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Sample records for uc riverside botanist

  1. Strong Earthquake Motion Estimates for Three Sites on the U.C. Riverside Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, R.; Elgamal, A.; Heuze, F.; Lai, T.; Lavalle, D.; Lawrence, B.; Liu, P.C.; Matesic, L.; Park, S.; Riemar, M.; Steidl, J.; Vucetic, M.; Wagoner, J.; Yang, Z.

    2000-11-01

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1--initial source and site characterization, drilling, geophysical logging, installation of the seismic station, and initial seismic monitoring, and Phase 2--extended seismic monitoring, dynamic soil testing, calculation of estimated site-specific earthquake strong motions at depth and at the surface, and, where applicable, estimation of the response of selected buildings to the CEP-estimated strong motions.

  2. Joseph Hooker: a philosophical botanist.

    PubMed

    Endersby, Jim

    2008-06-01

    The nineteenth-century British botanist, Joseph Dalton Hooker,was one of the people whose career became a model for that of the modern,professional scientist.However,he preferred to refer to himself as a philosophical botanist, rather than a professional. This paper explores the reasons for this choice,and analyses Hooker's imperial approach to plant classification, the consequences of which are still with us. PMID:18535350

  3. The Greatest Natural Botanist in the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Considers the contributions of John Bartram, a self-taught botanist and farmer in Colonial America. Bartram collected and classified hundreds of North American plant species, eventually enjoying international renown as a botanist. His 102-acre farm and garden in Pennsylvania have been restored and preserved. (MJP)

  4. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  5. UV - RIVERSIDE CA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brewer 112 is located in Riverside CA, measuring ultraviolet solar radiation. Irradiance and column ozone are derived from this data. Ultraviolet solar radiation is measured with a Brewer Mark IV, single-monochrometer, spectrophotometer manufactured by SCI-TEC Instruments, Inc. o...

  6. Cessna UC-78 Bobcat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1944-01-01

    Cessna UC-78 Bobcat: Known by some as the 'Double-breasted Cub, ' the Cessna UC-78 Bobcat was the Cessna model T-50 produced for the Air Corps during World War II as a light personnel transport. Versions were also ordered to train pilots on multi-engine aircraft. This example served with the NACA at Langley from the summer 1944 until summer 1945.

  7. 20. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, Historical Resources Department), S.P. Tresslar, photographer and date unknown. EARLY VIEW OF UNLINED GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL. - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  8. 11. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF WORKERS HARVESTING ORANGES IN GROVES - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  9. 8. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, Historical Resources Department), photographer unknown, ca. 1916. VIEW OF VICTORIA AVENUE FROM COUNTRY CLUB PARK - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  10. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF MISSION INN, SEVENTH STREET ENTRANCE - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  11. 19. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF CITRUS EXPERIMENT STATION - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  12. 17. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF MAGNOLIA AVENUE - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  13. 32. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, Historical Resources Department), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF EARLY ROPE AND ROLL PONY SIZER - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  14. 10. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF DUFFERIN AVENUE AND VEHICLE - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  15. 16. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF MAGNOLIA AVENUE WITH ELECTRIC STREET CAR - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  16. 15. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF BARNS, STABLE AND FIELD EQUIPMENT, ARLINGTON HEIGHTS FRUIT COMPANY, EXACT LOCATION UNKNOWN - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  17. 7. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, Historical Resources Department), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF VICTORIA AVENUE NEAR MYRTLE STREET - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  18. 14. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF OSBORNE CAMP AND STABLES, ARLINGTON HEIGHTS FRUIT COMPANY - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  19. 31. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, Historical Resources Department), photographer unknown, ca. 1900-1910. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF UNKNOWN PACKING HOUSE - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  20. 30. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF SANTA FE RAILROAD TRACKS AND PACHAPPA AVENUE (COMMERCE STREET) LOOKING NORTH - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  1. 5. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF ARLINGTON HEIGHTS CITRUS GROVES - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  2. [A Prussian in Venice: the botanist Melchior Wieland (1520-1589), pioneer in botanical field research in the Levant].

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The Italian physician and botanist Prospero Alpini (1553-1617) is considered as one of the most famous 16th Century Italian botanists having explored the plant species of Egypt and the Near East. Alpinis best-known works as for example De medicina Egyptiorum (Venetijs 1591) or De plantis Aegypti liber (Venetijs 1592), however, wouldn't certainly have been made possible without the influence of his academic teacher, the Prussian physician and botanist Melchior Wieland (ca. 1520-1589), having been applied director of the botanical garden of Padua in 1561. This study is therefore dedicated to the life, academic career, works and reception of this nearly forgotten botanist. PMID:26427159

  3. 75 FR 14465 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Riverside Metropolitan Museum, Riverside, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Riverside Metropolitan Museum, Riverside, CA AGENCY... American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory... divided into San Diego and Imperial Counties, as well as Baja Norte. While the nation of...

  4. 6. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Municipal Museum, Historic Resources Department), photographer unknown, ca. 1902. VIEW OF ARLINGTON HEIGHTS CITRUS GROVES, VICTORIA HILL AND VICTORIA RANCH CHASE HOUSE IN BACKGROUND - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  5. 76 FR 1150 - City of Riverside, CA; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City of Riverside, CA; Notice of Filing December 30, 2010. Take notice that on December 20, 2010, the City of Riverside, California (Riverside) filed a Petition for...

  6. 9. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riverside Library, Local History Collection), photographer unknown, October 1916. FORMER 'VICTORIA BRIDGE' (HOWE DECK TRUSS SUPPORTED BY TRESTLE) LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING STREETCAR AND THATCH-ROOFED, CANTILEVERED PEDESTRIAN PLATFORM - Victoria Bridge, Spanning Tequesquite Arroyo, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  7. 76 FR 3655 - Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin, Riverside-Corona Feeder Project, San Bernardino and Riverside...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... of Intent (NOI) to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement on February 24, 2010 (75 FR 8395). The... Bureau of Reclamation Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin, Riverside-Corona Feeder Project, San Bernardino and... project, including new groundwater wells and a 28- mile water pipeline with pump stations and a...

  8. 75 FR 8395 - Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin, Riverside-Corona Feeder Project, San Bernardino and Riverside...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin, Riverside-Corona Feeder Project, San Bernardino and... recovery project. The project will install new groundwater wells at the Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin in... flows in the Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin during wet years for delivery to communities in...

  9. 2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'SANTA ANA RIVER AT CHINO CREEK, RIVERSIDE COUNTY.' This is an oblique aerial view to the north, looking over the flooded fields between Chino Creek and the Santa Ana River, just upstream of the Prado Dam site. File number written on negative: R & H 80 024. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  10. 75 FR 81604 - City of Riverside, California; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City of Riverside, California; Notice of Filing December 21, 2010. Take notice that on December 13, 2010, the City of Riverside, California submitted its annual revision to...

  11. 78 FR 936 - City of Riverside, California; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City of Riverside, California; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 17, 2012, City of Riverside, California ] submitted its tariff filing per 35.28(e): Filing 2013...

  12. 78 FR 77448 - City of Riverside, California; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City of Riverside, California; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 11, 2013, City of Riverside, California submitted its tariff filing per 35.28(e): 2014...

  13. [Radioecological situation in the Iset riverside settlements].

    PubMed

    Peremyslova, L M; Kostiuchenko, V A; Popova, I Ia; Safronova, N G

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radioecological study of the Iset River and riverside settlements in 1961-2002. In 1961, specific activity of 90Sr in the Iset River water below the Techa River mouth was 44.4 Bq/l and decreased to 3.2 Bq/l in 2002. Annual Techa River run-offinto the Iset River was, on average, 2 x 10(12) Bq of 90Sr in 2000-2004. Density 90Sr-contamination of floodplain soils decreased downstream the Iset River from 146.1 to 37.1 kBq/m2 near the Iset River mouth. In 1977, 90Sr-specific activity of fish muscles was 18 Bq/kg and decreased to 2 Bq/kg in 2002. An average 90Sr-specific activity in milk in settlements located at distances of 12-26 km from the Techa River mouth was 10.2 Bq/l in 1961 and 1.2 Bq/l in 2001. The rate of 90Sr transfer in chain "floodplain soils --> milk" was 2 x 10(-5) (Bq/l)/(Bq/m2). Annual dietary 90Sr-intake by adult residents of the Iset riverside settlements did not exceed an annual limit of intake in 1964-2002. PMID:20143584

  14. 10. View of Riverside Bridge with Steel Reinforcing Rods in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Riverside Bridge with Steel Reinforcing Rods in Place and with 'Tower for Concrete' in the Background. The function of the 'tower for concrete' is uncertain, but may have to do with the transport of concrete from the point of mixing to the point of use (suggestion by NDOT Bridge Section personnel, February 1990). Original snapshot taken July, 1920. - Riverside Bridge, Spanning Truckee River at Booth Street, Reno, Washoe County, NV

  15. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U.C. Santa Barbara campus

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, R.; Nicholson, C.; Steidl, J.; Gurrola, L.; Alex, C.; Cochran, E.; Ely, G.; Tyler, T.

    1997-12-01

    The University of California Campus-Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is an integrated 3 year effort involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and four UC campuses - Los Angeles (UCLA), Riverside (UCR), Santa Barbara (UCSB), and San Diego (UCSD) - plus additional collaborators at San Diego State University (SDSU), at Los Alamos National Laboratory and in industry. The primary purpose of the project is to estimate potential ground motions from large earthquakes and to predict site-specific ground motions for one critical structure on each campus. This project thus combines the disciplines of geology, seismology, geodesy, soil dynamics, and earthquake engineering into a fully integrated approach. Once completed, the CLC project will provide a template to evaluate other buildings at each of the four UC campuses, as well as provide a methodology for evaluating seismic hazards at other critical sites in California, including other UC locations at risk from large earthquakes. Another important objective of the CLC project is the education of students and other professional in the application of this integrated, multidisciplinary, state-of-the-art approach to the assessment of earthquake hazard. For each campus targeted by the CLC project, the seismic hazard study will consist of four phases: Phase I - Initial source and site characterization, Phase II - Drilling, logging, seismic monitoring, and laboratory dynamic soil testing, Phase III - Modeling of predicted site-specific earthquake ground motions, and Phase IV - Calculations of 3D building response. This report cover Phase I for the UCSB campus and incudes results up through March 1997.

  16. uc(Pegasus) Facility Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J. C.; Lewicki, B. T.; Burke, S. P.; Eidietis, N. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Ford, B. A.; Garstka, G. D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Winz, G. R.

    2003-10-01

    Extensive new capabilities have been installed on the uc(Pegasus) ST facility. A new laboratory configuration allows separation of all power systems from the experimental hall. Data acquisition, control, and support facilities have been improved. New magnetic field power supplies utilize unique high-power 2700V IGCT switch modules to provide bipolar waveform control for the high-stress solenoid magnet, while 900V IGBTs provide uni/bipolar control of the PF and TF systems. The coil sets are independently controlled by pulse-width-modulated circuits developed by the HIT group. Capacitor charging, dumping, and monitoring are controlled by a PCI-based multichannel data acquisition and control system. These upgrades will provide: 1) increased V-s and loop voltage control for higher plasma current and suppression of MHD modes; 2) increased toroidal field with fast-ramp capability for improved access to the low-q, high ?t regime; and 3) flexible equilibrium field control for radial position and modest shape control.

  17. Knowledge structures in UC, the UNIX consultant

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    The knowledge structures implemented in UC, the UNIX consultant are sufficient for UC to reply to a large range of user queries in the domain of the UNIX operating system. The author describes how these knowledge structures are used in the natural language tasks of parsing, inference, planning, goal detection, and generation, and how they are organized to enable efficient access even with the large database of an expert system. The structuring of knowledge to provide direct answers to common queries and the high usability and efficiency of knowledge structures allow UC to hold an interactive conversation with a user. 12 references.

  18. Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/14, Rev. "B"; file drawer 77-1/102. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. photocopy on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  19. Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/15, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  20. 76 FR 30754 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Riverside and Orange Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ...: Riverside and Orange Counties, CA AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a proposed highway project in Riverside and Orange... in Riverside and Orange Counties. The State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project proposes to...

  1. Anza-Terwilliger hydrogeologic structures in Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morita, Andrew; Clark, Dennis A.; Morita, Andrew Y.; Martin, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This digital geospatial dataset documents the fault traces in the Anza and Terwilliger area of southwest Riverside County, California, that were modified from Moyle (1971) by Woolfenden and Bright (1988, figure 8). The fault information is used to help assess ground-water level changes in the area of Anza and Terwilliger between 2004 and 2005.

  2. 76 FR 8788 - Riverside Casualty, Inc.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Riverside Casualty, Inc.; Notice of Application February 8, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ] ACTION: Notice of application for an order under sections 6(b) and 6(e) of the Investment Company Act of 1940...

  3. Assesses the Seepage of Riverside Caused by Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hsieh, H.; Lee, C.; Hsu, K.

    2008-12-01

    This thesis mainly explored the effect of riverside water withdrawing on the seepage of a riverside. First of all, it verified the reliability of numerical model by using the ground water flow software MODFLOW to construct the four analytical models proposed by Grigoryev (1957), Hantush (1965), Wilson (1993), and Hunt (1999). This thesis explored the effect of riverside water withdrawing on the seepage of the river by means of hydrogeologic parameters and pumping well types. The findings are shown as the four analytical models are simulated by means of MODFLOW, and the verified results indicate that the riverside water withdrawing could be simulated correctly. It is indicated that whether a river fully penetrate the aquifer is an important factor that affects the seepage of a river. If a river fully penetrates the aquifer, it is estimated that the qs/Q (seepage of riverside/pumping amount) is 35.31%, while if there is a low permeable soil layer between the river and the aquifer, the qs/Q is 21.06%. It indicates that the low permeable soil layer in this model has an effect on qs/Q by 14.25%. The sensitivity analysis results of hydrogeologic parameters based on the riverside water withdrawing model indicate that the horizontal permeability coefficient, permeability coefficient of riverbed, and the difference between the ground water level and the river water level are the important factors that may affect the model, but the vertical permeability coefficient, specific storage, and specific storage coefficient do not have a remarkable effect. When the pump increases, the seepage of the river would be positively corrected to the drawdown of ground water level. The effect of pumping well diameter on qs/Q indicates that the increase of well diameter does not have a remarkable effect on the seepage of a river, but could result in drawdown of the ground water level within the well. Therefore, the drawdown of ground water could be controlled by adjusting the pumping well diameter. From the effect of the distance between the pumping well and the river, it is estimated that if the distance becomes bigger, qs/Q will decrease a little.

  4. Strong earthquake motion estimates for three sites on the U.C. San Diego campus

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S; Doroudian, M; Elgamal, A; Gonzales, S; Heuze, F; Lai, T; Minster, B; Oglesby, D; Riemer, M; Vernon, F; Vucetic, M; Wagoner, J; Yang, Z

    2002-05-07

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill, sample, and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1--initial source and site characterization, drilling, geophysical logging, installation of the seismic station, and initial seismic monitoring, and Phase 2--extended seismic monitoring, dynamic soil testing, calculation of estimated site-specific earthquake strong motions at depth and at the surface, and , where applicable, estimation of the response of selected buildings to the CEP-estimated strong motions.

  5. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  6. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  7. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  8. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  9. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) and... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS....25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  10. Riverside Park Overlook and Promenade over railroad at West 116th ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Riverside Park Overlook and Promenade over railroad at West 116th Street from Greenway, looking southeast. Note Cobra light on left, Riverside Park lampposts in front of arcades. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York, New York County, NY

  11. Radiogenic Risk of Malignant Neoplasms for Techa Riverside Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Akleyev, A. V.; Krestinina, L. Y.; Preston, D. L.; Davis, Faith; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Startsev, N. V.; Napier, Bruce A.; Ron, E.

    2008-11-01

    As a result of releases of liquid radioactive waste into the Techa River from the Mayak PA in the 1950s, residents of the riverside villages were for decades exposed to external and internal radiation resulting from consumption of locally produced food and river water. Presented in the paper is a brief description of the radiation conditions, organization of medical follow-up of the exposed population, principles for dose estimation, epidemiological analyses of cancer mortality and incidence for residents of the Techa RIverside villages. The estimates of excess relative risk of radiation-related leukemia and solid cancer mortality and incidence obtained for members of the Techa River cohort point to a clear-cut dependence of the rates on radiation exposure. Attributive risk of cancer incidence characterizing the proportion of radiation-related cancer cases among the total cancers was comparable with that for mortality: 3.2% derived for cancer incidence and 2.5% for cancer mortality. Based on the non-CLL leukemia excess relative risk (ERR) estimates calculated using the linear dose-effect model and the nature of the cohort, it was estimated that 31 (60%) out of 49 leukemia death cases (with the exclusion of 12 cases of chronic lymphatic leukemia) can be related to a long-term radiation exposure due to the contamination of the Techa River.

  12. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-109-1950, North Riverside Fire Department, North Riverside, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Zey, J.N.; Richardson, F.

    1989-03-01

    An assessment was made of the toxicity of smoke clouds produced by a zinc chloride smoke-generating device used in training exercises at the Fire Training Facility of the North Riverside Fire Department, North Riverside, Illinois. Analysis indicated that the smoke contained hydrochloric acid, zinc compounds, and several chlorinated hydrocarbons. Evaluations were made during two separate training exercises. Hydrochloric-acid concentrations ranged from trace amounts to 44 mg/m{sup 3}, exceeding the OSHA recommended ceiling level criteria of 7 mg/m{sup 3}. Zinc-chloride concentrations ranged from 63 to 172 mg/m{sup 3}; the limit was 2 mg/m{sup 3}. Zinc-chloride concentrations ranged from up to 62 mg/m{sup 3}. The amount of smoke generated for the exercise significantly surpassed that recommended by the manufacturer. Five and six participants in the two exercises experienced symptoms including breathing difficulty, joint pain, fever and chills, and general fatigue. These individuals were not wearing a respirator or had removed it as a part of the drill. The report concludes that the dense clouds created by the smoke-generating devices should be considered hazardous to individuals without respiratory protection and recommends the use of a self-contained breathing apparatus during training exercises.

  13. 75 FR 7029 - Lonza, Inc., Riverside Plant, Lonza Exclusive Synthesis Section, Custom Manufacturing Division...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Lonza, Inc., Riverside Plant, Lonza Exclusive Synthesis Section, Custom Manufacturing Division Including On-Site Leased Workers of Lab Support, Aerotek, Job Exchange,...

  14. 75 FR 1363 - City of Riverside, CA, California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission City of Riverside, CA, California Independent System Operator Corporation... and the California Independent System Operator Corporation filed its seventh annual revision to...

  15. Radiocarbon UC differentiation of sparkling and carbonated wines

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.E.; Krueger, H.W.; Burggraff, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    Specific UC-activities, percent of modern UC-activity, and calculated percent of fermentation CO2 are presented for CO2 contained in commercial sparkling wines, labeled as champagne or produced by the bulk (charmat) process. These data are given for the production years 1976-1982. The survey encompassed effervescent wines produced in Spain, Italy, West Germany, California, and New York. Addition of synthetic CO2 to approximately 40 samples represented as sparkling wines was indicated by low UC-activities of CO2 in these wines. Data for UC-activity were also presented for the ethanol distilled from sparkling wines for the years 1977-1980. In all cases, the UC-activity of ethanol was appropriate to the year of vintage.

  16. CWhatUC: a visual acuity simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel D.; Barsky, Brian A.; Klein, Stanley A.

    1998-06-01

    CWhatUC (pronounced 'see what you see') is a computer software system which will predict a patient's visual acuity using several techniques based on fundamentals of geometric optics. The scientific visualizations we propose can be clustered into two classes: retinal representations and corneal representations; however, in this paper, we focus our discussion on corneal representations. It is important to note that, for each method listed below, we can illustrate the visual acuity with or without spectacle correction. Corneal representations are meant to reveal how well the cornea focuses parallel light onto the fovea of the eye by providing a pseudo-colored display of various error metrics. These error metrics could be: (1) standard curvature representations, such as instantaneous or axial curvature, converted to refractive power maps by taking Snell's law into account; (2) the focusing distance from each refracted ray's average focus to the computed fovea; (3) the retinal distance on the retinal plane from each refracted ray to the chief ray (lateral spherical aberration). For each error metric, we show both real and simulated data, and illustrate how each representation contributes to the simulation of visual acuity.

  17. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    SciTech Connect

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  18. A Study of Desegregation in the Public Schools, Riverside, California. Riverside School Study, Progress Report 1968-1969. Project No. M8-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purl, Mabel C.; Singer, Harry

    This progress report of the Riverside Unified School District comprises a summary of the effect of integration on the achievement of elementary pupils. Little change is considered to have occurred in the achievement of these students following integration. However, the achievement of many minority pupils, it is held, may eventually improve through

  19. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, A. A.; Granroth, G. E.; Abernathy, D. L.; Stone, M. B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stocks, G. M.; Nagler, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreement with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Overall, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.

  20. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreementmore » with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.« less

  1. Light atom quantum oscillations in UC and US

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Stone, Matthew B.; Buyers, W. J. L.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Samolyuk, German D.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nagler, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    High energy vibrational scattering in the binary systems UC and US is measured using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. A clear set of well-defined peaks equally separated in energy is observed in UC, corresponding to harmonic oscillations of the light C atoms in a cage of heavy U atoms. The scattering is much weaker in US and only a few oscillator peaks are visible. We show how the difference between the materials can be understood by considering the neutron scattering lengths and masses of the lighter atoms. Monte Carlo ray tracing is used to simulate the scattering, with near quantitative agreement with the data in UC, and some differences with US. The possibility of observing anharmonicity and anisotropy in the potentials of the light atoms is investigated in UC. Lastly, the observed data is well accounted for by considering each light atom as a single atom isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator.

  2. 75 FR 13303 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Riverside County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Riverside County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Realty Action. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Palm Springs--South Coast Field Office, proposes to sell a parcel of public land...

  3. 75 FR 878 - Lonza, Inc. Riverside Plant; Lonza Exclusive Synthesis Section Custom Manufacturing Division...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Lonza, Inc. Riverside Plant; Lonza Exclusive Synthesis Section Custom Manufacturing Division Including On-Site Leased Workers of Lab Support, Aerotek, Job Exchange, and...

  4. 78 FR 1130 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 987 Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Decreased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule with request... hundredweight of dates handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order which regulates...

  5. Rogue Community College Student Satisfaction Survey, Winter 2000. Management Report: Redwood and Riverside Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Nancy

    The Annual Student Satisfaction Survey at Oregon's Rogue Community College (RCC) allows the school to measure achievement in services, classes, and facilities. Three hundred and eleven students responded to this winter 2000 survey. Findings include: (1) seventeen percent of all respondents at the Redwood and Riverside campuses were very satisfied

  6. Assessing Riverside Community College Nursing Student Attitudes toward Exposure to AIDS/HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    In fall 1990, a study was conducted to assess the attitudes of nursing students who were attending Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, toward exposure to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) positive patients in a hospital setting. All students enrolled in RCC's associate degree nursing program

  7. Exterior of 79th Street Rotunda from Riverside Park waterfront promenade ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior of 79th Street Rotunda from Riverside Park waterfront promenade (Hudson River Valley Greenway), looking south. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York, New York County, NY

  8. 75 FR 28055 - General Management Plan; Joshua Tree National Park; San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, CA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... National Park Service General Management Plan; Joshua Tree National Park; San Bernardino and Riverside... Management Plan (GMP) for Joshua Tree National Park, California. The new GMP will update the overall..., Joshua Tree National Park, Joshua, 74485 National Park Drive, Twentynine Palms, California...

  9. Assessing Riverside Community College Nursing Student Attitudes toward Exposure to AIDS/HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    In fall 1990, a study was conducted to assess the attitudes of nursing students who were attending Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, toward exposure to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) positive patients in a hospital setting. All students enrolled in RCC's associate degree nursing program…

  10. 76 FR 31685 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for the Riverside Fairy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... designation (70 FR 19154; April 12, 2005), and new information on the status and distribution of Riverside... refer to the final listing rule published in the Federal Register on August 3, 1993 (58 FR 41384); the..., 2000 (65 FR 57136), and April 27, 2004 (69 FR 23024), respectively; and the subsequent final...

  11. 75 FR 56019 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ...This rule would increase the assessment rate established for the California Date Administrative Committee (Committee) for the 2010- 11 and subsequent crop years from $0.75 to $1.00 per hundredweight of dates handled. The Committee locally administers the marketing order, which regulates the handling of dates grown or packed in Riverside County, California. Assessments upon date handlers are......

  12. 19. View to the north of Riverside Avenue. AZ196(J. C. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View to the north of Riverside Avenue. AZ-196(J. C. Gatti House) at left Part of AZ-197 (Shannon Copper Company Store) can be seen in group of buildings at right - Clifton Townsite, Confluence of Chase Creek & San Francisco River, Clifton, Greenlee County, AZ

  13. PARTICLE TOTAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY (PTEAM): RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA PILOT STUDY - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to estimate the frequency distribution of exposure of an urban population to inhalable particles (less than 10 micrometers in diameter). Probability sampling design was used to select 178 nonsmoking residents aged 10 or above in Riverside, CA. Each pers...

  14. Countering fear renewal: changes in the UCS representation generalize across contexts.

    PubMed

    Leer, Arne; Engelhard, Iris M

    2015-03-01

    After treatment of anxiety disorders, fear often returns. Analogue studies show that outside the extinction context the conditional stimulus (CS) activates the acquisition memory (CS predicts unconditional stimulus; UCS), rather than the extinction memory (CS does not predict UCS). Conditioning theory postulates that fear also diminishes after a reduction in the subjective cost of the UCS, which can occur in absence of any changes in the CS-UCS association. We hypothesized that fear reduction via "UCS deflation" generalizes across context. Healthy students underwent acquisition in context A with neutral CSs and 100dB white noise as UCS. One group received post-conditioning UCS exposure, in which UCS intensity decreased over time ("ABAdefl"). Another group received UCS presentations at equal intensity ("ABActrl"). Two groups did a filler task ("ABB"; "ABA"). Then, all groups underwent extinction in context B and were retested in context A (ABA-groups) or B (ABB-group). During each CS participants rated UCS expectancy and UCS cost. Results showed the typical increase in UCS expectancy following the context switch from extinction to test phase. In contrast, UCS deflation caused a reduction in cost ratings that was maintained after the context change. Findings suggest that UCS deflation techniques may reduce fear renewal. PMID:25645174

  15. The uc(Polarbear)-2 and the Simons Array Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Ade, P.; Akiba, Y.; Aleman, C.; Arnold, K.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barch, B.; Barron, D.; Bender, A.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunner, R.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; Fujino, T.; Fuller, G.; Gilbert, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Groh, J.; Haan, T. De; Hall, G.; Halverson, N.; Hamada, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Howe, L.; Inoue, Y.; Irie, F.; Jaehnig, G.; Jaffe, A.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J.; Kazemzadeh, K.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Kusaka, A.; Jeune, M. Le; Lee, A.; Leon, D.; Linder, E.; Lowry, L.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N.; Mizukami, K.; Montgomery, J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Raum, C.; Reichardt, C.; Richards, P.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K.; Segawa, Y.; Sherwin, B.; Shirley, I.; Siritanasak, P.; Stebor, N.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, J.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takakura, S.; Takatori, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Westbrook, B.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamashita, T.; Zahn, A.; Zahn, O.

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of the design and status of the uc(Polarbear)-2 and the Simons Array experiments. uc(Polarbear)-2 is a cosmic microwave background polarimetry experiment which aims to characterize the arc-minute angular scale B-mode signal from weak gravitational lensing and search for the degree angular scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. The receiver has a 365 mm diameter focal plane cooled to 270 mK. The focal plane is filled with 7588 dichroic lenslet-antenna-coupled polarization sensitive transition edge sensor (TES) bolometric pixels that are sensitive to 95 and 150 GHz bands simultaneously. The TES bolometers are read-out by SQUIDs with 40 channel frequency domain multiplexing. Refractive optical elements are made with high-purity alumina to achieve high optical throughput. The receiver is designed to achieve noise equivalent temperature of 5.8 \\upmu K_CMB√{s} in each frequency band. uc(Polarbear)-2 will deploy in 2016 in the Atacama desert in Chile. The Simons Array is a project to further increase sensitivity by deploying three uc(Polarbear)-2 type receivers. The Simons Array will cover 95, 150, and 220 GHz frequency bands for foreground control. The Simons Array will be able to constrain tensor-to-scalar ratio and sum of neutrino masses to σ (r) = 6× 10^{-3} at r = 0.1 and sum m_{\\upnu } (σ =1) to 40 meV.

  16. UCS-PROMOVE: The Engineer of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villas-Boas, V.

    2010-01-01

    The Universidade de Caxias do Sul (UCS) elaborated the cooperative project called "The engineer of the future", with the objective of promoting science and engineering among high school teachers and students. This project aims to improve the quality of the teaching and to increase the interest of students in technological areas, leading to a

  17. UCS-PROMOVE: The Engineer of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villas-Boas, V.

    2010-01-01

    The Universidade de Caxias do Sul (UCS) elaborated the cooperative project called "The engineer of the future", with the objective of promoting science and engineering among high school teachers and students. This project aims to improve the quality of the teaching and to increase the interest of students in technological areas, leading to a…

  18. Persistence and Graduation of UC Davis Undergraduates: 1971-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Arthur K., Jr.

    Persistence and graduation rates of four types of undergraduate students at the University of California, Davis, (UC Davis) are examined: domestic students with fewer than 12.5 college transfer units, including both regularly admitted students and those admitted by special action; and domestic students admitted with at least 84 but less than 135…

  19. 75 FR 28650 - Notice of Realty Action: Proposed Direct Sale of Public Lands in Riverside County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... market value of $77,000. DATES: Comments regarding the proposed sale must be received by the BLM on or... acres in Riverside County. The appraised fair market value is $77,000. The public land is identified...

  20. INDOOR, OUTDOOR, AND PERSONAL AIR EXPOSURES TO PARTICLES, ELEMENTS, AND NICOTINE FOR 178 RESIDENTS OF RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal, indoor, and outdoor concentrations of inhalable particles and 15 elements were measured for a probability sample of 178 persons representing 139,000 nonsmoking residents of Riverside, California. ewly designed personal monitors were employed. ersonal exposures often exc...

  1. The UC-LLNL Regional Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; Kim, Jinwon

    1996-09-01

    The UC-LLNL Regional Climate System Model has been under development since 1991. The unique system simulates climate from the global scale down to the watershed catchment scale, and consists of data pre- and post- processors, and four model components. The four model components are (1) a mesoscale atmospheric simulation model, (2) a soil-plant-snow model, (3) a watershed hydrology-riverflow model, and (4) a suite of crop response models. The first three model components have been coupled, and the system includes two-way feedbacks between the soil-plant-snow model and the mesoscale atmospheric simulation model. This three-component version of RCSM has been tested, validated, and successfully used for operational quantitative precipitation forecasts and seasonal water resource studies over the southwestern US. We are currently implementation and validating the fourth component, the Decision Support system for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT). A description of the UC-LLNL RCSM and some recent results are presented.

  2. Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region, Kern, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1952-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region Kern, Riverside, and Bernardino counties were made in five areas recommended as favorable for the occurrence of radioactive raw materials: (1) Rock Corral area, San Bernardino County. (2) Searles Station area, Kern county. (3) Soledad area, Kern County. (4) White Tank area, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. (5) Harvard Hills area, San Bernardino County. Anomalous radiation was detected in all but the Harvard Hills area. The radioactivity anomalies detected in the Rock Corral area are of the greatest amplitude yet recorded by the airborne equipment over natural sources. The activity is apparently attributable to the thorium-beating mineral associated with roof pendants of crystalline metamorphic rocks in a granitic intrusive. In the Searles Station, Soledad, and White Tank area, several radioactivity anomalies of medium amplitude were recorded, suggesting possible local concentrations of radioactive minerals.

  3. 20 CFR 603.4 - What is the confidentiality requirement of Federal UC law?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the confidentiality requirement of Federal UC law? 603.4 Section 603.4 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC) PROGRAM; CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STATE UC INFORMATION Confidentiality...

  4. The College Selection Process of Freshmen Admitted to UC Davis: The Range of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Bonnie L.

    Considerations in selecting a college were studied with a random sample of 768 freshmen admitted to the University of California (UC), Davis, in fall 1984. Major findings are: freshmen admitted to UC Davis had considerable breadth of knowledge about many other colleges and academic programs; over 80 percent applied to colleges besides UC Davis;…

  5. Thermodynamic and experimental study of UC powders ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guyadec, F.; Rado, C.; Joffre, S.; Coullomb, S.; Chatillon, C.; Blanquet, E.

    2009-09-01

    Mixed plutonium and uranium carbide (UPuC) is considered as a possible fuel material for future nuclear reactors. However, UPuC is pyrophoric and fine powders of UPuC are subject to temperature increase due to oxidation with air and possible ignition during conditioning and handling. In a first approach and to allow easier experimental conditions, this study was undertaken on uranium monocarbide (UC) with the aim to determine safe handling conditions for the production and reprocessing of uranium carbide fuels. The reactivity of uranium monocarbide in oxidizing atmosphere was studied in order to analyze the ignition process. Experimental thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed that UC powder obtained by arc melting and milling is highly reactive in air at about 200 C. The phases formed at the various observed stages of the oxidation process were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. At the same time, ignition was analyzed thermodynamically along isothermal sections of the U-C-O ternary diagram and the pressure of the gas produced by the UC + O 2 reaction was calculated. Two possible oxidation schemes were identified on the U-C-O phase diagram and assumptions are proposed concerning the overall oxidation and ignition paths. It is particularly important to understand the mechanisms involved since temperatures as high as 2500 C could be reached, leading to CO(g) production and possibly to a blast effect.

  6. Reconstruction of Long-Lived Radionuclide Intakes for Techa Riverside Residents: Cesium-137

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Peremyslova, L. M.; Shagina, N. B.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2013-05-01

    Radioactive contamination of the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) occurred from 1949–1956 due to routine and accidental releases of liquid radioactive wastes from the Mayak Production Association. The long-lived radionuclides in the releases were 90Sr and 137Cs. Contamination of the components of the Techa River system resulted in chronic external and internal exposure of about 30,000 residents of riverside villages. Data on radionuclide intake with diet are used to estimate internal dose in the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS), which was elaborated for the assessment of radiogenic risk for Techa Riverside residents. The 90Sri ntake function was recently improved taking into account the recently available archival data on radionuclide releases and in-depth analysis of the extensive data on 90Sr measurements in Techa Riverside residents. The main purpose of this paper is to evaluate the dietary intake of 137Cs by Techa Riverside residents. The 137Cs intake with river water used for drinking was reconstructed on the basis of the 90Sr intake-function and the concentration ratio 137Cs/90Sr in river water. Intake via 137Cs transfer from floodplain soil to grass and cows’ milk was evaluated for the first time. As a result, the maximal 137Cs intake level was indicated near the site of releases in upper-Techa River settlements (8,000–9,000 kBq). For villages located on the lower Techa River the 137Cs intake was significantly less (down to 300 kBq). Cows’ milk was the main source of 137Cs in diet in the upper-Techa.

  7. Reconstruction of long-lived radionuclide intakes for Techa riverside residents: 137Cs.

    PubMed

    Tolstykh, E I; Degteva, M O; Peremyslova, L M; Shagina, N B; Vorobiova, M I; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A

    2013-05-01

    Radioactive contamination of the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) occurred from 1949-1956 due to routine and accidental releases of liquid radioactive wastes from the Mayak Production Association. The long-lived radionuclides in the releases were Sr and Cs. Contamination of the components of the Techa River system resulted in chronic external and internal exposure of about 30,000 residents of riverside villages. Data on radionuclide intake with diet are used to estimate internal dose in the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS), which was elaborated for the assessment of radiogenic risk for Techa Riverside residents. The Sr intake function was recently improved, taking into account the recently available archival data on radionuclide releases and in-depth analysis of the extensive data on Sr measurements in Techa Riverside residents. The main purpose of this paper is to evaluate the dietary intake of Cs by Techa Riverside residents. The Cs intake with river water used for drinking was reconstructed on the basis of the Sr intake-function and the concentration ratio Cs-to-Sr in river water. Intake via Cs transfer from floodplain soil to grass and cows' milk was evaluated for the first time. As a result, the maximal Cs intake level was indicated near the site of releases in upper-Techa River settlements (8,000-9,000 kBq). For villages located on the lower Techa River, the Cs intake was significantly less (down to 300 kBq). Cows' milk was the main source of Cs in diet in the upper-Techa River region. PMID:23532077

  8. Zoonotic Intestinal Trematodes in Stray Cats (Felis catus) from Riverside Areas of the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Shik; Oh, Dae-Sung; Ahn, Kyu-Sung; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Sohn, Woon-Mok

    2015-04-01

    The present study was performed to survey the infection status of zoonotic intestinal trematode (ZIT) in stray cats from 5 major riverside areas in the Republic of Korea. Total 400 stray cats were captured with live-traps in riverside areas of Seomjingang ('gang' means river) (203 cats) from June to October 2010, and of Yeongsangang (41), Nakdonggang (57), Geumgang (38), and Hangang (61 cats) from June to October 2011, respectively. Small intestines resected from cats were opened with a pair of scissors in a beaker with 0.85% saline and examined with naked eyes and under a stereomicroscope. More than 16 ZIT species were detected in 188 (92.6%) cats from Seomjingang areas, and the number of worms recovered was 111 per cat infected. In cats from riverside areas of Yeongsangang, Nakdonggang, Geumgang, and Hangang, more than 9, 8, 3, and 5 ZIT species were recovered, and the worm burdens were 13, 42, 11, and 56 specimens per infected cat, respectively. As the members of family Heterophyidae, more than 10 species, i.e., Metagonimus spp., Pygidiopsis summa, Heterophyes nocens, Stellantchasmus falcatus, Heterophyopsis continua, Acanthotrema felis, Centrocestus armatus, Procerovum varium, Cryptocotyle concava, and Stictodora lari, were recovered. More than 5 species of echinostomes, i.e., Echinostoma hortense, Echinochasmus japonicus, Echinochasmus sp., Echinoparyphium sp., and unidentified larval echinostomes, were collected. Plagiorchis spp. were detected in cats from areas of Seomjin-gang and Yeongsangang. From the above results, it has been confirmed that stray cats in 5 major riverside areas of Korea are highly infected with various species of ZITs. PMID:25925180

  9. Emergency Pulloff on HHP southbound, in Riverside Park, West 114th ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Emergency Pulloff on HHP southbound, in Riverside Park, West 114th Street vicinity, looking southwest. HHP northbound and sloped median on left, galvanized steel W-style guide rails line river side of roadway, Cherry Walk (Hudson River Valley Greenway) and Hudson River on right. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York, New York County, NY

  10. UC Merced Center for Computational Biology Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Michael; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2010-11-30

    Final report for the UC Merced Center for Computational Biology. The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) was established to support multidisciplinary scientific research and academic programs in computational biology at the new University of California campus in Merced. In 2003, the growing gap between biology research and education was documented in a report from the National Academy of Sciences, Bio2010 Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists. We believed that a new type of biological sciences undergraduate and graduate programs that emphasized biological concepts and considered biology as an information science would have a dramatic impact in enabling the transformation of biology. UC Merced as newest UC campus and the first new U.S. research university of the 21st century was ideally suited to adopt an alternate strategy - to create a new Biological Sciences majors and graduate group that incorporated the strong computational and mathematical vision articulated in the Bio2010 report. CCB aimed to leverage this strong commitment at UC Merced to develop a new educational program based on the principle of biology as a quantitative, model-driven science. Also we expected that the center would be enable the dissemination of computational biology course materials to other university and feeder institutions, and foster research projects that exemplify a mathematical and computations-based approach to the life sciences. As this report describes, the CCB has been successful in achieving these goals, and multidisciplinary computational biology is now an integral part of UC Merced undergraduate, graduate and research programs in the life sciences. The CCB began in fall 2004 with the aid of an award from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), under its Genomes to Life program of support for the development of research and educational infrastructure in the modern biological sciences. This report to DOE describes the research and academic programs made possible by the CCB from its inception until August, 2010, at the end of the final extension. Although DOE support for the center ended in August 2010, the CCB will continue to exist and support its original objectives. The research and academic programs fostered by the CCB have led to additional extramural funding from other agencies, and we anticipate that CCB will continue to provide support for quantitative and computational biology program at UC Merced for many years to come. Since its inception in fall 2004, CCB research projects have continuously had a multi-institutional collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as individual collaborators at other sites. CCB affiliated faculty cover a broad range of computational and mathematical research including molecular modeling, cell biology, applied math, evolutional biology, bioinformatics, etc. The CCB sponsored the first distinguished speaker series at UC Merced, which had an important role is spreading the word about the computational biology emphasis at this new campus. One of CCB's original goals is to help train a new generation of biologists who bridge the gap between the computational and life sciences. To archive this goal, by summer 2006, a new program - summer undergraduate internship program, have been established under CCB to train the highly mathematical and computationally intensive Biological Science researchers. By the end of summer 2010, 44 undergraduate students had gone through this program. Out of those participants, 11 students have been admitted to graduate schools and 10 more students are interested in pursuing graduate studies in the sciences. The center is also continuing to facilitate the development and dissemination of undergraduate and graduate course materials based on the latest research in computational biology.

  11. Telehealth at UC Davis--a 20-year experience.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Thomas S; Dharmar, Madan; Katz-Bell, Jana; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Marcin, James P

    2013-05-01

    Telehealth at the University of California Health System began as a telefetal monitoring connection with a rural hospital in 1992 and evolved to become the Center for Health and Technology (CHT) in 2000. The Center supports the vision of the University of California Davis (UC Davis) Health System-a healthier world through bold innovation. The CHT focuses on the four pillars of the academic health center: clinical services, research and scholarly work, education, and public service. Since 1996, the Center has provided more than 33,000 telemedicine consultation (excluding teleradiology, telepathology, and phone consultations) in over 30 clinical specialties and at more than 90 locations across California. Research and continuous evaluation have played an integral role in shaping the telehealth program, as well as strategic collaborations and partnerships. In an effort to expand the field of telehealth the CHT provides telehealth training for health professionals, technical specialists, and administrators. Furthermore, it also plays an integral role in workforce development through the education of the next generation of community primary care physicians through Rural Programs In Medical Education (Rural PRIME) and continuing educational programs for working health professionals through videoconferencing and Web-based modalities. The Center is supported through a variety of funding sources, and its sustainability comes from a mix of fee-for-service payment, contracts, grants, gifts, and institutional funding. Together with key partners, UC Davis has educated and informed initiatives resulting in legislation and policies that advance telehealth. Looking toward the future, UC Davis is focused on technology-enabled healthcare and supporting synergy among electronic health records, health information exchange, mobile health, informatics, and telehealth. PMID:23343257

  12. The UC2-x - Carbon eutectic: A laser heating study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, D.; Boboridis, K.; Morel, S.; De Bruycker, F.

    2015-11-01

    The UC2-x - carbon eutectic has been studied by laser heating and fast multi-wavelength pyrometry under inert atmosphere. The study has been carried out on three compositions, two of which close to the phase boundary of the UC2-x - C miscibility gap (with C/U atomic ratios 2 and 2.1), and one, more crucial, with a large excess of carbon (C/U = 2.82). The first two compositions were synthesised by arc-melting. This synthesis method could not be applied to the last composition, which was therefore completed directly by laser irradiation. The U - C - O composition of the samples was checked by using a combustion method in an ELTRA® analyser. The eutectic temperature, established to be 2737 K ± 20 K, was used as a radiance reference together with the cubic - tetragonal (α → β) solid state transition, fixed at 2050 K ± 20 K. The normal spectral emissivity of the carbon-richer compounds increases up to 0.7, whereas the value 0.53 was established for pure hypostoichiometric uranium dicarbide at the limit of the eutectic region. This increase is analysed in the light of the demixing of excess carbon, and used for the determination of the liquidus temperature (3220 K ± 50 K for UC2.82). Due to fast solid state diffusion, also fostered by the cubic - tetragonal transition, no obvious signs of a lamellar eutectic structure could be observed after quenching to room temperature. The eutectic surface C/UC2-x composition could be qualitatively, but consistently, followed during the cooling process with the help of the recorded radiance spectra. Whereas the external liquid surface is almost entirely constituted by uranium dicarbide, it gets rapidly enriched in demixed carbon upon freezing. Demixed carbon seems to quickly migrate towards the inner bulk during further cooling. At the α → β transition, uranium dicarbide covers again the almost entire external surface.

  13. Approaches to improve the stability of the antiviral agent UC781 in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Damian, Festo; Fabian, Judit; Friend, David R; Kiser, Patrick F

    2010-08-30

    In this work, we evaluated the chemical stability profiles of UC781 based solutions to identify excipients that stabilize the microbicidal agent UC781. When different antioxidants were added to UC781 in sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin (SBE-beta-CD) solutions and subjected to a 50 degrees C stability study, it was observed that EDTA was a better stabilizing agent than sodium metabisulfite, glutathione or ascorbic acid. Some antioxidants accelerated the degradation of UC781, suggesting metal-catalyzed degradation of UC781. Furthermore, we observed substantial degradation of UC781 when stored in 1% Tween 80 and 1% DMSO solutions alone or in those with 10mM EDTA. On the other hand, improved stability of UC781 in the presence of 100 and 200mM of EDTA was observed in these solutions. The addition of both EDTA and citric acid in the stock solutions resulted in recovery of more than 60% of UC781 after 12 weeks. Generally, 10% SBE-beta-CD in the presence of EDTA and citric acid stabilized UC781 solutions: the amount of UC781 recovered approaching 95% after 12 weeks of storage at 40 degrees C. We also showed that the desulfuration reaction of the UC781 thioamide involves oxygen by running solution stability studies in deoxygenated media. Improved stability of UC781 in the present study indicates that the incorporation of EDTA, citric acid and SBE-beta-CD and the removal of oxygen in formulations of this drug will aid in increasing the stability of UC781 where solutions of the drug are required. PMID:20510342

  14. 77 FR 7655 - Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P... Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P. proposes to provide equity security financing to Employment Law Training,...

  15. 76 FR 76802 - Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P... Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P. proposes to provide equity security financing to Employment Law Training,...

  16. 76 FR 76802 - Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Riverside Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P... Micro-Cap Fund II, L.P. proposes to provide equity security financing to DrugTest Holding Company,...

  17. Document image decoding in the UC Berkeley Digital Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, Gary E.

    1996-03-01

    The UC Berkeley Environmental Digital Library Project is one of six university-led projects that were initiated in the fall of 1994 as part of a four-year digital library initiative sponsored by the NSF, NASA, and ARPA. The Berkeley project is particularly interesting from a document image analysis perspective because its testbed collection consists almost entirely of scanned materials. As a result, the Berkeley project is making extensive use of document recognition and other image analysis technology to provide content-based access to the collection. The Document Image Decoding (DID) group at Xerox PARC is a member of the Berkeley team and is investigating the application of DID techniques to providing high-quality (accurate and properly structured) transcriptions of scanned documents in the collection. This paper briefly describes the Berkeley project, discusses some of its recognition requirements and presents examples of online structured documents created using DID technology.

  18. Molecular structure of uranium carbides: Isomers of UC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalazar, M. Fernanda; Rayn, Vctor M.; Largo, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the most relevant isomers of uranium tricarbide are studied through quantum chemical methods. It is found that the most stable isomer has a fan geometry in which the uranium atom is bonded to a quasilinear C3 unit. Both, a rhombic and a ring CU(C2) structures are found about 104-125 kJ/mol higher in energy. Other possible isomers including linear geometries are located even higher. For each structure, we provide predictions for those molecular properties (vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, dipole moments) that could eventually help in their experimental detection. We also discuss the possible routes for the formation of the different UC3 isomers as well as the bonding situation by means of a topological analysis of the electron density.

  19. Molecular structure of uranium carbides: isomers of UC3.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, M Fernanda; Rayón, Víctor M; Largo, Antonio

    2013-03-21

    In this article, the most relevant isomers of uranium tricarbide are studied through quantum chemical methods. It is found that the most stable isomer has a fan geometry in which the uranium atom is bonded to a quasilinear C3 unit. Both, a rhombic and a ring CU(C2) structures are found about 104-125 kJ/mol higher in energy. Other possible isomers including linear geometries are located even higher. For each structure, we provide predictions for those molecular properties (vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, dipole moments) that could eventually help in their experimental detection. We also discuss the possible routes for the formation of the different UC3 isomers as well as the bonding situation by means of a topological analysis of the electron density. PMID:23534639

  20. Mercury Exposure in a Riverside Amazon Population, Brazil: A Study of the Ototoxicity of Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ana; Pacheco-Ferreira, Heloisa; Sanches, Seisse Gabriela G.; Carvallo, Renata; Cardoso, Nathália; Perez, Maurício; Câmara, Volney de Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mercury poisoning causes hearing loss in humans and animals. Acute and long-term exposures produce irreversible peripheral and central auditory system damage, and mercury in its various forms of presentation in the environment is ototoxic. Objective We investigated the otoacoustic emissions responses in a riverside population exposed to environmental mercury by analyzing the inhibitory effect of the medial olivocochlear system (MOCS) on transient otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). Methods The purpose of the research was to evaluate the entire community independently of variables of sex and age. All of the participants were born and lived in a riverside community. After otolaryngologic evaluation, participants were received tympanometry, evaluation of contralateral acoustic reflexes, pure tone audiometry, and recording of TEOAEs with nonlinear click stimulation. Hair samples were collect to measure mercury levels. Results There was no significant correlation between the inhibitory effect of the MOCS, age, and the level of mercury in the hair. Conclusions The pathophysiological effects of chronic exposure may be subtle and nonspecific and can have a long period of latency; therefore, it will be important to monitor the effects of mercury exposure in the central auditory system of the Amazon population over time. Longitudinal studies should be performed to determine whether the inhibitory effect of the MOCS on otoacoustic emissions can be an evaluation method and diagnostic tool in populations exposed to mercury. PMID:25992169

  1. Asymmetric ( UC)albumin transport across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; LeBon, T.R.; Shinbane, J.S.; Crandall, E.D.

    1985-10-01

    Bullfrog lungs were prepared as planar sheets and bathed with Ringer solution in Ussing chambers. In the presence of a constant electrical gradient (20, 0, or -20 mV) across the tissue, UC-labeled bovine serum albumin or inulin was instilled into the upstream reservoir and the rate of appearance of the tracer in the downstream reservoir was monitored. Two lungs from the same animal were used to determine any directional difference in tracer fluxes. An apparent permeability coefficient was estimated from a relationship between normalized downstream radioactivities and time. Results showed that the apparent permeability of albumin in the alveolar to pleural direction across the alveolar epithelial barrier is 2.3 X 10(-7) cm/s, significantly greater (P less than 0.0005) than that in the pleural to alveolar direction (5.3 X 10(-8) cm/s) when the tissue was short circuited. Permeability of inulin, on the other hand, did not show any directional dependence and averaged 3.1 X 10(-8) cm/s in both directions. There was no effect on radiotracer fluxes permeabilities of different electrical gradients across the tissue. Gel electrophoretograms and corresponding radiochromatograms suggest that the large and asymmetric isotope fluxes are not primarily due to digestion or degradation of labeled molecules. Inulin appears to traverse the alveolar epithelial barrier by simple diffusion through hydrated paracellular pathways. On the other hand, ( UC)albumin crosses the alveolar epithelium more rapidly than would be expected by simple diffusion. These asymmetric and large tracer fluxes suggest that a specialized mechanism is present in alveolar epithelium that may be capable of helping to remove albumin from the alveolar space.

  2. 76 FR 34618 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Proposed Amendments to Marketing Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... part 900 (73 FR 49307; August, 21, 2008). The additional supplemental rules of practice authorize the... issuance or amendment of an order. The order was last amended on February 1, 1978 (43 FR 4253). Since that... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 987 Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County,...

  3. 76 FR 16474 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Union Pacific Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, CA On March 3, 2011, Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP) filed with the Surface Transportation Board (Board) a...

  4. APPLICATION OF PSCF TO PMF-MODELED SOURCES OF PM2.5 IN RIVERSIDE USING 1-HR AVERAGED DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from semi-continuous instruments employed during a sampling campaign in Riverside, CA in July-August 2005 was used in a PMF2 analysis and sixteen sources were identified. Factors attributed to being primarily from local automobile emissions, local diesel emissions, wood comb...

  5. 20 CFR 603.4 - What is the confidentiality requirement of Federal UC law?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Federal UC law? 603.4 Section 603.4 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... requirement of Federal UC law? (a) Statute. Section 303(a)(1) of the SSA (42 U.S.C. 503(a)(1)) provides that....C. 502(a)), State law must include provision for such methods of administration as are found by...

  6. Uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein (ucMGP) is associated with coronary artery calcification in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Cranenburg, Ellen C M; Brandenburg, Vincent M; Vermeer, Cees; Stenger, Melanie; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H; Gladziwa, Ulrich; Ketteler, Markus; Schurgers, Leon J

    2009-02-01

    Matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate (Gla) protein (MGP) is a potent local inhibitor of cardiovascular calcification and accumulates at areas of calcification in its uncarboxylated form (ucMGP). We previously found significantly lower circulating ucMGP levels in patients with a high vascular calcification burden. Here we report on the potential of circulating ucMGP to serve as a biomarker for vascular calcification in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Circulating ucMGP levels were measured with an ELISA-based assay in 40 HD patients who underwent multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scanning to quantify the extent of coronary artery calcification (CAC). The mean ucMGP level in HD patients (193 +/- 65 nM) was significantly lower as compared to apparently healthy subjects of the same age (441 +/- 97 nM; p < 0.001) and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without CAC (560 +/- 140 nM; p < 0.001). Additionally, ucMGP levels correlated inversely with CAC scores (r = -0.41; p = 0.009), and this correlation persisted after adjustment for age, dialysis vintage and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Since circulating ucMGP levels are significantly and inversely correlated with the extent of CAC in HD patients, ucMGP may become a tool for identifying HD patients with a high probability of cardiovascular calcification. PMID:19190822

  7. 46 CFR 54.25-7 - Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-7 Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56). (a) Postweld heat treatment is required for all...

  8. 46 CFR 54.25-7 - Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-7 Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56). (a) Postweld heat treatment is required for all...

  9. 46 CFR 54.25-7 - Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-7 Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56). (a) Postweld heat treatment is required for all...

  10. 46 CFR 54.25-7 - Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-7 Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56). (a) Postweld heat treatment is required for all...

  11. 46 CFR 54.25-7 - Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-7 Requirement for postweld heat treatment (modifies UCS-56). (a) Postweld heat treatment is required for all...

  12. Disposition and metabolism of 2,3-( UC)dichloropropene in rats after inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.A.; Medinsky, M.A.; Dutcher, J.S.; Henderson, R.F.; Cheng, Y.S.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    2,3-Dichloropropene (2,3-DCP) is a constituent of some commercially available preplant soil fumigants for the control of plant parasitic nematodes. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the disposition and metabolism of 2,3-( UC)DCP in rats after inhalation. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed nose-only to a vapor concentration of 250 nmol 2,3-( UC)DCP/liter air (7.5 ppm; 25C, 620 Torr) for 6 hr. Blood samples were taken during exposure, and urine, feces, expired air, and tissues were collected for up to 65 hr after exposure. Urinary excretion was the major route of elimination of UC (55% of estimated absorbed 2,3-DCP). Half-time for elimination of UC in urine was 9.8 +/- 0.05 hr (anti x +/- SE). Half-time for elimination of UC feces (17% of absorbed 2,3-DCP) was 12.9 +/- 0.14 hr (anti x +/- SE). Approximately 1 and 3% of the estimated absorbed 2,3-( UC)DCP were exhaled as either 2,3-( UC)DCP or UCO2, respectively. Concentrations of UC in blood increased during 240 min of exposure, after which no further increases in blood concentration of UC were seen. UC was widely distributed in tissues analyzed after a 6-hr exposure of rats to 2,3-( UC)DCP. Urinary bladder (150 nmol/g), nasal turbinates (125 nmol/g), kidneys (84 nmol/g), small intestine (61 nmol/g), and liver (35 nmol/g) were tissues with the highest concentrations of UC immediately after exposure. Over 90% of the UC in tissues analyzed was 2,3-DCP metabolites. Half-times for elimination of UC from tissues examined ranged from 3 to 11 hr. The data from this study indicate that after inhalation 2,3-DCP is metabolized in tissues and readily excreted. 21 references. 2 figures, 4 tables.

  13. UCS proteins: chaperones for myosin and co-chaperones for Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weiming; Odunuga, Odutayo O

    2015-01-01

    The UCS (UNC-45/CRO1/She4p) family of proteins has emerged as chaperones that are specific for the folding, assembly and function of myosin. These proteins participate in various important myosin-dependent cellular processes that include myofibril organization and muscle functions, cell differentiation, cardiac and skeletal muscle development, cytokinesis and endocytosis. Mutations in the genes that code for UCS proteins cause serious defects in these actomyosin-based processes. Homologs of UCS proteins can be broadly divided into (1) animal UCS proteins, generally known as UNC-45 proteins, which contain an N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain in addition to the canonical UCS domain, and (2) fungal UCS proteins, which lack the TPR domain. Structurally, except for TPR domain, both sub-classes of UCS proteins comprise of several irregular armadillo (ARM) repeats that are divided into two-domain architecture: a combined central-neck domain and a C-terminal UCS domain. Structural analyses suggest that UNC-45 proteins form elongated oligomers that serve as scaffolds to recruit Hsp90 and/or Hsp70 to form a multi-protein chaperoning complex that assists myosin heads to fold and simultaneously organize them into myofibrils. Similarly, fungal UCS proteins may dimerize to promote folding of non-muscle myosins as well as determine their step size along actin filaments. These findings confirm UCS proteins as a new class of myosin-specific chaperones and co-chaperones for Hsp90. This chapter reviews the implications of the outcome of studies on these proteins in cellular processes such as muscle formation, and disease states such as myopathies and cancer. PMID:25487020

  14. Electrical methods of detecting contaminated groundwater at the stringfellow waste disposal site, riverside county, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierman, Donald J.

    1984-03-01

    At the Stringfellow Class I waste-disposal site near Riverside, California, the influence of variations in groundwater chemistry and saturation on electrical measurements made from the surface was tested Spontaneous potential, D C electrical sounding, dipole-dipole resistivity profiles, and mise-a-la-masse measurements were employed to investigate the sub-surface migration of the acidic fluids deposited in this site between 1956 and 1972 Mise-a-la-masse exploration conducted at the downstream edge of the site detected a major anomaly which, on excavation, proved to be the signature of a previously unsuspected leak from the surface disposal ponds on the site Downstream from the site, a dipole-dipole profile and electrical soundings correlate well with electrical conductivity of groundwater obtained from monitoring wells This study demonstrates that geophysical methods may be used to search for and map leaks from toxic chemical waste dumps

  15. Electrical methods of detecting contaminated groundwater at the Stringfellow Waste Disposal Site, Riverside, California

    SciTech Connect

    Stierman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    At the Stringfellow Class I waste-disposal site near Riverside, California, the influence of variations in groundwater chemistry and saturation on electrical measurements made from the surface was tested. Spontaneous potential, D.C. electrical sounding, dipole-dipole resistivity profiles, and mise-a-la-masse measurements were employed to investigate the sub-surface migration of the acidic fluids deposited in this site between 1956 and 1972. Mise-a-la-masse exploration conducted at the downstream edge of the site detected a major anomaly which, on excavation, proved to be the signature of a previously unsuspected leak from the surface disposal ponds on the site. Downstream from the site, a dipole-dipole profile and electrical soundings correlate well with electrical conductivity of groundwater obtained from monitoring wells. This study demonstrates that geophysical methods may be used to search for and map leaks from toxic chemical waste dumps. 6 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Impurity Spectroscopy and Wall Conditioning on uc(Pegasus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, D. J.; Fonck, R. J.; Kozar, M. P.; Reinke, M. L.; Winz, G. R.

    2004-11-01

    Impurity-induced radiation has significant influence on the V-s limited uc(Pegasus) experiment, and efforts are underway to control and measure the impurities therein. Titanium gettering, helium glow discharge and cryogenic pumping are used for wall conditioning. Initial low power operations are characterized by high deuterium pump speeds up to 35000 l/s and low gas recycling rates. Impurity species mix is estimated from time-resolved VUV spectra using a SPRED multichannel spectrometer. A fast-scanning 1-D CCD detector array provides a full 10-110 nm spectrum every 0.2 ms. Quantitative estimates of Z_eff and the shape of the n_e(R,t) profile will be pursued with a tangentially viewing visible bremsstrahlung (VB) array. This system uses a slow-scan CCD camera to provide time-resolved VB spatial profiles using on-chip line transfer of the exposed spectrum to a masked region during the shot. Oxygen is expected to be the dominant impurity, and XUV diodes with multilayer Ross filters are used to isolate the He-like and H-like oxygen line emissions for central impurity monitors.

  17. Heavy Metal Contaminated Soils in Riverside Park, Milwaukee, WI: Character, Bioavailability, and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansand, J. J.; Knudsen, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    Prior to being breached in 1990, the North Avenue Dam on the Milwaukee River had created a 2.5-mile impoundment for over 150 years. Upstream urban runoff and industrial pollution resulted in the deposition of heavy metal rich sediments in the slow moving waters of the impoundment. After the dam removal, the river returned to a more natural flowpath and as the river narrowed, newly exposed riverbed was annexed as part of Riverside Park, enabling ecological recovery efforts on the river and riparian zones. However, these newly exposed soils are enriched with heavy metal contaminants, most notably, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, and Ni, concentrated by the impoundment. The current study has analyzed the location and concentrations of these trace metals, as well as their mobility and availability. This study is being conducted in conjunction with the Urban Ecology Center, a nonprofit environmental organization located in Riverside Park that is dedicated to serving the local community and urban youth while restoring and protecting the natural areas along the Milwaukee River. Analyses have included determination of general soil parameters such as particle size, organic content, and point of zero charge analyses. Beyond bulk chemical analysis, we have conducted selective sequential extractions to estimate the chemical speciation of these elements, which showed that approximately 30 percent of contaminants are highly available. Additionally, the soils have been analyzed with an Electron Microprobe to directly observe phase relationships of metals in the soils. Microprobe and other analyses have shown that heavy metals are associated with a variety of phases, including Mn and Fe oxy-hydroxides, and vary in concentration and phase relationships with depth and distance from the river. Finally, a field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer (pXRF), coupled with GPS data, is being used to create a geochemical map of heavy metal distributions throughout the park.

  18. Initial Performance of uc(Bicep3): A Degree Angular Scale 95 GHz Band Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. L. K.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Alexander, K. D.; Amiri, M.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Buza, V.; Connors, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Grayson, J. A.; Halpern, M.; Harrison, S. A.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Kang, J.; Karkare, K. S.; Karpel, E.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Megerian, K. G.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pryke, C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Sorensen, C.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Steinbach, B.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Thompson, K. L.; Tolan, J. E.; Tucker, C. E.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Willmert, J.; Yoon, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    uc(Bicep3) is a 550-mm aperture telescope with cold, on-axis, refractive optics designed to observe at the 95-GHz band from the South Pole. It is the newest member of the uc(Bicep)/Keck family of inflationary probes specifically designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. uc(Bicep3) is designed to house 1280 dual-polarization pixels, which, when fully populated, totals to 9 the number of pixels in a single Keck 95-GHz receiver, thus further advancing the uc(Bicep)/Keck program's 95 GHz mapping speed. uc(Bicep3) was deployed during the austral summer of 2014-2015 with nine detector tiles, to be increased to its full capacity of 20 in the second season. After instrument characterization, measurements were taken, and CMB observation commenced in April 2015. Together with multi-frequency observation data from Planck, uc(Bicep2), and the Keck Array, uc(Bicep3) is projected to set upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r ? 0.03 at 95 % C.L.

  19. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image acquisition logic resulted in a significant fourfold improvement in MTF.

  20. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY (UC-CEIN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: 0830117
    Title: University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC-CEIN)
    Investigator: Andre E. Nel
    Institution: University of California - Los Angeles
    EPA Project Officer: Nor...

  1. Microbiotas from UC patients display altered metabolism and reduced ability of LAB to colonize mucus

    PubMed Central

    Vigsnaes, Louise Kristine; van den Abbeele, Pieter; Sulek, Karolina; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Steenholdt, Casper; Brynskov, Jørn; Vermeiren, Joan; van de Wiele, Tom; Licht, Tine Rask

    2013-01-01

    We compared fecal microbial communities derived either from Ulcerative Colitis (UC) patients in remission (n = 4) or in relapse (n = 4), or from healthy subjects (n = 4). These communities were used for inoculation of a dynamic in vitro gut model, which contained integrated mucin-covered microcosms. We found that the microbiota of the ‘mucus’ largely differed from that of the ‘lumen’. This was partly due to decreased mucus-associated populations of lactic acid producing bacterial populations (LAB), as LAB originating from UC patients had a significantly decreased capacity to colonize the mucin-covered microcosms as compared to those originating from healthy subjects. We found significant differences between the metabolomes of UC patients in relapse and remission, respectively, while the metabolome of patients in remission resembled that of healthy subjects. These novel findings constitute an important contribution to the understanding of the complex etiology of UC. PMID:23346367

  2. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA – CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY (UC-CEIN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: 0830117
    Title: University of California – Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC-CEIN)
    Investigator: Andre E. Nel
    Institution: University of California - Los Angeles
    EPA Project Officer: Nor...

  3. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see Table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  4. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  5. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  6. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see Table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  7. 46 CFR 54.25-3 - Steel plates (modifies UCS-6).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) will be allowed only in Class III pressure vessels (see Table 54.01-5(b)). ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). 54.25-3 Section 54.25-3... Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-3 Steel plates (modifies UCS-6). The...

  8. The 'first' instead of the 'oldest'. St. John's Riverside, in Yonkers, N.Y., markets its history.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2002-01-01

    St. John's Riverside Hospital, Yonkers, N.Y., built an integrated campaign upon its long history. Using billboards, print ads, bus shelters, radio and TV it touted its 130-plus years and its long history of firsts. Its integrated campaign proclaimed these "firsts." It specifically targeted its marketing to middle to upper-middle income residents of the surrounding area, particularly females between ages 25 and 54. PMID:12238239

  9. Experimental study of UC polycrystals in the prospect of improving the as-fabricated sample purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveu, Gaëlle; Martin, Guillaume; Fiquet, Olivier; Garcia, Philippe; Carlot, Gaëlle; Palancher, Hervé; Bonnin, Anne; Khodja, Hicham; Raepsaet, Caroline; Sauvage, Thierry; Barthe, Marie-France

    2014-12-01

    Uranium and plutonium carbides are candidate fuels for Generation IV nuclear reactors. This study is focused on the characterization of uranium monocarbide samples. The successive fabrication steps were carried out under atmospheres containing low oxygen and moisture concentrations (typically less than 100 ppm) but sample transfers occurred in air. Six samples were sliced from four pellets elaborated by carbothermic reaction under vacuum. Little presence of UC2 is expected in these samples. The α-UC2 phase was indeed detected within one of these UC samples during an XRD experiment performed with synchrotron radiation. Moreover, oxygen content at the surface of these samples was depth profiled using a recently developed nuclear reaction analysis method. Large oxygen concentrations were measured in the first micron below the sample surface and particularly in the first 100-150 nm. UC2 inclusions were found to be more oxidized than the surrounding matrix. This work points out to the fact that more care must be given at each step of UC fabrication since the material readily reacts with oxygen and moisture. A new glovebox facility using a highly purified atmosphere is currently being built in order to obtain single phase UC samples of better purity.

  10. Contamination and harm relevant UCS-expectancy bias in spider phobic individuals: influence of treatment.

    PubMed

    van Overveld, Mark; de Jong, Peter J; Huijding, Jorg; Peters, Madelon L

    2010-01-01

    Phobic individuals expect aversive UCS's following encounters with phobic stimuli. Previous research using a thought-experiment procedure showed that contamination rather than harm-related outcome expectancies differentiated best between high and low spider fearful undergraduates. This study investigated the alleged role of these UCS-expectancy biases in the maintenance of phobic complaints. First, this study sought to replicate these earlier findings in a community sample of high spider fearful individuals who applied for treatment (n = 60) and a sample of low spider fear controls (n = 30). Second, the present study tested if UCS-expectancies disappear following successful treatment and whether there were any differences between harm and contamination-related UCS expectancies in this respect. If contamination- and/or harm-related UCS-expectancy biases play a critical role in the maintenance of spider fear, these biases should be substantially reduced after successful treatment. The results showed that spider fearful individuals associated spiders relatively strongly with both harm- and contamination-related outcomes. Consistent with the alleged reciprocal relationship between phobic fear and UCS expectancy bias, both types of biased expectancies were effectively reduced following treatment. PMID:20146198

  11. Highly favorable antiviral activity and resistance profile of the novel thiocarboxanilide pentenyloxy ether derivatives UC-781 and UC-82 as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, J; Pelemans, H; Aquaro, S; Perno, C F; Witvrouw, M; Schols, D; De Clercq, E; Karlsson, A

    1996-08-01

    The novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific thiocarboxanilide derivatives that contain either a substituted furanyl (UC-781) or thienyl (UC-82) ring linked to the thiocarboxy group and a pentenyloxyether chain linked to the 4-chlorophenyl ring in meta position show highly favorable antiviral properties. Compounds UC-781 and UC-82 discovered by scientists at Uniroyal Chemical Ltd. proved to be > or = 5-10-fold more inhibitory to wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains (EC50 approximately 0.002 microgram/ml) than the thiocarboxanilide oxime ether UC-10 and other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as nevirapine, bis(heteroaryl)piperazine, and tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,l-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one. In addition, the compounds were able to knock out virus replication in cell culture at concentrations that were 20-50-fold lower than those of nevirapine or bis(heteroaryl)piperazine. They were also highly efficient (EC50 < or = 0.02 microgram/ml) in suppressing the replication of mutant virus strains that contained mutations in their reverse transcriptase that conferred resistance to other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (i.e., Tyr181 to Cys, Lys103 to Asn, Val106 to Ala, and Leu100 to Ile). The compounds selected for virus mutants that were only marginally resistant to the thiocarboxanilides ( < 10-20-fold). The antiviral activity of the compounds was only slightly affected by the presence of high concentrations of human serum, and the compounds were shown to be highly stable in the presence of human serum for at least 24 hr at room temperature. PMID:8700148

  12. Longitudinal hair mercury concentration in riverside mothers along the Upper Madeira river (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Boischio, A A; Cernichiari, E

    1998-05-01

    Mercury releases from gold mining occurred during the 1980s in the Upper Madeira river, a Southern tributary of the Amazon. Downstream from these areas, riverside residents rely on fish consumption for subsistence. In July of 1993, hair samples were collected for mercury analysis from a group of mothers and their infants and one pregnant woman. By assuming a constant rate of hair growth (1.1 cm per month), a temporal profile of the methylmercury exposure was determined for the previous 2 to 3 years. The length of hair segments corresponded to hair growth during pregnancy and the subsequent breastfeeding periods. During all periods, hair mercury concentrations in six mothers were in the range of 4.5-26.8 ppm, slightly lower than those of their infants (8.2-28.4 ppm). Further segmental analyses of hair mercury from another six mothers showed concentrations in the range of 12.2-41.0 ppm during the three trimesters of pregnancy and 4.0-33.5 ppm during breast feeding-slightly lower than their infants (11.6-50.4 ppm). Another four mothers showed hair mercury concentrations in the range of 21. 3-84.4 ppm. PMID:9600799

  13. Molecular markers in ambient aerosol in the Mahanadi Riverside Basin of eastern central India during winter.

    PubMed

    Nirmalkar, Jayant; Deb, Manas K; Deshmukh, Dhananjay K; Tsai, Ying I; Verma, Santosh K

    2015-01-01

    Organic molecular markers are important atmospheric constituents. Their formation and sources are important aspects of the study of urban and rural air quality. We collected PM10 aerosol samples from the Mahanadi Riverside Basin (MRB), a rural part of eastern central India, during the winter of 2011. PM10 aerosols were characterized for molecular markers using ion chromatography. The concentration of PM10 ranged from 208.8 to 588.3 ?g m(-3) with a mean concentration of 388.9 ?g m(-3). Total concentration of anhydrosugars, sugar alcohols, primary sugars, and oxalate were found to be 3.25, 5.60, 10.52, and 0.37 ?g m(-3), respectively, during the study period. Glucose was the most abundant species followed by levoglucosan and mannitol. Significant positive correlation between the molecular markers, anhydrosugars, sugar alcohols, primary sugars, and oxalic acid confirmed that biomass burning, biogenic activity, and re-suspension of soil particles were the main sources of aerosol in the eastern central India study area. PMID:25131681

  14. Hydrologic and Geologic Reconnaissance of Pinto Basin, Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunkel, Fred

    1963-01-01

    Pinto basin, in the north-central part of Riverside County, Calif., is a typical desert valley formed by downfaulting along several major fault zones. The valley is filled with alluvium, and ground water in the alluvium discharges as subsurface outflow through an alluvium-filled gap at the east end of the valley. Occasionally surface water from cloudburst floods also discharges in a wash through the gap at the east end of the valley. A northeastward extension of the major fault along the south side of the valley acts as a barrier to the discharge of ground water from the valley. The average ground-water gradient is less than 1 foot per mile across the main part of the valley above this barrier, but the water level drops abruptly across the fault. The ground-water storage capacity of the uppermost 100 feet of saturated alluvium beneath the central valley area is estimated to be about 230,000 acre-feet. All this water in storage occurs at depths greater than 95 feet below the land surface and cannot be reached by plants or animals. During 1959 virtually all the water pumped in the area was withdrawn from storage. However, the quantity of water pumped is small in relation to the total quantity in storage. Except for a small decline in head, no evidence indicates that the pumping will greatly impair the yield for many years or cause the water to deteriorate in quality.

  15. Geologic map of the Lakeview 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Matti, Jonathan C.

    2001-01-01

    This Open-File Report contains a digital geologic map and map database of the Lakeview 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California, that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute) version 7.2.1 double-precision coverages of the various elements of the geologic map 2. A Postscript file to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram and a Description of Map Units 3. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. This Readme; includes, in Appendix I, data contained in lkvw_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. (Test plots from this .pdf do not produce 1:24,000-scale maps. Adobe Acrobat page size settings control map scale.) This release includes features not found in most other digital geologic maps, in that all polygons, lines, and points in the coverage are encoded with detailed, comprehensive, contained in five INFO data tables (.rel) (see Matti and others, 1998a, 1998b, and 1998c for information on how the encoding may be accessed and utilized). No paper map is included in this report, but a PostScript plot file containing an image of the geologic map sheet, topographic base, Correlation of Map Units (CMU), and detailed Description of Map Units (DMU) is. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation name, age, and lithology. Even though this is an author-prepared report, every attempt has been made to closely adhere to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U. S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above). If roads in some areas, especially roads that parallel topographic contours, do not show well on plots of the geologic map, we recommend use of the USGS Lakeview 7.5' topographic quadrangle in conjunction with the geologic map.

  16. Seasonal comparisons of single-particle chemical mixing state in Riverside, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xueying; Pratt, Kerri A.; Shields, Laura G.; Toner, Stephen M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2012-11-01

    The Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside, CA (SOAR) field campaign, conducted in the summer and fall of 2005, focused on developing a stronger understanding of seasonal influences on the sources and processes contributing to some of the highest levels of particulate matter in the United States. On-line single-particle mass spectrometry measurements showed that carbonaceous particles generally dominated the submicron size range (>75% by number), compared to primarily aged sea salt and dust in the supermicron size range. During periods with high PM2.5 (particulate matter <2.5 ?m) mass and number concentrations, hygroscopic water-containing carbonaceous particles internally mixed with sulfate and nitrate extended up into the supermicron size mode. The mixing state of carbonaceous particles changed with season. In the summer, carbonaceous particles were primarily mixed with secondary (oxidized) organic carbon and sulfate; whereas in the fall, they were mixed mostly with ammonium nitrate. During each season, different processes contributed to the highest pollution levels. In the summer, photochemical production of highly aged secondary organic carbon resulted in daily peaks in both number and mass particle concentrations, followed by removal in the afternoon by the arrival of the clean marine air masses from the coast. In contrast, cooler, more stagnant meteorological conditions in the fall season resulted in the buildup over several days of submicron carbonaceous particles mixed with semivolatile ammonium, nitrate, and amines. In addition, Santa Ana wind events in the fall led to dust and biomass burning particles dominating both the submicron and supermicron size ranges.

  17. Personal exposure to airborne particles and metals: results from the Particle TEAM study in Riverside, California.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, H; Xue, J; Spengler, J; Wallace, L; Pellizzari, E; Jenkins, P

    1996-01-01

    The PTEAM Study was the first large-scale probability-based study of personal exposure to particles. Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Air Resources Board of California, it was carried out by the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) and the Harvard University School of Public Health (HSPH). HSPH designed and constructed a 4-lpm, battery-operated personal monitor for inhalable particles (PM10) that could be worn comfortably for up to 14 hours by persons from 10 to 70 years old. The monitor was worn for two consecutive 12-hour periods (day and night) during the fall of 1990 by 178 participants representing 139,000 nonsmoking residents of Riverside, California. Nearly identical monitors were employed to collect concurrent indoor and outdoor samples. The monitors were equipped with a different sampling nozzle to collect fine particles (PM2.5). Population-weighted daytime personal PM10 exposures averaged 150 +/- 9 (SE) micrograms/m3, compared to concurrent indoor and outdoor concentrations of 95 +/- 6 micrograms/m3. This suggested the existence of excess mass near the person, a "personal cloud" that appeared related to personal activities. Fourteen of 15 prevalent elements also were evaluated in the personal samples. The two major indoor sources of indoor particles were smoking and cooking; even in these homes, however, more than half of the indoor particles came from outdoors, and a substantial portion of the indoor particles were of undetermined indoor origin. Outdoor concentrations near the homes were well correlated with outdoor concentrations at the central site, supporting the idea of using the central site as an indicator of of ambient concentrations over a wider area. Indoor concentrations were only weakly correlated with outdoor concentrations, however, and personal exposures were even more poorly correlated with outdoor concentrations. Elemental profiles were obtained for environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) (major contributions from potassium and chlorine) and cooking emissions (aluminum, iron, calcium, and chlorine). These profiles can be used in future source apportionment studies. PMID:8777374

  18. Elevated blood lead levels in a riverside population in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Fernando; Fillion, Myriam; Lemire, Mlanie; Passos, Carlos Jos Sousa; Rodrigues, Jairo Lisboa; Philibert, Aline; Guimares, Jean-Rmy; Mergler, Donna

    2009-07-01

    Lead (Pb) is recognized as one of the most toxic metals. Sources of Pb exposure have been widely documented in North America, and the removal of Pb additives from gasoline was reflected in a dramatic lowering of blood Pb concentration. In Latin America, the removal of Pb from gasoline resulted in decreased exposure, but Pb levels in many areas remain high due to occupational and environmental sources of exposure. While many of the Pb sources have been identified (mining, industries, battery recycling, lead-based paint, ceramics), new ones occasionally crop up. Here we report on blood Pb (B-Pb) levels in remote riverside communities of the Brazilian Amazon. Blood Pb (B-Pb) levels were determined in 448 persons from 12 villages of the Lower Tapajs River Basin, Par, Brazil. Socio-demographic and dietary information, as well as occupational, residential and medical history was collected using an interview-administered questionnaire. B-Pb, measured by ICP-MS, showed elevated concentrations. Mean B-Pb was 13.1 microg/dL +/- 8.5, median B-Pb was 11.2 microg/dL and ranged from 0.59 to 48.3 microg/dL. Men had higher B-Pb compared to women (median: 15.3 microg/dL vs 7.9 microg/dL respectively). B-Pb increased with age for women, while it decreased for men. For both genders, B-Pb decreased with education. There were significant differences between villages. Exploratory analyses, using linear partition models, showed that for men B-Pb was lower among those who were involved in cattle-raising, and higher among those who hunted, farmed and fished. The distribution profile of B-Pb directed us towards artisanal transformation of manioc to flour (farinha), which requires heating in a large metal pan, with stirring primarily done by young men. In the village with the highest B-Pb, analysis of Pb concentrations (dry weight) of manioc (prior to transformation) and farinha (following transformation) from 6 houses showed a tenfold increase in Pb concentration (mean: 0.017 +/- 0.016 to 0.19 +/- 0.10 microg/g). This was confirmed in one of these villages where we sampled manioc paste (just before roasting) and the roasted farinha (0.05 microg/g vs 0.20 microg/g). While there may be other sources (ammunition, sinkers for fishing nets), the high concentrations in farinha, a dietary staple, assuredly makes an important contribution. Further action needs to reduce Pb sources in this region. PMID:19389665

  19. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Vancomycin-Heteroresistant Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain UC7032, Isolated from Food

    PubMed Central

    Pietta, Ester; Bassi, Daniela; Fontana, Cecilia; Puglisi, Edoardo; Cappa, Fabrizio; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis strain UC7032 was isolated from ready-to-eat cured meat and is heteroresistant to glycopeptide antibiotics. The draft whole-genome analysis revealed that this strain shows common characteristics typical of strains that are involved in nosocomial infections. PMID:24072859

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Vancomycin-Heteroresistant Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain UC7032, Isolated from Food.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Simona; Pietta, Ester; Bassi, Daniela; Fontana, Cecilia; Puglisi, Edoardo; Cappa, Fabrizio; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis strain UC7032 was isolated from ready-to-eat cured meat and is heteroresistant to glycopeptide antibiotics. The draft whole-genome analysis revealed that this strain shows common characteristics typical of strains that are involved in nosocomial infections. PMID:24072859

  2. A novel UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure to inhibit relapse to drug seeking

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yi-xiao; Xue, Yan-xue; Liu, Jian-feng; Shi, Hai-shui; Jian, Min; Han, Ying; Zhu, Wei-li; Bao, Yan-ping; Wu, Ping; Ding, Zeng-bo; Shen, Hao-wei; Shi, Jie; Shaham, Yavin; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that a conditioned stimulus (CS) memory retrieval-extinction procedure decreases reinstatement of cocaine and heroin seeking in rats and heroin craving in humans. Here we show that non-contingent cocaine or methylphenidate injections (UCS retrieval) 1 h before the extinction sessions decreases cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement, spontaneous recovery, and renewal of cocaine seeking in rats. Unlike the CS-based memory retrieval-extinction procedure, the UCS memory retrieval manipulation decreases renewal and reinstatement of cocaine seeking in the presence of cocaine cues that were not present during extinction training and also decreases cocaine seeking when the procedure commences after 28 days of abstinence. The inhibitory effect of the UCS retrieval manipulation on cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement is mediated by regulation of AMPA-receptor endocytosis in the basolateral amygdala. The UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure has superior relapse prevention characteristics than the CS memory retrieval-extinction procedure and could be a promising method for decreasing relapse in human addicts. PMID:26169171

  3. Environmental Profiles of Paper vs. Electronic UC-CEAS Annual Reports

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2010, the University of Cincinnati College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (UC-CEAS) created a new electronic format for the Annual Report that could be distributed through the colleges website to replace the prior print version. In order to determine the environmental co...

  4. A thermodynamic study of the cyclodextrin-UC781 inclusion complex using a HPLC method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haitao; Parniak, Michael A.; Hillier, Sharon L.; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    UC781, a very potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with extreme hydrophobicity and poor water solubility, is under development as a topical vaginal microbicide product to prevent HIV transmission. In this study, the thermodynamic behavior of the interaction between UC781 with three cyclodextrins (CDs): ?-cyclodextrin (?CD), hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (HP?CD) and methyl-?-cyclodextrin (M?CD), was investigated using a reversed-phase HPLC method. A mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile: H2O (30:70) solution containing various CD concentrations was used. The retention time at different temperatures was determined to evaluate the inclusion process. The influence of ?CDs on the solubility and hydrophobicity of UC781 was characterized by retention time values. The results showed that the inclusion capacity of cyclodextrins follows the order M?CD > ?CD > HP?CD. An enthalpyentropy compensation effect was also observed. In addition, the results revealed that the change of ?H is greater than that of ?S. These results suggested that the complexation of UC781 with ?CDs is an enthalpy driven process. The modification on ?-cyclodextrin will influence the inclusion process. PMID:26097403

  5. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY (UC-CEIN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: 0830117
    Title: University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC-CEIN)
    Investigator: Andre E. Nel
    Institution: University of California - Los Angeles
    EPA Project Officer: Nor...

  6. What Was It like? Being in the Pioneer Class at UC Merced

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Entering the UC Merced campus and turning onto Scholars Lane, students saw, in this order, large cow pastures surrounding the campus, tall chainlink fences enclosing construction materials, orange fences stating "limits of construction," and across the small road, the residence facilities. Students who were willing to brave this combination of

  7. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior

  8. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Paul

    2012-05-31

    This is the final report of the UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence which spanned from 2005-2012. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program, to provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills to create advanced automotive technologies. The UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence established in 2005 is focused on research, education, industrial collaboration and outreach within automotive technology. UC Davis has had two independent GATE centers with separate well-defined objectives and research programs from 1998. The Fuel Cell Center, administered by ITS-Davis, has focused on fuel cell technology. The Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Design Center (HEV Center), administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, has focused on the development of plug-in hybrid technology using internal combustion engines. The merger of these two centers in 2005 has broadened the scope of research and lead to higher visibility of the activity. UC Davis’s existing GATE centers have become the campus’s research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

  9. A novel UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure to inhibit relapse to drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi-xiao; Xue, Yan-xue; Liu, Jian-feng; Shi, Hai-shui; Jian, Min; Han, Ying; Zhu, Wei-li; Bao, Yan-ping; Wu, Ping; Ding, Zeng-bo; Shen, Hao-wei; Shi, Jie; Shaham, Yavin; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that a conditioned stimulus (CS) memory retrieval-extinction procedure decreases reinstatement of cocaine and heroin seeking in rats and heroin craving in humans. Here we show that non-contingent cocaine or methylphenidate injections (UCS retrieval) 1 h before the extinction sessions decreases cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement, spontaneous recovery, and renewal of cocaine seeking in rats. Unlike the CS-based memory retrieval-extinction procedure, the UCS memory retrieval manipulation decreases renewal and reinstatement of cocaine seeking in the presence of cocaine cues that were not present during extinction training and also decreases cocaine seeking when the procedure commences after 28 days of abstinence. The inhibitory effect of the UCS retrieval manipulation on cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement is mediated by regulation of AMPA-receptor endocytosis in the basolateral amygdala. The UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure has superior relapse prevention characteristics than the CS memory retrieval-extinction procedure and could be a promising method for decreasing relapse in human addicts. PMID:26169171

  10. A New Campus Building on Efficiency: University of California (UC) Merced Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    The University of California (UC), Merced partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit two existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% as part of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  11. 20 CFR 603.23 - What information must State UC agencies obtain from other agencies, and crossmatch with wage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information must State UC agencies obtain from other agencies, and crossmatch with wage information, for purposes of an IEVS? 603.23 Section 603.23 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (UC)...

  12. The UC Berkeley K-12 Science Coalition - Facilitating Student Participation in Space Science Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, I.

    1999-05-01

    Although many astronomy undergraduate and graduate majors are interested in becoming professional astronomers, there is a growing number of students interested in following their astronomy training with alternate careers in science education. My talk will describe innovative opportunities for students at UC Berkeley to gain experience in K-12 science education and outreach through a coordinated effort, the UC Berkeley K-12 Science Coalition. At institutions of higher education, the many science departments and research units have disciplinary foci that are too specialized to meet the broad needs of the K-12 science curriculum. Thus, coordination of individual efforts is the only way to provide a cohesive program of support for K-12 schools, and fulfill science education standards and curricular requirements at the various grade levels. At UC Berkeley alone, scores of science education and outreach programs exist in many disciplinary areas working with schools at all grade levels. Until recently, these programs have traditionally worked independently of each other and without consistent levels of coordination with school district priorities. The UC Berkeley K-12 Science Coalition has recently been established under the leadership of the campus' Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost, to coordinate individual science outreach efforts to best serve the K-12 community. The goals of such coordination are to improve K-12 student achievement, teacher professional development, and curriculum through a cohesive structure in which the various programs and academic departments/units can contribute effectively. The Science Coalition will also serve as a framework for UC Berkeley students to participate effectively in science education, obtain needed training and experience, as well as an opportunity to explore alternate careers with an astronomy degree.

  13. UC781 Microbicide Gel Retains Anti-HIV Activity in Cervicovaginal Lavage Fluids Collected following Twice-Daily Vaginal Application

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Holder, Angela; Pau, Chou-Pong; McNicholl, Janet M.; Chaikummao, Supraporn; Chonwattana, Wannee; Hart, Clyde E.

    2012-01-01

    The potent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor UC781 has been safety tested as a vaginal microbicide gel formulation for prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission. To investigate whether UC781 retained anti-infective activity following exposure to the female genital tract, we conducted an ex vivo analysis of the UC781 levels and antiviral activity in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) fluids from 25 Thai women enrolled in a 14-day safety trial of twice-daily vaginal application of two concentrations of the UC781 microbicide gel. CVL samples were collected from women in the 0.1% (n = 5), 0.25% (n = 15), and placebo (n = 5) gel arms following the first application of gel (T15 min) and 8 to 24 h after the final application (T8-24 h) and separated into cell-free (CVL-s) and pelletable (CVL-p) fractions. As UC781 is highly hydrophobic, there were significantly higher levels of UC781 in the CVL-p samples than in the CVL-s samples for the UC781 gel arms. In T8-24 h CVL-p samples, 2/5 and 13/15 samples collected from the 0.1% and 0.25% UC781 gel arms, respectively, efficiently blocked infection with ≥4 log10 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of a CCR5-tropic CRF01_AE HIV-1 virus stock. Independent of the arm, the 11 CVL-p samples with UC781 levels of ≥5 μg/CVL sample reduced infectious HIV by ≥4 log10 TCID50. Our results suggest that the levels and anti-infective activities of UC781 gel formulations are likely to be associated with a cellular or pelletable component in CVL samples. Therefore, cellular and pelletable fractions should be assayed for drug levels and anti-infective activity in preclinical studies of candidate microbicides. PMID:22508307

  14. Space Station UCS antenna pattern computation and measurement. [UHF Communication Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Lu, Ba P.; Johnson, Larry A.; Fournet, Jon S.; Panneton, Robert J.; Ngo, John D.; Eggers, Donald S.; Arndt, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the interference to the Space Station Ultrahigh Frequency (UHF) Communication Subsystem (UCS) antenna radiation pattern due to its environment - Space Station. A hybrid Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) technique was applied in this study. The antenna was modeled using the Method of Moments (MOM) and the radiation patterns were computed using the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) in which the effects of the reflected and diffracted fields from surfaces, edges, and vertices of the Space Station structures were included. In order to validate the CEM techniques, and to provide confidence in the computer-generated results, a comparison with experimental measurements was made for a 1/15 scale Space Station mockup. Based on the results accomplished, good agreement on experimental and computed results was obtained. The computed results using the CEM techniques for the Space Station UCS antenna pattern predictions have been validated.

  15. Sixteen years of collaborative learning through active sense-making in physics (CLASP) at UC Davis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Wendell; Webb, David; Paul, Cassandra; West, Emily; Bowen, Mark; Weiss, Brenda; Coleman, Lawrence; De Leone, Charles

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes our large reformed introductory physics course at UC Davis, which bioscience students have been taking since 1996. The central feature of this course is a focus on sense-making by the students during the 5 h per week discussion/labs in which the students take part in activities emphasizing peer-peer discussions, argumentation, and presentations of ideas. The course differs in many fundamental ways from traditionally taught introductory physics courses. After discussing the unique features of CLASP and its implementation at UC Davis, various student outcome measures are presented that show increased performance by students who took the CLASP course compared to students who took a traditionally taught introductory physics course. Measures we use include upper-division GPAs, MCAT scores, FCI gains, and MPEX-II scores.

  16. Production of UC-labeled gas in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits by Neisseria cinerea

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, J.M.; Mitchell, E.B. Jr.; Knapp, J.S.; Buttke, T.M.

    1985-09-01

    Six strains of Neisseria cinerea were tested in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.), and all yielded positive glucose growth indices and negative maltose and fructose growth indices. These results were similar to those achieved with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. However, most of the N. cinerea isolates tested yielded 3-h glucose growth indices that were lower than those obtained with gonococci. UC-labeled gas was produced significantly faster by N. gonorrhoeae than by N. cinerea. Additional studies suggested that the UC-labeled gas produced by N. cinerea was carbon dioxide. N. cinerea strains were similar to Branhamella catarrhalis strains because both species failed to produce detectable acid from glucose, maltose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose in cysteine-tryptic agar media. However, in contrast to N. cinerea strains, B. catarrhalis strains did not metabolize glucose in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits.

  17. U@C28: the electronic structure induced by the 32-electron principle.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xing; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Wanrun; Lei, Yanyu; Wang, Zhigang

    2015-09-28

    First principles calculations show that the neutral U@C28 has a (cage)(2) ground state with Td symmetry instead of the long believed (5f)(1)(cage)(1) ground state with D2 symmetry. Its 34 valence electrons preferentially obey the 32-electron principle which fills all the s-, p-, d-, and f-type valence shells of the uranium atom. The remaining two valence electrons cannot break the electronic configuration and thus are located on the cage. PMID:26299736

  18. Pteam: Monitoring of phthalates and PAHs in indoor and outdoor air samples in Riverside, California. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, L.; Clayton, A.; Keever, J.; Perritt, R.; Whitaker, D.

    1992-12-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to obtain indoor and outdoor air concentration data for benzo(a)pyrene, other polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and phthalates in California residences to be used in making exposure predictions. To meet these objectives, a field monitoring study was performed in 125 homes in Riverside, California in the fall of 1990. In each home, two 12-hour indoor air samples were collected during daytime and overnight periods. In a subset of 65 homes, outdoor air samples were also collected. PAH and phthalate concentrations were measured in collected air samples using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. Along with field monitoring, information on potential source usage in the home was collected using questionnaires.

  19. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mosey, G.; Van Geet, O.

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of deploying a photovoltaics (PV) system on the Stringfellow Superfund Site in Riverside, California. The site was assessed for possible PV installations. The cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options were estimated. The economics of the potential systems were analyzed using an electric rate of $0.13/kWh and incentives offered by Southern California Edison under the California Solar Initiative. According to the assessment, a government-owned, ground-mounted PV system represents a technically and economically feasible option. The report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of such a system.

  20. In vitro batch cultures of gut microbiota from healthy and ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects suggest that sulphate-reducing bacteria levels are raised in UC and by a protein-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Nazeha A; Walton, Gemma E; Gibson, Glenn R; Tuohy, Kieran M; Andrews, Simon C

    2014-02-01

    Imbalances in gut microbiota composition during ulcerative colitis (UC) indicate a role for the microbiota in propagating the disorder. Such effects were investigated using in vitro batch cultures (with/without mucin, peptone or starch) inoculated with faecal slurries from healthy or UC patients; the growth of five bacterial groups was monitored along with short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. Healthy cultures gave two-fold higher growth and SCFA levels with up to ten-fold higher butyrate production. Starch gave the highest growth and SCFA production (particularly butyrate), indicating starch-enhanced saccharolytic activity. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were the predominant bacterial group (of five examined) for UC inocula whereas they were the minority group for the healthy inocula. Furthermore, SRB growth was stimulated by peptone presumably due to the presence of sulphur-rich amino acids. The results suggest raised SRB levels in UC, which could contribute to the condition through release of toxic sulphide. PMID:23941288

  1. Bandwidth and gain enhancement of optically transparent 60-GHz CPW-fed antenna by using BSIS-UC-EBG structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Tian, Huiping; Guo, Zheng; Yang, Daquan; Zhou, Jian; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-06-01

    A method in terms of bandwidth and gain enhancement is presented for optically transparent coplanar waveguide fed (CPW-Fed) antenna, which supports unlicensed 60 GHz band (57-66 GHz) applications. The original antenna and mesh antenna in [8] were designed on a transparent material that is made of a 0.2-mm-thick fused silica 7980 Corning substrate (?r: 3.8 and tan ?: 0.0001). However, the peak gains of -5.3 and -5.4 dBi at 60 GHz of those antennas can be further improved. Thus, in this paper, a novel bidirectional symmetric I-shaped slot uniplanar compact electromagnetic band-gap (BSIS-UC-EBG) structure with a reflection phase band of 58.0-62.1 GHz is proposed to improve antenna performance. Based on this BSIS-UC-EBG structure, both transparent BSIS-UC-EBG antenna and transparent mesh BSIS-UC-EBG antenna with enhanced properties are presented and discussed. The analysis results show that the impedance bandwidth (the peak gain) of transparent BSIS-UC-EBG antenna and transparent mesh BSIS-UC-EBG antenna are enhanced to 36.6% (4.7 dBi) and 44.7% (5.8 dBi), respectively. In addition, we also discuss the comparison of radiation patterns at 60 GHz, and the results illustrate that the radiation patterns are basically identical.

  2. Production of lactic acid from cellobiose and cellotriose by Lactobacillus delbrueckii mutant Uc-3.

    PubMed

    Adsul, Mukund; Khire, Jayant; Bastawde, Kulbhushan; Gokhale, Digambar

    2007-08-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii mutant Uc-3 utilizes both cellobiose and cellotriose efficiently, converting it into L(+) lactic acid. The enzyme activities of cellobiose and cellotriose utilization were determined for cell extracts, whole cells, and disrupted cells. Aryl-beta-glucosidase activity was detected only for whole cells and disrupted cells, suggesting that these activities are cell bound. The mutant produced 90 g/liter of lactic acid from 100 g/liter of cellobiose with 2.25 g/liter/h productivity. PMID:17557849

  3. An Integrated Study of Geoelectric Vertical Sounding and Hydrogeochemistry in the Riverside Alluvium around Buyeo Area, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, S.; Park, Y.; Yun, S.

    2005-12-01

    The water quality of alluvial aquifers in agricultural areas is sensitive to the behaviour of agricultural chemicals (e.g., fertilizers, pesticides, and lime) and, also, to the geologic conditions. It is important to know the characteristics of the aquifers (e.g., depth, spatial distribution, and soil types) and the relationship between subsurface geology and the groundwater contamination for its effective use and management in the future. In order to provide the subsurface information of the lithology and the groundwater zone for hydrogeologic interpretations, an integrated study using twenty vertical electric soundings (VES), direct observation of lithology from two boreholes and hydrochemical data from irrigation well has been conducted in the riverside alluvium near Buyeo area, Korea. Main results of this study are as follows. The depth of main groundwater table is getting slightly deeper toward the river. The boundary between surface sandy and silty soils extends to the subsurface at depth of groundwater table. The vestige of an ancient river channel, such as an oxbow lake, can be identified by a lateral continuation of perched aquifer parallel to the river on the resistivity profiles. This perched aquifer materials are composed of clay-rich silt soils, which prohibit the infiltration of oxygen and nitrate from the land surface. Therefore, the groundwater of the main aquifer below the oxbow lake shows the very low NO3 level and Eh values under the strong anoxic condition. Surface resistivity contour map indicates that the resistivity varies with a NW-SE trending zonal distribution and increases toward the river. This result shows an agreement with the spatial distribution of surface soils, implying that the variation of surface resistivity is mainly controlled by surface lithology or soil type. On the other hand, the distribution of water resistivities is correlated with that of total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration, while the earth resistivity of aquifer shows a different spatial distribution from those of water resistivity and TDS. It is interpreted that the earth resistivity of aquifer might represent the variations of soil type rather than water chemistry in the study area. The present study shows that the geoelectric sounding survey with the complement of borehole lithology and hydrochemical data can provide an inexpensive and useful method for delineating the subsurface hydrogeology in the riverside alluvial aquifer.

  4. Apportionment of primary and secondary organic aerosols in southern California during the 2005 study of organic aerosols in riverside (SOAR-1).

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Stone, Elizabeth A; Ulbrich, Ingrid M; DeCarlo, Peter F; Snyder, David C; Schauer, James J; Peltier, Richard E; Weber, Rodney J; Murphy, Shane M; Seinfeld, John H; Grover, Brett D; Eatough, Delbert J; Jimenez, Jose L

    2008-10-15

    Ambient sampling was conducted in Riverside, California during the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols in Riverside to characterize the composition and sources of organic aerosol using a variety of state-of-the-art instrumentation and source apportionmenttechniques. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass is estimated by elemental carbon and carbon monoxide tracer methods, water soluble organic carbon content, chemical mass balance of organic molecular markers, and positive matrix factorization of high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer data. Estimates obtained from each ofthese methods indicate that the organic fraction in ambient aerosol is overwhelmingly secondary in nature during a period of several weeks with moderate ozone concentrations and that SOA is the single largest component of PM1 aerosol in Riverside. Average SOA/OA contributions of 70-90% were observed during midday periods, whereas minimum SOA contributions of approximately 45% were observed during peak morning traffic periods. These results are contraryto previous estimates of SOAthroughout the Los Angeles Basin which reported that, other than during severe photochemical smog episodes, SOA was lower than primary OA. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed. PMID:18983089

  5. Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of 3-t-(methyl- UC) butyl-4-hydroxyanisole in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, G.A.; Hendrix, P.Y.

    1985-09-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of 3-t-(methyl- UC)butyl-4-hydroxyanisole was studied in male rats. 3-t-(methyl- UC)butyl-4-hydroxyanisole was administered by gavage at a single dose of 1.5 mmol/kg. Urine, feces, blood, and 20 major tissues were collected at 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, 16, 17, 18, 24, 48, 72, 168, and 240 hr after dosing and were analyzed for radioactivity. Almost all radioactivity was eliminated from rats in 48 hrs. Forty one per cent of the administered dose was recovered in urine, while feces accounted for 53%. At early time points radioactivity was mainly found in gastrointestinal tissues with concentrations remaining high up to 16-18 hr after administration indicating a slow absorption and elimination of the compound. The maximum concentration of radiolabel in kidney, liver, bladder, spleen, heart, pancreas, and brain was reached at 6 hr and remained up to 24 hr. The concentration of radioactivity in liver and kidney was approximately 10-fold higher than other tissues at the peak time of 16-18 hrs. Calculated absorption and elimination rate constants demonstrated slow uptake and clearance of label by many tissues. Covalent binding in eight representative tissues at 10 time points was also studied. Results indicate that binding increases slowly and exponentially with time reaching maximum levels at 12-24 hr in most of the tissues followed by a slow decline with time.

  6. Transformation of Escherichia coli JM109 using pUC19 by the Yoshida effect.

    PubMed

    Mendes, G P; Vieira, P S; Lanceros-Méndez, S; Kluskens, L D; Mota, M

    2015-08-01

    Transformation of non-competent Escherichia coli JM109 was accomplished using pUC19 as donor plasmid and sepiolite as the acicular material to promote cell piercing via application of friction with a polystyrene stick or a magnetic bar on the surface of a hydrogel containing agar. An automatic spreading setup was built with a conventional stirring plate and compared to manual spreading. Several parameters were optimized, namely, the agar content of the hydrogel (2%), concentration of cells (OD=1.3 corresponding to 1.4×10(9) bacterial cells/mL), concentration of sepiolite (0.01%), manual versus mechanical spreading (automatic spreading more consistent) and spreading time (30s). Efficiency values up to 4.1×10(4) CFU/μg pUC19 were obtained. The method proved to be suitable for a rapid and low cost transformation of non-competent E. coli JM109, where higher values of efficiency do not need to be attained. PMID:25966644

  7. Development of telescope control system for the 50cm telescope of UC Observatory Santa Martina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tzu-Chiang; Soto, Ruben; Reveco, Johnny; Vanzi, Leonardo; Fernández, Jose M.; Escarate, Pedro; Suc, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    The main telescope of the UC Observatory Santa Martina is a 50cm optical telescope donated by ESO to Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. During the past years the telescope has been refurbished and used as the main facility for testing and validating new instruments under construction by the center of Astro-Engineering UC. As part of this work, the need to develop a more efficient and flexible control system arises. The new distributed control system has been developed on top of Internet Communication Engine (ICE), a framework developed by Zeroc Inc. This framework features a lightweight but powerful and flexible inter-process communication infrastructure and provides binding to classic and modern programming languages, such as, C/C++, java, c#, ruby-rail, objective c, etc. The result of this work shows ICE as a real alternative for CORBA and other de-facto distribute programming framework. Classical control software architecture has been chosen and comprises an observation control system (OCS), the orchestrator of the observation, which controls the telescope control system (TCS), and detector control system (DCS). The real-time control and monitoring system is deployed and running over ARM based single board computers. Other features such as logging and configuration services have been developed as well. Inter-operation with other main astronomical control frameworks are foreseen in order achieve a smooth integration of instruments when they will be integrated in the main observatories in the north of Chile

  8. The Plasmid Complement of Lactococcus lactis UC509.9 Encodes Multiple Bacteriophage Resistance Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Mahony, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains are used globally for the production of fermented dairy products, particularly hard cheeses. Believed to be of plant origin, L. lactis strains that are used as starter cultures have undergone extensive adaptation to the dairy environment, partially through the acquisition of extrachromosomal DNA in the form of plasmids that specify technologically important phenotypic traits. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the eight plasmids of L. lactis UC509.9, an Irish dairy starter strain. Key industrial phenotypes were mapped, and genes that are typically associated with lactococcal plasmids were identified. Four distinct, plasmid-borne bacteriophage resistance systems were identified, including two abortive infection systems, AbiB and AbiD1, thereby supporting the observed phage resistance of L. lactis UC509.9. AbiB escape mutants were generated for phage sk1, which were found to carry mutations in orf6, which encodes the major capsid protein of this phage. PMID:24814781

  9. Rapid large-scale deployment of tuberculosis testing in a high school - Riverside County, California, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Cameron; Cole, Barbara; Saruwatari, Kimberly; Leon, Ramon

    2015-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), can spread from person to person through the air, which can make contact investigations particularly complex in heavily populated settings such as schools. In November 2013, a student (the index patient) at a southern California high school with approximately 2,000 students and staff members was diagnosed with active pulmonary TB. Because of an unexpectedly high number of positive tuberculin skin test results in the initial contact investigation, testing was extended to the entire school population, which had to be completed before the end of the school term. A total of 1,806 persons were tested in 24 hours. The rapid testing of the entire population of a high school is unusual and led to widespread media attention and community concern, requiring close coordination among branches of the County of Riverside Department of Public Health, local governments, and the school district. The testing resulted in identification of two additional cases of TB; in addition, 72 persons underwent treatment for latent TB infection (LTBI). This incident demonstrates the importance of a coordinated emergency response in a large-scale deployment of rapid testing, including efficiently focused resources, organized testing operations, and effective media relations. PMID:26042648

  10. Analysis of hematopoiesis dynamics in residents of Techa riverside villages chronically exposed to nonuniform radiation: modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, O A; Akleyev, A V; Dimov, G P

    2014-04-01

    A profound approach to the analysis of clinical data on the dynamics of major hematopoietic lineages (granulocytopoietic, thrombocytopoietic, and erythrocytopoietic systems) in chronically irradiated humans is proposed. It is based on recently developed mathematical models of these systems in humans, which enable one to study and interpret clinical hematological data. The developed approach is applied to the analysis of statistically processed clinical data, which were obtained under hematological examinations of residents of Techa riverside villages. These people were exposed to chronic irradiation with varying dose rate due to the radioactive contamination of the river basin by the Mayak Production Association. In the course of modeling studies, the relationship between the dynamics of aforementioned systems in examined individuals and the variation of chronic exposure dose rate over the considered period of time is revealed. It is found that the models are capable of reproducing common regularities and peculiarities of the dynamics of systems on hand, including the decreased stationary levels of blood cell concentrations during the period of maximum radiation exposure, the recovery processes during the period of decrease of exposure dose rate, and the prevalence of younger bone marrow granulocytopoietic cells over more mature ones during the entire period. The mechanisms of such effects of chronic irradiation on the hematopoietic lineages are revealed on the basis of modeling studies. All this testifies to the efficiency of employment of the developed models in the analysis, investigation, and prediction of effects of chronic irradiation on human hematopoietic system. PMID:24562065

  11. Detection and genome analysis of a novel (dima)rhabdovirus (Riverside virus) from Ochlerotatus sp. mosquitoes in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Gábor; Boros, Ákos; Pál, József; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric; Pankovics, Péter

    2016-04-01

    During an investigation for potential arboviruses present in mosquitoes in Hungary (Central Europe) three highly similar virus strains of a novel rhabdovirus (family Rhabdoviridae) called Riverside virus (RISV, KU248085-KU248087) were detected and genetically characterized from Ochlerotatus sp. mosquito pools collected from 3 geographical locations using viral metagenomic and RT-PCR methods. The ssRNA(-) genome of RISVs follows the general genome layout of rhabdoviruses (3'-N-P-M-G-L-5') with two alternatives, small ORFs in the P and G genes (Px and Gx). The genome of RISVs contains some unusual features such as the large P proteins, the short M proteins with the absence of N-terminal region together with the undetectable "Late budding" motif and the overlap of P and M genes. The unusually long 3' UTRs of the M genes of RISVs probably contain a remnant transcription termination signal which is suggesting the presence of an ancestral gene. The phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons show that the closest known relative of RISVs is the recently identified partially sequenced mosquito-borne rhabdovirus, North Creek virus (NOCRV), from Australia. The RISVs and NOCRV form a distinct, basally rooted lineage in the dimarhabdovirus supergroup. The host species range of RISVs is currently unknown, although the presence of these viruses especially in Ochlerotatus sp. mosquitoes which are known to be fierce biting pests of humans and warm-blooded animals and abundant and widespread in Hungary could hold some potential medical and/or veterinary risks. PMID:26883377

  12. Yuma District Resource Management Plan, Yuma, La Paz, and Mohave Counties, Arizona and San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial Counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Implementation of a resource management plan is proposed for 1.2 million acres within the 2.7-million-acre Yuma District, located in Yuma, La Paz, and Mohave counties, Arizona and San Bernardino, Riverside, and Imperial counties, California. Under the preferred alternative, wildlife habitat would be a priority consideration on approximately 247,740 acre, and nine special management areas would be designated. A portion of the Cactus Plain and the Chemehuevi/Needles wilderness study areas would be recommended for wilderness designation. Two areas totaling 31,360 acres would be designated as special management areas, and another six areas totaling 155,705 acres would be managed to protect their natural values. Livestock grazing would be authorized at 3998 animal unit months on four allotments. Approximately 55,490 acres of federal lands would be available for disposal and 31,220 acres would be acquired. Nine utility corridors and nine communication sites would be designated. Existing recreational facilities would be maintained, with additional facilities provided when warranted. Along Parker Strip, only floodproofed day-use facilities would be allowed within the 100-year flood plain. Off-road vehicle (ORV) use designations would be made on 640 acres and ORV use in the remainder of the district would be limited to existing roads and trails. Continuous occupancy of mobile home sites would be restricted to one five-month period in a single year. Permanent residential use would be phased out.

  13. Use of airborne remote sensing to detect riverside Brassica rapa to aid in risk assessment of transgenic crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Luisa M.; Mason, David C.; Allainguillaume, Joel; Wilkinson, Mike J.

    2009-11-01

    High resolution descriptions of plant distribution have utility for many ecological applications but are especially useful for predictive modeling of gene flow from transgenic crops. Difficulty lies in the extrapolation errors that occur when limited ground survey data are scaled up to the landscape or national level. This problem is epitomized by the wide confidence limits generated in a previous attempt to describe the national abundance of riverside Brassica rapa (a wild relative of cultivated rapeseed) across the United Kingdom. Here, we assess the value of airborne remote sensing to locate B. rapa over large areas and so reduce the need for extrapolation. We describe results from flights over the river Nene in England acquired using Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) imagery, together with ground truth data. It proved possible to detect 97% of flowering B. rapa on the basis of spectral profiles. This included all stands of plants that occupied >2m square (>5 plants), which were detected using single-pixel classification. It also included very small populations (<5 flowering plants, 1-2m square) that generated mixed pixels, which were detected using spectral unmixing. The high detection accuracy for flowering B. rapa was coupled with a rather large false positive rate (43%). The latter could be reduced by using the image detections to target fieldwork to confirm species identity, or by acquiring additional remote sensing data such as laser altimetry or multitemporal imagery.

  14. A new paradigm in ulcerative colitis: regulatory T cells are key factor which induces/exacerbates UC through an immune imbalance.

    PubMed

    Hanai, Hiroyuki; Iida, Takayuki; Ikeya, Kentaro; Abe, Jinrou; Maruyama, Yasuhiko; Shimura, Teruyuki; Sugimoto, Ken; Watanabe, Fumitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Leukocytapheresis (LCAP) appears to remove or inactivate inflammatory cells and to reset immunological responses, resulting to cure responders of ulcerative colitis (UC). The changes of T cell subsets were investigated in UC patients treated with LCAP. Levels of T cell subsets in peripheral blood before and after LCAP were analysed by flow cytometric analysis. Of 20 UC patients, 13 (65%) achieved remission and 2 (10%) showed the improvement of UC symptoms. Ratios of some T cell subtypes such as regulatory T (Treg) cells and memory T cells to CD4(+) T cells changed significantly only in responders. Especially, ratio of resting Treg/CD4(+) T cells was significantly increased after the first LCAP session, and then one of activated Treg/CD4(+) T cells was increased after 2 week. This may lead to the development of a new UC paradigm in which an imbalance in Treg cell subsets triggers the onset and/or exacerbation of UC. PMID:23280396

  15. Role of oral nitrate in the nitrosation of ( UC)proline by conventional microflora and germ-free rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, A.K.; Rowland, I.R.; Walters, D.G.; Gangolli, S.D.; Cottrell, R.C.; Massey, R.C.

    1985-11-01

    The urinary excretion of N-nitroso-L-(U- UC)proline by conventional microflora and germ free rats was used to assess the role of the gut bacteria and oral nitrate in the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds. The formation of nitrosoproline was qualitatively similar in conventional and germfree rats suggesting no involvement of the intestinal flora in this reaction. Furthermore, nitrosamino acid production was similar following the administration of nitrate and (U- UC)proline or (U- UC)proline alone, demonstrating no involvement of exogenous nitrate under the conditions of the experiment. Dietary contamination with nitrate/nitrite was negligible. The results are consistent with the suggestion that nitrate/nitrite reserves in the body are important in the formation of nitrosoproline in vivo.

  16. Distinguishing features of an infectious molecular clone of the highly divergent and noncytopathic human immunodeficiency virus type 2 UC1 strain.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, S W; Quiroga, M; Werner, A; Dina, D; Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    A full-length infectious molecular clone was derived from the noncytopathic human immunodeficiency virus type 2 UC1 strain (HIV-2UC1) that was originally recoverd from an individual from the Ivory Coast. Like the parental isolate, the molecularly cloned virus (HIV-2UC1mc or UC1 mc) demonstrates a reduced ability to induce syncytium formation, to kill cells, and to down-modulate the cell surface CD4 receptor in infected cells. Phylogenetic analysis of the DNA sequence of UC1mc revealed that it is the first full-length infectious molecular clone in the second HIV-2 subgroup previously identified by partial sequence analysis of the HIV-2D205 and HIV-2GH-2 strains. These highly divergent HIV-2 strains appear to be genetically equidistant from other HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac/sm strains. UC1mc is unlike any other HIV-2 or SIVmac/sm strain in that it lacks a cysteine residue at the proposed signal peptide cleavage site in Env. However, site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that this missing cysteine is not alone important in the noncytopathic phenotype of UC1mc. Like other HIV-2 and SIV strains, the UC1mc Env transmembrane protein (gp43) is mutated to a truncated form (gp34) after passage in certain T-cell lines. The UC1 molecular clone should be helpful in determining the genetic sequences associated with HIV-2 cytopathicity. Images PMID:8419635

  17. Fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, T.; Hsieh, D.P.

    1985-05-01

    A detailed fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1 at low doses was performed. The milk collected in the first 24 h following dosing contained radioactivity equivalent to 0.45-1.1% of the dose given. The radioactivity in each sample was partitioned into 4 fractions: ether, protein, dichloromethane, and water-alcohol. Over 80% of the radioactivity was detected in the dichloromethane fraction, of which over 95% was attributable to aflatoxin M1. No aflatoxin B1 or other known aflatoxin metabolites were detected in any fraction. The results indicate that the major metabolite of aflatoxin B1 in goat milk is aflatoxin M1 and that other metabolites, including conjugates, are of minor significance.

  18. FIFI: The MPE Garching/UC Berkeley Far-Infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geis, Norbert; Genzel, Reinhard; Haggerty, M.; Herrmann, F.; Jackson, J.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Nikola, T.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Rumitz, M.; Stacey, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the performance characteristics of the MPE Garching/UC Berkeley Far-Infrared Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FIFI) for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The spectrometer features two or three cryogenic tunable Fabry-Perot filters in series giving spectral resolution R of up to 10(exp 5) in the range of 40 microns less than lambda less than 200 microns, and an imaging 5x5 array of photoconductive detectors with variable focal plane plate scale. The instrument works at background limited sensitivity of up to 2 x 10(exp -19) W cm(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) per pixel per resolution element at R = 10(exp 5) on the KAO.

  19. Weathering of Mine Tailings Deposited on the Riverside and Related Impact of Heavy Metals on the River Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Kim, Y.; Kim, B.; Jeon, S.; Kim, M.

    2006-12-01

    The weathering of ore minerals is very important because it controls the migration and distribution of toxic heavy metals in the geologic environment. In general, the soils, stream water, and groundwater are severely polluted near abandoned mines. The tailings can be also moved away by natural or anthropogenic ways to the other sites and it can cause severe environmental problems especially in river near the urban areas. In Bonghwa area, Korea, the red deposits of weathered mine tailings are easily found, which are considered to be removed by flood from the abandoned mine and deposited on the riverside of the upper stream of Nakdong river more than ten years ago. We studied the weathering of deposited mine tailings and their impact on the rive water. To study the mineral compositions and weathering products in the tailing deposits, XRD and SEM with EDS were used. Quartz and feldspar with minor amount of mica were main primary minerals identified in the deposits. It was very hard to characterize some poor crystalline secondary minerals formed by weathering of ore minerals. Gypsum was identified as major sulfate minerals with minor component of bannite. From EDS analysis, Fe oxide and sulfate probably goethite and schwertmannite were the main iron minerals, indicating schwertmannite was precipitated first and transformed into goethite later by the removal of sulfate. Heavy metals such as As and Pb were detected from some secondary precipitates, probably due to the adsorption or coprecipitation with iron minerals. Mn oxide was the major secondary minerals composing black layers in the deposits. As and Pb in precipitates indicate that galena and arsenopyrite may be the main constituents of ore minerals in addition to pyrite. The behaviors of heavy metals and their influences on the river water are particularly controlled by secondary minerals and those relationship will be discussed with the results of the sequential extraction and secondary mineral compositions.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors of clonorchiasis among residents of riverside areas in Muju-gun, Jeollabuk-do, Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Do-Soon; Na, Sung-Jin; Cho, Shin Hyeong; June, Kyung Ja; Cho, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Ha

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated the status of Clonorchis sinensis infection and potential risk factors among residents of riverside areas (Geumgang) in Muju-gun, Jeollabuk-do (Province), Korea. From January to February 2010, a total of 349 (171 males, 178 females) stool samples were collected and examined by the formalin-ether concentration technique. Also, village residents were interviewed using questionnaires to obtain information about C. sinensis infection-related risk factors. Overall egg-positive rate of C. sinensis was 13.2%. Egg-positive rates were significantly higher in males, farmers, and residents who had lived there more than 20 years, and in residents who had eaten raw freshwater fish than in opposite groups, respectively. However, there was no significant difference between age groups, education levels, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, health status, past history of infection, and experience of clonorchiasis medication and examination. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine risk factors for clonorchiasis. On univariate analysis, the odds ratios for males, farmers, those who had lived there more than 20 years, and who had eaten raw freshwater fish were 2.41, 4.44, 3.16, and 4.88 times higher than those of the opposites, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the odds ratio of residents who had eaten raw freshwater fish was 3.2-fold higher than that of those who had not. These results indicate that residents living in Muju-gun, along the Geum River, Korea, have relatively high C. sinensis egg-positive rates, and the habit of eating raw freshwater fish was the major factor for the maintenance of clonorchiasis. PMID:25246718

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Laverivirus UC1, a Dicistrovirus-Like RNA Virus Featuring an Unusual Genome Organization

    PubMed Central

    DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Laverivirus UC1, assembled from San Francisco wastewater. This dicistronic RNA virus bears some similarity to dicistroviruses; however, it appears to have a unique genome organization relative to all other known RNA viruses. PMID:26139710

  2. Heat transfer characteristics of uc(d)-mannitol as a phase change material for a medium thermal energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, Makoto; Liu, Qiusheng; Fukuda, Katsuya

    2015-11-01

    Melting process and heat transfer characteristics of uc(d)-mannitol were investigated experimentally and numerically to construct a fundamental database of the waste heat recovery systems for ships. uc(d-)Mannitol which has relatively high latent heat was selected in this study as a phase-change material for medium thermal energy storage. Experimental results indicate that the melting temperature and latent heat of uc(d)-mannitol were affected by the heating rate. The weight of uc(d)-mannitol did not decrease with the increase in temperature between 436 and 455 K. Moreover, numerical simulation was conducted using the commercial CFD code, ANSYS FLUENT. On the basis of the numerical simulation, melting process was affected by natural convection at the inner wall. As the heat flux of the cartridge heater input came from the inner wall, the liquid fraction increased from the inner wall to the outer wall through natural convection. The numerical result was compared with the experimental data. The temperature of the numerical simulation was approximately consistent with the experimental data. Moreover, the local heat transfer coefficients at the heater surface were calculated by the result of the numerical simulation. The heat transfer coefficients decreased during the phase change. It was considered that the heat transfer process changed from conductive heat transfer of solid state to natural convection heat transfer of liquid state as the liquid fraction increased with time.

  3. Former University of California Chancellors Urge New Funding Models for UC. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.15.11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Studies in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this era of massive budget cuts, the survival of the University of California as a great institution of learning has become the subject of increasingly urgent debate. Twenty-two of the twenty-nine living former UC chancellors met in San Francisco on June 26-28, 2011 to discuss the current threats facing the University and all of California

  4. Tackling the Transition to UC: To Implement Unified Communications on Campus, It Often Pays to Take a Phased Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the challenges faced by two schools that lie, coincidentally, just 110 miles apart in the vast spaces of North Dakota. Both schools, members of the North Dakota University System, decided to forge ahead with a unified communications (UC) implementation. And while their final solutions differ, how the two

  5. The chemistry of water in the ultracompact HII region (UC HII) Mon R2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente, A.; Pilleri, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Berne, O.; Rizzo, J. R.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Ossenkopf, V.; Gerin, M.; WADI KP Team

    2011-05-01

    Ultracompact (UC) HII regions constitute one of the earliest phases in the formation of a massive star and are characterized by extreme physical and chemical conditions (G0 105 in units of Habing field and n> 106 cm-3). Their understanding is important for distinguishing the different processes in massive star formation (UV radiation vs shocks) and because they can be used as a template for other extreme photon-dominated regions (PDRs) such as the surface layers of circumstellar disks and the nuclei of starburst galaxies. The UC HII Mon R2 is the only one that can be spatially resolved with Herschel. It has been extensively studied at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths and all evidences support a chemistry driven by the strong UV field while shocks play only a minor role. Its physical and kinematical structure is well known and current observations are well explained by an expanding envelope with ve=0.5(r/Rout)-1 km s-1 triggered by the inner HII region. HIFI observations revealed that the emission of the o-H2O 11,0?10,1 line is extended over all the region. The o-H218O 11,0?10,1 line has been detected towards the ionization front. Combining the o-H2O 11,0?10,1, o-H218O 11,0?10,1 with the high-J CO and 13CO lines observed with Herschel, we have been able to derive the water abundance profile across this expanding envelope. The o-H2O abundance varies in the range a few 10-7--10-8 with the highest values for the gas closest to the ionized region. HIFI observations of the o-NH3 10?01 have also been performed toward this PDR. Contrary to o-H2O, the o-NH3 abundance is minimum for the gas with the highest expansion velocities. This is consistent with the predictions of gas phase chemical models for PDRs but also with recent HIFI results in bipolar outflows. We discuss this result in the context of the relative importance of the gas phase and grain surface chemistry in the formation of H2O in warm star forming regions. The influence of different desorption mechanisms, thermal desorption, photodesorption and grain sputtering, is under study.

  6. Independent technical review and analysis of hydraulic modeling and hydrology under low-flow conditions of the Des Plaines River near Riverside, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Over, Thomas M.; Straub, Timothy D.; Hortness, Jon E.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated a streamgage and published daily flows for the Des Plaines River at Riverside since Oct. 1, 1943. A HEC-RAS model has been developed to estimate the effect of the removal of Hofmann Dam near the gage on low-flow elevations in the reach approximately 3 miles upstream from the dam. The Village of Riverside, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources-Office of Water Resources (IDNR-OWR), and the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-Chicago District (USACE-Chicago) are interested in verifying the performance of the HEC-RAS model for specific low-flow conditions, and obtaining an estimate of selected daily flow quantiles and other low-flow statistics for a selected period of record that best represents current hydrologic conditions. Because the USGS publishes streamflow records for the Des Plaines River system and provides unbiased analyses of flows and stream hydraulic characteristics, the USGS served as an Independent Technical Reviewer (ITR) for this study.

  7. Development of Readout Electronics for uc(POLARBEAR-2) Cosmic Microwave Background Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, K.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Barron, D.; Bender, A. N.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Keating, B.; Kusaka, A.; Lee, A.; Montgomery, J.; Rotermund, K.; Shirley, I.; Suzuki, A.; Whitehorn, N.

    2016-01-01

    The readout of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers with a large multiplexing factor is key for the next generation cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment, uc(Polarbear)-2 (Suzuki in J Low Temp Phys 176:719, 2014), having 7588 TES bolometers. To enable the large arrays, we have been developing a readout system with a multiplexing factor of 40 in the frequency domain. Extending that architecture to 40 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics, above 4 MHz. This paper focuses on cryogenic readout and shows how it affects cross talk and the responsivity of the TES bolometers. A series resistance, such as equivalent series resistance of capacitors for LC filters, leads to non-linear response of the bolometers. A wiring inductance modulates a voltage across the bolometers and causes cross talk. They should be controlled well to reduce systematic errors in CMB observations. We have been developing a cryogenic readout with a low series impedance and have tuned bolometers in the middle of their transition at a high frequency (> 3 MHz).

  8. The Broadband Anti-reflection Coated Extended Hemispherical Silicon Lenses for uc(Polarbear-2) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siritanasak, P.; Aleman, C.; Arnold, K.; Cukierman, A.; Hazumi, M.; Kazemzadeh, K.; Keating, B.; Matsumura, T.; Lee, A. T.; Lee, C.; Quealy, E.; Rosen, D.; Stebor, N.; Suzuki, A.

    2015-12-01

    uc(Polarbear-2) (PB-2) is a next-generation receiver that is part of the Simons Array cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment which is located in the Atacama desert in Northern Chile. The primary scientific goals of the Simons Array are a deep search for the CMB B-mode signature of gravitational waves from inflation and the characterization of large-scale structure using its effect on CMB polarization. The PB-2 receiver will deploy with 1897 dual-polarization sinuous antenna-coupled pixels, each with a directly contacting extended hemispherical silicon lens. Every pixel has dual polarization sensitivity in two spectral bands centered at 95 and 150 GHz, for a total of 7588 transition edge sensor bolometers operating at 270 mK. To achieve the PB-2 detector requirements, we developed a broadband anti-reflection (AR) coating for the extended hemispherical lenses that uses two molds to apply two layers of epoxy, Stycast 1090 and Stycast 2850FT. Our measurements of the absorption loss from the AR coating on a flat surface at cryogenic temperatures show less than 1 % absorption, and the coating has survived multiple thermal cycles. We can control the diameter of the coating within 25 \\upmu m and translation errors are within 25 \\upmu m in all directions, which results in less than 1 % decrease in transmittance. We also find the performance of the AR-coated lens matches very well with simulations.

  9. Antioxidant activity-guided fractionation of blue wheat (UC66049 Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Tyl, Catrin E; Bunzel, Mirko

    2012-01-25

    Antioxidant activity-guided fractionation based on three in vitro antioxidant assays (Folin-Ciocalteu, TEAC, and leucomethylene blue assays) was used to identify major antioxidants in blue wheat (UC66049 Triticum aestivum L.). After consecutive extractions with solvents of various polarities and multiple chromatographic fractionations, several potent antioxidants were identified by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Anthocyanins (delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-rutinoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, and cyanidin-3-rutinoside), tryptophan, and a novel phenolic trisaccharide (β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside) were the most active water-extractable constituents. However, anthocyanins were found to be major contributors to the overall blue wheat antioxidant activity only when the extraction steps were performed under acidic conditions. Alkylresorcinols were among the most active antioxidants extractable with 80% ethanol in the TEAC assay. However, this may be due to a color change instead of a bleaching of the ABTS radical. Ferulic acid was found to be the major antioxidant in alkaline cell-wall hydrolysates. The contents of the most active antioxidants were determined. PMID:22225003

  10. Examination of UC-ZrC after long term irradiation at thermionic temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L.; Johnson, H. O.

    1972-01-01

    Two fluoride tungsten clad UC-ZrC fueled capsules, designated as V-2C and V-2D, were examined a hot cell after irradiation in NASA Plum Brook Reactor at a maximum cladding temperature of 1930 K for 11,089 and 12,031 hours to burnups of 3.0 x 10 to the 20th power and 2.1 x 10 to the 20th power fission/c.c. respectively. Percentage of fission gas release from the fuel material was measured by radiochemical means. Cladding deformation, fuel-cladding interaction and microstructures of fuel, cladding, and fuel-cladding interface were studied metallographically. Compositions of dispersions in fuel, fuel matrix and fuel-cladding interaction layer were analyzed by electron microprobe techniques. Axial and radial distributions of burnup were determined by gamma-scan, autoradiography and isotopic burnup analysis. The results are presented and discussed in conjunction with the requirements of thermionic fuel elements for space power application.

  11. THE NASA-UC ETA-EARTH PROGRAM. I. A SUPER-EARTH ORBITING HD 7924

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Johnson, John Asher; Fischer, Debra A.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Isaacson, Howard; Wright, Jason T.; Henry, Gregory W.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Anderson, Jay; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2009-05-01

    We report the discovery of the first low-mass planet to emerge from the NASA-UC Eta-Earth Program, a super-Earth orbiting the K0 dwarf HD 7924. Keplerian modeling of precise Doppler radial velocities reveals a planet with minimum mass M{sub P} sin i = 9.26 M {sub +} in a P = 5.398 d orbit. Based on Keck-HIRES measurements from 2001 to 2008, the planet is robustly detected with an estimated false alarm probability of less than 0.001. Photometric observations using the Automated Photometric Telescopes at Fairborn Observatory show that HD 7924 is photometrically constant over the radial velocity period to 0.19 mmag, supporting the existence of the planetary companion. No transits were detected down to a photometric limit of {approx}0.5 mmag, eliminating transiting planets with a variety of compositions. HD 7924b is one of only eight planets detected by the radial velocity technique with M{sub P} sin i < 10 M {sub +} and as such is a member of an emerging family of low-mass planets that together constrain theories of planet formation.

  12. Facility and Programmable Power Supply Development for the uc(Pegasus) ST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, B. T.; Battaglia, D. J.; Burke, S. P.; Eidietis, N. W.; Ford, B. A.; Fonck, R. J.; Garstka, G. D.; Kozar, M. P.; Quinn, J. C.; Unterberg, E. A.; Winz, G. R.

    2004-11-01

    A rebuild of the uc(Pegasus) ST facility with several major upgrades is in its final stages, and low-power ohmic operation has begun. A new low-inductance, fast-response toroidal field system allows variation of Bt within a few ms. Additional poloidal field coils, including divertor coils, provide shaping control. New modular IGBT and IGCT switching power supplies have been developed to provide full programmability control of all the magnet coils. The toroidal and poloidal systems are powered by several 900 V/16 KA IGBT switch assemblies, while the OH system requires a 2700 V/48 KA IGCT system. An array of IGBT switch modules has been successfully deployed for low-power OH operation --- albeit with full power for poloidal and toroidal fields --- while initial deployment of the IGCT system is expected this Fall. Together, these systems provide increased V-sec, programmability for V_loop and flexible position and shape control, and increased toroidal field strength.

  13. TRANSLATIONAL NUTRITION RESEARCH AT UC DAVIS – THE KEY ROLE OF THE CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    PubMed Central

    Kasim-Karakas, Sidika; Hyson, Dianne; Halsted, Charles; van Loan, Marta; Chedin, Erica; Berglund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health’s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program has had a profound impact on clinical research and training methods at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). UC Davis was among the first 12 institutions to receive NIH funding for this award, and created its Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC) in 2006. The funding accelerated and further integrated an existing conscientious and careful planning effort for translational research with a stepwise approach to gradually increase our institutional competencies, capabilities, and resources in this area. The development of our CTSC has led us to develop new ways of bringing together a diverse faculty and facilitating research. The CTSC has impacted virtually every area and infrastructure resource involved in promoting clinical and translational research at our institution. PMID:20388150

  14. REVIEW OF UCR (UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-RIVERSIDE) PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINATION OF OH (HYDROXYL RADICALS) RATE CONSTANTS WITH VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS) AND ITS APPLICABILITY TO PREDICT PHOTOCHEMICAL OZONE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The experimental protocol for determining the rate constants for reactions of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) as developed by the University of California-Riverside group is evaluated. Limits of detection and precision are discussed. The protocol is ...

  15. Evaluation of Potential Hydrocarbon Transport at the UC-4 Emplacement Hole, Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, Brad F.; Papelis, Charalambos; Pohll, Greg; Sloop, Derek

    1998-09-30

    Emplacement hole UC-4 was drilled in 1969 at the Central Nevada Test Area and left filled with drilling mud. Surface characterization samples collected from abandoned mud pits in the area yielded elevated concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbon, thereby raising a concern that the mud-filled emplacement hole may be leaching hydrocarbons into alluvial aquifers. This study was initiated to address this concern. An analytical solution for flow near a wellbore was used to calculate the amount of time it would take for a contaminant to move through the mud-filled well and into the surrounding aquifer. No hydraulic data are available from the emplacement hole; therefore, ranges of hydraulic conductivity and porosity were used in 100 Monte Carlo realizations to estimate a median travel time. Laboratory experiments were performed on samples collected from the central mud pit to determine the hydrocarbon release function for the bentonite drilling mud. The median contaminant breakthrough took about 12,000 years to travel 10 m, while the initial breakthrough took about 300 years and the final breakthrough took about 33,000 years. At a distance of about 10 m away from the emplacement hole, transport velocity is dominated by the hydraulics of the aquifer and not by the emplacement hole hydraulics. It would take an additional 45,500 years for the contaminant to travel 800 m to the U.S. Department of Energy land exclusion boundary. Travel times were primarily affected by the hydraulic conductivity and porosity of the drilling mud, then by the hydraulic conductivity, porosity and hydraulic gradient of the alluvial aquifer, followed by the hydrocarbon release function.

  16. UCS Protein Rng3p Is Essential for Myosin-II Motor Activity during Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Benjamin C.; James, Michael L.; Pollard, Luther W.; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    UCS proteins have been proposed to operate as co-chaperones that work with Hsp90 in the de novo folding of myosin motors. The fission yeast UCS protein Rng3p is essential for actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we investigated the role of Rng3p in fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) motor activity. Myo2p isolated from an arrested rng3-65 mutant was capable of binding actin, yet lacked stability and activity based on its expression levels and inactivity in ATPase and actin filament gliding assays. Myo2p isolated from a myo2-E1 mutant (a mutant hyper-sensitive to perturbation of Rng3p function) showed similar behavior in the same assays and exhibited an altered motor conformation based on limited proteolysis experiments. We propose that Rng3p is not required for the folding of motors per se, but instead works to ensure the activity of intrinsically unstable myosin-II motors. Rng3p is specific to conventional myosin-II and the actomyosin ring, and is not required for unconventional myosin motor function at other actin structures. However, artificial destabilization of myosin-I motors at endocytic actin patches (using a myo1-E1 mutant) led to recruitment of Rng3p to patches. Thus, while Rng3p is specific to myosin-II, UCS proteins are adaptable and can respond to changes in the stability of other myosin motors. PMID:24244528

  17. Sulforaphane retards the growth of UM-UC-3 xenographs, induces apoptosis, and reduces survivin in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengqian; Shan, Yujuan

    2012-05-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate that exists exclusively in cruciferous vegetables, may be the most promising preventive agent for bladder cancer (BC) to date. We previously observed that SFN dramatically inhibits human BC T24 cells in vitro. Our hypothesis is that SFN may attenuate BC growth. To test our hypothesis, we investigated the effect of SFN on human BC UM-UC-3 cell xenografts implanted into athymic mice. Sulforaphane extract was routinely prepared in our laboratory, and its content was measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. Athymic mice were injected subcutaneously with a UM-UC-3 cell suspension (2.010(6) cells/200 ?L per mouse) and randomly divided into 2 groups. The positive control group was orally gavaged with water, and the treatment group was orally administered SFN from broccoli sprout (12 mg/kg body weight) for 5 weeks. At the end of the experiment, tumor tissues were harvested and processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. The average tumor volume decreased from 4.11.67 cm(3) in the positive control mice to 1.50.72 cm(3) in the SFN-treated mice, evidencing an inhibitory rate of 63%. The SFN extract also reduced the appearance of tumors, including karyopyknosis and angiogenesis. Sulforaphane extract induced caspase 3 and cytochrome c expression but reduced the expression of survivin. Sulforaphane extract retards the growth of UM-UC-3 xenografts in vivo, confirming its future potential in BC therapy. PMID:22652377

  18. LLNL/UC (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)/(University of California) AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) facility and research program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Proctor, I.D.; Southon, J.R.; Caffee, M.W.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Roberts, M.L.; Moore, T.L.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Nelson, D.E.; Loyd, D.H.; Vogel, J.S.

    1990-04-18

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California (UC) now have in operation a large AMS spectrometer built as part of a new multiuser laboratory centered on an FN tandem. AMS measurements are expected to use half of the beam time of the accelerator. LLNL use of AMS is in research on consequences of energy usage. Examples include global warming, geophysical site characterization, radiation biology and dosimetry, and study of mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. UC research activities are in clinical applications, archaeology and anthropology, oceanography, and geophysical and geochemical research. Access is also possible for researchers outside the UC system. The technological focus of the laboratory is on achieving high rates of sample through-put, unattended operation, and advances in sample preparation methods. Because of the expected growth in the research programs and the other obligations of the present accelerator, we are designing a follow-on dedicated facility for only AMS and microprobe analysis that will contain at least two accelerators with multiple spectrometers. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Infrared spectra and quantum chemical calculations of the uranium-carbon molecules UC, CUC, UCH, and U(CC)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Andrews, Lester; Ma, Dongxia; Gagliardi, Laura; Gonalves, Antnio P.; Pereira, Cludia C. L.; Maralo, Joaquim; Godart, Claude; Villeroy, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    Laser evaporation of carbon rich uranium/carbon alloy targets into condensing argon or neon matrix samples gives weak infrared absorptions that increase on annealing, which can be assigned to new uranium carbon bearing species. New bands at 827.6 cm-1 in solid argon or 871.7 cm-1 in neon become doublets with mixed carbon 12 and 13 isotopes and exhibit the 1.0381 carbon isotopic frequency ratio for the UC diatomic molecule. Another new band at 891.4 cm-1 in argon gives a three-band mixed isotopic spectrum with the 1.0366 carbon isotopic frequency ratio, which is characteristic of the anti-symmetric stretching vibration of a linear CUC molecule. No evidence was found for the lower energy cyclic U(CC) isomer. Other bands at 798.6 and 544.0 cm-1 are identified as UCH, which has a uranium-carbon triple bond similar to that in UC. Evidence is found for bicyclic U(CC)2 and tricyclic U(CC)3. This work shows that U and C atoms react spontaneously to form the uranium carbide U?C and C?U?C molecules with uranium-carbon triple bonds.

  20. Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, System-Based Approaches 22nd Symposium in Plant Biology (University of California-Riverside)

    SciTech Connect

    Minorsky, Peter V.

    2003-06-01

    The symposium ''Frontiers of Plant Cell Biology: Signals and Pathways, Systems-Based Approaches'' was held January 15-18, 2003 at the Riverside Convention Center in Riverside, California. The host organization for the symposium was the Center for Plant Cell Biology (CEPCEB) at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). The meeting, focusing on systems-based approaches to plant cell biology research, was the first of this kind in the field of plant biology. The speakers and nearly 100 posters placed emphasis on recent developments in plant cellular biology and molecular genetics, particularly those employing emerging genomic tools, thereby sharing the most current knowledge in the field and stimulating future advances. In attendance were many well-established scientists and young investigators who approach plant cell biology from different but complementary conceptual and technical perspectives. Indeed, many disciplines are converging in the field of cell biology, producing synergies that will enable plant scientists to determine the function of gene products in the context of living cells in whole organisms. New, cross-disciplinary collaborations, as well as the involvement of computer scientists and chemists in plant biology research, are likely additional outcomes of the symposium. The program included 39 invited session speakers and workshop/panel speakers. Sessions were convened on the following themes: Cell-Cell Communication; Protein Trafficking; Cell Surface, Extracellular Matrix and Cell Wall; Signal Transduction; Signal Transduction and Proteosome; and Systems-Based Approaches to Plant Cell Biology. Workshops on Chemical Genetics and Visual Microscopy were also presented. Abstracts from each of the speaker presentations, as well as the posters presented at the meeting were published in a program booklet given to the 239 faculty members, researchers, postdoctoral scientists and graduate students in attendance. The booklet thus serves as a reference for symposium attendees to locate additional information about a topic of their particular interest and to contact other investigators. In addition, an article reviewing the symposium by science writer Peter V. Minorsky appeared in the June 2003 issue of Plant Physiology, a special issue devoted to systems-based approaches in the study of the model plant Arabidopsis (article submitted as part of this Final Technical Report).

  1. Geologic map and digital database of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute Quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    This data set maps and describes the geology of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California. The quadrangle, situated in Joshua Tree National Park in the eastern Transverse Ranges physiographic and structural province, encompasses parts of the Hexie Mountains, Cottonwood Mountains, northern Eagle Mountains, and south flank of Pinto Basin. It is underlain by a basement terrane comprising Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and Mesozoic and Mesozoic or Cenozoic hypabyssal dikes. The basement terrane is capped by a widespread Tertiary erosion surface preserved in remnants in the Eagle and Cottonwood Mountains and buried beneath Cenozoic deposits in Pinto Basin. Locally, Miocene basalt overlies the erosion surface. A sequence of at least three Quaternary pediments is planed into the north piedmont of the Eagle and Hexie Mountains, each in turn overlain by successively younger residual and alluvial deposits. The Tertiary erosion surface is deformed and broken by north-northwest-trending, high-angle, dip-slip faults and an east-west trending system of high-angle dip- and left-slip faults. East-west trending faults are younger than and perhaps in part coeval with faults of the northwest-trending set. The Porcupine Wash database was created using ARCVIEW and ARC/INFO, which are geographical information system (GIS) software products of Envronmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). The database consists of the following items: (1) a map coverage showing faults and geologic contacts and units, (2) a separate coverage showing dikes, (3) a coverage showing structural data, (4) a scanned topographic base at a scale of 1:24,000, and (5) attribute tables for geologic units (polygons and regions), contacts (arcs), and site-specific data (points). The database, accompanied by a pamphlet file and this metadata file, also includes the following graphic and text products: (1) A portable document file (.pdf) containing a navigable graphic of the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base. The map is accompanied by a marginal explanation consisting of a Description of Map and Database Units (DMU), a Correlation of Map and Database Units (CMU), and a key to point-and line-symbols. (2) Separate .pdf files of the DMU and CMU, individually. (3) A PostScript graphic-file containing the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base accompanied by the marginal explanation. (4) A pamphlet that describes the database and how to access it. Within the database, geologic contacts , faults, and dikes are represented as lines (arcs), geologic units as polygons and regions, and site-specific data as points. Polygon, arc, and point attribute tables (.pat, .aat, and .pat, respectively) uniquely identify each geologic datum and link it to other tables (.rel) that provide more detailed geologic information.

  2. Mg uc(ii) Lines Observed During the X-class Flare on 29 March 2014 by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Heinzel, P.; Kleint, L.; Kaparov, J.

    2015-11-01

    Mg uc(ii) lines represent one of the strongest emissions from the chromospheric plasma during solar flares. In this article, we studied the Mg uc(ii) lines observed during the X1 flare on 29 March 2014 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48) by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS detected large intensity enhancements of the Mg uc(ii) h and k lines, subordinate triplet lines, and several other metallic lines at the flare footpoints during this flare. We have used the advantage of the slit-scanning mode (rastering) of IRIS and performed, for the first time, a detailed analysis of spatial and temporal variations of the spectra. Moreover, we were also able to identify positions of strongest hard X-ray (HXR) emissions using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations and to correlate them with the spatial and temporal evolution of IRIS Mg uc(ii) spectra. The light curves of the Mg uc(ii) lines increase and peak contemporarily with the HXR emissions but decay more gradually. There are large red asymmetries in the Mg uc(ii) h and k lines after the flare peak. We see two spatially well-separated groups of Mg uc(ii) line profiles, non-reversed and reversed. In some cases, the Mg uc(ii) footpoints with reversed profiles are correlated with HXR sources. We show the spatial and temporal behavior of several other line parameters (line metrics) and briefly discuss them. Finally, we have synthesized the Mg uc(ii) k line using our non-LTE code with the Multilevel Accelerated Lambda Iteration (MALI) technique. Two kinds of models are considered, the flare model F2 of Machado et al. (Astrophys. J. 242, 336, 1980) and the models of Ricchiazzi and Canfield (Astrophys. J. 272, 739, 1983, RC models). Model F2 reproduces the peak intensity of the non-reversed Mg uc(ii) k profile at flare maximum, but does not account for high wing intensities. On the other hand, the RC models show the sensitivity of Mg uc(ii) line intensities to various electron-beam parameters. Our simulations also show that the microturbulence produces a broader line core, while the intense line wings are caused by an enhanced line source function.

  3. Simulation of rice plant temperatures using the UC Davis Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, A.; Pyles, D.; Paw U, K.

    2009-12-01

    The thermal environment in the plant canopy affects plants growth processes such as flowering and ripening. High temperatures often cause grain sterility and poor filling in serial crops, and reduce their production in tropical and temperate regions. With global warming predicted, these effects have become a major concern worldwide. In this study, we observed the plant body temperature profiles for the rice canopy and simulate them using a higher-order closure micrometeorological model to understand the relationship between plant temperatures and atmospheric condition. Experiments were conducted in rice paddy during 2007-summer season under warm temperate climate in Japan. Leaf temperatures at three different height (0.3, 0.5, 0.7m) and panicle temperatures at 0.9m were measured using fine-thermocouples. The UC Davis Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA) was used to calculate plant body temperature profiles in the canopy. ACASA is based on the radiation transfer, higher-order closure of turbulent equations for mass and heat exchange, and detailed plant physiological parameterization for the canopy-atmosphere-soil system. Water temperature was almost constant of 21-23 C throughout the summer because of continuous irrigation. Therefore, larger difference between air temperature at 2 m and water temperature was found on daytime. Observed leaf/panicle temperature was lower near the water surface and higher on upper layer in the canopy. Difference of temperatures between 0.3 m and 0.9 m was around 3-4 C for daytime, and around 1-2 C for nighttime. Calculated result of ACASA recreated these trends of plant temperature profile sufficiently. However, the relationship between plant and air temperature in the canopy was a little different from observed, i.e. observed leaf/panicle temperature were almost the same as air temperature, in contrast the simulated air temperature was 0.5-1.5 C higher than plant temperatures for the both of daytime and night time. This could be mainly due to the overestimation of latent heat flux in the day, and longwave cooling at night, although the precise reasons are unclear. ACASA can calculate the plant temperatures from given boundary condition, so that it is expected that it will elucidate how canopy structure (mainly leaf area index) affects thermal conditions in the canopy.

  4. Development and pilot molecular applications of the uncoupled state-specific MRCC (UC-SS-MRCC) theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sanghamitra; Datta, Dipayan; Maitra, Rahul; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we propose and apply an uncoupled approximation to the rigorous, size-extensive state-specific multireference coupled cluster theory (SS-MRCC), developed earlier by Mukherjee and coworkers [U.S. Mahapatra, B. Datta, D. Mukherjee, J. Chem. Phys. 110 (1999) 6171]. Both the parent formulation and the uncoupled approximant use the Jeziorski-Monkhorst Ansatz: ?=??exp(T?)|??>UC-SS-MRCC) we explore the possibility of avoiding the coupling term by approximating the coupling matrix element < ?l?exp(- T?)exp( T?)? ??> by , where T(?)s form the subset of the components of T? operators which has the same excitation structure of those operators T? that give nontrivial contributions by their actions on ??. Absence of the coupling terms leads to considerable simplifications of the working equations. Pilot molecular applications of the UC-SS-MRCC theory to the singlet states of CH 2 and SiH 2, which possess strongly multi-reference character and to the potential energy surface of the ground state of Li 2 indicate the extreme closeness of the computed energies with those from the rigorous but more involved parent SS-MRCC theory. This indicates the potentiality and the efficacy of the UC-SS-MRCC approximation.

  5. Objects earlier than precursors of UC HII regions: Inflow-signpost for a common way of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Zhu, M.; Xu, D.; Wei, Y.; Zhu, L.

    Searching for objects in the earliest phases of star formation, e.g sources at the beginning of a gravitational collapse, are essential to our understanding of massive star formation. Today a number of precursors of ultra compact HII regions (PUCHs) have been found. Embedded in dense gas and dust, these PUCHs have a high bolometric luminosity but little or no 6 cm radio continuum emission (Molinari, et al. 2000; Beuther, et al. 2002). Evidence for Collapse was found in ultra compact (UC) HII regions and 12 water maser sources (Zhang, et al. 1998; Wu & Evans II 2003). This paper presents the identification of massive cores with no detectable infrared and radio sources. These kinds of cores usually have strong sub-mm emission. A special case is the SCUBA core JCMT 18354-0649S which has both infall and outflow motions as indicated by the profiles of high excitation molecular lines. This core is at a stage earlier than PUCHs. Blue profiles are also found in UC HII region, which indicates that material is still infalling in this phase. Our observations suggest that infall exists in different evolutionary stages for high mass star formation, similar to the low mass cases.

  6. Palouse prairie - synaptic relics from a senior pseudo-botanist

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, vegetation of the Missoula Valley prairie has been regarded as "Agropyron-Festuca community," otherwise described as "Palouse bunchgrass prairie" or just "Palouse prairie." Synecology of this association has been well described starting in the 1920s, however there is no description of...

  7. Adventures with Doug: An Interview with Dot Wade, Prairie Botanist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Morris; Wade, Dot

    1995-01-01

    The wife of the late Doug Wade discusses the course of his career in outdoor education and nature interpretation; the relationship he had with his mentor, Aldo Leopold; his success as a teacher and his relationship with his students; and how a background in botany enabled her to assist her husband with field trips. (LP)

  8. In vivo and in vitro effects of growth hormone on the incorporation of ( UC)leucine into protein of liver and muscle of the eel

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Y.; Ishioka, H.

    1985-08-01

    In vivo administration of ovine GH (2 micrograms/g body wt) increased ( UC)leucine incorporation into protein of the liver, skeletal muscle, and opercular muscle of hypophysectomized eels. Addition of ovine GH into the medium slightly increased ( UC)leucine incorporation into protein of liver slices during 5 hr in vitro incubation, but did not affect protein synthesis from ( UC)leucine in opercular muscle. In vivo pretreatment with ovine GH 48 hr prior to tissue preparation clearly increased ( UC)leucine incorporation into protein of liver slices in vitro. However, no statistically significant change was observed for in vitro incorporation of ( UC)leucine into protein of opercular muscle of hypophysectomized eels which had been previously treated with ovine GH. These results indicate that ovine GH has a protein anabolic action in the liver and muscle of the eel and that compared to mammals a rather long lag period is needed to elicit such protein anabolic actions of GH in these animals.

  9. Metabolism of high density lipoproteins reconstituted with (TH)cholesteryl ester and ( UC)cholesterol in the rat, with special reference to the ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Nestler, J.E.; Bamberger, M.; Rothblat, G.H.; Strauss, J.F. III

    1985-08-01

    In order to study the metabolism of high density lipoprotein (HDL)-carried sterol in the rat, human HDL was reconstituted with ( UC)cholesterol and (TH)cholesteryl ester. After iv injection into immature PMSG-human CG primed rats pretreated with 4-aminopyrazolopyrimidine and aminoglutethimide, there was time-dependent accumulation of TH and UC in various organs which reached a maximum by 15-90 min. On a milligram wet weight basis, uptake of TH and UC was greatest in the adrenals, next in ovaries, followed by the liver, with little uptake by kidneys and spleen. On an organ basis, accumulation was greatest by the liver. Coadministration of excess unlabeled HDL, but not human low density lipoprotein, reduced accumulation of radioactivity by the ovaries and adrenals by 60%, indicating a specific and saturable uptake process. Granulosa cells cultured in lipoprotein-deficient medium with reconstituted HDL formed TH- and UC-labeled 20 alpha-hydroxypregn-4-en-3-one. Over a 24-h period, utilization of both ( UC)cholesterol and (TH)cholesteryl ester was linear, but rates of utilization of the two sterol moieties were not parallel. Lysosomotropic agents had no effect on utilization of either free or esterified cholesterol for steroidogenesis but reduced degradation of SVI-labeled low density lipoprotein apoprotein. These findings lend further support to the concept of a distinct HDL pathway in steroidogenic cells of the rat.

  10. Well-construction, water-quality, and water-level data, and pond-infiltration estimates, for three ground-water subbasins, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, C.A.; Kaehler, C.A.; Christensen, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    Reclaimed water in the Eastern Municipal Water District of Riverside County,California, is used within the service area for agricultural irrigation.Owing to the seasonal demand for reclaimed water, storage/infiltration ponds were constructed in the Winchester, Menifee, and south Perris subbasins.Reclaimed water infiltrates from these ponds and enters the groundwater system. Little is known of the effects of the reclaimed water on groundwater quality. In cooperation with the Eastern MunicipalWater District, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1995 to determine the quantity and fate of reclaimed water percolating from these storage ponds. Data compiled during the first phase of this study are presented in this report. Field reconnaissance of the Winchester, Menifee, and south Perris subbasins indicated the existence of many wells. Wellconstruction data for 115 of these wells were tabulated. Available historical waterquality and waterlevel data for 178 wells in the subbasins also were tabulated. In addition, water levels in 86 wells were measured during the spring and autumn of 1995. On the basis of these data, waterlevel contour lines were drawn and the direction of groundwater flow was determined.Three lithologic sections through the subbasins were constructed from drillers' logs of 26 wells.

  11. Estimating hydraulic conductivity using grain-size analyses, aquifer tests, and numerical modeling in a riverside alluvial system in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Jae-Yeol; Hamm, Se-Yeong; Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Ko, Eun-Joung; Yang, Kyounghee; Lee, Jeong-Hwan

    2008-09-01

    Hydraulic conductivity ( K) for an alluvial system in a riverbank filtration area in Changwon City, South Korea, has been studied using grain-size distribution, pumping and slug tests, and numerical modeling. The alluvial system is composed of layers: upper fine sand, medium sand, lower fine sand, and a highly conductive sand/gravel layer at the base. The geometric mean of K for the sand/gravel layer (9.89 10-4 m s-1), as determined by grain-size analyses, was 3.33 times greater than the geometric mean obtained from pumping tests (2.97 10-4 m s-1). The geometric mean of K estimates obtained from slug tests (3.08 10-6 m s-1) was one to two orders of magnitude lower than that from pumping tests and grain-size analyses. K estimates derived from a numerical model were compared to those derived from the grain-size methods, slug tests and pumping tests in order to determine the degree of deviation from the numerical model. It is considered that the K estimates determined by the slug tests resemble the uppermost part of the alluvial deposit, whereas the K estimates obtained by grain-size analyses and pumping tests are similar to those from the numerical model for the sand/gravel layer of the riverside alluvial system.

  12. Geoelectric resistivity sounding of riverside alluvial aquifer in an agricultural area at Buyeo, Geum River watershed, Korea: an application to groundwater contamination study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Hee; Doh, Seong-Jae; Yun, Seong-Taek

    2007-12-01

    Twenty profiles of vertical electric soundings (VES) were obtained in a riverside alluvium at the Buyeo area, South Korea, to examine the variations of subsurface geology and associated groundwater chemistry. The combination of the VES data with the borehole data provided useful information on subsurface hydrogeologic conditions. The vestige of an ancient river channel (e.g. oxbow lake) was identified on the resistivity profiles by the lateral continuation of a near-surface perched aquifer parallel to the river. Such a perched aquifer is typically developed in the area with a clay-rich silty surface alluvium which prohibits the infiltration of oxygen. Therefore, groundwater below the oxbow lake shows a very low nitrate concentration and Eh values under the strong anoxic condition. The distribution of water resistivity is correlated with that of measured total dissolved solids concentration in groundwater, while the earth resistivity of the aquifer shows a significant spatial variation. It is interpreted that the earth resistivity of the aquifer is mainly controlled by the soil type rather than by the water chemistry in the study area.

  13. LncRNA uc.48+ is involved in diabetic neuropathic pain mediated by the P2X3 receptor in the dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouyu; Xu, Hong; Zou, Lifang; Xie, Jinyang; Wu, Hong; Wu, Bing; Yi, Zhihua; Lv, Qiulan; Zhang, Xi; Ying, Mofeng; Liu, Shuangmei; Li, Guilin; Gao, Yun; Xu, Changshui; Zhang, Chunping; Xue, Yun; Liang, Shangdong

    2016-03-01

    Some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) participate in physiological processes that maintain cellular and tissue homeostasis, and thus, the dysregulated expression of lncRNAs is involved in the onset and progression of many pathological conditions. Research has indicated that the genetic knockout of some lncRNAs in mice resulted in peri- or postnatal lethality or developmental defects. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major cause of peripheral neuropathy. Our studies showed that the expression levels of lncRNA uc.48+ in the diabetic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the DM patients' serum samples were increased. It suggested that lncRNA uc.48+ was involved in the pathophysiological process of DM. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lncRNA uc.48+ small interfering RNA (siRNA) on diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP) mediated by the P2X3 receptor in the DRG. The values of the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) were measured by the von Frey test and Hargreaves' test, respectively. The levels of P2X3 protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) in the DRG were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and western blotting. The experiments showed that the MWT and TWL values in DM rats were lower than those in the control rats. The MWT and TWL values in DM rats treated with lncRNA uc.48+ siRNA were increased compared to those in DM rats, but there was no significant difference between the DM rat group and the DM?+?scramble siRNA group. The levels of P2X3 protein and mRNA in the DM DRG were higher than those in the control, while the levels of P2X3 protein and mRNA in the DG of DM rats treated with uc.48+ siRNA were significantly decreased compared to those in DM rats. The expression levels of TNF-? in the DRG of DM rats treated with uc.48+ siRNA were significantly decreased compared to those in the DM group. The phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2 in the DM DRG were decreased by uc.48+ siRNA treatment. Therefore, uc.48+ siRNA treatment may alleviate the DNP by inhibiting the excitatory transmission mediated by the P2X3 receptor in DRG. PMID:26686228

  14. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nrnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 ?m is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 103 L? for IRS5A, 13 L? for IRS5C, and 10 L? for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (9 M?, 1 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission filament and mid-emission. The H2 line ratios probe the properties of M 17 SW PDR, which is confirmed to have a clumpy structure with two temperature distributions: warm, dense molecular clumps with nH> 105 cm-3 and T ? 575 K and cooler atomic gas with nH 3.7 103-1.5 104 cm-3 and T 50 - 200 K. Based on observations by the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope on Cerro Paranal, Chile (ESO program IDs: 281.C-5027(A), 281.C-5051(A, B)).

  15. Preparation of UC0.07-0.10N0.90-0.93 spheres for TRISO coated fuel particles

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack Lee; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Johnson, Jared A; Silva, Chinthaka M; Lindemer, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is considering a new nuclear fuel, which should be much more impervious during a loss of coolant accident. The fuel would consist of tristructural isotropic coated particles with dense uranium nitride (UN) kernels. The objectives of this effort are to make uranium oxide microspheres with adequately dispersed carbon nanoparticles and to convert these microspheres into UN kernels. Recent improvements to internal gelation process were successfully applied to the production of uranium gel spheres with different concentrations of carbon black. After the spheres were washed, a simple, two-step heat profile was used to produce kernels with a chemical composition of UC0.07 0.10N0.90 0.93. The first step involved heating the microspheres to 2023 K in a vacuum, and in the second step, the microspheres were held at 1873 K for 6 hrs in nitrogen.

  16. A Report Card on Latina/o Leadership in California's Public Universities: A Trend Analysis of Faculty, Students, and Executives in the CSU and UC Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Jose L.; Acevedo-Gil, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the status of leadership in two California public higher education systems: California State University (CSU) and the University of California (UC) from 2001 to 2009. Findings reveal that the representation of Latina/o faculty and administrators does not reflect the density in the Latina/o undergraduate student and general…

  17. A Report Card on Latina/o Leadership in California's Public Universities: A Trend Analysis of Faculty, Students, and Executives in the CSU and UC Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Jose L.; Acevedo-Gil, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The article examines the status of leadership in two California public higher education systems: California State University (CSU) and the University of California (UC) from 2001 to 2009. Findings reveal that the representation of Latina/o faculty and administrators does not reflect the density in the Latina/o undergraduate student and general

  18. First Phase 1 Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Rectal Microbicide Trial Using UC781 Gel with a Novel Index of Ex Vivo Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Peter A.; Saunders, Terry; Elliott, Julie; Khanukhova, Elena; Dennis, Robert; Adler, Amy; Cortina, Galen; Tanner, Karen; Boscardin, John; Cumberland, William G.; Zhou, Ying; Ventuneac, Ana; Carballo-Diguez, Alex; Rabe, Lorna; McCormick, Timothy; Gabelnick, Henry; Mauck, Christine; McGowan, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Successful control of the HIV/AIDS pandemic requires reduction of HIV-1 transmission at sexually-exposed mucosae. No prevention studies of the higher-risk rectal compartment exist. We report the first-in-field Phase 1 trial of a rectally-applied, vaginally-formulated microbicide gel with the RT-inhibitor UC781 measuring clinical and mucosal safety, acceptability and plasma drug levels. A first-in-Phase 1 assessment of preliminary pharmacodynamics was included by measuring changes in ex vivo HIV-1 suppression in rectal biopsy tissue after exposure to product in vivo. Methods HIV-1 seronegative, sexually-abstinent men and women (N?=?36) were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing UC781 gel at two concentrations (0.1%, 0.25%) with placebo gel (1?1?1). Baseline, single-dose exposure and a separate, 7-day at-home dosing were assessed. Safety and acceptability were primary endpoints. Changes in colorectal mucosal markers and UC781 plasma drug levels were secondary endpoints; ex vivo biopsy infectibility was an ancillary endpoint. Results All 36 subjects enrolled completed the 714 week trial (100% retention) including 3 flexible sigmoidoscopies, each with 28 biopsies (14 at 10 cm; 14 at 30 cm). There were 81 Grade 1 adverse events (AEs) and 8 Grade 2; no Grade 3, 4 or procedure-related AEs were reported. Acceptability was high, including likelihood of future use. No changes in mucosal immunoinflammatory markers were identified. Plasma levels of UC781 were not detected. Ex vivo infection of biopsies using two titers of HIV-1BaL showed marked suppression of p24 in tissues exposed in vivo to 0.25% UC781; strong trends of suppression were seen with the lower 0.1% UC781 concentration. Conclusions Single and 7-day topical rectal exposure to both concentrations of UC781 were safe with no significant AEs, high acceptability, no detected plasma drug levels and no significant mucosal changes. Ex vivo biopsy infections demonstrated marked suppression of HIV infectibility, identifying a potential early biomarker of efficacy. (Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov; #NCT00408538) PMID:21969851

  19. Undenatured type II collagen (UC-II®) for joint support: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background UC-II contains a patented form of undenatured type II collagen derived from chicken sternum. Previous preclinical and clinical studies support the safety and efficacy of UC-II in modulating joint discomfort in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of UC-II in moderating joint function and joint pain due to strenuous exercise in healthy subjects. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in healthy subjects who had no prior history of arthritic disease or joint pain at rest but experienced joint discomfort with physical activity. Fifty-five subjects who reported knee pain after participating in a standardized stepmill performance test were randomized to receive placebo (n = 28) or the UC-II (40 mg daily, n = 27) product for 120 days. Joint function was assessed by changes in degree of knee flexion and knee extension as well as measuring the time to experiencing and recovering from joint pain following strenuous stepmill exertion. Results After 120 days of supplementation, subjects in the UC-II group exhibited a statistically significant improvement in average knee extension compared to placebo (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 74.0 ± 2.2º; p = 0.011) and to baseline (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.002). The UC-II cohort also demonstrated a statistically significant change in average knee extension at day 90 (78.8 ± 1.9º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.045) versus baseline. No significant change in knee extension was observed in the placebo group at any time. It was also noted that the UC-II group exercised longer before experiencing any initial joint discomfort at day 120 (2.8 ± 0.5 min, p = 0.019), compared to baseline (1.4 ± 0.2 min). By contrast, no significant changes were seen in the placebo group. No product related adverse events were observed during the study. At study conclusion, five individuals in the UC-II cohort reported no pain during or after the stepmill protocol (p = 0.031, within visit) as compared to one subject in the placebo group. Conclusions Daily supplementation with 40 mg of UC-II was well tolerated and led to improved knee joint extension in healthy subjects. UC-II also demonstrated the potential to lengthen the period of pain free strenuous exertion and alleviate the joint pain that occasionally arises from such activities. PMID:24153020

  20. Mercury levels assessment in hair of riverside inhabitants of the Tapajs River, Par State, Amazon, Brazil: fish consumption as a possible route of exposure.

    PubMed

    Faial, Kleber; Deus, Ricardo; Deus, Simonny; Neves, Ramiro; Jesus, Iracina; Santos, Elisabeth; Alves, Cludio Nahum; Brasil, Davi

    2015-04-01

    The study present evaluated the levels of mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in hair samples of people from Barreiras community, riverside inhabitants of the Tapajs River (Par, Brazil), an area impacted by clandestine gold mining, as well as we analyzed the levels of Hg and Se (selenium) in nine fish species (carnivores and non-carnivorous) from the Tapajs River, which stand out as the main species consumed by riverside inhabitants, to evaluate a relationship between frequency of fish consumption and Hg concentration, and also to evaluate possible mechanisms of fish protection (or non-protection) to Hg exposure by Se. Furthermore we analyze the water quality to evaluate the environmental trophic state, fact responsible by creating conditions that can potentiate the effects of toxic mercury. Concentrations of Hg and MeHg were analyzed in hair samples of 141 volunteers in different age band. Of those, 84.40% of samples present values above the threshold for biological tolerance, which is 6.00?gg(-1) of total Hg in hair. Total Hg, in men there was a variation of 2.07-24.93?gg(-1), while for women the variation was 4.84-27.02?gg(-1). Consequently, the level of MeHg in men presented a variation of 1.49-19.57?gg(-1), with an average of 11.68?gg(-1), while with women the variation was from 3.73 to 22.35?gg(-1), with an average of 10.38?gg(-1). In fish species, Hg concentrations in carnivorous species had an average of 0.66?gg(-1), higher than that permitted by current legislation, ranging from 0.30 to 0.98?gg(-1), while the non-carnivorous species have values below the recommended by the legislation averaging 0.09?gg(-1), ranging between 0.02 and 0.44?gg(-1). For Se in fish, show that among carnivores, the contents of Se ranged between 0.18 and 0.54?gg(-1) with a mean of 0.34?gg(-1), while for non-carnivores these values were of the order of 0.16-0.56?gg(-1), with an average of 0.32?gg(-1). In surface water quality variables at the sampling points all showed values in accordance with the range established by current legislation. In this regard, the results provided by this study, while not conclusive, are strong indicators that despite not having been shown the relationship between the concentration of mercury in hair and feeding habits along the Tapajs River basin communities showed that a plausible correlation exists between levels of mercury and selenium in fish. This fact may serve as a subsidy to research human health, because in the Amazon, there is still a lot to examine with regards to the full understanding of the Se cycle. PMID:25467850

  1. Development of a Real-Time GPS/Seismic Displacement Meter: Applications to Civilian Infrastructure in Orange and Western Riverside Counties, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Yehuda

    2005-01-01

    We propose a three-year applications project that will develop an Integrated Real-Time GPS/Seismic System and deploy it in Orange and Western Riverside Counties, spanning three major strike-slip faults in southern California (San Andreas, San Jacinto, and Elsinore) and significant populations and civilian infrastructure. The system relying on existing GPS and seismic networks will collect and analyze GPS and seismic data for the purpose of estimating and disseminating real-time positions and total ground displacements (dynamic, as well as static) during all phases of the seismic cycle, from fractions of seconds to years. Besides its intrinsic scientific use as a real-time displacement meter (transducer), the GPS/Seismic System will be a powerful tool for local and state decision makers for risk mitigation, disaster management, and structural monitoring (dams, bridges, and buildings). Furthermore, the GPS/Seismic System will become an integral part of California's spatial referencing and positioning infrastructure, which is complicated by tectonic motion, seismic displacements, and land subsidence. Finally, the GPS/Seismic system will also be applicable to navigation in any environment (land, sea, or air) by combining precise real-time instantaneous GPS positioning with inertial navigation systems. This development will take place under the umbrella of the California Spatial Reference Center, in partnership with local (Counties, Riverside County Flood and Water Conservation District, Metropolitan Water District), state (Caltrans), and Federal agencies (NGS, NASA, USGS), the geophysics community (SCIGN/SCEC2), and the private sector (RBF Consulting). The project will leverage considerable funding, resources, and R&D from SCIGN, CSRC and two NSF-funded IT projects at UCSD and SDSU: RoadNet (Real-Time Observatories, Applications and Data Management Network) and the High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN). These two projects are funded to develop both the wireless networks and the integrated, seamless, and transparent information management system that will deliver seismic, geodetic, oceanographic, hydrological, ecological, and physical data to a variety of end users in real-time in the San Diego region. CSRC is interested in providing users access to real-time, accurate GPS data for a wide variety of applications including RTK surveying/GIS and positioning of moving platforms such as aircraft and emergency vehicles. SCIGN is interested in upgrading sites to high-frequency real-time operations for rapid earthquake response and GPS seismology. The successful outcome of the project will allow the implementation of similar systems elsewhere, particularly in plate boundary zones with significant populations and civilian infrastructure. CSRC would like to deploy the GPS/Seismic System in other parts of California, in particular San Diego, Los Angeles County and the San Francisco Bay Area.

  2. UNC-45/CRO1/She4p (UCS) Protein Forms Elongated Dimer and Joins Two Myosin Heads Near Their Actin Binding Region

    SciTech Connect

    H Shi; G Blobel

    2011-12-31

    UNC-45/CRO1/She4p (UCS) proteins have variously been proposed to affect the folding, stability, and ATPase activity of myosins. They are the only proteins known to interact directly with the motor domain. To gain more insight into UCS function, we determined the atomic structure of the yeast UCS protein, She4p, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. We found that 16 helical repeats are organized into an L-shaped superhelix with an amphipathic N-terminal helix dangling off the short arm of the L-shaped molecule. In the crystal, She4p forms a 193-{angstrom}-long, zigzag-shaped dimer through three distinct and evolutionary conserved interfaces. We have identified She4p's C-terminal region as a ligand for a 27-residue-long epitope on the myosin motor domain. Remarkably, this region consists of two adjacent, but distinct, binding epitopes localized at the nucleotide-responsive cleft between the nucleotide- and actin-filament-binding sites. One epitope is situated inside the cleft, the other outside the cleft. After ATP hydrolysis and Pi ejection, the cleft narrows at its base from 20 to 12 {angstrom} thereby occluding the inside the cleft epitope, while leaving the adjacent, outside the cleft binding epitope accessible to UCS binding. Hence, one cycle of higher and lower binding affinity would accompany one ATP hydrolysis cycle and a single step in the walk on an actin filament rope. We propose that a UCS dimer links two myosins at their motor domains and thereby functions as one of the determinants for step size of myosin on actin filaments.

  3. The interaction of heavy metals and nutrients present in soil and native plants with arbuscular mycorrhizae on the riverside in the Matanza-Riachuelo River Basin (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Rodolfo E; García, Ileana V; de Cabo, Laura; Weigandt, Cristian F; Fabrizio de Iorio, Alicia

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the contamination by heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn), and nutrients (N, P) in soils and native plants, and the effect of the concentration of those elements with the density of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) spores in soil and colonization in roots from the riverside of the Matanza-Riachuelo River Basin (MRRB). The concentration of metals and nutrients in soils and plants (Eleocharis montana, Cyperus eragrostis, Hydrocotyle bonariensis) increased from the upper sites (8 km from headwaters) to the lower sites (6 km from the mouth of the Riachuelo River) of the basin. AM-colonization on the roots of H. bonariensis and spore density in soil decreased as the concentrations of metals in soil and plant tissues increased from the upper to lower sites of the basin within a consistent gradient of contamination associated with land use, soil disturbance, population, and chemicals discharged into the streams and rivers along the MRRB. The general trends for all metals in plant tissue were to have highest concentrations in roots, then in rhizomes and lowest in aerial biomass. The translocation (TF) and bioconcentration (BCF) factors decreased in plants which grow from the upper sites to the lower sites of the basin. The plants tolerated a wide range in type and quantity of contamination along the basin by concentrating more metals and nutrients in roots than in aboveground tissue. The AM spore density in soil and colonization in roots of H. bonariensis decreased with the increase of the degree of contamination (Dc) in soil. PMID:25461058

  4. Does the cortical bone resorption rate change due to 90Sr-radiation exposure? Analysis of data from Techa Riverside residents.

    PubMed

    Tolstykh, Evgenia I; Shagina, Natalia B; Degteva, Marina O; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Napier, Bruce A

    2011-08-01

    The Mayak Production Association released large amounts of (90)Sr into the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) with peak amounts in 1950-1951. Techa Riverside residents ingested an average of about 3,000 kBq of (90)Sr. The (90)Sr-body burden of approximately 15,000 individuals has been measured in the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine in 1974-1997 with use of a special whole-body counter (WBC). Strontium-90 had mainly deposited in the cortical part of the skeleton by 25 years following intake, and (90)Sr elimination occurs as a result of cortical bone resorption. The effect of (90)Sr-radiation exposure on the rate of cortical bone resorption was studied. Data on 2,022 WBC measurements were selected for 207 adult persons, who were measured three or more times before they were 50-55 years old. The individual-resorption rates were calculated with the rate of strontium recirculation evaluated as 0.0018 year(-1). Individual absorbed doses in red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface (BS) were also calculated. Statistically significant negative relationships of cortical bone resorption rate were discovered related to (90)Sr-body burden and dose absorbed in the RBM or the BS. The response appears to have a threshold of about 1.5-Gy RBM dose. The radiation-induced decrease in bone resorption rate may not be significant in terms of health. However, a decrease in bone remodeling rate can be among several causes of an increased level of degenerative dystrophic bone pathology in exposed persons. PMID:21523463

  5. The Dynamics of Transmission and Spatial Distribution of Malaria in Riverside Areas of Porto Velho, Rondnia, in the Amazon Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Katsuragawa, Tony Hiroshi; Gil, Luiz Herman Soares; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; de Almeidae Silva, Alexandre; Costa, Joana D'Arc Neves; da Silva Arajo, Maisa; Escobar, Ana Lcia; Pereira da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando

    2010-01-01

    The study area in Rondnia was the site of extensive malaria epidemic outbreaks in the 19th and 20th centuries related to environmental impacts, with large immigration flows. The present work analyzes the transmission dynamics of malaria in these areas to propose measures for avoiding epidemic outbreaks due to the construction of two Hydroelectric Power Plants. A population based baseline demographic census and a malaria prevalence follow up were performed in two river side localities in the suburbs of Porto Velho city and in its rural vicinity. The quantification and nature of malaria parasites in clinical patients and asymptomatic parasite carriers were performed using microscopic and Real Time PCR methodologies. Anopheles densities and their seasonal variation were done by monthly captures for defining HBR (hourly biting rate) values. Main results: (i) malaria among residents show the riverside profile, with population at risk represented by children and young adults; (ii) asymptomatic vivax and falciparum malaria parasite carriers correspond to around 15% of adults living in the area; (iii) vivax malaria relapses were responsible for 30% of clinical cases; (iv) malaria risk for the residents was evaluated as 2025% for vivax and 57% for falciparum malaria; (v) anopheline densities shown outdoors HBR values 5 to 10 fold higher than indoors and reach 10.000 bites/person/year; (vi) very high incidence observed in one of the surveyed localities was explained by a micro epidemic outbreak affecting visitors and temporary residents. Temporary residents living in tents or shacks are accessible to outdoors transmission. Seasonal fishermen were the main group at risk in the study and were responsible for a 2.6 fold increase in the malaria incidence in the locality. This situation illustrates the danger of extensive epidemic outbreaks when thousands of workers and secondary immigrant population will arrive attracted by opportunities opened by the Hydroelectric Power Plants constructions. PMID:20169070

  6. Does the cortical bone resorption rate change due to 90Sr-radiation exposure? Analysis of data from Techa Riverside residents

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstykh, E. I.; Shagina, N. B.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2011-08-01

    The Mayak Production Association released large amounts of 90Sr into the Techa River (Southern Urals, Russia) with peak amounts in 1950-1951. Techa Riverside residents ingested an average of about 3,000 kBq of 90Sr. The 90Sr-body burden of approximately 15,000 individuals has been measured in the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine in 1974-1997 with use of a special whole-body counter (WBC). Strontium-90 had mainly deposited in the cortical part of the skeleton by 25 years following intake, and 90Sr elimination occurs as a result of cortical bone resorption. The effect of 90Sr-radiation exposure on the rate of cortical bone resorption was studied. Data on 2,022 WBC measurements were selected for 207 adult persons, who were measured three or more times before they were 50-55 years old. The individual-resorption rates were calculated with the rate of strontium recirculation evaluated as 0.0018 year−1. Individual absorbed doses in red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface (BS) were also calculated. Statistically significant negative relationships of cortical bone resorption rate were discovered related to 90Sr-body burden and dose absorbed in the RBM or the BS. The response appears to have a threshold of about 1.5-Gy RBM dose. The radiation induced decrease in bone resorption rate may not be significant in terms of health. However, a decrease in bone remodeling rate can be among several causes of an increased level of degenerative dystrophic bone pathology in exposed persons.

  7. Numerical study of the hydroclimate of the Southwestern United States using the UC-LLNL regional climate system model

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; Kim, J.

    1996-09-01

    The UC-LLNL Regional Climate System Model (RCSM) has been under development since 1991. This modeling system includes interactions among atmospheric, land surface, and subsurface processes. Important physical processes included in this RCSM are effects of vegetation, surface energy and water budgets, lateral hydrologic transport, and agro-ecosystem response. Our RCSM is composed of a preprocessor fro importing, interpreting, and analyzing multi-scale data, a Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation (MAS) model, a multi-layer soil-plant-snow (SPS) model that is interactively coupled with the atmospheric model, a physically based, fully distributed watershed hydrology-riverflow model (TOPMODEL) and a post-processor for output data analysis. We are currently implementing and validating the Decision Support System for Agro-Economic Transfer (DSSAT). An important feature of our RCSM us the ability to simulate the atmospheric, land surface, and hydrologic variables from the global scale down to the watershed catchment scale. the full coupled MAS and SPS models have been used for experimental operational NWP over the southwestern United States since October 1993. Our watershed hydrology-riverflow model has been set up for the Russian River watershed and the Headwaters to the North Fork of the American River in Northern California.

  8. Preparation of UC0.07-0.10N0.90-0.93 spheres for TRISO coated fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R. D.; Silva, C. M.; Lindemer, T. B.; Johnson, J. A.; Collins, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering a new nuclear fuel that would be less susceptible to ruptures during a loss-of-coolant accident. The fuel would consist of tristructural isotropic coated particles with dense uranium nitride (UN) kernels with diameters of 650 or 800 ?m. The objectives of this effort are to make uranium oxide microspheres with adequately dispersed carbon nanoparticles and to convert these microspheres into UN spheres, which could be then sintered into kernels. Recent improvements to the internal gelation process were successfully applied to the production of uranium gel spheres with different concentrations of carbon black. After the spheres were washed and dried, a simple two-step heat profile was used to produce porous microspheres with a chemical composition of UC0.07-0.10N0.90-0.93. The first step involved heating the microspheres to 2023 K in a vacuum, and in the second step, the microspheres were held at 1873 K for 6 h in flowing nitrogen.

  9. A change in temperature modulates defence to yellow (stripe) rust in wheat line UC1041 independently of resistance gene Yr36

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rust diseases are of major importance in wheat production worldwide. With the constant evolution of new rust strains and their adaptation to higher temperatures, consistent and durable disease resistance is a key challenge. Environmental conditions affect resistance gene performance, but the basis for this is poorly understood. Results Here we show that a change in day temperature affects wheat resistance to Puccinia striiformis f. sp tritici (Pst), the causal agent of yellow (or stripe) rust. Using adult plants of near-isogenic lines UC1041 +/- Yr36, there was no significant difference between Pst percentage uredia coverage in plants grown at day temperatures of 18°C or 25°C in adult UC1041 + Yr36 plants. However, when plants were transferred to the lower day temperature at the time of Pst inoculation, infection increased up to two fold. Interestingly, this response was independent of Yr36, which has previously been reported as a temperature-responsive resistance gene as Pst development in adult UC1041 -Yr36 plants was similarly affected by the plants experiencing a temperature reduction. In addition, UC1041 -Yr36 plants grown at the lower temperature then transferred to the higher temperature were effectively resistant and a temperature change in either direction was shown to affect Pst development up to 8 days prior to inoculation. Results for seedlings were similar, but more variable compared to adult plants. Enhanced resistance to Pst was observed in seedlings of UC1041 and the cultivar Shamrock when transferred to the higher temperature. Resistance was not affected in seedlings of cultivar Solstice by a temperature change in either direction. Conclusions Yr36 is effective at 18°C, refining the lower range of temperature at which resistance against Pst is conferred compared to previous studies. Results reveal previously uncharacterised defence temperature sensitivity in the UC1041 background which is caused by a change in temperature and independently of Yr36. This novel phenotype is present in some cultivars but absent in others, suggesting that Pst defence may be more stable in some cultivars than others when plants are exposed to varying temperatures. PMID:24397376

  10. Somatosensory Psychophysical Losses in Inhabitants of Riverside Communities of the Tapajós River Basin, Amazon, Brazil: Exposure to Methylmercury Is Possibly Involved

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; da Costa, Carlos Araújo; de Araújo, Amélia Ayako Kamogari; de Oliveira, Cláudia Simone Baltazar; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the somatosensory system of methylmercury-exposed inhabitants living in the communities of the Tapajós river basin by using psychophysical tests and to compare with measurements performed in inhabitants of the Tocantins river basin. We studied 108 subjects from Barreiras and São Luiz do Tapajós, two communities of the Tapajós river basin, State of Pará, Amazon, Brazil, aged 13–53 years old. Mercury analysis was performed in head hair samples weighting 0.1–0.2 g by using atomic absorption spectrometry. Three somatosensory psychophysical tests were performed: tactile sensation threshold, vibration sensation duration, and two-point discrimination. Semmes-Weinstein 20 monofilaments with different diameters were used to test the tactile sensation in the lower lip, right and left breasts, right and left index fingers, and right and left hallux. The threshold was the thinner monofilament perceived by the subject. Vibration sensation was investigated using a 128 Hz diapason applied to the sternum, right and left radial sides of the wrist, and right and left outer malleoli. Two trials were performed at each place. A stopwatch recorded the vibration sensation duration. The two-point discrimination test was performed using a two-point discriminator. Head hair mercury concentration was significantly higher in mercury-exposed inhabitants of Tapajós than in non-exposed inhabitants of Tocantins (p < 0.01). When all subjects were divided in two groups independently of age—mercury-exposed and non-exposed—the following results were found: tactile sensation thresholds in mercury-exposed subjects were higher than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts, except at the left chest; vibration sensation durations were shorter in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects, at all locations except in the upper sternum; two-point discrimination thresholds were higher in mercury-exposed than in non-exposed subjects at all body parts. There was a weak linear correlation between tactile sensation threshold and mercury concentration in the head hair samples. No correlation was found for the other two measurements. Mercury-exposed subjects had impaired somatosensory function compared with non-exposed control subjects. Long-term mercury exposure of riverside communities in the Tapajós river basin is a possible but not a definitely proven cause for psychophysical somatosensory losses observed in their population. Additionally, the relatively simple psychophysical measures used in this work should be followed by more rigorous measures of the same population. PMID:26658153

  11. Report on the Program "Fluid-mediated particle transport in geophysical flows" at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, UC Santa Barbara, September 23 to December 12, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, James T.; Meiburg, Eckart; Valance, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    The Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics (KITP) program held at UC Santa Barbara in the fall of 2013 addressed the dynamics of dispersed particulate flows in the environment. By focusing on the prototypes of aeolian transport and turbidity currents, it aimed to establish the current state of our understanding of such two-phase flows, to identify key open questions, and to develop collaborative research strategies for addressing these questions. Here, we provide a brief summary of the program outcome.

  12. Biotransformation of primary nicotine metabolites. I. In vivo metabolism of R-(+)-( UC-NCH3)N-methylnicotinium ion in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, W.F.; Crooks, P.A.

    1985-09-01

    The in vivo biotransformation and tissue distribution of the methylated nicotine metabolite R-(+)-( UC-NCH3)N-methylnicotinium acetate was studied in the guinea pig. The detection and quantification of 24-hr urinary metabolites after ip injection was determined by cation-exchange HPLC interfaced to a radiochemical flowthrough detector. The urinary metabolite profile consisted of five peaks. One eluted close to the void, and three coeluted with authentic standards of N-methylcotininium ion, N-methylnornicotinium ion, and N-methylnicotinium ion. A fifth, and as yet unidentified, metabolite was also detected. Tissue distribution of UC label after 24 hr was highest in the adrenal gland and epididymis followed by the gallbladder, bladder, kidney, spleen, and heart. No significant amounts of UC were found in the brain. The results indicate that N-methylcotininium ion and N-methylnornicotinium ion are both formed subsequent to the formation of N-methylnicotinium ion in the metabolism of R-(+)-nicotine in the guinea pig.

  13. UC Merced's Inaugural Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochsner, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis (IPA) of the University of California, Merced collaborated with the Division of Student Affairs to launch three undergraduate surveys in the first year of operations at the new campus: the New Undergraduate Survey (NUS), administered to all new freshmen and transfers in fall 2005; the National…

  14. UC Merced's Inaugural Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochsner, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis (IPA) of the University of California, Merced collaborated with the Division of Student Affairs to launch three undergraduate surveys in the first year of operations at the new campus: the New Undergraduate Survey (NUS), administered to all new freshmen and transfers in fall 2005; the National

  15. Commission Review of a Proposal by Riverside Community College District To Convert the Moreno Valley Educational Center to a Full-Service Community College Campus. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request from the California Community College Board of Governors. Commission Report 04-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this report, the Commission considers the request by the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges (BOG) and the Riverside Community College District (RCCD) to establish the Moreno Valley Educational Center as a full-service community college campus. The Commission?s overall conclusion is that the Moreno Valley Educational Center…

  16. Rainfall-runoff characteristics and effects of increased urban density on streamflow and infiltration in the eastern part of the San Jacinto River basin, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guay, Joel R.

    2002-01-01

    To better understand the rainfall-runoff characteristics of the eastern part of the San Jacinto River Basin and to estimate the effects of increased urbanization on streamflow, channel infiltration, and land-surface infiltration, a long-term (1950?98) time series of monthly flows in and out of the channels and land surfaces were simulated using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- FORTRAN (HSPF) rainfall-runoff model. Channel and land-surface infiltration includes rainfall or runoff that infiltrates past the zone of evapotranspiration and may become ground-water recharge. The study area encompasses about 256 square miles of the San Jacinto River drainage basin in Riverside County, California. Daily streamflow (for periods with available data between 1950 and 1998), and daily rainfall and evaporation (1950?98) data; monthly reservoir storage data (1961?98); and estimated mean annual reservoir inflow data (for 1974 conditions) were used to calibrate the rainfall-runoff model. Measured and simulated mean annual streamflows for the San Jacinto River near San Jacinto streamflow-gaging station (North-South Fork subbasin) for 1950?91 and 1997?98 were 14,000 and 14,200 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 1.4 percent. The standard error of the mean for measured and simulated annual streamflow in the North-South Fork subbasin was 3,520 and 3,160 acre-feet, respectively. Measured and simulated mean annual streamflows for the Bautista Creek streamflow-gaging station (Bautista Creek subbasin) for 1950?98 were 980 acre-feet and 991 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 1.1 percent. The standard error of the mean for measured and simulated annual streamflow in the Bautista Creek subbasin was 299 and 217 acre-feet, respectively. Measured and simulated annual streamflows for the San Jacinto River above State Street near San Jacinto streamflow-gaging station (Poppet subbasin) for 1998 were 23,400 and 23,500 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 0.4 percent. The simulated mean annual streamflow for the State Street gaging station at the outlet of the study basin and the simulated mean annual basin infiltration (combined infiltration from all the channels and land surfaces) were 8,720 and 41,600 acre-feet, respectively, for water years 1950-98. Simulated annual streamflow at the State Street gaging station ranged from 16.8 acre-feet in water year 1961 to 70,400 acre-feet in water year 1993, and simulated basin infiltration ranged from 2,770 acre-feet in water year 1961 to 149,000 acre-feet in water year 1983.The effects of increased urbanization on the hydrology of the study basin were evaluated by increasing the size of the effective impervious and non-effective impervious urban areas simulated in the calibrated rainfall-runoff model by 50 and 100 percent, respectively. The rainfall-runoff model simulated a long-term time series of monthly flows in and out of the channels and land surfaces using daily rainfall and potential evaporation data for water years 1950?98. Increasing the effective impervious and non-effective impervious urban areas by 100 percent resulted in a 5-percent increase in simulated mean annual streamflow at the State Street gaging station, and a 2.2-percent increase in simulated basin infiltration. Results of a frequency analysis of the simulated annual streamflow at the State Street gaging station showed that when effective impervious and non-effective impervious areas were increased 100 percent, simulated annual streamflow increased about 100 percent for low-flow conditions and was unchanged for high-flow conditions. The simulated increase in streamflow at the State Street gaging station potentially could infiltrate along the stream channel further downstream, outside of the model area.

  17. Coupling XRD, EXAFS, and 13C NMR to study the effect of the carbon stoichiometry on the local structure of UC(1x).

    PubMed

    Carvajal Nuez, U; Martel, L; Prieur, D; Lopez Honorato, E; Eloirdi, R; Farnan, I; Vitova, T; Somers, J

    2013-10-01

    A series of uranium carbide samples, prepared by arc melting with a C/U ratio ranging from 0.96 to 1.04, has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). XRD determines phase uniqueness and the increase of the lattice parameter versus the carbon content. In contrast, (13)C NMR detects the different carbon environments in the lattice and in this study, clearly identifies the presence of discrete peaks for carbon in the octahedral lattice site in UC and an additional peak associated with excess carbon in hyperstoichiometric samples. Two peaks associated with different levels of carbon deficiency are detected for all hypostoichiometric compositions. More than one carbon environment is always detected by (13)C NMR. This exemplifies the difficulty in obtaining a perfect stoichiometric uranium monocarbide UC(1.00). The (13)C MAS spectra of uranium carbides exhibit the effects resulting from the carbon content on both the broadening of the peaks and on the Knight shift. An abrupt spectral change occurs between hypo- and hyperstoichiometric samples. The results obtained by EXAFS highlight subtle differences between the different stoichiometries, and in the hyperstoichiometric samples, the EXAFS results are consistent with the excess carbon atoms being in the tetrahedral interstitial position. PMID:24063301

  18. Measurement of the enthalpy and specific heat of a Be/sub 2/C-graphite-UC/sub 2/ reactor fuel material to 1980/sup 0/K

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    The enthalpy and specific heat of a Be/sub 2/C-graphite-UC/sub 2/ composite nuclear fuel material were measured over the temperature range 300 to 1980/sup 0/K using differential scanning calorimetry and liquid argon vaporization calorimetry. The fuel material measured was developed at Sandia National Laboratories for use in pulsed test reactors. The material is a hot-pressed composite consisting of 40 vol % Be/sub 2/C, 49.5 vol % graphite, 3.5 vol % UC/sub 2/ and 7.0 vol % void. The specific heat was measured with the differential scanning calorimeter over the temperature range 300 to 950/sup 0/K while the enthalpy was measured over the range 1185 to 1980/sup 0/K with the liquid argon vaporization calorimeter. The normal spectral emittance at a wavelength of 6.5 x 10/sup -5/ cm was measured over the experimental temperature range. The combined experimental enthalpy data were fit using a spline routine and differentiated to give the specific heat. Comparison of the measured specific heat of the composite to the specific heat calculated by summing the contributions of the individual components indicates that the specific heat of the Be/sub 2/C component differs significantly from literature values and is approximately 0.6 cal/g-K (2.5 x 10/sup 3/ J/Kg-K) for temperatures above 1000/sup 0/K.

  19. Influence of Li+ and Nd3+ co-doping on structural and optical properties of uc(l)-arginine-passivated ZnS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-09-01

    We report the effect of Li + and Nd3+ co-doping on structural and optical properties of uc(l)-arginine-passivated ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray diffraction study were used to explore the morphological and structural aspects of prepared NPs. HR-TEM analysis confirmed that the size of ZnS NPs reduces from 5 to 3 nm as the concentration of co-dopant increases from 1 to 5 wt%. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra show absorption peaks in the range of 295-315 nm indicating huge blue shift as compared to the bulk ZnS (340 nm, E g = 3.6 eV) due to the quantum confinement effect. The large optical band gap was estimated in the range of 3.95-4.62 eV and found increasing as the co-dopant concentration increases. Photoluminescence spectra showed that co-doped ZnS NPs emit multiple intense violet-colored (370, 375, 380, 388 and 398 nm) and blue-colored (425, 448, 455 and 465 nm) peaks with increasing intensity. Fourier transform infrared study confirmed the strong interaction between ZnS NPs and uc(l)-arginine ligands. The presence of co-dopant in the sample is confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Based on the results, we proposed that this material is a new class of luminescent material suitable in optoelectronics devices application, especially in light-emitting devices, electroluminescent devices, display devices, etc.

  20. The "Turning Point" for Minority Pre-Meds: The Effect of Early Undergraduate Experience in the Sciences on Aspirations to Enter Medical School of Minority Students at UC Berkeley and Stanford University. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.20.08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Donald A.; Matsui, John

    2008-01-01

    The University of California faces the challenge of increasing the diversity of students graduating from its medical schools while also adhering to mandated restrictions on the use of race or ethnicity in the admissions process. Students from diverse backgrounds who gain admission as undergraduates to UC Berkeley and express an early interest in a

  1. Power balancing effect on the performance of IMPACC modulator under critical coupling (CC), over coupling (OC), and under coupling (UC) conditions at high frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingel, Benjamin B.; Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Prescod, Andru; Madabhushi, R.

    2012-01-01

    IMPACC (Interferometric Modulator with Phase-modulating and Cavity-modulating Components) is ultra-linear optical consisting of a phase modulator and a ring resonator on different arms of a Mach Zehnder interferometer (MZI). External control of the RF power split ratio from an input radio frequency (RF) signal into the two separate arms of the interferometer has been shown to add (1) design flexibility, (2) the ability to achieve high spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) of more than 130 dB, when compared to the single-ring RAMZI (Resonator-assisted MZI) and (3) compensate parameter deviation due to manufacturing imperfection. Our previous reports have assumed that the Optical power split ratio of the input optical signal into the two arm of MZI is balanced with a 50:50 split ratio due to the optical splitter or optical coupler. Here, we investigate three issues. First, we report the negative effect of unbalanced power of the input optical signal on the SFDR performance of IMPACC. Second, we utilize the inherent compensate technique of IMPACC to counteract this effect. Third, the power unbalanced effect is reported at high RF modulation frequency (23GHz) for three different conditions of the ring resonator (RR) namely, critical coupling (CC), over coupling (OC), and under coupling (UC). Lastly, we compare the performance of IMPACC to the single-ring RAMZI with traveling-wave electrode design under sub-octave operations.

  2. Observed IRIS Profiles of the h and k Doublet of Mg uc(ii) and Comparison with Profiles from Quiescent Prominence NLTE Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Pelouze, Gabriel; Heinzel, Petr; Kleint, Lucia; Anzer, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    With the launch of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, it is now possible to obtain high-resolution solar prominence spectra and to begin to distinguish the contributions of the many (apparent or not) threads that structure prominences. We aim at comparing unique observations obtained in the Mg uc(ii) h and k lines of a polar crown prominence with the radiative outputs from one-dimensional models built with non-local-thermodynamic equilibrium codes (Heinzel et al. Astron. Astrophys. 564, A132, 2014). We characterize the profiles obtained through thorough calibration procedures, with attention paid to the absolute values, full-width at half-maximum, and the ratio of k to h intensities. We also show that at the top of some structures, line-of-sight velocities of about 9 km s^{-1} can be detected. We find a range of static, low-pressure, low-thickness, low-temperature models that could fit k or h observed values, but that cannot satisfy the low observed k/h ratio. We investigate whether these low values might be explained by the inclusion of horizontal flows in small-scale threads. These flows are also necessary in another class of models, where the pressure is kept low but thickness and temperature are increased up to the observed thickness and up to 15 000 K.

  3. THE NASA-UC ETA-EARTH PROGRAM. II. A PLANET ORBITING HD 156668 WITH A MINIMUM MASS OF FOUR EARTH MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John Asher; Fischer, Debra A.; Wright, Jason T.; Henry, Gregory W.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Anderson, Jay; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2011-01-10

    We report the discovery of HD 156668 b, an extrasolar planet with a minimum mass of M{sub P} sin i = 4.15 M{sub +}. This planet was discovered through Keplerian modeling of precise radial velocities from Keck-HIRES and is the second super-Earth to emerge from the NASA-UC Eta-Earth Survey. The best-fit orbit is consistent with circular and has a period of P = 4.6455 days. The Doppler semi-amplitude of this planet, K = 1.89 m s{sup -1}, is among the lowest ever detected, on par with the detection of GJ 581 e using HARPS. A longer period (P {approx} 2.3 years), low-amplitude signal of unknown origin was also detected in the radial velocities and was filtered out of the data while fitting the short-period planet. Additional data are required to determine if the long-period signal is due to a second planet, stellar activity, or another source. Photometric observations using the Automated Photometric Telescopes at Fairborn Observatory show that HD 156668 (an old, quiet K3 dwarf) is photometrically constant over the radial velocity period to 0.1 mmag, supporting the existence of the planet. No transits were detected down to a photometric limit of {approx}3 mmag, ruling out transiting planets dominated by extremely bloated atmospheres, but not precluding a transiting solid/liquid planet with a modest atmosphere.

  4. AbiG, a genotypically novel abortive infection mechanism encoded by plasmid pCI750 of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC653.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, L; Coffey, A; Daly, C; Fitzgerald, G F

    1996-01-01

    AbiG is an abortive infection (Abi) mechanism encoded by the conjugative plasmid pCI750 originally isolated from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC653. Insensitivity conferred by this Abi manifested itself as complete resistance to phi 712 (936 phage species) with only partial resistance to phi c2 (c2 species). The mechanism did not inhibit phage DNA replication. The smallest subclone of pCI750 which expressed the Abi phenotype contained a 3.5-kb insert which encoded two potential open reading frames. abiGi (750 bp) and abiGii (1,194 bp) were separated by 2 bp and appeared to share a single promoter upstream of abiGi. These open reading frames showed no significant homology to sequences of either the DNA or protein databases; however, they did exhibit the typical low G+C content (29 and 27%, respectively) characteristic of lactococcal abi genes. In fact, the G+C content of a 7.0-kb fragment incorporating the abiG locus was 30%, which may suggest horizontal gene transfer from a species of low G+C content. In this context, it is notable that remnants of IS elements were observed throughout this 7.0-kb region. PMID:8795193

  5. Analytical results and sample locality map for rock, stream-sediment, and soil samples, Northern and Eastern Coloado Desert BLM Resource Area, Imperial, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Harley D.; Chaffee, Maurice A.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In 1996-1998 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a geochemical study of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) 5.5 million-acre Northern and Eastern Colorado Desert Resource Area (usually referred to as the NECD in this report), Imperial, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, southeastern California (figure 1). This study was done in support of the BLM's Coordinated Management Plan for the area. This report presents analytical data from this study. To provide comprehensive coverage of the NECD, we compiled and examined all available geochemical data, in digital form, from previous studies in the area, and made sample-site plots to aid in determining where sample-site coverage and analyses were sufficient, which samples should be re-analyzed, and where additional sampling was needed. Previous investigations conducted in parts of the current study area included the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program studies of the Needles and Salton Sea 1? x 2? quadrangles; USGS studies of 12 BLM Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) (Big Maria Mountains, Chemehuevi Mountains, Chuckwalla Mountains, Coxcomb Mountains, Mecca Hills, Orocopia Mountains, Palen-McCoy, Picacho Peak, Riverside Mountains, Sheephole Valley (also known as Sheep Hole/Cadiz), Turtle Mountains, and Whipple Mountains); and USGS studies in the Needles and El Centro 1? x 2? quadrangles done during the early 1990s as part of a project to identify the regional geochemistry of southern California. Areas where we did new sampling of rocks and stream sediments are mainly in the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range and in Joshua Tree National Park, which extends into the west-central part of the NECD, as shown in figure 1 and figure 2. This report contains analytical data for 132 rock samples and 1,245 stream-sediment samples collected by the USGS, and 362 stream-sediment samples and 189 soil samples collected during the NURE program. All samples are from the Northern and Eastern Colorado Desert BLM Resource Area and vicinity. Included in the 1,245 stream-sediment samples collected by the USGS are 284 samples collected as part of the current study, 817 samples collected as part of investigations of the12 BLM WSAs and re-analyzed for the present study, 45 samples from the Needles 1? X 2? quadrangle, and 99 samples from the El Centro 1? X 2? quadrangle. The NURE stream-sediment and soil samples were re-analyzed as part of the USGS study in the Needles quadrangle. Analytical data for samples from the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range, which is located within the area of the NECD, were previously reported (King and Chaffee, 1999a). For completeness, these results are also included in this report. Analytical data for samples from the area of Joshua Tree National Park that is within the NECD have also been reported (King and Chaffee, 1999b). These results are not included in this report. The analytical data presented here can be used for baseline geochemical, mineral resource, and environmental geochemical studies.

  6. The American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) at UC Irvine: A Two-Week Residential Summer Program for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. R.; Polequaptewa, N.; Leon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Native Americans remain severely underrepresented in the geosciences, despite a clear need for qualified geoscience professionals within Tribal communities to address critical issues such as natural resource and land management, water and air pollution, and climate change. In addition to the need for geoscience professionals within Tribal communities, increased participation of Native Americans in the geosciences would enhance the overall diversity of perspectives represented within the Earth science community and lead to improved Earth science literacy within Native communities. To address this need, the Department of Earth System Science and the American Indian Resource Program at the University California have organized a two-week residential American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) for high-school students (grades 9-12) from throughout the nation. The format of the AISESS program is based on the highly-successful framework of a previous NSF Funded American Indian Summer Institute in Computer Science (AISICS) at UC Irvine and involves key senior personnel from the AISICS program. The AISESS program, however, incorporates a week of camping on the La Jolla Band of Luiseo Indians reservation in Northern San Diego County, California. Following the week of camping and field projects, the students spend a week on the campus of UC Irvine participating in Earth System Science lectures, laboratory activities, and tours. The science curriculum is closely woven together with cultural activities, native studies, and communication skills programs The program culminates with a closing ceremony during which students present poster projects on environmental issues relevant to their tribal communities. The inaugural AISESS program took place from July 15th-28th, 2012. We received over 100 applications from Native American high school students from across the nation. We accepted 40 students for the first year, of which 34 attended the program. The objective of the program is to introduce students to Earth System Science and, hopefully, inspire them to pursue Earth or Environmental Science degrees. Towards this end, we developed a fairly broad curriculum which will be presented here. Evaluation planning was conducted during the first quarter of 2012 during recruitment. A longitudinal database was established for the project to track college preparatory course-taking, GPA, school attendance, participation in earth science activities, and attitudes and interest in attending college and completing a degree after high school. Based on attendance during AISESS, schools and students will be selected as descriptive case studies. A pre-post design for evaluating the Summer Institute includes a survey about student background, attitudes, and knowledge about preparing to complete high school and attend college after graduation and focus groups of participants immediately after the Institute to capture qualitative data about their experiences in the field and at the University. Initial evaluation results will be presented here.

  7. Field Botanist for a Day: A Group Exercise for the Introductory Botany Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbatt, Natalie M.

    2004-01-01

    A group exercise, suggested to be most effective when used near the semester-end, enables entry-level students to appreciate the application of plant biology and makes botany labs experimental. It is believed that this series of labs helps students to appreciate their own learning when they teach and explain things to others.

  8. [Marcel Petitmengin (1881-1908), pharmacist botanist: his life, his work].

    PubMed

    Larnaudie, S; Labrude, P

    1999-01-01

    Marcel Petitmengin was born in Nancy in January 1881. Student at the school of pharmacy and preparator in its laboratory for natural history, he received his diploma in 1904. He had already published some papers on botany and belonged to the International Academy for Geographical botany. He choose the flora of Mount Viso, in Italy, for his philosophical thesis. In the same time, he worked on greek flora with Maire, then on Primulaceae from Asia. Having published about fifty papers on botany, he died from tuberculosis in October 1908, being twenty-seven years old. Very faithful, he took part actively in protestantism in Nancy. PMID:11625556

  9. Predictive and Prognostic Value of Ribonucleotide Reductase Regulatory Subunit M1 and Excision Repair Cross-Complementation Group 1 in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma (UC) Treated with First-Line Gemcitabine Plus Platinum Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miso; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Lee, Eunsik; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that expression of ribonucleotide reductase regulatory subunit M1 (RRM1) and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is associated with resistance to gemcitabine and cisplatin, respectively. We evaluated the significance of RRM1 and ERCC1 expression to predict tumor response to gemcitabine plus platinum chemotherapy (GP) and survival in advanced UC. We retrospectively collected tumor samples and reviewed clinical data of 53 patients with unresectable or metastatic UC, who were treated with first-line GP. RRM1 and ERCC1 expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Among 53 patients, 12 (22.6%) and 26 (49.1%) patients had tumors that demonstrated a high expression for RRM1 and ERCC1, respectively. Twenty-nine (70.7%) of 41 patients with low RRM1 expression achieved a clinical response (complete + partial responses), but only 3 (25.0%) of 12 patients with high RRM1 expression achieved a clinical response after GP (P=0.007). Nineteen (70.4%) of 27 patients with low ERCC1 expression achieved a clinical response, while 13 (50.0%) of 26 patients with high ERCC1 expression achieved a clinical response (P=0.130). High RRM1 expression was associated with shorter progression free survival and overall survival (PFS P=0.006, OS P=0.006). Multivariate analysis confirmed that patients with high RRM1 expression had a significantly greater risk of progression and death than those with low RRM1 expression. ERCC1 status was not a significant predictor for PFS and OS. RRM1 expression was predictive and prognostic of clinical outcome in advanced UC treated with gemcitabine plus platinum combination chemotherapy. PMID:26200905

  10. Synthesis and structure of [U{C(PPh2NMes)2}2] (Mes = 2,4,6-Me3C6H2): A homoleptic uranium bis(carbene) complex with two formal U=C double bonds.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Oliver J; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J; Liddle, Stephen T

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of H2C(PPh2NMes)2 (1, Mes = 2,4,6-Me3C6H2) with two equivalents of ButLi afforded the methandiide complex [Li2{C(PPh2NMes)2}2]2 (2); reaction of 2 with [UI3(THF)4] gave [U{C(PPh2NMes)2}2] (3), which is the first homoleptic uranium bis(carbene) complex with two formal U=C double bonds. PMID:20401420

  11. Geologic map of the Riverside East 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Cox, Brett F.

    2001-01-01

    a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in rse_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Marine deposits are in part overlain by local, mostly alluvial fan, deposits and are labeled Qomf. Grain size follows f. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  12. Geologic map of the Riverside West 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Cox, Brett F.

    2001-01-01

    a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in rsw_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Marine deposits are in part overlain by local, mostly alluvial fan, deposits and are labeled Qomf. Grain size follows f.Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  13. Sir James Edward Smith (1759-1828) MD FRS, botanist, co-founder of the Linnean Society of London.

    PubMed

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2009-05-01

    James Edward Smith's interest in botany led him to enter medicine at Edinburgh in 1781. Smith was continuing his medical studies in London when Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820) suggested to him that he should purchase the collection of the famous Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus that had just been offered to Banks. Smith bought the Linnean Collection and Library in 1784. In 1786 he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Medicine from Leiden. In 1788 Smith, with two associates, founded the Linnean Society of London and became President for life. Smith turned from medicine to natural history as a lecturer and writer. During his lifetime he produced numerous botanical works of high value, including The English Flora (1824-28), and he did much to popularize botany. PMID:19401517

  14. Genetic algorithms at UC Davis/LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Vemuri, V.R.

    1993-12-31

    A tutorial introduction to genetic algorithms is given. This brief tutorial should serve the purpose of introducing the subject to the novice. The tutorial is followed by a brief commentary on the term project reports that follow.

  15. Variation resources at UC Santa Cruz.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daryl J; Trumbower, Heather; Kern, Andrew D; Rhead, Brooke L; Kuhn, Robert M; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2007-01-01

    The variation resources within the University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser include polymorphism data drawn from public collections and analyses of these data, along with their display in the context of other genomic annotations. Primary data from dbSNP is included for many organisms, with added information including genomic alleles and orthologous alleles for closely related organisms. Display filtering and coloring is available by variant type, functional class or other annotations. Annotation of potential errors is highlighted and a genomic alignment of the variant's flanking sequence is displayed. HapMap allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium (LD) are available for each HapMap population, along with non-human primate alleles. The browsing and analysis tools, downloadable data files and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/. PMID:17151077

  16. The ENCODE Project at UC Santa Cruz.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daryl J; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Clawson, Hiram; Hinrichs, Angie S; Trumbower, Heather; Raney, Brian J; Karolchik, Donna; Barber, Galt P; Harte, Rachel A; Hillman-Jackson, Jennifer; Kuhn, Robert M; Rhead, Brooke L; Smith, Kayla E; Thakkapallayil, Archana; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Encyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to identify all functional elements in the human genome. The pilot phase is for comparison of existing methods and for the development of new methods to rigorously analyze a defined 1% of the human genome sequence. Experimental datasets are focused on the origin of replication, DNase I hypersensitivity, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter function, gene structure, pseudogenes, non-protein-coding RNAs, transcribed RNAs, multiple sequence alignment and evolutionarily constrained elements. The ENCODE project at UCSC website (http://genome.ucsc.edu/ENCODE) is the primary portal for the sequence-based data produced as part of the ENCODE project. In the pilot phase of the project, over 30 labs provided experimental results for a total of 56 browser tracks supported by 385 database tables. The site provides researchers with a number of tools that allow them to visualize and analyze the data as well as download data for local analyses. This paper describes the portal to the data, highlights the data that has been made available, and presents the tools that have been developed within the ENCODE project. Access to the data and types of interactive analysis that are possible are illustrated through supplemental examples. PMID:17166863

  17. Secondary organic aerosol formation of primary, secondary and tertiary Amines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amines have been widely identified in ambient aerosol in both urban and rural environments and they are potential precursors for formation of nitrogen-containing secondary organic aerosols (SOA). However, the role of amines in SOA formation has not been well studied. In this wrok, we use UC-Riversid...

  18. Descriptions of new varieties recently distributed from the Citrus Clonal Protection Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Citrus Clonal Protection Program (CCPP) is operated through the Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology at University of California (UC) Riverside and is funded in large part by The California Citrus Research Board (CRB). The CCPP processes citrus propagative material in two phases. First...

  19. Long Range Development Plan, University of California, Riverside.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell (George Vernon) and Associates, Architects and Planners.

    A long range development plan, conceived as a general guide to final objectives, uses many diagrams and maps to illustrate the text. The plan is predicated on the assumption that orderly and efficient development of site possibilities is subject to ever-changing influences. The following areas are examined--(1) campus environment, (2) academic…

  20. Long Range Development Plan, University of California, Riverside.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell (George Vernon) and Associates, Architects and Planners.

    A long range development plan, conceived as a general guide to final objectives, uses many diagrams and maps to illustrate the text. The plan is predicated on the assumption that orderly and efficient development of site possibilities is subject to ever-changing influences. The following areas are examined--(1) campus environment, (2) academic

  1. Science Education at Riverside Middle School A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, Bettie Ann Pickens

    For more than thirty years the gender gap in science and related careers has been a key concern of researchers, teachers, professional organizations, and policy makers. Despite indicators of progress for women and girls on some measures of achievement, course enrollment patterns, and employment, fewer women than men pursue college degrees and careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. According to the results of national assessments, the gender gap in science achievement begins to be evident in the middle school years. Gender and school science achievement involve a complex set of factors associated with schools and child/family systems that may include school leadership, institutional practices, curriculum content, teacher training programs, teacher expectations, student interests, parental involvement, and cultural values. This ethnographic case study was designed to explore the context for science education reform and the participation of middle school girls. The study analyzed and compared teaching strategies and female student engagement in sixth, seventh, and eighth grade science classrooms. The setting was a middle school situated in a district that was well-known for its achievement in reading, math, and technology. Findings from the study indicated that while classroom instruction was predominantly organized around traditional school science, the girls were more disciplined and outperformed the boys. The size of the classrooms, time to prepare for hands-on activities, and obtaining resources were identified as barriers to teaching science in ways that aligned with recent national science reform initiatives. Parents who participated in the study were very supportive of their daughters' academic progress and career goals. A few of the parents suggested that the school's science program include more hands-on activities; instruction designed for the advanced learner; and information related to future careers. Overall the teachers and students perceived their science program to be gender fair. Eighth grade participants who had career goals related to science and engineering, indicated that their science instruction did not provide the rigor they needed to improve their critical skills for advanced placement in high school. Recommendations include the need for professional development on inquiry-based science, equitable student achievement, and diverse perspectives in science education.

  2. Fire Prevention in California's Riverside County Headstart Project: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkman, William S.; Taylor, Jean

    Results of evaluation are reported for a safety program devised by Head Start teachers and California Division of Forestry personnel to teach fire prevention education to Head Start children. Chapters describe the place of fire prevention in Head Start and causes of fire starting behavior in children. The Head Start Fire Prevention Kit is also…

  3. UC Berkeley Seismic Guidelines, Appendix II: Ground Motion Time Histories for the UC Berkeley Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Authors, Various

    2003-06-03

    Three sets of ten time histories each were developed to represent the ground motions for each of the three return periods. All of the time histories are provided as pairs of fault-normal and fault-parallel components. The ground motion time histories are provided in two forms: unmodified, and spectrally modified to match the probabilistic response spectra. The unmodified time histories can be scaled to match the probabilistic response spectra at a specified period, such as the first mode period of the structure being analyzed, while leaving the shape of the response spectrum unmodified. This approach preserves the particular characteristics of the individual time history, together with the peaks and troughs of its response spectrum. These individual characteristics are modified in the spectrally matched time histories, resulting in a suite of ten time histories (for a given return period) that all have the same response spectrum for a given component (fault normal or fault parallel) that follows the smooth shape of the probabilistic response spectrum.

  4. UC Berkeley Seismic Guidelines, Appendix II: Ground Motion TimeHistories for the UC Berkeley Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Various

    2003-06-03

    Three sets of ten time histories each were developed to represent the ground motions for each of the three return periods. All of the time histories are provided as pairs of fault-normal and fault-parallel components. The ground motion time histories are provided in two forms: unmodified, and spectrally modified to match the probabilistic response spectra. The unmodified time histories can be scaled to match the probabilistic response spectra at a specified period, such as the first mode period of the structure being analyzed, while leaving the shape of the response spectrum unmodified. This approach preserves the particular characteristics of the individual time history, together with the peaks and troughs of its response spectrum. These individual characteristics are modified in the spectrally matched time histories, resulting in a suite of ten time histories (for a given return period) that all have the same response spectrum for a given component (fault normal or fault parallel) that follows the smooth shape of the probabilistic response spectrum.

  5. Preparation of homogeneous (Th 0.8U 0.2)O 2 powders by mechanical blending of Th(C 2O 4) 26H 2O and U(C 2O 4) 26H 2O powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alta?, Y.; Eral, M.; Tel, H.

    2001-04-01

    Thorium oxalate and uranium (IV) oxalate powders were prepared and characterized by chemical, TGA/DTG, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Th(C 2O 4) 26H 2O and U(C 2O 4) 26H 2O powders (80% Th and 20% U) were mechanically mixed in a diagonal rotating drum for 3 h. Mechanically mixed oxalates were decomposed at 623 K, calcined at 1173 K for 24 h in air and reduced for 2 h at 923 K in hydrogen atmosphere. The powders were compacted into pellets and sintered in flowing CO 2 at 1373 K for 1 h. The XRD pattern of (Th 0.8U 0.2)O 2 obtained showed that a complete solid solution was formed.

  6. Systematics and the origin of species from the viewpoint of a botanist: edgar anderson prepares the 1941 jesup lectures with ernst mayr.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    The correspondence between Edgar Anderson and Ernst Mayr leading into their 1941 Jesup Lectures on "Systematics and the Origin of Species" addressed population thinking, the nature of species, the relationship of microevolution to macroevolution, and the evolutionary dynamics of plants and animals, all central issues in what came to be known as the Evolutionary Synthesis. On some points, they found ready agreement; for others they forged only a short term consensus. They brought two different working styles to this project reflecting their different appreciations of what was possible at this point in evolutionary studies. For Mayr, it was a focused project with definitive short term conclusions imminent while Anderson viewed it as an episode in an ongoing historical process that, while exciting and suggestive, remained openended. Thus, Mayr and Anderson represent two distinct perspectives on the Evolutionary Synthesis in formation; by understanding both of their points of view, we can grasp more fully the state of evolutionary theory at this key moment. PMID:22684268

  7. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  8. UC Assurance Plan For Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July2007

    SciTech Connect

    Chernowski, John

    2007-07-09

    This Division ES&H Self-Assessment Manual describes how the Laboratory administers a division self-assessment program that conforms to the institutional requirements promulgated in the 'LBNL Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Program' (LBNL/PUB-5344, latest revision). The institutional program comprises all appraisal and reporting activities that identify environmental, safety, and health deficiencies and associated corrective actions. It is designed to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for self-assessment. Self-assessment is a continuous process of information gathering and evaluation. A division selfassessment program should describe methods for gathering and documenting information, and methods to analyze these performance data to identify trends and root causes and their corrections.

  9. Characterization of Vegetation using the UC Davis Remote Sensing Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, M.; Hart, Q. J.; Bowen, K. S.; Ustin, S. L.

    2006-12-01

    Remote sensing provides information about the dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere with continuous spatial and temporal coverage on many different scales. We present the design and construction of a suite of instrument modules and network infrastructure with size, weight and power constraints suitable for small scale vehicles, anticipating vigorous growth in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other mobile platforms. Our approach provides the rapid deployment and low cost acquisition of high aerial imagery for applications requiring high spatial resolution and revisits. The testbed supports a wide range of applications, encourages remote sensing solutions in new disciplines and demonstrates the complete range of engineering knowledge required for the successful deployment of remote sensing instruments. The initial testbed is deployed on a Sig Kadet Senior remote controlled plane. It includes an onboard computer with wireless radio, GPS, inertia measurement unit, 3-axis electronic compass and digital cameras. The onboard camera is either a RGB digital camera or a modified digital camera with red and NIR channels. Cameras were calibrated using selective light sources, an integrating spheres and a spectrometer, allowing for the computation of vegetation indices such as the NDVI. Field tests to date have investigated technical challenges in wireless communication bandwidth limits, automated image geolocation, and user interfaces; as well as image applications such as environmental landscape mapping focusing on Sudden Oak Death and invasive species detection, studies on the impact of bird colonies on tree canopies, and precision agriculture.

  10. UC DAVIS CENTER FOR CHILDREN’S ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of the CCEH in the next five years are to: (1) better understand the mechanisms by which environmental, immunologic, and molecular factors interact to influence the risk and severity of autism; (2) identify early immunologic, environmental, and genomic markers of sus...

  11. Status of the UC-Berkeley SETI efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, E. J.; Anderson, D. P.; Bankay, R.; Cobb, J.; Howard, A.; Lebofsky, M.; Siemion, A. P. V.; von Korff, J.; Werthimer, D.

    2011-10-01

    We summarize radio and optical SETI programs based at the University of California, Berkeley. The SEVENDIP optical pulse search looks for ns time scale pulses at visible wavelengths. It utilizes an automated 30 inch telescope, three ultra fast photo multiplier tubes and a coincidence detector. The target list includes F, G, K and M stars, globular cluster and galaxies. The ongoing SERENDIP V.v sky survey searches for radio signals at the 300 meter Arecibo Observatory. The currently installed configuration supports 128 million channels over a 200 MHz bandwidth with ~1.6 Hz spectral resolution. Frequency stepping allows the spectrometer to cover the full 300MHz band of the Arecibo L-band receivers. The final configuration will allow data from all 14 receivers in the Arecibo L-band Focal Array to be monitored simultaneously with over 1.8 billion channels. SETI@home uses the desktop computers of volunteers to analyze over 160 TB of data at taken at Arecibo. Over 6 million volunteers have run SETI@home during its 10 year history. The SETI@home sky survey is 10 times more sensitive than SERENDIP V.v but it covers only a 2.5 MHz band, centered on 1420 MHz. SETI@home searches a much wider parameter space, including 14 octaves of signal bandwidth and 15 octaves of pulse period with Doppler drift corrections from -100 Hz/s to +100 Hz/s. SETI@home is being expanded to analyze data collected during observations of Kepler objects of interest in May 2011. The Astropulse project is the first SETI search for μs time scale pulses in the radio spectrum. Because short pulses are dispersed by the interstellar medium, and the amount of dispersion is unknown, Astropulse must search through 30,000 possible dispersions. Substantial computing power is required to conduct this search, so the project uses volunteers and their personal computers to carry out the computation (using distributed computing similar to SETI@home). Keywords: radio instrumentation, FPGA spectrometers, SETI, optical SETI, Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, volunteer computing, radio transients, optical transients.

  12. UC DAVIS CENTER FOR CHILDRENS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of the CCEH in the next five years are to: (1) better understand the mechanisms by which environmental, immunologic, and molecular factors interact to influence the risk and severity of autism; (2) identify early immunologic, environmental, and genomic markers of sus...

  13. 77 FR 72069 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for the Riverside Fairy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... species on August 3, 1993 (58 FR 41384). We published our first rule designating critical habitat on May 30, 2001 (66 FR 29384). In response to a settlement agreement, we revised critical habitat in a final rule published April 12, 2005 (70 FR 19154). That rule was also challenged in court, and based on...

  14. Professional Learning Communities and the Degree of Teamness in Riverside County High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Benjamin A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine if a significant difference in the degree of teamness in high school teams whose schools have strong evidence of the five dimensions of a Professional Learning Community, compared to high school teams in schools that do not have strong evidence of the five dimensions of a Professional Learning

  15. Writing at Riverside Health Services: An Ethnographic Study in Entrepreneurial Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brender, Linda

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an ethnographic study that investigated the relationships that evolve when professional nurses who own a home health care agency write for multiple, conflicting corporate discourse communities, including their lawyers, management consultants, and marketing professionals. This study revealed that conflicting…

  16. 75 FR 9442 - Lonza, Inc., Riverside Plant, Lonza Exclusive Synthesis Section, Custom Manufacturing Division...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... published in the Federal Register on January 6, 2010 (75 FR 878). The initial investigation, initiated on... the Federal Register on January 25, 2010 (75 FR 3935). To support the request for reconsideration, the..., Custom Manufacturing Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Lab Support, Aerotek, Job...

  17. 77 FR 12543 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for Riverside Fairy Shrimp

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... critical habitat rule (76 FR 31686; June 1, 2011); (b) Areas containing the physical and biological... revise critical habitat (76 FR 31686) for further discussion. (9) Any probable economic, national... critical habitat designation published in the Federal Register on June 1, 2011 (76 FR 31686), which...

  18. 75 FR 70571 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Increased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... livestock-feeding operation; otherwise, such cull dates must be shipped or delivered to the Committee for... September 15, 2010 (75 FR 56019). Copies of the proposed rule were also mailed or sent via facsimile to...

  19. 78 FR 35314 - Availability of Final Environmental Impact Statement; Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin, Riverside...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... 24, 2010 (75 FR 8395) and published a Notice of Availability for the draft SEIR/EIS on January 20, 2011 (76 FR 3655). The Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability was published on January 28, 2011 (76 FR 5156). The Western Municipal Water District filed a Notice of Determination...

  20. Does the Gender Wage Gap Exist at Riverside Community College District?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jami; Casolari, Amber

    2015-01-01

    The gender wage gap in the United States is a well-documented social and economic phenomenon. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 has done little to bring parity between men's and women's wages. Existing data show a relationship between race, age, geography, immigration, education, and women's pay status. This study analyzes wage disparity within higher…

  1. Test Reviews: Newborg, J. (2005). "Battelle Developmental Inventory--Second Edition." Itasca, IL: Riverside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Stacy L.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-2), a criterion-referenced, individually administered, standardized assessment used to measure the developmental skills in children aged birth through 7 years, 11 months. The BDI-2 is composed of 450 items grouped into five domains (Adaptive,

  2. 78 FR 54147 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, California; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... to complying with the E-Government Act, to promote the use of the internet and other information... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office #0; #0;Rules and Regulations... 20250-0237; Fax: (202) 720-8938; or Internet: http://www.regulations.gov . Comments should reference...

  3. Geologic map of the Corona South 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside and Orange counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, C.H., Jr.; Morton, Douglas M.; Weber, F. Harold, Jr.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.; O'Brien, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    a. A Readme file; includes in Appendix I, data contained in crs_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Marine deposits are in part overlain by local, mostly alluvial fan, deposits and are labeled Qomf. Grain size follows f. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  4. Geologic map of the Lake Mathews 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Weber, F. Harold

    2001-01-01

    a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in lkm_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Miscellaneous Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous.Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand.In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Marine deposits are in part overlain by local, mostly alluvial fan, deposits and are labeled Qomf. Grain size follows f. Even though this is an Open-File report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  5. Geologic map and digital database of the Bachelor Mountain 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Kennedy, Michael P.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.; Burns, Diane

    2003-01-01

    Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in bch_met.txt The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000- scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formationname, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above). This Readme file describes the digital data, such as types and general contents of files making up the database, and includes information on how to extract and plot the map and accompanying graphic file. Metadata information can be accessed at http://geo-nsdi.er.usgs.gov/metadata/open-file/03-102 and is included in Appendix I of this Readme.

  6. Geologic map of the Corona North 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Gray, C.H., Jr.; Bovard, Kelly R.; Dawson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in crn_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000- scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Marine deposits are in part overlain by local, mostly alluvial fan, deposits and are labeled Qomf. Grain size follows f. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  7. Geologic map and digital database of the Romoland 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.; Morton, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in rom_met.txt The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000- scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formationname, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above). This Readme file describes the digital data, such as types and general contents of files making up the database, and includes information on how to extract and plot the map and accompanying graphic file. Metadata information can be accessed at http://geo-nsdi.er.usgs.gov/metadata/open-file/03-102 and is included in Appendix I of this Readme.

  8. Geologic map of the Sunnymead 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Matti, Jonathan C.

    2001-01-01

    a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in sun_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Marine deposits are in part overlain by local, mostly alluvial fan, deposits and are labeled Qomf. Grain size follows f. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  9. 77 FR 59244 - Environmental Impact Statement: Riverside County, CA; Notice of Intent

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    .... The proposed project would widen Cajalco Road from two to four lanes between Harvill Avenue at the east end and Temescal Canyon Road at the west end, from four to five lanes between Temescal Wash and Temescal Canyon Road, and from four to six lanes between Interstate 215 (I-215) southbound ramps...

  10. RECONSTRUCTION OF LONG-LIVED RADIONUCLIDE INTAKES FOR TECHA RIVERSIDE RESIDENTS: STRONTIUM-90

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Peremyslova, L. M.; Shagina, N. B.; Shishkina, Elena A.; Krivoshchapov, Victor A.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2011-07-15

    Releases of radioactive materials from the Mayak Production Association in 1949-1956 resulted in contamination of the Techa River; a nuclide of major interest was 90Sr, which downstream residents consumed with water from the river and with milk contaminated by cow's consumption of river water and contaminated pasture. Over the years, several reconstructions of dose have been performed for the approximately 30,000 persons who make up the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of the study described here was to derive a revised reference-90Sr-intake function for the members of this cohort. The revision was necessary because recently discovered data have provided a more accurate description of the time course of the releases, and more is now known about the importance of the pasture grass-cow-milk pathway for the members of this cohort. The fundamental basis for the derivation of the reference-90Sr-intake function remains the same: thousands of measurements of 90Sr content in bone with a special whole-body counter, thousands of measurement of beta-activity of front teeth with a special tooth-beta counter, and a variety of other measurements, including post mortem measurements of 90Sr in bone, measurements of 90Sr in cow's milk, and measurements of beta activity in human excreta. Results of the new analyses are that the major intake started in September 1950 and peaked somewhat later than originally postulated. However, the total intake for adult residents has not changed significantly. For children of some birth years, the intake and incorporation of 90Sr in bone tissue have changed substantially.

  11. Reconstruction of long-lived radionuclide intakes for Techa riverside residents: strontium-90.

    PubMed

    Tolstykh, E I; Degteva, M O; Peremyslova, L M; Shagina, N B; Shishkina, E A; Krivoshchapov, V A; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A

    2011-07-01

    Releases of radioactive materials from the Mayak Production Association in 1949-1956 resulted in contamination of the Techa River; a nuclide of major interest was 90Sr, which downstream residents consumed with water from the river and with milk contaminated by cows' consumption of river water and contaminated pasture. Over the years, several reconstructions of dose have been performed for the approximately 30,000 persons who make up the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of the study described here was to derive a revised reference-90Sr-intake function for the members of this cohort. The revision was necessary because recently discovered data have provided a more accurate description of the time course of the releases, and more is now known about the importance of the pasture grass-cow-milk pathway for the members of this cohort. The fundamental basis for the derivation of the reference-90Sr-intake function remains the same: thousands of measurements of 90Sr content in bone with a special whole-body counter, thousands of measurements of beta-activity of front teeth with a special tooth-beta counter, and a variety of other measurements, including post mortem measurements of 90Sr in bone, measurements of 90Sr in cow's milk, and measurements of beta activity in human excreta. Results of the new analyses are that the major intake started in September 1950 and peaked somewhat later than originally postulated. However, the total intake for adult residents has not changed significantly. For children of some birth years, the intake and incorporation of Sr in bone tissue have changed substantially. PMID:21617390

  12. Riverside: A Case Study of Social Capital and Cultural Reproduction and Their Relationship to Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharakis, Jeff; Flora, Jan

    2005-01-01

    This case study research is based on a 3-year project (1996-1999) in which Iowa State University Extension developed and implemented a long-term community development project based on strengthening social capital using participatory research. The results of this mapping were initially interpreted as indicating a high level of social capital, but

  13. 75 FR 42377 - Foreign-Trade Zone 244-Riverside County, CA; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... reorganize the zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (74 FR 1170, 1/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 1/22/09). The ASF is an option for grantees for the establishment or reorganization of... on August 21, 2000 (Board Order 1104, 65 FR 54196, 09/07/2000). The current zone project includes...

  14. Does the Gender Wage Gap Exist at Riverside Community College District?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jami; Casolari, Amber

    2015-01-01

    The gender wage gap in the United States is a well-documented social and economic phenomenon. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 has done little to bring parity between men's and women's wages. Existing data show a relationship between race, age, geography, immigration, education, and women's pay status. This study analyzes wage disparity within higher

  15. Geologic map of the Valley Mountain 15 quadrangle, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.; Bacheller, John; Fitzgibbon, Todd T.; Powell, Robert E.; Allen, Charlotte M.

    2013-01-01

    The Valley Mountain 15 quadrangle straddles the Pinto Mountain Fault, which bounds the eastern Transverse Ranges in the south against the Mojave Desert province in the north. The Pinto Mountains, part of the eastern Transverse Ranges in the south part of the quadrangle expose a series of Paleoproterozoic gneisses and granite and the Proterozoic quartzite of Pinto Mountain. Early Triassic quartz monzonite intruded the gneisses and was ductiley deformed prior to voluminous Jurassic intrusion of diorite, granodiorite, quartz monzonite, and granite plutons. The Jurassic rocks include part of the Bullion Mountains Intrusive Suite, which crops out prominently at Valley Mountain and in the Bullion Mountains, as well as in the Pinto Mountains. Jurassic plutons in the southwest part of the quadrangle are deeply denuded from midcrustal emplacement levels in contrast to supracrustal Jurassic limestone and volcanic rocks exposed in the northeast. Dikes inferred to be part of the Jurassic Independence Dike Swarm intrude the Jurassic plutons and Proterozoic rocks. Late Cretaceous intrusion of the Cadiz Valley Batholith in the northeast caused contact metamorphism of adjacent Jurassic plutonic rocks. The Tertiary period saw emplacement of basanitoid basalt at about 23 Ma and deposition of Miocene and (or) Pliocene ridge-capping gravels. An undated east-dipping low-angle normal fault zone in the Pinto Mountains drops hanging-wall rocks eastward and may account for part of the contrast in uplift history across the quadrangle. The eastern Transverse Ranges are commonly interpreted as severely rotated clockwise tectonically in the Neogene relative to the Mojave Desert, but similar orientations of Jurassic dike swarms suggest that any differential rotation between the two provinces is small in this quadrangle. The late Cenozoic Pinto Mountain Fault and other strike-slip faults cut Quaternary deposits in the quadrangle, with two northwest-striking faults cutting Holocene deposits. Geographic Information System and metadata on most geologic features are available on the Geologic map of the Sheep Hole Mountains 30 by 60 quadrangle, U.S. Geological Survey map MF2234, scale 1:100,000, available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/mf/2002/2344/.

  16. Geologic controls on the chemical behaviour of nitrate in riverside alluvial aquifers, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Joong-Hyuk; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Kangjoo; Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ju

    2003-04-01

    To investigate the origin and behaviour of nitrate in alluvial aquifers adjacent to Nakdong River, Korea, we chose two representative sites (Wolha and Yongdang) having similar land-use characteristics but different geology. A total of 96 shallow groundwater samples were collected from irrigation and domestic wells tapping alluvial aquifers.About 63% of the samples analysed had nitrate concentrations that exceeded the Korean drinking water limit (443 mg l-1 NO3-), and about 35% of the samples had nitrate concentrations that exceeded the Korean groundwater quality standard for agricultural use (886 mg l-1 NO3-). Based on nitrogen isotope analysis, two major nitrate sources were identified: synthetic fertilizer (about 4 15N) applied to farmland, and animal manure and sewage (15-20 15N) originating from upstream residential areas. Shallow groundwater in the farmland generally had higher nitrate concentrations than those in residential areas, due to the influence of synthetic fertilizer. Nitrate concentrations at both study sites were highest near the water table and then progressively decreased with depth. Nitrate concentrations are also closely related to the geologic characteristics of the aquifer. In Yongdang, denitrification is important in regulating nitrate chemistry because of the availability of organic carbon from a silt layer (about 20 m thick) below a thin, sandy surface aquifer. In Wolha, however, conservative mixing between farmland-recharged water and water coming from a village is suggested as the dominant process. Mixing ratios estimated based on the nitrate concentrations and the 15N values indicate that water originating from the village affects the nitrate chemistry of the shallow groundwater underneath the farmland to a large extent.

  17. Intensive early season adulticide applications decrease arbovirus transmission throughout the Coachella Valley, Riverside County, California.

    PubMed

    Lothrop, Hugh D; Lothrop, Branka B; Gomsi, Donald E; Reisen, William K

    2008-08-01

    In the Coachella Valley of California the seasonal onset of St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), western equine encephalomyelitis virus (WEEV), and West Nile virus (WNV) has been detected consistently at the shoreline of the Salton Sea near the community of North Shore. The timing and intensity of initial amplification in the Culex tarsalis Coquillett/wild bird cycle at this focus seemed closely linked to the subsequent dispersal of virus to the rest of the Coachella Valley and perhaps southern California. In 2004, an attempt was made to interrupt the amplification and dispersal of WNV using ground ultra-low volume (ULV) applications of Pyrenone 25-5. Although these localized treatments were started 1 month after the initial detection in April, surveillance indicated no dispersal from this focus at this time. However, these treatments appeared to have little effect, and WNV eventually was detected throughout the valley, with seven human cases reported in the urbanized upper valley near Palm Springs. In 2005, the initial detection of WNV at North Shore at the end of May was followed rapidly by dispersal throughout the valley precluding efforts at containment. Evaluation of ground and aerial applications at North Shore during May and June 2005, respectively, indicated variable kill of sentinel mosquitoes (overall mortality: ground, 43%; air, 34%) and limited control of the target Cx. tarsalis population. In 2006, aerial ULV applications with the same chemical were begun immediately following the first detection of virus in mid-April, resulting in an apparent reduction of Cx. tarsalis abundance and delay of WNV activity in the rural lower valley and a marked decline in transmission by Culex quinquefasciatus Say populations in the densely populated upper northwestern valley with no human cases reported. PMID:18494603

  18. Mineral resources of the Santa Rose Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Riverside County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Calzia, J.P.; Madden-McGuire, D.J.; Oliver, H.W.; Schreiner, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Santa Rosa Mountains Wilderness Study Area covers 68,051 acres in the Santa Rose Mountains, California. An appraisal of the mineral resources (known) and an assessment of mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of this wilderness study area were made at the request of the US Bureau of Land Management. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral surveys indicate that the study area has high potential for tungsten and marble resources, moderate potential for gold, and no potential for oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources.

  19. Writing at Riverside Health Services: An Ethnographic Study in Entrepreneurial Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brender, Linda

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an ethnographic study that investigated the relationships that evolve when professional nurses who own a home health care agency write for multiple, conflicting corporate discourse communities, including their lawyers, management consultants, and marketing professionals. This study revealed that conflicting

  20. Geologic map of the Steele Peak 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; digital preparation by Alvarez, Rachel M.; Diep, Van M.

    2001-01-01

    a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in stp_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Marine deposits are in part overlain by local, mostly alluvial fan, deposits and are labeled Qomf. Grain size follows f. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  1. Eagle Mountain Mine: geology of the former Kaiser Steel Operation in Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Force, Eric R.

    2001-01-01

    Iron ore replaces a variety of host rocks along the two unconformities, forming massive to globular bodies, and its mineralogy correlates with deuteric alteration features, not anhydrous skarn. Its pyrite contains as much as 3% cobalt. Iron was only one of five elements that showed mobility in this region on a scale that suggests basic crustal processes. The others in probable order of flux magnitude are silica, magnesium, sodium, and potassium, to form regionally distributed “vitreous quartzite”, dolomite, and secondary feldspars, respectively.

  2. Using NASA climate data to improve effectiveness of undergraduate-level climate change education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, R. M.; Droser, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing society today, and yet the science of global climate change and the potential effects are poorly understood by the general population. Through a NASA Innovations in Climate Education grant, UC Riverside is addressing this disconnect by fully redesigning the undergraduate level Earth Sciences courses, which serve over 3,000 students every year. The majority of these students are not Earth Sciences majors and so these changes in the climate change education curriculum reach a very broad range of students. This new curriculum centers around a new website that hosts online activities that allows students to utilized and manipulate NASA climate data sets in order to directly observe changes in the global climate system. All lower division Earth Sciences courses will include online activities and a unit on global climate change. In addition to this general improvement in climate change education, we have restructured our lower division Climate Change course (GEO 11) to focus on these online activities in order to give students first-hand experience with both global and local climate data. Because these activities are hosted online, they can be seemlessly integrated with other online resources, accessed from school or home and be viewed on a variety of devices, thus vastly increasing student accessibility. In the future, these activities will be available to other institutions. UC Riverside is an ideal institution at which to launch a broad-reaching climate change education program like this. As one of the most socioeconomically and ethnically diverse universities and one of only two federally-designated Hispanic Serving Research Institutions, UC Riverside primarily educates undergraduate students from the portions of society that will be most heavily impacted by the effects of climate change. GEO 11 and the other lower division courses produce climate-literate students of different majors and backgrounds, who can continue on to serve as climate science advocates in society.

  3. Correlates of Success in Chemistry 1A at UC [University of California] Irvine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailiff, Norman Lynn, Jr.; Jacobs, Marion K.

    This paper discusses correlates (not causes) of success in a college chemistry class. It focuses on the immediate and practical concern of identifying those antecedent variables which, because of their close association with success in chemistry, could be used to predict success. Multiple regression analysis determined that the most satisfactory

  4. U.C. Davis high energy particle physics research: Technical progress report -- 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    Summaries of progress made for this period is given for each of the following areas: (1) Task A--Experiment, H1 detector at DESY; (2) Task C--Experiment, AMY detector at KEK; (3) Task D--Experiment, fixed target detectors at Fermilab; (4) Task F--Experiment, PEP detector at SLAC and pixel detector; (5) Task B--Theory, particle physics; and (6) Task E--Theory, particle physics.

  5. New teaching methods in use at UC Irvine's optical engineering and instrument design programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberman, Donn M.; Rowe, T. Scott; Jo, Joshua; Dimas, David

    2012-10-01

    New teaching methods reach geographically dispersed students with advances in Distance Education. Capabilities include a new "Hybrid" teaching method with an instructor in a classroom and a live WebEx simulcast for remote students. Our Distance Education Geometric and Physical Optics courses include Hands-On Optics experiments. Low cost laboratory kits have been developed and YouTube type video recordings of the instructor using these tools guide the students through their labs. A weekly "Office Hour" has been developed using WebEx and a Live Webcam the instructor uses to display his live writings from his notebook for answering students' questions.

  6. EXFILE: A program for compiling irradiation data on UN and UC fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, J. T.; Smith, R. L.; Weinstein, M. B.; Davison, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN-4 computer program for handling fuel pin data is described. Its main features include standardized output, easy access for data manipulation, and tabulation of important material property data. An additional feature allows simplified preparation of input decks for a fuel swelling computer code (CYGRO-2). Data from over 300 high temperature nitride and carbide based fuel pin irradiations are listed.

  7. Operating Efficiencies at Some UC and CSU Comparator Universities. Report 11-03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidarous, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    In December 2010, the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) staff surveyed public universities in other states to learn how they have dealt with cuts in state funding. All of the institutions CPEC surveyed have increased tuition and or fees at least once in the last two fiscal years, and many project additional increases. All have

  8. UC Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Curriculum and Research Enhancement. Final report, February 14, 1993--February 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K.; Peterson, P.F.

    1995-05-11

    This is a report for the 2/14/93 to 2/14/95 period of the five-year program proposed and initiated in 1992, for curriculum and research enhancement for the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. The program is designed to strengthen the departmental academic infrastructure and improve the education breadth of nuclear engineering students. The DOE funds have supported scholarships and a novel educational program which includes summer coursework at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. The summer course provides an important introduction to reactor safety and operations to students who will in the future be responsible for running many of our existing nuclear power plants. The work was funded under DOE contract DE-FG0393ER75856, with a matching gift to the Department from the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). The program described in the original grant proposal has been successful implemented with an enthusiastic response from our students and faculty. The program consisted of two parts, one for innovative additions to our curriculum funded by the DOE, and the other for distinguished lectureships and support for basic research funded by gifts from PG&E.

  9. Characterization Test Report for the Mnemonics-UCS Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Joshua J.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this testing includes the Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System delivered to KSC: two interrogator (transceiver) systems, four temperature sensors, with wooden mounting blocks, two antennas, two power supplies, network cables, and analysis software. Also included are a number of additional temperature sensors and newly-developed hydrogen sensors

  10. Thermal management for LLNL/UC/SSRL bending magnet beamline VIII at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, E.J.; Younger, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    All the important heat loads on the elements of Beamline VIII are cataloged. The principal elements are identified and their heat loads tabulated for various loading scenarios. The expected heat loads are those from normal operations including the anticipated performance improvements planned for the SPEAR ring and from abnormal operations due to positional perturbations of the electron beam. (LEW)

  11. UC/MALDI-MS analysis of HDL; evidence for density-dependent post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffery D.; Henriquez, Ronald R.; Tichy, Shane E.; Russell, David H.; McNeal, Catherine J.; Macfarlane, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the nature of the post-translational modifications of the major apolipoproteins of HDL is different for density-distinct subclasses. These subclasses were separated by ultracentrifugation using a novel density-forming solute to yield a high-resolution separation. The serum of two subjects, a control with a normolipidemic profile and a subject with diagnosed cardiovascular disease, was studied. Aliquots of three HDL subclasses were analyzed by MALDI and considerable differences were seen when comparing density-distinct subclasses and also when comparing the two subjects. A detailed analysis of the post-translational modification pattern of apoA-1 shows evidence of considerable protease activity, particularly in the more dense fractions. We conclude that part of the heterogeneity of the population of HDL particles is due to density-dependent protease activity. PMID:19050741

  12. Technology Licensing for the Benefit of the Developing World: UC Berkeley's Socially Responsible Licensing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mimura, Carol

    2007-01-01

    In the years since the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980, university technology transfer success has been measured primarily by traditional metrics such as numbers of patents filed, revenue obtained from licensed patents and numbers of start-up companies founded to commercialize university intellectual property. Intellectual property (IP)…

  13. College Costs and Family Income: The Affordability Issue at UC and CSU. Report 11-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jessika

    2011-01-01

    Rising costs are putting an education at California's public universities out of reach for many Californians. Eroding state funding for higher education has meant that more costs are passed on to students and their families in the form of increased fees. Room and board and other costs have grown much faster than inflation. Incomes have not kept

  14. The U.C. Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory and Department of Physics Submillimeter Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. I.; Jaffe, D. T.; Genzel, R.

    1986-01-01

    The UCB submm heterodyne receiver is a complete system for high-resolution astronomical spectroscopy in the 350-micron and 450-micron atmospheric windows. This compact system mounts directly at the Cassegrain focus of large optical and IR telescopes. It consists of a laser local oscillator, open structure mixer, quasi-optical coupling system, a broad-band IF system, and an acoustooptical spectrometer. The local oscillator is a 1-m-long submm laser optically pumped by a CO2 laser. The mixer is a quasi-optical corner-cube antenna structure and Schottky diode. The mixer is currently operated at room temperature, and its performance at 77 K is being evaluated. The system noise temperature is less than 7000 K SSB during observations.

  15. Technology Licensing for the Benefit of the Developing World: UC Berkeley's Socially Responsible Licensing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mimura, Carol

    2007-01-01

    In the years since the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980, university technology transfer success has been measured primarily by traditional metrics such as numbers of patents filed, revenue obtained from licensed patents and numbers of start-up companies founded to commercialize university intellectual property. Intellectual property (IP)

  16. A Total Systems Approach: Reducing Workers' Compensation Costs at UC Davis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukulinsky, Janet C.

    1993-01-01

    The University of California (Davis) has revamped its workers' compensation program by improving accountability and safety, implementing safety training, informing workers of the costs of the workers' compensation program, designating a physician and physical therapist, giving light duty to injured employees, using sports medicine techniques, and…

  17. A Community of Scientists and Educators: The Compass Project at UC Berkeley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Schwab, Josiah

    2016-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Its goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations underrepresented in the physical sciences. For undergraduate students, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Graduate students, together with upper-level undergraduates, design and run all Compass programs. Compass strives to incorporate best practices from the science education literature. Experiences in Compass leave participants poised to be successful students researchers, teachers, and mentors.

  18. The Universal Canister Strategy in Spent Fuel Reprocessing: UC-C a Real Industrial Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Thomasson, J.; Barithel, S.; Cocaud, A.; Derycke, P.; Pierre, P.

    2003-02-25

    In commercial nuclear activities, spent fuel back end management is a key issue for nuclear countries as spent fuel represent most of national civil nuclear waste legacy. Ensuring public safety and protection of the environment, now and in the future has been and still remains a major commitment, it is still the subject of thorough development efforts and active public debates. Considerable benefits can be obtained from the Universal Canister strategy as implemented in France in spent fuel treatment and waste conditioning based on reprocessing. COGEMA developed sophisticated waste conditioning processes to simplify High Level and Long Lived Intermediate Level Waste storage and final disposal. Main benefits are: waste stabilization by immobilization and encapsulation; ultimate waste toxicity reduction; drastic ultimate waste volume reduction; and ultimate waste packages standardization.

  19. University as Publisher: Summary of a Meeting Held at UC Berkeley on November 1, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Diane, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of electronic publishing, the scholarly communication landscape at universities has become increasingly diverse. Multiple stakeholders including university presses, libraries, and central IT departments are challenged by the increasing volume and the rapidity of production of these new forms of publication in an environment of

  20. Monitoring Based Commissioning: Benchmarking Analysis of 24 UC/CSU/IOU Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan; Mathew, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Buildings rarely perform as intended, resulting in energy use that is higher than anticipated. Building commissioning has emerged as a strategy for remedying this problem in non-residential buildings. Complementing traditional hardware-based energy savings strategies, commissioning is a 'soft' process of verifying performance and design intent and correcting deficiencies. Through an evaluation of a series of field projects, this report explores the efficacy of an emerging refinement of this practice, known as monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx). MBCx can also be thought of as monitoring-enhanced building operation that incorporates three components: (1) Permanent energy information systems (EIS) and diagnostic tools at the whole-building and sub-system level; (2) Retro-commissioning based on the information from these tools and savings accounting emphasizing measurement as opposed to estimation or assumptions; and (3) On-going commissioning to ensure efficient building operations and measurement-based savings accounting. MBCx is thus a measurement-based paradigm which affords improved risk-management by identifying problems and opportunities that are missed with periodic commissioning. The analysis presented in this report is based on in-depth benchmarking of a portfolio of MBCx energy savings for 24 buildings located throughout the University of California and California State University systems. In the course of the analysis, we developed a quality-control/quality-assurance process for gathering and evaluating raw data from project sites and then selected a number of metrics to use for project benchmarking and evaluation, including appropriate normalizations for weather and climate, accounting for variations in central plant performance, and consideration of differences in building types. We performed a cost-benefit analysis of the resulting dataset, and provided comparisons to projects from a larger commissioning 'Meta-analysis' database. A total of 1120 deficiency-intervention combinations were identified in the course of commissioning the projects described in this report. The most common location of deficiencies was in HVAC equipment (65% of sites), followed by air-handling and distributions systems (59%), cooling plant (29%), heating plants (24%), and terminal units (24%). The most common interventions were adjusting setpoints, modifying sequences of operations, calibration, and various mechanical fixes (each done in about two-thirds of the sites). The normalized rate of occurrence of deficiencies and corresponding interventions ranged from about 0.1/100ksf to 10/100ksf, depending on the issue. From these interventions flowed significant and highly cost-effective energy savings For the MBCx cohort, source energy savings of 22 kBTU/sf-year (10%) were achieved, with a range of 2% to 25%. Median electricity savings were 1.9 kWh/sf-year (9%), with a range of 1% to 17%. Peak electrical demand savings were 0.2 W/sf-year (4%), with a range of 3% to 11%. The aggregate commissioning cost for the 24 projects was $2.9 million. We observed a range of normalized costs from $0.37 to 1.62/sf, with a median value of $1.00/sf for buildings that implemented MBCx projects. Per the program design, monitoring costs as a percentage of total costs are significantly higher in MBCx projects (median value 40%) than typical commissioning projects included in the Meta-analysis (median value of 2% in the commissioning database). Half of the projects were in buildings containing complex and energy-intensive laboratory space, with higher associated costs. Median energy cost savings were $0.25/sf-year, for a median simple payback time of 2.5 years. Significant and cost-effective energy savings were thus obtained. The greatest absolute energy savings and shortest payback times were achieved in laboratory-type facilities. While impacts varied from project to project, on a portfolio basis we find MBCx to be a highly cost-effective means of obtaining significant program-level energy savings across a variety of building types. Energy savings are expected to be more robust and persistent for MBCx projects than for conventionally commissioned ones. Impacts of future programs can be maximized by benchmarking energy use and targeting the commissioning towards particularly energy-intensive facilities such as laboratories.

  1. Development of a coded-aperture backscatter imager using the UC San Diego HEXIS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Heindl, William A.

    2003-09-01

    Defence R&D Canada-Suffield and the University of California, San Diego, have recently begun a collaborative effort to develop a coded aperture based X-ray backscatter imaging detector that will provide sufficient speed, contrast and spatial resolution to detect antipersonnel landmines and improvised explosive devices. While our final objective is to field a hand-held detector, we have currently constrained ourselves to a design that can be fielded on a small robotic platform. Coded aperture imaging has been used by the observational X-ray and gamma ray astronomy community for a number of years, which has driven advances in detector design that is now being realized in systems that are substantially faster, cheaper and lighter than those only a decade ago. With these advances, a coded aperture hand-held imaging system has only recently become a possibility. One group at the Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, has had a longterm programme developing the CZT based HEXIS detector as the detection element of a coded aperture imager. Designed as a satellite payload, this low-power system is ruggedized and light-weight, all necessary qualities for incorporation into the envisioned portable imaging system. This paper will begin with an introduction to the landmine and improvised explosive device detection problem, followed by a discussion of the HEXIS detector. We will then present early results from our proof-of-principle experiments, and conclude with a discussion on future work.

  2. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Pechanga Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  3. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Vail Lake Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  4. Overview of Dose Assessment Developments and the Health of Riverside Residents Close to the “Mayak” PA Facilities, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Standring, William J.F.; Dowdall, Mark; Strand, Per

    2009-01-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) has been involved in studies related to the Mayak PA and the consequences of activities undertaken at the site for a number of years. This paper strives to present an overview of past and present activities at the Mayak PA and subsequent developments in the quantification of health effects on local populations caused by discharges of radioactive waste into the Techa River. Assessments of doses to affected populations have relied on the development of dose reconstruction techniques for both external and internal doses. Contamination levels are typically inhomogeneous and decrease with increasing distance from the discharge point. Citations made in this paper give a comprehensive, though not exhaustive, basis for further reading about this topic. PMID:19440276

  5. 77 FR 37762 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Order Amending Marketing Order 987

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... supplemental rules of practice to 7 CFR part 900 (73 FR 49307; August 21, 2008). The additional supplemental... published in the Federal Register on June 14, 2011 (76 FR 34618). No comments were received. A proposed rule... 9, 2011 (76 FR 69678). This document directed that a referendum among date producers be...

  6. 76 FR 69678 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, CA; Proposed Amendments to Marketing Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... the addition of supplemental rules of practice to 7 CFR part 900 (73 FR 49307; August, 21, 2008). The... published in the Federal Register on June 14, 2011 (76 FR 34618). No comments were received. AMS will... issuance or amendment of an order. The order was last amended on February 1, 1978 (43 FR 4253). Since...

  7. Geologic Map of the Sheep Hole Mountains 30' x 60' Quadrangle, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    This data set describes and maps the geology of the Sheep Hole Mountains 30' x 60' quadrangle in southern California. The quadrangle covers an area of the Mojave Desert characterized by desert ranges separated by broad basins. Ranges include parts of the Old Woman, Ship, Iron, Coxcomb, Pinto, Bullion, and Calumet mountains as well as Lead Mountain and the Kilbeck Hills. Basins include part of Ward Valley, part of Cadiz Valley including Cadiz Lake playa, and broad valleys occupied by the Bristol Lake and Dale Lake playas. Bedrock geologic units in the ranges range in age from Proterozoic to Quaternary. The valleys expose Neogene and Quaternary deposits. Proterozoic granitoids in the quadrangle include the Early Proterozoic Fenner Gneiss, Kilbeck Gneiss, Dog Wash Gneiss, granite of Joshua Tree, the (highly peraluminous granite) gneiss of Dry Lakes valley, and a Middle Proterozoic granite. Proterozoic supracrustal rocks include the Pinto Gneiss of Miller (1938) and the quartzite of Pinto Mountain. Early Proterozoic orogeny left an imprint of metamorphic mineral assemblages and fabrics in the older rocks. A Cambrian to Triassic sequence deposited on the continental shelf lies above a profound nonconformity developed on the Proterozoic rocks. Small metamorphosed remnants of this sequence in the quadrangle include rocks correlated to the Tapeats, Bright Angel, Bonanza King, Redwall, Bird Spring, Hermit, Coconino, Kaibab, and Moenkopi formations. The Dale Lake Volcanics (Jurassic), and the McCoy Mountains Formation of Miller (1944)(Cretaceous and Jurassic?) are younger Mesozoic synorogenic supracrustal rocks in the quadrangle. Mesozoic intrusions form much of the bedrock in the quadrangle, and represent a succession of magmatic arcs. The oldest rock is the Early Triassic quartz monzonite of Twentynine Palms. Extensive Jurassic magmatism is represented by large expanses of granitoids that range in composition from gabbro to syenogranite. They include the Virginia May Quartz Monzonite and other members of the Bullion Intrusive Suite, the Chubbock Porphyry, and rocks that form the Goat Basin pluton, Music Valley pluton, and Ship Mountains pluton. The Jurassic plutons range in emplacement depths from mid-crustal to hypabysasal. Mafic and felsic dikes that probably are part of the Late Jurassic Independence dike swarm intrude the Jurassic batholithic rocks. A Mesozoic ductile fault (tectonic slide), the Scanlon thrust, places an inverted sequence of lower Paleozoic rocks and their Proterozoic basement over a lower plate of younger Paleozoic and Triassic rocks. The lower- plate rocks are internally sliced and folded. They in turn are superposed along an attenuation tectonic slide, the Kilbeck fault, over highly strained tectonic schist. The major tectonic slides and associated fabrics are cut by Late Cretaceous batholithic rocks. Widespread Late Cretaceous granitoids assigned to the Cadiz Valley batholith and the Old-Woman Piute Range batholith together form a contiguous super-unit of granite and granodiorite compositions. The Old- Woman Piute Range batholith includes the granite of Sweetwater Wash in the Painted Rock pluton and the Old Woman Mountains Granodiorite forming the Old Woman pluton. The large Cadiz Valley batholith is divided into the Iron Mountains Intrusive Suite and the Coxcomb Intrusive Suite. The Iron Mountains Intrusive Suite includes the Granite Pass Granite (which forms the Granite Pass pluton), the Danby Lake Granite Gneiss, and the Iron Granodiorite Gneiss. The Coxcomb Intrusive Suite consists of many units including the Clarks Pass Granodiorite, the Sheep Hole Mountains Granodiorite (forms the Sheep Hole Mountains pluton), and the Sheep Hole Pass Granite (forms the Sheep Hole Pass pluton). The Cretaceous rocks were emplaced at a range of deep to shallow depths, and their intrusion resulted in an aureole 2-3 km wide in older rocks. Mylonitic fabrics developed through a thickness of >1.3 km, together

  8. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Black Star Canyon Quadrangle, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  9. Geologic map and digital database of the San Bernardino Wash 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.; digital preparation by Cossette, Pamela M.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map and digital database of the San Bernardino Wash quadrangle are products of a regional geologic mapping effort undertaken in the eastern Transverse Ranges in and around Joshua Tree National Park. This investigation, part of the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), is conducted in cooperation with the California Geologic Survey and the National Park Service. In line with the goals of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP), mapping of the San Bernardino Wash and other quadrangles has been directed toward generating a multipurpose digital geologic map database that is applicable to land-related investigations in the earth and biological sciences. This mapping is conducted to further understanding of bedrock geology and surficial processes in the region and to document evidence for seismotectonic activity in the eastern Transverse Ranges. It is also intended to serve as a base layer suitable for ecosystem and mineral resource assessment and for building a hydrogeologic framework for Pinto Basin. Initial investigations span Pinto Basin from the Hexie and Eagle Mountains northward into the Pinto Mountains (see fig. 1). Quadrangles mapped include the Conejo Well 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2001a), the Porcupine Wash 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2001b), the Pinto Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2002), and the San Bernardino Wash 7.5-minute quadrangle. Parts of the San Bernardino Wash quadrangle had been mapped previously at a variety of scales (Weir, and Bader, 1963; Hope, 1966, 1969; Jennings, 1967; Powell, 1981, 1993).

  10. Geologic map and digital database of the Pinto Mountain 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map and digital database of the Pinto Mountain quadrangle are products of a regional geologic mapping effort undertaken in the eastern Transverse Ranges in and around Joshua Tree National Park. This investigation, part of the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), is conducted in cooperation with the California Geologic Survey and the National Park Service. In line with the goals of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP), mapping of the Pinto Mountain and other quadrangles has been directed toward generating a multipurpose digital geologic map database that is applicable to land-related investigations in the earth and biological sciences. This mapping is conducted to further understanding of bedrock geology and surficial processes in the region and to document evidence for seismotectonic activity in the eastern Transverse Ranges. It is also intended to serve as a base layer suitable for ecosystem and mineral resource assessment and for building a hydrogeologic framework for Pinto Basin. Initial investigations span Pinto Basin from the Hexie and Eagle Mountains northward into the Pinto Mountains. Quadrangles mapped include the Conejo Well 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2001a), the Porcupine Wash 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2001b), the Pinto Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle, and the San Bernardino Wash 7.5-minute quadrangle (Powell, 2002). Parts of the Pinto Mountain quadrangle had been mapped previously at a variety of scales (Weir, and Bader, 1963; Hope, 1966, 1969; Jennings, 1967; Powell, 1981, 1993).

  11. Geologic map and digital database of the Redlands 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Morton, Douglas M.; Cox, Brett F.; Kendrick, Katherine J.; Digital preparation by Cossette, P.M.; Jones, B.; Kennedy, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    This geologic database of the Redlands 7.5' quadrangle was prepared by the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), a regional geologic-mapping project sponsored jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the California Geological Survey. The database was developed as a contribution to the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program's National Geologic Map Database, and is intended to provide a general geologic setting of the Redlands quadrangle. The database and map provide information about earth materials and geologic structures, including faults and folds that have developed in the quadrangle due to complexities in the San Andreas Fault system. The Redlands 7.5' quadrangle contains earth materials and structures that provide insight into the late Cenozoic geologic evolution of the southern California Inland Empire region. Important stratigraphic and structural elements include (1) the modern trace of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults and (2) late Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary materials and geologic structures that formed during the last million years or so and that record complex geologic interactions within the San Andreas Fault system. These materials and the structures that deform them provide the geologic framework for investigations of earthquake hazards and ground-water recharge and subsurface flow. Geologic information contained in the Redlands database is general-purpose data that is applicable to land-related investigations in the earth and biological sciences. The term "general-purpose" means that all geologic-feature classes have minimal information content adequate to characterize their general geologic characteristics and to interpret their general geologic history. However, no single feature class has enough information to definitively characterize its properties and origin. For this reason the database cannot be used for site-specific geologic evaluations, although it can be used to plan and guide investigations at the site-specific level. This summary pamphlet discusses major categories of surficial materials in the Redlands quadrangle, and provides a conceptual framework and basis for how geologicmap units containing such materials are recognized and correlated.

  12. Aquifer geometry, lithology, and water levels in the AnzaTerwilliger area2013, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, Matthew K.; Morita, Andrew Y.; Nawikas, Joseph M.; Christensen, Allen H.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Langenheim, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of data from 33 wells, water levels mostly declined between the fall of 2006 and the fall of 2013; the median decline was 5.1 feet during this period, for a median rate of decline of about 0.7 feet/year. Based on data from 40 wells, water-level changes between fall 2004 and fall 2013 were variable in magnitude and trend, but had a median decline of 2.4 feet and a median rate of decline of about 0.3 feet/ year. These differences in apparent rates of groundwater-level change highlight the value of ongoing water-level measurements to distinguish decadal, or longer term, trends in groundwater storage often associated with climatic variability and trends. Fifty-four long-term hydrographs indicated the sensitivity of groundwater levels to climatic conditions; they also showed a general decline in water levels across the study area since 1986 and, in some cases, dating back to the 1950s.

  13. Salton Seismic Imaging Project Line 6: San Andreas Fault and Northern Coachella Valley Structure, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Fuis, G.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Tarnowski, J. M.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Matti, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) is a large-scale, active- and passive-source seismic project designed to image the San Andreas fault (SAF) and adjacent basins (Imperial and Coachella Valleys) in southernmost California. Data and preliminary results from many of the seismic profiles are reported elsewhere (including Fuis et al., Rymer et al., Goldman et al., Langenheim et al., this meeting). Here, we focus on SSIP Line 6, one of four 2-D seismic profiles that were acquired across the Coachella Valley. The 44-km-long, SSIP-Line-6 seismic profile extended from the east flank of Mt. San Jacinto northwest of Palm Springs to the Little San Bernardino Mountains and crossed the SAF (Mission Creek (MCF), Banning (BF), and Garnet Hill (GHF) strands) roughly normal to strike. Data were generated by 10 downhole explosive sources (most spaced about 3 to 5 km apart) and were recorded by approximately 347 Texan seismographs (average spacing 126 m). We used first-arrival refractions to develop a P-wave refraction tomography velocity image of the upper crust along the seismic profile. The seismic data were also stacked and migrated to develop low-fold reflection images of the crust. From the surface to about 7 km depth, P-wave velocities range from about 2.5 km/s to about 7.2 km/s, with the lowest velocities within an ~2-km-deep, ~20-km-wide basin, and the highest velocities below the transition zone from the Coachella Valley to Mt. San Jacinto and within the Little San Bernardino Mountains. The BF and GHF strands bound a shallow sub-basin on the southwestern side of the Coachella Valley, but the underlying shallow-depth (~4 km) basement rocks are P-wave high in velocity (~7.2 km/s). The lack of a low-velocity zone beneath BF and GHF suggests that both faults dip northeastward. In a similar manner, high-velocity basement rocks beneath the Little San Bernardino Mountains suggest that the MCF dips vertically or southwestward. However, there is a pronounced low-velocity zone in basement rocks between about 2 and 7 km depth beneath and southwest of the MCF, suggesting a vertical or slightly southwest-dipping MCF. The apparent northeast dip of the BF and the apparent vertical or southwest dip of the MCF suggests that the two main strands of the SAF (MCF and BF) merge at about 10 km depth. A plot of double-difference earthquake hypocenters (Hauksson, 2000) along the seismic profile shows events that occurred between 1980-2000 (excluding those in 1992, prior to and after the Joshua Tree and Landers earthquakes) are largely confined to the vicinity of the basement low-velocity zone between the MCF and BF. However, a separate alignment of hypocenters occurs southwest of the BF and projects toward the surface beneath Mt. San Jacinto. Collectively, the velocity images and the seismicity data suggest the BF strand of the SAF dips to the northeast at about 50 degrees in the upper 10 km, and the MCF strand is either vertical or dips southwestward about 80 degrees, with both strands merging at about 10 km depth and forming a near-vertical zone of faults to at least 15 km depth. The SSIP Line 6 data are consistent with structures interpreted by Catchings et al. (2009).

  14. 78 FR 78349 - Cities of Anaheim, Azusa, Banning, Colton, Pasadena, Riverside, CA v. Trans Bay Cable LLC; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Bay Cable LLC; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on December 17, 2013, pursuant to sections 206 and... (collectively, Six Cities or Complainants) filed a formal complaint against Trans Bay Cable LLC (Trans Bay...

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Temecula Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougrov, N. G.; Goksu, H. Y.; Haskell, E.; Degteva, M. O.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Neta, P. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  17. Geologic map and digital database of the Yucaipa 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Morton, D.M.; Cox, B.F.; Carson, S.E.; Yetter, T.J.; Digital preparation by: Cossette, P.M.; Wright, M.C.; Kennedy, S.A.; Dawson, M.L.; Hauser, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    This geologic database of the Yucaipa 7.5' quadrangle was prepared by the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), a regional geologic-mapping project sponsored jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the California Geological Survey. The database was developed as a contribution to the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program's National Geologic Map Database, and is intended to provide a general geologic setting of the Yucaipa quadrangle. The database and map provide information about earth materials and geologic structures, including faults and folds that have developed in the quadrangle due to complexities in the San Andreas Fault system. The Yucaipa 7.5' quadrangle contains materials and structures that provide unique insight into the Mesozoic and Cenozoic geologic evolution of southern California. Stratigraphic and structural elements include: (1) strands of the San Andreas Fault that bound far-traveled terranes of crystalline and sedimentary rock; (2) Mesozoic crystalline rocks that form lower and upper plates of the regionwide Vincent-Orocopia Thrust system; and (3) late Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary materials and geologic structures that formed during the last million years or so and that record complex geologic interactions within the San Andreas Fault system. These materials and the structures that deform them provide the geologic framework for investigations of geologic hazards and ground-water recharge and subsurface flow. Geologic information contained in the Yucaipa database is general-purpose data that is applicable to land-related investigations in the earth and biological sciences. The term "generalpurpose" means that all geologic-feature classes have minimal information content adequate to characterize their general geologic characteristics and to interpret their general geologic history. However, no single feature class has enough information to definitively characterize its properties and origin. For this reason the database cannot be used for site-specific geologic evaluations, although it can be used to plan and guide investigations at the site-specific level.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Santiago Peak Quadrangle, Orange and Riverside Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. 78 FR 17718 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the McCoy Solar Energy Project, Riverside...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the McCoy Solar Energy...) for the McCoy Solar Energy Project (MSEP), a photovoltaic solar electricity generation project. The... proposed would have consisted of an up to 750-megawatt photovoltaic solar energy generation facility...

  20. Heracleum Sosnowskyi Manden.

    PubMed

    Jakubowicz, Oliwia; ?aba, Czes?aw; Nowak, Gerard; Jarmuda, Stanis?aw; ?aba, Ryszard; Marcinkowski, Jerzy T

    2012-01-01

    Heracleum Sosnowskyi was discovered in 1772 and described as a separate species in 1944 by I. P. Mandenova. Its name is derived from the surname of a botanist studying Caucasian flora, Prof. D.I. Sosnowski. In the area of the Caucasus foothills, the plant reaches approximately 1-1,5 m in height, whereas in Poland its size is significantly larger, up to 3-3.5 m. Heracleum blooms from mid-June to the end of July. The flowers are arranged in umbels and last for 2-3 weeks. In Central Europe, the species colonizes mostly neglected green areas, ruins and riversides. Heracleum poses a serious threat to the human population due to its photoallergic properties, resulting from the presence of intensely toxic furanocoumarin in its sap. Furanocoumarins are found in small hairs that cover the leaves and stem, and are the components of the essential oil. They may penetrate the skin through the epithelial layer, posing a direct threat to human health. Contact with the plant, followed by sun exposure, may lead to the development of large blisters and symptoms of burns. Heracleum, in the event of consumption, is also harmful to farm animals, causing, among others, internal bleeding and diarrhea. Although the toxic properties of Heracleum have been known for many years, every summer people who had contact with the plant present at physicians of different medical specialties. PMID:22742809

  1. CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge: Two Institutional Networks Increasing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, Chris David; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe two programs, CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge, with the common mission of increasing participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in astronomy, through summer research opportunities, in the case of CAMPARE, scholarships in the case of Cal-Bridge, and significant mentoring in both programs, leading to an increase in their numbers successfully pursuing a PhD in the field.In 6 years, the CAMPARE program has sent 62 students, >85% from underrepresented groups, to conduct summer research at one of twelve major research institutions in California, Arizona, and Wyoming. The graduation rate among CAMPARE scholars is 97%, and of the 37 CAMPARE scholars who have graduated with a Bachelor's degree, almost 60% (21) have completed or are pursuing graduate education in astronomy or a related field, at institutions including UCLA, USC, UC Riverside, Stanford, Univ. of Rochester, Georgia Tech, Kent State, Indiana Univ., Univ. of Oregon, Syracuse, and the Fisk-Vanderbilt Master's-to-PhD program. The Cal-Bridge program is a CSU-UC Bridge program comprised of faculty form 5 University of California (UC), 8 California State University (CSU), and 8 California Community College (CCC) campuses in Southern California. Cal-Bridge provides much deeper mentoring and professional development experiences over the last two years of undergraduate and first year of graduate school to students from this diverse network of higher education institutions. Cal-Bridge Scholars benefit from financial support, intensive, joint mentoring by CSU and UC faculty, professional development workshops, and exposure to research opportunities at the participating UC campuses.

  2. Site Plan & Site Section of Citrus Landscape (Showing Relationship ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Site Plan & Site Section of Citrus Landscape (Showing Relationship of Groves & Irrigation System to Grove Canal) - Arlington Heights Citrus Landscape, Southwestern portion of city of Riverside, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  3. Site Plan & Site Section of Citrus Landscape (Showing Relationship ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Site Plan & Site Section of Citrus Landscape (Showing Relationship of Victoria Avenue to Citrus Groves) - Arlington Heights Citrus Landscape, Southwestern portion of city of Riverside, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  4. 22. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer and date unknown. 'FLUME NO. 9, 'GAGE CANAL SYSTEM,' RIVERSIDE, CAL.' VIEW OF FLUME OVER TEQUESQUITE ARROYO. - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  5. Does chronic nitrogen deposition during biomass growth affect atmospheric emissions from biomass burning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Michael R.; Chong, Joey; Weise, David R.; Asa-Awuku, Akua A.

    2016-03-01

    Chronic nitrogen deposition has measureable impacts on soil and plant health. We investigate burning emissions from biomass grown in areas of high and low NO x deposition. Gas and aerosol-phase emissions were measured as a function of photochemical aging in an environmental chamber at UC-Riverside. Though aerosol chemical speciation was not available, results indicate a systemic compositional difference between biomass grown in high and low deposition areas. Aerosol emissions from biomass grown in areas of high NO x deposition exhibit a lower volatility than biomass grown in a low deposition area. Furthermore, fuel elemental analysis, NO x emission rates, and aerosol particle number distributions differed significantly between the two sites. Despite the limited scale of fuels explored, there is strong evidence that the atmospheric emissions community must pay attention to the regional air quality of biomass fuels growth areas.

  6. East Asian hydroclimate and agro-ecosystem research using the UC-LLNL regional climate system model

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; Kim, J.; Chung, T.; Oh, J.; Bae, D.

    1997-05-01

    Investigations of East Asian hydroclimate and agro-ecosystem response to hydroclimate variability have been initiated using the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Regional Climate System Model (RCSM). This system simulates climate from the global scale down to the watershed catchment scale, and consists of data pre- and post-processors, and four model components. The four model components are (1) a mesoscale atmospheric simulation model, (2) a soil-plant-snow model, (3) a watershed hydrology-riverflow modeling suite, and (4) a crop response modeling suite. The first three model components have been coupled, and the system includes two-way feedbacks between the soil-plant-snow model and the mesoscale atmospheric simulation model. Integration of the fourth component - the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) into the RCSM is part of our current research plan. This paper provides a brief overview of agro-ecosystem modeling, the RCSM, applications of the RCSM to East Asia, and future directions.

  7. Evidence of Short Timescale Flux Density Variations of UC HII Regions in Sgr B2 Main and North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pree, C. G.; Peters, T.; Mac Low, M. M.; Wilner, D. J.; Goss, W. M.; Galván-Madrid, R.; Keto, E. R.; Klessen, R. S.; Monsrud, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have recently published observations of significant flux density variations at 1.3 cm in H ii regions in the star-forming regions Sgr B2 Main and North. To further study these variations, we have made new 7 mm continuum and recombination line observations of Sgr B2 at the highest possible angular resolution of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We have observed Sgr B2 Main and North at 42.9 GHz and at 45.4 GHz in the BnA configuration (Main) and the A configuration (North). We compare these new data to archival VLA 7 mm continuum data of Sgr B2 Main observed in 2003 and Sgr B2 North observed in 2001. We find that 1 of the 41 known ultracompact and hypercompact H ii regions in Sgr B2 (K2-North) has decreased ∼27% in flux density from 142 ± 14 to 103 ± 10 mJy (2.3σ) between 2001 and 2012. A second source, F3c-Main, has increased ∼30% in flux density from 82 ± 8 to 107 ± 11 mJy (1.8σ) between 2003 and 2012. F3c-Main was previously observed to increase in flux density at 1.3 cm over a longer time period between 1989 and 2012. An observation of decreasing flux density, such as that observed in K2-North, is particularly significant since such a change is not predicted by the classical hypothesis of steady expansion of H ii regions during massive star accretion. Our new observations at 7 mm, along with others in the literature, suggest that the formation of massive stars occurs through time-variable and violent accretion.

  8. The Management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley: Turning Points and Consequences. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.12.13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, John; Hextrum, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This white paper was prepared at the request of the Advisory Committee to the Athletic Study Center as a result of their concern over poor graduation rates in football as released by the NCAA in 2012. The paper received extensive review by the members of that committee as well as several other knowledgeable faculty and senior administrators before…

  9. UC Davis XIPline (zipline) end-station at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: Development and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberie, S. R.; Cahill, T. A.; Cahill, C. F.; Cahill, T. M.; Iceman, C. R.; Barnes, D. E.

    2013-11-01

    The X-ray fluorescence Induced by Polychromatic Beam end-station (XIPline, pronounced zipline) began development and operation at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) in early 2012. The end-station is a collaboration of the University of California Davis, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the SSRL. Since its initial development, the end-station has been used as an element specific analytical tool for a variety of environmental, metallic, and mineral samples. Presented here are the motivations for development, the specifications of the beamline end-station, and two examples of recent experiments performed. Specifically we look at analysis of an aerosol deposited substrate to demonstrate the main purpose of this line and we also show our analysis of the recent Sutter's Mill Meteorite, an example of bulk sample analysis.

  10. Possible role of laccase from Fusarium incarnatum UC-14 in bioremediation of Bisphenol A using reverse micelles system.

    PubMed

    Chhaya, Urvish; Gupte, Akshaya

    2013-06-15

    Bisphenol A [2,2 bis (4 hydroxyphenyl) propane] is widely used in the variety of industrial and residential applications such as the synthesis of polymers including polycarbonates, epoxy resins, phenol resins, polyesters and polyacrylates. BPA has been recognized as an Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDC), thus it is necessary to assess its biodegradability or fate in the natural environment. In general, environmental pollutant such as BPA does not dissolve in aqueous media, owing to their high hydrophobicity, and hence non-aqueous catalysis can be employed to enhance biodegradability of phenolic environmental pollutant. Purified laccase hosted in reverse micelles using ternary system of isooctane: AOT [Bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulphosuccinate sodium salt)]:water having hydration ratio (Wo) of 30 with protein concentration of 43.5 ?g/ml was found to eliminate 91.43% of 200 ppm of Bisphenol A at 50 C, pH-6.0 when incubated with laccase/Reverse Micelles system for 75 min. GC-MS analysis of isooctane soluble fractions detected the presence of 4,4'-(2 hydroxy propane 1,2 diyl) diphenol, bis (4-hydroxylphenyl) butenal and 2-(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl) vinyl) pent-2-enal indicated degradation of BPA by two oxidation steps and one ring opening step (C-C bond cleavage). Laccase/RM system exhibited several advantages for the oxidative degradation of hydrophobic phenols mainly because of the solubility of either enzyme or substrate was improved in organic media and the stable activity of laccase in organic media was achieved. PMID:23611799

  11. Training the Translational Research Teams of the Future: UC Davis - HHMI Integrating Medicine into Basic Science Program

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Anne A.; Rainwater, Julie A.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Bonham, Ann C.; Robbins, John A.; Henderson, Stuart; Meyers, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for successful models of how to recruit, train, and retain bench scientists at the earliest stages of their careers into translational research. One recent, promising model is the University of California Davis Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science (HHMI-IMBS) program, part of the HHMI Med into Grad initiative. This article outlines the HHMI-IMBS program’s logic, design, and curriculum that guide the goal of research that moves from bedside to bench. That is, a curriculum that provides graduate students with guided translational training, clinical exposure, team science competencies and mentors from diverse disciplines that will advance the students careers in clinical translational research and re-focusing of research to answer clinical dilemmas. The data indicate that this training program provides an effective, adaptable model for training future translational researchers. HHMI-IMBS students showed improved confidence in conducting translational research, greater interest in a future translational career, and higher levels of research productivity and collaborations than a comparable group of pre-doctoral students. PMID:24127920

  12. Doing Much More with Less: Implementing Operational Excellence at UC Berkeley. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.10.13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeri, Andrew J.; Lyons, Richard; Huston, Peggy; Wilton, John

    2013-01-01

    Universities are undergoing historic change, from the sharp downward shift in government funding to widespread demands to document performance. At the University of California Berkeley, this led to an operational change effort unlike any the university had ever attempted, dubbed Operational Excellence. The authors describe their experiences…

  13. The Birth of a Research University: UC Merced, No Small Miracle. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.14.11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrochers, Lindsay Ann

    2011-01-01

    In 1960, the State of California adopted a Master Plan for Higher Education which was a three tiered plan intended to channel students according to their ability to either the University of California, the California State University or the California community colleges and a plan which limited the doctoral and research missions to the University

  14. 46 CFR 54.25-8 - Radiography (modifies UW-11(a), UCS-57, UNF-57, UHA-33, and UHT-57).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) does...) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels §...

  15. 46 CFR 54.25-8 - Radiography (modifies UW-11(a), UCS-57, UNF-57, UHA-33, and UHT-57).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) does...) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels §...

  16. 46 CFR 54.25-8 - Radiography (modifies UW-11(a), UCS-57, UNF-57, UHA-33, and UHT-57).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) does...) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels §...

  17. 46 CFR 54.25-8 - Radiography (modifies UW-11(a), UCS-57, UNF-57, UHA-33, and UHT-57).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) does...) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels §...

  18. 46 CFR 54.25-8 - Radiography (modifies UW-11(a), UCS-57, UNF-57, UHA-33, and UHT-57).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VIII of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 54.01-1) does...) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels §...

  19. Training the translational research teams of the future: UC Davis-HHMI Integrating Medicine into Basic Science program.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Anne A; Rainwater, Julie A; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Bonham, Ann C; Robbins, John A; Henderson, Stuart; Meyers, Frederick J

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for successful models of how to recruit, train, and retain bench scientists at the earliest stages of their careers into translational research. One recent, promising model is the University of California Davis Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science (HHMI-IMBS) program, part of the HHMI Med into Grad initiative. This paper outlines the HHMI-IMBS program's logic, design, and curriculum that guide the goal of research that moves from bedside to bench. That is, a curriculum that provides graduate students with guided translational training, clinical exposure, team science competencies, and mentors from diverse disciplines that will advance the students careers in clinical translational research and re-focusing of research to answer clinical dilemmas. The authors have collected data on 55 HHMI-IMBS students to date. Many of these students are still completing their graduate work. In the current study the authors compare the initial two cohorts (15 students) with a group of 29 control students to examine the program success and outcomes. The data indicate that this training program provides an effective, adaptable model for training future translational researchers. HHMI-IMBS students showed improved confidence in conducting translational research, greater interest in a future translational career, and higher levels of research productivity and collaborations than a comparable group of predoctoral students. PMID:24127920

  20. Peacebook: A Resource Guide for Peace Studies at U.C. Berkeley, 1982-83 [and] 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Studies Student Association.

    A series of essays and lists of resource materials as well as courses relevant to peace studies at the University of California Berkeley are presented in the two guides. Topics of the 1982-83 guide include the undergraduate major in Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS), a proposed curriculum, core courses, concentration area courses (social systems,…

  1. In-use light duty gasoline vehicle particulate matter emissions on the FTP, REP05 and UC cycles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cadle, S.H.; Mulawa, P.; Groblicki, P.; Laroo, C.; Ragazzi, R.A.

    1999-06-02

    The study was conducted at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) Aurora Emissions Technical Center, in the eastern Denver metropolitan area starting in May 1998. The program was designed to focus on in-use, late model (1990 or later model year) LDGVs. The goals of the exhaust PM characterization component (aided by CRC`s participation in this study) were to (1) improve the data base on PM emission rates from in-use vehicles at low temperatures (35 deg F); (2) determine the impact of driving cycle on PM emission rate; (3) determine the impact of an oxygenated fuel on the PM emission rate and (4) determine the impact of fuel and driving cycle on the particle size distribution, number and the PM chemical composition.

  2. U.C. Davis particle physics research. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1970--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    During the period of this contract, the participants carried out theoretical and experimental researches in high energy particle physics. The experiment group has been working with both bubble chamber and electronic detectors. The bubble chamber work made use of bubble chambers and particle beams at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermilab, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The different electronic detectors were the TPC/Two Gamma facility situated at the PEP electron-positron collider at SLAC, the AMY detector at TRISTAN, the electron-positron collider at KEK in Japan, fixed target detectors at Fermilab, and a hybrid bubble chamber/electronic detector at SLAC. Negotiations were also started with the H1 collaboration for a UCD participation at the upcoming Hera electron-proton collider. The theoretical groups have been engaged in a wide variety of studies. Phenomenological studies of high energy interactions have constituted a major fraction of the effort, particularly those associated with the higgs field, various aspects of supersymmetry, and searches for new physics. Work on reactions associated with ee, ep, and hadron colliders has been extensive and includes many analyses providing tests of QCD. Lattice gauge theory has been a major area of work, and electroweak physics and mathematical physics have also been topics of study. Work has been published on heavy flavor decays and CP noninvariance, super symmetry, Yang-Mills theory and electroweak symmetry breaking as well as string theory.

  3. U.C. Davis particle physics research. Final technical progress report, March 1, 1989--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    During the period of this contract, the participants carried out theoretical and experimental researches in high energy particle physics. The experimental group has been working at Fermilab studying the collisions of high energy hadrons on fixed targets; at the KEK laboratory in Japan participating in the AMY collaboration at the high energy electron-positron collider, Tristan; at the DESY laboratory in Germany participating in the H1 collaboration at the newly commissioned electron-proton collider, Hera; and in collaboration with LBL on pixel detector design for the SSC, while waiting for high luminosity running to start at PEP. The theoretical group has been engaged in phenomenological studies of high energy interactions, particularly those associated with the higgs field and various aspects of symmetry breaking, heavy flavor decays and CP noninvariance, super symmetry, Yang-Mills theory and electroweak symmetry breaking. Lattice gauge calculations on finite temperature phase transitions have also been under study, as well as work on string theory.

  4. Translational nutrition research at UC-Davis – the key role of the clinical and translational science center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the facility and equipment needs for human clinical nutrition research the New York Academy of Sciences presented a symposium. This paper is the result of that symposium and provides information into how clinical nutrition research is conducted at the Clinical and Translational ...

  5. Geohydrology, water quality, and nitrogen geochemistry in the saturated and unsaturated zones beneath various land uses, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, California, 1991-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, Terry F.; Bright, D.J.; Fay, R.G.; Christensen, A.H.; Anders, R.B.; Baharie, B.S.; Land, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Eastern Municipal Water District, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and the Orange County Water District, has completed a derailed study of the Hemet groundwater basin. The quantity of ground water stored in the basin in August 1992 is estimated to be 327,000 acre-feet. Dissolved-solids concentration ranged from 380 to 700 mg/L (milligrams per liter), except in small areas where the concentration exceeded 1,000 mg/L. Nitrate concentrations exc__*'ded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 mg/L nitrate (its nitrogen) in the southeastern part of the basin, in the Domenigoni Valley area, and beneath a dairy in the Diamond Valley area. Seven sites representing selected land uses-residential, tuff grass irrigated with reclaimed water, citrus grove, irrigated farm, poultry farm, and dairy (two sites)--were selected for detailed study of nitrogen geochemistry in the unsaturated zone. For all land uses, nitrate was the dominant nitrogen species in the unsaturated zone. Although nitrate was seasonally present in the shallow unsaturated zone beneath the residential site, it was absent at moderate depths, suggesting negligible migration of nitrate from the surface at this time. Microbial denitrification probably is occurring in the shallow unsaturated zone. High nitrate concentrations in the deep unsaturated zone (greater than 100 ft) suggest either significantly higher nitrate loading at some time in the past, or lateral movement of nitrate at depth. Nitrate also is seasonally present in the shallow unsaturated zone beneath the reclaimed-water site, and (in contrast with the residential site), nitrate is perennially present in the deeper unsaturated zone. Mictobial identification in the unsaturated zone and in the capillary fringe above the water table decreases, the concentrations of nitrate in pore water to below the MCL before reaching the water table. Pore water in the unsaturated the citrus grove site contains very high concentrations of nitrate. Even though there are zones of microbial denitrification, nitrate seems to be migrating downward to the water table. The presence of a shallow perched-water zone beneath the irrigated-farm site prevents the vertical movement of nitrate from the surface to the regional water table. Above the perched zone, nitrate concentrations in the unsaturated zone are variable, ranging from below the MCL to four times the MCL. Periodically, nitrate is flushed from the shallow unsaturated zone to the perched-water zone. The unsaturated zone pore-moisture quality could not be adequately addressed because of the very dry conditions in the unsaturated zone beneath the poultry-farm site. Surficial clay deposits prevent water from percolating downward. At the two dairy sites, nitrate loading in pore waleratthesurfacewasvezyhigh, as great as 7,000 mg/L. Microbial denitrification in the unsaturated zone causes such concentrations to decrease rapidly with depth. At a depth of 20 R, nitrate concentration was less than 100 mg/L. In= areas where the depth to water is less than 20 ft, nitrate loading to ground water can be very high, whereas in areas where depth to water is greater than 100 ft, most of the nitrate is microbially removed before reaching the water table.

  6. The Bureaucratization of a County Schools Office: An Historical Field Study of the County Superintendent of Schools Office in Riverside County, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrick, William Edward

    The bureaucratic nature of school organizations is now commonly acknowledged. According to Carlson's description of four types of service organizations, school organizations are "domestic" rather than "wild" in that they do not have to compete with peer organizations for their own survival. To investigate the historical development and

  7. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on antioxidant status and concentrations of the metals in the blood of riverside Amazonian communities co-exposed to Hg and Pb.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; Souza, Marilesia Ferreira de; Oliveira, Andria vila Soares de; Lengert, Andr van Helvoort; Oliveira, Marcelo Tempesta de; Camargo, Rossana Batista de Oliveira Godoy; Grotto, Denise; Valentini, Juliana; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Braga, Gilberto bida Leite; Clus, Ilce Mara de Syllos; Adeyemi, Joseph; Barbosa, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    There have been reports of genetic effects affecting the metabolism of Hg and Pb individually, and thus modulating their toxicities. However, there is still a knowledge gap with respect to how genetics may influence the toxicities of these toxic metals during a co-exposure scenario. This present study is therefore aimed at investigating the effects of polymorphisms in genes (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, GCLM, GCLC, GPx1, ALAD, VDR and MDR1) that have been implicated in Hg and Pb metabolisms affects the kinetics of these metals, as well as various blood antioxidant status parameters: MDA and GSH, and the activities of CAT, GPx and ALAD among populations that have been co-exposed to both Hg and Pb. Study subjects (207 men; 188 women) were from an Amazonian population in Brazil, exposed to Hg and Pb from diet. The blood levels of Hg and Pb were determined by ICP-MS while genotyping were performed by PCR assays. The median values of Hg and Pb in blood were 39.8g/L and 11.0g/dL, respectively. GSTM1, ALAD and VDR polymorphisms influenced Hg in blood (?=0.17; 0.37 and 0.17; respectively, p<0.050) while variations on GCLM, GSTT1 and MDR1 (TT) modulated the concentrations of Pb among the subjects (?=-0.14; 0.13 and -0.22; re-spectively, p<0.050). GSTT1 and GCLM polymorphisms also are associated to changes of MDA concentrations. Persons with null GSTM1 genotype had higher activity of the antioxidant enzyme CAT than carries of the allele. Individuals with deletion of both GSTM1 and GSTT1 had a decreased expression of GPx compared to those that expressed at least, one of the enzymes. ALAD 1/2 subjects had lower ALAD activity than individuals with the non-variant genotype. Our findings give further support that polymorphisms related to Hg and Pb metabolism may modulate Hg and Pb body burden and, consequently metals-induced toxicity. PMID:25728017

  8. High-resolution seismic reflection/refraction imaging from Interstate 10 to Cherry Valley Boulevard, Cherry Valley, Riverside County, California: implications for water resources and earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandhok, G.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Horta, E.; Rymer, M.J.; Martin, P.; Christensen, A.

    1999-01-01

    This report is the second of two reports on seismic imaging investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1997 and 1998 in the Cherry Valley area in California (Figure 1a). In the first report (Catchings et al., 1999), data and interpretations were presented for four seismic imaging profiles (CV-1, CV-2, CV-3, and CV-4) acquired during the summer of 1997 . In this report, we present data and interpretations for three additional profiles (CV-5, CV-6, and CV-7) acquired during the summer of 1998 and the combined seismic images for all seven profiles. This report addresses both groundwater resources and earthquake hazards in the San Gorgonio Pass area because the shallow (upper few hundred meters) subsurface stratigraphy and structure affect both issues. The cities of Cherry Valley and Beaumont are located approximately 130 km (~80 miles) east of Los Angeles, California along the southern alluvial fan of the San Bernardino Mountains (see Figure 1b). These cities are two of several small cities that are located within San Gorgonio Pass, a lower-lying area between the San Bernardino and the San Jacinto Mountains. Cherry Valley and Beaumont are desert cities with summer daytime temperatures often well above 100 o F. High water usage in the arid climate taxes the available groundwater supply in the region, increasing the need for efficient management of the groundwater resources. The USGS and the San Gorgonio Water District (SGWD) work cooperatively to evaluate the quantity and quality of groundwater supply in the San Gorgonio Pass region. To better manage the water supplies within the District during wet and dry periods, the SGWD sought to develop a groundwater recharge program, whereby, excess water would be stored in underground aquifers during wet periods (principally winter months) and retrieved during dry periods (principally summer months). The SGWD preferred a surface recharge approach because it could be less expensive than a recharging program based on injection wells. However, at an existing surface recharge site, surface recharge of the aquifer was limited by the presence of clayrich layers that impede the downward percolation of the surface water. In boreholes, these clay-rich layers were found to extend from the near surface to about 50 m depth. If practical, the SGWD desired to relocate the recharge ponds to another location within the Cherry Valley–Beaumont area. This required that sites be found where the clay-rich layers were absent. The SGWD elected to explore for such sites by employing a combination of drilling and seismic techniques. A number of near-surface faults have been suggested in the Cherry Valley-Beaumont area (Figure 1b). However, there may be additional unmapped faults that underlie the alluvial valley of San Gorgonio Pass. Because faults are known to act as barriers to lateral groundwater flow in alluvial groundwater systems, mapped and unmapped subsurface faults in the Cherry Valley-Beaumont area would likely influence groundwater flow and the lateral distribution of recharged water. These same faults may pose a significant hazard to the local desert communities and to greater areas of southern California due to the presence of lifelines (water, electrical, gas, transportation, etc.) that extend through San Gorgonio Pass to larger urban areas. The three principal goals of the seismic investigation presented in this report were to laterally map the subsurface stratigraphic horizons, locate faults that may act as barriers to groundwater flow, and measure velocities of shallow sediments that may give rise to amplified shaking during major earthquakes.

  9. Geologic and geophysical maps of the El Casco 7.5? quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California, with accompanying geologic-map database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matti, J.C.; Morton, D.M.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2015-01-01

    Geologic information contained in the El Casco database is general-purpose data applicable to land-related investigations in the earth and biological sciences. The term general-purpose means that all geologic-feature classes have minimal information content adequate to characterize their general geologic characteristics and to interpret their general geologic history. However, no single feature class has enough information to definitively characterize its properties and origin. For this reason the database cannot be used for site-specific geologic evaluations, although it can be used to plan and guide investigations at the site-specific level.

  10. Measurement of Casimir force with magnetic materials Alexandr Banishev, Chia-Cheng Chang, Umar Mohideen Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Mohideen, Umar

    2012-02-01

    The Casimir effect is important in various fields from atomic physics to nanotechnology. According to the Lifshitz theory of the Casimir force, the interaction between two objects depends both on their dielectric permittivity and magenetic permeability. Thus the role of magnetic properties on the Casimir force is interesting particularly due to the possibility of a reduction the Casimir force. In this report we will present the results of a Casimir force measurement between a magnetic material such as nickel coated on SiO2 plate and a Au-coated sphere.

  11. IGPP-LLNL 1998 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Cook, K H; Tweed, J

    1999-11-19

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in tectonics, geochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research Center, headed by Kem Cook, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics Directorate's astrophysics efforts. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. Additional information regarding IGPP-LLNL projects and people may be found at http://wwwigpp.llnl.gov/. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $30,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, such as salary support for UC graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty; and costs for experimental facilities. A statistical overview of IGPP-LLNL's UCRP (colloquially known as the mini-grant program) is presented in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 1 shows the distribution of UCRP awards among the UC campuses, by total amount awarded and by number of proposals funded. Figure 2 shows the distribution of awards by center.

  12. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U. C. San Diego campus

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S.; Erick, F.; Heuze, F.E.; Mellors, R.; Minster, B.; Park, S.; Wagoner, J.

    1999-07-01

    The basic approach of the Campus Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the University of California (UC) system in geology, seismology, geotechnical engineering, and structural engineering to evaluate the effects of large earthquakes on UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, dynamic soil testing, and structural dynamics. The UC campuses currently chosen for applications of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The basic procedure is first to identify possible earthquake source regions and local campus site conditions that may affect estimates of strong ground motion. Combined geological , geophysical, and geotechnical studies are conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. The project will then drill and log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access to deeper materials, below the soil layers, that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analysis of conjugate downhole and uphole records provides a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are then used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings.

  13. Institute of Geophyics and Planetary Physics. Annual report for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F.J.

    1995-09-29

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, Riverside, and Irvine and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the six branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, high-pressure sciences, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and is structured around three research centers. The Center for Geosciences, headed by George Zandt and Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Center for High-Pressure Sciences, headed by William Nellis, sponsors research on the properties of planetary materials and on the synthesis and preparation of new materials using high-pressure processing.

  14. IGPP 1999-2000 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Cook, K; Hitchcock, B

    2003-01-27

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Irvine, Los Angeles, San Diego, Santa Cruz and Riverside, and at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important inter-institutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the seven branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in tectonics, geochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL was directed by Charles Alcock during this period and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research Center, headed by Kem Cook, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics Directorate's astrophysics efforts. At the end of the period covered by this report, Alcock left for the University of Pennsylvania. Cook became Acting Director of IGPP, the Physics Direcorate merged with portions of the old Lasers Direcorate to become Physics and Advanced Technologies. Energy Programs and Earth and Environmental Sciences Directorate became Energy and Environment Sciences Directorate. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. Additional information regarding IGPP-LLNL projects and people may be found at http://wwwigpp. llnl.gov/. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $30,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, such as salary support for UC graduate students, postdoctoral fellows; and costs for experimental facilities. A statistical overview of IGPP-LLNL's UCRP (colloquially known as the mini-grant program) is presented in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 1 shows the distribution of UCRP awards among

  15. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research Center, headed by Charles Alcock, provides a home for theoretical and observational astrophysics and serves as an interface with the Physics and Space Technology Department's Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics and with other astrophysics efforts at LLNL. The IGPP branch at LLNL (as well as the branch at Los Alamos) also facilitates scientific collaborations between researchers at the UC campuses and those at the national laboratories in areas related to earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics. It does this by sponsoring the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), which provides funds to UC campus scientists for joint research projects with LLNL. The goals of the UCRP are to enrich research opportunities for UC campus scientists by making available to them some of LLNL's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific program at LLNL through collaborative or interdisciplinary work with UC campus researchers. UCRP funds (provided jointly by the Regents of the University of California and by the Director of LLNL) are awarded annually on the basis of brief proposals, which are reviewed by a committee of scientists from UC campuses, LLNL programs, and external universities and research organizations. Typical annual funding for a collaborative research project ranges from $5,000 to $25,000. Funds are used for a variety of purposes, including salary support for visiting graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty; released-time salaries for LLNL scientists; and costs for experimental facilities. Although the permanent LLNL staff assigned to IGPP is relatively small (presently about five full-time equivalents), IGPP's research centers have become vital research organizations. This growth has been possible because of IGPP support for a substantial group of resident postdoctoral fellows; because of the 20 or more UCRP projects funded each year; and because IGPP hosts a variety of visitors, guests, and faculty members (from both UC and other institutions) on sabbatical leave. To focus attention on areas of topical interest in the geosciences and astrophysics, IGPP-LLNL hosts conferences and workshops, and also organizes seminars in astrophysics and geosciences. Section IV lists the seminars given in FY 1996.

  16. Proposed Construction of Off-Campus Community College Centers in Western Riverside County. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request of the Riverside and Mt. San Jacinto Community College Districts for Capital Funds To Build Permanent Off-Campus Centers in Norco and Moreno Valley and South of Sun City. Commission Report 88-27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    This report contains the California Postsecondary Education Commission's (CPEC's) analysis of a proposal to construct off-campus community college centers in the cities of Norco, Moreno Valley, and Sun City. Section 1 provides background material on the process of reviewing proposals for new college campuses and centers, population projections for

  17. The Role of Ethnographic Interviewing in Climate Change Evaluation Research: Investigating Intended and Unintended program effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloro-Bidart, T.

    2012-12-01

    Ethnographic interviewing is an under-utilized tool in climate change evaluation research, even though it has the potential to serve as a powerful method of data collection. The utility of the ethnographic interview lies in its ability to elicit responses from program participants describing what a program is in practice, shedding light on both intended and unintended program impacts. Drawing on evaluation work involving a federally-funded climate change grant at the University of California, Riverside, I will discuss how to design an ethnographic interview protocol in an effort to share "best practices" with other climate change evaluators. Particular attention will be given to applying ethnographic approaches to various program types, even those differing from the one discussed. I will share some of the concrete findings from my work on this grant, to serve as examples of the kinds of data evaluators can collect when employing an ethnographic approach to interviewing. UC Riverside's climate change grant is multi-faceted, however the component studied ethnographically was a science fair mentoring program. About twenty K-12 students from high poverty, ethnically diverse schools who expressed an interest in participating in science fair were paired up with graduate student mentors to simultaneously research climate change and design authentic science fair projects to compete at various levels. Since one of the stated goals of the grant is to "stimulate…students to consider climate science as a career track through experiential education activities" I was particularly interested in how student experiences with the project might differ from school science which has historically "pushed out" ethnically diverse students like those in many of Riverside's schools. (In the program students are able to interact one-on-one with a mentor and in school settings there is typically one teacher for more than thirty students). I also sought to understand student perceptions of the project design and implementation and how these perceptions might influence their thinking about science as a career. Further, I aimed to explore how mentor pedagogical philosophies might impact student experiences with the projects, since the scholarly literature supports the idea that teaching practices are linked to student success and interest in science. The key to ethnographic interviewing, which sets it apart from survey research and other interviewing styles is that the evaluator or researcher designs guided, yet open-ended questions, allowing informants to discuss what is important to them. This type of questioning affords the researcher the opportunity to ascertain whether or not the grant met some of its intended goals and impacts, while simultaneously granting participants the freedom to discuss unintended impacts not anticipated by the principal investigator and evaluator.

  18. PLANTS OF RAMAYANA*

    PubMed Central

    Balapure, K. M.; Maheshwari, J. K.; Tandon, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    The article presents a list of plants mentioned in Ramayana one of the two great epics of this country which has been compiled and the probable equivalent botanical names have been fixed. This study will be useful to the botanists, palaeo – botanists, ethonobotanists, foresters, naturalists and environmentalists as well. PMID:22557592

  19. 75 FR 22832 - Lake Wales Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, Highlands and Polk Counties, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ..., 2008 (73 FR 35149). For more about the refuge and our CCP process, please see that notice. Lake Wales... specialist (assistant refuge manager), a private lands biologist, a botanist/biologist, a biological science... lands biologist, a botanist/ biologist, and a fire/forestry technician. To support operations...

  20. Evaluation of Type I cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, November 1, 1994--February 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

    1996-07-31

    This research was focused on evaluating hydrated cement sorbents in the U. C. pilot spray dryer. The main goal of this work was to determine the hydration conditions resulting in reactive hydrated cement sorbents. Hydration of cement was achieved by stirring or by grinding in a ball mill at either room temperature or elevated temperatures. Also, the effects of several additives were studied. Additives investigated include calcium chloride, natural diatomite, calcined diatomaceous earth, and fumed silica. The performance of these sorbents was compared with conventional slaked lime. Further, the specific surface area and pore volume of the dried SDA sorbents were measured and compared to reactivity. Bench-scale tests were performed to obtain a more detailed picture of the development of the aforementioned physical properties as a function of hydration time.

  1. Tackling diversity challenges in Geoscience with the "Advancing Space Science Undergraduate Research Experience" (ASSURE) program at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, C. L.; Paglierani, R.; Shackelford, R. L., III; Peticolas, L. M.; Frappier, R.; Mendez, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL) has a long history of undergraduates working within the various research groups that range from theoretical astrophysics through to mechanical engineering. This year, we have established for the first time, a formal summer program for the undergraduate students, focusing on students traditionally underserved in Geosciences. This program, called the Advancing Space Science through Undergraduate Research Experiences program brings best-practiced methods to the development of a cohort, academic achievement, and research methodologies to the summer interns, with emphasis on the needs of underrepresented students who have not been exposed to a research environment before. In addition, specific care was given when recruiting for the program. Community College students recommend to us by faculty partners within the Colleges were recruited in order to provide them with hands on experience in a laboratory setting that they would not otherwise have had. In addition, we selected a number of pre- and in-service teachers from the STEM Teacher and Researcher Program (STAR) program. The combination of these two demographics of students has provided a unique and supportive environment for all involved.

  2. UC Berkeley's Adaptations to the Crisis of Public Higher Education in the US: Privatization? Commercialization? or Hybridization? Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.17.13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslauer, George W.

    2013-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley now delivers more to the public of California than it ever has, and it does this on the basis of proportionally less funding by the State government than it has ever received. This claim may come as a surprise, since it is often said that Berkeley is in the process of privatizing, becoming less of a public

  3. Impact in the School System of a Strategy for Identifying and Selecting Academically Talented Students: The Experience of Program PENTA-UC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arancibia, Violeta; Lissi, Maria Rosa; Narea, Marigen

    2008-01-01

    The study explores the consequences, for participating schools, of the implementation of a system for the identification and selection of academically talented students, in the context of an extracurricular enrichment program operating at Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. The participants were 73 students, 50 teachers, and seven members of

  4. Development and evaluation of a trehalose-contained solution formula to preserve hUC-MSCs at 4°C.

    PubMed

    Di, Guohu; Wang, Jiexi; Liu, Minxia; Wu, Chu-Tse; Han, Ying; Duan, Haifeng

    2012-03-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) hold great promise in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Various preclinical and clinical trials have been carried out to illustrate the therapeutic potential of these cells. However, one major challenge for manufacturing clinical grade hMSCs is the requisition of current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) grade practices in cell isolation, processing, storage, and distribution. Development of non-toxic and animal serum-free preservation medium is critical for storage and distribution of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we developed a solution formula that could preserve MSCs at 4°C for up to 3 weeks. In the solution, trehalose is a key ingredient for maintaining survival of MSCs. Among the concentrations investigated, 40 mM trehalose showed the best outcome with the viability maintained more than 92.7 ± 1.5% for 7 days. Cells preserved in the solution formula for 3 weeks still remained about 70% viability, and produced results similar to those of freshly harvested hMSCs in terms of growth kinetics, expression profile of cell surface antigens, and differentiation potential. In summary, storage of MSCs in the medium makes it far easier for transporting the cells from processing units to clinical sites. PMID:22170612

  5. Impact in the School System of a Strategy for Identifying and Selecting Academically Talented Students: The Experience of Program PENTA-UC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arancibia, Violeta; Lissi, Maria Rosa; Narea, Marigen

    2008-01-01

    The study explores the consequences, for participating schools, of the implementation of a system for the identification and selection of academically talented students, in the context of an extracurricular enrichment program operating at Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. The participants were 73 students, 50 teachers, and seven members of…

  6. Have They Finished? Time-to-Degree of Freshmen Entering UC and CSU in Fall 2000. Working Paper WP/06-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The time taken for students to complete their degrees is a persistent concern. A bachelor's degree is often thought of as being a four-year program, but many students take well over four years to graduate. Slow progress toward graduation is costly to students, who often have to take out loans for tuition and living costs. In addition, prolonged

  7. The NASA-UC-UH Eta-Earth program. IV. A low-mass planet orbiting an M dwarf 3.6 PC from Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Becker, Juliette C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wright, Jason T.; Johnson, John Asher

    2014-10-10

    We report the discovery of a low-mass planet orbiting Gl 15 A based on radial velocities from the Eta-Earth Survey using HIRES at Keck Observatory. Gl 15 Ab is a planet with minimum mass Msin i = 5.35 ± 0.75 M {sub ⊕}, orbital period P = 11.4433 ± 0.0016 days, and an orbit that is consistent with circular. We characterize the host star using a variety of techniques. Photometric observations at Fairborn Observatory show no evidence for rotational modulation of spots at the orbital period to a limit of ∼0.1 mmag, thus supporting the existence of the planet. We detect a second RV signal with a period of 44 days that we attribute to rotational modulation of stellar surface features, as confirmed by optical photometry and the Ca II H and K activity indicator. Using infrared spectroscopy from Palomar-TripleSpec, we measure an M2 V spectral type and a sub-solar metallicity ([M/H] = –0.22, [Fe/H] = –0.32). We measure a stellar radius of 0.3863 ± 0.0021 R {sub ☉} based on interferometry from CHARA.

  8. 12. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riveside Municipal Museum, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riveside Municipal Museum, Historical Resources Department), photographer and date unknown. TENTING OF CITRUS TREES AT NIGHT - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  9. 9. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riveside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riveside Library, Local History Collection), photographer unknown, ca. 1916. VIEW OF MAUDE STREET AT VICTORIA AVENUE LOOKING SOUTH - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  10. 27. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1913. TIGHTENING JOINTS AND ADJUSTING PLATES ON STEEL FLUME AT MOCKINGBIRD DAM ON THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  11. 29. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1926. CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS AT OLIVEWOOD PUMPING STATION ON THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  12. 23. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1917. VIEW OF FLUME NO. 3 OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL AND NEW 66' REINFORCED CONCRETE PIPELINE - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  13. 24. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1939. VIEW OF SAND PUMP HOUSE AT THE HEAD OF THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  14. 28. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1913. CONSTRUCTION OF CORE WALL AT MOCKINGBIRD DAM ON THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  15. 13. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riveside Library, Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Riveside Library, Local History Collection), photographer and date unknown. VIEW OF JAPANESE WORKER HOUSING, ARLINGTON HEIGHTS FRUIT COMPANY, EXACT LOCATION UNKNOWN - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  16. 26. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1931. VIEW OF CONSTRUCTION OF GUNITE INVERT SIPHON REPLACING FLUME NO. 10 ON GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  17. Recon secured room (room 236), detail of sliding map panels ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Recon secured room (room 236), detail of sliding map panels and tracks. View to northeast - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  18. North and west sides of the cooling tower, utility building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and west sides of the cooling tower, utility building (building 2606) is in the background at right - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Cooling Tower, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  19. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  20. Detail of main entrance at west end of north front, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of main entrance at west end of north front, with original air force emblems on doors - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  1. 15. VIEW OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL NEAR HILLTOP DRIVE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL NEAR HILLTOP DRIVE AND BARTON ROAD, SHOWING END OF SIPHON. CANAL FOLLOWS CONTOUR OF HILL UNDER DIRT ROAD - Gage Irrigation Canal, Running from Santa Ana River to Arlington Heights, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  2. Telephone equipment room (room 227), looking east along the switchboard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Telephone equipment room (room 227), looking east along the switchboard panels. "Looking glass" panel is located at center, just above the desk - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  3. 5 CFR 531.603 - Locality pay areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of the United States and its territories and possessions as listed in 5 CFR 591.205 not located..., IN; (18) Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside, CA—consisting of the Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside,...

  4. Looking north along the control console area towards the classified ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north along the control console area towards the classified storage room; projection stands at left - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  5. D.O.P. and D.I. secured room, looking southeast towards the map ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    D.O.P. and D.I. secured room, looking southeast towards the map rack sliding panels and the east mural - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  6. Detail, south end of control console with speakers; looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, south end of control console with speakers; looking southeast towards the TV control panel room - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  7. Detail of generator number three, oblique. Control panels on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of generator number three, oblique. Control panels on the main floor and on the mezzanine are visible behind and above the generators. - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  8. Detail, north end of console and pneumatic tube message port, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, north end of console and pneumatic tube message port, also showing mirror to reflect view of communications switchboard - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  9. Overall view to northwest inside building 2606, from near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view to northwest inside building 2606, from near the south end of the mezzanine. The Enterprise 5000 generator is in the foreground - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  10. Detail of the largest generator, an Enterprise 5000, also known ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of the largest generator, an Enterprise 5000, also known as "Big Bertha", looking southeast - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  11. Telephone equipment room, showing channel terminal bank with vacuum tubes. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Telephone equipment room, showing channel terminal bank with vacuum tubes. View to east - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  12. 21. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), H. B. Wesner, photographer, date unknown. 'VIEWS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCENERY. ARTESIAN WELLS, SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA. SUPPLYING THE GAGE CANAL OF RIVERSIDE.' - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  13. 77 FR 66500 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... the City of Riverside, in the counties of Orange and Riverside, State of California. Those actions... to Pierce Street in the City of Riverside. The existing express lanes in Orange County will be extended east from the Orange/County line to Interstate 15 (I-15) in the City of Corona. The existing...

  14. 75 FR 54420 - Cancellation of Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS); Travis County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Statement (SEIS) would be prepared for the proposed SH 71 roadway between Riverside Drive and SH 130 in... for proposed improvements to State Highway (SH) 71 from Riverside Drive to SH 130, in Travis County... to 40 CFR 1508.22 and 43 TAC Sec. 2.5(e)(2) for proposed improvement of SH 71 from Riverside Drive...

  15. SRS scientific and technical abstracts, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document focuses on the scientific and technical information (STT) reports, articles, and presentations generated at the site by various authors and organizations of Westinghouse Savannah River Company and its subcontractors. Abstracts of these STI products are contained within this document. The abstracts have been compiled as they originally appeared in the source reports. No changes to the content have been made except as necessary to correct errors of spelling, to reduce abstract length, or to ensure that the information is unclassified. The abstracts are organized according to information categories ( UC'' categories) established by the Department of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). When reports fall into more than one category, their abstract is included as an entry in the most applicable section of this document. UC-700 General, Miscellaneous, and Progress Reports, UC-701 Chemistry, UC-702 Environmental Sciences, UC-703 Geosciences, UC-704 Materials, UC-705 Mathematics and Computer Sciences, UC-706 Engineering, Equipment, and Instruments, UC-707 Health and Safety, UC-708 Biological Sciences, UC-711 Chemical Separation Processes for Plutonium and Uranium, UC-712 Inertial Confinement Fusion, UC-713 Radioisotope and Radiation Applications, UC-714 Criticality Studies, UC-715 Technology - Feed Materials, UC-721 Defense Waste Management, UC-722 Transportation of Nuclear Materials, UC-731 Nuclear Materials Production, UC-732 Special Isotope Separation (Plutonium), UC-733 Nuclear Raw Materials, UC-741 Chemical High Explosives, UC-742 Applications of Explosions, UC-743 Nuclear Propulsion Systems, UC-744 Aerospace Nuclear Safety, and Index 91.

  16. SRS scientific and technical abstracts, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document focuses on the scientific and technical information (STT) reports, articles, and presentations generated at the site by various authors and organizations of Westinghouse Savannah River Company and its subcontractors. Abstracts of these STI products are contained within this document. The abstracts have been compiled as they originally appeared in the source reports. No changes to the content have been made except as necessary to correct errors of spelling, to reduce abstract length, or to ensure that the information is unclassified. The abstracts are organized according to information categories (``UC`` categories) established by the Department of Energy`s Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). When reports fall into more than one category, their abstract is included as an entry in the most applicable section of this document. UC-700 General, Miscellaneous, and Progress Reports, UC-701 Chemistry, UC-702 Environmental Sciences, UC-703 Geosciences, UC-704 Materials, UC-705 Mathematics and Computer Sciences, UC-706 Engineering, Equipment, and Instruments, UC-707 Health and Safety, UC-708 Biological Sciences, UC-711 Chemical Separation Processes for Plutonium and Uranium, UC-712 Inertial Confinement Fusion, UC-713 Radioisotope and Radiation Applications, UC-714 Criticality Studies, UC-715 Technology - Feed Materials, UC-721 Defense Waste Management, UC-722 Transportation of Nuclear Materials, UC-731 Nuclear Materials Production, UC-732 Special Isotope Separation (Plutonium), UC-733 Nuclear Raw Materials, UC-741 Chemical High Explosives, UC-742 Applications of Explosions, UC-743 Nuclear Propulsion Systems, UC-744 Aerospace Nuclear Safety, and Index 91.

  17. The HSP, the QCN, and the Dragon: Developing inquiry-based QCN instructional modules in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. H.; Liang, W.; Chang, C.; Yen, E.; Lin, C.; Lin, G.

    2012-12-01

    High Scope Program (HSP) is a long-term project funded by NSC in Taiwan since 2006. It is designed to elevate the quality of science education by means of incorporating emerging science and technology into the traditional curricula in senior high schools. Quake-Catcher Network (QCN), a distributed computing project initiated by Stanford University and UC Riverside, encourages the volunteers to install the low-cost, novel sensors at home and school to build a seismic network. To meet both needs, we have developed a model curriculum that introduces QCN, earthquake science, and cloud computing into high school classrooms. Through professional development workshops, Taiwan cloud-based earthquake science learning platform, and QCN club on Facebook, we have worked closely with Lan-Yang Girl's Senior High School teachers' team to design workable teaching plans through a practical operation of seismic monitoring at home or school. However, some obstacles to learning appear including QCN installation/maintain problems, high self-noise of the sensor, difficulty of introducing earthquake sciences for high school teachers. The challenges of QCN outreach in Taiwan bring out our future plans: (1) development of easy, frequently updated, physics-based QCN-experiments for high school teachers, and (2) design of an interactive learning platform with social networking function for students.

  18. Secondary organic aerosol formation from primary aliphatic amines with NO3 radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Q. G. J.; Qi, Li; Warren, B.; Cocker, D. R., III; Erupe, M. E.; Silva, P. J.

    2009-03-01

    Primary aliphatic amines are an important class of nitrogen containing compounds emitted from automobiles, waste treatment facilities and agricultural animal operations. A series of experiments conducted at the UC-Riverside/CE-CERT Environmental Chamber is presented in which oxidation of methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine with O3 and NO3 have been investigated. Very little aerosol formation is observed in the presence of O3 only. However, after addition of NO, and by extension NO3, large aerosol mass yields (~44% for butylamine) are seen. Aerosol generated was determined to be organic in nature due to the small fraction of NO and NO2 in the total signal (<1% for all amines tested) as detected by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). We propose a reaction mechanism between carbonyl containing species and the parent amine leading to formation of particulate imine products. These findings can have significant impacts on rural communities with elevated nighttime PM loadings, when significant levels of NO3 exist.

  19. Secondary organic aerosol formation from primary aliphatic amines with NO3 radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Q. G. J.; Qi, Li; Warren, B.; Cocker, D. R., III; Erupe, M. E.; Silva, P. J.

    2008-07-01

    Primary aliphatic amines are an important class of nitrogen containing compounds found to be emitted from automobiles, waste treatment facilities and agricultural animal operations. A series of experiments conducted at the UC-Riverside/CE-CERT Environmental Chamber is presented in which oxidation of methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine with NO3 has been investigated. Very little aerosol formation is observed in the presence of O3 only. However, after addition of NO, and by extension NO3, large yields of aerosol mass loadings (~44% for butylamine) are seen. Aerosol generated was determined to be organic in nature due to the small fraction of NO and NO2 in the total signal (<17% for all amines tested) as detected by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). We propose a reaction mechanism between carbonyl containing species and the parent amine leading to formation of particulate imine products. These findings can have significant impacts on rural communities and lead to elevated nighttime PM loadings, when significant levels on NO3 exist.

  20. Experimentally measured morphology of biomass burning aerosol and its impacts on CCN ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, M.; Espinoza, C.; Asa-Awuku, A.

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the morphological properties of freshly emitted and atmospherically aged aerosols from biomass burning. The impacts of particle morphology assumptions on hygroscopic predictions are examined. Chamber experiments were conducted at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Morphological data was obtained through the use of an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) system and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Data from these instruments was used to calculate both a dynamic shape factor and a fractal-like dimension for the biomass burning emissions. This data was then used with κ-Köhler theory to adjust the calculated hygroscopicity for experimentally determined morphological characteristics of the aerosol. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning aerosol from two chaparral fuels show that particles are non-spherical with dynamic shape factors greater than 1.15 for aerosol sizes relevant to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation. Accounting for particle morphology can shift the hygroscopicity parameter κ by 0.15 or more. To our knowledge, this work provides the first laboratory chamber measurements of morphological characteristics for biomass burning cloud condensation nuclei and provides experimental particle shape evidence to support the variation in reported hygroscopicities of the complex aerosol.

  1. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements. PMID:23957441

  2. High energy physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    The hadron collider group is studying proton-antiproton interactions at the world`s highest collision energy 2 TeV. Data-taking with the D0 detector is in progress at Fermilab and the authors have begun the search for the top quark. S. Wimpenny is coordinating the effort to detect t{bar t} decaying to two leptons, the most readily identifiable channel. At UC Riverside design and testing for a silicon tracker for the D0 upgrade is in progress; a parallel development for the SDC detector at SSC is also underway. The major group effort of the lepton group has been devoted to the OPAL experiment at LEP. They will continue to focus on data-taking to improve the quality and quantity of their data sample. A large number of papers have been published based on approximately 500,000 events taken so far. The authors will concentrate on physics analysis which provides stringent tests of the Standard Model. The authors are continuing participation in the RD5 experiment at the SPS to study muon triggering and tracking. The results of this experiment will provide critical input for the design of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment being proposed for the LHC. The theory group has been working on problems concerning the possible vilation of e-{mu}-{tau} universality, effective Lagrangians, neutrino physics, as well as quark and lepton mass matrices.

  3. Test Review: Woodcock, R. W., Schrank, F. A., Mather, N., & McGrew, K. S. 2007). "Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement, Form C/Brief Battery." Rolling Meadows, IL: Riverside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenwelge, Cheryl H.

    2009-01-01

    The Woodcock Johnson III Brief Assessment is a "maximum performance test" (Reynolds, Livingston, Willson, 2006) that is designed to assess the upper levels of knowledge and skills of the test taker using both power and speed to obtain a large amount of information in a short period of time. The Brief Assessment also provides an adequate

  4. [Bodies in balance: riverside images and everyday life in Açaí Port and on Maracujá Island, Belém (State of Pará)].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Flávio Leonel Abreu da; Bassalo, Terezinha de Fátima Ribeiro

    2012-09-01

    Based on photographic records, this paper reflects on the ebb and flow of the Maracujá Island dwellers, between the island and Belém, making use of the ways they use their bodies or 'know how to use' them, that Mauss called corporal techniques. Bodies disclosed, since they are always exposed and therefore capable of being visually and ethnographically categorized. Inspired on Certeau, the article seeks to think of the corporal tactics devised by island residents to practice the landscapes of belonging revealing peculiar body expressions in constructing their everyday experiences. Such observations do not refer to a body-object, but to a body that is the subject of culture, as Csordas says, a body that is "the existential basis of culture". PMID:23060203

  5. Is Hydrotropism All Wet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses traditional school demonstrations and experiments in hydrotropism. Explains that these experiments seem to "prove" hydrotropism, but yet most botanists reject hydrotropism. Teachers continue to teach the concept because it is logical and the experiments are simple. (PR)

  6. SEPEL: New Phytotrons for Environmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, P. J.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Describes the controlled environment facilities provided botanists by the Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratories; the procedures followed by outside scientists using the facility, and the history of its development. (AL)

  7. Examination of plants in lunar (germ free) soil in Plant Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Charles Walkenshaw, Manned Spacecraft Center botanist, examines sorghum and tobacco plants in lunar (germ free) soil in the Plant Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory. The soil was brought back from the Moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts.

  8. Biology and physiology of vines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vines have interested botanists since Darwin but surprisingly little progress has been made at describing the mechanisms by which vines twine and tendrils coil. Anatomical, histochemical and immunocytochemical investigations indicate that gelatinous (G) fibers, which were generally thought to occur ...

  9. Basement plan. ("Alter COC Bldg 2605, Basement Plan and Architectural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement plan. ("Alter COC Bldg 2605, Basement Plan and Architectural Details.") Strategic Air Command, Riverside, California, March Air Force Base. Drawing no. B-973, sheet no. 1 of 6, 14 April 1966; project no. MAR-267-5; CE-353; file drawer 1308. Last revised 20 October 1966. Various scales. 28x40 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  10. 77 FR 53189 - Notice of Public Meetings for the Draft Legislative Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... the Proposed Renewal of the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range Land Withdrawal, California AGENCY... Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range (CMAGR) in Imperial and Riverside counties, California. With...

  11. 5. EASTSIDE RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST. WEST DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION, QUARRIES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EASTSIDE RESERVOIR, LOOKING WEST. WEST DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION, QUARRIES TO LEFT MIDDLE GROUND OF PICTURE. - Eastside Reservoir, Diamond & Domenigoni Valleys, southwest of Hemet, Hemet, Riverside County, CA

  12. Satellite Sensornet Gateway Technology Infusion Through Rapid Deployments for Environmental Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzel, T.; Silva, F.; Deschon, A.; Ye, W.; Cho, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Satellite Sensornet Gateway (SSG) is an ongoing ESTO Advanced Information Systems Technology project, at the University of Southern California. The major goal of SSG is to develop a turnkey solution for building environmental observation systems based on sensor networks. Our system has been developed through an iterative series of deployment-driven design, build, test, and revise which maximizes technology infusion to the earth scientist. We have designed a robust and flexible sensor network called Sensor Processing and Acquisition Network (SPAN). Our SPAN architecture emphasizes a modular and extensible design, such that core building blocks can be reused to develop different scientific observation systems. To support rapid deployment at remote locations, we employ satellite communications as the backhaul to relay in-situ sensor data to a central database. To easily support various science applications, we have developed a unified sensor integration framework that allows streamlined integration of different sensors to the system. Our system supports heterogeneous sets of sensors, from industry-grade products to research- specific prototypes. To ensure robust operation in harsh environments, we have developed mechanisms to monitor system status and recover from potential failures along with additional remote configuration and QA/QC functions. Here we briefly describe the deployments, the key science missions of the deployments and the role that the SSG technology played in each mission. We first deployed our SSG technology at the James Reserve in February 2007. In a joint deployment with the NEON project, SDSC, and UC Riverside, we set up a meteorological station, using a diverse set of sensors, with the objective of validating our basic technology components in the field. This system is still operational and streaming live sensor data. At Stunt Ranch, a UC Reserve near Malibu, CA, we partnered with UCLA biologist Phillip Rundel in order to study the drought impact on deep and shallow rooted plants. Our system was deployed in December 2007 and monitors sap flow on various plant species, while using a satellite link for real-time data access. In April 2008, in a joint deployment with UCLA, UC Merced, and GLEON, our SSG technology was used to study the impact of agricultural run off in a series of salt lakes near Bahia Blanca, Argentina. Our system collected meteorological data that were combined with water quality measurements taken from boats and buoys. Our SSG technology was used at the PASI workshop in June 2008 at the La Selva Biological Research Station in Costa Rica. As part of a two-week curriculum, students from throughout the americas used our system to collect measurements in the rain forest and later analyzed the data. La Selva plans to install several SSG nodes throughout the reserve and make mobile nodes available for visiting researchers to use in their research. We are currently planning a deployment with environmental engineer Tom Harmon from UC Merced to build an autonomous water quality flow path and reactive transport observation system near Merced, CA. SSG technology will be deployed to monitor soil, groundwater, and surface water parameters. In China's Guizhou Province, we are collaborating with researcher Sarah Rothenberg, who is studying mercury cycling in rice paddies. Our SSG system will collect soil parameters such as pH and ORP, in addition to environmental measurements such as PAR, and UV. This presentation will describe the SSG project, the SPAN prototype and our experience with technology infusion from the deployments. class="ab'>

  13. Evaluation of Ohio fly ash/hydrated lime slurries and Type 1 cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. Pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.; Meyers, G.R.

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this year`s work included an evaluation of the performance of fly ash/hydrated lime as well as hydrated cement sorbents for spray drying adsorption (SDA) of SO{sub 2} from a simulated high-sulfur flue gas. These sorbents were evaluated for several different hydration methods, and under different SDA operating conditions. In addition, the physical properties of surface area and porosity of the sorbents was determined. The most reactive fly ash/hydrated lime sorbent studied was prepared at room temperature with milled fly ash. Milling fly ash prior to hydration with lime did have a beneficial effect on calcium utilization. No benefit in utilization was experienced either by hydrating the slurries at a temperature of 90{degrees}C as compared to hydration at room temperature, or by increasing hydration time. While the surface areas varied greatly from sorbent to sorbent, the pore size distributions indicated ``ink bottle`` pores with surface porosity on the order of 0.5 microns. No correlation could be drawn between the surface area of the sorbents and calcium utilization. These results suggest that the composition of the resulting sorbent might be more important than its surface area. The most effective sorbent studied this year was produced by hydrating cement for 3 days at room temperature. This sorbent provided a removal efficiency and a calcium utilization over 25 percent higher than baseline results at an approach to saturation temperature of 30{degrees}F and a stoichiometric ratio of 0.9. A maximum SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of about 90 percent was experienced with this sorbent at an approach to saturation temperature of 20{degrees}F.

  14. A New Mountain to Climb: As the New Dean of UC-Berkeley's Law School, Christopher Edley Jr. Plans to Continue the Civil Rights and Social Justice Agenda Work for Which He Has Become Well Known

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    On July 1, Christopher Edley Jr. became the dean of the University of California-Berkeley Boalt Hall School of Law. The first African American to hold the deanship of California's premier public law school, Edley brings to the job an array of accomplishments and experiences few American law school deans can match. This article describes his

  15. Improved ferroelectric/piezoelectric properties and bright green/UC red emission in (Li,Ho)-doped CaBi4Ti4O15 multifunctional ceramics with excellent temperature stability and superior water-resistance performance.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ping; Guo, Yongquan; Tian, Mijie; Zheng, Qiaoji; Jiang, Na; Wu, Xiaochun; Xia, Zhiguo; Lin, Dunmin

    2015-10-21

    Multifunctional materials based on rare earth ion doped ferro/piezoelectrics have attracted considerable attention in recent years. In this work, new lead-free multifunctional ceramics of Ca1-x(LiHo)x/2Bi4Ti4O15 were prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction method. The great multi-improvement in ferroelectricity/piezoelectricity, down/up-conversion luminescence and temperature stability of the multifunctional properties is induced by the partial substitution of (Li0.5Ho0.5)(2+) for Ca(2+) ions in CaBi4Ti4O15. All the ceramics possess a bismuth-layer structure, and the crystal structure of the ceramics is changed from a four layered bismuth-layer structure to a three-layered structure with the level of (Li0.5Ho0.5)(2+) increasing. The ceramic with x = 0.1 exhibits simultaneously, high resistivity (R = 4.51 10(11)? cm), good piezoelectricity (d33 = 10.2 pC N(-1)), high Curie temperature (TC = 814 C), strong ferroelectricity (Pr = 9.03 ?C cm(-2)) and enhanced luminescence. These behaviours are greatly associated with the contribution of (Li0.5Ho0.5)(2+) in the ceramics. Under the excitation of 451 nm light, the ceramic with x = 0.1 exhibits a strong green emission peak centered at 545 nm, corresponding to the transition of the (5)S2?(5)I8 level in Ho(3+) ions, while a strong red up-conversion emission band located at 660 nm is observed under the near-infrared excitation of 980 nm at room temperature, arising from the transition of (5)F5?(5)I8 levels in Ho(3+) ions. Surprisingly, the excellent temperature stability of ferroelectricity/piezoelectricity/luminescence and superior water-resistance behaviors of piezoelectricity/luminescence are also obtained in the ceramic with x = 0.1. Our study suggests that the present ceramics may have potential applications in advanced multifunctional devices at high temperature. PMID:26387782

  16. Passing the Baton: A New Program from ACSA and the New Teacher Center at UC Santa Cruz Is Improving the Way a New Generation of Site Leaders is Prepared and Supported

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Gary; Danilovich, Duff L.; Fogel, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Through a collaborative effort, the New Teacher Center at the University of California Santa Cruz and the Association of California School Administrators are offering intensive, coaching-based induction support to first- and second-year administrators that is integral to their professional certification. This program rests on the commitment and

  17. Characterization of PM-PEMS for in-use measurements conducted during validation testing for the PM-PEMS measurement allowance program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Yusuf; Johnson, Kent C.; Durbin, Thomas D.; Jung, Heejung; Cocker, David R.; Bishnu, Dipak; Giannelli, Robert

    2012-08-01

    This study provides an evaluation of the latest Particulate Matter-Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PM-PEMS) under different environmental and in-use conditions. It characterizes four PM measurement systems based on different measurement principles. At least three different units were tested for each PM-PEMS to account for variability. These PM-PEMS were compared with a UC Riverside's mobile reference laboratory (MEL). PM measurements were made from a class 8 truck with a 2008 Cummins diesel engine with a diesel particulate filter (DPF). A bypass around the DPF was installed in the exhaust to achieve a brake specific PM (bsPM) emissions level of 25 mg hp-1h-1. PM was dominated by elemental carbon (EC) during non-regeneration conditions and by hydrated sulfate (H2SO4.6H2O) during regeneration. The photo-acoustic PM-PEMS performed best, with a linear regression slope of 0.90 and R2 of 0.88 during non-regenerative conditions. With the addition of a filter, the photo-acoustic PM-PEMS slightly over reported than the total PM mass (slope = 1.10, R2 = 0.87). Under these same non-regeneration conditions, a PM-PEMS equipped with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technology performed the poorest, and had a slope of 0.22 and R2 of 0.13. Re-tests performed on upgraded QCM PM-PEMS showed a better slope (0.66), and a higher R2 of 0.25. In the case of DPF regeneration, all PM-PEMS performed poorly, with the best having a slope of 0.20 and R2 of 0.78. Particle size distributions (PSD) showed nucleation during regeneration, with a shift of particle size to smaller diameters (˜64 nm to ˜13 nm) with elevated number concentrations when compared to non-regeneration conditions.

  18. Climate Change, NASA and New Media: Engaging Non-Science Undergraduates in Climate Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, R. M.; Mrofka, D. D.; Droser, M.

    2011-12-01

    UC Riverside is one of the most socioeconomically and ethnically diverse university campuses in the country. As one of only two federally-designated Hispanic Serving Research Institutions, UCR has long been committed to successfully educating and graduating Latino students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields (fields in which Latino students are severely under-represented). Because Latinos are the fastest growing ethnic minority in the country, educating Latino students in climate science is necessary for creating an educated and informed American society. Each year nearly 3000 undergraduate students take lower-division courses in the UCR Earth Sciences Department. This creates a unique opportunity to educate a broad cross-section of students from all fields and majors in societally-important Earth Science issues. As part of a NASA Global Climate Change Education grant, the Earth Sciences Department has restructured its lower-division courses to emphasize climate science by redesigning labs and activities that incorporate online NASA climate data, with the idea that first-hand analysis of data will provide students with a better understanding of the complexities of climate change. While NASA data and resources are being woven in all lower-division courses, one course in particular, "Global Climate Change," has been completely redesigned: this course now both examines the science of climate change and trains students in the articulation of climate science. Students learn to use new medial like YouTube to create and disseminate their own educational vidoes. The goal of this approach is to educate all students, not just those studying Earth Sciences, and to ultimately increase the general public's understanding of global climate change.

  19. Temperature Effects on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacarab, M.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2014-12-01

    Formation and properties of multiple secondary organic aerosol (SOA) systems were studied in the UC Riverside / CE-CERT dual 90m3 environmental chambers at temperatures ranging from 278K to 313K, controlled to a set point within 0.5K. Three SOA systems were studied: a simple cyclohexene ozonolysis system, a biogenic ?-pinene ozonolysis system, and an anthropogenic gasoline vehicle exhaust. Aerosol number, volume, and mass concentrations were monitored throughout experiments along with particle density, volatility, and hygroscopicity. Both gas and aerosol phase mass spectra were observed in real time via a SYFT selected ion flow tube mass spectrometer (SIFT-MS) and an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), respectively. It was found that the temperature of the system drastically affected aerosol yields in all three systems studied with 278K yields being drastically higher than yields at 313K. Particle density was found to be much higher at 278K for the cyclohexene-O3 and vehicle exhaust systems (at 1.6g/cm3 and 2 g/cm3, respectively), compared to average SOA density of 1.4g/cm3, while the particle density of the biogenic system remained unaffected by temperature. Aerosol phase mass spectra showed significant oxidation at 313K compared to 278K. This work aims to help elucidate temperature's effect on gas-particle partitioning and hysteresis effects seen in SOA formation that can be used in emerging atmospheric SOA models.

  20. Instantaneous nitric oxide effect on secondary organic aerosol formation from m-xylene photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijie; Tang, Ping; Cocker, David R.

    2015-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation is highly sensitive to NO concentration. The instantaneous effect of NO on SOA formation from m-xylene photooxidation is investigated in this work by data mining 10 years of aromatic hydrocarbon chamber experiments conducted in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT chamber. First, the effect of sub-ppb NO concentrations on SOA formation is explored. The relationship of SOA growth rate to 1) NO2/NO ratio; 2) instantaneous HC/NO; 3) absolute NO concentration; 4) peroxy radical reaction branching ratio and 5) hydroxyl radical concentration are illustrated. Second, continuous and stepwise NO, NO2 and HONO injection are applied to m-xylene photooxidation experiments to simulate continuous NO sources in an urban area. The influence of these reaction scenarios on radical concentrations and SOA formation is explored. [HO2rad ]/[RO2rad ] shows a strong correlation with SOA yields in addition to [rad OH]/[HO2rad ], [rad OH], [HO2rad ] and [RO2rad ]. Enhanced SOA formation is observed when low NO levels (<1 ppb) are artificially maintained by continuous or step-wise injection; consistent with earlier research, SOA formation is observed to be suppressed by large initial NO injections. It is proposed that NO at sub-ppb level enhances rad OH formation increasing HO2rad and RO2rad and therefore promoting SOA formation. Further, two NO pathways (one promoting and one suppressing SOA formation) and one extremely low NO phase (NO "free") are used to demonstrate the evolution of NO impact on SOA formation during photooxidation. This study implies that SOA yields from aromatic hydrocarbon and low NOx photooxidation is previously underestimated due to differences between traditional environmental chamber experiments and atmospheric reactivity.

  1. 20 CFR 603.2 - What definitions apply to this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., regulations, and interpretations thereof, including statements of general policy and interpretations of... by the State UC agency for determining UC monetary eligibility or are downloaded to the State...

  2. 20 CFR 603.2 - What definitions apply to this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., regulations, and interpretations thereof, including statements of general policy and interpretations of... by the State UC agency for determining UC monetary eligibility or are downloaded to the State...

  3. 20 CFR 603.2 - What definitions apply to this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., regulations, and interpretations thereof, including statements of general policy and interpretations of... by the State UC agency for determining UC monetary eligibility or are downloaded to the State...

  4. 20 CFR 603.2 - What definitions apply to this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., regulations, and interpretations thereof, including statements of general policy and interpretations of... by the State UC agency for determining UC monetary eligibility or are downloaded to the State...

  5. What Does It Mean to be Central? A Botanical Geography of Paris 1830-1848.

    PubMed

    Hoquet, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on the geography of the botanical community in Paris, under the July Monarchy (1830-1848). At that time, the Muséum d'Histoire naturelle (MHN) was at its institutional acme and, under the impulse of François Guizot, its budget was increasing dramatically. However, closer attention to manuscript sources (correspondence, travel diaries) reveals that the botanists of the time favoured other private institutions, located both on the Right and Left Banks of the Seine. The MHN was prestigious for its collections and professors but it was relatively remote from the centre of Paris, and its plant samples were sometimes difficult to access. Several other first-class private herbaria granted liberal access to botanists: those of Jacques Gay, Phillip Barker Webb, and Benjamin Delessert. Thanks to their wealth, these plant amateurs had ownership of historical herbaria consisting of species types alongside rich botanical libraries. Botanists visiting Paris from foreign countries or other provinces of France also spent some time studying less general plant collections, like those of Count Jaubert, or specialized collections, like Montagne's or Léveillé's on cryptogams. Other botanists also enjoyed renown at the time, although they published little, if anything (like Maire). Living in crammed apartments, literally in the middle of their plant samples, these botanists were key nodes in botanical networks, although they had no relation with the prestigious MHN. PMID:26242744

  6. 25. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, March 1954. VIEW OF THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL, CONCRETE 'COVERING COMPLETED & BACKFILLED TO WATERMAN AVENUE...CURVING TOWARD NO. 1 TUNNEL' - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  7. D.O.P. and D.I. secured room (room 215), looking west towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    D.O.P. and D.I. secured room (room 215), looking west towards murals. Sliding map tracks are visible on the floor next to the wall at left. Also note original fluorescent lights - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  8. From Equal Access to Equal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh-Reuss, Diana; Moore, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Over the past three years, the Riverside County Office of Education's County Achievement Team, as a recipient of a California Department of Education (CDE) grant, has worked with eight pilot schools and districts in the state to bring about systems change with equitable attention and results for each subgroup. The project, Riverside County

  9. 10. INTERIOR OF OUTLET TOWER LOOKING DOWN TO TIER #1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR OF OUTLET TOWER LOOKING DOWN TO TIER #1 OF SLIDE GATES. STRUCTURE HAS LEVELS ENABLING OPERATORS TO CHOOSE LEVEL WITH BEST QUALITY WATER. OVERHANGING DEVICE THAT LOOKS LIKE A LIGHT STANDARD IS ACTUALLY A METER FOR MEASURING WATER LEVELS. - Lake Mathews, East of Route 15, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  10. 40 CFR 52.726 - Control strategy: Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Implementation Plan. This submittal satisfies 40 CFR 58.20(f) which requires the State to provide for the... that the Federal site-specific rule for Riverside (40 CFR 52.741(e)(10)) has been superseded by the... Riverside, promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency on August 21, 1995 (40 CFR...

  11. Telco maintenance (room 228) looking south into the telephone equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Telco maintenance (room 228) looking south into the telephone equipment room (room 227). Note workbench in left corner, lighting fixtures, and air handling ducts - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  12. 14. VIEW OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL AT HILLTOP DRIVE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL AT HILLTOP DRIVE AND BARTON ROAD, SHOWING OLD ROUTE OF CANAL VIADUCT ACROSS BARTON ROAD. SIPHON NOW GOES UNDER ROAD AND EMERGES AT RIGHT REAR BELOW TWO TELEPHONE POLES (SEE CA-120-15) - Gage Irrigation Canal, Running from Santa Ana River to Arlington Heights, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  13. West wall, display area (room 101), view 1 of 4: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West wall, display area (room 101), view 1 of 4: southwest corner, showing stairs to commander's quarters and viewing bridge, windows to controller's room (room 102), south end of control consoles, and holes in pedestal floor for computer equipment cables (tape drive I/O?) - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  14. Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Commander's conference room (room 202), closet and hallway to bathroom and bedroom, leading to conference room 211. Viewing windows look down on the display area. View to north - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  15. Interior, equipment room, weather support area (from July, 1968 drawing) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, equipment room, weather support area (from July, 1968 drawing) at north end of display area, looking west. Window looks south towards the main console - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  16. In California, a Public Research University Succeeds because Its Low-Income Students Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebel, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Riverside has long struggled to shake its reputation as a campus of last resort in the University of California system, taking in students who could not get accepted at more prestigious branches. But Riverside's position has also allowed it to draw large numbers of students from low-income backgrounds, who are likelier than their wealthier peers

  17. U.S. EPA TEAM STUDY OF INHALABLE PARTICLES (PM-10): STUDY DESIGN, RESPONSE RATE, AND SAMPLER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA studied the exposures of 175 residents of Riverside, CA to inha1able particles (<10 u diameter) in the early fall of 1990. Participants were probabilistically selected to represent most of the Riverside nonsmoking population over the age of 10. They wore a newly-design...

  18. Looking west in the basement utility room, room 24, overview ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking west in the basement utility room, room 24, overview of air handling system, large walk-in filter, large ducts, pipes, and gauges - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  19. Interior of display area (room 101), looking south towards TV ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of display area (room 101), looking south towards TV control panel room (room 139) at far left corner. The stairway leads to the commander's quarters and the senior battle viewing bridge at top right. Control and communication consoles at the right - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  20. Factors Contributing to Adjustment and Achievement. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerard, Harold B.

    A longitudinal study to determine the conditions surrounding successful or unsuccessful integration of Negroes, Mexican Americans, and Anglos in the Riverside Unified School District in Riverside, California, began in school year 1965-66, and included kindergarten through grade 6. Test batteries placed emphasis on achievement "related attitudes.

  1. West wall, display area (room 101), view 3 of 4: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West wall, display area (room 101), view 3 of 4: north part, showing senior battle staff viewing bridge), projection booths, control consoles, and pneumatic tube message port - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  2. Annual Report, 1995. California Educational Research Cooperative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zykowski, Jane L.; And Others

    The California Educational Research Cooperative (CERC) of the School of Education, University of California, Riverside, was established in 1988 as a joint venture designed to bring educational professionals and researchers together. CERC is a partnership among the Riverside and San Bernadino County Offices of Education, 19 local school districts,

  3. 75 FR 66078 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Staff Assessment for the Solar Reserve LLC Rice Solar Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Reserve LLC Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA (DOE/ EIS-0439) and Possible California Desert... environmental analysis document for the proposed Rice Solar Energy Project (Project), in Riverside County..., 2010 (75 FR 15427).\\1\\ Western and the BLM held public scoping meetings in Big River, CA, on March...

  4. 75 FR 15427 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement/Staff Assessment for the Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... the Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA (DOE/EIS-0439) and Possible Land Use Plan... addressed in the EIS and SA for the proposed Rice Solar Energy Project (Project) in Riverside County, California. Rice Solar Energy, LLC (RSE) has applied to Western to interconnect the proposed Project...

  5. Pneumatic vacuum tube message center, basement room 23, looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pneumatic vacuum tube message center, basement room 23, looking southeast toward doorway and corridor. Note soundproof walls, pedestal flooring, and cable tray suspended from the ceiling - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  6. Detail of one way mirror, mail slot, and electrical box ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of one way mirror, mail slot, and electrical box at sentry post no. 3, top of east stairs near the end of second floor corridor - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  7. Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the west end of the combat operations center, looking southwest towards fan system one, air ducts, and walk-in filter rooms. The exterior equipment well is visible at the left - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  8. West wall, display area (room 101), view 4 of 4: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West wall, display area (room 101), view 4 of 4: northwest corner, with D.M. logistics office below (room 137), and D.O./D.D.O. offices above. Lower stairs lead to entry shown in view 13 - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  9. Display area, looking north towards the classified storage rooms, D.M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Display area, looking north towards the classified storage rooms, D.M. Logistics and D.O. Offices in northwest corner. Viewing bridge is at upper left, and alert status display at upper right - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  10. 40 CFR 81.17 - Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... county; Orange County—the entire county; Riverside County—that portion of Riverside County which lies... Bernardino County line; San Bernardino County—that portion of San Bernardino County which lies west and south... Angeles County boundary; Los Angeles County—that portion of Los Angeles County which lies south and...

  11. 40 CFR 81.167 - Southeast Desert Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Imperial County. Kern County—that portion of Kern County which lies east and south of a line described as... Angeles County—that portion of Los Angeles County which lies north and east of a line described as follows... boundary. Riverside County—that portion of Riverside County which lies east of a line described as...

  12. Lysenko affair and Polish botany.

    PubMed

    Khler, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the slight impact of Lysenkoism upon Polish botany. I begin with an account of the development of plant genetics in Poland, as well as the attitude of scientists and the Polish intelligentsia toward Marxist philosophy prior to the World War II. Next I provide a short history of the introduction and demise of Lysenkoism in Polish science, with a focus on events in botany, in context with key events in Polish science from 1939 to 1958. The article outlines the little effects of Lysenkoism upon botanists and their research, as well as how botanists for the most part rejected what was often termed the "new biology." My paper shows that though Lysenko's theories received political support, and were actively promoted by a small circle of scientists and Communist party activists, they were never accepted by most botanists. Once the political climate in Poland altered after the events of 1956, Lysenko's theories were immediately abandoned. PMID:20665091

  13. Women and botany in Risorgimento Italy.

    PubMed

    Logan, Gabriella Berti

    2004-01-01

    The first Italian women described as botanists by their male peers were active during the Risorgimento. They were few in numbers and only one of them, Elisabetta Fiorini, was recognized for her extensive contributions to the field of cryptogams in Italy by being nominated to important Italian scientific academies. No such recognition was ever alloted to the other female botanists who acted as collectors, correspondents and/or patrons to male botanists, had their own garden of exotic plants, or discovered a new species of phanerogams, and occasionally published on the subject. This study will show that a woman could still belong to Italian scientific academies in the nineteenth century, if like Fiorini, she chose to practice science in a way that was considered at par with that of male scientists. PMID:16021769

  14. User computer system pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Eimutis, E.C.

    1989-09-06

    The User Computer System (UCS) is a general purpose unclassified, nonproduction system for Mound users. The UCS pilot project was successfully completed, and the system currently has more than 250 users. Over 100 tables were installed on the UCS for use by subscribers, including tables containing data on employees, budgets, and purchasing. In addition, a UCS training course was developed and implemented.

  15. An Empire's Extract: Chemical Manipulations of Cinchona Bark in the Eighteenth-Century Spanish Atlantic World.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Matthew James

    2014-01-01

    In 1790, the Spanish Crown sent a "botanist-chemist" to South America to implement production of a chemical extract made from cinchona bark, a botanical medicament from the Andes used throughout the Atlantic World to treat malarial fevers. Even though the botanist-chemist's efforts to produce the extract failed, this episode offers important insight into the role of chemistry in the early modern Atlantic World. Well before the Spanish Crown tried to make it a tool of empire, chemistry provided a vital set of techniques that circulated among a variety of healers, who used such techniques to make botanical medicaments useful and intelligible in new ways. PMID:26103756

  16. [Status of hemapoiesis in residents of the Techa riverside villages in the period of maximum radiation exposure. Report 2. Influence of exposure dose and dose rate of red bone marrow as well as modifying factors on the frequency of cytopenia and cytosis].

    PubMed

    Akleev, A V; Dimov, G P; Varfolomeeva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is a retrospective estimation of the influence of dose and dose rate of the red bone marrow chronic radiation exposure in combination with various modifying factors (gender, age, comorbidity) on the frequency of deviations from normal values of the results of peripheral blood investigation in humans exposed on the Techa River. The results of investigation show that humans chronically exposed to radiation can develop marked changes in the cellular composition of peripheral blood characterized by a tendency to cytopenia (signs of the decompensation of hemopoiesis). The tendency to cytopenia can be identified earlier in the lymphoid germ, and later in platelet and erythroid lines. A high lability of granulocytes under the influence of various, often infectious, factors is the cause of the lack of statistically significant differences in terms of frequency of neutropenia. Several non-radiation factors (gender, age, health status) in combination with radiation exposure could have a modifying influence on hematopoiesis, which contributed to the disruption of adaptation processes and the development of conditions characterized by a tendency to cytopenias in exposed individuals. The red bone marrow dose rate reduction resulted in a gradual decrease in the frequency of erythrocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytopenia in the group of exposed population. Increased frequencies of erythrocytosis, thrombocytosis, lymphocytosis, monocytosis and neutrophilia were observed when the median dose rate was reduced to the level of 0.024 Gy/year (in the year 1956), which could be regarded as activation of regenerative processes in hematopoiesis. PMID:22690575

  17. Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, COmbat Operations Center, Utility Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 57, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/57, Rev. "B"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966 "drawings updated." Various scales. 29 x 41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  18. Case study in health information management: strategic planning.

    PubMed

    Homan, C V

    1992-08-01

    The strategic planning process has proven to be invaluable to Riverside Hospital's success. Involvement of all levels of the organization and integration of plans solidifies organizational commitments and provides a framework that assures accomplishment of overall goals. With major developments in computerization of medical records and other systems that support patient care data analysis on the horizon, Riverside's integrated plans are defining crucial information system projects. As the pool of available resources for projects continues to shrink, the planning format described assures funding of information system needs that will secure a position for Riverside in the health care marketplace of the future. PMID:10122867

  19. Ulcerative Colitis Presented as Fever and Bloody Diarrhea at Initiation of Dialysis in an Elderly Patient with End-Stage Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Kanazawa, Yuka; Nakamura, Noriko; Masutani, Kosuke; Esaki, Motohiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disorder that mainly affects the colon and rectum. Immunological derangements are associated with the pathogenesis of UC. Many patients with UC also have chronic kidney disease, associated with immunological disorders and/or pharmacotherapy for UC. Some patients with UC may develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and require renal replacement therapy. However, little is known clinically about ESRD patients who develop UC or about patients with UC who develop ESRD. This report describes an elderly patient with ESRD who presented with fever and bloody diarrhea and was finally diagnosed as UC (pancolitis type) at dialysis initiation. The patient was successfully treated with a series of immunosuppressive agents. This report highlights the importance of considering UC as a potential cause of bloody stool and fever in patients with ESRD. PMID:26617642

  20. A Set of Descriptions for Evaluating Guayule Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) as a source of rubber is receiving world-wide attention as an alternative to Hevea in order to meet increasing demand for natural rubber. As more breeders, agronomists, botanists, and other scientists become involved in evaluating and develop...

  1. Secondary succession: insect-plant relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, V.K.

    1984-12-01

    Botanists have dominated the study of secondary succession, and as a result, models and theories have focused on plants. Recent work, however, has revealed several complex relationships between plants and insects during succession, including adaptations of life-cycle strategies. Furthermore, insect herbivores play a key role in the course and rate of plant succession.

  2. Historical accounts of George Washington Carver's contributions to the study of fungi and fungal diseases of plants in the southestern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    George Washington Carver is well known for his many discoveries and contributions for increasing the utility of several classes of food due to numerous processing procedures resulting in additional value products. Dr. Carver's training as microbiologist, botanist, and plant pathologist began as a s...

  3. Clonal Fidelity in Large Colonies of Box Huckleberry (Gaylussacia brachycera Gray) Assessed by DNA Fingerprinting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The box huckleberry (Gaylussacia brachycera) is a slow-growing, dwarf evergreen member of the family Ericaceae that is native to eight states in the Eastern United States. It is a rare plant with conservation status in several states of critically imperiled (S1). Botanists have been intrigued by thi...

  4. Plants, People, and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galston, Arthur W.

    1970-01-01

    Advocates that some established botanists should become involved in social and political problems to which botanical expertise is relevant. Discusses food production in relation to world population growth, indicating problems on which botanical knowledge and research should be brought to bear. Discusses herbicides and plant growth regulators as

  5. Making a Theist out of Darwin: Asa Gray's Post-Darwinian Natural Theology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, T. Russell

    2012-01-01

    In March of 1860 the eminent Harvard Botanist and orthodox Christian Asa Gray began promoting the Origin of Species in hopes of securing a fair examination of Darwin's evolutionary theory among theistic naturalists. To this end, Gray sought to demonstrate that Darwin had not written atheistically and that his theory of evolution by natural

  6. Understanding plant cold hardiness: an opinion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How plants adapt to freezing temperatures and acclimate to survive the formation of ice within their tissues has been a subject of study for botanists and plant scientists since the latter part of the 19th century. In recent years, there has been an explosion of information on this topic and molecu...

  7. Beyond botany to genetic resource preservation: the S. P. Vander Kloet Vaccinium L. collections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. S. P. Vander Kloet, botanist, traveled the world examining and obtaining specimens to redefine infrageneric taxonomic units within Vaccinium L., family Ericaceae. Besides his botanical treatises, his legacy includes herbarium voucher specimens and ex situ genetic resource collections including a...

  8. International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (Vienna Code) Journal or equivalent: Book

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botany requires a precise and simple system of nomenclature used by botanists in all countries, dealing on the one hand with the terms that denote the ranks of taxonomic groups or units, and on the other hand with the scientific names that are applied to the individual taxonomic groups of plants. Th...

  9. All about Plant & Animal Interdependency. Plant Life for Children[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Plants provide oxygen, food, shelter, medicine and more for all animals, including humans. In fact, people depend on plants for their very survival just as plants rely on animals! In All About Plant & Animal Interdependency, join aspiring botanists as they discover how plants and animals interrelate. Learn about the constant exchange of gases in…

  10. Capturing Difficult Botanical Concepts with a Net of Previous Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, Tom R.

    2004-01-01

    There are a number of ways to capture student interest and improve student ability to understand complex phenomena. Without attempting any systematic assessment of the improvement in student learning the analogies, conversations with students lead to believe that techniques are a valuable tool in the botanist's toolbox.

  11. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six computer software packages including "Invisible Bugs,""Chaos Plus...,""The Botanist's Apprentice,""A Baby is Born," Storyboard Plus-Version 2.0," and "Weather." Hardware requirements, functions, performance, and use in the classroom are discussed. (CW)

  12. Science, Discovery & Laughter. Video Guide Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daynes, Beth

    This booklet accompanies a videotape covering the same material. It is intended as a guide to performing 16 science demonstrations with young children. Section titles are: "Surface Tension", "Budding Botanist", "Mystery Matter", "Young Rock Stars", "What a Gas!", "Zounds...What Sounds!", and "Brrrrr...Cool Science." Included is a section…

  13. Nature in the City. Adventure Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferbert, Mary Lou

    "Nature in the City" is a program designed to introduce young city dwellers to the wealth of nature that thrives in their urban world. The goal is not to produce botanists or zoologists, but to build attitudes and values as children increase their awareness, understanding, and appreciation of nature. Although the natural communities within cities…

  14. Scientist within You, Vol. 1: Experiments and Biographies of Distinguished Women in Science. Instructor's Guide for Use with Students Ages 8-13. Second Edition, Completely Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Rebecca Lowe; Thompson, Mary H.

    This book highlights women's achievements in science and mathematics from the first century A.D. to the present. Included are paleontologists, geologists, astronomers, mathematicians, chemists, botanists, biologists, engineers, physicians entomologists, and atomic physicists. Their noteworthy accomplishments are translated to students through…

  15. Plants, People, and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galston, Arthur W.

    1970-01-01

    Advocates that some established botanists should become involved in social and political problems to which botanical expertise is relevant. Discusses food production in relation to world population growth, indicating problems on which botanical knowledge and research should be brought to bear. Discusses herbicides and plant growth regulators as…

  16. What Kind of a Flower is That?--An Alternative Model for Discussing Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanselow, John F.

    As a botanist uses specific, non-judgmental descriptions that are part of a conceptual framework to help see different varieties and characteristics of plants, so teachers can see more clearly what they do if they describe rather than judge what is done. If the purpose of using a framework or model to discuss lesson presentations and classroom…

  17. Botanical Literature in India 1973-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheswarappa, B. S.; Nagaraju, A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study that used bibliometrics to examine botanical research activity in India. The findings discussed include the growth of botanical literature, authorship patterns and collaborative research, important research centers and their rankings, journals preferred by Indian botanists, subfields of research, and the applicability of…

  18. Scientist within You, Vol. 1: Experiments and Biographies of Distinguished Women in Science. Instructor's Guide for Use with Students Ages 8-13. Second Edition, Completely Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Rebecca Lowe; Thompson, Mary H.

    This book highlights women's achievements in science and mathematics from the first century A.D. to the present. Included are paleontologists, geologists, astronomers, mathematicians, chemists, botanists, biologists, engineers, physicians entomologists, and atomic physicists. Their noteworthy accomplishments are translated to students through

  19. WEST PLUM CREEK WETLANDS ASSESSMENT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will assist Douglas County and other conservation partners by assessing the types and locations of wetland resources in the watershed. This study will involve site visits by ecologists, botanists, and other wetland experts. Study results will be mapped using GIS so...

  20. MAIDENHAIR TREE: Ginkgo biloba, ON THE HOUSE'S EAST SIDE LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAIDENHAIR TREE: Ginkgo biloba, ON THE HOUSE'S EAST SIDE LOOKING EAST. THIS TREE IS THE OLDEST DOCUMENTED AT BARTRAM'S GARDEN. WILLIAM HAMILTON, A NEIGHBOR AND ALSO A WELL-KNOWN BOTANIST, INTRODUCED THE GINGKO TO NORTH AMERICA IN 1785, IN PART THROUGH THIS GIFT TO THE BARTRAMS - John Bartram House & Garden, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA