and treatment of poultry waste-water using pilot scale UASB reactor.  

PubMed

The feasibility of applying the up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) treatment for poultry waste (faeces) water was examined. A continuous-flow UASB pilot scale reactor of 3.50 L capacity using mixed culture was operated for 95 days to assess the treatability of poultry waste-water and its methane production. The maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) removed was found to be 78% when organic loading rate (OLR) was 2.9 kg COD m(-3) day(-1) at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 13.2 hr. The average biogas recovery was 0.26 m3 CH4 kg COD with an average methane content of 57% at mean temperature of 30 degrees C. Data indicate more rapid methanogenesis with higher loading rates and shorter hydraulic retention times. At feed concentration of 4.8 kg COD m(-3) day(-1), anaerobic digestion was severely retarded at all hydraulic retention time tested. This complication in the reactor operations may be linked to build-up of colloidal solids often associated with poultry waste water and ammonia toxicity. Isolates from granular sludge and effluent were found to be facultative anaerobes most of which were Pseudomonas genera. PMID:12180651

Atuanya, Ernest I; Aigbirior, Moses

2002-07-01

35

Anaerobic degradation of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and the fate of ADF additives  

Microsoft Academic Search

A central composite design was employed to methodically investigate anaerobic treatment of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) in bench-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors. A total of 23 runs at 17 different operating conditions were conducted in continuous mode. The development of four empirical models describing process responses (i.e., chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, biomass specific acetoclastic activity, methane

Thi Tham Pham

2002-01-01

36

DESENVOLVIMENTO E OPERAÇÃO DE REATOR ANAERÓBIO DE MANTA DE LODO (UASB) NO TRATAMENTO DOS EFLUENTES DA SUINOCULTURA EM ESCALA LABORATORIAL Development and operation of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) treating liquid effluent from swine manure in laboratory scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The swine production, since 70 th , is one of the most pollutant agro-industrial activities in the Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The objective of this research was to develop an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor (UASB), aiming at treating the effluent generated within a maximum efficiency and minimum time and cost. Therefore, a lab-scale reactor was built up and monitored

Cláudio Milton; Montenegro Campos; Fernanda Ribeiro do Carmo; Cláudio Gouvêa Botelho; Claudionor Camilo da Costa

37

Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in raw sewage and their behavior in UASB reactors operated at different hydraulic retention times.  

PubMed

This work investigated the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in raw sewage (from Belo Horizonte city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil) and assessed their behavior in demo-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors (UASB reactors) operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRT). The dissolved concentration of the studied micropollutants in the raw and treated sewage was obtained using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by analysis in a liquid chromatography system coupled to a hybrid high resolution mass spectrometer consisting of an ion-trap and time of flight (LC-MS-IT-TOF). The natural (estradiol) and synthetic (ethinylestradiol) estrogens were hardly detected; when present, however, their concentrations were lower than the method quantification limits. The concentrations of bisphenol A and miconazole in raw sewage were similar to that reported in the literature (around 200 ng L?¹ and hardly detected, respectively). The antibiotics sulfamethoxazole (median 13.0 ng L?¹) and trimethoprim (median 61.5 ng L?¹), and the other pharmaceutical compounds (diclofenac and bezafibrate, with median 99.9 and 94.4 ng L?¹, respectively) were found in lower concentrations when compared with reports in the literature, which might indicate a lower consumption of such drugs in Brazil. The UASB reactors were inefficient in the removal of bisphenol A, and led to an increased concentration of nonylphenol in the effluent. The anaerobic reactors were also inefficient in the removal of diclofenac, and led to a partial removal of bezafibrate; whereas, for sulfamethoxazole there seemed to be a direct relationship between the HRT and removal efficiencies. For trimethoprim the sludge retention time (SRT) seemed to play an important role, although it was only partially removed in the UASB reactors. PMID:23109571

Queiroz, F B; Brandt, E M F; Aquino, S F; Chernicharo, C A L; Afonso, R J C F

2012-01-01

38

Performance of staged and non-staged up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (USSB and UASB) reactors treating low strength complex wastewater.  

PubMed

The use of anaerobic processes to treat low-strength wastewater has been increasing in recent years due to their favourable performance-costs balance. For optimal results, it is necessary to identify reactor configurations that are best suited for this kind of application. This paper reports on the comparative study carried out with two high-rate anaerobic reactor systems with the objective of evaluating their performances when used for the treatment of low-strength, complex wastewater. One of the systems is the commonly used up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The other is the up-flow staged sludge bed (USSB) system in which the reactor was divided longitudinally into 3, 5 and 7 compartments by the use of baffles. The reactors (9 l) were fed with a synthetic, soluble and colloidal waste (chemical oxygen demand (COD) < 1000 mg/l) and operated at 28 degrees C and 24 h hydraulic retention time. Intermediate flow hydraulics, between plug-flow and completely-mixed, in the UASB and 7 stages USSB reactors allowed efficient degradation of substrates with minimum effluent concentrations. Low number of compartments in the USSB reactors increased the levels of short-circuiting thus reducing substrate removal efficiencies. All reactors showed high COD removal efficiencies (93-98%) and thus can be regarded as suitable for the treatment of low strength, complex wastewater. Staged anaerobic reactors can be a good alternative for this kind of application provided they are fitted with a large enough (> or =7) number of compartments to fully take advantage of their strengths. Scale factors seem to have influenced importantly on the comparison between one and multi staged sludge-bed reactors and, therefore, observations made here could change at larger reactor volumes. PMID:20174990

Sevilla-Espinosa, Susana; Solórzano-Campo, Maricela; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo

2010-09-01

39

Anaerobic degradation of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and the fate of ADF additives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A central composite design was employed to methodically investigate anaerobic treatment of aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) in bench-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors. A total of 23 runs at 17 different operating conditions were conducted in continuous mode. The development of four empirical models describing process responses (i.e., chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, biomass specific acetoclastic activity, methane production rate, and methane production potential) as functions of ADF concentration, hydraulic retention time (HRT), and biomass concentration is presented. Model verification indicated that predicted responses (COD removal efficiencies, biomass specific acetoclastic activity, and methane production rates and potential) were in good agreement with experimental results. Biomass specific acetoclastic activity was improved by almost two-fold during ADF treatment in UASB reactors. For the design window, COD removal efficiencies were higher than 90%. Predicted methane production potentials were close to theoretical values, and methane production rates increased as the organic loading rate (OLR) was increased. ADF toxicity effects were evident for 1.6% ADF at medium specific organic loadings (SOLR above 0.5 g COD/g VSS/d). In contrast, good reactor stability and excellent removal efficiencies were achieved at 1.2% ADF for reactor loadings approaching that of highly loaded systems (0.73 g COD/g VSS/d). Acclimation to ADF resulted in an initial reduction in the biomass settling velocity. The fate of ADF additives was also investigated. There was minimal sorption of benzotriazole (BT), 5-methyl-1 H-benzotriazole (MeBT), and 5,6-dimethyl-1 H-benzotriazole (DiMeBT) to anaerobic granules. A higher sorption capacity was measured for NP. Active transport may be one of the mechanisms for NP sorption. Ethylene glycol degradation experiments indicated that BT, MeBT, DiMeBT, and the nonionic surfactant Tergitol NP-4 had no significant effects on acidogenesis and methanogenesis at the concentration levels studied. A significant inhibition of acetoclastic activity was observed for NP at 100 mg/L, with acetic acid consumption rate at 38% of that for controls. No evidence for anaerobic degradation of benzotriazole and its derivatives was observed; however, both batch and continuous experiments suggested that anaerobic degradation of NP occurred. Kinetic analysis of operational data obtained for the anaerobic treatment of ADF in UASB reactors indicated that the substrate utilization rate was independent of the reactor biomass concentration. The maximum rate of substrate utilization and the half-velocity constants for ADF treatment were 28.4 g COD/L/d and 648 mg COD/L, respectively. For 1.2% ADF, the biomass yield and endogenous decay coefficients were 0.027 g VSS/g COD and 0.012 d-1 , respectively.

Pham, Thi Tham

40

Start-Up Characteristics of a Granule-Based Anammox UASB Reactor Seeded with Anaerobic Granular Sludge  

PubMed Central

The granulation of anammox sludge plays an important role in the high nitrogen removal performance of the anammox reactor. In this study, anaerobic granular sludge was selected as the seeding sludge to start up anammox reactor in order to directly obtain anammox granules. Results showed that the anammox UASB reactor was successfully started up by inoculating anaerobic granular sludge, with substrate capacity of 4435.2?mg/(L·d) and average ammonium and nitrite removal efficiency of 90.36% and 93.29%, respectively. During the start-up course, the granular sludge initially disintegrated and then reaggregated and turned red, suggesting the high anammox performance. Zn-Fe precipitation was observed on the surface of granules during the operation by SEM-EDS, which would impose inhibition to the anammox activity of the granules. Accordingly, it is suggested to relatively reduce the trace metals concentrations, of Fe and Zn in the conventional medium. The findings of this study are expected to be used for a shorter start-up and more stable operation of anammox system. PMID:24455691

Wang, Yun-Yan; Tang, Chong-Jian; Chai, Li-Yuan; Xu, Kang-Que; Song, Yu-Xia

2013-01-01

41

Immobilized humic substances as redox mediator for the simultaneous removal of phenol and Reactive Red 2 in a UASB reactor.  

PubMed

The present study reports a novel treatment concept combining the redox-mediating capacity of immobilized humic substances with the biodegrading activity of anaerobic sludge for the simultaneous removal of two representative pollutants of textile wastewaters (e.g., phenol and Reactive Red 2 (RR2)) in a high-rate anaerobic reactor. The use of immobilized humic substances (1 g total organic carbon (TOC)?L(-1), supported on an anion exchange resin) in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor increased the decolorization efficiency of RR2 (~90 %), extent of phenol oxidation (~75 %), and stability as compared to a control UASB reactor operated without immobilized humic substances, which collapsed after 120 days of dye introduction (50-100 mg L(-1)). Increase in the concentration of immobilized humic substances (2 g TOC L(-1)) further enhanced the stability and efficiency of the UASB reactor. Detection of aniline in the effluent as RR2 reduction product confirmed that reduction of RR2 was the major mechanism of dye removal. This is the first demonstration of immobilized humic substances serving as effective redox mediators for the removal of recalcitrant pollutants from wastewater in a high-rate anaerobic bioreactor. The novel treatment concept could also be applicable to remove a wide variety of contaminants susceptible to redox conversion, which are commonly found in different industrial sectors. PMID:24013221

Martínez, Claudia M; Celis, Lourdes B; Cervantes, Francisco J

2013-11-01

42

Optimization of process performance in a granule-based anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor.  

PubMed

In this study, the individual and interactive effects of influent substrate concentration (TNinf), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and upflow velocity (Vup) on the performance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in a granule-based upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor were investigated by employing response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite design. The purpose of this work was to identify the optimal combination of TNinf, HRT and Vup with respect to the nitrogen removal efficiency (NRE) and nitrogen removal rate (NRR). The reduced cubic models developed for the responses indicated that the optimal conditions corresponded to a TNinf content of 644-728mgNL(-1), an HRT of 0.90-1.25h, and a Vup of 0.60-1.79mh(-1). The results of confirmation trials were similar to the predictions of the developed models. These results provide useful information for improving the nitrogen removal performance of the anammox process in a UASB reactor. PMID:25156877

Xing, Bao-Shan; Guo, Qiong; Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Hui-Zhong; Jin, Ren-Cun

2014-10-01

43

Effects of bioaugmentation strategies in UASB reactors with a methanogenic consortium for removal of phenolic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The removal of phenol, ortho- (op) and para- (p-) cresol was studied with two series of UASB reactors using unacclimatized granular sludges bioaugmented with a consortium enriched against these substances. The parameters studied were the amount of inoculum added to the sludges and the method of immobilization of the inoculum. Two methods were used, adsorption to the biomass or encapsulation with calcium alginate beads. In the bioaugmentation by adsorption experiment, and with a 10% inoculum, complete phenol removal was obtained after 36 d, while 178 d were required in the control reactor. For p-cresol, 95% removal was obtained in the bioaugmented reactor on day 48 while 60 d were required to achieve 90% removal in the control reactor. For o-cresol, the removals were only marginally better with the bioaugmented reactors. Tests performed with the reactors biomass under non-limiting substrate concentrations showed that the specific activities of the bioaugmented biomasses were larger than the original biomass for phenol, and p-cresol even after 276 of operations, showing that the inoculum bacteria successfully colonized the sludge granules. Immobilization of the inoculum by encapsulation in calcium alginate beads, was performed with 10% of the inoculum. Results showed that the best activities were obtained when the consortium was encapsulated alone and the beads added to the sludges. This reactor presented excellent activity and the highest removal of the various phenolic compounds a few days after start-up. After 90 d, a high-phenolic compounds removal was still observed, demonstrating the effectiveness of the encapsulation technique for the start-up and maintenance of high-removal activities.

Hajji, K.T.; Lepine, F.; Bisaillon, J.G.; Beaudet, R.; Hawari, J.; Guiot, S.R.

2000-02-20

44

Anaerobic treatment of fish meal process waste-water in a UASB reactor at high pH  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of high pH on anaerobic degradation of fish process waste-water with a high total ammonia concentration was investigated in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. More than 99% of volatile fatty acids and trimethylamine in the process waste-water were degraded up to pH 7.9. Above pH 7.9 only the conversion of acetate was slightly decreased. At pH

M. Sandberg; B. K. Ahring

1992-01-01

45

Role of calcium oxide in sludge granulation and methanogenesis for the treatment of palm oil mill effluent using UASB reactor.  

PubMed

The granulation process in palm oil mill effluent using calcium oxide-cement kiln dust (CaO-CKD) provides an attractive and cost effective treatment option. In this study the efficiency of CaO-CKD at doses of 1.5-20 g/l was tested in batch experiments and found that 10 g of CaO/l caused the greatest degradation of VFA, butyrate and acetate. An upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was operated continuously at 35°C for 150 days to investigate the effect of CaO-CKD on sludge granulation and methanogenesis during start-up. The treatment of POME emphasized the influence of varying organic loading rates (OLR). Up to 94.9% of COD was removed when the reactor was fed with the 15.5-65.5 g-CODg/l at an OLR of 4.5-12.5 kg-COD/m(3)d, suggesting the feasibility of using CaO in an UASB process to treat POME. The ratio of volatile solids/total solids (VS/TS) and volatile fatty acids in the anaerobic sludge in the UASB reactor decreased significantly after long-term operation due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the granules. Granulation and methanogenesis decreased with an increase in the influent CaO-CKD concentration. PMID:22047724

Ahmad, Anwar; Ghufran, Rumana; Abd Wahid, Zularisam

2011-12-30

46

Energy saving system with high effluent quality for municipal sewage treatment by UASB-DHS.  

PubMed

An up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) - down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) was applied to Japanese municipal sewage treatment, and its treatability, energy consumption, and sludge production were evaluated. The designed sewage load was 50 m(3)/d. The sewage typically had a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 402 mg/L, a suspended solids (SS) content of 167 mg/L, and a temperature of 17-29 °C. The UASB and DHS exhibited theoretical hydraulic retention times of 9.7 and 2.5 h, respectively. The entire system was operated without temperature control. Operation was started with mesophilic anaerobic digested sludge for the UASB and various sponge media for the DHS. Continuous operational data suggest that although the cellulose decomposition and methanogenic process in the UASB are temperature sensitive, stable operation can be obtained by maintaining a satisfactory sludge volume index and sludge concentration. For the DHS, the cube-type medium G3-2 offers superior filling rates, biological preservation and operational execution. The SS derived from the DHS contaminated the effluent but could be removed by optional sand filtration. A comparison with conventional activated sludge (CAS) treatment confirmed that this system is adequate for municipal sewage treatment, with an estimated energy requirement and excess sludge production approximately 75 and 85% less than those of CAS, respectively. PMID:22828294

Tanaka, H; Takahashi, M; Yoneyama, Y; Syutsubo, K; Kato, K; Nagano, A; Yamaguchi, T; Harada, H

2012-01-01

47

Enhancing the start-up of a UASB reactor treating domestic wastewater by adding a water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water extract of Moringa oleifera seeds (WEMOS) was used to enhance the start-up of a self-inoculated upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating raw domestic wastewater. Two reactors labelled control (RC) and WEMOS addition (RM) were started without special inoculum. Both reactors were fed continuously for 22 weeks with domestic wastewater containing an average total chemical oxygen demand (COD) of

Y. Kalogo; A. M'Bassiguié Séka; W. Verstraete

2001-01-01

48

Anaerobic digestion as final step of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery: Biogas production from fermentation effluent in a UASB reactor-pilot-scale results.  

PubMed

In order to lower the costs for second generation bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass anaerobic digestion of the effluent from ethanol fermentation was implemented using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system in a pilot-scale biorefinery plant. Both thermophilic (53 degrees C) and mesophilic (38 degrees C) operation of the UASB reactor was investigated. At an OLR of 3.5 kg-VS/(m(3) day) a methane yield of 340 L/kg-VS was achieved for thermophilic operation (53 degrees C) while 270 L/kg-VS was obtained under mesophilic conditions (38 degrees C). For loading rates higher than 5 kg-VS/(m(3) day) the methane yields were, however, higher under mesophilic conditions compared to thermophilic conditions. The conversion of dissolved organic matter (VS(diss)) was between 68% and 91%. The effluent from the ethanol fermentation showed no signs of toxicity to the anaerobic microorganisms. However, a high content of suspended matter reduced the degradation efficiency. The retention time of the anaerobic system could be reduced from 70 to 7 h by additional removal of suspended matter by clarification. Implementation of the biogas production from the fermentation effluent accounted for about 30% higher carbon utilization in the biorefinery compared to a system with only bioethanol production. PMID:20506521

Uellendahl, H; Ahring, B K

2010-09-01

49

PVA-gel beads enhance granule formation in a UASB reactor.  

PubMed

PVA-gel beads were used as a biocarrier in a lab-scale UASB reactor treating synthetic wastewater composed of corn steep liquor (CSL) with the aim of evaluating its use as a growth nucleus to enhance granule formation. Over 117 days of operation, the organic loading rate was increased to 22.5kgCOD/m3/day with an influent COD of about 10.8g/L at an HRT of 12h with COD removal efficiencies greater than 87%. By the end of the study period, the PVA-gel turned black and granule formation was achieved as compared with the formation of much fewer natural granules without the PVA-gel nucleus. No filamentous bacteria were found on the surface or interior of the PVA-gel beads. The PVA-gel granules had an average settling velocity 200m/h (5cm/s), and a biomass attachment of 0.93g VSS/g PVA-gel. The required time for formation of PVA-gel granules was thus demonstrated to be shorter than that of ordinary sludge granules under the experimental conditions used in this study. PMID:18400493

Wenjie, Zhang; Dunqiu, Wang; Yasunori, Koga; Taichi, Yamamoto; Li, Zhang; Kenji, Furukawa

2008-11-01

50

Biotreatability and kinetics of UASB reactor to mixtures of chlorophenol pollutants.  

PubMed

In most natural ecosystems heterotrophic microorganisms encounter complex mixtures of carbon sources, each of which is present at a concentration of few micrograms per litre. This study examined the biotreatability and kinetics of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor to complex mixtures of chlorophenols encountered in environmental conditions using on-line and off-line experimental studies. Results indicate that (1) steady-state concentration was quite lower (98.3 mg L(-1)) with complex mixture of chlorophenols than steady-state concentration achieved when only 2.4 dichlorophenol (124 mg L(-1)) was studied alone on the same reactor; (2) that toxic effects of chlorophenols increase with increasing concentrations of toxicant. (Onset of the inhibitory effect occurred at a lower concentration in multi-substrate than in single substrate utilization): (3) addition of alternative utilizable substrate can mitigate toxic effects and enhance degradation; (4) the relative concentration of substrate was critical in determining utilization patterns. HPLC analysis of off-line experimental samples resulted in a steady-state treatment efficiency of 68% for COD, 36% for 2-chlorophenol, 40.5% for 4-chlorophenol, 70.7% for 2,4-dichlorophenol, 53.2% for 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and 42% for pentachlorophenol in presence of glucose. Kinetic constant in terms of Vmax and Ks were determined. Ks for the five chlorophenols ranged between 0.016 and 0.117 kg m(-3) day(-1) while Vmax range between 0.056 and 0.244 kg m(-3) day(-1). PMID:12718513

Atuanya, E I; Chakrabarti, T

2003-04-01

51

Coagulant recovery from water treatment plant sludge and reuse in post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater.  

PubMed

In the present study, feasibility of recovering the coagulant from water treatment plant sludge with sulphuric acid and reusing it in post-treatment of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater were studied. The optimum conditions for coagulant recovery from water treatment plant sludge were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). Sludge obtained from plants that use polyaluminium chloride (PACl) and alum coagulant was utilised for the study. Effect of three variables, pH, solid content and mixing time was studied using a Box-Behnken statistical experimental design. RSM model was developed based on the experimental aluminium recovery, and the response plots were developed. Results of the study showed significant effects of all the three variables and their interactions in the recovery process. The optimum aluminium recovery of 73.26 and 62.73 % from PACl sludge and alum sludge, respectively, was obtained at pH of 2.0, solid content of 0.5 % and mixing time of 30 min. The recovered coagulant solution had elevated concentrations of certain metals and chemical oxygen demand (COD) which raised concern about its reuse potential in water treatment. Hence, the coagulant recovered from PACl sludge was reused as coagulant for post-treatment of UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater. The recovered coagulant gave 71 % COD, 80 % turbidity, 89 % phosphate, 77 % suspended solids and 99.5 % total coliform removal at 25 mg Al/L. Fresh PACl also gave similar performance but at higher dose of 40 mg Al/L. The results suggest that coagulant can be recovered from water treatment plant sludge and can be used to treat UASB reactor effluent treating municipal wastewater which can reduce the consumption of fresh coagulant in wastewater treatment. PMID:24777321

Nair, Abhilash T; Ahammed, M Mansoor

2014-09-01

52

Coupling digestion in a pilot-scale UASB reactor and electrochemical oxidation over BDD anode to treat diluted cheese whey.  

PubMed

The efficiency of the anaerobic treatment of cheese whey (CW) at mesophilic conditions was investigated. In addition, the applicability of electrochemical oxidation as an advanced post-treatment for the complete removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from the anaerobically treated cheese whey was evaluated. The diluted cheese whey, having a pH of 6.5 and a total COD of 6 g/L, was first treated in a 600-L, pilot-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The UASB process, which was operated for 87 days at mesophilic conditions (32?±?2 °C) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3 days, led to a COD removal efficiency between 66 and 97 %, while the particulate matter of the wastewater was effectively removed by entrapment in the sludge blanket of the reactor. When the anaerobic reactor effluent was post-treated over a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode at 9 and 18 A and in the presence of NaCl as the supporting electrolyte, complete removal of COD was attained after 3-4 h of reaction. During electrochemical experiments, three groups of organochlorinated compounds, namely trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), and haloketons (HKs), as well as 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) and chloropicrin were identified as by-products of the process; these, alongside free chlorine, are thought to increase the matrix ecotoxicity to Artemia salina. PMID:24793070

Katsoni, Alphathanasia; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Diamadopoulos, Evan

2014-11-01

53

Biogas production from wheat straw in batch and UASB reactors: the roles of pretreatment and seaweed hydrolysate as a co-substrate.  

PubMed

This research evaluated biogas production in batch and UASB reactors from pilot-scale acid catalysed steam pretreated and enzymatic hydrolysed wheat straw. The results showed that the pretreatment was efficient and, a sugar yield of 95% was obtained. The pretreatment improved the methane yield (0.28 m(3)/kg VS(added)) by 57% compared to untreated straw. Treatment of the straw hydrolysate with nutrient supplementation in a UASB reactor resulted in a high methane production rate, 2.70 m(3)/m(3).d at a sustainable OLR of 10.4 kg COD/m(3).d and with a COD reduction of 94%. Alternatively, co-digestion of the straw and seaweed hydrolysates in a UASB reactor also maintained a stable anaerobic process and can thus reduce the cost of nutrients addition. We have shown that biogas production from wheat straw can be competitive by pretreatment, high methane production rate in UASB reactors and also by co-digestion with seaweed hydrolysate. PMID:23196235

Nkemka, Valentine Nkongndem; Murto, Marika

2013-01-01

54

Biotic and abiotic processes contribute to successful anaerobic degradation of cyanide by UASB reactor biomass treating brewery waste water.  

PubMed

In contrast to the general aerobic detoxification of industrial effluents containing cyanide, anaerobic cyanide degradation is not well understood, including the microbial communities involved. To address this knowledge gap, this study measured anaerobic cyanide degradation and the rearrangements in bacterial and archaeal microbial communities in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor biomass treating brewery waste water using bio-methane potential assays, molecular profiling, sequencing and microarray approaches. Successful biogas formation and cyanide removal without inhibition were observed at cyanide concentrations up to 5 mg l(-1). At 8.5 mg l(-1) cyanide, there was a 22 day lag phase in microbial activity, but subsequent methane production rates were equivalent to when 5 mg l(-1) was used. The higher cumulative methane production in cyanide-amended samples indicated that part of the biogas was derived from cyanide degradation. Anaerobic degradation of cyanide using autoclaved UASB biomass proceeded at a rate more than two times lower than when UASB biomass was not autoclaved, indicating that anaerobic cyanide degradation was in fact a combination of simultaneous abiotic and biotic processes. Phylogenetic analyses of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes for the first time identified and linked the bacterial phylum Firmicutes and the archaeal genus Methanosarcina sp. as important microbial groups involved in cyanide degradation. Methanogenic activity of unadapted granulated biomass was detected at higher cyanide concentrations than reported previously for the unadapted suspended biomass, making the aggregated structure and predominantly hydrogenotrophic nature of methanogenic community important features in cyanide degradation. The combination of brewery waste water and cyanide substrate was thus shown to be of high interest for industrial level anaerobic cyanide degradation. PMID:23726700

Novak, Domen; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H; Pirc, Elizabeta Tratar; Jerman, Vesna; Insam, Heribert; Logar, Romana Marinšek; Stres, Blaž

2013-07-01

55

Effect of carbon sources on the removal of 1,1,2Trichloroethane and 1,1,2,2Tetrachloroethane in UASB reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of two carbon sources namely sodium acetate and ethanol was studied in bench-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors for the removal of chlorinated ethanes i.e., 1,1,2-Trichloroethane (TCA) and 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane (TeCA) contained in the simulated wastewaters. The Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) was maintained as 24 hours in all the reactors. The granular biomass in the test reactors R2

Debolina Basu; Shyam R. Asolekar

2012-01-01

56

Development of empirical models for performance evaluation of UASB reactors treating poultry manure wastewater under different operational conditions.  

PubMed

A nonlinear modeling study was carried out to evaluate the performance of UASB reactors treating poultry manure wastewater under different organic and hydraulic loading conditions. Two identical pilot scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors (15.7 L) were run at mesophilic conditions (30-35 degrees C) in a temperature-controlled environment with three hydraulic retention times (theta) of 15.7, 12 and 8.0 days. Imposed volumetric organic loading rates (L(V)) ranged from 0.65 to 4.257 kg COD/(m(3) day). The pH of the feed varied between 6.68 and 7.82. The hydraulic loading rates (L(H)) were controlled between 0.105 and 0.21 m(3)/(m(2)day). The daily biogas production rates ranged between 4.2 and 29.4 L/day. High volumetric COD removal rates (R(V)) ranging from 0.546 to 3.779 kg COD(removed)/(m(3)day) were achieved. On the basis of experimental results, two empirical models having a satisfactory correlation coefficient of about 0.9954 and 0.9416 were developed to predict daily biogas production (Q(g)) and effluent COD concentration (S(e)), respectively. Findings of this modeling study showed that optimal COD removals ranging from 86.3% to 90.6% were predicted with HRTs of 7.9, 9.5, 11.2, 12.6, 13.7 and 14.3 days, and L(V) of 1.27, 1.58, 1.78, 1.99, 2.20 and 2.45 kg COD/(m(3)day) for the corresponding influent substrate concentrations (S(i)) of 10,000, 15,000, 20,000, 25,000, 30,000 and 35,000 mg/L, respectively. PMID:17913349

Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Sakar, Suleyman

2008-05-01

57

pH regulation of alkaline wastewater with carbon dioxide: a case study of treatment of brewery wastewater in UASB reactor coupled with absorber.  

PubMed

Studies were carried out with carbon dioxide absorber (CA) to evaluate the usage of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the biogas as an acidifying agent by Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor. Investigation on the 5l absorber revealed that ratio of brewery wastewater (BW) flow rate to biogas flow rate of 4.6-5.2 was optimum for minimum consumption of CO(2) for acidification. The acidified BW after the absorber was treated in UASB reactor with optimum organic loading rate (OLR) of 23.1 kg COD/m(3)/day and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2h. UASB reactor exhibited good performance with respect to reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and methane yield. The implications of the present study on the full scale anaerobic reactor of medium scale brewery revealed that sufficient cost savings could be made if CO(2) in the biogas or CO(2) that was being wasted (let out to the atmosphere) can be used instead of sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) for pH control. PMID:17046245

Rao, A Gangagni; Reddy, T Sasi Kanth; Prakash, S Surya; Vanajakshi, J; Joseph, Johny; Sarma, P N

2007-08-01

58

pH regulation of alkaline wastewater with carbon dioxide: A case study of treatment of brewery wastewater in UASB reactor coupled with absorber  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies were carried out with carbon dioxide absorber (CA) to evaluate the usage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the biogas as an acidifying agent by Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor. Investigation on the 5l absorber revealed that ratio of brewery wastewater (BW) flow rate to biogas flow rate of 4.6–5.2 was optimum for minimum consumption of CO2 for acidification.

A. Gangagni Rao; T. Sasi Kanth Reddy; S. Surya Prakash; J. Vanajakshi; Johny Joseph; P. N. Sarma

2007-01-01

59

Performance comparison of a pilot-scale UASB and DHS system and activated sludge process for the treatment of municipal wastewater.  

PubMed

This study compares the performance of a pilot-scale combination of UASB and DHS system to that of activated sludge process (ASP) for the treatment of municipal sewage. Both systems were operated in parallel with the same sewage as influent. The study was conducted for more than 300 days, which revealed that organic removal efficiency of UASB+DHS system was comparable to that of ASP. Unfiltered BOD removal by both systems was more than 90%. However, UASB+DHS system outperformed ASP for pathogen removal. In addition, volume of excess sludge production from UASB+DHS was 15 times smaller than that from ASP. Moreover, unlike ASP, there is no requirement of aeration for the operation of UASB+DHS system, which makes it an economical treatment system. Considering the above observations, it was concluded that UASB+DHS system can be a cost-effective and viable option for the treatment of municipal sewage over ASP, especially for low-income countries. PMID:17418365

Tandukar, Madan; Ohashi, A; Harada, H

2007-06-01

60

Effects of alkalinity and co-substrate on the performance of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor through decolorization of Congo Red azo dye.  

PubMed

The effect of substrate (glucose) concentrations and alkalinitiy (NaHCO3) on the decolorization of a synthetic wastewater containing Congo Red (CR) azo dye was performed in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Color removal efficiencies approaching 100% were obtained at glucose-COD concentrations varying between 0 and 3000 mg/l. The methane production rate and total aromatic amine (TAA) removal efficiencies were found to be 120 ml per day and 43%, respectively, while the color was completely removed during glucose-COD free operation of the UASB reactor. The complete decolorization of CR dye under co-substrate free operation could be attributed to TAA metabolism which may provide the electrons required for the cleavage of azo bond in CR dye exist in the UASB reactor. No significant differences in pH levels (6.6-7.4), methane production rates (2000-2700 ml/day) and COD removal efficiencies (82-90%) were obtained for NAHCO3 concentrations ranging between 550 and 3000 mg/l. However, decolorization efficiency remained at 100% with decreasing NaHCO3 concentrations as low as 250 mg/l in the feed. An alkalinity/COD ratio of 0.163 in the feed was suggested for simultaneous optimum COD and color removal. PMID:15501672

I?ik, Mustafa; Sponza, Delia Teresa

2005-03-01

61

Sugarcane molasses-based bio-ethanol wastewater treatment by two-phase multi-staged up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) combination with up-flow UASB and down-flow hanging sponge.  

PubMed

This study was designed to evaluate a treatment system for high strength wastewater (vinasse) from a sugarcane molasses-based bio-ethanol plant in Thailand. A laboratory-scale two-phase treatment system composed of a sulfate reducing (SR) tank and multi-staged up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (MS-UASB) reactor was used as the pre-treatment unit. Conventional UASB and down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactors were used as the post-treatment unit. The treatment system was operated for 300 days under ambient temperature conditions (24.6-29.6 °C). The hydraulic retention time (HRT) in each unit was kept at 25 h for the two-phase system and 23 h for the UASB&DHS. The influent concentration was allowed to reach up to 15,000 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L. COD removal efficiency (based on influent COD) of the two-phase MS-UASB and the UASB&DHS was 54.9 and 18.7%, respectively. Due to the effective removal of sulfide in the SR tank, the MS-UASB achieved a high methane conversion ratio of up to 97%. In DHS, nitrification occurred at the outside portion of the sponge media while denitrification occurred at the inside. Consequently, 27% of the total nitrogen (TN) was removed. An amount of 32% of residual nitrogen (28 mgN/L) was in the form of nitrate, a better nitrogen state for fertilizer. PMID:24647181

Choeisai, P; Jitkam, N; Silapanoraset, K; Yubolsai, C; Yoochatchaval, W; Yamaguchi, T; Onodera, T; Syutsubo, K

2014-01-01

62

Co-digestion to support low temperature anaerobic pretreatment of municipal sewage in a UASB-digester.  

PubMed

The aim of this work was to demonstrate that co-digestion improves soluble sewage COD removal efficiency in treatment of low temperature municipal sewage by a UASB-digester system. A pilot scale UASB-digester system was applied to treat real municipal sewage, and glucose was chosen as a model co-substrate. Co-substrate was added in the sludge digester to produce additional methanogenic biomass, which was continuously recycled to inoculate the UASB reactor. Soluble sewage COD removal efficiency increased from 6 to 23%, which was similar to its biological methane potential (BMP). Specific methanogenic activity of the UASB and of the digester sludge at 15°C tripled to a value respectively of 43 and 39 mg CH4-COD/(g VSS d). Methane production in the UASB reactor increased by more than 90% due to its doubled methanogenic capacity. Therefore, co-digestion is a suitable approach to support a UASB-digester for pretreatment of low temperature municipal sewage. PMID:24080295

Zhang, Lei; Hendrickx, Tim L G; Kampman, Christel; Temmink, Hardy; Zeeman, Grietje

2013-11-01

63

Use of electrochemical oxidation process as post-treatment for the effluents of a UASB reactor treating cellulose pulp mill wastewater.  

PubMed

The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the electrochemical oxidation process as a post-treatment for the effluents of a bench-scale UASB reactor treating simulated wastewater from an unbleached pulp plant. The oxidation process was performed using a single compartment cell with two plates as electrodes. The anode was made of Ti/Ru0.3Ti0.7O2 and the cathode of stainless steel. The following variables were evaluated: current density (75, 150 and 225 mA cm(-2)) and recirculation flow rate in the electrochemical cell (0.22, 0.45 and 0.90 L h(-1)). The increase in current density from 75 to 225 mA cm(-2) did not increased the color removal efficiency for the tested flow rates, 0.22, 0.45 and 0.90 L h(-1), however the energy consumption increased significantly. The results indicated the technical feasibility of the electrochemical treatment as post-treatment for UASB reactors treating wastewaters from pulp and paper plants. PMID:16939104

Buzzini, A P; Miwa, D W; Motheo, A J; Pires, E C

2006-01-01

64

Performance and granulation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating saline sulfate wastewater.  

PubMed

An upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was employed to treat saline sulfate wastewater. Mesophilic operation (35 ± 0.5 °C) was performed with hydraulic retention time fixed at 16 h. When the salinity was 28 g L(-1), the chemical oxygen demand and sulfate removal efficiencies were 52 and 67 %, respectively. The salinity effect on sulfate removal was less than that on organics removal. The methane productions were 887 and 329 cm(3) L(-1) corresponding to the NaCl concentrations of 12 and 28 g L(-1), respectively. High salinity could stimulate microbes to produce more extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and granulation could be performed better. Besides, with the high saline surroundings, a great deal of Na(+) compressed the colloidal electrical double-layer, neutralized the negative charge of the sludge particles and decreased their electrostatic repulsion. The repulsion barrier disappeared and coagulation took place. The maximum size of granules was 5 mm, which resulted from the coupled triggering forces of high EPSs and Na(+) contents. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were dominant in the high saline surroundings while the methane-producing archaea dominated in the low saline surroundings. The SRB were affected least by the salinity. PMID:23624725

Li, Jin; Yu, Lian; Yu, Deshuang; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Peiyu; Ji, Zhongguang

2014-02-01

65

A review: The anaerobic treatment of sewage in UASB and EGSB reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The anaerobic treatment process is increasingly recognized as the core method of an advanced technology for environmental protection and resource preservation and it represents, combined with other proper methods, a sustainable and appropriate wastewater treatment system for developing countries. Anaerobic treatment of sewage is increasingly attracting the attention of sanitary engineers and decision makers. It is being used successfully in

Lucas Seghezzo; Grietje Zeeman; Jules B. van Lier; H. V. M. Hamelers; Gatze Lettinga

1998-01-01

66

Assessment of electrochemical and chemical coagulation as post-treatment for the effluents of a UASB reactor treating cellulose pulp mill wastewater.  

PubMed

This paper presents results from exploratory experiments to test the technical feasibility of electrolytic treatment and coagulation followed by flocculation and sedimentation as post-treatment for the effluent of an UASB reactor treating simulated wastewater from an unbleached Kraft pulp mill. The electrolytic treatment provided up to 67% removal of the remaining COD and 98% of color removal. To achieve these efficiencies the energy consumption ranged from 14 Wh x l(-1) to 20 Wh x l(-1). The coagulation-flocculation treatment followed by settling required 350-400 mg x l(-1) of aluminium sulfate. The addition of a high molecular weight cationic polymer enhanced both COD and color removal. Both post-treatment processes are technically feasible. PMID:16180426

Buzzini, A P; Motheo, A J; Pires, E C

2005-01-01

67

Effect of carbon sources on the removal of 1,1,2-trichloroethane and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane in UASB reactor.  

PubMed

The effect of two carbon sources namely sodium acetate and ethanol was studied in bench-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors for the removal of chlorinated ethanes i.e., 1,1,2-Trichloroethane (TCA) and 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane (TeCA) contained in the simulated wastewaters. The Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) was maintained as 24 hours in all the reactors. The granular biomass in the test reactors R2 and R3 were acclimated to 40 mg/L of TCA and 20 mg/L of TeCA, respectively. The effluent TCA and TeCA concentrations were 0.03 mg/L and 0.18 mg/L, respectively, at the end of acclimation phase. Sodium acetate and ethanol both were found to be suitable as the primary substrates in the biodegradation of TCA and TeCA. However, lower concentrations of the toxic pollutants (TCA and TeCA) were obtained in the effluents with the use of sodium acetate. The COD removal efficiency in the test reactors (R2 and R3) varied in the range of 95 % to 98.2 % accompanied by the formation of 1,2-Dichloroethane (DCA) as the major intermediate. PMID:22375547

Basu, Debolina; Asolekar, Shyam R

2012-01-01

68

Treatment of a chocolate industry wastewater in a pilot-scale low-temperature UASB reactor operated at short hydraulic and sludge retention time.  

PubMed

The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of a 244-L pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor during the treatment of chocolate-processing industry wastewater under low-temperature conditions (18 ± 0.6 °C) for approximately 250 d. The applied organic loading rate (OLR) was varied between 4 and 7 kg/m(3)/d by varying the influent soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODsol), while keeping the hydraulic retention time constant (6.4 ± 0.3 h). The CODsol removal efficiency was low (59-78%). The measured biogas production increased from 240 ± 54 to 431 ± 61 L/d during the experiments. A significant linear correlation between the measured biogas production and removed OLR indicated that 81.69 L of biogas were produced per kg/m(3) of CODsol removed. Low average reactor volatile suspended solids (VSS) (2,700-4,800 mg/L) and high effluent VSS (177-313 mg/L) were derived in a short sludge retention time (SRT) (4.9 d). The calculated SRT was shorter than those reported in the literature, but did not affect the reactor's performance. Average sludge yield was 0.20 kg-VSS/kg-CODsol. The low-temperature anaerobic treatment was a good option for the pre-treatment of chocolate-processing industry wastewater. PMID:23508162

Esparza-Soto, M; Arzate-Archundia, O; Solís-Morelos, C; Fall, C

2013-01-01

69

Preliminary evaluation of the electrochemical and chemical coagulation processes in the post-treatment of effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor.  

PubMed

The main objective of this paper was to perform a preliminary comparative study between chemical and electrochemical coagulation processes, both followed by flocculation and sedimentation of an effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating simulated wastewater from an unbleached Kraft pulp mill. The electrochemical treatment removed up to 67% (with aluminum electrodes) and 82% (with stainless-steel electrodes) of the remaining chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 84% (stainless steel) and 98% (aluminum) of the color in the wastewater. These efficiencies were achieved with an energy consumption ranging from 14 to 20 Wh l(-1). The coagulation-flocculation treatment with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate removed up to 87% and 90% of COD and 94% and 98% of color, respectively. The addition of a high molecular weight cationic polymer enhanced both COD and color removal efficiencies. The two post-treatment processes proved to be technically feasible; however the economical feasibility could not be assessed since the experiments were performed with small reactors that could distort scale factors. PMID:17134820

Buzzini, A P; Patrizzi, L J; Motheo, A J; Pires, E C

2007-12-01

70

Sustainable treatment of rubber latex processing wastewater : The UASB-system combined with aerobic post-treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of this PhD-thesis is to assess the applicability of UASB-process for treating RLP wastewater and the feasibility of some adequate post-treatment processes for the effluent of the anaerobic treatment process.The studies were carried out in The Netherlands during November 1990-May 1991 and May 1993-October 1993, and in South Vietnam during 1991-1995.The survey was carried out in six

Nguyen Trung Viet

1999-01-01

71

Biohydrogen production using an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sewage sludge was acclimated to establish H2-producing enrichment cultures for converting sucrose (20gCOD\\/l) into H2 in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The operating hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were 24–4h. The experimental results indicated that this UASB system could be used for hydrogen production. The hydrogen productivity was HRT dependent and nearly constant at the HRT of 8–20h. However,

Feng-Yung Chang; Chiu-Yue Lin

2004-01-01

72

Performance of staged and non-staged up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (USSB and UASB) reactors treating low strength complex wastewater  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of anaerobic processes to treat low-strength wastewater has been increasing in recent years due to their favourable\\u000a performance-costs balance. For optimal results, it is necessary to identify reactor configurations that are best suited for\\u000a this kind of application. This paper reports on the comparative study carried out with two high-rate anaerobic reactor systems\\u000a with the objective of evaluating

Susana Sevilla-Espinosa; Maricela Solórzano-Campo; Ricardo Bello-Mendoza

2010-01-01

73

Development of anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR), a novel anaerobic treatment system.  

PubMed

A novel anaerobic treatment system, the anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR), was developed after completing a parallel study with upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) processes. Using sucrose as the main component of a synthetic wastewater, the AMBR achieved a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rate of 30 g.l-1.day-1 at a 12-h hydraulic retention time (HRT). This resulted in a standard methane production rate (SMPR) of 6.51.l-1.day-1 and an average methane-based COD (MCOD) removal efficiency of 62.2%. A key element in granular biomass formation was migration of the biomass blanket through the reactor. Although a carbohydrate-rich wastewater was used, no separate pre-acidification was required for the AMBR, because of high mixing intensities and wash out of acidogenic bacteria. In contrast, the absence of pre-acidification created "bulking" problems (caused by abundant acidogenic bacteria at the surface of granules) in a UASB reactor, operated under conditions similar to that of the AMBR. As a result, a maximum COD loading rate and SMPR of 21 g.l-1.day-1 and 4.91.l-1.day-1 were achieved, respectively, for the UASB reactor at a 12-h HRT. These values were 18 g.l-1.day-1 and 3.71.l-1.day-1, respectively, for an ASBR at a 12-h HRT. Hence, the performance of the AMBR in treating a carbohydrate-rich wastewater was found to be superior in terms of maximum loading rate and SMPR. PMID:11329676

Angenent, L T; Sung, S

2001-05-01

74

Tokamak reactor systems code  

SciTech Connect

A tokamak reactor systems code has been developed by combining a previously developed plasma engineering code with an existing reactor systems code and adding calculations for thermal hydraulics, stress analysis, physical sputtering, and neutron activation dose rate. Calculations from the thermal hydraulics and neutron activation dose rate modules are compared with results from more complex codes. The effects on reactor performance of unpredictable properties such as plasma profiles and confinement times are demonstrated.

Baxter, D.C.; Dabiri, A.E.

1983-09-01

75

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOEpatents

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

1994-12-20

76

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOEpatents

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01

77

UASB Treatment of Methanolic Pulp Wastewater with Addition of Waste Starch and Incinerated Ash  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The pulp wastewater consists mainly of methanol. It is expected to treat using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process. Paper manufactories also produce waste starch and incinerated ash. The integrated treating for these wastes is desirable. In this study, two UASB reactors were operated to treat pulp wastewater with addition of waste starch and with addition of incinerated ash, receptively. Continuous operations of a UASB reactor treating pulp wastewater with addition of waste starch (PS reactor) and a UASB reactor treating pulp wastewater with addition of incinerated ash (PA reactor) , were investigated at mesophilic conditions. The PS reactor performed well with an average 93.7% total CODCr and 97.3% soluble CODCr removal efficiency in average at a maximum volumetric loading rate (VLR) of 16.0 kgCOD/m3/d. The PA reactor was also successfully operated with an average 95.3% total CODCr and 97.5% soluble CODCr removal efficiency in average at a maximum VLR of 14.6 kgCOD/m3/d. Successfully developed granules were obtained after over 140 days of operation in both reactors, and the granules were 1 to 2 mm in mean diameter. Microbial analysis revealed the genus Methanomethylovorans was predominant in the granules of both reactors.

Takahashi, Shintaro; Kobaysashi, Takuro; Li, Yu-You; Harada, Hideki

78

Application of molecular techniques to evaluate the methanogenic archaea and anaerobic bacteria in the presence of oxygen with different COD:sulfate ratios in a UASB reactor.  

PubMed

In this paper, the microbial characteristics of the granular sludge in the presence of oxygen (3.0+/-0.7 mg O2 l(-1)) were analyzed using molecular biology techniques. The granules were provided by an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) operated over 469 days and fed with synthetic substrate. Ethanol and sulfate were added to obtain different COD/SO4(2-) ratios (3.0, 2.0, and 1.6). The results of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses showed that archaeal cells, detected by the ARC915 probe, accounted for 77%, 84%, and 75% in the COD/SO(4)(2-) ratios (3.0, 2.0, and 1.6, respectively). Methanosaeta sp. was the predominant acetoclastic archaea observed by optical microscopy and FISH analyses, and confirmed by sequencing of the excised bands of the DGGE gel with a similarity of 96%. The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (similarity of 99%) was verified by sequencing of the DGGE band. Others identified microorganism were similar to Shewanella sp. and Desulfitobacterium hafniense, with similarities of 95% and 99%, respectively. These results confirmed that the presence of oxygen did not severely affect the metabolism of microorganisms that are commonly considered strictly anaerobic. We obtained mean efficiencies of organic matter conversion and sulfate reducing higher than 74%. PMID:18634895

Hirasawa, Julia Sumiko; Sarti, Arnaldo; Del Aguila, Nora Katia Saavedra; Varesche, Maria Bernadete A

2008-10-01

79

Bioelectrochemical enhancement of anaerobic methanogenesis for high organic load rate wastewater treatment in a up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor  

PubMed Central

A coupling process of anaerobic methanogenesis and electromethanogenesis was proposed to treat high organic load rate (OLR) wastewater. During the start-up stage, acetate removal efficiency of the electric-biological reactor (R1) reached the maximization about 19 percentage points higher than that of the control anaerobic reactor without electrodes (R2), and CH4 production rate of R1 also increased about 24.9% at the same time, while additional electric input was 1/1.17 of the extra obtained energy from methane. Coulombic efficiency and current recorded showed that anodic oxidation contributed a dominant part in degrading acetate when the metabolism of methanogens was low during the start-up stage. Along with prolonging operating time, aceticlastic methanogenesis gradually replaced anodic oxidation to become the main pathway of degrading acetate. When the methanogens were inhibited under the acidic conditions, anodic oxidation began to become the main pathway of acetate decomposition again, which ensured the reactor to maintain a stable performance. FISH analysis confirmed that the electric field imposed could enrich the H2/H+-utilizing methanogens around the cathode to help for reducing the acidity. This study demonstrated that an anaerobic digester with a pair of electrodes inserted to form a coupling system could enhance methanogenesis and reduce adverse impacts. PMID:25322701

Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie; Yu, Qilin

2014-01-01

80

Bioelectrochemical enhancement of anaerobic methanogenesis for high organic load rate wastewater treatment in a up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor.  

PubMed

A coupling process of anaerobic methanogenesis and electromethanogenesis was proposed to treat high organic load rate (OLR) wastewater. During the start-up stage, acetate removal efficiency of the electric-biological reactor (R1) reached the maximization about 19 percentage points higher than that of the control anaerobic reactor without electrodes (R2), and CH4 production rate of R1 also increased about 24.9% at the same time, while additional electric input was 1/1.17 of the extra obtained energy from methane. Coulombic efficiency and current recorded showed that anodic oxidation contributed a dominant part in degrading acetate when the metabolism of methanogens was low during the start-up stage. Along with prolonging operating time, aceticlastic methanogenesis gradually replaced anodic oxidation to become the main pathway of degrading acetate. When the methanogens were inhibited under the acidic conditions, anodic oxidation began to become the main pathway of acetate decomposition again, which ensured the reactor to maintain a stable performance. FISH analysis confirmed that the electric field imposed could enrich the H2/H(+)-utilizing methanogens around the cathode to help for reducing the acidity. This study demonstrated that an anaerobic digester with a pair of electrodes inserted to form a coupling system could enhance methanogenesis and reduce adverse impacts. PMID:25322701

Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yaobin; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie; Yu, Qilin

2014-01-01

81

Solids removal in upflow anaerobic reactors, a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This desk study deals with the mechanisms and parameters affecting particles separation from wastewater in mainly upflow anaerobic reactors. Despite the fact that the functioning of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) systems depends on both physical parameters and biological processes, the physical parameters have been barely reported in the literature. The reason is that the underlying mechanisms are very complex

Nidal Mahmoud; Grietje Zeeman; Huub Gijzen; Gatze Lettinga

2003-01-01

82

Nuclear reactor shutdown system  

DOEpatents

An inherent shutdown system for a nuclear reactor having neutron absorbing rods affixed to an armature which is held in an upper position by a magnetic flux flowing through a Curie temperature material. The Curie temperature material is fixedly positioned about the exterior of an inner duct in an annular region through which reactor coolant flows. Elongated fuel rods extending from within the core upwardly toward the Curie temperature material are preferably disposed within the annular region. Upon abnormal conditions which result in high neutron flux and coolant temperature, the Curie material loses its magnetic permeability, breaking the magnetic flux path and allowing the armature and absorber rods to drop into the core, thus shutting down the fissioning reaction. The armature and absorber rods are retrieved by lowering the housing for the electromagnet forming coils which create a magnetic flux path which includes the inner duct wall. The coil housing then is raised, resetting the armature.

Bhate, Suresh K. (Niskayuna, NY); Cooper, Martin H. (Monroeville, PA); Riffe, Delmar R. (Murrysville, PA); Kinney, Calvin L. (Penn Hills, PA)

1981-01-01

83

Sedimentological evolution in an UASB treating SYNTHES, a new representative synthetic sewage, at low loading rates.  

PubMed

The changes in the sedimentological attributes of the sludge bed in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor fed with a low-strength wastewater mimicking raw domestic sewage were assessed in this study. The reactor was inoculated with 250 ml of granular sludge from a full-scale UASB reactor. The organic loading rate (OLR) varied from 1 to 2 g COD/ld. During the half-year long study, the reactor was operated at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 4.8 and 10 h, at 33 degrees C. Sludge sedimentology showed that the original granular sludge experienced serious instability and disintegration, leading to a much finer final grain assemblage, mainly due to substrate transfer limitation and cell starvation at the interior of larger granules. With time, the size uniformity tended to decrease, sphericity tended to increase, the skewness of the granule size distribution became negative, and the kurtosis became peaked and leptokurtic. In spite of the observed size reduction, reactor efficiency increased to a CODtotal removal of 96%. Biomass (sludge) yield was 0.012 g VS/g COD removed. The CH4 content of the biogas was high (up to 96%). This study thus highlights the treatment of a new type of wastewater with the deployment of the UASB reactor. It also reports the evolutionary trend of the biomass particle size distribution, making reference to a classic sedimentological appraisal. PMID:15062822

Aiyuk, Sunny; Verstraete, Willy

2004-07-01

84

Reactor control rod timing system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod

Peter T. K

1982-01-01

85

Attrition reactor system  

DOEpatents

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

1993-09-28

86

Attrition reactor system  

DOEpatents

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxvile, TN)

1993-01-01

87

Alternative biological systems for the treatment of vinasse from wine.  

PubMed

This work studied alternative treatment schemes for the vinasse wastewater from wine distilleries aiming at overcoming the problems caused by the high nitrogen and sulfur concentrations. A plexiglas laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor of 20 L volume that was operated at 45°C and hydraulic retention time 1 d, was included in all the examined systems. System 1 was the conventional UASB reactor, system 2 was the UASB reactor supplemented with iron. System 3 consisted of the UASB reactor supplemented with iron and a CSTR reactor that operated under the following conditions: Diluted Oxygen 1.2 mg/L, Hydraulic Retention Time 1 d, pH 6.7 and Temperature 45°C. System 3 aimed at converting ammonium directly to dinitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions but it needed to be preceeded by a first partial nitrification step. All systems had high COD efficiencies over 75%. Ferrous iron addition apart from enhancing the performance of systems 2 and 3, it was able to retain all sulphur content of the wastewater as ferrous sulfide stripping the biogas from hydrogen sulfide. System 3 also managed to meet its goal, since it achieved an 86% nitrogen reduction. Conclusively, system 3 seems to be a very promising environmental technology for the treatment of distillery and winery byproducts, as well as industrial wastewater with high sulfur and nitrogen content. PMID:21123920

Vlyssides, A; Barampouti, E M; Mai, S; Stamatoglou, A; Tsimas, E

2010-01-01

88

Improvement of COD and color removal from UASB treated poultry manure wastewater using Fenton's oxidation.  

PubMed

The applicability of Fenton's oxidation as an advanced treatment for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal from anaerobically treated poultry manure wastewater was investigated. The raw poultry manure wastewater, having a pH of 7.30 (+/-0.2) and a total COD of 12,100 (+/-910) mg/L was first treated in a 15.7 L of pilot-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The UASB reactor was operated for 72 days at mesophilic conditions (32+/-2 degrees C) in a temperature-controlled environment with three different hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 15.7, 12 and 8.0 days, and with organic loading rates (OLR) between 0.650 and 1.783 kg COD/(m3day). Under 8.0 days of HRT, the UASB process showed a remarkable performance on total COD removal with a treatment efficiency of 90.7% at the day of 63. The anaerobically treated poultry manure wastewater was further treated by Fenton's oxidation process using Fe2+ and H2O2 solutions. Batch tests were conducted on the UASB effluent samples to determine the optimum operating conditions including initial pH, effects of H2O2 and Fe2+ dosages, and the ratio of H2O2/Fe2+. Preliminary tests conducted with the dosages of 100 mg Fe2+/L and 200 mg H2O2/L showed that optimal initial pH was 3.0 for both COD and color removal from the UASB effluent. On the basis of preliminary test results, effects of increasing dosages of Fe2+ and H2O2 were investigated. Under the condition of 400 mg Fe2+/L and 200 mg H2O2/L, removal efficiencies of residual COD and color were 88.7% and 80.9%, respectively. Under the subsequent condition of 100 mg Fe2+/L and 1200 mg H2O2/L, 95% of residual COD and 95.7% of residual color were removed from the UASB effluent. Results of this experimental study obviously indicated that nearly 99.3% of COD of raw poultry manure wastewater could be effectively removed by a UASB process followed by Fenton's oxidation technology used as a post-treatment unit. PMID:17643817

Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Sakar, Suleyman

2008-03-01

89

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOEpatents

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09

90

Reactor steam isolation cooling system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a reactor steam isolation cooling system. It comprises: a containment building having a containment wall; a reactor pressure vessel disposed inside the containment building and including a nuclear reactor core therein operable for generating reactor steam; an isolation pool disposed outside the containment building and adjacent to the containment wall and containing pool water; an isolation condenser including: a plurality of parallel heat pipes; a tube sheet disposed between the hot and cold tubes and through which the heat pipes are disposed in sealing contact therewith; and means for selectively channeling the reactor steam from the pressure vessel between the hot tubes of the evaporator assembly for removing heat therefrom to form reactor condensate.

Dillmann, C.W.

1992-10-27

91

Evaluation of a Novel Integrated Bioreactor—AOS System for Treating Oil-Containing Restaurant Wastewater on Site in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

AOS system is an anaerobic digestion reactor (A-section, UASB or UBF), oxidation degradation reactor (O-section, aerobic biofilm reactor), and physical sedimentation tank (S-section) 3-in-1 integrated reactor. The compact bioreactor was applied to treat oil-containing restaurant's wastewater on site in Hong Kong. The treatment efficiency was observed at different HRT. Experimental results indicated that the AOS system for treating oil-containing restaurant

L. Wang; Q. Zhou; H. Chua

2005-01-01

92

An expert system for monitoring and diagnosis of anaerobic wastewater treatment plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, an expert system (ES) developed for the monitoring and diagnosis of anaerobic wastewater treatment plants (AWT), is presented. The system was evaluated in a hybrid pilot plant of 1.1m3 located in an industrial environment for the treatment of wastewaters from a fibreboard production factory. The reactor is a hybrid USBF, combining an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)

A. Puñal; E. Roca; J. M. Lema

2002-01-01

93

Reactor refueling containment system  

DOEpatents

A method of refueling a nuclear reactor whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01

94

Reactor refueling containment system  

DOEpatents

A method of refueling a nuclear reactor is disclosed whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced. 2 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Meuschke, R.E.

1995-05-02

95

Reactor core isolation cooling system  

DOEpatents

A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

Cooke, F.E.

1992-12-08

96

Plasma reactor waste management systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The University of North Dakota is developing a plasma reactor system for use in closed-loop processing that includes biological, materials, manufacturing, and waste processing. Direct-current, high-frequency, or microwave discharges will be used to produce plasmas for the treatment of materials. The plasma reactors offer several advantages over other systems, including low operating temperatures, low operating pressures, mechanical simplicity, and relatively safe operation. Human fecal material, sunflowers, oats, soybeans, and plastic were oxidized in a batch plasma reactor. Over 98 percent of the organic material was converted to gaseous products. The solids were then analyzed and a large amount of water and acid-soluble materials were detected. These materials could possibly be used as nutrients for biological systems.

Ness, Robert O., Jr.; Rindt, John R.; Ness, Sumitra R.

1992-01-01

97

The role of sludge retention time in the hydrolysis and acidification of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins during digestion of primary sludge in CSTR systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of the sludge retention time (SRT) between 3 and 15days, on hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis of domestic sewage was researched by simulating a sludge bed segment of an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) system as a completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The CSTR systems were fed with primary sludge (settled solids of domestic sewage) as the influent at

Yehuda Miron; Grietje Zeeman; Jules B van Lier; Gatze Lettinga

2000-01-01

98

Rapid starting methanol reactor system  

DOEpatents

The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

1984-01-01

99

Solvent refined coal reactor quench system  

DOEpatents

There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01

100

Solvent refined coal reactor quench system  

DOEpatents

There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream. 1 fig.

Thorogood, R.M.

1983-11-08

101

A case study of enteric virus removal and insights into the associated risk of water reuse for two wastewater treatment pond systems in Bolivia.  

PubMed

Wastewater treatment ponds (WTP) are one of the most widespread treatment technologies in the world; however, the mechanisms and extent of enteric virus removal in these systems are poorly understood. Two WTP systems in Bolivia, with similar overall hydraulic retention times but different first stages of treatment, were analyzed for enteric virus removal. One system consisted of a facultative pond followed by two maturation ponds (three-pond system) and the other consisted of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by two maturation (polishing) ponds (UASB-pond system). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction with reverse transcription (RT-qPCR) was used to measure concentrations of norovirus, rotavirus, and pepper mild mottle virus, while cell culture methods were used to measure concentrations of culturable enteroviruses (EV). Limited virus removal was observed with RT-qPCR in either system; however, the three-pond system removed culturable EV with greater efficiency than the UASB-pond system. The majority of viruses were not associated with particles and only a small proportion was associated with particles larger than 180 ?m; thus, it is unlikely that sedimentation is a major mechanism of virus removal. High concentrations of viruses were associated with particles between 0.45 and 180 ?m in the UASB reactor effluent, but not in the facultative pond effluent. The association of viruses with this size class of particles may explain why only minimal virus removal was observed in the UASB-pond system. Quantitative microbial risk assessment of the treated effluent for reuse for restricted irrigation indicated that the three-pond system effluent requires an additional 1- to 2-log10 reduction of viruses to achieve the WHO health target of <10(-4) disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost per person per year; however, the UASB-pond system effluent may require an additional 2.5- to 4.5-log10 reduction of viruses. PMID:25129566

Symonds, E M; Verbyla, M E; Lukasik, J O; Kafle, R C; Breitbart, M; Mihelcic, J R

2014-11-15

102

Reactor control rod timing system  

DOEpatents

A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

1982-01-01

103

Decolorization and COD reduction of UASB pretreated poultry manure wastewater by electrocoagulation process: A post-treatment study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of electrocoagulation (EC) technique for decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of anaerobically pretreated poultry manure wastewater was investigated in a laboratory batch study. Two identical 15.7-L up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors were first run under various organic and hydraulic loading conditions for 216 days. Effects of operating parameters such as type of sacrificial electrode material,

Kaan Yetilmezsoy; Fatih Ilhan; Zehra Sapci-Zengin; Suleyman Sakar; M. Talha Gonullu

2009-01-01

104

Membrane installation for enhanced up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) performance.  

PubMed

It is postulated that up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor efficiency can be enhanced by a membrane immersed in the reactor to operate it as an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for low-strength wastewater treatment. This postulate was tested by comparing the performance with and without a hollow fiber microfiltration membrane module immersed in UASB reactors operated at two specific organic loading rates (SOLR). Results showed that membrane filtration enhanced process performance and stability, with over 90% total organic carbon (TOC) removal consistently achieved. More than 91% of the TOC removal was achieved by suspended biomass, while less than 6% was removed by membrane filtration and digestion in the membrane attached biofilm during stable AnMBRs operation. Although the membrane and its biofilm played an important role in initial stage of the high SOLR test, linear increased TOC removal by bulk sludge mainly accounted for the enhanced process performance, implying that membrane led to enhanced biological activity of the suspended sludge. The high retention of active fine sludge particles in suspension was the main reason for this significant improvement of performance and biological activity, which led to decreased SOLR with time to a theoretical optimal level around 2  g COD/g MLVSS·d and the establishment of a microbial community dominated by Methanothrix-like microbes. It was concluded that UASB process performance can be enhanced by transforming such to AnMBR operation when the loading rate is too high for sufficient sludge retention, and/or when the effluent water quality demands are especially stringent. PMID:23578587

Liu, Yin; Zhang, Kaisong; Bakke, Rune; Li, Chunming; Liu, Haining

2013-09-01

105

Reactor vessel annealing system  

DOEpatents

A system for annealing a vessel (14) in situ by heating the vessel (14) to a defined temperature, composed of: an electrically operated heater assembly (10) insertable into the vessel (14) for heating the vessel (14) to the defined temperature; temperature monitoring components positioned relative to the heater assembly (10) for monitoring the temperature of the vessel (14); a controllable electric power supply unit (32-60) for supplying electric power required by the heater assembly (10); a control unit (80-86) for controlling the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60); a first vehicle (2) containing the power supply unit (32-60); a second vehicle (4) containing the control unit (80-86); power conductors (18,22) connectable between the power supply unit (32-60) and the heater unit (10) for delivering the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10); signal conductors (20,24) connectable between the temperature monitoring components and the control unit (80-86) for delivering temperature indicating signals from the temperature monitoring components to the control unit (80-86); and control conductors (8) connectable between the control unit (80-86) and the power supply unit (32-60) for delivering to the power supply unit (32-60) control signals for controlling the level of power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10).

Miller, Phillip E. (Greensburg, PA); Katz, Leonoard R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Nath, Raymond J. (Murrysville, PA); Blaushild, Ronald M. (Export, PA); Tatch, Michael D. (Randolph, NJ); Kordalski, Frank J. (White Oak, PA); Wykstra, Donald T. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kavalkovich, William M. (Monroeville, PA)

1991-01-01

106

Treatment of domestic wastewater in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor followed by moving bed biofilm reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of a laboratory-scale sewage treatment system composed of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor\\u000a and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) at a temperature of (22–35 °C) was evaluated. The entire treatment system was operated\\u000a at different hydraulic retention times (HRT’s) of 13.3, 10 and 5.0 h. An overall reduction of 80–86% for CODtotal; 51–73% for CODcolloidal and 20–55%

A. Tawfik; F. El-Gohary; H. Temmink

2010-01-01

107

Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time

P. T. K

1980-01-01

108

Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion.

Groh, Edward F. (Naperville, IL); Olson, Arne P. (Western Springs, IL); Wade, David C. (Naperville, IL); Robinson, Bryan W. (Oak Lawn, IL)

1984-01-01

109

Shutdown system for a nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

An ultimate shutdown system is provided for termination of neutronic activity in a nuclear reactor. The shutdown system includes bead chains comprising spherical containers suspended on a flexible cable. The containers are comprised of mating hemispherical shells which provide a ruggedized enclosure for reactor poison material. The bead chains, normally suspended above the reactor core on storage spools, are released for downward travel upon command from an external reactor monitor. The chains are capable of horizontal movement, so as to flow around obstructions in the reactor during their downward motion. 8 figs.

Groh, E.F.; Olson, A.P.; Wade, D.C.; Robinson, B.W.

1984-06-05

110

Combination of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) for berberine reduction from wastewater and the effects of berberine on bacterial community dynamics.  

PubMed

Berberine is a broad-spectrum antibiotic extensively used in personal medication. The production of berberine results in the generation of wastewater containing concentrated residual berberine. However, few related studies up to date focus on berberine removal from wastewaters. In this study, a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-membrane bioreactor (MBR) process was developed for berberine removal from synthetic wastewater. The performance of the UASB-MBR system on berberine, COD and NH(4)(+)--N removal was investigated at different berberine loadings. And the effects of berberine on bacterial communities were evaluated using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Results showed that, as the increase of berberine loadings, UASB performance was affected remarkably, whereas, efficient and stable performance of MBR ensured the overall removal rates of berberine, COD and NH(4)(+)--N consistently reached up to 99%, 98% and 98%, respectively. Significant shifts of bacterial community structures were detected in both UASB and MBR, especially in the initial operations. Along with the increase of berberine loadings, high antibiotic resisting species and some functional species, i.e. Acinetobacter sp., Clostridium sp., Propionibacterium sp., and Sphingomonas sp. in UASB, as well as Sphingomonas sp., Methylocystis sp., Hydrogenophaga sp. and Flavobacterium sp. in MBR were enriched in succession. PMID:23280052

Qiu, Guanglei; Song, Yonghui; Zeng, Ping; Duan, Liang; Xiao, Shuhu

2013-02-15

111

Extreme thermophilic biohydrogen production from wheat straw hydrolysate using mixed culture fermentation: Effect of reactor configuration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen production from hemicellulose-rich wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in continuously-stirred tank reactor (CSTR), up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor, and anaerobic filter (AF) reactor. The CSTR was operated at an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3days, and the UASB and AF reactors were operated at 1day HRT, using mixed extreme thermophiles at 70°C. The highest hydrogen production yield of

Prawit Kongjan; Irini Angelidaki

2010-01-01

112

Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)  

SciTech Connect

A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.; Barrett, R.J.; Gorker, G.E.; Spampinaton, P.T.; Bulmer, R.H.; Dorn, D.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Ghose, S.

1985-09-01

113

UASB performance and microbial adaptation during a transition from mesophilic to thermophilic treatment of palm oil mill effluent.  

PubMed

The treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) by an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) at organic loading rates (OLR) between 2.2 and 9.5 g COD l(-1) day(-1) was achieved by acclimatizing the mesophilic (37 °C) microbial seed to the thermophilic temperature (57 °C) by a series of stepwise temperature shifts. The UASB produced up to 13.2 l biogas d(-1) with methane content on an average of 76%. The COD removal efficiency ranged between 76 and 86%. Microbial diversity of granules from the UASB reactor was also investigated. The PCR-based DGGE analysis showed that the bacterial population profiles significantly changed with the temperature transition from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions. In addition, the results suggested that even though the thermophilic temperature of 57 °C was suitable for a number of hydrolytic, acidogenic and acetogenic bacteria, it may not be suitable for some Methanosaeta species acclimatized from 37 °C. Specifically, the bands associated with Methanosaeta thermophila PT and Methanosaeta harundinacea can be detected during the four consecutive operation phases of 37 °C, 42 °C, 47 °C and 52 °C, but their corresponding bands were found to fade out at 57 °C. The DGGE analysis predicted that the temperature transition can result in significant methanogenic biomass washout at 57 °C. PMID:22466006

Khemkhao, Maneerat; Nuntakumjorn, Boonyarit; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Phalakornkule, Chantaraporn

2012-07-30

114

The 5-kwe reactor thermoelectric system summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Design of the 5-kwe reactor thermoelectric system was initiated in February 1972 and extended through the conceptual design phase into the preliminary design phase. Design effort was terminated in January, 1973. This report documents the system and component requirements, design approaches, and performance and design characteristics for the 5-kwe system. Included is summary information on the reactor, radiation shields, power conversion systems, thermoelectric pump, radiator/structure, liquid metal components, and the control system.

Vanosdol, J. H. (editor)

1973-01-01

115

High-rate treatment of terephthalate in anaerobic hybrid reactors.  

PubMed

The anaerobic degradation of terephthalate as sole substrate was studied in three anaerobic upflow reactors. Initially, the reactors were operated as upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors and seeded with suspended methanogenic biomass obtained from a full-scale down-flow fixed film reactor, treating wastewater generated during production of purified terephthalic acid. The reactors were operated at 30, 37, and 55 degrees C. The terephthalate removal capacities remained low in all three reactors (<4 mmolxL-1xday-1, or 1 g of chemical oxygen demand (COD)xL-1xday-1) due to limitations in biomass retention. Batch experiments with biomass from the UASB reactors revealed that, within the mesophilic temperature range, optimal terephthalate degradation is obtained at 37 degrees C. No thermophilic terephthalate-degrading culture could be obtained in either continuous or batch cultures. To enhance biomass retention, the reactors were modified to anaerobic hybrid reactors by introduction of two types of reticulated polyurethane (PUR) foam particles. The hybrid reactors were operated at 37 degrees C and seeded with a mixture of biomass from the UASB reactors operated at 30 and 37 degrees C. After a lag period of approximately 80 days, the terephthalate conversion capacity of the hybrid reactors increased exponentially at a specific rate of approximately 0.06 day-1, and high removal rates were obtained (40-70 mmolxL-1xday-1, or 10-17 g of CODxL-1xday-1) at hydraulic retention times between 5 and 8 h. These high removal capacities could be attributed to enhanced biomass retention by the development of biofilms on the PUR carrier material as well as the formation of granular biomass. Biomass balances over the hybrid reactors suggested that either bacterial decay or selective wash-out of the terephthalate fermenting biomass played an important role in the capacity limitations of the systems. The presented results suggest that terephthalate can be degraded at high volumetric rates if sufficiently long sludge ages can be maintained, and the reactor pH and temperature are close to their optima. PMID:10356251

Kleerebezem, R; Ivalo, M; Hulshoff Pol, L W; Lettinga, G

1999-01-01

116

Self-actuating reactor shutdown system  

DOEpatents

A control system for the automatic or self-actuated shutdown or "scram" of a nuclear reactor. The system is capable of initiating scram insertion by a signal from the plant protection system or by independent action directly sensing reactor conditions of low-flow or over-power. Self-actuation due to a loss of reactor coolant flow results from a decrease of pressure differential between the upper and lower ends of an absorber element. When the force due to this differential falls below the weight of the element, the element will fall by gravitational force to scram the reactor. Self-actuation due to high neutron flux is accomplished via a valve controlled by an electromagnet and a thermionic diode. In a reactor over-power, the diode will be heated to a change of state causing the electromagnet to be shorted thereby actuating the valve which provides the changed flow and pressure conditions required for scramming the absorber element.

Barrus, Donald M. (San Jose, CA); Brummond, Willian A (Livermore, CA); Peterson, Leslie F. (Danville, CA)

1988-01-01

117

TREAT Reactor Control and Protection System  

SciTech Connect

The main control algorithm of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) resides in Read Only Memory (ROM) and only experiment specific parameters are input via keyboard entry. Prior to executing an experiment, the software and hardware of the control computer is tested by a closed loop real-time simulation. Two computers with parallel processing are used for the reactor simulation and another computer is used for simulation of the control rod system. A monitor computer, used as a redundant diverse reactor protection channel, uses more conservative setpoints and reduces challenges to the Reactor Trip System (RTS). The RTS consists of triplicated hardwired channels with one out of three logic. The RTS is automatically tested by a digital Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) prior to the execution of an experiment. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Lipinski, W.C.; Brookshier, W.K.; Burrows, D.R.; Lenkszus, F.R.; McDowell, W.P.

1985-01-01

118

Cooling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

Amtmann, Hans H. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA)

1982-01-01

119

EFFECT OF STARCH ADDITION ON THE PERFORMANCE AND SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION OF UASB PROCESS TREATING METHANOLIC WASTEWATER  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mesophilic(35℃) UASB reactor treating synthetic wastewater containing methanol with addition of starch was continuously operated for over 430 days by changing the organic loading rate from 2.5 to 120kg-COD/m3.d. The microbial community structure of the granules was analyzed with the molecular tools and its metabolic characteristics were evaluated using specific methanogenic activity tests. The process was successfully operated with over 98% soluble COD removal efficiency at VLR 30kg-COD/m3.d for approximately 300 days, and granulation satisfactory proceeded. The results of cloning and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis suggest that groups related the genus Methanomethylovorans and the genus Methanosaeta were predominant in the reactor although only the genus Methanomethylovorans was predominant in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater in the previous study. Abundance of the granules over 0.5 mm in diameter in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater with addition of starch was 3 times larger than that in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater. Specific methanogenic activity tests in this study indicate that the methanol-methane pathway and the methanol-H2/CO2-methane pathway were predominant, and however, there was a certain level of activity for acetate-methane pathway unlike the reactor treating methanolic wastewater. These results suggest addition of starch might be responsible for diversifying the microbial community and encouraging the granulation.

Yan, Feng; Kobayashi, Takuro; Takahashi, Shintaro; Li, Yu-You; Omura, Tatsuo

120

Reductive decolourisation of sulphonated mono and diazo dyes in one- and two-stage anaerobic systems.  

PubMed

This work assessed the application of one- and two-stage mesophilic anaerobic systems to colour removal of sulphonated mono and diazo dyes with ethanol as electron donor. The dyes Congo Red (CR), Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Red 2 (RR2) were selected as model compounds and tested separately in seven different periods. The one-stage system (R(1)) consisted of a single up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, whereas the two-stage system (R(2)) consisted of an acidogenic UASB reactor (R(A)), a settler and a methanogenic UASB reactor (R(M)). For CR and RB5, no remarkable difference was observed between the colour removal performance of both anaerobic systems R(1) and R(2). The experiments with RR2 revealed that R(2) was more efficient on colour removal than R(1), showing efficiencies almost 2-fold (period VI) and 2.5-fold (period VII) higher than those found by R(1). Additionally, R(2) showed a higher stability, giving a good prospect for application to textile wastewaters. Finally, the acidogenic reactor (R(A)) had an important role in the overall decolourisation achieved by R(2) during the experiments with CR and RB5 (>78 %), whereas for RR2, a more recalcitrant dye, R(A) was responsible for up to 38 % of the total colour removal. PMID:23456307

da Silva, Marcos Erick Rodrigues; Firmino, Paulo Igor Milen; dos Santos, André Bezerra

2013-05-01

121

Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

2008-06-30

122

Fluidized-Bed Reactor System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gas pyrolysis in hot fluidized beds minimized by use of selectively filtered radiation and parabolic cavity. Reactor is parabolic cavity of two or more axes in which light emanating from one axis bounces off walls of cavity and passes through object axis to heat sample.

Morrison, A. D.

1985-01-01

123

An expert system for monitoring and diagnosis of anaerobic wastewater treatment plants.  

PubMed

In this paper, an expert system (ES) developed for the monitoring and diagnosis of anaerobic wastewater treatment plants (AWT), is presented. The system was evaluated in a hybrid pilot plant of 1.1 m3 located in an industrial environment for the treatment of wastewaters from a fibreboard production factory. The reactor is a hybrid USBF, combining an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) in the lower part and an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) at the top. PMID:12153033

Puñal, A; Roca, E; Lema, J M

2002-05-01

124

Energy conversion systems design for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Various energy conversion systems have been reviewed in order to select an efficient power cycle to be compatible with the fusion reactor requirements. The power cycles were selected for a toroidal confinement system with D-T and D-D fuel cycles and a tandem mirror reactor (TMR) with a D-/sup 3/He fuel cycle. Reversed Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) was selected as an example of a toroidal confinement system with D-T fuel cycle since there has recently been a comprehensive design study for it. Tokamak was selected as an example of a toroidal confinement system with D-D fuel cycle. Tandem mirror reactor was chosen as an example of confinement for D-/sup 3/He fuel cycle. The steam cycle was found to be most suitable for the RFP and Tokamak reactors while a combination of direct energy conversion system and steam cycle was found to be most suitable for D-/sup 3/He tandem mirror reactor.

Dabiri, A.E.

1989-03-01

125

Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors have significant advantages as energy sources for closed-cycle power systems. The advantages arise from the removal of temperature limits associated with conventional reactor fuel elements, the wide variety of methods of extracting energy from fissioning gases, and inherent low fissile and fission product in-core inventory due to continuous fuel reprocessing. Example power cycles and their general performance characteristics are discussed. Efficiencies of gaseous fuel reactor systems are shown to be high with resulting minimal environmental effects. A technical overview of the NASA-funded research program in gaseous fuel reactors is described and results of recent tests of uranium hexafluoride (UF6)-fueled critical assemblies are presented.

Kendall, J. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

1977-01-01

126

Nuclear reactor system with aligned feedwater and superheater penetrations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor system is described wherein a prestressed concrete reactor vessel is provided with a main cavity for the reactor core and at least one subsidiary cavity for a steam generator. At least two feedwater penetrations are provided in the reactor vessel communicating between the exterior of the reactor vessel and the subsidiary cylindrical cavity. A superheater penetration is

E. J. Hurn; J. A. Kissinger

1981-01-01

127

Systems Issues in Nuclear Reactor Safety  

E-print Network

Apostolakis U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission CmrApostolakis@nrc.gov MIT SDM Conference on Systems Thinking, accident, or naturally caused event occurs at a nuclear facility." [Commission's White Paper, FebruarySystems Issues in Nuclear Reactor Safety Commissioner George ApostolakisCommissioner George

de Weck, Olivier L.

128

Plasma arc process systems, reactors, and applications  

SciTech Connect

Thermal plasma arc systems are being applied to a wide variety of high-temperature applications. The use of electricity is proving to be a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of industrial wastes, recycling of scrap, upgrading of existing metallurgical processes, and new methods for the production of materials. Thermal plasma arc reactors are classified according to: (1) the mode of arc attachment, as non-transferred and transferred: and (2) the site for energy and/or mass transfer, as dispersed phase or condensed phase (bulk, film and packed bed). Unique features in the design of plasma reactor systems and applications in waste treatment and metals production are discussed.

Mac Rae, D.R. (Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (USA))

1989-03-01

129

Anaerobic biodegradation of spent sulphite liquor in a UASB reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anaerobic biodegradation of fermented spent sulphite liquor, SSL, which is produced during the manufacture of sulphite pulp, was investigated. SSL contains a high concentration of lignin products in addition to hemicellulose and has a very high COD load (173gCODl?1). Batch experiments with diluted SSL and pretreated SSL indicated a potential of 12–22 l methane per litre SSL, which corresponds to

T. G. Jantsch; I. Angelidaki; J. E. Schmidt; B. E. Braña de Hvidsten; B. K. Ahring

2002-01-01

130

Dynamic Impregnator Reactor System (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the multifarious system designed for complex feedstock impregnation and processing. IBRF feedstock system has several unit operations combined into one robust system that provides for flexible and staged process configurations, such as spraying, soaking, low-severity pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, concentration/evaporation, and distillation.

Not Available

2012-09-01

131

Decolorization and COD reduction of UASB pretreated poultry manure wastewater by electrocoagulation process: a post-treatment study.  

PubMed

The performance of electrocoagulation (EC) technique for decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of anaerobically pretreated poultry manure wastewater was investigated in a laboratory batch study. Two identical 15.7-L up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors were first run under various organic and hydraulic loading conditions for 216 days. Effects of operating parameters such as type of sacrificial electrode material, time of electrolysis, current density, initial pH, and electrolyte concentration were further studied to optimize conditions for the post-treatment of UASB pretreated poultry manure wastewater. Preliminary tests conducted with two types of sacrificial electrodes (Al and Fe) resulted that Al electrodes were found to be more effective for both COD and color removals than Fe electrodes. The subsequent EC tests performed with Al electrodes showed that optimal operating conditions were determined to be an initial pH of 5.0, a current density of 15mA/cm(2), and an electrolysis time of 20min. The results indicated that under the optimal conditions, about 90% of COD and 92% of residual color could be effectively removed from the UASB effluent with the further contribution of the EC technology used as a post-treatment unit. In this study, the possible acute toxicity of the EC effluent was also evaluated by a static bioassay test procedure using guppy fish (Lebistes reticulatus). Findings of this study clearly indicated that incorporation of a toxicological test into conventional physicochemical analyses provided a better evaluation of final discharge characteristics. PMID:18554794

Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Ilhan, Fatih; Sapci-Zengin, Zehra; Sakar, Suleyman; Gonullu, M Talha

2009-02-15

132

Treatment of phenol and cresols in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process has been successfully applied in the treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. Several researchers have investigated the suitability of the process for the treatment of phenols and phenolic wastewaters. The anaerobic treatment of phenols is still at an investigative stage. With increasing recognition of the UASB process, feasibility studies on the treatment of wastewater

Gali S. Veeresh; Pradeep Kumar; Indu Mehrotra

2005-01-01

133

Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is participating in a NASA-sponsored program to demonstrate the feasibility of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor. The work is aimed at acquiring experimental and theoretical information for the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test heat removal by optical radiation. The basic goal of this work is for space applications, however, other NASA-sponsored work suggests several attractive applications to help meet earth-bound energy needs. Such potential benefits are: small critical mass, on-site fuel processing, high fuel burnup, low fission fragment inventory in reactor core, high temperature for process heat, optical radiation for photochemistry and space power transmission, and high temperature for advanced propulsion systems.

Helmick, H. H.; Schwenk, F. C.

1978-01-01

134

Gaseous fuel reactor systems for aerospace applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research on the gaseous fuel nuclear rocket concept continues under the programs of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office for Aeronautics and Space Technology and now includes work related to power applications in space and on earth. In a cavity reactor test series, initial experiments confirmed the low critical mass determined from reactor physics calculations. Recent work with flowing UF6 fuel indicates stable operation at increased power levels. Preliminary design and experimental verification of test hardware for high-temperature experiments have been accomplished. Research on energy extraction from fissioning gases has resulted in lasers energized by fission fragments. Combined experimental results and studies indicate that gaseous-fuel reactor systems have significant potential for providing nuclear fission power in space and on earth.

Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.

1977-01-01

135

Fault-tolerant reactor protection system  

DOEpatents

A reactor protection system having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Each division performs independently of the others (asynchronous operation). All communications between the divisions are asynchronous. Each chassis substitutes its own spare sensor reading in the 2/3 vote if a sensor reading from one of the other chassis is faulty or missing. Therefore the presence of at least two valid sensor readings in excess of a set point is required before terminating the output to the hardware logic of a scram inhibition signal even when one of the four sensors is faulty or when one of the divisions is out of service.

Gaubatz, Donald C. (Cupertino, CA)

1997-01-01

136

Fault-tolerant reactor protection system  

DOEpatents

A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Each division performs independently of the others (asynchronous operation). All communications between the divisions are asynchronous. Each chassis substitutes its own spare sensor reading in the 2/3 vote if a sensor reading from one of the other chassis is faulty or missing. Therefore the presence of at least two valid sensor readings in excess of a set point is required before terminating the output to the hardware logic of a scram inhibition signal even when one of the four sensors is faulty or when one of the divisions is out of service. 16 figs.

Gaubatz, D.C.

1997-04-15

137

Reactor power system deployment and startup  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper addresses issues that should receive further examination in the near-term as concept selection for development of a U.S. space reactor power system is approached. The issues include: the economics, practicality and system reliability associated with transfer of nuclear spacecraft from low earth shuttle orbits to operational orbits, via chemical propulsion versus nuclear electric propulsion; possible astronaut supervised reactor and nuclear electric propulsion startup in low altitude Shuttle orbit; potential deployment methods for nuclear powered spacecraft from Shuttle; the general public safety of low altitude startup and nuclear safe and disposal orbits; the question of preferred reactor power level; and the question of frozen versus molten alkali metal coolant during launch and deployment. These issues must be considered now because they impact the SP-100 concept selection, power level selection, weight and size limits, use of deployable radiators, reliability requirements, and economics, as well as the degree of need for and the urgency of developing space reactor power systems.

Wetch, J. R.; Nelin, C. J.; Britt, E. J.; Klein, G.

1985-01-01

138

UASB performance and electron competition between methane-producing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in treating sulfate-rich wastewater containing ethanol and acetate.  

PubMed

To find an appropriate method for sulfate-rich wastewater containing ethanol and acetate with COD/sulfate ratio of 1, a UASB reactor was operated for more than 180 days. The influences of HRT (hydraulic retention time) and OLR (organic loading rate) on organics and sulfate removal, gas production, and electrons utilization were investigated. The sludge activity and microorganism composition were also determined. The results indicated that this system removed more than 80% of COD and 30% of sulfate with HRT above 6h and OLR below 12.3 gCOD/L d. Further HRT decrease caused volatile fatty acids accumulation and performance deterioration. Except at HRT of 2h, COD and electron flow were mostly utilized by methane-producing archaea (MPA), and methane yield remained in the range of 0.18-0.24 LCH4/gCOD. Methane was mainly generated by Methanosaeta concilii GP6 with acetate as substrate, whereas sulfate was mainly reduced by incomplete-oxidizing Desulfovibrio species with ethanol as substrate. PMID:23597763

Jing, Zhaoqian; Hu, Yong; Niu, Qigui; Liu, Yuyu; Li, Yu-You; Wang, Xiaochang C

2013-06-01

139

Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor  

DOEpatents

A system for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary.

Chastagner, Philippe (3134 Natalie Cir., Augusta, GA 30909-2748)

1994-01-01

140

Combination of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor and a novel cascade sponge reactor for sewage treatment.  

PubMed

Performance of the combined process of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and cascade sponge reactor (CSR) for sewage treatment was studied. UASB-CSR system was operated at HRTs of 24 h, 16 h, and 8 h at an average wastewater temperature of 29°C. It comprises of the most efficient combined process not only for COD(T) (98.9%), BOD(T) (98.5%), TSS (99.3%), total nitrogen (89.1%), total phosphorus (99.0%), total coliform (99.9%) and fecal coliform (99.9%) removal but also for reducing excess sludge production. Fecal coliform counts were found 23 MPN/100 ml only in final effluents. The effluent quality of the system sufficiently meets the discharged standards which regulate wastewater discharge into drains. The parameters of CSR are closely related to those of the potable water after certain advanced treatment which can be reused in many ways. Moreover, it does not require any external aeration and thus the cost associated with energy and devices required for aeration are cut to zero. PMID:21436565

Patel, K; Mungray, A K

2011-01-01

141

Integral reactor system and method for fuel cells  

DOEpatents

A reactor system is integrated internally within an anode-side cavity of a fuel cell. The reactor system is configured to convert hydrocarbons to smaller species while mitigating the lower production of solid carbon. The reactor system may incorporate one or more of a pre-reforming section, an anode exhaust gas recirculation device, and a reforming section.

Fernandes, Neil Edward; Brown, Michael S; Cheekatamarla, Praveen; Deng, Thomas; Dimitrakopoulos, James; Litka, Anthony F

2013-11-19

142

Space reactor electric systems: system integration studies, Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of preliminary space reactor electric system integration studies performed by Rockwell International's Energy Systems Group (ESG). The preliminary studies investigated a broad range of reactor electric system concepts for powers of 25 and 100 KWe. The purpose of the studies was to provide timely system information of suitable accuracy to support ongoing mission planning activities. The preliminary system studies were performed by assembling the five different subsystems that are used in a system: the reactor, the shielding, the primary heat transport, the power conversion-processing, and the heat rejection subsystems. The subsystem data in this report were largely based on Rockwell's recently prepared Subsystem Technology Assessment Report. Nine generic types of reactor subsystems were used in these system studies. Several levels of technology were used for each type of reactor subsystem. Seven generic types of power conversion-processing subsystems were used, and several levels of technology were again used for each type. In addition, various types and levels of technology were used for the shielding, primary heat transport, and heat rejection subsystems. A total of 60 systems were studied.

Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.; Harty, R.B.; Katz, B.; Keshishian, V.; Lillie, A.F.; Thomson, W.B.

1983-03-29

143

Plasma generators, reactor systems and related methods  

DOEpatents

A plasma generator, reactor and associated systems and methods are provided in accordance with the present invention. A plasma reactor may include multiple sections or modules which are removably coupled together to form a chamber. Associated with each section is an electrode set including three electrodes with each electrode being coupled to a single phase of a three-phase alternating current (AC) power supply. The electrodes are disposed about a longitudinal centerline of the chamber and are arranged to provide and extended arc and generate an extended body of plasma. The electrodes are displaceable relative to the longitudinal centerline of the chamber. A control system may be utilized so as to automatically displace the electrodes and define an electrode gap responsive to measure voltage or current levels of the associated power supply.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pink, Robert J. (Pocatello, ID); Lee, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-06-19

144

Reactor component inventory system at FFTF  

SciTech Connect

A reliable inventory control system was developed at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to keep track of the occupancy of 900 refueling facility locations, to compile historical data on the movement of each reactor assembly, and to simulate assembly moves. The simulate capability is valuable because it allows verification of documents before they are issued for use in the plant, and eliminates the possibility of planning illegal or impossible moves. The system is installed on a UNIVAC 1100 computer and is maintained using a data base management system by Sperry Univac called MAPPER.

Ordonez, C.R.; Redekopp, R.D.; Reed, E.A.

1985-02-01

145

Effect of chitosan on UASB treating POME during a transition from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions.  

PubMed

The effects of chitosan addition on treatment of palm oil mill effluent were investigated using two lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors: (1) with chitosan addition at the dosage of 2 mg chitosan per g volatile suspended solids on the first day of the operation (R1), (2) without chitosan addition (the control, R2). The reactors were inoculated with mesophilic anaerobic sludge which was acclimatized to a thermophilic condition with a stepwise temperature increase of 5 °C from 37 to 57 °C. The OLR ranged from 2.23 to 9.47 kg COD m(-3) day(-1). The difference in biogas production rate increased from non-significant to 18% different. The effluent volatile suspended solids of R1 was 65 mg l(-1) lower than that of R2 on Day 123. 16S rRNA targeted denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of microbial community indicated that some methanogens in the genus Methanosaeta can be detected in R1 but not in R2. PMID:21316949

Khemkhao, Maneerat; Nuntakumjorn, Boonyarit; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Phalakornkule, Chantaraporn

2011-04-01

146

Reactor protection system design alternatives for sodium fast reactors  

E-print Network

Historically, unprotected transients have been viewed as design basis events that can significantly challenge sodium-cooled fast reactors. The perceived potential consequences of a severe unprotected transient in a ...

DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

2011-01-01

147

Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1986-01-01

148

Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

Harto, Andang Widi

2012-06-01

149

Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

2014-01-01

150

Weld monitor and failure detector for nuclear reactor system  

DOEpatents

Critical but inaccessible welds in a nuclear reactor system are monitored throughout the life of the reactor by providing small aperture means projecting completely through the reactor vessel wall and also through the weld or welds to be monitored. The aperture means is normally sealed from the atmosphere within the reactor. Any incipient failure or cracking of the weld will cause the environment contained within the reactor to pass into the aperture means and thence to the outer surface of the reactor vessel where its presence is readily detected.

Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

1987-01-01

151

Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system  

DOEpatents

A reusable system is described for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member. The locking cap has two opposing fingers shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed.

Not Available

1980-09-17

152

Fluid shut-down system for a nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear reactor shut-down system is described which comprises a ; fluidic vortex valve for releasably maintaining a liquid neutron poison outside ; of the reactor core, the poison being contained by a reservoir and biased by ; pressure for flow into poison tubes within the reactor. The upper ends of the ; poison tubes communicate with the supply port

F. W. Barclay; J. R. Frey; J. N. Wilson; R. W. Besant

1975-01-01

153

Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration  

DOEpatents

An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

Anstine, Larry D. (San Jose, CA); James, Dean B. (Saratoga, CA); Melaika, Edward A. (Berkeley, CA); Peterson, Jr., John P. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01

154

MHD power conversion system for NERVA reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optimized linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems to produce 200 MWe for 1000 seconds are defined. For the specific mission envisioned, a mass flow of 45.36 Kg/sec (100 lbs/sec) of hydrogen is available to the system. Westinghouse NERVA reactor technology can heat this mass flow of hydrogen to 2550 K at a pressure of 12 atm. This hydrogen flow is assumed to be seeded with cesium to obtain the required MHD generator conductivity. For each MHD system concept considered, the MHD generator design was optimized in terms of operating Mach number, load parameter, and cesium seed fraction. The simplest concept, an open-cycle MHD system, is optimized by minimizing the total magnet plus cesium seed mass. The resulting magnet and magnet plus seed mass are 44092 and 54143 Kg respectively. The second concept considered was an open-cycle MHD system with seed recovery and reuse. It is optimized by minimizing the magnet mass. The resulting magnet mass is 40110 Kg. A third concept, a closed-cycle MHD system, was also considered. If only equilibrium conductivity is considered, cesium seeded hydrogen is shown to be the more attractive than cesium seeded helium, and the optimum generator would be identical to that for the open-cycle MHD system with seed recovery.

Seikel, G. R.; Condit, W. C.

1985-01-01

155

Nuclear safety calculations for heatpipe power system reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Misperceptions continue to exist about the safety of space nuclear systems-both with reactors and radioisotope systems. Frequently engineers do not bother to sufficiently explain the risk, because it is obvious to them that the risks are inconsequential and that their time can be spent in more productive ways. This paper attempts to quantify some of the nuclear risks associated with two space reactor concepts. The paper does not perform a detailed risk assessment; it merely provides information and data that serves as evidence that the risk to personnel and the public are minimal. The reactor concepts evaluated are Heatpipe Power System (HPS) reactors-the HOMER-15, a Mars surface reactor, and the SAFE-400, a space power reactor. The study concludes that these reactors do not pose any credible risk to personnel or the public. .

Poston, David I.

2002-01-01

156

Fuel Systems for Compact Fast Space Reactors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

About 200 refractory metal clad ceramic fuel pins have been irradiated in thermal reactors under the 1200 K to 1550 K cladding temperature conditions of primary relevance to space reactors. This paper reviews performance with respect to fissile atom densi...

C. M. Cox, D. S. Dutt, R. A. Karnesky

1983-01-01

157

Shutdown heat removal system reliability in thermal reactors  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the failure probability per year of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS) at hot standby conditions for two thermal reactor designs is presented. The selected reactor designs are the Pressurized Water Reactor and the Nonproliferation Alternative System Assessment Program Heavy Water Reactor. Failures of the SHRS following the initiating transients of loss of offsite power and loss of main feedwater system are evaluated. Common mode failures between components are incorporated in this anlaysis via the ..beta..-factor method and the sensitivity of the system reliability to common mode failures is investigated parametrically.

Sun, Y.H.; Bari, R.A.

1980-01-01

158

Proceedings of a Symposium on Advanced Compact Reactor Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reactor system technologies suitable for a variety of aerospace and terrestrial applications are considered. Technologies, safety and regulatory considerations, potential applications, and research and development opportunities are covered.

1983-01-01

159

Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system  

DOEpatents

A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01

160

Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOEpatents

A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

1994-01-01

161

Integrated application of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for the treatment of wastewaters.  

PubMed

The UASB process among other treatment methods has been recognized as a core method of an advanced technology for environmental protection. This paper highlights the treatment of seven types of wastewaters i.e. palm oil mill effluent (POME), distillery wastewater, slaughterhouse wastewater, piggery wastewater, dairy wastewater, fishery wastewater and municipal wastewater (black and gray) by UASB process. The purpose of this study is to explore the pollution load of these wastewaters and their treatment potential use in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket process. The general characterization of wastewater, treatment in UASB reactor with operational parameters and reactor performance in terms of COD removal and biogas production are thoroughly discussed in the paper. The concrete data illustrates the reactor configuration, thus giving maximum awareness about upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for further research. The future aspects for research needs are also outlined. PMID:21764417

Latif, Muhammad Asif; Ghufran, Rumana; Wahid, Zularisam Abdul; Ahmad, Anwar

2011-10-15

162

Cryogenic system design for a compact tokamak reactor  

SciTech Connect

The International Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) is a program presently underway to design a next-generation tokamak reactor. The cryogenic system for this reactor must meet unusual and new requirements. Unusually high heat loads (100 kW at 4.5 K) must be handled because neutron shielding has been limited to save space in the reactor core. Also, large variations in the cryogenics loads occur over short periods of time because of the pulsed nature of some of the operating scenarios. This paper describes a workable cryogenic system design for a compact tokamak reactor such as ITER. A design analysis is presented dealing with a system that handles transient loads, coil quenches, reactor cool-down and the effect of variations in helium-supply temperatures on the cryogenic stability of the coils. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Slack, D.S.; Kerns, J.A.; Miller, J.R.

1988-10-28

163

Prism reactor system design and analysis of postulated unscrammed events  

SciTech Connect

Key safety characteristics of the PRISM reactor system include the passive reactor shutdown characteristic and the passive shutdown heat removal system, RVACS. While these characteristics are simple in principle, the physical processes are fairly complex, particularly for the passive reactor shutdown. It has been possible to adapt independent safety analysis codes originally developed for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor review, although some limitations remain. In this paper, the analyses of postulated unscrammed events are discussed, along with limitations in the predictive capabilities and plans to correct the limitations in the near future. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C.

1991-08-01

164

PRISM reactor system design and analysis of postulated unscrammed events  

SciTech Connect

Key safety characteristics of the PRISM reactor system include the passive reactor shutdown characteristics and the passive shutdown heat removal system, RVACS. While these characteristics are simple in principle, the physical processes are fairly complex, particularly for the passive reactor shutdown. It has been possible to adapt independent safety analysis codes originally developed for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor review, although some limitations remain. In this paper, the analyses of postulated unscrammed events are discussed, along with limitations in the predictive capabilities and plans to correct the limitations in the near future. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Rosztoczy, Z.; Lane, J. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01

165

Exhaust system with emissions storage device and plasma reactor  

DOEpatents

An exhaust system for a combustion system, comprising a storage device for collecting NO.sub.x, hydrocarbon, or particulate emissions, or mixture of these emissions, and a plasma reactor for destroying the collected emissions is described. After the emission is collected in by the storage device for a period of time, the emission is then destroyed in a non-thermal plasma generated by the plasma reactor. With respect to the direction of flow of the exhaust stream, the storage device must be located before the terminus of the plasma reactor, and it may be located wholly before, overlap with, or be contained within the plasma reactor.

Hoard, John W. (Livonia, MI)

1998-01-01

166

Design of a 25-kWe Surface Reactor System Based on SNAP Reactor Technologies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Hastelloy-X clad, sodium-potassium (NaK-78) cooled, moderated spectrum reactor using uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH) fuel based on the SNAP program reactors is a promising design for use in surface power systems. This paper presents a 98 kWth reactor for a power system the uses multiple Stirling engines to produce 25 kWe-net for 5 years. The design utilizes a pin type geometry containing UZrHx fuel clad with Hastelloy-X and NaK-78 flowing around the pins as coolant. A compelling feature of this design is its use of 49.9% enriched U, allowing it to be classified as a category III-D attractiveness and reducing facility costs relative to highly-enriched space reactor concepts. Presented below are both the design and an analysis of this reactor's criticality under various safety and operations scenarios.

Dixon, David D.; Hiatt, Matthew T.; Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.

2006-01-01

167

Design of a 25-kWe Surface Reactor System Based on SNAP Reactor Technologies  

SciTech Connect

A Hastelloy-X clad, sodium-potassium (NaK-78) cooled, moderated spectrum reactor using uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH) fuel based on the SNAP program reactors is a promising design for use in surface power systems. This paper presents a 98 kWth reactor for a power system the uses multiple Stirling engines to produce 25 kWe-net for 5 years. The design utilizes a pin type geometry containing UZrHx fuel clad with Hastelloy-X and NaK-78 flowing around the pins as coolant. A compelling feature of this design is its use of 49.9% enriched U, allowing it to be classified as a category III-D attractiveness and reducing facility costs relative to highly-enriched space reactor concepts. Presented below are both the design and an analysis of this reactor's criticality under various safety and operations scenarios.

Dixon, David D. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Hiatt, Matthew T. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2006-01-20

168

Computer optimization of reactor-thermoelectric space power systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer simulation and optimization code that has been developed for nuclear space power systems is described. The results of using this code to analyze two reactor-thermoelectric systems are presented.

Maag, W. L.; Finnegan, P. M.; Fishbach, L. H.

1973-01-01

169

Microprocessor tester for the treat upgrade reactor trip system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The upgrading of the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at ANL-Idaho has been designed to provide additional experimental capabilities for the study of core disruptive accident (CDA) phenomena. In addition, a programmable Automated Reactor Control System (ARCS) will permit high-power transients up to 11,000 MW having a controlled reactor period of from 15 to 0.1 sec. These modifications to the

F. R. Lenkszus; R. G. Bucher

1984-01-01

170

77 FR 36014 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling- Water Reactors.'' This guide describes...cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs). DATES:...

2012-06-15

171

ANDES Measurements for Advanced Reactor Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A significant number of new measurements was undertaken by the ANDES “Measurements for advanced reactor systems” initiative. These new measurements include neutron inelastic scattering from 23Na, Mo, Zr, and 238U, neutron capture cross sections of 238U, 241Am, neutron induced fission cross sections of 240Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm, and measurements that explore the limits of the surrogate technique. The latter study the feasibility of inferring neutron capture cross sections for Cm isotopes, the neutron-induced fission cross section of 238Pu and fission yields and fission probabilities through full Z and A identification in inverse kinematics for isotopes of Pu, Am, Cm and Cf. Finally, four isotopes are studied which are important to improve predictions for delayed neutron precursors and decay heat by total absorption gamma-ray spectrometry (88Br, 94Rb, 95Rb, 137I). The measurements which are performed at state-of-the-art European facilities have the ambition to achieve the lowest possible uncertainty, and to come as close as is reasonably achievable to the target uncertainties established by sensitivity studies. An overview is presented of the activities and achievements, leaving detailed expositions to the various parties contributing to the conference.

Plompen, A. J. M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Kopecky, S.; Nyman, M.; Rouki, C.; Salvador Castiñeira, P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Lampoudis, C.; Calviani, M.; Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Gonzalez Romero, E.; Aïche, M.; Jurado, B.; Mathieu, L.; Derckx, X.; Farget, F.; Rodrigues Tajes, C.; Bacquias, A.; Dessagne, Ph.; Kerveno, M.; Borcea, C.; Negret, A.; Colonna, N.; Goncalves, I.; Penttilä, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Jokinen, A.

2014-05-01

172

Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage, and cleaning stations-have accumulated satisfactory construction and operation experiences. In addition, two special issues for future development are described in this report: large capacity interim storage and transuranic-bearing fuel handling.

Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01

173

Simulation of the TREAT-Upgrade Automatic Reactor Control System  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Upgrade. A simulation was used to facilitate the ARCS design and to completely test and verify its operation before installation at the TREAT facility.

Lipinski, W.C.; Kirsch, L.W.; Valente, A.D.

1984-01-01

174

Fission product scrubbing system for a nuclear reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fission product scrubbing system is described for a nuclear reactor including a containment building defining a containment space for accommodating reactor components, comprising (a) means defining a water tank in the containment building; (b) a dividing wall extending into the water tank for separating the water tank into a first and a second compartment; (c) means defining a collection

1986-01-01

175

Expert system for control rod programming of boiling water reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Control rod programming, one of the main tasks in reactor core management of boiling water reactors (BWRs), can be successfully accomplished by well-experienced engineers. By use of core performance evaluation codes, their knowledge plays the main role in searching through optimal control rod patterns and exposure points for adjusting notch positions and exchanging rod patterns. An expert system has been

T. Fukuzaki; K. Yoshida; Y. Kobayashi; H. Matsuura; K. Hoshi

1986-01-01

176

Reactor protection system design using micro-computers  

SciTech Connect

Reactor protection systems for nuclear power plants have traditionally been built using analog hardware. This hardware works quite well for single parameter trip functions; however, optimum protection against DNBR and KW/ft limits requires more complex trip functions than can easily be handled with analog hardware. For this reason, Babcock and Wilcox has introduced a Reactor Protection System, called the RPS-II, that utilizes a micro-computer to handle the more complex trip functions. The paper describes the design of the RPS-II and the operation of the micro-computer within the Reactor Protection System.

Fairbrother, D. B.

1976-01-01

177

An original procedure for physical simulation of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A procedure for sludge blanket reactors physical simulation is presented. To simulate the liquid phase, a solution of 1.0 g\\/l of polyvinyl alcohol provided the desired rheological behavior. Biological granules presented in UASB reactors were simulated using granules of a water absorbent acrylic polymer capable to expand up to one hundred times in volume when moistened. The biochemical reactions that

E. C. Pires; W. S. Hanisch; M. A. N. Andrade

2000-01-01

178

Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large amounts of electric power are required for some of the systems envisioned in support of SDI. Since various applications are being considered, and an overall power architecture study has not been completed, the required power levels and corresponding operating times for specific systems are not known. The characteristics of six designs for power levels of 2, 10 and 20 MWe for operating time of 1 and 7 yrs are described. The operating conditions for these arbitrary designs were chosen to minimize system specific mass. Both gas and liquid cooled reactors are considered. The designs discussed draw heavily on the Pluto project experience. Gas cooled thermal reactors coupled with Brayton cycle power conversion appear to provide reasonable multimegawatt space power systems. An advanced radiation design must be developed which can meet the mass limit assumed. The inherent high temperature capability of the reactors considered removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance.

Walter, Carl E.

179

Metrology/viewing system for next generation fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Next generation fusion reactors require accurate measuring systems to verify sub-millimeter alignment of plasma-facing components in the reactor vessel. A metrology system capable of achieving such accuracy must be compatible with the vessel environment of high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field. This environment requires that the system must be remotely deployed. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system is being integrated with a remotely operated deployment system to meet these requirements. The metrology/viewing system consists of a compact laser transceiver optics module which is linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units that are located outside of the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism is a telescopic-mast positioning system. This paper identifies the requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor metrology and viewing system, and describes a remotely operated precision ranging and surface mapping system.

Spampinato, P.T.; Barry, R.E.; Chesser, J.B.; Menon, M.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dagher, M.A. [Boeing Rocketdyne Div., Canoga Park, CA (United States)

1997-02-01

180

Thermal energy conversion systems overview for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

The author describes various thermal energy conversion systems reviewed in order to select an efficient power cycle that is compatible with fusion reactor requirements. The most suitable power cycles were selected for a toroidal confinement system with deuterium-tritium and deuterium-deuterium fuel cycles and for a tandem mirror reactor (TMR) with a D-/sup 3/He fuel cycle. The steam cycle was found to be most suitable for the reversed-field pinch and tokamak reactors, whereas a combination of a direct energy conversion system and a steam cycle was found to be most suitable for a D-/sup 3/He TMR. It is anticipated that the energy conversion systems of all fusion reactors fall under these two categories.

Dabiri, A.E. (Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (US))

1989-09-01

181

Autonomous Control and Diagnostics of Space Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes three key features of the development of an autonomous control strategy for space reactor systems. These include the development of a reactor simulation model for transient analysis, development of model-predictive control as part of the autonomous control strategy, and a fault detection and isolation module. The latter is interfaced with the control supervisor as part of a hierarchical control system. The approach has been applied to the nodal model of the SP-100 reactor with a thermo-electric generator. The results of application demonstrate the effectiveness of the control approach and its ability to reconfigure the control mode under fault conditions. (authors)

Upadhyaya, B.R.; Xu, X.; Perillo, S.R.P. [The University of Tennessee, Nuclear Engineering Department, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Na, M.G. [Chosun University, Nuclear Engineering Department, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01

182

78 FR 64027 - Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the U.S. Advanced Pressurized-Water Reactor, U.S. Evolutionary Power...Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors.'' Draft Regulatory Guide...Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors'' (proposed new RG...

2013-10-25

183

Design of a nuclear reactor system for lunar base applications  

E-print Network

DESIGN OF A NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM FOR LUNAR BASE APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RICMARD ODELL GRIFFITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1986 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineer ing DESIGN OF A NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM FOR LUNAR BASE APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RICHARD ODELL GRIFFITH Appr oved as to style and content by: Carl A. Endman (Chain of Committee) Cer aid A. Schlapper...

Griffith, Richard Odell

2012-06-07

184

Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure  

DOEpatents

A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Wade, Gentry E. (Saratoga, CA)

1990-01-01

185

Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure  

DOEpatents

A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Wade, Gentry E. (Saratoga, CA)

1989-01-01

186

Reactor systems modeling for ICF hybrids  

SciTech Connect

The computational models of ICF reactor subsystems developed by LLNL and TRW are described and a computer program was incorporated for use in the EPRI-sponsored Feasibility Assessment of Fusion-Fission Hybrids. Representative parametric variations have been examined. Many of the ICF subsystem models are very preliminary and more quantitative models need to be developed and included in the code.

Berwald, D.H.; Meier, W.R.

1980-10-01

187

Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect

Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

2007-11-30

188

System aspects of a Space Nuclear Reactor Power System  

SciTech Connect

Selected systems aspects of a 300 kW nuclear reactor power system for spacecraft have been studied. The approach included examination of two candidate missions and their associated spacecraft, and a number of special topics dealing with the power system design and operation. The missions considered were a reusable orbital transfer vehicle and a space-based radar. The special topics included: power system configuration and scaling, launch vehicle integration, operating altitude, orbital storage, start-up, thawing, control, load following, procedures in case of malfunction, restart, thermal and nuclear radiation to other portions of the spacecraft, thermal stresses between subsystems, boom and cable designs, vibration modes, altitude control, reliability, and survivability. Among the findings are that the stowed length of the power system is important to mission design and that orbital storage for months to years may be needed for missions involving orbital assembly. The power system design evolved during the study and has continued to evolve; the current design differs somewhat from that examined in this paper.

Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

1988-01-01

189

Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model.

Bloomfield, H.S.

1987-12-01

190

Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characteristics of six designs for power levels of 2, 10, and 20 MWe for operating time of 1 and 7 years are described. The operating conditions for these arbitrary designs were chosen to minimize system specific mass. The designs are based on recent work which benefits from earlier analyses of nuclear space power systems conducted at LLNL. Both gas and liquid cooled reactors had been considered. Pitts and Walter reported on the results of a detailed study of a 10 MWe lithium cooled reactor in a potassium Rankine system. Unpublished results of a computer analysis provide details of an argon cooled reactor in an argon Brayton system. The gas cooled reactor design was based on extensive development work on the 500 MWth reactor for the nuclear ramjet (Pluto) as described by Walter. The designs discussed here draw heavily on the Pluto project experience, which culminated in a successful full power ground test as reported by Reynolds. At higher power levels gas cooled reactors coupled with Brayton systems with advanced radiator designs becomes attractive.

Walter, C. E.

191

Reference Reactor Module for the Affordable Fission Surface Power System  

SciTech Connect

Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The requirements of many surface power applications allow the consideration of systems with much less development risk than most other space reactor applications, because of modest power (10s of kWe) and no driving need for minimal mass (allowing temperatures <1000 K). The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. This paper describes the reference AFSPS reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based, UO{sub 2}-fueled, liquid metal-cooled fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. One of the important 'affordability' attributes is that the concept has been designed to minimize both the technical and programmatic safety risk.

Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Amiri, Benjamin W.; Marcille, Thomas F. [Nuclear Systems Design Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States)

2008-01-21

192

Architecture of the ETR (experimental test reactor) systems code  

SciTech Connect

TETRA, a tokamak systems code capable of modeling experimental test reactors (ETRs), was developed in a joint effort by participants of the fusion community. The first version of this code was constructed to model devices similar to the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER) in configuration and design. A major feature of this code is its ability to perform optimization studies. Future work will include broadening the scope of the code, particularly in the area of materials selection, to more accurately simulate tokamak configurations such as the Next European Torus (NET) and the Fusion Engineering Reactor (FER). 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Reid, R.L.; Galambos, J.D.

1987-01-01

193

Deployment history and design considerations for space reactor power systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The history of the deployment of nuclear reactors in Earth orbits is reviewed with emphases on lessons learned and the operation and safety experiences. The former Soviet Union's "BUK" power systems, with SiGe thermoelectric conversion and fast neutron energy spectrum reactors, powered a total of 31 Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellites (RORSATs) from 1970 to 1988 in 260 km orbit. Two of the former Soviet Union's TOPAZ reactors, with in-core thermionic conversion and epithermal neutron energy spectrum, powered two Cosmos missions launched in 1987 in ˜800 km orbit. The US' SNAP-10A system, with SiGe energy conversion and a thermal neutron energy spectrum reactor, was launched in 1965 in 1300 km orbit. The three reactor systems used liquid NaK-78 coolant, stainless steel structure and highly enriched uranium fuel (90-96 wt%) and operated at a reactor exit temperature of 833-973 K. The BUK reactors used U-Mo fuel rods, TOPAZ used UO 2 fuel rods and four ZrH moderator disks, and the SNAP-10A used moderated U-ZrH fuel rods. These low power space reactor systems were designed for short missions (˜0.5 kW e and ˜1 year for SNAP-10A, <3.0 kW e and <6 months for BUK, and ˜5.5 kW e and up to 1 year for TOPAZ). The deactivated BUK reactors at the end of mission, which varied in duration from a few hours to ˜4.5 months, were boosted into ˜800 km storage orbit with a decay life of more than 600 year. The ejection of the last 16 BUK reactor fuel cores caused significant contamination of Earth orbits with NaK droplets that varied in sizes from a few microns to 5 cm. Power systems to enhance or enable future interplanetary exploration, in-situ resources utilization on Mars and the Moon, and civilian missions in 1000-3000 km orbits would generate significantly more power of 10's to 100's kW e for 5-10 years, or even longer. A number of design options to enhance the operation reliability and safety of these high power space reactor power systems are presented and discussed.

El-Genk, Mohamed S.

2009-05-01

194

Wind effects on the performance of the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the main safety features of current liquid-metal reactor (LMR) designs is the utilization of decay heat removal systems that remove heat by natural convection. The reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) is one of these passive systems. The performance of the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) of a liquid-metal reactor is a function of the pressure difference

C. P. Tzanos; A. Hunsbedt

1996-01-01

195

Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system  

DOEpatents

A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

1980-01-01

196

Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system  

DOEpatents

A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

Jacox, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Drexler, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hunt, Robert N. M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01

197

Thermal Stress Calculations for Heatpipe-Cooled Reactor Power Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A heatpipe-cooled fast reactor concept has been under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the past several years, to be used as a power source for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) or as a planetary surface power system. The reactor core consists of an array of modules that are held together by a core lateral restraint system. Each module includes a single heatpipe surrounded by 3-6 clad fuel pins. As part of this development effort, a partial array of a candidate heatpipe-cooled reactor is to be tested in the SAFE-100 experimental program at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The partial array comprises 19 3-pin modules, which are powered by resistance heaters. This paper describes the analyses that were performed in support of this test program, to assess thermal and structural performance and to specify the test conditions needed to simulate reactor operating conditions.

Kapernick, Richard J.; Guffee, Ray M.

2003-01-01

198

Reactor Lithium Heat Pipes for HP-STMCs Space Reactor Power System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Design and performance analysis of the nuclear reactor's lithium heat pipes for a 110-kWe Heat Pipes-Segmented Thermoelectric Module Converters (HP-STMCs) Space Reactor Power system (SRPS) are presented. The evaporator length of the heat pipes is the same as the active core height (0.45 m) and the C-C finned condenser is of the same length as the STMC panels (1.5 m). The C-C finned condenser section is radiatively coupled to the collector shoes of the STMCs placed on both sides. The lengths of the adiabatic section, the values of the power throughput and the evaporator wall temperature depend on the radial location of the heat pipe in the reactor core and the number and dimensions of the potassium heat pipes in the heat rejection radiator. The reactor heat pipes have a total length that varies from 7.57 to 7.73 m, and a 0.2 mm thick Mo-14%Re wick with an average pore radius of 12 ?m. The wick is separated from the Mo-14%Re wall by a 0.5 mm annulus filled with liquid lithium, to raise the prevailing capillary limit. The nominal evaporator (or reactor) temperature varies from 1513 to 1591 K and the thermal power of the reactor is 1.6 MW, which averages 12.7 kW for each of the 126 reactor heat pipes. The power throughput per heat pipe increase to a nominal 15.24 kW at the location of the peak power in the core and to 20.31 kW when an adjacent heat pipe fails. The prevailing capillary limit of the reactor heat pipes is 28.3 kW, providing a design margin >= 28%.

Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

2004-02-01

199

Modeling and simulation of CANDU reactor and its regulating system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analytical computer codes are indispensable tools in design, optimization, and control of nuclear power plants. Numerous codes have been developed to perform different types of analyses related to the nuclear power plants. A large number of these codes are designed to perform safety analyses. In the context of safety analyses, the control system is often neglected. Although there are good reasons for such a decision, that does not mean that the study of control systems in the nuclear power plants should be neglected altogether. In this thesis, a proof of concept code is developed as a tool that can be used in the design. optimization. and operation stages of the control system. The main objective in the design of this computer code is providing a tool that is easy to use by its target audience and is capable of producing high fidelity results that can be trusted to design the control system and optimize its performance. Since the overall plant control system covers a very wide range of processes, in this thesis the focus has been on one particular module of the the overall plant control system, namely, the reactor regulating system. The center of the reactor regulating system is the CANDU reactor. A nodal model for the reactor is used to represent the spatial neutronic kinetics of the core. The nodal model produces better results compared to the point kinetics model which is often used in the design and analysis of control system for nuclear reactors. The model can capture the spatial effects to some extent. although it is not as detailed as the finite difference methods. The criteria for choosing a nodal model of the core are: (1) the model should provide more detail than point kinetics and capture spatial effects, (2) it should not be too complex or overly detailed to slow down the simulation and provide details that are extraneous or unnecessary for a control engineer. Other than the reactor itself, there are auxiliary models that describe dynamics of different phenomena related to the transfer of the energy from the core. The main function of the reactor regulating system is to control the power of the reactor. This is achieved by using a set of detectors. reactivity devices. and digital control algorithms. Three main reactivity devices that are activated during short-term or intermediate-term transients are modeled in this thesis. The main elements of the digital control system are implemented in accordance to the program specifications for the actual control system in CANDU reactors. The simulation results are validated against requirements of the reactor regulating system. actual plant data. and pre-validated data from other computer codes. The validation process shows that the simulation results can be trusted in making engineering decisions regarding the reactor regulating system and prediction of the system performance in response to upset conditions or disturbances. KEYWORDS: CANDU reactors. reactor regulating system. nodal model. spatial kinetics. reactivity devices. simulation.

Javidnia, Hooman

200

Low temperature treatment of domestic sewage in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket and anaerobic hybrid reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The treatment of sewage at a temperature of 13°C was investigated in three reactors (each 3.84 litre) a UASB and two anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactors with small sludge granules with an average diameter of 0.73mm. The media used in the AH reactors were vertical polyurethane foam sheets. The reactors were operated at a HRT of 8h. The use of small

Tarek A. Elmitwalli; Marcel H. Zandvoort; Grietje Zeeman; Harry Bruning; Gatze Lettinga

1999-01-01

201

Some studies on UASB bioreactors for the stabilization of low strength industrial effluents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The suitability of two stage biomethanation process using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactors was studied for the treatment of low strength industrial effluents like rice mill wastewater. Maximum VFA yield was 0.75 mg (as acetic acid) per mg of COD consumed at a flow rate of 25 ml\\/min. Hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1 hr was found suitable for

G. Rajesh; M. Bandyopadhyay; D. Das

1999-01-01

202

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01

203

Pressurized reactor system and a method of operating the same  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus are provided for operating a pressurized reactor system in order to precisely control the temperature within a pressure vessel in order to minimize condensation of corrosive materials from gases on the surfaces of the pressure vessel or contained circulating fluidized bed reactor, and to prevent the temperature of the components from reaching a detrimentally high level, while at the same time allowing quick heating of the pressure vessel interior volume during start-up. Superatmospheric pressure gas is introduced from the first conduit into the fluidized bed reactor and heat derived reactions such as combustion and gassification are maintained in the reactor. Gas is exhausted from the reactor and pressure vessel through a second conduit. Gas is circulated from one part of the inside volume to another to control the temperature of the inside volume, such as by passing the gas through an exterior conduit which has a heat exchanger, control valve, blower and compressor associated therewith, or by causing natural convection flow of circulating gas within one or more generally vertically extending gas passages entirely within the pressure vessel (and containing heat exchangers, flow rate control valves, or the like therein). Preferably, inert gas is provided as a circulating gas, and the inert gas may also be used in emergency shut-down situations. In emergency shut-down reaction gas being supplied to the reactor is cut off, while inert gas from the interior gas volume of the pressure vessel is introduced into the reactor.

Isaksson, Juhani M. (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01

204

Software reliability and safety in nuclear reactor protection systems  

SciTech Connect

Planning the development, use and regulation of computer systems in nuclear reactor protection systems in such a way as to enhance reliability and safety is a complex issue. This report is one of a series of reports from the Computer Safety and Reliability Group, Lawrence Livermore that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor National Laboratory, that investigates different aspects of computer software in reactor protection systems. There are two central themes in the report, First, software considerations cannot be fully understood in isolation from computer hardware and application considerations. Second, the process of engineering reliability and safety into a computer system requires activities to be carried out throughout the software life cycle. The report discusses the many activities that can be carried out during the software life cycle to improve the safety and reliability of the resulting product. The viewpoint is primarily that of the assessor, or auditor.

Lawrence, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-11-01

205

Experimental and Computational Study of a Scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System  

E-print Network

The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) is one of the next generation nuclear reactors designed to achieve high temperatures to support industrial applications and power generation. The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is a passive...

Vaghetto, Rodolfo

2013-11-25

206

General Electric Reactor Protection System Unavailability, 1984--1995  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was performed of the safety-related performance of the reactor protection system (RPS) at U. S. General Electric commercial reactors during the period 1984 through 1995. RPS operational data were collected from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System and Licensee Event Reports. A risk-based analysis was performed on the data to estimate the observed unavailability of the RPS, based on a fault tree model of the system. Results were compared with existing unavailability estimates from Individual Plant Examinations and other reports.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Calley, Michael Brennan; Gentillon, Cynthia Ann; Wierman, Thomas Edward; Hamzehee, H.; Rasmuson, D.

1999-08-01

207

General Electric Reactor Protection System Unavailability, 1984-1995  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was performed of the safety-related performance of the reactor protection system (RPS) at U.S. General Electric commercial reactors during the period 1984 through 1995. RPS operational data were collected from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System and Licensee Event Reports. A risk-based analysis was performed on the data to estimate the observed unavailability of the RPS, based on a fault tree model of the system. Results were compared with existing unavailability estimates from Individual Plant Examinations and other reports.

C. D. Gentillon; D. Rasmuson (USNRC); H. Hamzehee; M. B. Calley; S. A. Eide; T. Wierman (INEEL)

1999-08-01

208

Westinghouse Reactor Protection System Unavailability, 1984--1995  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was performed of the safety-related performance of the reactor protection system (RPS) at U. S. Westinghouse commercial reactors during the period 1984 through 1995. RPS operational data were collected from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System and Licensee Event Reports. A risk-based analysis was performed on the data to estimate the observed unavailability of the RPS, based on a fault tree model of the system. Results were compared with existing unavailability estimates from Individual Plant Examinations and other reports.

Eide, Steven Arvid; Calley, Michael Brennan; Gentillon, Cynthia Ann; Wierman, Thomas Edward; Rasmuson, D.; Marksberry, D.

1999-08-01

209

Westinghouse Reactor Protection System Unavailability, 1984-1995  

SciTech Connect

An analysis was performed of the safety-related performance of the reactor protection system (RPS) at U.S. Westinghouse commercial reactors during the period 1984 through 1995. RPS operational data were collected from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System and Licensee Event Reports. A risk-based analysis was performed on the data to estimate the observed unavailability of the RPS, based on a fault tree model of the system. Results were compared with existing unavailability estimates from Individual Plant Examinations and other reports.

C. D. Gentillon; D. Marksberry (USNRC); D. Rasmuson; M. B. Calley; S. A. Eide; T. Wierman (INEEL)

1999-08-01

210

Reactor technology assessment and selection utilizing systems engineering approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first Nuclear power plant (NPP) deployment in a country is a complex process that needs to consider technical, economic and financial aspects along with other aspects like public acceptance. Increased interest in the deployment of new NPPs, both among newcomer countries and those with expanding programs, necessitates the selection of reactor technology among commercially available technologies. This paper reviews the Systems Decision Process (SDP) of Systems Engineering and applies it in selecting the most appropriate reactor technology for the deployment in Malaysia. The integrated qualitative and quantitative analyses employed in the SDP are explored to perform reactor technology assessment and to select the most feasible technology whose design has also to comply with the IAEA standard requirements and other relevant requirements that have been established in this study. A quick Malaysian case study result suggests that the country reside with PWR (pressurized water reactor) technologies with more detailed study to be performed in the future for the selection of the most appropriate reactor technology for Malaysia. The demonstrated technology assessment also proposes an alternative method to systematically and quantitatively select the most appropriate reactor technology.

Zolkaffly, Muhammed Zulfakar; Han, Ki-In

2014-02-01

211

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR SYSTEMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A homogeneous reactor system is designed with means for removing fission ; product gases from the system. The means comprises a pressurizer vessel with a ; gas space for stripping the fission product gases from the fuel solution. Oxygen ; is used as the pressurizing gas. A condenser is also arranged in the gas space ; of the pressurizer vessel

Brunings

1962-01-01

212

An Instrumentation System for a Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A unique data acquisition system has been developed to cope with the problems of testing Kiwi Reactors in the Rover Program. This uniqueness is due to the large number of parameters measured, the extremely high reliability and accuracy requirements, extreme requirements for system flexibility, and the wide ranges of parameters. The requirement for up to 1,500 simultaneous measurements with one-percent

J. H. Jurmain

1962-01-01

213

STORS: BATTELLE-NORTHWEST'S SLUDGE TO OIL REACTOR SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

A continuous primary sewage sludge thermochemical conversion system was designed, built, and operated for over 100 hr during 1984 at Battelle-Northwest. This was designated as the STORS (Sludge-to-Oil-Reactor System), because the major product was a burnable oil. Starting with 20...

214

Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic  

DOEpatents

A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically ``identical`` values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic. 16 figs.

Gaubatz, D.C.

1996-12-17

215

Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic  

DOEpatents

A reactor protection system having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically "identical" values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic.

Gaubatz, Donald C. (Cupertino, CA)

1996-01-01

216

Behaviour of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting chemicals in simplified sewage treatment systems.  

PubMed

This work assessed the behaviour of nine pharmaceuticals and/or endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in demo-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors (UASB reactors) coupled to distinct simplified post-treatment units (submerged bed, polishing ponds, and trickling filters) fed on raw sewage taken from a municipality in Brazil. The dissolved concentration of the studied micropollutants in the raw and treated sewage was obtained using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by analysis in a liquid chromatography system coupled to a hybrid high resolution mass spectrometer consisting of an ion-trap and time of flight (LC-MS-IT-TOF). The UASB reactors demonstrated that they were not appropriate for efficiently removing the assessed compounds from the sewage. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was an important parameter for the removal of the hydrophilic and less biodegradable compounds, such as trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole. The post-treatment units substantially increased the removal of most target micropollutants present in the anaerobic effluents, with a greater removal of micropollutants in simplified systems that require a large construction area, such as the submerged bed and polishing ponds, probably because of the higher HRT employed. Alternatively, compact post-treatment systems, such as trickling filters, tended to be less effective at removing most of the micropollutants studied, and the type of packing proved to be crucial for determining the fate of such compounds using trickling filters. PMID:23850766

Brandt, Emanuel M F; de Queiroz, Fernanda B; Afonso, Robson J C F; Aquino, Sérgio F; Chernicharo, Carlos A L

2013-10-15

217

Analysis of reactor trips originating in balance of plant systems  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an analysis of balance-of-plant (BOP) related reactor trips at commercial US nuclear power plants of a 5-year period, from January 1, 1984, through December 31, 1988. The study was performed for the Plant Systems Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives of the study were: to improve the level of understanding of BOP-related challenges to safety systems by identifying and categorizing such events; to prepare a computerized data base of BOP-related reactor trip events and use the data base to identify trends and patterns in the population of these events; to investigate the risk implications of BOP events that challenge safety systems; and to provide recommendations on how to address BOP-related concerns in regulatory context. 18 refs., 2 figs., 27 tabs.

Stetson, F.T.; Gallagher, D.W.; Le, P.T.; Ebert, M.W. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1990-09-01

218

TREAT (Transient Reactor Test Facility) reactor control rod scram system simulations and testing  

SciTech Connect

Air cylinders moving heavy components (100 to 300 lbs) at high speeds (above 300 in/sec) present a formidable end-cushion-shock problem. With no speed control, the moving components can reach over 600 in/sec if the air cylinder has a 5 ft stroke. This paper presents an overview of a successful upgrade modification to an existing reactor control rod drive design using a computer model to simulate the modified system performance for system design analysis. This design uses a high speed air cylinder to rapidly insert control rods (278 lb moved 5 ft in less than 300 msec) to scram an air-cooled test reactor. Included is information about the computer models developed to simulate high-speed air cylinder operation and a unique new speed control and end cushion design. A patent application is pending with the US Patent Trade Mark Office for this system (DOE case number S-68,622). The evolution of the design, from computer simulations thru operational testing in a test stand (simulating in-reactor operating conditions) to installation and use in the reactor, is also described. 6 figs.

Solbrig, C.W.; Stevens, W.W.

1990-01-01

219

Design, analysis and optimization of the power conversion system for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System  

E-print Network

The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor system (MPBR) requires a gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) as the power conversion system for it to achieve economic competitiveness as a GenIV nuclear system. The availability of controllable ...

Wang, Chunyun, 1968-

2003-01-01

220

Dynamic analysis of gas-core reactor system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A heat transfer analysis was incorporated into a previously developed model CODYN to obtain a model of open-cycle gaseous core reactor dynamics which can predict the heat flux at the cavity wall. The resulting model was used to study the sensitivity of the model to the value of the reactivity coefficients and to determine the system response for twenty specified perturbations. In addition, the model was used to study the effectiveness of several control systems in controlling the reactor. It was concluded that control drums located in the moderator region capable of inserting reactivity quickly provided the best control.

Turner, K. H., Jr.

1973-01-01

221

System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2012  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

T. E. Wierman

2013-10-01

222

Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983 - 1992  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987-88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

Buden, D.

1993-08-01

223

Incipient Transient Detection in Reactor Systems: Experimental and Theoretical Investigation  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this research was to develop a method for detecting reactor system transients at the earliest possible time through a comprehensive experimental, testing and benchmarking program. This approach holds strong promise for developing new diagnostic technologies that are non-intrusive, generic and highly portable across different systems. It will help in the design of new generation nuclear power reactors, which utilize passive safety systems with a reliable and non-intrusive multiphase flow diagnostic system to monitor the function of the passive safety systems. The main objective of this research was to develop an improved fuzzy logic based detection method based on a comprehensive experimental testing program to detect reactor transients at the earliest possible time, practically at their birth moment. A fuzzy logic and neural network based transient identification methodology and implemented in a computer code called PROTREN was considered in this research and was compared with SPRT (Sequentially Probability Ratio Testing) decision and Bayesian inference. The project involved experiment, theoretical modeling and a thermal-hydraulic code assessment. It involved graduate and undergraduate students participation providing them with exposure and training in advanced reactor concepts and safety systems. In this final report, main tasks performed during the project period are summarized and the selected results are presented. Detailed descriptions for the tasks and the results are presented in previous yearly reports (Revankar et al 2003 and Revankar et al 2004).

Lefteri H. Tsoukalas; S.T. Revankar; X Wang; R. Sattuluri

2005-09-27

224

Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the first in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. Also described in this series are the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design driving motivators dictated the final configuration of the Westinghouse SMR to varying degrees, depending on the specific features under consideration. These design drivers include safety, economics, AP1000{sup R} reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR NSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and is composed of 89 modified Westinghouse 17x17 Robust Fuel Assemblies (RFA). These modified fuel assemblies have an active core length of only 2.4 m (8 ft) long, and the entirety of the core is encompassed by a radial reflector. The Westinghouse SMR core operates on a 24 month fuel cycle. The reactor vessel is approximately 24.4 m (80 ft) long and 3.7 m (12 ft) in diameter in order to facilitate standard rail shipping to the site. The reactor vessel houses hot and cold leg channels to facilitate coolant flow, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), instrumentation and cabling, an intermediate flange to separate flow and instrumentation and facilitate simpler refueling, a pressurizer, a straight tube, recirculating steam generator, and eight reactor coolant pumps (RCP). The containment vessel is 27.1 m (89 ft) long and 9.8 m (32 ft) in diameter, and is designed to withstand pressures up to 1.7 MPa (250 psi). It is completely submerged in a pool of water serving as a heat sink and radiation shield. Housed within the containment are four combined core makeup tanks (CMT)/passive residual heat removal (PRHR) heat exchangers, two in-containment pools (ICP), two ICP tanks and four valves which function as the automatic depressurization system (ADS). The PRHR heat exchangers are thermally connected to two different ultimate heat sink (UHS) tanks which provide transient cooling capabilities. (authors)

Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01

225

Catalytic reactor system for the tritium emissions reduction facility  

SciTech Connect

Two platinum catalyst reactor subsystems have been built for the new Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF) at Mound. The two parallel subsystems each consist of three major components: a passive conservation heat exchanger, an electric preheater, and a catalytic reactor. All subsystem components and interconnecting piping are fabricated from Inconel 625 for high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. System connections are welded for longevity and reliability. Active elements are backed up by installed spares, and the reactor catalyst is replaceable. Since double containment of tritium processing systems is an important safety concept, the entire subsystem is enclosed in a stainless steel glovebox. Careful planning during the design phase created thermal isolation from the glovebox, and the ability to translate the entire subsystem from the glovebox for major maintenance. 4 refs.

Wieneke, R.E.

1991-12-31

226

Catalytic reactor system for the tritium emissions reduction facility  

SciTech Connect

Two platinum catalyst reactor subsystems have been built for the new Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF) at Mound. The two parallel subsystems each consist of three major components: a passive conservation heat exchanger, an electric preheater, and a catalytic reactor. All subsystem components and interconnecting piping are fabricated from Inconel 625 for high temperature strength and corrosion resistance. System connections are welded for longevity and reliability. Active elements are backed up by installed spares, and the reactor catalyst is replaceable. Since double containment of tritium processing systems is an important safety concept, the entire subsystem is enclosed in a stainless steel glovebox. Careful planning during the design phase created thermal isolation from the glovebox, and the ability to translate the entire subsystem from the glovebox for major maintenance. 4 refs.

Wieneke, R.E.

1991-01-01

227

Rotating solid radiative coolant system for space nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

The RING power system described in this paper is proposed as a primary or emergency heat rejection system for advanced space reactor power applications. The system employs a set of four (4) counter-rotating, 90 degree offset, coolant-carrying rings. The rings (segmented, corrugated, finned, thin-walled pipes, filled with liquid lithium) pass through a cavity heat exchanger and reradiate the absorbed heat to the space environment. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Apley, W.J.; Babb, A.L.

1988-05-01

228

Deployment of remote dismantlement systems at the CP-5 reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Chicago Pile 5 (CP-5) Reactor Facility is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Illinois site. CP-5 was the principal nuclear reactor used to produce neutrons for scientific research at Argonne from 1954 to 1979. The CP-5 reactor was a heavy-water moderated, enriched uranium-fueled reactor with a graphite reflector. The CP-5 D&D project includes the disassembly and removal of all radioactive components, equipment, and structures associated with the CP-5 facility. The Department of Energy`s Robotics Technology Development Program along with the Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown Office, have provided teleoperated, remote systems for use in the dismantlement of the CP-5 reactor structure for tasks requiring remote dismantlement. These systems include the dual-arm work platform, the Rosie mobile D&D vehicle, the swing-reduced crane control system, and a remotely-operated crane control system. The dual-arm work platform is a robotic dismantlement system that includes a pair of Schilling Titan III hydraulic manipulators mounted on a special platform, a hydraulic power unit and an operator console. The Rosie mobile D&D work system developed by RedZone Robotics, Inc. is an electro-hydraulic omni-directional locomotor platform with a heavy manipulator mounted on its deck. The Rosie vehicle moves about the floor around the CP-5 reactor block and is operated from a console in the control room. The swing-reduced crane control system has been installed on the CP-5 polar crane, and allows a load suspended from the crane hook to be moved while reducing the induced swing in the load. A remote control system and a rotating crane hook have also been added to the CP-5 polar crane. This paper discusses the status of these remote systems at CP-5 and the facility changes made to allow for their use in the dismantlement of the reactor structure internals. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Black, D.B.; Ditch, R.W.; Henley, D.R.; Seifert, L.S.

1997-06-01

229

Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A monitoring system for detecting changes in the liquid levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting changes in the density of the liquid in these regions. A plurality of gamma radiation detectors are used, arranged

DeVolpi

1987-01-01

230

Automating large-scale reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper conveys a philosophy for developing automated large-scale control systems that behave in an integrated, intelligent, flexible manner. Methods for operating large-scale systems under varying degrees of equipment degradation are discussed, and a design approach that separates the effort into phases is suggested. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Kisner, R.A.

1985-01-01

231

Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

1983-03-29

232

Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems  

DOEpatents

A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

Repasky, John Michael

2012-10-16

233

A gas-cooled reactor surface power system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

1999-01-01

234

A gas-cooled reactor surface power system  

SciTech Connect

A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-1146, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

1999-01-22

235

Anaerobic Treatment of Yeast Effluent in an Expanded Granular Sludge Bed Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of an anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor, to treat high strength yeast wastewater. The EGSB reactor was seeded with granular sludge from the UASB reactor of a full-scale brewery factory. Experiment was done under operational condition of a total superficial up flow velocity(Vup) of 6m·h-1, Temperature of 30?,

Yan Zhi-yong; Wang Jing-song; Xie Lei

2010-01-01

236

Ultra-reliable computer systems: an integrated approach for application in reactor safety systems  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in operation and maintenance of nuclear reactors can be realized with the application of computers in the reactor control systems. In the context of this paper a reactor control system encompasses the control aspects of the Reactor Safety System (RSS). Equipment qualification for application in reactor safety systems requires a rigorous demonstration of reliability. For the purpose of this paper, the reliability demonstration will be divided into two categories. These categories are demonstrations of compliance with respect to (a) environmental; and (b) functional design constrains. This paper presents an approach for the determination of computer-based RSS respective to functional design constraints only. It is herein postulated that the design for compliance with environmental design constraints is a reasonably definitive problem and within the realm of available technology. The demonstration of compliance with design constraints respective to functionality, as described herein, is an extension of available technology and requires development.

Chisholm, G.H.

1985-01-01

237

Effect of reactor configuration on biogas production from wheat straw hydrolysate.  

PubMed

The potential of wheat straw hydrolysate for biogas production was investigated in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. The hydrolysate originated as a side stream from a pilot plant pretreating wheat straw hydrothermally (195 degrees C for 10-12 min) for producing 2nd generation bioethanol [Kaparaju, P., Serrano, M., Thomsen, A.B., Kongjan, P., Angelidaki, I., 2009. Bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas production from wheat straw in a biorefinery concept. Bioresource Technology 100 (9), 2562-2568]. Results from batch assays showed that hydrolysate had a methane potential of 384 ml/g-volatile solids (VS)(added). Process performance in CTSR and UASB reactors was investigated by varying hydrolysate concentration and/or organic loading rate (OLR). In CSTR, methane yields increased with increase in hydrolysate concentration and maximum yield of 297 ml/g-COD was obtained at an OLR of 1.9 g-COD/l d and 100% (v/v) hydrolysate. On the other hand, process performance and methane yields in UASB were affected by OLR and/or substrate concentration. Maximum methane yields of 267 ml/g-COD (COD removal of 72%) was obtained in UASB reactor when operated at an OLR of 2.8 g-COD/l d but with only 10% (v/v) hydrolysate. However, co-digestion of hydrolysate with pig manure (1:3 v/v ratio) improved the process performance and resulted in methane yield of 219 ml/g-COD (COD removal of 72%). Thus, anaerobic digestion of hydrolysate for biogas production was feasible in both CSTR and UASB reactor types. However, biogas process was affected by the reactor type and operating conditions. PMID:19647428

Kaparaju, Prasad; Serrano, María; Angelidaki, Irini

2009-12-01

238

A simple fuzzy simulation model for nuclear reactor system dynamics  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a simple image model, the package flow model, for fuzzy simulation of nuclear reactor system dynamics. By using this model, fuzzy inference rules and their membership functions are easily obtained. The system dynamics can be approximately simulated by fuzzy inference. The method and some examples are described. The advantages of this model are intuitive understandability, flexible modification, and simplicity. Furthermore, high-speed calculation and high reliability can be realized by using fuzzy computing hardware in the near future.

Matsuoka, H. (Science and Technology Agency Fukui Atomic Energy Coordinator Office, Matsu-cho 7-28 Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken 914 (JP))

1991-05-01

239

Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps  

DOEpatents

An expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Humenik, Keith E. (Columbia, MD)

1993-01-01

240

Emergency core cooling system for a fast reactor. [LMFBR  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main heat transport system for a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor is constructed with elevated piping and guard vessels or pipes around all components of the system below the elevation of the elevated piping so the head developed by the pumps at emergency motor speed will be unsufficient to lift the liquid-metal-coolant over the top of the guard tanks or pipes

H. G. Johnson; R. N. Madsen

1976-01-01

241

The impact of passive safety systems on desirability of advanced light water reactors  

E-print Network

This work investigates whether the advanced light water reactor designs with passive safety systems are more desirable than advanced reactor designs with active safety systems from the point of view of uncertainty in the ...

Eul, Ryan C

2006-01-01

242

Evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic system for carbon and nitrogen removal in slaughterhouse wastewater.  

PubMed

In this work the performance of an anaerobic UASB reactor coupled with an activated sludge reactor for carbon and nitrogen removal in slaughterhouse wastewater is investigated. Periods with and without recirculation of aerobic effluent over 165 days are analysed. Working with a recirculation ratio of 2, removal efficiencies up to 90% and 65% are obtained for DQO and total nitrogen (TN), respectively. Higher recirculation ratios caused severe washout of active biomass in both reactors due to the high hydraulic loading rates applied. Denitrification in the UASB reactor was complete, with no nitrite accumulation and mainly to nitrogen gas. Significant decreases in COD removal efficiencies in the UASB reactor were observed at recirculation ratio of 2. Sudden decreases in total nitrogen efficiencies were related to inhibition process of nitrifying microorganisms, especially at high recirculation ratios. PMID:11575093

Núñez, L A; Martínez, B

2001-01-01

243

Expert system for control rod programming of boiling water reactors  

SciTech Connect

Control rod programming, one of the main tasks in reactor core management of boiling water reactors (BWRs), can be successfully accomplished by well-experienced engineers. By use of core performance evaluation codes, their knowledge plays the main role in searching through optimal control rod patterns and exposure points for adjusting notch positions and exchanging rod patterns. An expert system has been developed, based on a method of knowledge engineering, to lighten the engineer's load in control rod programming. This system utilizes an inference engine suited for planning/designing problems, and stores the knowledge of well-experienced engineers in its knowledge base. In this report, the inference engine, developed considering the characteristics of the control rod programming, is introduced. Then the constitution and function of the expert system are discussed.

Fukuzaki, T.; Yoshida, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Matsuura, H.; Hoshi, K.

1986-01-01

244

Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

Buden, D.

1993-08-11

245

78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC...system components for light water nuclear power reactors. ADDRESSES:...

2013-10-25

246

77 FR 15812 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light- Water Reactors.'' DG-1265 is proposed...condensate and feedwater systems in all types of light water reactor facilities licensed...

2012-03-16

247

Completely modular Thermionic Reactor Ion Propulsion System (TRIPS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nuclear reactor powered ion propulsion system described is an advanced completely modularized system which lends itself to development of prototype and/or flight type components without the need for complete system tests until late in the development program. This modularity is achieved in all of the subsystems and components of the electric propulsion system including (1) the thermionic fuel elements, (2) the heat rejection subsystem (heat pipes), (3) the power conditioning modules, and (4) the ion thrusters. Both flashlight and external fuel type in-core thermionic reactors are considered as the power source. The thermionic fuel elements would be useful over a range of reactor power levels. Electrical heated acceptance testing in their flight configuration is possible for the external fuel case. Nuclear heated testing by sampling methods could be used for acceptance testing of flashlight fuel elements. The use of heat pipes for cooling the collectors and as a means of heat transport to the radiator allows early prototype or flight configuration testing of a small module of the heat rejection subsystem as opposed to full scale liquid metal pumps and radiators in a large vacuum chamber. The power conditioner (p/c) is arranged in modules with passive cooling.

Peelgren, M. L.; Kikin, G. M.; Sawyer, C. D.

1972-01-01

248

Monitoring nuclear reactor systems using neural networks and fuzzy logic  

SciTech Connect

A new approach is presented that demonstrates the potential of trained artificial neural networks (ANNs) as generators of membership functions for the purpose of monitoring nuclear reactor systems. ANN`s provide a complex-to-simple mapping of reactor parameters in a process analogous to that of measurement. Through such ``virtual measurements`` the value of parameters with operational significance, e.g., control-valve-disk-position, valve-line-up or performance can be determined. In the methodology presented the output of a virtual measuring device is a set of membership functions which independently represent different states of the system. Utilizing a fuzzy logic representation offers the advantage of describing the state of the system in a condensed form, developed through linguistic descriptions and convenient for application in monitoring, diagnostics and generally control algorithms. The developed methodology is applied to the problem of measuring the disk position of the secondary flow control valve of an experimental reactor using data obtained during a start-up. The enhanced noise tolerance of the methodology is clearly demonstrated as well as a method for selecting the actual output. The results suggest that it is possible to construct virtual measuring devices through artificial neural networks mapping dynamic time series to a set of membership functions and thus enhance the capability of monitoring systems. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Ikonomopoulos, A.; Tsoukalas, L.H.; Uhrig, R.E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Mullens, J.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1991-12-01

249

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. It consists of the combination of a reactor vessel enclosing a heat generating core and assembly containing fissionable fuel surrounded by a spaced apart encircling fuel core assembly support cylinder provided with an upper and a lower inward projecting flange for securing the fuel core assembly within the reactor vessel, a primary heat exchanger cylinder positioned concentrically intermediate the fuel core assembly support cylinder and the fuel core assembly in spaced apart relation with each the support cylinder and the fuel core assembly, the reactor vessel being substantially filled with liquid metal coolant whereby the fuel core assembly is submerged therein, the fuel core assembly having a multiplicity of vertical coolant passages extending through the axial length thereof providing for a primary heat exchanging convection circuit for the liquid metal coolant passing upward through the heat producing fuel core to an area above the fuel core assembly and returning around down through a space between the fuel core assembly and the primary heat exchanger cylinder for recycling around and up through the fuel core assembly.

Hunsbedt, A.; Fanning, A.W.

1991-06-04

250

Post impact behavior of mobile reactor core containment systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The reactor core containment vessel temperatures after impact, and the design variables that affect the post impact survival of the system are analyzed. The heat transfer analysis includes conduction, radiation, and convection in addition to the core material heats of fusion and vaporization under partially burial conditions. Also, included is the fact that fission products vaporize and transport radially outward and condense outward and condense on cooler surfaces, resulting in a moving heat source. A computer program entitled Executive Subroutines for Afterheat Temperature Analysis (ESATA) was written to consider this complex heat transfer analysis. Seven cases were calculated of a reactor power system capable of delivering up to 300 MW of thermal power to a nuclear airplane.

Puthoff, R. L.; Parker, W. G.; Vanbibber, L. E.

1972-01-01

251

Real-time, multitasking control system for reactor inspection robots  

SciTech Connect

The Equipment Engineering Division of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina has developed a remote system to perform ultrasonic (UT) and eddy current (ET) wall weld inspections inside the nuclear reactors at the site. The basic components of the inspection system include an inspection robot and control hardware, a supervisory computer, and ultrasonic and eddy current data collection and analysis computers. The ultrasonic and eddy current systems are responsible for driving the transducers, and digitizing, displaying, and storing the information. 7 figs.

Byrne, T.J.; Jenkins, J.B.; Lewis, W.I.; Park, L.R.; Reeves, G.E.

1988-01-01

252

Designing visual displays and system models for safe reactor operations  

SciTech Connect

The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving the design of visual displays and the user`s prospective model of a system. The studies involve a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming and its use in expanding design choices from the operator`s perspective image. The contents of this paper focuses on the studies and how they are applicable to the safety of operating reactors.

Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

1995-12-31

253

Safety characteristics of a suspended-pellet fission reactor system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new fission reactor system with passive safety characteristics to eliminate the occurrence of loss-of-coolant accidents, reduce reactivity excursion effects, and which also provides for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle through on-site spent fuel management is examined. The concept uses multi-coated fuel pellets which are suspended by an upward moving coolant in vertical columns of the reactor core and electro-refining elemental separation to remove selected fission products prior to actinide recycling. The possibility of fuel melt following a loss-of-coolant is avoided as a decrease in coolant flow results in the removal of fuel from the core through the action of gravity alone. Average fluid velocities in the columns which are necessary to suspend the pellets are calculated and found to be consistent with the necessary heat extraction to yield ˜1--10 Wth per column. The total output power of such suspended pellet-type reactors is compared to the power necessary to provide the suspending fluid flow, yielding favourable ratios of ˜102--103. The reduction of reactivity excursion tendencies is envisaged through an ablative layer of material in the pellets which sublimates at temperatures above normal operating conditions. In the event of a power or temperature increase the particles fragment and thereby change their hydrodynamic drag characteristics, thus leading to fuel removal from the core by elutriation. Comparison of nuclear-to-thermal response times and elutriation rates for limiting power transients indicate that the present design assists in reactivity excursion mitigation. Closure of the nuclear fuel cycle is attained through a spent fuel management strategy which requires only on-site storage of a fraction of the fission products produced during reactor operation. Electro-refining separation of selected fission products combined with complete actinide recycling yields no isolation of plutonium or highly enriched uranium during the procedure. The out-of-core waste stream has a significantly reduced radioactivity, volume and lifetime compared to the once-through waste management strategy and thus provides an alternative to long-term geological disposal of fission reactor wastes. The Pellet Suspension Reactor concept possesses some unique operating characteristics and, additionally, is shown to be similar to conventional fission reactors in terms of common performance features.

Kingdon, David Ross

254

Enabling autonomous control for space reactor power systems  

SciTech Connect

The application of nuclear reactors for space power and/or propulsion presents some unique challenges regarding the operations and control of the power system. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of a space reactor power system (SRPS) employed for deep space missions must be able to accommodate unattended operations due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion while adapting to evolving or degraded conditions with no opportunity for repair or refurbishment. Thus, a SRPS control system must provide for operational autonomy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted an investigation of the state of the technology for autonomous control to determine the experience base in the nuclear power application domain, both for space and terrestrial use. It was found that control systems with varying levels of autonomy have been employed in robotic, transportation, spacecraft, and manufacturing applications. However, autonomous control has not been implemented for an operating terrestrial nuclear power plant nor has there been any experience beyond automating simple control loops for space reactors. Current automated control technologies for nuclear power plants are reasonably mature, and basic control for a SRPS is clearly feasible under optimum circumstances. However, autonomous control is primarily intended to account for the non optimum circumstances when degradation, failure, and other off-normal events challenge the performance of the reactor and near-term human intervention is not possible. Thus, the development and demonstration of autonomous control capabilities for the specific domain of space nuclear power operations is needed. This paper will discuss the findings of the ORNL study and provide a description of the concept of autonomy, its key characteristics, and a prospective functional architecture that can support SRPS control for an extended deep space mission. The desirable characteristics of autonomous control include intelligence, robustness, optimization, flexibility, and adaptability. The degree of autonomy that is necessary for a given mission will depend on resource constraints, performance goals, operational complexity, technological capabilities, and mission risk considerations. The prospective architectural framework employs a hierarchical structure to integrate needed control, diagnostic, and decision functions and thus enable autonomy. (authors)

Wood, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2006-07-01

255

Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission.

Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory. P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6010 (United States)

2004-02-04

256

Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission.

Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

2004-02-01

257

Fast Shutdown System tests in the Georgia Tech Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Shutdown System (FSS) is a new safety system design concept being considered for in installation in the Savannah River (SRS) production reactors. This system is expected to mitigate the consequences of a Design Basis Loss of Coolant Accident, and therefore allow higher operational power levels. A test of this system in the Georgia Tech Research Reactor is proposed to demonstrate the efficacy of this concept. Three tests will be conducted at full power (5MW) and one at low power (100kw). Two full power tests will be conducted with the FSS rod backfilled with one (1) atmosphere of He-4, and one with the rod evacuated. The low power conducted with the FSS rod evacuated. Neutron flux and pressure data will be collected with an independent data acquisition system (DAS). Safety issues associated with the performance of the Fast Shutdown System experiments are addressed in this report. The credible accident scenarios were analyzed using worst case scenarios to demonstrate that no significant nuclear or personnel safety hazards would result from the performance of the proposed experiments.

Wallace, J.M.

1990-03-16

258

Ongoing Development of a Series Bosch Reactor System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future manned missions to deep space or planetary surfaces will undoubtedly require highly robust, efficient, and regenerable life support systems that require minimal consumables. To meet this requirement, NASA continues to explore a Bosch-based carbon dioxide reduction system to recover oxygen from CO2. In order to improve the equivalent system mass of Bosch systems, we seek to design and test a "Series Bosch" system in which two reactors in series are optimized for the two steps of the reaction, as well as to explore the use of in situ materials as carbon deposition catalysts. Here we report recent developments in this effort including assembly and initial testing of a Reverse Water-Gas Shift reactor (RWGSr) and initial testing of two gas separation membranes. The RWGSr was sized to reduce CO2 produced by a crew of four to carbon monoxide as the first stage in a Series Bosch system. The gas separation membranes, necessary to recycle unreacted hydrogen and CO2, were similarly sized. Additionally, we report results of preliminary experiments designed to determine the catalytic properties of Martian and Lunar regolith simulant for the carbon deposition step.

Abney, Morgan; Mansell, Matt; DuMez, Sam; Thomas, John; Cooper, Charlie; Long, David

2013-01-01

259

77 FR 55877 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...condensate and feedwater systems in all types of light water reactor facilities; and (2) to...including condensate storage and supply, for light-water reactors (LWRs) and for...

2012-09-11

260

Challenges and Innovative Technologies On Fuel Handling Systems for Future Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors  

E-print Network

Reactors Mathieu CHASSIGNET1;� , Sebastien DUMAS1 , Christophe PENIGOT1 , Ge´rard PRELE2 , Alain CAPITAINE2 October 14, 2010) The reactor refuelling system provides the means of transporting, storing, and handling reactor core subassemblies. The system consists of the facilities and equipment needed to accomplish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

261

10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1...boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled...

2013-01-01

262

10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.  

...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1...boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled...

2014-01-01

263

10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1...boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled...

2012-01-01

264

10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1...boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled...

2011-01-01

265

10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section...cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1...boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled...

2010-01-01

266

Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience with advanced supercritical-water power cycles. The current design activities build upon a series of small-scale efforts over the past decade to evaluate and describe the features and technology variants of FHRs. Key prior concept evaluation reports include the SmAHTR preconceptual design report,1 the PB-AHTR preconceptual design, and the series of early phase AHTR evaluations performed from 2004 to 2006. This report provides a power plant-focused description of the current state of the AHTR. The report includes descriptions and sizes of the major heat transport and power generation components. Component configuration and sizing are based upon early phase AHTR plant thermal hydraulic models. The report also provides a top-down AHTR comparative economic analysis. A commercially available advanced supercritical water-based power cycle was selected as the baseline AHTR power generation cycle both due to its superior performance and to enable more realistic economic analysis. The AHTR system design, however, has several remaining gaps, and the plant cost estimates consequently have substantial remaining uncertainty. For example, the enriched lithium required for the primary coolant cannot currently be produced on the required scale at reasonable cost, and the necessary core structural ceramics do not currently exist in a nuclear power qualified form. The report begins with an overview of the current, early phase, design of the AHTR plant. Only a limited amount of information is included about the core and vessel as the core design and refueling options are the subject of a companion report. The general layout of an AHTR system and site showing the relationship of the major facilities is then provided. Next is a comparative evaluation of the AHTR anticipated performance and costs. Finally, the major system design efforts necessary to bring the AHTR design to a pre-conceptual level are then presented.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL] [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-09-01

267

N reactor confinement system high-pressure test report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the High-Pressure Confiner Test (PT-N-605) performed at N Reactor in October 1987. This test pressurized the confiner building to a maximum design basis accident pressure of 3.9 psi. It utilized integrated leak rate tests before and after the pressurization to evaluate the damage done to the confiner by the pressure. The test demonstrated that the confiner structure and its penetration seals perform as designed when subjected to the maximum pressure postulated by a design basis accident. This report also reviews the N Reactor description, confinement concept, confinement system function, and safety analyses study done prior to the test. It describes and addresses some recommendations of the Accelerated Safety Enhancement program, and it reviews the development and performance of the High-Pressure Confiner Test. 36 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Galvin, M.R.; Holy, D.A.; Reed, R.W.

1987-10-01

268

Fission product scrubbing system for a nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fission product scrubbing system is described for a nuclear reactor including a containment building defining a containment space for accommodating reactor components, comprising (a) means defining a water tank in the containment building; (b) a dividing wall extending into the water tank for separating the water tank into a first and a second compartment; (c) means defining a collection plenum normally hermetically sealed from the containment space and the environment externally of the containment building; (d) means defining a communication passage in the dividing wall underneath the water level in the first and second compartments for maintaining communication between the water stored in the first and second compartments; (e) a standpipe extending from the containment space into the second compartment; (f) a vent pipe extending from the collection plenum into the environment externally of the containment building; and (g) a rupture disc mounted in the vent pipe for normally blocking communication between the collection plenum and the environment.

Leach, D.S.

1986-09-09

269

A small, 1400 K, reactor for Brayton space power systems.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted to determine minimum dimensions and minimum weight obtainable in a design for a reactor using uranium-233 nitride or plutonium-239 nitride as fuel. Such a reactor had been considered by Krasner et al. (1971). Present space power status is discussed, together with questions of reactor design and power distribution in the reactor. The characteristics of various reactor types are compared, giving attention also to a zirconium hydride reactor.

Lantz, E.; Mayo, W.

1972-01-01

270

System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module  

DOEpatents

A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

Matchett, Richard L. (Bethel Park, PA); Roof, David R. (North Huntingdon, PA); Kikta, Thomas J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wilczynski, Rosemarie (McKees Rocks, PA); Nilsen, Roy J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bacvinskas, William S. (Bethel Park, PA); Fodor, George (Pittsburgh, PA)

1990-01-01

271

System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module  

DOEpatents

A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

1988-07-28

272

Reactor Controllability of 3-Region-Core Molten Salt Reactor System - A Study on Load Following Capability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) systems are liquid-fueled reactors that can be used for actinide burning, production of electricity, production of hydrogen, and production of fissile fuels (breeding). Thorium (Th) and uranium-233 (²³³U) are fertile and fissile of the MSR systems, and dissolved in a high-temperature molten fluoride salt (fuel salt) with a very high boiling temperature (up to 1650

Takahisa Yamamoto; Koshi Mitachi; Masatoshi Nishio

2006-01-01

273

Small-scale domestic wastewater treatment using an alternating pumped sequencing batch biofilm reactor system.  

PubMed

An alternating pumped sequencing batch biofilm reactor (APSBBR) system was developed to treat small-scale domestic wastewater. This laboratory system had two reactor tanks, Reactor 1 and Reactor 2, with two identical plastic biofilm modules in each reactor. Reactor 1 of the APSBBR had five operational phases--fill, anoxic, aerobic, settle and draw. In the aerobic phase, the wastewater was circulated between the two reactor tanks with centrifugal pumps and aeration was mainly achieved through oxygen absorption by microorganisms in the biofilms when they were exposed to the air. This paper details the performance of the APSBBR system in treating synthetic domestic wastewater over 18 months. The effluent from the APSBBR system satisfied the European Wastewater Treatment Directive requirements, with respect to COD, ammonium-nitrogen and suspended solids. The biofilm growth in the two reactor tanks was different due to the difference in substrate loadings and growth conditions. PMID:16408190

Rodgers, Michael; Zhan, Xinmin; O'Reilly, Edmond

2006-04-01

274

Water gas shift membrane reactor for CO 2 control in IGCC systems: techno-economic feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel reactor concept, the water gas shift membrane reactor (WGS-MR) for CO2 removal in IGCC systems has been investigated. In order to establish full insight in the possibilities of the application of such a reactor, a multidisciplinary feasibility study has been carried out comprising system integration studies, catalyst research, membrane research, membrane reactor modelling and bench scale membrane reactor

M Bracht; P. T Alderliesten; R Kloster; R Pruschek; G Haupt; E Xue; J. R. H Ross; M. K Koukou; N Papayannakos

1997-01-01

275

Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-03-01

276

Parametric systems analysis of the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR)  

SciTech Connect

The close coupling in the stellarator/torsatron/heliotron (S/T/H) between coil design (peak field, current density, forces), magnetics topology (transform, shear, well depth), and plasma performance (equilibrium, stability, transport, beta) complicates the reactor assessment more so than for most magnetic confinement systems. In order to provide an additional degree of resolution of this problem for the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR), a parametric systems model has been developed and applied. This model reduces key issues associted ith plasma performance, first-wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S), and coil design to a simple relationship between beta, system geometry, and a number of indicators of overall plant performance. The results of this analysis can then be used to guide more detailed, multidimensional plasma, magnetics, and coil design efforts towards technically and economically viable operating regimes. In general, it is shown that beta values > 0.08 may be needed if the MSR approach is to be substantially competitive with other approaches to magnetic fusion in terms of system power density, mass utilization, and cost for total power output around 4.0 GWt; lower powers will require even higher betas.

Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.

1982-05-01

277

Reactor core configuration and important systems related to physics tests of Daya Bay NPP.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A brief introduction to reactor core configuration and important systems related to physics tests of Daya Bay NPP is given. These systems involve the reactor core system (COR), the full length rod control system (RGL), the in-core instrumentation system (...

Tao Shaoping

1995-01-01

278

SAFSIM: A computer program for engineering simulations of space reactor system performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) is a FORTRAN computer program that provides engineering simulations of user-specified flow networks at the system level. It includes fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and reactor dynamics capabilities. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the simulation of almost any flow system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to

D. Dobranich

1992-01-01

279

Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Power Conversion System for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System  

E-print Network

Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Power Conversion System for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System By Chunyun Wang B.S.M.E. Tsinghua University, 1991 M.S.N.E. Tsinghua University, 1994 Submitted;2 #12;Design, Analysis, and Optimization of the Power Conversion System for the Modular Pebble Bed

280

Thermoelectric converter for SP-100 space reactor power system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Conductively coupling the thermoelectric converter to the heat source and the radiator maximizes the utilization of the reactor and radiator temperatures and thereby minimizes the power system weight. This paper presents the design for the converter and the individual thermoelectric cells that are the building block modules for the converter. It also summarizes progress on the fabrication of initial cells and the results obtained from the preparation of a manufacturing plan. The design developed for the SP-100 system utilizes thermally conductive compliant pads that can absorb the displacement and distortion caused by the combinations of temperatures and thermal expansion coefficients. The converter and cell designs provided a 100 kWe system which met the system requirements. Initial cells were fabricated and tested.

Terrill, W. R.; Haley, V. F.

1986-01-01

281

Granules characteristics in the vertical profile of a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating poultry slaughterhouse wastewater.  

PubMed

The performance and the granules characteristics of a 450 m(3) -UASB reactor operating for 1228 days, treating poultry slaughterhouse wastewater with an average COD reduction of 85% was examined. Granules were sampled in three different positions along the vertical central line of the reactor, revealing variations in the concentration of volatile total solids. Although the reactor had been in operation for an extended period of time, granule sizes of 0.5-1.5 mm appeared to predominate. The hollow core was well defined for granules with sizes ranging from 2 to 3 mm in all the sampling ports. The granules exhibited no layered microbial distribution and were packed with different morphotype cells intertwined randomly throughout the cross-section. Methanogenic Archaea predominated in the granules taken from every sampling port along the reactor. The results indicated that the characterization of the granules is a useful tool for the adoption of operational strategies toward optimization of UASB reactors. PMID:17478089

Del Nery, Valéria; Pozzi, Eloisa; Damianovic, Márcia H R Z; Domingues, Mércia R; Zaiat, Marcelo

2008-04-01

282

Degradation of phenol and p-cresol in reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and phenol concentration on the degradation of phenol and p-cresol in wastewater were investigated in two respective UASB (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket) reactors with effluent recirculation at 37 oC for over 440 days. After acclimation, nearly all the phenol and p-cresol at moderate concentrations could be degraded without carbohydrate as a co-substrate. Treating

Herbert H. P. Fang; Gong-Ming Zhou

2000-01-01

283

Effect of reactor configuration on biogas production from wheat straw hydrolysate  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential of wheat straw hydrolysate for biogas production was investigated in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. The hydrolysate originated as a side stream from a pilot plant pretreating wheat straw hydrothermally (195°C for 10–12min) for producing 2nd generation bioethanol [Kaparaju, P., Serrano, M., Thomsen, A.B., Kongjan, P., Angelidaki, I., 2009. Bioethanol, biohydrogen

Prasad Kaparaju; María Serrano; Irini Angelidaki

2009-01-01

284

Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development.

Anderson, R.V.

1982-11-16

285

Upgrading of existing aerobic plants with the LUCAS anaerobic system based on full-scale experiences.  

PubMed

It has been demonstrated that the combination of anaerobic-aerobic treatment is the best technological and economical solution for the treatment of high loaded wastewater. Where in the past aerobic treatment systems were still very acceptable due to the very good treatment efficiency, simplicity and robustness of the technology, this has, in most cases, been changed due to very stringent sludge disposal legislation. The anaerobic pretreatment takes care of approximately 80-90% of the overall treatment efficiency at high loading rates and low sludge production and low energy costs. The aerobic posttreatment takes care of the absolute high removal efficiency and nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Because of the low organic loading rate of the aerobic posttreatment also in this stage the sludge production is low. The combination of anaerobic-aerobic treatment results in a compact system capable of reaching high treatment efficiency at low sludge production and lower energy consumption. Waterleau Global Water Technology has developed LUCAS anaerobic-aerobic system that combines an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor with an aerobic, constant-level cyclic activated sludge system, which is very suitable for the treatment of high loaded wastewaters in general and brewery waste water in particular. It has been proven from several full scale upgrading projects that the UASB system is best suitable for implementation in the aerobic plants that have to be extended in capacity. PMID:16235744

Gerards, R; Gils, W; Vriens, L

2005-01-01

286

Screening reactor steam/water piping systems for water hammer  

SciTech Connect

A steam/water system possessing a certain combination of thermal, hydraulic and operational states, can, in certain geometries, lead to a steam bubble collapse induced water hammer. These states, operations, and geometries are identified. A procedure that can be used for identifying whether an unbuilt reactor system is prone to water hammer is proposed. For the most common water hammer, steam bubble collapse induced water hammer, six conditions must be met in order for one to occur. These are: (1) the pipe must be almost horizontal; (2) the subcooling must be greater than 20 C; (3) the L/D must be greater than 24; (4) the velocity must be low enough so that the pipe does not run full, i.e., the Froude number must be less than one; (5) there should be void nearby; (6) the pressure must be high enough so that significant damage occurs, that is the pressure should be above 10 atmospheres. Recommendations on how to avoid this kind of water hammer in both the design and the operation of the reactor system are made.

Griffith, P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-09-01

287

Coil system for a mirror-based hybrid reactor  

SciTech Connect

Two different superconducting coil systems for the SFLM Hybrid study - a quadrupolar mirror based fusion-fission reactor study - are presented. One coil system is for a magnetic field with 2 T at the midplane and a mirror ratio of four. This coil set consists of semiplanar coils in two layers. The alternative coil system is for a downscaled magnetic field of 1.25 T at the midplane and a mirror ratio of four, where a higher {beta} is required to achieve sufficient the neutron production. This coil set has one layer of twisted 3D coils. The 3D coils are expected to be considerably cheaper than the semiplanar, since NbTi superconductors can be used for most coils instead of Nb3Sn due to the lower magnetic field.

Hagnestal, A.; Agren, O.; Moiseenko, V. E. [Uppsala University, Angstroem laboratory, Division of Electricity, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna st. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

2012-06-19

288

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory

Daniel J. McDermott; Kenneth J. Schrader; Terry L. Schulz

1994-01-01

289

TRAC modeling of the K-reactor neutron poison injection system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a numerical study of the transport of gadolinium poison solution (GPS) through the supplementary safety system (SSS) of the K reactor at the Savannah River site. The analysis focuses on the movement of the GPS interface as the GPS flows from the storage tank to the reactor tank and was performed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code

D. C. Jr. Thoman; K. W. Ross; R. L. Garrett

1994-01-01

290

Exergy analysis of an ammonia synthesis reactor in a solar thermochemical power system  

Microsoft Academic Search

An ammonia-based thermochemical energy storage system is under investigation at the Australian National University. In recent years, one line of research has been the analysis of ammonia synthesis reactors. A two-dimensional numerical reactor model was previously validated with experimental results and was used in this study to compare maximum thermal output with maximum exergy output of the reactor investigated. The

H Kreetz; K Lovegrove

2002-01-01

291

Facilities with MKER-800 (800 MW multiloop boiling-water power reactor) as a reactor system having improved safety  

SciTech Connect

Negative post-Chernobyl attitude toward nuclear power had concerned for the most part water-graphite channel-type reactors. Drawbacks of the RBMK power units--first of all positive reactivity effect and absence of the containment--had been attributed to all reactors of this type. However, the channel-type design, being unbiased, have a number of advantages as compared to vessel-type reactors both in terms of safety and in terms of economy. The indicated advantages of the water-graphite channel-type reactors are totally implemented in MKER-800 design. The MKER-800 is a multiloop reactor. Each circulation loop consists of a steam separator, two downcomers, water and steam-water lines, fuel channels. Natural circulation of the coolant is intensified with aid of water jet pumps mounted in all downcomers is connected to 50 fuel channels each. Coolant is heated and partially evaporated when it passes through the channels. Separated steam is conducted at 7 MPa via steam removal lines--which are provided with cut-off devices and main safety valves--to the main steam lines feeding steam to the turbogenerator. Besides, provision is made for steam removing from the steam lines to the passive cooling system. MKER-800 design meets the Russian and international requirements set for the reactors of enhanced safety. To attain these qualities, the reactor plant (RP) has adopted technical solutions described in this paper.

Adamov, E.; Bryunin, S.; Grozdov, I.; Kuznetsov, S.; Petrov, A.; Cherkashov, Yu. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1996-07-01

292

Expert system driven fuzzy control application to power reactors  

SciTech Connect

For the purpose of nonlinear control and uncertainty/imprecision handling, fuzzy controllers have recently reached acclaim and increasing commercial application. The fuzzy control algorithms often require a supervisory'' routine that provides necessary heuristics for interface, adaptation, mode selection and other implementation issues. Performance characteristics of an on-line fuzzy controller depend strictly on the ability of such supervisory routines to manipulate the fuzzy control algorithm and enhance its control capabilities. This paper describes an expert system driven fuzzy control design application to nuclear reactor control, for the automated start-up control of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. The methodology is verified through computer simulations using a valid nonlinear model. The necessary heuristic decisions are identified that are vitally important for the implemention of fuzzy control in the actual plant. An expert system structure incorporating the necessary supervisory routines is discussed. The discussion also includes the possibility of synthesizing the fuzzy, exact and combined reasoning to include both inexact concepts, uncertainty and fuzziness, within the same environment.

Tsoukalas, L.H.; Berkan, R.C.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Uhrig, R.E.

1990-01-01

293

Expert system driven fuzzy control application to power reactors  

SciTech Connect

For the purpose of nonlinear control and uncertainty/imprecision handling, fuzzy controllers have recently reached acclaim and increasing commercial application. The fuzzy control algorithms often require a ``supervisory`` routine that provides necessary heuristics for interface, adaptation, mode selection and other implementation issues. Performance characteristics of an on-line fuzzy controller depend strictly on the ability of such supervisory routines to manipulate the fuzzy control algorithm and enhance its control capabilities. This paper describes an expert system driven fuzzy control design application to nuclear reactor control, for the automated start-up control of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. The methodology is verified through computer simulations using a valid nonlinear model. The necessary heuristic decisions are identified that are vitally important for the implemention of fuzzy control in the actual plant. An expert system structure incorporating the necessary supervisory routines is discussed. The discussion also includes the possibility of synthesizing the fuzzy, exact and combined reasoning to include both inexact concepts, uncertainty and fuzziness, within the same environment.

Tsoukalas, L.H.; Berkan, R.C.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Uhrig, R.E.

1990-12-31

294

FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) reactor shutdown system reliability reevaluation  

SciTech Connect

The reliability analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor shutdown system was reevaluated. Failure information based on five years of plant operating experience was used to verify original reliability numbers or to establish new ones. Also, system modifications made subsequent to performance of the original analysis were incorporated into the reevaluation. Reliability calculations and sensitivity analyses were performed using a commercially available spreadsheet on a personal computer. The spreadsheet was configured so that future failures could be tracked and compared with expected failures. A number of recommendations resulted from the reevaluation including both increased and decreased surveillance intervals. All recommendations were based on meeting or exceeding existing reliability goals. Considerable cost savings will be incurred upon implementation of the recommendations.

Pierce, B.F.

1986-07-01

295

Methanogenic degradation of p-cresol in batch and in continuous UASB reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two methanogenic cultures were grown in the presence of p-cresol as sole carbon source or together with a mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFA). Both batch cultures produced methane from VFA in the presence of p-cresol, up to concentrations of about 200 ppm, in a first experiment, without significant activity inhibition. After several transfers, one of the cultures tolerated higher

Christian Kennes; Ramon Mendez; Juan M. Lema

1997-01-01

296

Anaerobic digestion of olive oil mill effluents together with swine manure in UASB reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combined anaerobic digestion of olive oil mill effluent (OME) with swine manure, was investigated. In batch experiments was shown that for anaerobic degradation of OME alone nitrogen addition was needed. A COD:N ratio in the range of 65:1 to 126:1 was necessary for the optimal degradation process. Furthermore, it was found that methane productions rates during digestion of either swine

I. Angelidaki; B. K. Ahring; H. Deng; J. E. Schmidt

2002-01-01

297

Optimization of biogas production from wheat straw stillage in UASB reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, thermophilic anaerobic digestion of wheat straw stillage was investigated. Methane potential of stillage was determined in batch experiments at two different substrate concentrations. Results showed that higher methane yields of 324ml\\/g-(volatile solids) VSadded were obtained at stillage concentrations of 12.8g-VS\\/L than at 25.6g-VS\\/l. Continuous anaerobic digestion of stillage was performed in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket

Prasad Kaparaju; María Serrano; Irini Angelidaki

2010-01-01

298

Supervisory Control System Architecture for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular SMR Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular advanced SMR (AdvSMR) plants. This research activity advances the state-of-the art by incorporating decision making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides a brief history of hierarchical functional architectures and the current state-of-the-art, describes a reference AdvSMR to show the dependencies between systems, presents a hierarchical structure for supervisory control, indicates the importance of understanding trip setpoints, applies a new theoretic approach for comparing architectures, identifies cyber security controls that should be addressed early in system design, and describes ongoing work to develop system requirements and hardware/software configurations.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Cole, Daniel L [University of Pittsburgh; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2013-08-01

299

A computer program for engineering simulations of space reactor system performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear thermal propulsion systems are envisioned as a fast and efficient form of transportation for the exploration of space. Several nuclear reactor concepts have been proposed. This document discusses SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) which is an engineering computer program that allows the fluid mechanic, heat transfer, and reactor dynamic simulation of the entire propulsion system. SAFSIM currently contains three

D. Dobranich

1992-01-01

300

Lunar Regolith Simulant Feed System for a Hydrogen Reduction Reactor System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the goals of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the moon is to produce oxygen from the lunar regolith which is present in the form of Ilmenite (FeTi03) and other compounds. A reliable and attainable method of extracting some of the oxygen from the lunar regolith is to use the hydrogen reduction process in a hot reactor to create water vapor which is then condensed and electrolyzed to obtain oxygen for use as a consumable. One challenge for a production system is to reliably acquire the regolith with an excavator hauler mobility platform and then introduce it into the reactor inlet tube which is raised from the surface and above the reactor itself. After the reaction, the hot regolith (-1000 C) must be expelled from the reactor for disposal by the excavator hauler mobility system. In addition, the reactor regolith inlet and outlet tubes must be sealed by valves during the reaction in order to allow collection of the water vapor by the chemical processing sub-system. These valves must be able to handle abrasive regolith passing through them as well as the heat conduction from the hot reactor. In 2008, NASA has designed and field tested a hydrogen reduction system called ROxygen in order to demonstrate the feasibility of extracting oxygen from lunar regolith. The field test was performed with volcanic ash known as Tephra on Mauna Kea volcano on the Big Island of Hawai'i. The tephra has similar properties to lunar regolith, so that it is regarded as a good simulant for the hydrogen reduction process. This paper will discuss the design, fabrication, operation, test results and lessons learned with the ROxygen regolith feed system as tested on Mauna Kea in November 2008.

Mueller, R. P.; Townsend, Ivan I., III

2009-01-01

301

Compatibility of refractory materials for nuclear reactor poison control systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Metal-clad poison rods have been considered for the control system of an advanced space power reactor concept studied at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Such control rods may be required to operate at temperatures of about 140O C. Selected poison materials (including boron carbide and the diborides of zirconium, hafnium, and tantalum) were subjected to 1000-hour screening tests in contact with candidate refractory metal cladding materials (including tungsten and alloys of tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum) to assess the compatibility of these materials combinations at the temperatures of interest. Zirconium and hafnium diborides were compatible with refractory metals at 1400 C, but boron carbide and tantalum diboride reacted with the refractory metals at this temperature. Zirconium diboride also showed promise as a reaction barrier between boron carbide and tungsten.

Sinclair, J. H.

1974-01-01

302

Post impact behavior of mobile reactor core containment systems.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the future, nuclear assemblies containing fission products will be transported at high speeds. An example is a reactor supplying power to a large subsonic airplane. In this case an accident can occur resulting in a ground impact at speeds up to 1000 ft/sec. This paper analyzes the containment vessel temperatures after impact and attempts to understand the design variables that affect the post impact survival of the system. The heat transfer analysis includes conduction, radiation, and convection in addition to the core material heats of fusion and vaporization under partial-burial conditions. Also, included is the fact that fission products vaporize and transport radially outward and condense on cooler surfaces, resulting in a moving heat source.

Puthoff, R. L.; Parker, W. G.; Van Bibber, L. E.

1972-01-01

303

Effects of directly soluble and fibrous rapidly acidifying chemical oxygen demand and reactor liquid surface tension on granulation and sludge-bed stability in upflow anaerobic sludge-blanket reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, it has become clear that the rapidly acidifying chemical oxygen demand (RACOD) content of the waste water\\u000a and the surface tension of the reactor liquid contribute to the phenomenon of granular growth in upflow anaerobic sludge-blanket\\u000a reactors (UASB). By adding 20% of directly soluble RACOD, in the form of a sucrose\\/starch mixture, on top of the original

H. Grootaerd; B. Liessens; W. Verstraete

1997-01-01

304

Reliability evaluation of the Savannah River reactor leak detection system  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Reactors have been in operation since the mid-1950's. The primary degradation mode for the primary coolant loop piping is intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The leak-before-break (LBB) capability of the primary system piping has been demonstrated as part of an overall structural integrity evaluation. One element of the LBB analyses is a reliability evaluation of the leak detection system. The most sensitive element of the leak detection system is the airborne tritium monitors. The presence of small amounts of tritium in the heavy water coolant provide the basis for a very sensitive system of leak detection. The reliability of the tritium monitors to properly identify a crack leaking at a rate of either 50 or 300 lb/day (0.004 or 0.023 gpm, respectively) has been characterized. These leak rates correspond to action points for which specific operator actions are required. High reliability has been demonstrated using standard fault tree techniques. The probability of not detecting a leak within an assumed mission time of 24 hours is estimated to be approximately 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per demand. This result is obtained for both leak rates considered. The methodology and assumptions used to obtain this result are described in this paper. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Daugherty, W.L.; Sindelar, R.L. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Wallace, I.T. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1991-01-01

305

78 FR 41436 - Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY...Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors...Rules, Announcements, and Directives Branch (RADB), Office of...Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water...

2013-07-10

306

77 FR 62270 - Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY...Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors...Rules, Announcements, and Directives Branch (RADB), Office of...Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water...

2012-10-12

307

Start-up of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal process using low activity anammox inoculum to treat low strength UASB effluent.  

PubMed

The start-up of the completely autotrophic nitrogen removal process was examined in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using low activity anoxic ammonium oxidation (anammox) inoculum. The SBR received effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) that treated low strength wastewater. The volumetric nitrogen loading rate (vNLR) was first 0.24 ± 0.11 kg Nm(-3)d(-1) and then reduced to 0.10 ± 0.02 kg Nm(-3)d(-1). The average specific anammox activity was 2.27 ± 1.31 mg N (gVSS h)(-1), at 30°C representing an increase of 161% compared to the inoculum. The decrease in vNLR did not significantly affect anammox activity, but resulted in a decrease of denitrifying heterotrophic activity to very low levels after the first 30 days owing to the decrease of organic loading rate (OLR). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed the stable presence of anammox bacteria in biomass. Numerous filamentous microorganisms were present, several of which were in a state of endogenous respiration. PMID:24077156

Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Frison, N; Di Fabio, S; Noutsopoulos, C; Fatone, F

2013-11-01

308

Development of a differential volume reactor system for soil biodegradation studies  

SciTech Connect

A bench scale experimental system was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation by mixed microbial cultures in PAH contaminated Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) soils and on sand. The reactor system was chosen in order to provide a fundamental protocol capable for evaluating the performance of specific mixed microbial cultures on specific soil systems by elucidating the important system variables and their interactions. The reactor design and peripherals are described. A plug flow differential volume reactor (DVR) was used in order to remove performance effects related to reactor type, as opposed to system structure. This reactor system could be well represented mathematically. Methods were developed for on-line quantitative determination of PAH liquid phase concentrations. The mathematical models and experimental data are presented for the biodegradation of naphthalene on artificial and MGP soils.

Webb, O.F.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Reed, G.D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

1991-12-31

309

Organic loading rate and food-to-microorganism ratio shape prokaryotic diversity in a demo-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating domestic wastewater.  

PubMed

We investigated the microbial community in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating domestic wastewater (DW) during two different periods of organic loading rate (OLR) and food-to-microorganism (F/M) ratio. 16S rDNA clone libraries were generated, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analyses were performed. Fluctuations in the OLR and F/M ratio affected the abundance and the composition of the UASB prokaryotic community, mainly at the species level, as well as the performance of the UASB reactor. The qPCR analysis suggested that there was a decrease in the bacterial cell number during the rainy season, when the OLR and F/M ratio were lower. However, the bacterial diversity was higher during this time, suggesting that the community degraded more diversified substrates. The diversity and the abundance of the archaeal community were higher when the F/M ratio was lower. Shifts in the methanogenic community composition might have influenced the route of methane production, with methane produced by acetotrophic methanogens (dry season), and by hydrogenotrophic, methylotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens (rainy season). This study revealed higher levels of bacterial diversity, metabolic specialization and chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of the DW UASB reactor during the rainy season. PMID:24000090

Cardinali-Rezende, Juliana; Araújo, Juliana C; Almeida, Paulo G S; Chernicharo, Carlos A L; Sanz, José L; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A

2013-12-01

310

Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)  

SciTech Connect

The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

2010-02-01

311

Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water  

SciTech Connect

This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

Michael Corradini; Mark Anderson; Yassin Hassan; Akira Tokuhiro

2013-01-16

312

Incorporating ''fuzzy'' data and logical relations in the design of expert systems for nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper applies the method of assigning probability in Dempster-Shafer Theory (DST) to the components of rule-based expert systems used in the control of nuclear reactors. Probabilities are assigned to premises, consequences, and rules themselves. This paper considers how uncertainty can propagate through a system of Boolean equations, such as fault trees or expert systems. The probability masses assigned to primary initiating events in the expert system can be derived from observing a nuclear reactor in operation or based on engineering knowledge of the reactor parts. Use of DST mass assignments offers greater flexibility to the construction of expert systems.

Guth, M.A.S.

1987-01-01

313

Application and evaluation of ceramic materials in Tory reactor systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Declasslfied 28 Nov 1973. The Tory series of test reactors is intended ; to lead to a reactor capable of use as a ramjet power plant. Current designs are ; presented. Beryllium oxide is presently the only serious contender as the ; moderator. Analytical and experimental treatment of the thermal stress problem ; in BeO is discussed. There is a

J. H. Moyer; W. B. Myers; C. E. Walter; W. M. Jr. Wells

1960-01-01

314

Membrane integrated system in the fusion reactor fuel cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The future fusion reactor fuel will be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Deuterium is produced using traditional separation technology. Tritium must be produced by means of a nuclear reaction between neutrons and lithium atoms within the reactor breeder which, in this study, is supposed to be a ceramic lithiated material. The tritium produced in the breeder needs a proper

A. Basile; V. Violante; F. Santella; E. Drioli

1995-01-01

315

Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications.

Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

1982-01-01

316

Design of biochemical reactors mass transfer criteria for simple and complex systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biochemical reactors are treated as heterogeneous catalytic reactors in which physical mass transfer completely or significantly\\u000a controls the overall rate of the process being promoted in the reactor. The treatment used to develop basic design strategies\\u000a takes into account the special constraints imposed by biological and biochemical phenomena on the systems.\\u000a \\u000a By identifying the fundamental principles involved, generalized mass transfer

M. Moo-Young; H. Blanch

317

Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor having a reactor vessel and a reactor core disposed in the vessel for passage of coolant water through the core, the coolant water extending upward to a level substantially above the core in normal operation condition. It comprises: an open-topped box located above the core and immersed

1991-01-01

318

A long term radiological risk model for plutonium-fueled and fission reactor space nuclear system  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the optimization of the RISK III mathematical model, which provides risk assessment for the use of a plutonium-fueled, fission reactor in space systems. The report discusses possible scenarios leading to radiation releases on the ground; distinctions are made for an intact reactor and a dispersed reactor. Also included are projected dose equivalents for various accident situations. 54 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs. (TEM)

Bartram, B.W.; Dougherty, D.K.

1987-01-01

319

Sensory Systems for a Control Rod Position using Reed Switches for the Integral Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

The system-integrated reactor currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is being designed with a soluble boron free operation and the use of a nuclear heating for the reactor start-up. These design features require a Control Element Drive Mechanism (CEDM) for the integral reactor to have a fine-step movement capability as well as a high reliability for

Je-Yong Yu; Suhn Choi; Ji-Ho Kim; Doo-Jeong Lee

320

OUTLINE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 4K3/6K3: Sep-Dec, 2013 Reactor Design for Heterogenous Systems  

E-print Network

an understanding of Advanced Reactor Design including Catalytic kinetics, mass transfer limitations, packed and fluidized bed reactors and two phase reactors. POLICY REMINDER: Academic Integrity: You are expectedOUTLINE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 4K3/6K3: Sep-Dec, 2013 Reactor Design for Heterogenous Systems

Thompson, Michael

321

Reactor physic and reprocessing scheme for innovative molten salt reactor system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molten salt reactor is one of the six concepts retained by the Generation IV forum in 2001. Based on the MSRE and MSBR concepts developed by ORNL in the 60s which involve a liquid fuel constituted of fluorine molten salt at a temperature close to 600°C, new developments with innovative approach and technology have been realized which contribute to

S. Delpech; E. Merle-Lucotte; D. Heuer; M. Allibert; V. Ghetta; C. Le-Brun; X. Doligez; G. Picard

2009-01-01

322

TRAC modeling of the K-reactor neutron poison injection system  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a numerical study of the transport of gadolinium poison solution (GPS) through the supplementary safety system (SSS) of the K reactor at the Savannah River site. The analysis focuses on the movement of the GPS interface as the GPS flows from the storage tank to the reactor tank and was performed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). The objectives of the study were (a) to develop an SSS TRAC model to benchmark against available test data and (b) to use the TRAC model to perform sensitivity studies to determine worst-case arrival times of GPS at the reactor for utilization in the safety analyses.

Thoman, D.C. Jr.; Ross, K.W. [SAIC, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garrett, R.L.

1994-12-31

323

Interaction of the control system with core nuclear design for fast spectrum space power reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reactor control system and operating strategy are essential factors in assessing reactor reliability and safety. The control system and its mode of operation also exert major influences on mechanical design of core components and all aspects of nuclear design. This is especially true of reactors for space power applications because of the imposed requirements regarding compactness, minimum mass, and long term operational reliability without external intervention or maintenance. Generic features of the interaction between nuclear design and reactor control system design for fast spectrum space power reactors are outlined. Several basic control concepts were analyzed. These included ex-core control drums, in-core control rods, burnable poisons, dispersed poisons in the core, and movable fuel segments or regions. Cross sections for calculations were generated with MC sup 2 -2, and neutronics calculations were performed with the VIM Monte Carlo code, ONEDANT, and DIF3D.

Lell, R. M.; Hanan, N. A.

324

Space-reactor system and subsystem investigations: Cost and schedule estimates for reactor and shield subsystems technology development. SP-100 program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cost and schedule estimates of the technology development for reactor and shielding subsystems of a 100-kWe class space reactor electric system are presented. The subsystems technology development (which includes reactor and shield subsystems ground testing) is supported by materials and processes development and component development. For the purpose of the cost estimate, seven generic types of reactor subsystems were used: uranium-zirconium hydride, NaK-cooled thermal reactor; lithium-cooled, refractory-clad fast reactors; Na- or K-cooled fast reactor; in-core thermionic reactor; inert gas-cooled particle fuel reactor; inert gas-cooled metal-clad fast reactor; and heat pipe-cooled fast reactor. Also three levels of technology were included for each of the generic types of reactor subsystem: current, improved, and advanced. The data in this report encompass all these technology levels. The shielding subsystem uses both gamma (heavy-metal) and neutron (hydrogenous material) shields. The shields considered would be used in conjunction with unmanned payloads.

Determan, W. R.; Harty, R. B.; Hylin, C.

1983-06-01

325

Biological hydrogen production in suspended and attached growth anaerobic reactor systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological production of hydrogen gas has received increasing interest from the international community during the last decade. Most studies on biological fermentative hydrogen production from carbohydrates using mixed cultures have been conducted in conventional continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) under mesophilic conditions. Investigations on hydrogen production in reactor systems with attached microbial growth have recently come up as well as

Hariklia N. Gavala; Ioannis V. Skiadas; Birgitte K. Ahring

2006-01-01

326

Design of make-up water system for Tehran research reactor spent nuclear fuels storage pool  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spent nuclear fuels storage (SNFS) is an essential auxiliary system in nuclear facility.Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent nuclear fuels have to be stored in water pool of SNFS away from reactor to allow for radioactive to decay and removal of generated heat. To prevent corrosion damage of fuels and other equipments, the storage pool is filled with de-ionized

Reza Gholizadeh Aghoyeh; Hosein Khalafi

2010-01-01

327

Quantification of anammox activity in a denitrification reactor for a recirculating aquaculture system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The activity of anammox bacteria in a denitrification reactor in a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for gilthead seabream production was investigated. Organic matter, extracted from the pond's solid filter, was used as the electron donor and carbon source for the denitrification reaction. The reactor was operated at four solid retention times (SRT). At steady state, anammox activity showed similar activity

Ori Lahav; Iris Bar Massada; Dimitry Yackoubov; Ruth Zelikson; Noam Mozes; Yossi Tal; Sheldon Tarre

2009-01-01

328

APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

This report details the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation of Eco Logic International's gas-phase chemical reduction process, with an emphasis on their Reactor System. he Eco Logic process employees a high temperature reactor filled with hydrogen gas as the means to destr...

329

Integral nuclear power reactor with natural coolant circulation. Investigation of passive RHR system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of a small power (up to 240 MWe) integral PWR for nuclear co-generation power plants has been carried out. The distinctive features of this advanced reactor are: primary circuit arrangement in a single pressure vessel; natural coolant circulation; passive safety systems with self-activated control devices; use of a second (guard) vessel housing the reactor; favourable conditions for the

O. B. Samoilov; V. S. Kuul; V. A. Malamud; G. I. Tarasov

1996-01-01

330

Energy recovery from dairy waste-waters: impacts of biofilm support systems on anaerobic CST reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anaerobic digestion is one of the major steps involved in the treatment of dairy industry waste-waters and many CSTRs (continuously-stirred tank reactors) are functioning for this purpose all over the world. In this paper, the authors describe their attempts to upgrade a CSTR's performance by incorporating a biofilm support system (BSS) within the existing reactor. The focus of the work

E. V. Ramasamy; S. A. Abbasi

2000-01-01

331

Endothermic reactors for an ammonia based thermochemical solar energy storage and transport system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ammonia dissociation reaction is one of a number of reactions which has been investigated for use in closed loop solar thermochemical energy storage systems, over a period of nearly two decades. A recent series of experiments with an electrically heated high pressure ammonia dissociation reactor has validated a two dimensional pseudo-homogenous theoretical reactor model, established rate parameters for the

K. Lovegrove; A. Luzzi

1996-01-01

332

Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An integration study was performed by coupling an SP-100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystem. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power-conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one standby unit. Integratiaon-design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystem could be integrated with the SP-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to offset the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9-percent mass advantage and the Stirling a 50-percent radiator-area advantage.

Harty, Richard B.; Durand, Richard E.; Mason, Lee S.

1991-09-01

333

Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An integration study was performed by coupling an SP-100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystem. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power-conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one standby unit. Integratiaon-design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion subsystem could be integrated with the SP-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to offset the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9-percent mass advantage and the Stirling a 50-percent radiator-area advantage.

Harty, Richard B.; Durand, Richard E.; Mason, Lee S.

1991-01-01

334

PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION  

E-print Network

of TRISO-coated micro-particles as a fuel in these reactors leads to multi-heterogeneity physics features that must be properly treated and accounted for. Inherent interrelationships of neutron interactions, temperature effects, and structural effects...

Kelly, Ryan 1989-

2011-04-20

335

System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

Aigner, R.D.

2000-04-01

336

Analytical prediction and experimental verification of reactor safety system injection transient  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the computer code that was developed for thermal hydraulic transient analysis of mixed phase fluid system and the flow tests that were carried out to validate the Code. A full scale test facility was designed to duplicate the Supplementary Shutdown System (SSS) of Savannah River Production Reactors. Several steady state and dynamic flow tests were conducted simulating the actual reactor injection transients. A dynamic multiphase fluid flow code was developed and validated with experimental results and utilized for system performance predictions and development of technical specifications for reactors. 3 refs.

Roy, B.N.; Nomm, E.

1991-12-31

337

Analytical prediction and experimental verification of reactor safety system injection transient  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the computer code that was developed for thermal hydraulic transient analysis of mixed phase fluid system and the flow tests that were carried out to validate the Code. A full scale test facility was designed to duplicate the Supplementary Shutdown System (SSS) of Savannah River Production Reactors. Several steady state and dynamic flow tests were conducted simulating the actual reactor injection transients. A dynamic multiphase fluid flow code was developed and validated with experimental results and utilized for system performance predictions and development of technical specifications for reactors. 3 refs.

Roy, B.N.; Nomm, E.

1991-01-01

338

Sliding mode control of the space nuclear reactor system TOPAZ II  

SciTech Connect

The Automatic Control System (ACS) of the space nuclear reactor power system TOPAZ II that generates electricity from nuclear heat using in-core thermionic converters is considered. Sliding Mode Control Technique was applied to the reactor system controller design in order to provide the robust high accuracy following of a neutron (thermal) power reference profile in a start up regime and a payload electric power (current) reference profile following in an operation regime. Extensive simulations of the TOPAZ II reactor system with the designed sliding mode controllers showed improved accuracy and robustness of the reactor system performances in a start up regime and in an electric power supply regime as well. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Shtessel, Y.B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Wyant, F.J. [Phillips Laboratory/Power Management Division, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue, SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87117-5776 (United States)

1996-03-01

339

The development of a remote monitoring system for the Nuclear Science Center reactor  

E-print Network

With funding provided by Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), design of Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactors (STAR) to aid countries with insufficient energy supplies is underway. The development of a new monitoring system that allows...

Jiltchenkov, Dmitri Victorovich

2012-06-07

340

Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors  

E-print Network

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2008-01-01

341

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOEpatents

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, Daniel J. (Export, PA); Schrader, Kenneth J. (Penn Hills, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1994-01-01

342

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOEpatents

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

1994-05-03

343

Treatment of fruit-juice industry wastewater in a two-stage anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor system followed by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study has been carried out to assess the performance of a combined system consisting of an anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor followed by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for treatment of fruit-juice industry wastewater at a temperature of 26 °C. Three experimental runs were conducted in this investigation. In the first experiment, a single-stage AH reactor was operated at a hydraulic

A. Tawfik; H. El-Kamah

2012-01-01

344

Treatment of fruit-juice industry wastewater in a two-stage anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor system followed by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study has been carried out to assess the performance of a combined system consisting of an anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor followed by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for treatment of fruit-juice industry wastewater at a temperature of 26 °C. Three experimental runs were conducted in this investigation. In the first experiment, a single-stage AH reactor was operated at a hydraulic

A. Tawfik; H. El-Kamah

2011-01-01

345

Effect of the liquid upflow velocity on thermophilic sulphate reduction in acidifying granular sludge reactors.  

PubMed

The effect of the superficial liquid upflow velocity on the acidifying and sulfate reducing capacity of thermophilic (55 degrees C; pH 6.0) granular sludge bed reactors treating partly acidified wastewater was investigated. A comparison was made between a UASB and an EGSB reactor, operated at an upflow velocity of 1 m.h-1 and 6.8 m.h-1, respectively. Both reactors were inoculated with a mixture of mesophilic sulphidogenic, thermophilic sulphidogenic and thermophilic methanogenic sludge (ratio 2:1:1). They were fed a synthetic wastewater containing starch, sucrose, lactate, propionate and acetate and a low sulphate concentration (COD/SO4(2-) ratio of 10). At the end of the experiment, the sulphate level of the influent was slightly increased to a COD/SO4(2-) ratio of 8. The reactors were operated at a hydraulic retention time of about 5 h and the imposed volumetric organic loading rates (OLR) ranged from 4.9 to 40.0 g COD l-1d-1. When imposing an OLR of 40.0 g COD l-1d-1, the acidification efficiency dropped to 80% and the sulphate reduction efficiency decreased to 50% in the UASB reactor. In the EGSB reactor, the sulphate reduction efficiency dropped to 30% directly following the OLR increase to 40 g COD l-1d-1, but recovered rapidly to 100% (at an OLR of 35 g COD l-1d-1) until the end of the experiment. In the UASB reactor, there was a net acetate and propionate production. At the higher organic loading rates, propionate was converted to n-butyrate and n-valerate. These back reactions did not occur in the EGSB reactor, in which an active methanogenic population developed, leading to a net acetate removal (up to 50%) and a high gas loading rate (up to 8.5 l l-1d-1). In both reactors, the effluent sulphide concentration was always below 200 mg l-1, of which about 90% was present as undissociated H2S (under the given conditions--pH 5.8-6.1 and 55 degrees C). The biogas (including CH4 and CO2) production rates in the UASB were very low, i.e. < 31 biogas l-1 reactor d-1, resulting in negligible amounts (< 20%) of H2S stripped from the reactor liquid. In the EGSB reactor, the biogas production rates reached up to 8.5 l l-1d-1, resulting in H2S stripping efficiencies up to 75%. PMID:11349377

Lens, P N; Korthout, D; van Lier, J B; Hulshoff Pol, L W; Lettinga, G

2001-02-01

346

A microprocessor tester for the treat upgrade reactor trip system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The upgrading of the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at ANL-Idaho has been designed to provide additional experimental capabilities for the study of core disruptive accident (CDA) phenomena. To improve the analytical extrapolation of test results to full-size assembly bundles, the facility upgrade will increase the maximum size of the test bundle from 7 to 37 fuel pins. By creating

F. R. Lenkszus; R. G. Bucher

1985-01-01

347

Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab  

DOEpatents

Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprises many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

Kotora, J. Jr.; Groh, E.F.; Kann, W.J.; Burelbach, J.P.

1984-04-10

348

Multi-channel monolith reactors as dynamical systems *, J. Brindleyb  

E-print Network

to other types of reactor e.g. fixed-bed. Most mathematical models of monoliths concen- trate on modelling phenomenology. © 2003 The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved. Keywords: Catalytic combustion; Multi.james@shu.ac.uk (A. James). Combustion and Flame 134 (2003) 193­205 0010-2180/03/$ ­ see front matter © 2003

James, Alex

349

Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage.

Harty, Richard B.; Durand, Richard E.

1993-01-01

350

Compact, high-power nuclear reactor systems based on small diameter particulate fuel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two compact, high-power nuclear reactor concepts are discussed. Both are gas-cooled cavity-type reactors which utilize particulate fuel of the type now used in HTGR reactors. Unshielded reactor volumes are on the order of one cubic meter. The Fixed Bed Reactor operating temperature is limited to 2500 K and the output power to 250 MW(e). In the Rotating Bed Reactor fuel is held within a rotating porous metal drum as a rotating fluidized bed. Rotating Bed Reactor outlet temperatures up to 3000 K and output power levels up to 1000 MW(e) are achievable. Both reactors can be brought up from stand by to full power in times on the order of a few seconds, due primarily to the short thermal time constant for the fuel particles. Turbine and MHD Brayton are the power conversion cycles of choice. Open cycle operation is generally favored for applications operating at less than 1000 sec of equivalent integrated full power. At power levels above 1 MW(e), the liquid droplet radiator is the favored means of heat rejection. Power system specific power levels of 10 kW(e)/kg (not including shield) appears to be quite feasible.

Powell, J. R.; Botts, T. E.

351

Initial results of systems analysis of the ETR/ITER (Engineering Test Reactor/International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) design space  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary versions of the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) systems code TETRA (Tokamak Engineering Test Reactor Analysis), which determines design solutions by the method of constrained optimization, are used to characterize the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and its design parameter space. We find that the physics objectives of high ignition margin and high plasma current lead to minimum size at relatively low aspect ratios (A = 2.5-3.0), while the engineering objective of high neutron wall load (W/sub L/ /approx gt/ 1.0 MW/m/sup 2/) leads to minimum size at higher A (/approximately/3.5). For minimum-size ITERs, the optimal toroidal field coil (TFC) designs fall within a narrow range of maximum fields (10-11 T) with R varying over only a few percent despite a factor of two change in the winding pack current density J/sub wp/. The major radius of the design is found to be sensitive to changes in elongation, inboard distances (such as plasma scrape-off), inductive flux capability, plasma temperature, beta limit, and ignition margin. A preliminary characterization of the US ITER designs with plasma current I/sub p/ > 15 MA and R < 4.5 m has been obtained by combining the engineering assumptions for devices such as the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER) with the physics assumptions for devices such as the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) and the Next European Torus (NET). These devices can accommodate a range of full- to reduced-bore, driven (Q < 10), steady-state plasmas for the engineering phase that produces high neutron wall load and fluence. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Peng, Y.K.M.; Galambos, J.D.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Kalsi, S.; Deleanu, L.

1987-01-01

352

Analysis of a microbial community associated with polychlorinated biphenyl degradation in anaerobic batch reactors.  

PubMed

The degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was investigated under fermentative-methanogenic conditions for up to 60 days in the presence of anaerobic biomass from a full-scale UASB reactor. The low methane yields in the PCBs-spiked batch reactors suggested that the biomass had an inhibitory effect on the methanogenic community. Reactors containing PCBs and co-substrates (ethanol/sodium formate) exhibited substantial PCB reductions from 0.7 to 0.2 mg mL(-1). For the Bacteria domain, the PCBs-spiked reactors were grouped with the PCB-free reactors with a similarity of 55 %, which suggested the selection of a specific population in the presence of PCBs. Three genera of bacteria were found exclusively in the PCB-spiked reactors and were identified using pyrosequencing analysis, Sedimentibacter, Tissierela and Fusibacter. Interestingly, the Sedimentibacter, which was previously correlated with the reductive dechlorination of PCBs, had the highest relative abundance in the RCS-PCB (7.4 %) and RCS-PCB-PF (12.4 %) reactors. Thus, the anaerobic sludge from the UASB reactor contains bacteria from the Firmicutes phylum that are capable of degrading PCBs. PMID:25104219

Gomes, B C; Adorno, M A T; Okada, D Y; Delforno, T P; Lima Gomes, P C F; Sakamoto, I K; Varesche, M B A

2014-11-01

353

Safety System Design Concept and Performance Evaluation for a Long Operating Cycle Simplified Boiling Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The long operating cycle simplified boiling water reactor is a reactor concept that pursues both safety and the economy by employing a natural circulation reactor core without a refueling, a passive decay heat removal, and an integrated building for the reactor and turbine. Throughout the entire spectrum of the design basis accident, the reactor core is kept covered by the passive emergency core cooling system. The decay heat is removed by the conventional active low-pressure residual heat removal system. As for a postulated severe accident, the suppression pool water floods the lower part of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in the case when core damage occurs, and the in-vessel retention that keeps the melt inside the RPV is achieved by supplying the coolant. The containment adopts a parallel-double-steel-plate structure similar to a hull structure, which contains coolant between the inner and outer walls to absorb the heat transferred from the inside of the containment. Consequently, the containment structure functions as a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the decay heat in case of an accident. This paper describes the PCCS performance evaluation by using TRAC code to show one of the characteristic plant features. The core damage frequency for internal events was also evaluated to examine the safety level of the plant and to show the adequacy of the safety system design.

Arai, Kenji; Suzuki, Seijiro; Nakamaru, Mikihide; Heki, Hideaki [Toshiba Corporation (Japan)

2003-07-15

354

Material Issues of Blanket Systems for Fusion Reactors - Compatibility with Cooling Water -  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental assisted cracking (EAC) is one of the material issues for the reactor core components of light water power reactors(LWRs). Much experience and knowledge have been obtained about the EAC in the LWR field. They will be useful to prevent the EAC of water-cooled blanket systems of fusion reactors. For the austenitic stainless steels and the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, they clarifies that the EAC in a water-cooled blanket does not seem to be acritical issue. However, some uncertainties about influences on water temperatures, water chemistries and stress conditions may affect on the EAC. Considerations and further investigations elucidating the uncertainties are discussed.

Miwa, Yukio; Tsukada, Takashi; Jitsukawa, Shiro

355

Method and apparatus for enhancing reactor air-cooling system performance  

DOEpatents

An enhanced decay heat removal system is disclosed for removing heat from the inert gas-filled gap space between the reactor vessel and the containment vessel of a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. Multiple cooling ducts in flow communication with the inert gas-filled gap space are incorporated to provide multiple flow paths for the inert gas to circulate to heat exchangers which remove heat from the inert gas, thereby introducing natural convection flows in the inert gas. The inert gas in turn absorbs heat directly from the reactor vessel by natural convection heat transfer. 6 figs.

Hunsbedt, A.

1996-03-12

356

A Preliminary Report on Static Analysis of C Code for Nuclear Reactor Protection System  

E-print Network

of a system. US NRC's cybersecurity regulations (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 2010) also require each Commission 2011) in nuclear I&C systems seeks to prevent unauthorized malicious accesses to informationA Preliminary Report on Static Analysis of C Code for Nuclear Reactor Protection System Jong

357

Methanethiol degradation in anaerobic bioreactors at elevated pH (?8): Reactor performance and microbial community analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The degradation of methanethiol (MT) at 30°C under saline–alkaline (pH 8–10, 0.5M Na+) conditions was studied in a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with estuarine sediment from the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands). At a sodium concentration of 0.5M and a pH between 8 and 9 complete MT degradation to sulfide, methane and carbon dioxide was possible at

Robin C. van Leerdam; Frank A. M. de Bok; Monica Bonilla-Salinas; Wim van Doesburg; Bart P. Lomans; Piet N. L. Lens; Alfons J. M. Stams; Albert J. H. Janssen

2008-01-01

358

Sodium coolant purification systems for a nuclear power station equipped with a BN-1200 reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Both traditional coolant purification methods (by means of traps and sorbents for removing cesium), the use of which supported successful operation of nuclear power installations equipped with fast-neutron reactors with a sodium coolant, and the possibility of removing oxygen from sodium through the use of hot traps are analyzed in substantiating the purification system for a nuclear power station equipped with a BN-1200 reactor. It is shown that a cold trap built into the reactor vessel must be a mandatory component of the reactor plant primary coolant circuit's purification system. The use of hot traps allows oxygen to be removed from the sodium coolant down to permissible concentrations when the nuclear power station operates in its rated mode. The main lines of works aimed at improving the performance characteristics of cold traps are suggested based on the results of performed investigations.

Alekseev, V. V.; Kovalev, Yu. P.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kozlov, F. A.; Kumaev, V. Ya.; Kondrat'ev, A. S.; Matyukhin, V. V.; Pirogov, E. P.; Sergeev, G. P.; Sorokin, A. P.; Torbenkova, I. Yu.

2013-05-01

359

Multi-reactor power system configurations for multimegawatt nuclear electric propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modular, multi-reactor power system and vehicle configuration for piloted nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) missions to Mars is presented. Such a design could provide enhanced system and mission reliability, allowing a comfortable safety margin for early manned flights, and would allow a range of piloted and cargo missions to be performed with a single power system design. Early use of common power modules for cargo missions would also provide progressive flight experience and validation of standardized systems for use in later piloted applications. System and mission analysis are presented to compare single and multi-reactor configurations for piloted Mars missions. A conceptual design for the Hydra modular multi-reactor NEP vehicle is presented.

George, Jeffrey A.

1991-01-01

360

Preliminary design of reactor power systems for the manned space base.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of design integration studies of uranium-zirconium hydride (UZr-Hx) reactor power systems for the NASA space base study program are presented. The power conversion systems investigated include the Brayton cycle, the organic Rankine cycle, the SNAP-8 mercury Rankine cycle, and thermoelectric (PbTe). The proposed space base has a 10-year life and requires 100 kWe of power. Two 50-kWe power systems with a nominal replacement life of 5 years are utilized. Parametric design data such as life, weight, radiator area, reactor outlet-temperature, reactor thermal power, and power conversion system efficiency are presented and used for the design and integration of the system with the space base.

Mckhann, G. G.; Coggi, J. V.; Diamond, S. D.

1972-01-01

361

Ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor-MHD system for space nuclear electric power  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The conceptual design of a nuclear space power system based on the ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor with MHD energy conversion is presented. This UF4 fueled gas core cavity reactor operates at 4000 K maximum core temperature and 40 atm. Materials experiments, conducted with UF4 up to 2200 K, demonstrate acceptable compatibility with tungsten-molybdenum-, and carbon-based materials. The supporting nuclear, heat transfer, fluid flow and MHD analysis, and fissioning plasma physics experiments are also discussed.

Maya, Isaac; Anghaie, Samim; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.

1991-01-01

362

Computer based on-line monitoring system for Fast Breeder Test Reactor, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\/Abstract\\/ Fast Breeder reactor uses mixed carbide\\/oxide of Plutonium & Uranium as fuel and liquid sodium as coolant. The temperature of the coolant is measured at outlet of each fuel subassembly by in-core Cr-Al thermocouple. Computer based signal processing system is used to supervise the reactor core against flow blockage, power excursion and clad-hot spot. The neutronic flux is measured

P. Swaminathan; Indira Gandhi

363

Destruction of chlorobenzene and carbon tetrachloride in a two-stage molten salt oxidation reactor system.  

PubMed

Molten salt oxidation (MSO) is one of the promising alternative destruction technologies for chlorinated organics, because it is capable of trapping chlorine during organic destruction. This study investigated the characteristics of a two-stage MSO reactor system for the destruction of CCl(4) and C(6)H(5)Cl. Investigated parameters were the MSO reactor temperature (from 1023 K to 1223 K) and the excess oxidizing air feed rate (50% and 100%). The destruction of chlorinated solvents is substantial in the Li(2)CO(3)-Na(2)CO(3) eutectic molten salt, irrespective of the tested condition. However, further oxidation of CO, which is found to be the major destruction product, is not substantial due to the limited temperature and gas residence time in the MSO reactor. Increases in the reactor temperature as well as those in the oxidizing air feed rate consistently lead to decreased emissions of carbon monoxide. No significant influence of the MSO reactor operating condition on the chlorine capturing efficiency was found. Over 99.95% and 99.997% of the chlorine was captured in the hot MSO reactors during the C(6)H(5)Cl and CCl(4) destructions, respectively. This result suggests a relatively low potential of the MSO system in the recombination of chlorinated organics, when compared to a conventional incineration system. PMID:18501405

Yang, Hee-Chul; Cho, Yong-Jun; Eun, Hee-Chul; Kim, Eung-Ho

2008-08-01

364

Acclimation of the trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic granular sludge and the degradation characteristics in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.  

PubMed

The granulation process was examined in an 8 L laboratory upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor using synthetic wastewater contained trichloroethylene (TCE). Glucose and lactate were used as primary substrates. The anaerobic bacteria biomass were acclimated and granulated by increasing the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and TCE loadings. Anaerobic sludge was acclimated successfully in 120 days in the anaerobic sludge acclimation appliance. Since start-up, the UASB was operated as a continuous-flow reactor under the following operation conditions: temperature of (35 ± 1)°C, pH ? 7.2, hydraulic retention time of 10 h, COD of 2.5 g L(-1) and TCE loading rate from 50.5 to 252.3 mg · (L d)(-1). The UASB reactor was started successfully. The sludge volume index was 13 mL g(-1). The maximum specific methanogenic activity was 1.42 gCOD · (gVSS(.)d)(-1). After 90 days, 85% of COD and 85% of TCE removal efficiencies were achieved. The TCE degrading granular sludge had an average diameter of 2.7 mm and total suspended solid of 52 g L(-1). Anaerobic sludge adsorption of TCE reached adsorption equilibrium in 0.5 h, and in 1 h reached desorption equilibrium. Furthermore, cis-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride were detected, which showed that the removal of TCE was caused by both adsorption and biodegradation but mainly by biodegradation. PMID:24434977

Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yang; Hu, Miao; Jiang, Zhao

2014-01-01

365

Analysis of space reactor system components: Investigation through simulation and non-nuclear testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of fission energy in space power and propulsion systems offers considerable advantages over chemical propulsion. Fission provides over six orders of magnitude higher energy density, which translates to higher vehicle specific impulse and lower specific mass. These characteristics enable ambitious space exploration missions. The natural space radiation environment provides an external source of protons and high energy, high Z particles that can result in the production of secondary neutrons through interactions in reactor structures. Applying the approximate proton source in geosynchronous orbit during a solar particle event, investigation using MCNPX 2.5.b for proton transport through the SAFE-400 heat pipe cooled reactor indicates an incoming secondary neutron current of (1.16 +/- 0.03) x 107 n/s at the core-reflector interface. This neutron current may affect reactor operation during low power maneuvers (e.g., start-up) and may provide a sufficient reactor start-up source. It is important that a reactor control system be designed to automatically adjust to changes in reactor power levels, maintaining nominal operation without user intervention. A robust, autonomous control system is developed and analyzed for application during reactor start-up, accounting for fluctuations in the radiation environment that result from changes in vehicle location or to temporal variations in the radiation field. Development of a nuclear reactor for space applications requires a significant amount of testing prior to deployment of a flight unit. High confidence in fission system performance can be obtained through relatively inexpensive non-nuclear tests performed in relevant environments, with the heat from nuclear fission simulated using electric resistance heaters. A series of non-nuclear experiments was performed to characterize various aspects of reactor operation. This work includes measurement of reactor core deformation due to material thermal expansion and implementation of a virtual reactivity feedback control loop; testing and thermal hydraulic characterization of the coolant flow paths for two space reactor concepts; and analysis of heat pipe operation during start-up and steady state operation.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

366

Extension of the CENTAR system simulation code to thermionic space nuclear reactors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Code for Extended Nonlinear Transient Analysis of Extraterrestial Reactors (CENTAR) is a general-purpose reactor system simulation code capable of modeling coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, neutronic, and control in an arbitrary reactor system (or subsystem) configuration. CENTAR 4.0 has been enhanced to support thermionic solid-core systems as well as liquid-metal systems. Several new models have been added. The fuel model has been enhanced to support two-dimensional heat transfer with multiple material gap interfaces. Gaps may contain thermionic converters. A quasi-steady-state heat-pipe component model has been added to predict operating limits. The thermoelectric/electromagnetic (TEM) pump model in CENTAR has been extended to also model electromagnetic pumps. A thermionic energy conversion model has been added. Numerous other enhancements to code architecture, user interface, and I/O have also been added in version 4.0.

Nassersharif, Bahram; Gaeta, Michael J.; Berge, Francoise; Guffee, Laura; Williams, Ken

367

DynMo: Dynamic Simulation Model for Space Reactor Power Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Dynamic simulation Model (DynMo) for space reactor power systems is developed using the SIMULINK® platform. DynMo is modular and could be applied to power systems with different types of reactors, energy conversion, and heat pipe radiators. This paper presents a general description of DynMo-TE for a space power system powered by a Sectored Compact Reactor (SCoRe) and that employs off-the-shelf SiGe thermoelectric converters. SCoRe is liquid metal cooled and designed for avoidance of a single point failure. The reactor core is divided into six equal sectors that are neutronically, but not thermal-hydraulically, coupled. To avoid a single point failure in the power system, each reactor sector has its own primary and secondary loops, and each loop is equipped with an electromagnetic (EM) pump. A Power Conversion assembly (PCA) and a Thermoelectric Conversion Assembly (TCA) of the primary and secondary EM pumps thermally couple each pair of a primary and a secondary loop. The secondary loop transports the heat rejected by the PCA and the pumps TCA to a rubidium heat pipes radiator panel. The primary loops transport the thermal power from the reactor sector to the PCAs for supplying a total of 145-152 kWe to the load at 441-452 VDC, depending on the selections of the primary and secondary liquid metal coolants. The primary and secondary coolant combinations investigated are lithium (Li)/Li, Li/sodium (Na), Na-Na, Li/NaK-78 and Na/NaK-78, for which the reactor exit temperature is kept below 1250 K. The results of a startup transient of the system from an initial temperature of 500 K are compared and discussed.

El-Genk, Mohamed; Tournier, Jean-Michel

2005-02-01

368

VBÉR-300 reactor system and power-generating units for regional nuclear power production  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic design solutions and characteristics of the VBR-300 reactor system for the power-generating units of 150–300 MW(e)\\u000a nuclear power plants and regional nuclear heat-and-electricity plants are described. The reactor system implemented as a unit\\u000a is based on the technologies and solutions used for marine nuclear power systems, which have been corroborated by experience\\u000a in operating nuclear-powered icebreakers. The technical-economic

V. I. Kostin; V. V. Petrunin; O. B. Samoilov; A. V. Kurachenkov

2007-01-01

369

Treatment of winery effluent with upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)--granular sludges enriched with Enterobacter sakazakii.  

PubMed

Three upflow anaerobic sludge blankets (UASBs) were evaluated for the treatment of winery wastewater: the first was seeded with granular sludge enriched with Enterobacter sakazakii and reached a 90% COD removal within 17 d at hydraulic retention time of 24 h; the second was seeded with brewery granules and achieved 85% COD removal within 50 d, the third was seeded with just sludge and showed the typical problems encountered with conventional sludge seeding and had continuously to be re-seeded. A PCR-based technique was developed for the rapid detection of E. sakazakii in the granular sludge. PMID:14719823

Keyser, M; Witthuhn, R C; Ronquest, L C; Britz, T J

2003-11-01

370

Enhancing VHTR passive safety and economy with thermal radiation based direct reactor auxiliary cooling system  

SciTech Connect

One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The RVACS can be characterized as a surface-based decay heat removal system. It is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to the core volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to the vessel surface area). Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environmental side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or inner graphite reflector blocks. There will be gaps or annular regions formed between these cooling pipes and their corresponding surrounding graphite surfaces. Graphite has an excellent heat conduction property. By taking advantage of this feature, we can have a volume-based method to remove decay heat. The scalability can be achieved, if needed, by employing more rows of cooling pipes to accommodate higher decay heat rates. Since heat can easily conduct through the graphite regions among the holes made for the cooling pipes, those cooling pipes located further away from the active core region can still be very effective in removing decay heat. By removing the limit on the decay heat removal capability due to the limited available surface area as in a RVACS, the reactor power density and therefore the reactor power can be significantly increased, without losing the passive heat removal feature. This paper introduces the concept of using DRACS to enhance VHTR passive safety and economics. Three design options with different cooling pipe locations are discussed. Analysis results from a lumped volume based model and CFD simulations are presented. (authors)

Zhao, H.; Zhang, H.; Zou, L. [Idaho National Laboratory (United States); Sun, X. [Ohio State Univ. (United States)

2012-07-01

371

Conceptual design of a deuterium-/sup 3/He fueled tandem mirror reactor satellite/breeder system  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe and assess a system of ''nearly'' neutron-free fusion reactors and their fuel breeding source. This breeder is a fusion reactor that produces /sup 3/He for the ''satellite'' reactors. In this study the breeder is a self-sustaining fuel production plant, that is, it neither contributes to the power grid system nor consumes any power from the grid system. The assessment is made with respect to physics, engineering, cost, and safety.

Shuy, G.W.; Dabiri, A.E.; Gurol, H.

1986-05-01

372

An integrated safe shutdown heat removal system for light water reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A design concept is introduced for an integrated safe shutdown heat removal system (ISSS) for light water reactors that is independent of all components and systems outside the primary containment, other than elements of the ISSS itself, which includes an integral stored water supply. A principle theme is to obtain simple, reliable, and highly protected means for water makeup and

J. C. Ebersole; D. Okrent

1976-01-01

373

SOPRAG: a system for boiling water reactors reload pattern optimization using genetic algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used in combination with the steady state nodal core simulator PRESTO-B to create a system for the optimization of reload patterns for Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The system uses the basic GA operators, crossover, mutation and selection over the loading pattern (LP) represented by a combination of fresh and burned fuel assemblies, as well as an

J. L François; H. A López

1999-01-01

374

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from Households  

E-print Network

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from of different integrated low-cost wastewater treatment systems, comprising one ABR as first treatment step filter and a vertical flow constructed wetland. A mixture of septage and domestic wastewater was used

Richner, Heinz

375

A RESEARCH ON SEAMLESS PLATFORM CHANGE OF REACTOR PROTECTION SYSTEM FROM PLC TO FPGA  

E-print Network

-critical systems such as RPS (Reactor Protection System) for nuclear power plants. The software loaded into a PLC with an example of a preliminary version of RPS in a Korean nuclear power plant, from software requirements of PLC 1. INTRODUCTION A safety grade PLC is an industrial digital computer used to develop safety

376

Behavior of 241Am in fast reactor systems - a safeguards perspective  

SciTech Connect

Advanced fuel-cycle developments around the world currently under development are exploring the possibility of disposing of {sup 241}Am from spent fuel recycle processes by burning this material in fast reactors. For safeguards practitioners, this approach could potentially complicate both fresh- and spent-fuel safeguards measurements. The increased ({alpha},n) production in oxide fuels from the {sup 241}Am increases the uncertainty in coincidence assay of Pu in MOX assemblies and will require additional information to make use of totals-based neutron assay of these assemblies. We have studied the behavior of {sup 241}Am-bearing MOX fuel in the fast reactor system and the effect on neutron and gamma-ray source-terms for safeguards measurements. In this paper, we will present the results of simulations of the behavior of {sup 241}Am in a fast breeder reactor system. Because of the increased use of MOX fuel in thermal reactors and advances in fuel-cycle designs aimed at americium disposal in fast reactors, we have undertaken a brief study of the behavior of americium in these systems to better understand the safeguards impacts of these new approaches. In this paper we will examine the behavior of {sup 241}Am in a variety of nuclear systems to provide insight into the safeguards implications of proposed Am disposition schemes.

Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lafleur, Adrienne M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

377

Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turbo alternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

2009-01-01

378

Ethanol and toluene removal in a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor in the presence of sulfate.  

PubMed

In this study it is reported the operation of a horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB) reactor under sulfate-reducing condition which was also exposed to different amounts of ethanol and toluene. The system was inoculated with sludge taken from up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors treating refuses from a poultry slaughterhouse. The HAIB reactor comprised of an immobilized biomass on polyurethane foam and ferrous and sodium sulfate solutions were used (91 and 550 mg/L, respectively), to promote a sulfate-reducing environment. Toluene was added at an initial concentration of 2.0 mg/L followed by an increased range of different amendments (5, 7, and 9 mg/L). Ethanol was added at an initial concentration of 170 mg/L followed by an increased range of 960 mg/L. The reactor was operated at 30(+/-2) degrees C with hydraulic detention time of 12 h. Organic matter removal efficiency was close to 90% with a maximum toluene degradation rate of 0.06 mg(toluene)/mg(vss)/d. Sulfate reduction was close to 99.9% for all-nutritional amendments. Biofilm microscopic characterization revealed a diversity of microbial morphologies and DGGE-profiling showed a variation of bacterial and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) populations, which were significantly associated with toluene amendments. Diversity of archaea remained unaltered during the different phases of this experiment. Thus, this study demonstrates that compact units of HAIB reactors, under sulfate reducing conditions, are a potential alternative for in situ aromatics bioremediation. PMID:15915510

Cattony, E B M; Chinalia, F A; Ribeiro, R; Zaiat, M; Foresti, E; Varesche, M B A

2005-07-20

379

Expert system connected to the University of Texas Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A PC-based system for implementing and evaluating expert system strategies has been developed to operate with the UT-TRIGA. A primary purpose for the system development is to research methods of improving digital control system reliability. One proposal currently being investigated is the use of program functional diversity by applying functionally different programming techniques.

Bauer, T.L.; Wehring, B.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States)

1994-12-31

380

Lunar in-core thermionic nuclear reactor power system conceptual design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a conceptual design of a lunar in-core thermionic reactor power system. The concept consists of a thermionic reactor located in a lunar excavation with surface mounted waste heat radiators. The system was integrated with a proposed lunar base concept representative of recent NASA Space Exploration Initiative studies. The reference mission is a permanently-inhabited lunar base requiring a 550 kWe, 7 year life central power station. Performance parameters and assumptions were based on the Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification Program. Five design cases were analyzed ranging from conservative to advanced. The cases were selected to provide sensitivity effects on the achievement of TFE program goals.

Mason, Lee S.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Gallup, Donald R.

1991-01-01

381

Characterization of a New Continuous Air Monitoring System For the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A continuous air monitor (CAM) is a critical piece of equipment to support radiation safety in nuclear facilities where the generation of airborne radioactivity is a possibility for either normal operations or accident scenarios. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor is planning to install a new CAM system manufactured by Canberra Industries for monitoring airborne radioactive particulates. In this study, the new CAM was evaluated to determine 1) baseline response, 2) response to high exposure rates, 3) appropriate background compensation, 4) detection limits, and 5) alarm settings. The results of this study will help to properly integrate the new CAM into the reactor radiation monitoring system.

Alqahtani, Mohammad Saad

382

System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Natural-Circulation Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multidimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural-circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 300-MW(thermal) lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400-MW(electric) lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactor designed by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. The primary reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) is prepared for the JNC concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 s after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 deg. C because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporarily reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system, and the outlet temperature decreases successfully.

Sakai, Takaaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan); Enuma, Yasuhiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan); Iwasaki, Takashi [Nuclear Energy System, Inc. (Japan)

2004-03-15

383

System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth Cooled Natural Circulated Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth cooled natural circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 100 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled natural circulation reactor designed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. PRACS (Primary Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System) is prepared for the JNC's concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 sec after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 Centigrade, because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporary reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system and the out let temperature decreases successfully. (authors)

Takaaki Sakai; Yasuhiro Enuma [O-arai Engineering Center, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Narita 4002, O-arai, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Takashi Iwasaki [Nuclear Energy System Inc. Narita 4002, O-arai, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan); Kazuhiro Ohyama [Advanced Reactor Technology Co. Ltd., 15-1 Tomihisa-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 162-0067 (Japan)

2002-07-01

384

Utilizing a Russian space nuclear reactor for a United States space mission: Systems integration issues  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a US spacecraft One component is the Topaz II Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz II reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz II was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz II, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons teamed regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

Reynolds, E.; Schaefer, E. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Polansky, G.; Lacy, J. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bocharov, A. [GDBMB, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1993-09-30

385

Operation of Fusion Reactors in One Atmosphere of Air Instead of Vacuum Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Engineering design studies of both magnetic and inertial fusion power plants have assumed that the plasma will undergo fusion reactions in a vacuum environment. Operation under vacuum requires an expensive additional major system for the reactor-a vacuum vessel with vacuum pumping, and raises the possibility of sudden unplanned outages if the vacuum containment is breached. It would be desirable in many respects if fusion reactors could be made to operate at one atmosphere with air surrounding the plasma, thus eliminating the requirement of a pressure vessel and vacuum pumping. This would have obvious economic, reliability, and engineering advantages for currently envisaged power plant reactors; it would make possible forms of reactor control not possible under vacuum conditions (i.e. adiabatic compression of the fusion plasma by increasing the pressure of surrounding gas); it would allow reactors used as aircraft engines to operate as turbojets or ramjets in the atmosphere, and it would allow reactors used as fusion rockets to take off from the surface of the earth instead of low earth orbit.

Roth, J. Reece

2009-07-01

386

OPERATION OF FUSION REACTORS IN ONE ATMOSPHERE OF AIR INSTEAD OF VACUUM SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Engineering design studies of both magnetic and inertial fusion power plants have assumed that the plasma will undergo fusion reactions in a vacuum environment. Operation under vacuum requires an expensive additional major system for the reactor-a vacuum vessel with vacuum pumping, and raises the possibility of sudden unplanned outages if the vacuum containment is breached. It would be desirable in many respects if fusion reactors could be made to operate at one atmosphere with air surrounding the plasma, thus eliminating the requirement of a pressure vessel and vacuum pumping. This would have obvious economic, reliability, and engineering advantages for currently envisaged power plant reactors; it would make possible forms of reactor control not possible under vacuum conditions (i.e. adiabatic compression of the fusion plasma by increasing the pressure of surrounding gas); it would allow reactors used as aircraft engines to operate as turbojets or ramjets in the atmosphere, and it would allow reactors used as fusion rockets to take off from the surface of the earth instead of low earth orbit.

Roth, J. Reece [UT Plasma Sciences Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States)

2009-07-26

387

Reactor control system upgrade for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center Sacramento, CA.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a new reactor control system for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Facility. This new control system not only provides the same functionality as the existing control system in terms of graphic displays of reactor process variables, data archival capability, and manual, automatic, pulse and square-wave modes of operation, but adds to the functionality of the previous control system by incorporating signal processing algorithms for the validation of sensors and automatic calibration and verification of control rod worth curves. With the inclusion of these automated features, the intent of this control system is not to replace the operator but to make the process of controlling the reactor easier and safer for the operator. For instance, an automatic control rod calibration method reduces the amount of time to calibrate control rods from days to minutes, increasing overall reactor utilization. The control rod calibration curve, determined using the automatic calibration system, can be validated anytime after the calibration, as long as the reactor power is between 50W and 500W. This is done by banking all of the rods simultaneously and comparing the tabulated rod worth curves with a reactivity computer estimate. As long as the deviation between the tabulated values and the reactivity estimate is within a prescribed error band, then the system is in calibration. In order to minimize the amount of information displayed, only the essential flux-related data are displayed in graphical format on the control screen. Information from the sensor validation methods is communicated to the operators via messages, which appear in a message window. The messages inform the operators that the actual process variables do not correlate within the allowed uncertainty in the reactor system. These warnings, however, cannot cause the reactor to shutdown automatically. The reactor operator has the ultimate responsibility of using this information to either keep the reactor operating or to shut the reactor down. In addition to new developments in the signal processing realm, the new control system will be migrating from a PC-based computer platform to a Sun Solaris-based computer platform. The proven history of stability and performance of the Sun Sohuis operating system are the main advantages to this change. The I/O system will also be migrating from a PC-based data collection system, which communicates plant data to the control computer using RS-232 connections, to an Ethernet-based I/O system. The Ethernet Data Acquisition System (EDAS) modules from Intelligent Instrumentation, Inc. provide an excellent solution for embedded control of a system using the more universally-accepted data transmission standard of TCP/IP. The modules contain a PROM, which operates all of the functionality of the I/O module, including the TCP/IP network access. Thus the module does not have an internal, sophisticated operating system to provide functionality but rather a small set hard-coded of instructions, which almost eliminates the possibility of the module failing due to software problems. An internal EEPROM can be modified over the Internet to change module configurations. Once configured, the module is contacted just like any other Internet host using TCP/IP socket calls. The main advantage to this architecture is its flexibility, expandability, and high throughput.

Power, M. A.

1999-03-10

388

Enhancing VHTR Passive Safety and Economy with Thermal Radiation Based Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System  

SciTech Connect

One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The decay heat first is transferred to the core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to the reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface area). When the relative decay heat removal capability decreases, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annular core designs with inner graphite reflector can mitigate this effect; therefore can further increase the reactor power. Another way to increase the reactor power is to increase power density. However, the reactor power is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environment side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or inner graphite reflector blocks. There will be gaps between these cooling pipes and their corresponding surrounding graphite surfaces. Graphite has an excellent heat conduction property. By taking advantage of this feature, we can have a volume-based method to remove decay heat. The scalability can be achieved, if needed, by employing more rows of cooling pipes to accommodate higher decay heat rates. Since heat can easily conduct through the graphite regions between the holes made for the cooling pipes, those cooling pipes located further away from the active core region can still be very effective in removing decay heat. By removing the limit on the decay heat removal capability due to the limited available surface area as in a RVACS, the reactor power and power density can be significantly increased, without losing the passive heat removal feature. This paper will introduce the concept of using DRACS to enhance VHTR passive safety and economics. Three design options will be discussed, depending on the cooling pipe locations. Analysis results from a lumped volume based model and CFD simulations will be presented.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Xiaodong Sun

2012-06-01

389

Treatment of tomato processing wastewater by an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket-anoxic-aerobic system.  

PubMed

The main objective of this study is to assess the achievability of stringent discharge criteria i.e. BOD(5)<15 mg/L, TSS<15 mg/L and NH(4)-N<1mg/L during the treatment of tomato processing wastewater with COD of 2800-15,500 mg/L, BOD(5) of 1750-7950 mg/L, TKN of 48-340 mg/L and NH(4)-N of 21-235 mg/L. Two treatment systems, a UASB-aerobic system and a UASB-anoxic-aerobic system were tested. Furthermore due to alkalinity deficiency, in the raw wastewater, the study explored varying UASB effluent recirculation flowrates to the UASB influent to reduce additional alkalinity requirements. The UASB-anoxic-aerobic system was effective in treating tomato canning wastewater at an overall HRT of 1.75 days while achieving 98.5% BOD(5), 95.6% COD, 84% TSS and 99.5% NH(4)-N removal producing effluent BOD(5), COD, TSS, NH(4)-N, TKN, NO(2)-N, NO(3)-N and PO(4)-P of 10, 70, 15, 0.5, 3, 0, 60 and 4 mg/L, respectively. The biogas yield was 0.43 m(3)/kg COD removed. PMID:16275063

Gohil, Alpesh; Nakhla, George

2006-11-01

390

Study of reactor Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of using Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft was investigated. The primary performance parameters of systems mass and radiator area were determined for systems from 100 to 1000 kW sub e. Mathematical models of all system components were used to determine masses and volumes. Two completely independent systems provide propulsion power so that no single-point failure can jeopardize a mission. The waste heat radiators utilize armored heat pipes to limit meteorite puncture. The armor thickness was statistically determined to achieve the required probability of survival. A 400 kW sub e reference system received primary attention as required by the contract. The components of this system were defined and a conceptual layout was developed with encouraging results. An arrangement with redundant Brayton power systems having a 1500 K (2240 F) turbine inlet temperature was shown to be compatible with the dimensions of the space shuttle orbiter payload bay.

1979-01-01

391

Refurbishment, reloading of the Da Lat Nuclear Research Reactor and renovation of its control system  

SciTech Connect

As the main scientific tool at the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), the Da Lat Nuclear Research Reactor is playing a special role in the development of nuclear application in Viet Nam. Reconstructed from the previous TRIGAMARK II, it has been operating since, 1984, totalling 13,500 hrs. Since November 1992 it has undergone a general inspection followed by a complete refurbishment in response to technical requirement for ensuring its reliability and safety. The reactor, shut down for main inspection and refurbishment tasks until March 1993, was put into operation alternately with the remaining refurbishment works. In pullet the renovation of its control and instrumentation system has been carried out. This has been thought necessary due to spare part procurement problems and the need to modernize the system for improving its reliability. Finally, a programme for reloading the reactor core is being implemented, in order to increase its reserve reactivity.

Tran Ha Anh; Tran Khacan; Trinh Dinh Hal [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)] [and others

1994-12-31

392

Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources  

DOEpatents

Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

Kong, Peter C

2013-11-26

393

Comprehensive safety analysis code system for nuclear fusion reactors I: Model and analyses of overpower events for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive safety analysis code system has been proposed for the quantitative investigation of the safety of nuclear fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). As a first step, the plasma dynamics and the thermal characteristics of the core internal structures have been developed by a one-point model and a time-dependent one-dimensional heat transfer model, respectively. The

T. Honda; T. Uda; K. Maki; T. Okazaki; Y. Seki; I. Aoki

1994-01-01

394

A Conceptual Multi-Megawatt System Based on a Tungsten CERMET Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. A conceptual reactor system to support Multi-Megawatt Nuclear Electric Propulsion is investigated within this paper. The reactor system consists of a helium cooled Tungsten-UN fission core, surrounded by a beryllium neutron reflector and 13 B4C control drums coupled to a high temperature Brayton power conversion system. Excess heat is rejected via carbon reinforced heat pipe radiators and the gamma and neutron flux is attenuated via segmented shielding consisting of lithium hydride and tungsten layers. Turbine inlet temperatures ranging from 1300 K to 1500 K are investigated for their effects on specific powers and net electrical outputs ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW. The reactor system is estimated to have a mass, which ranges from 15 Mt at 1 MWe and a turbine inlet temperature of 1500 K to 1200 Mt at 100 MWe and a turbine temperature of 1300 K. The reactor systems specific mass ranges from 32 kg/kWe at a turbine inlet temperature of 1300 K and a power of 1 MWe to 9.5 kg/kW at a turbine temperature of 1500 K and a power of 100 MWe.

Jonathan A. Webb; Brian Gross

2011-02-01

395

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOEpatents

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-12-07

396

Assessing the influence of reactor system design criteria on the performance of model colon fermentation units.  

PubMed

Fermentation reactor systems are a key platform in studying intestinal microflora, specifically with respect to questions surrounding the effects of diet. In this study, we develop computational representations of colon fermentation reactor systems as a way to assess the influence of three design elements (number of reactors, emptying mechanism, and inclusion of microbial immobilization) on three performance measures (total biomass density, biomass composition, and fibre digestion efficiency) using a fractional-factorial experimental design. It was determined that the choice of emptying mechanism showed no effect on any of the performance measures. Additionally, it was determined that none of the design criteria had any measurable effect on reactor performance with respect to biomass composition. It is recommended that model fermentation systems used in the experimenting of dietary effects on intestinal biomass composition be streamlined to only include necessary system design complexities, as the measured performance is not benefited by the addition of microbial immobilization mechanisms or semi-continuous emptying scheme. Additionally, the added complexities significantly increase computational time during simulation experiments. It was also noted that the same factorial experiment could be directly adapted using in vitro colon fermentation systems. PMID:24216456

Moorthy, Arun S; Eberl, Hermann J

2014-04-01

397

Applications of nuclear reactor power systems to electric propulsion missions.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of nuclear electric propulsion systems (NEP) has been evaluated for a wide variety of missions in an attempt to establish the commonality of NEP system requirements. Emphasis was given to those requirements and system characteristics that serve as guidelines for current technology development programs. Various interactions and tradeoffs between NEP system and mission parameters are described. The results show that the most significant factors in selecting NEP system size are launch mode (direct or spiral escape) and, to a weaker extent, launch vehicle capability. Other factors such as mission, payload, and thrust time constraints, have little influence, thus allowing one NEP system to be used for many missions. The results indicated that a 100 kWe NEP would be suitable for most direct escape missions and a 250 kWe NEP system would be suitable for more demanding missions that use the spiral escape mode.

Schaupp, R. W.; Sawyer, C. D.

1971-01-01

398

Atmospheric reentry of the in-core thermionic SP-100 reactor system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presumed end-of-life atmospheric reentry of the GA SP-100 system was studied to assess dispersal feasibility and associated hazards. Reentry was studied by sequential use of an orbital trajectory and a heat analysis computer program. Two heating models were used. The first model assumed a thermal equilibrium condition between the stagnation point aerodynamic heating and the radiative cooling of the skin material surface. The second model allowed for infinite conductivity of the skin material. Four reentering configurations were studied representing stages of increased SP-100 breakup: (1) radiator, shield and reactor, (2) shield and reactor, (3) reactor with control drums, and (4) reactor without control drums. Each reentering configuration was started from a circular orbit at 116 km having an inertial velocity near Mach 25. The assumed failing criterion was the attainment of melting temperature of a critical system component. The reentry analysis revealed breakup of the vessel in the neighborhood of 61 km altitude and scattering of the fuel elements. Subsequent breakup of the fuel elements was not predicted. Oxidation of the niobium skin material was calculated to cause an increase in surface temperature of less than ten percent. The concept of thermite analogs for enhancing reactor reentry dispersal was assessed and found to be feasible in principle. A conservative worst-case hazards analysis was performed for radioactive and nonradioactive toxic SP-100 materials assumed to be dispersed during end-of-life reentry. The hazards associated with this phase of the SP-100 mission were calculated to be insignificant.

Stamatelatos, M. G.; Barsell, A. W.; Harris, P. A.; Francisco, J.

1987-01-01

399

SUSEE: A Compact, Lightweight Space Nuclear Power System Using Present Water Reactor Technology  

SciTech Connect

The SUSEE space reactor system uses existing nuclear fuels and the standard steam cycle to generate electrical and thermal power for a wide range of in-space and surface applications, including manned bases, sub-surface mobile probes to explore thick ice deposits on Mars and the Jovian moons, and mobile rovers. SUSEE cycle efficiency, thermal to electric, ranges from {approx}20 to 24%, depending on operating parameters. Rejection of waste heat is by a lightweight condensing radiator that can be launched as a compact rolled-up package and deployed into flat panels when appropriate. The 50 centimeter diameter SUSEE reactor can provide power over the range of 10 kW(e) to 1 MW(e) for a period of 10 years. Higher power outputs are possible using slightly larger reactors. System specific weight (reactor, turbine, generator, piping, and radiator) is {approx}3 kg/kW(e). Two SUSEE reactor options are described, based on the existing Zr/O2 cermet and the UH3/ZrH2 TRIGA nuclear fuels.

Maise, George; Powell, James; Paniagua, John [Plus Ultra Technologies, Incorporated, Shoreham, NY 11786 (United States)

2006-01-20

400

Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor balance of plant and supporting systems design  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the second in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. It focuses, in particular, upon the supporting systems and the balance of plant (BOP) designs of the Westinghouse SMR. Several Westinghouse SMR systems are classified as safety, and are critical to the safe operation of the Westinghouse SMR. These include the protection and monitoring system (PMS), the passive core cooling system (PXS), and the spent fuel cooling system (SFS) including pools, valves, and piping. The Westinghouse SMR safety related systems include the instrumentation and controls (I and C) as well as redundant and physically separated safety trains with batteries, electrical systems, and switch gears. Several other incorporated systems are non-safety related, but provide functions for plant operations including defense-in-depth functions. These include the chemical volume control system (CVS), heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems, component cooling water system (CCS), normal residual heat removal system (RNS) and service water system (SWS). The integrated performance of the safety-related and non-safety related systems ensures the safe and efficient operation of the Westinghouse SMR through various conditions and transients. The turbine island consists of the turbine, electric generator, feedwater and steam systems, moisture separation systems, and the condensers. The BOP is designed to minimize assembly time, shipping challenges, and on-site testing requirements for all structures, systems, and components. (authors)

Memmott, M. J.; Stansbury, C.; Taylor, C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01

401

Space reactor/Stirling cycle systems for high power Lunar applications  

SciTech Connect

NASA`s Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has proposed the use of high power nuclear power systems on the lunar surface as a necessary alternative to solar power. Because of the long lunar night ({approximately} 14 earth days) solar powered systems with the requisite energy storage in the form of regenerative fuel cells or batteries becomes prohibitively heavy at high power levels ({approximately} 100 kWe). At these high power levels nuclear power systems become an enabling technology for variety of missions. One way of producing power on the lunar surface is with an SP-100 class reactor coupled with Stirling power converters. In this study, analysis and characterization of the SP-100 class reactor coupled with Free Piston Stirling Power Conversion (FPSPC) system will be performed. Comparison of results with previous studies of other systems, particularly Brayton and Thermionic, are made.

Schmitz, P.D. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Mason, L.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

1994-09-01

402

Development of a High Fidelity System Analysis Code for Generation IV Reactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditional nuclear reactor system analysis codes such as RELAP and TRAC employ an operator split methodology. In this approach, each of the physics (fluid flow, heat conduction and neutron diffusion) is solved separately and the coupling terms are done explicitly. This approach limits accuracy (first order in time at best) and makes the codes slow in running since the explicit

Hongbin Zhang; Vincent A. Mousseau; Haihua Zhao

2008-01-01

403

A modified batch reactor system to study equilibrium-reactive transport problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is difficult to design column experiments to study transport processes involving slow geochemical reactions that require long residence times to reach equilibrium. We propose a sequential equilibration reactor (SER) setup to study such equilibrium geochemical reactive transport problems. The proposed system consists of sequentially operated batch reactors that directly mimic typical one-dimensional grids used in numerical reactive transport models. The SER experimental setup has the characteristics of batch experiments and provides complete control over the reaction time; in addition, the setup also includes certain simple transport features. We conducted several single-reactor and multiple-reactor SER experiments to investigate arsenic adsorption and transport on iron-oxide coated sand, at different pH, solid-solution ratio, and initial arsenic concentration conditions. The data generated from the experiments are compared against predictions from a geochemical transport code (PHREEQCI) that used previously developed surface complexation model parameters to describe the reaction system. The model predictions matched the SER experimental data well. The proposed SER system provides a flexible alternative to column experiments and allows better control over system parameters such as pH, reaction time, and solid-solution ratio.

Jeppu, Gautham P.; Clement, T. Prabhakar; Barnett, Mark O.; Lee, Kang-Kun

2012-03-01

404

Oxidative destabilization of dissolved organics and E. coli in domestic wastewater through immobilized cell reactor system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Domestic wastewater contains a considerable amount of pathogenic organisms besides non-biodegradable organics. The conventional technologies followed for the treatment of domestic wastewater are less efficient in removing pathogenic organisms despite substantial removal of dissolved organics. The focal theme of the present investigation was to use a chemo-autotrophic activated carbon oxidation (CAACO) system, an immobilized cell reactor using chemoautotrophs (Bacillus sp.)

G. Sekaran; K. Ramani; A. Ganesh Kumar; B. Ravindran; L. John Kennedy; A. Gnanamani

2007-01-01

405

Development of optical components for in-vessel viewing systems used for fusion experimental reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optical components including imagefiber, periscope, glass, reflecting mirror and adhesive for lens are essential elements of in-vessel viewing system use for fusion experimental reactor and extensive of gamma irradiation tests have been conducted. These components were irradiated in the range of 1 MGy - 100 MGy under the average exposure dose rate of 1 X 106 R\\/h. As a result,

Kenjiro Obara; Satoshi Kakudate; Kiyoshi Oka; Eisuke Tada; Yosuke Morita; Masahiro Seki

1994-01-01

406

Mars, the Moon, and the Ends of the Earth: Autonomy for Small Reactor Power Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been considering deep space missions that utilize a small-reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power. Additionally, application of SRPS modules as a planetary power source is being investigated to enable a continuous human presence for nonpolar lunar sites and on Mars. A SRPS can

Wood; Richard Thomas

2008-01-01

407

Performance of the liquid reactivity control system in BWRs (boiling water reactors)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boiling water reactors rely on the injection of soluble neutron absorbers to control power in case of failure in the control rod (scram) system. Typically this liquid poison'' is injected from eight small holes on a standpipe positioned vertically near the outer edge of the core shroud in the lower plenum. The achievement of control is predicated on good mixing

T. G. Theofanous; E. A. Shabana

1989-01-01

408

A Concept of Passive Safety, Pressurized Water Reactor System with Inherent Matching Nature of Core Heat Generation and Heat Removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reduction of manpower in operation and maintenance by simplification of the system are essential to improve the safety and the economy of future light water reactors. At the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), a concept of a simplified passive safety reactor system JPSR was developed for this purpose and in the concept minimization of developing work and conservation

Yoshio MURAO; Fumimasa ARAYA; Takamichi IWAMURA; Keisuke OKUMURA

1995-01-01

409

Determination of glycerol in alcoholic beverages using packed bed reactors with immobilized glycerol dehydrogenase and an amperometric FIA system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A flow injection analysis system incorporating amperometric detection and enzyme reactor for glycerol determination in alcoholic beverages is described. The reactor is based on the glycerol dehydrogenase system, and the enzyme was immobilized through chemical modification on several supporting materials such as aminopropyl and isothiocyanate controlled pore glass, aminopolystyrene resin and m-aminobenzyloxymethyl cellulose. NADH, the product of the enzymatic reaction,

M. I. Prodromidis; C. D. Stalikas; S. M. Tzouwara-Karayanni; M. I. Karayannis

1996-01-01

410

Operating Experience Feedback Report - Air Systems Problems: Commercial Power Reactors,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential failures of safety-related systems in U.S. plants that resulted from degraded or malfunctioning non-safety grade air systems. Based upon the evaluation of these events, the...

H. L. Ornstein

1987-01-01

411

Space reactor system and subsystem investigations: assessment of technology issues for the reactor and shield subsystem. SP-100 Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of Rockwell's effort on the SP-100 Program, preliminary assessment has been completed of current nuclear technology as it relates to candidate reactor/shield subsystems for the SP-100 Program. The scope of the assessment was confined to the nuclear package (to the reactor and shield subsystems). The nine generic reactor subsystems presented in Rockwell's Subsystem Technology Assessment Report, ESG-DOE-13398, were addressed for the assessment.

Atkins, D.F.; Lillie, A.F.

1983-06-30

412

SAFIRE: A systems analysis code for ICF (inertial confinement fusion) reactor economics  

SciTech Connect

The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis for ICF Reactor Economics) code incorporates analytical models for scaling the cost and performance of several inertial confinement fusion reactor concepts for electric power. The code allows us to vary design parameters (e.g., driver energy, chamber pulse rate, net electric power) and evaluate the resulting change in capital cost of power plant and the busbar cost of electricity. The SAFIRE code can be used to identify the most attractive operating space and to identify those design parameters with the greatest leverage for improving the economics of inertial confinement fusion electric power plants.

McCarville, T.J.; Meier, W.R.; Carson, C.F.; Glasgow, B.B.

1987-01-12

413

Response of a thermal barrier system to acoustic excitation in a gas turbine nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine located within a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) induces high acoustic sound pressure levels into the primary coolant (helium). This acoustic loading induces high cycle fatigue stresses which may control the design of the thermal barrier system. This study examines the dynamic response of a thermal barrier configuration consisting of a fibrous insulation compressed against the reactor vessel by a coverplate which is held in position by a central attachment fixture. The results of dynamic vibration analyses indicate the effect of the plate size and curvature and the attachment size on the response of the thermal barrier.

Betts, W.S. Jr.; Blevins, R.D.

1980-11-01

414

Reduction of worldwide plutonium inventories using conventional reactors and advanced fuels: A systems study  

SciTech Connect

The potential for reducing plutonium inventories in the civilian nuclear fuel cycle through recycle in LWRs of a variety of mixed-oxide forms is examined by means of a cost-based plutonium-flow systems model that includes an approximate measure of proliferation risk. The impact of plutonium recycle in a number of forms is examined, including the introduction of nonfertile fuels into conventional (LWR) reactors to reduce net plutonium generation, to increase plutonium burnup, and to reduce exo-reactor plutonium inventories.

Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Chodak, P. III [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.

1997-09-01

415

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOEpatents

A method and system are disclosed for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod. 12 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.; Lambert, J.B.; Herzog, J.P.

1997-02-11

416

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOEpatents

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01

417

Flow-induced vibration and instability of some nuclear-reactor-system components. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

The high-velocity coolant flowing through a reactor system component is a source of energy that can induce component vibration and instability. In fact, many reactor components have suffered from excessive vibration and/or dynamic instability. The potential for detrimental flow-induced vibration makes it necessary that design engineers give detailed considerations to the flow-induced vibration problems. Flow-induced-vibration studies have been performed in many countries. Significant progress has been made in understanding the different phenomena and development of design guidelines to avoid damaging vibration. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the recent progress in several selected areas, to discuss some new results and to indentify future research needs. Specifically, the following areas will be presented: examples of flow-induced-vibration problems in reactor components; excitation mechanisms and component response characteristics; instability mechanisms and stability criteria; design considerations; and future research needs.

Chen, S.S.

1983-01-01

418

Transient thermal analysis of a space reactor power system  

E-print Network

an expression for energy generation due to fission as well as s term that accounts for energy generation {'r om decay heat. The thermoelectric heat exchanger model accounts for energy conversion to useful electrical output v hich is handled by a posver.... The radiator emissivity is allowed to degrade, resulting in higher temperatures throughout the system, The electrical load on the thermoelectrics is dropped to observe the effect on the temperatures of the system. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author would like...

Gaeta, Michael J.

2012-06-07

419

Development of a novel integrated continuous reactor system for biocatalytic production of biodiesel.  

PubMed

A novel integrated immobilized enzyme-reactor system involving a continuous stirred tank reactor with two packed bed reactors in series was developed for the continuous production of biodiesel. The problem of methanol solubility into oil was solved by introducing a stirred tank reactor to dissolve methanol into partially converted oil. This step made the process perfectly continuous without requiring any organic solvent and intermittent methanol addition in the process. The substrate feeding rate of 0.74 mL/min and enzyme loading of 0.75 g per reactor were determined to be optimum for maximum biodiesel yield. The integrated continuous process was stable up to 45 cycles with biodiesel productivity of 137.2 g/L/h, which was approximately 5 times higher than solvent free batch process. In comparison with the processes reported in literature using expensive Novozyme 435 and hazardous organic solvent, the present process is completely green and perfectly continuous with economic and environmental advantages. PMID:24001564

Chattopadhyay, Soham; Sen, Ramkrishna

2013-11-01

420

Addition of soluble and insoluble neutron absorbers to the reactor coolant system of TMI-2  

SciTech Connect

The physical and chemical properties of six elements were studied and combined with cost estimates to determine the feasibility of adding them to the TMI-2 reactor coolant to depress k/sub eff/ to less than or equal to 0.95. Both soluble and insoluble forms of the elements B, Cd, Gd, Li, Sm, and Eu were examined. Criticality calculations were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the absorber concentration required to meet the 0.95 k/sub eff/ criterion. The conclusion reached is that all elements with the exception of boron have overriding disadvantages which preclude their use in this reactor. Solubility experiments in the reactor coolant show that boron solubility is the same as that of boron in pure aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide and boric acid; consequently, solubility is not a limiting factor in reaching the k/sub eff/ criterion. Examination of the effect of pH on sodium requirements and costs for processing to remove radionuclides revealed a sharp dependence; small decreases in pH lead to a large decrease in both sodium requirements and processing costs. Boron addition to meet any contemplated reactor safety requirements can be accomplished with existing equipment; however, this addition must be made with the reactor coolant system filled and pressurized to ensure uniform boron concentration.

Hansen, R.F.; Silverman, J.; Queen, S.P.; Ryan, R.F.; Austin, W.E.

1984-07-01

421

Circulation system for flowing uranium hexafluoride cavity reactor experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research related to determining the feasibility of producing continuous power from fissile fuel in the gaseous state is presented. The development of three laboratory-scale flow systems for handling gaseous UF6 at temperatures up to 500 K, pressure up to approximately 40 atm, and continuous flow rates up to approximately 50g/s is presented. A UF6 handling system fabricated for static critical tests currently being conducted is described. The system was designed to supply UF6 to a double-walled aluminum core canister assembly at temperatures between 300 K and 400 K and pressure up to 4 atm. A second UF6 handling system designed to provide a circulating flow of up to 50g/s of gaseous UF6 in a closed-loop through a double-walled aluminum core canister with controlled temperature and pressure is described. Data from flow tests using UF6 and UF6/He mixtures with this system at flow rates up to approximately 12g/s and pressure up to 4 atm are presented. A third UF6 handling system fabricated to provide a continuous flow of UF6 at flow rates up to 5g/s and at pressures up to 40 atm for use in rf-heated, uranium plasma confinement experiments is described.

Jaminet, J. F.; Kendall, J. S.

1976-01-01

422

Startup thaw concept for the SP-100 space reactor power system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thaw concept for a space reactor power system which employs lithium as a circulant for both the heat-transport and the heat-rejection fluid loops is presented. An exemplary thermal analysis for a 100-kWe (i.e., SP-100) system is performed. It is shown that the design of the thaw system requires a thorough knowledge of the various physical states of the circulant throughout the system, both spatially and temporally, and that the design has to provide adequate margins for the system to avoid a structural or thermally induced damage.

Kirpich, A.; Das, A.; Choe, H.; Mcnamara, E.; Switick, D.; Bhandari, P.

1990-01-01

423

A 300 W laboratory reactor system for chemical-looping combustion with particle circulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a method to burn gaseous fuels with inherent separation of carbon dioxide. A continuously operated laboratory reactor system for chemical-looping combustion with two interconnected fluidized beds was designed and built. This chemical-looping combustor was designed to operate with a fuel flow corresponding to 100–300W. The CLC system was operated successfully using a highly reactive nickel-based oxygen-carrier.

Eva Johansson; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt; Hilmer Thunman

2006-01-01

424

Survey of Remote Area Monitoring Systems at U.S. Light-Water-Cooled Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A study was made of the capabilities and operating practices, including calibration, of remote area monitoring (RAM) systems at light-water-cooled power reactors in the United States. The information was obtained by mail questionaire. Specific design capabilities, including range, readout and alarm features are documented along with the numbers and location of detectors, calibration and operational procedures. Comments of respondents regarding RAM systems are also included.

Kathren, R. L.; Mileham, A. P.

1982-04-01

425

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS AS RESERVOIRS AND REACTORS FOR INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper provides a review of numerous drinking water and geochemical investigations and recent studies of pipe deposits and water treatment materials. This analysis shows that there is growing evidence from analogous natural water systems and some analytical studies that many ...

426

Gaseous fission product management for molten salt reactors and vented fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

Fission gas disposal is one of the unresolved difficulties for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) and advanced reactors with vented fuel systems. As these systems operate, they produce many radioactive isotopes of xenon and krypton (e.g. {sup 135}Xe t{sub 1/2} = 9.14 hours and {sup 85}Kr t{sub 1/2}= 10.73 years). Removing these gases proves vital to the success of such reactor designs for two reasons. First, the gases act as large neutron sinks which decrease reactivity and must be counterbalanced by increasing fuel loading. Second, for MSRs, inert fission product gases naturally separate quickly from high temperature salts, thus creating high vapor pressure which poses safety concerns. For advanced reactors with solid vented fuel, the gases are allowed to escape into an off-gas system and thus must be managed. Because of time delays in transport of fission product gases in vented fuel systems, some of the shorter-lived radionuclides will decay away thereby reducing the fission gas source term relative to an MSR. To calculate the fission gas source term of a typical molten salt reactor, we modeled a 1000 MWe graphite moderated thorium MSR similar to that detailed in Mathieu et al. [1]. The fuel salt used in these calculations was LiF (78 mole percent) - (HN)F 4 (22 mole percent) with a heavy nuclide composition of 3.86% {sup 233}U and 96.14% {sup 232}Th by mass. Before we can remove the fission product gases produced by this reactor configuration, we must first develop an appropriate storage mechanism. The gases could be stored in pressurized containers but then one must be concerned about bottle failure. Methods to trap noble gases in matrices are expensive and complex. Alternatively, there are direct storage/disposal options: direct injection into the Earth or injecting a grout-based product into the Earth. Advances in drilling technologies, hydro fracture technologies, and methods for the sequestration of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel plants are creating new options for disposal of fission gas wastes. In each option, lithostatic pressure, a kilometer or more underground, eliminates the pressure driving force for noble gas release and dissolves any untrapped gas in deep groundwater or into incorporated solid waste forms. The options, challenges, and potential for these methods to dispose of gaseous fission products are described. With this research, we hope to help both MSRs and other advanced reactors come one step closer to commercialization. (authors)

Messenger, S. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 54-1717, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 24-207, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Massie, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., NW12-230, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2012-07-01

427

Multiplying steady-state culture in multi-reactor system.  

PubMed

Cultivation of microorganisms in batch experiments is fast and economical but the conditions therein change constantly, rendering quantitative data interpretation difficult. By using chemostat with controlled environmental conditions the physiological state of microorganisms is fixed; however, the unavoidable stabilization phase makes continuous methods resource consuming. Material can be spared by using micro scale devices, which however have limited analysis and process control capabilities. Described herein are a method and a system combining the high throughput of batch with the controlled environment of continuous cultivations. Microorganisms were prepared in one bioreactor followed by culture distribution into a network of bioreactors and continuation of independent steady state experiments therein. Accelerostat cultivation with statistical analysis of growth parameters demonstrated non-compromised physiological state following distribution, thus the method effectively multiplied steady state culture of microorganisms. The theoretical efficiency of the system was evaluated in inhibitory compound analysis using repeated chemostat to chemostat transfers. PMID:24861314

Erm, Sten; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

2014-11-01

428

Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor  

DOEpatents

A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Nesbitt, Loyd B. (San Jose, CA)

1997-01-01

429

Reviewing real-time performance of nuclear reactor safety systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining real-time performance of computer-based safety systems used in nuclear power plants. Three areas of guidance are covered in this report. The first area covers how to determine if, when, and what prototypes should be required of developers to make a convincing demonstration that specific problems have been solved or that performance goals have been met. The second area has recommendations for timing analyses that will prove that the real-time system will meet its safety-imposed deadlines. The third area has description of means for assessing expected or actual real-time performance before, during, and after development is completed. To ensure that the delivered real-time software product meets performance goals, the paper recommends certain types of code-execution and communications scheduling. Technical background is provided in the appendix on methods of timing analysis, scheduling real-time computations, prototyping, real-time software development approaches, modeling and measurement, and real-time operating systems.

Preckshot, G.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-08-01

430