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Sample records for ulnar nerve lesions

  1. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow, so prolonged pressure on the elbow or entrapment ...

  2. ACUTE LESION OF THE MOTOR BRANCH OF THE ULNAR NERVE IN THE WRIST AFTER TUG-OF-WAR TRAINING

    PubMed Central

    Seguti, Vladimir Ferreira; Bonavides, Aloísio Fernandes; Flores, Leandro Pretto; Ferreira, Lisiane Seguti

    2015-01-01

    Papers correlating clinical and electrophysiological findings relating to ulnar nerve lesions in the wrist are uncommon in the literature, if compared with elbow injuries. We present the case of a patient with atrophy of the intrinsic musculature of the hand, secondary to injury only of the motor branch of the ulnar nerve, which is located in Guyon's canal close to the hamate hook. We review the anatomical, clinical and neurophysiological aspects of distal ulnar nerve injuries and we emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary approaches. Specifically in relation to the mechanism of injury of this patient (tug-of-war), we did not find any similar cases in the literature. We issue an alert regarding the risks during military physical training. PMID:27047837

  3. [Ulnar nerve lesions after osteosynthesis of a supercondylar humerus fracture during childhood. Indications for revision].

    PubMed

    Jester, A; Flügel, A; Germann, G; Oestreich, K

    2006-12-01

    Since 1948, closed reduction and osteosynthesis for supracondylar humeral fractures using two K-wires from the medial and lateral side has been performed on a regular basis. Although this procedure is used routinely, many authors have described paralysis of the ulnar nerve after blindly inserting the medial K-wire. Only very few publications describe the treatment options after iatrogenic paralysis of this nerve. The patients described showed progressive paralysis of the ulnar nerve after K-wire osteosynthesis. Intraoperatively, all patients showed scarring but intact continuity. After surgical revision and neurolysis, all four patients showed complete restitution after 1 year. If patients show progressive paralysis of the ulnar nerve early operative revision after 3 months should be performed. PMID:16969654

  4. Outcome following Nerve Repair of High Isolated Clean Sharp Injuries of the Ulnar Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Post, René; de Boer, Kornelis S.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS) ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. Methods High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. Results The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0–516). The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. Conclusion From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved. PMID:23082230

  5. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow. The damage destroys the nerve covering ( myelin sheath) ... be caused by: Long-term pressure on the elbow An elbow fracture or dislocation Temporary pain and ...

  6. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  7. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia and entrapment of the ulnar nerve

    PubMed Central

    Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Ricci, Alessandro; Raysi, Soheila Dehcordi; Marzi, Sara; Del Maestro, Mattia; Galzio, Renato Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) is a sporadic vasoproliferative lesion of uncertain etiology involving the skin and the subcutaneous tissue. Occasionally, it involves also the large arteries compressing the near nerves. ALHE is commonly confused with Kimura's disease because of their clinical and histological similarities. Case Description: We report a case of a 52-year-old female suffering from a 6-month pain and paresthesias in the fourth and fifth finger of the right hand. The angiography showed a pseudoaneurysm in the proximal third of the right ulnar artery. A complete surgical excision of the vascular lesion was undertaken. The lesion forced the right ulnar nerve. The histopathological diagnosis deposed for ALHE. Conclusion: Up to now, literature has described 8 cases of ALHE involving the arteries, and only one case originating from the ulnar nerve. The authors report a case of a female with ALHE involving the ulnar artery that compressed the ulnar nerve. Clinical aspects, radiological features, surgical treatment, and operative findings are discussed reviewing the pertinent literature. PMID:27069750

  8. Median to ulnar nerve anastomosis: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Piagkou, M; Tasigiorgos, S; Lappas, D; Troizos-Papavassiliou, P; Piagkos, G; Skandalakis, P; Demesticha, T

    2012-01-01

    Median to Ulnar nerve anastomosis in the forearm has been shown to be of clinical significance leading to "anomalous" innervation and is correlated with misdiagnosis during the assessment of nerve lesions, injuries and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). In 1763, Martin first described the anastomosis and Gruber next mentioning it, in 1870 thus referred to as Martin--Gruber anastomosis. Despite its long history, its nature remains unclear. Many anatomical, electrophysiological, histological and genetic studies have been published, reporting the anastomosis' frequency, citing its clinical importance and classifying it into various classes and types. Diagnosis is made mostly with electrophysiological studies whereby researchers have cited certain clues taking into consideration the asymptomatic nature of the anastomosis. The current literature on median to ulnar nerve anastomosis is reviewed, highlighting its frequency and clinical significance making an excellent tool for correct diagnosis in many clinicians. PMID:23025109

  9. Isolated ulnar dorsal cutaneous nerve herpes zoster reactivation.

    PubMed

    Kayipmaz, Murat; Basaran, Serdar Hakan; Ercin, Ersin; Kural, Cemal

    2013-09-01

    Herpes zoster is a viral disease presenting with vesicular eruptions that are usually preceded by pain and erythema. Herpes zoster can be seen in any dermatome of the body but most commonly appears in the thoracic region. Herpes zoster virus is typically transmitted from person to person through direct contact. The virus remains dormant in the dorsal ganglion of the affected individual throughout his or her lifetime. Herpes zoster reactivation commonly occurs in elderly people due to normal age-related decline in cell-mediated immunity. Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication and is defined as persistent pain or dysesthesia 1 month after resolution of the herpetic rash. This article describes a healthy 51-year-old woman who experienced a burning sensation and shooting pain along the ulnar dorsal cutaneous nerve. Ten days after the onset of pain, she developed cutaneous vesicular eruption and decreased light-touch sensation. Wrist and fourth and fifth finger range of motion were painful and slightly limited. Muscle strength was normal. Nerve conduction studies indicated an ulnar dorsal cutaneous nerve lesion. She was treated with anti-inflammatory and antibiotic drugs and the use of a short-arm resting splint. At 5-month follow-up, she reported no residual pain, numbness, or weakness. Herpes zoster in the upper extremity may be mistaken for entrapment neuropathies and diseases characterized by skin eruptions; ulnar nerve zoster reactivation is rarely seen. The authors report an uncommon ulnar dorsal cutaneous nerve herpes zoster reactivation. Clinicians should be aware of this virus during patients' initial evaluation. PMID:24025017

  10. MR anatomy and pathology of the ulnar nerve involving the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal.

    PubMed

    Shen, Luyao; Masih, Sulabha; Patel, Dakshesh B; Matcuk, George R

    2016-01-01

    Ulnar neuropathy is a common and frequent reason for referral to hand surgeons. Ulnar neuropathy mostly occurs in the cubital tunnel of the elbow or Guyon's canal of the wrist, and it is important for radiologists to understand the imaging anatomy at these common sites of impingement. We will review the imaging and anatomy of the ulnar nerve at the elbow and wrist, and we will present magnetic resonance imaging examples of different causes of ulnar neuropathy, including trauma, overuse, arthritis, masses and mass-like lesions, and systemic diseases. Treatment options will also be briefly discussed. PMID:26995584

  11. Ulnar Nerve Entrapment at the Elbow (Cubital Tunnel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... like changes in activities and bracing. If conservative methods do not improve your symptoms, or if the ... take pressure off of the nerve if: • Nonsurgical methods have not improved your condition • The ulnar nerve ...

  12. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW. PMID:26788268

  13. Ulnar nerve reconstruction with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene conduit.

    PubMed

    Stanec, S; Stanec, Z

    1998-12-01

    The ulnar nerve of a 22-year-old woman was reconstructed by expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) conduit, 141 days after nerve transection at the distal forearm level. A 2.9 cm nerve gap was bridged by a corrugated, 3.9 cm long, 6 mm diameter ePTFE tube. At final evaluation 3 years later the patient achieved excellent motor and sensory recovery. Exploration of the tube, at that time, showed macroscopically normal nerve inside the conduit. PMID:10209470

  14. Atraumatic Main-En-Griffe due to Ulnar Nerve Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Aswani, Yashant; Saifi, Shenaz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Leprosy is the most common form of treatable peripheral neuropathy. However, in spite of effective chemotherapeutic agents, neuropathy and associated deformities are seldom ameliorated to a significant extent. This necessitates early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical examination of peripheral nerves is highly subjective and inaccurate. Electrophysiological studies are painful and expensive. Ultrasonography circumvents these demerits and has emerged as the preferred modality for probing peripheral nerves. Case Report We describe a 23-year-old male who presented with weakness and clawing of the medial digits of the right hand (main-en-griffe) and a few skin lesions since eighteen months. The right ulnar nerve was thickened and exquisitely tender on palpation. Ultrasonography revealed an extensive enlargement of the nerve with presence of intraneural color Doppler signals suggestive of acute neuritis. Skin biopsy was consistent with borderline tuberculoid leprosy with type 1 lepra reaction. The patient was started on WHO multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy along with antiinflammatory drugs. Persistence of vascular signals at two months’ follow-up has led to continuation of the steroid therapy. The patient is compliant with the treatment and is on monthly follow-up. Conclusions In this manuscript, we review multitudinous roles of ultrasonography in examination of peripheral nerves in leprosy. Ultrasonography besides diagnosing enlargement of nerves in leprosy and acute neuritis due to lepra reactions, guides the duration of anti-inflammatory therapy in lepra reactions. Further, it is relatively inexpensive, non-invasive and easily available. All these features make ultrasonography a preferred modality for examination of peripheral nerves. PMID:26788223

  15. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Double Crush Syndrome of the Ulnar Nerve by the Anconeus Epitrochlearis and a Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Uk; Kim, Min-Wook; Kim, Jae Min

    2016-01-01

    Double compression of the ulnar nerve, including Guyon's canal syndrome associated with cubital tunnel syndrome caused by the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle, is a very rare condition. We present a case of double crush syndrome of the ulnar nerve at the wrist and elbow in a 55-year-old man, as well as a brief review of the literature. Although electrodiagnostic findings were consistent with an ulnar nerve lesion only at the elbow, ultrasonography revealed a ganglion compressing the ulnar nerve at the hypothenar area and the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle lying in the cubital tunnel. Careful physical examination and ultrasound assessment of the elbow and wrist confirmed the clinical diagnosis prior to surgery. PMID:26885291

  16. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Double Crush Syndrome of the Ulnar Nerve by the Anconeus Epitrochlearis and a Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Uk; Kim, Min-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Double compression of the ulnar nerve, including Guyon's canal syndrome associated with cubital tunnel syndrome caused by the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle, is a very rare condition. We present a case of double crush syndrome of the ulnar nerve at the wrist and elbow in a 55-year-old man, as well as a brief review of the literature. Although electrodiagnostic findings were consistent with an ulnar nerve lesion only at the elbow, ultrasonography revealed a ganglion compressing the ulnar nerve at the hypothenar area and the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle lying in the cubital tunnel. Careful physical examination and ultrasound assessment of the elbow and wrist confirmed the clinical diagnosis prior to surgery. PMID:26885291

  17. Tendon Transfers Part II: Transfers for Ulnar Nerve Palsy and Median Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sammer, Douglas M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives After reading this article (part II of II), the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the anatomy and function of the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm and hand. 2. Describe the clinical deficits associated with injury to each nerve. 3. Describe the indications, benefits, and drawbacks for various tendon transfer procedures used to treat median and ulnar nerve palsy.4. Describe the treatment of combined nerve injuries. 5. Describe postoperative care and possible complications associated with these tendon transfer procedures. Summary This article discusses the use of tendon transfer procedures for treatment of median and ulnar nerve palsy as well as combined nerve palsies. Postoperative management and potential complications are also discussed. PMID:19730287

  18. Unusual Communications between the Cutaneous Branches of Ulnar Nerve in the Palm.

    PubMed

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Padavinangady, Abhinitha; Nayak, Satheesha B; Jetti, Raghu

    2015-03-01

    Variations of dorsal and volar digital cutaneous branches of ulnar nerve are of tremendous clinical importance for successful regional nerve blocks, skin flaps, carpal tunnel release and placement of electrodes for electrophysiological studies. With the aforementioned clinical implications it is worth to report the variations of cutaneous branches of ulnar nerve. In the current case, we have encountered a rare variation (Kaplan`s anastomosis) of ulnar nerve, in the right upper limb. We have noticed that the dorsal cutaneous branch of ulnar nerve divided into three branches, the lateral two branches supplied the skin of the medial one and half fingers of the dorsum of hand. The medial branch established communications with the superficial branches of ulnar nerve and distributed to the skin of the one and half fingers of the volar aspect of hand. The possible outcome of this communications is discussed. Course and distribution of ulnar nerve on the contralateral side was found to be normal. PMID:25954612

  19. Unusual Communications between the Cutaneous Branches of Ulnar Nerve in the Palm

    PubMed Central

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Nayak, Satheesha B.; Jetti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Variations of dorsal and volar digital cutaneous branches of ulnar nerve are of tremendous clinical importance for successful regional nerve blocks, skin flaps, carpal tunnel release and placement of electrodes for electrophysiological studies. With the aforementioned clinical implications it is worth to report the variations of cutaneous branches of ulnar nerve. In the current case, we have encountered a rare variation (Kaplan`s anastomosis) of ulnar nerve, in the right upper limb. We have noticed that the dorsal cutaneous branch of ulnar nerve divided into three branches, the lateral two branches supplied the skin of the medial one and half fingers of the dorsum of hand. The medial branch established communications with the superficial branches of ulnar nerve and distributed to the skin of the one and half fingers of the volar aspect of hand. The possible outcome of this communications is discussed. Course and distribution of ulnar nerve on the contralateral side was found to be normal. PMID:25954612

  20. Anatomical variations of the ulnar and median nerves in the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Artico, M; De Santis, S; Cavallotti, D; Cavallotti, C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of our study was the evaluation of the anatomy of ulnar and median nerves in the upper limb in order to ameliorate knowledge on the clinical anatomy of these nerves. In fact, further information on this topic may be useful owing to its possible clinical relevance when planning surgical anatomy and reconstructive surgery in tumor affected and injured patients. The relationships between ulnar and median nerve and neighbouring anatomical structures have been examined, together with the course and ramification of the ulnar and median nerves in six fresh cadavers. Moreover, we have performed a review of the literature. Four specific aspects were evaluated during dissection: 1) division modality of the ulnar nerve at the wrist; 2) anatomical details of the medial humeral epicondyle; 3) anatomical relationships between median nerve and retinaculum flexorum; 4) median-ulnar nerves anastomosis. Our results show that: the medial humeral epicondyle shows specific anatomical details in relation to the ulnar nerve; the relationships between the median nerve and the transverse carpal ligament may be characterized by one or two nerve trunks (two cases of bifid median nerve in our experience); median-ulnar nerve anastomosis may be also found at various levels. Comparing our results with those of the available literature we can conclude that anatomical variations of ulnar and median nerve in the upper limb are not an infrequent finding and their clinical, diagnostic and surgical relevance should be considered. PMID:11103856

  1. Ultrasound-guided Percutaneous Medial Pinning of Pediatric Supracondylar Humeral Fractures to avoid Ulnar Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Soldado, Francisco; Knorr, Jorge; Haddad, Sleiman; Diaz-Gallardo, Paula; Palau-Gonzalez, Jordi; Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Karmali, Samir; de Gauzy, Jérôme Sales

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medial pinning is one of the most controversial aspects of the surgical treatment of supracondylar fractures (SHF) owing to the risk of ulnar nerve injury. Aim: To evaluate the safety and usefulness of medial pinning for SHF using ultrasound imaging for ulnar nerve visualization. Methods: Fifteen children, with a mean age of 60 months, with displaced SHF were treated with a crossed-pinning configuration after fracture reduction. Intraoperative ultrasound was used to guide medial pin insertion to avoid ulnar nerve injury. Results: Cubital tunnel anatomy was easily identified in all children. All children showed a subluxating ulnar nerve that required elbow extension to about 90º before medial pin insertion. None suffered ulnar nerve dysfunction after using the referred technique. Conclusions: Although technically demanding, ultrasound may be a valuable adjuvant to avoid ulnar nerve injury while performing a medial pinning in pediatric SHF. PMID:26213700

  2. Evaluation of the function status of the ulnar nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Liu, N; Wang, Y W; Zhang, Z C; Zheng, L N; Zhu, J

    2015-01-01

    Many carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients have symptoms in both the median and ulnar digits more frequently than in the median digits alone. This is possibly because of close anatomical contiguity of the carpal tunnel and Guyon's canal, and the high pressure may also affect the latter, causing indirect compression of ulnar nerve fibers. Thus, we evaluated the functional status of the ulnar nerve in patients with CTS in order to investigate the relationship between ulnar nerve impairment and sensory symptoms of the ulnar territory. Electrophysiological studies were conducted in CTS patients and healthy controls. CTS patients were divided into the mild/moderate group and severe group; they were further divided into the symptomatic and asymptomatic subgroups according to the sensory symptom of the fifth digit region. The findings suggest that CTS patients could have coexisting ulnar nerve wrist entrapments that might exacerbate the severity of CTS. Sensory impairment in the ulnar territory was observed more frequently in the mild/moderate stage of CTS, which is associated with ulnar nerve involvement. These findings also suggest that damage to the ulnar nerve fibers caused by compression forces in Guyon's canal may underlie the ulnar spread of symptoms in CTS. PMID:25966136

  3. [Indications and methods of treatment of injuries of the peripheral nerves. Comparative clinical results of the management of the median nerve and ulnar nerve using the epineural, perineural fascicular suture and transplantation].

    PubMed

    Margić, K; Poljsak, Z; Pavlin, I

    1983-01-01

    In the last five years we have treated 95 lesions of the peripheral nerves. There were 24 lacerations of median and 25 of ulnar nerve. The results of treatment of median and ulnar nerve with epineural, perineural fascicular suture and transplant have been compared. The authors have tested the localisation of touch, two-point discrimination, recognition of small items, basic positions of the hand, precise action of the hand, and the motor power according to the Seddon's scale. The results were divided in excellent (2PD: 3-5 mm, power 5), very good (2PD: 6-9 mm. power 4), good (2 PD: 10-12 mm. power 4), fair (2PD: over 12 mm. power 3) and poor. The good results are groups excellent, very good and good. There were 44% good results using perineural fascicular suture of median nerve and 50% of ulnar nerve. The other methods have given poor results. PMID:6364660

  4. Ulnar nerve entrapment neuropathy at the elbow: relationship between the electrophysiological findings and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Halac, Gulistan; Topaloglu, Pinar; Demir, Saliha; Cıkrıkcıoglu, Mehmet Ali; Karadeli, Hasan Huseyin; Ozcan, Muhammet Emin; Asil, Talip

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Ulnar nerve neuropathies are the second most commonly seen entrapment neuropathies of the upper extremities after carpal tunnel syndrome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate pain among ulnar neuropathy patients by the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale and determine if it correlated with the severity of electrophysiologicalfindings. [Subjects and Methods] We studied 34 patients with clinical and electrophysiological ulnar nerve neuropathies at the elbow. After diagnosis of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, all patients underwent the Turkish version of the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale. [Results] The ulnar entrapment neuropathy at the elbow was classified as class-2, class-3, class-4, and class-5 (Padua Distal Ulnar Neuropathy classification) for 15, 14, 4, and 1 patient, respectively. No patient included in class-1 was detected. According to Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale, 24 patients scored under 12 points. The number of patients who achieved more than 12 points was 10. Groups were compared by using the χ2 test, and no difference was detected. There was no correlation between the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale and electromyographic findings. [Conclusion] We found that the severity of electrophysiologic findings of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow did not differ between neuropathic and non-neuropathic groups as assessed by the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale. PMID:26311956

  5. Applied anatomical study of the vascularized ulnar nerve and its blood supply for cubital tunnel syndrome at the elbow region.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Xiu-Li; He, Qiong; Hu, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Liu, Zheng-Hai; Wen, Yong; Peng, Tian-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is often accompanied by paresthesia in ulnar nerve sites and hand muscle atrophy. When muscle weakness occurs, or after failure of more conservative treatments, anterior transposition is used. In the present study, the ulnar nerve and its blood vessels were examined in the elbows of 18 adult cadavers, and the external diameter of the nutrient vessels of the ulnar nerve at the point of origin, the distances between the origin of the vessels and the medial epicondyle of the humerus, and the length of the vessels accompanying the ulnar nerve in the superior ulnar collateral artery, the inferior ulnar collateral artery, and the posterior ulnar recurrent artery were measured. Anterior transposition of the vascularized ulnar nerve was performed to treat cubital tunnel syndrome. The most appropriate distance that the vascularized ulnar nerve can be moved to the subcutaneous tissue under tension-free conditions was 1.8 ± 0.6 cm (1.1-2.5 cm), which can be used as a reference value during the treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome with anterior transposition of the vascularized ulnar nerve. PMID:25788935

  6. Applied anatomical study of the vascularized ulnar nerve and its blood supply for cubital tunnel syndrome at the elbow region

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei-xiu-li; He, Qiong; Hu, Zhong-lin; Chen, Sheng-hua; Lv, Yun-cheng; Liu, Zheng-hai; Wen, Yong; Peng, Tian-hong

    2015-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is often accompanied by paresthesia in ulnar nerve sites and hand muscle atrophy. When muscle weakness occurs, or after failure of more conservative treatments, anterior transposition is used. In the present study, the ulnar nerve and its blood vessels were examined in the elbows of 18 adult cadavers, and the external diameter of the nutrient vessels of the ulnar nerve at the point of origin, the distances between the origin of the vessels and the medial epicondyle of the humerus, and the length of the vessels accompanying the ulnar nerve in the superior ulnar collateral artery, the inferior ulnar collateral artery, and the posterior ulnar recurrent artery were measured. Anterior transposition of the vascularized ulnar nerve was performed to treat cubital tunnel syndrome. The most appropriate distance that the vascularized ulnar nerve can be moved to the subcutaneous tissue under tension-free conditions was 1.8 ± 0.6 cm (1.1–2.5 cm), which can be used as a reference value during the treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome with anterior transposition of the vascularized ulnar nerve. PMID:25788935

  7. Ulnar-to-median nerve anastomosis in the forearm. Review and report of 2 new cases.

    PubMed

    Resende, L A; Adamo, A S; Kimaid, P A; Castro, H A; Canheu, A C; Schelp, A O

    2000-06-01

    The ulnar-to-median nerve anastomosis in the forearm is a very rare occurrence, not mentioned in many anatomical text books. We found only 4 cases cited in medical literature. Here we describe 2 new cases, for which diagnosis was suspected when the compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle (APB), obtained by maximal stimulation of the median nerve at the elbow, was lower than that obtained at the wrist. The diagnosis was confirmed by stimulation of the ulnar nerve at the elbow, which evoked a compound muscle action potential of the APB with a clear negative initial deflection without volume-conducted potential. PMID:10907604

  8. Paediatric medial epicondyle fracture without elbow dislocation associated with intra-articular ulnar nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Elbashir, Mohamed; Domos, Peter; Latimer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Elbow fractures are not uncommon in children, and some are associated with neurovascular injuries. Having a nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation is rare and was not described in the literature. Here, we have reported probably the first case of an ulnar nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation. A 9-year-old female presented to the emergency department after falling off a monkey bar. She had a painful, swollen and tender right elbow with no history or clinical signs of an elbow dislocation but had complete ulnar nerve palsy. She was managed initially with analgesia and plaster application and was taken directly to the operating theatre. Examination under anaesthesia revealed no elbow joint instability. The ulnar nerve was found entrapped between the trochlea and proximal ulna, intra-articularly. The medial epicondyle was also found avulsed from the humerus, with an incarcerated medial epicondylar fragment in the elbow joint. PMID:26546588

  9. Missed ulnar nerve injury and closed forearm fracture in a child.

    PubMed

    Amit, Batra; Ashish, Devgan; Vinit, Verma; Raj, Singh; Shivani, Batra; Narender, Magu; Rohit, Singla; Paritosh, Gogna; Navdeep, Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Ulnar nerve injury in closed fracture of forearm in children is uncommon.Commonly, neurapraxia is the reason for this palsy but other severe injuries or nerve entrapment has been reported in some cases. The importance of diagnosis concerning the types of the nerve injury lies in the fact that they have totally different management.We present a case of ulnar nerve deficit in a child following a closed fracture of the forearm bones. It is imperative to diagnose exact cause of palsy as it forms the basis for treatment. MRI scan can help diagnosis and accordingly guide the management. Simple nerve contusion should be treated conservatively, and exploration with fixation of the fracture should be done in lacerations and entrapments of the nerve. Surgery is not the treatment of choice in cases that could be managed conservatively. PMID:23910681

  10. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  11. Ultrasonographic reference sizes of the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots in healthy Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Mukai, Tomoya; Ueno, Hiroki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify, for practical use, ultrasonographic reference values for nerve sizes at multiple sites, including entrapment and non-entrapment sites along the median and ulnar nerves and among the cervical nerve roots. We verified reliable sites and site-based differences between the reference values. In addition, we found associations between the reference nerve sizes and several physical characteristics (gender, dominant hand, age, height, weight, body mass index [BMI] and wrist circumference). Nerves were measured bilaterally at 26 sites or levels in 60 healthy Japanese adults (29 males; age, 35.4 9.7 y; BMI, 22.3 3.6 kg/m(2); wrist circumference, 16.0 1.3 cm on the right side and 15.9 1.2 cm on the left side). The mean reference nerve sizes were 5.6-9.1 mm(2) along the median nerve, 4.1-6.7 mm(2) along the ulnar nerve and 2.14-3.39 mm among the cervical nerve roots. Multifactorial regression analyses revealed that the physical characteristics most strongly associated with nerve size were age, BMI and wrist circumference at the entrapment sites (F= 7.6, p < 0.01, at the pisiform bone level of the carpal tunnel; F= 15.1, p < 0.001, at the level of Guyon's canal), as well as wrist circumference and gender at the non-entrapment sites (F= 70.6, p < 0.001, along the median nerve; F= 24.7, p < 0.001, along the ulnar nerve). Our results suggest that the factors with the greatest influence on nerve size differed between entrapment and non-entrapment sites. Site-based differences in nerve size were determined using one-way analyses of variance (p < 0.001). Intra- and inter-observer reliability was highest for the median nerve, at both the distal wrist crease and mid-humerus; at the arterial split along the ulnar nerve; and at the fifth cervical nerve root level. No systematic error was indicated by Bland-Altman analysis; the coefficients of variation were 5.5%-9.2% for intra-observer reliability and 7.1%-8.7% for inter-observer reliability. PMID:23830101

  12. Anastomosis between the median and ulnar nerve in the forearm. An anatomic study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kazakos, Konstantin J; Smyrnis, Anastasios; Xarchas, Konstantin C; Dimitrakopoulou, Alexandra; Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros

    2005-02-01

    Anastomosis between the median and ulnar nerve in the forearm has been shown to be of clinical significance. We aimed to determine the presence of median to ulnar nerve communications in the forearm of the Greek population by anatomical studies. At the same time we defined the types and patterns of the anastomoses found and compared them to those reported in similar studies that were retrieved after a wide review of the literature. One hundred and sixty three forearms from 100 cadavers (53 males, 47 females, 25-91 years old) were carefully dissected to observe median and ulnar nerve communication. The anastomosis was found in 10 cadavers; it was bilateral in 4 and unilateral in 6, on the right side in four and on the left side in two. It occurred in 7 of the 53 male cadavers (14%) and in 3 of the 47 females (6.5%). Overall, the anastomosis was found in 14 of the 163 forearms (8.6%). No case of ulnar to median nerve anastomosis in the forearm was found in anatomical examination. PMID:15792204

  13. Distal Ulna Fracture With Delayed Ulnar Nerve Palsy in a Baseball Player.

    PubMed

    Pasque, Charles B; Pearson, Clark; Margo, Bradley; Ethel, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We present a case report of a college baseball player who sustained a blunt-trauma, distal-third ulna fracture from a thrown ball with delayed presentation of ulnar nerve palsy. Even after his ulna fracture had healed, the nerve injury made it difficult for the athlete to control a baseball while throwing, resulting in a delayed return to full baseball activity for 3 to 4 months. He had almost complete nerve recovery by 6 months after his injury and complete nerve recovery by 1 year after his injury. PMID:26866319

  14. Concomitant Lipoma and Ganglion Causing Ulnar Nerve Compression at the Wrist: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lee Ping; Tan, Jacqueline Siau Woon

    2016-04-01

    We present a rare case of ulnar nerve compression caused by concurrent lumps-a lipoma and a ganglion at the wrist, with no prior report cited in the English literature. This case illustrates the possibility of dual concurrent pathologies causing ulnar neuropathy and the importance of not missing one. PMID:25536205

  15. Endometriotic lesions of the lower troncular nerves.

    PubMed

    Niro, J; Fournier, M; Oberlin, C; Le Tohic, A; Panel, P

    2014-10-01

    Although exceptional, endometriotic lesions of the troncular nerves of the lower limb may occur and are often diagnosed with delay. We report, hereby, the first case of femoral nerve endometriosis the treatment of which consisted of radical resection with femoral nerve transplant. We completed a review of the literature on sciatic nerve endometriotic lesions and discussed the physiopathology and surgical treatment. PMID:25267476

  16. Electroneurography of right median and ulnar nerves in diabetic patients with and without retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Tupković, Emir; Pavljesević, Suzana; Nisić, Mediha; Salihović, Samiha

    2007-08-01

    In this study we examined motor and sensory conduction velocities in right median and ulnar nerves in diabetic patients. Control group consisted of 25 healthy volunteers (13 males) with average age of 52 years. The first examined group consisted of 25 diabetic patients (13 males) without retinal changes, 59,6 years old on average, and the second group consisted of 40 patients (15 males) 59,4 years old on average: 22 of them with type 1, and 18 with type 2 retinal changes. The motor and sensory conduction velocities in right median nerve in the control group were significantly higher than those measured in the first group (p<0,0005 for motor, and p=0,0027 for sensory velocity), and the second group (p<0,0001 for motor, and p=0,0001 for sensory velocity). Significantly higher conduction velocities in sensory median nerve were compared between the examined groups (p<0,001), but motor conduction velocity was not significantly higher (p=0,09). The motor conduction velocity in ulnar nerve in the control group was significantly higher in comparison with the patients of first (p=0,0027) and second examined group (p=0,0001). The sensory conduction velocity in ulnar nerve was not significantly higher compared with the first (p=0,081), and significantly higher compared with the second examined group (p<0,0001). The sensory conduction velocity of ulnar nerve was significantly higher (p=0,019) in diabetic patients without retinopathy compared with patients with retinopathy. Diabetic patients with retinal changes have higher risk of developing more severe neurophysiologic signs of neuropathy. So, simple observation with ophthalmoscope may be useful diagnostic tool in its determination and may be the target of further therapeutic strategy. PMID:17848148

  17. Median ulnar nerves communication in the forearm: a study with autopsy material.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Luis E; Forero, Pedro L; Quintero, Iván D

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of median-ulnar communication in the forearm presents variability in different population groups. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and morphologic expression of the median-ulnar communication in a sample of the Colombian population. One hundred and eight forearms of autopsy material at the National Institute of Forensic Medicine of Bucaramanga, Colombia were studied. Using an approach of the flexor compartment of forearm the median and ulnar nerves were dissected and the communications between these two structures were characterized. The communicating branch occurred in 28 (25.9%) forearms. It occurred unilaterally in 12 specimens and bilaterally in 8, with statistically significant difference (P=0.01). The communication between the anterior interosseous and ulnar nerves was most frequent, observed in 13 (46.4%) forearms. The length of the communicating branch was 56.9 +/- 8.3 mm. The distance of the proximal and distal points of the communicating branch to the bi- epicondylar line was 59.6 +/- 15.4 mm and 102.7 +/- 23.5 mm respectively. The length of the forearm was 269.8 +/- 15.9 mm. A projection of the communicating branch from the upper third to the midthird of the forearm was observed. The incidence of the median-ulnar communication in the present study is in the high rank reported in the literature; there is an agreement with prior studies in finding more numerous communicating branches in the right forearm. The median-ulnar communication should be taken into account for surgical approach of the forearm. PMID:26749683

  18. Anatomical Study of the Ulnar Nerve Variations at High Humeral Level and Their Possible Clinical and Diagnostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Guru, Anitha; Kumar, Naveen; Ravindra Shanthakumar, Swamy; Patil, Jyothsna; Nayak Badagabettu, Satheesha; Aithal Padur, Ashwini; Nelluri, Venu Madhav

    2015-01-01

    Background. Descriptive evaluation of nerve variations plays a pivotal role in the usefulness of clinical or surgical practice, as an anatomical variation often sets a risk of nerve palsy syndrome. Ulnar nerve (UN) is one amongst the major nerves involved in neuropathy. In the present anatomical study, variations related to ulnar nerve have been identified and its potential clinical implications discussed. Materials and Method. We examined 50 upper limb dissected specimens for possible ulnar nerve variations. Careful observation for any aberrant formation and/or communication in relation to UN has been carried out. Results. Four out of 50 limbs (8%) presented with variations related to ulnar nerve. Amongst them, in two cases abnormal communication with neighboring nerve was identified and variation in the formation of UN was noted in remaining two limbs. Conclusion. An unusual relation of UN with its neighboring nerves, thus muscles, and its aberrant formation might jeopardize the normal sensori-motor behavior. Knowledge about anatomical variations of the UN is therefore important for the clinicians in understanding the severity of ulnar nerve neuropathy related complications. PMID:26246909

  19. Anatomical Study of the Ulnar Nerve Variations at High Humeral Level and Their Possible Clinical and Diagnostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Anitha; Kumar, Naveen; Ravindra Shanthakumar, Swamy; Patil, Jyothsna; Nayak Badagabettu, Satheesha; Aithal Padur, Ashwini; Nelluri, Venu Madhav

    2015-01-01

    Background. Descriptive evaluation of nerve variations plays a pivotal role in the usefulness of clinical or surgical practice, as an anatomical variation often sets a risk of nerve palsy syndrome. Ulnar nerve (UN) is one amongst the major nerves involved in neuropathy. In the present anatomical study, variations related to ulnar nerve have been identified and its potential clinical implications discussed. Materials and Method. We examined 50 upper limb dissected specimens for possible ulnar nerve variations. Careful observation for any aberrant formation and/or communication in relation to UN has been carried out. Results. Four out of 50 limbs (8%) presented with variations related to ulnar nerve. Amongst them, in two cases abnormal communication with neighboring nerve was identified and variation in the formation of UN was noted in remaining two limbs. Conclusion. An unusual relation of UN with its neighboring nerves, thus muscles, and its aberrant formation might jeopardize the normal sensori-motor behavior. Knowledge about anatomical variations of the UN is therefore important for the clinicians in understanding the severity of ulnar nerve neuropathy related complications. PMID:26246909

  20. Compression neuropathy of the ulnar digital nerves in the thumbs of a massage therapist.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Chen, Chien-Lian

    2014-01-01

    Compression neuropathies of digital nerves, caused by hypertrophied or anomalous muscles, are rare compared with such occurrences above the wrist. We reported a case of compression neuropathy of the ulnar digital nerves in bilateral thumbs of a massage therapist. Entrapment of the digital nerves by the hypertrophied first dorsal interosseous and adductor pollicis muscles over the first web space of the right hand was detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical debulking of the muscles and neurolysis were performed on the dominant right hand. The left hand was successfully treated with botulinum toxin. No recurrence was noted in a follow-up of 36 months. PMID:23486120

  1. High origin of dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve and variations in its branching pattern and distribution: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Ulnar nerve is a branch of the brachial plexus. In the front of the forearm, normally near the wrist joint, it gives a dorsal cutaneous branch which supplies the skin of the dorsum of the hand. Case presentation The present case reports a very rare finding, the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve along with the main nerve trunk originated between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, after descending along the medial border of the forearm extensor surface, on the dorsal aspect of the wrist it is divided into three branches, one medial and two lateral. The medial most division received a communicating branch from the superficial ramus of the ulnar nerve and continued as the medial proper digital nerve of the little finger. The lateral two divisions became cutaneous on the medial half of the dorsum of the hand along the medial three digits i.e. radial and ulnar side of little, ring and middle finger. Conclusion The site, extent of injury, variations and the delay in the treatment, significantly influences the outcome of ulnar nerve repair. Thus, an adequate knowledge of all possible variations in the ulnar nerve may be important for clinicians and may help to explain uncommon symptoms. PMID:20062647

  2. [Permanent abduction of the little finger without ulnar nerve palsy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yacoubi, H; Najib, A; Daoudi, A

    2012-10-01

    Wartenberg's sign, or permanent abduction of the little finger, occurs in the context of sequelae of ulnar nerve palsy. Its presence alone is rarely reported in the literature and is due to avulsion of the insertion of the third volar interosseous muscle. Several surgical techniques to correct this sign are reported in the literature. The authors report the case of a Wartenberg's sign without ulnar nerve palsy due to traumatic avulsion of the third volar interosseous muscle that was treated by a transfer of the extensor digiti minimi onto the radial side of the extensor digitorium communis according to technique of Bellan et al. After 1-year follow-up, result was good with no recurrence of any deformities and a normal active extension. PMID:23084653

  3. In situ decompression of the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Robert P; Zlotolow, Dan A

    2007-08-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is a clinical entity that has been described for more than a century. Numerous conservative and surgical treatments have evolved to address this condition, but a consensus has yet to emerge regarding optimal treatment. Evidence suggests a limited but potentially valuable role for in situ decompression of the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel. Future research will undoubtedly clarify this role and contribute to the development of a standard treatment protocol. PMID:17765584

  4. Low profile radial nerve palsy orthosis with radial and ulnar deviation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Jean; Ollason, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who sustain damage to the radial nerve experience a significant loss in functional use of the hand. Traditional orthoses have been effective in providing assistance with wrist stabilization and finger/thumb MP extension. These authors adapted a low profile orthosis to provide the necessary support while allowing radial and ulnar deviation of the wrist, thus increasing functional use of the hand.--Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26190027

  5. Ulnar nerve neuropraxia after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Konczak, Clark R

    2005-01-01

    A case is presented that illustrates and discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis and chiropractic management of a 50-year-old male presenting with a case of ulnar neuropraxia following extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy. Onset is believed to be due to the patient’s arm position in full abduction and external rotation during the lithotripsy procedure. Motor abnormalities related to the ulnar nerve were noted in the absence of distinct sensory findings. Chiropractic treatment focused on relief of the patient’s pain during the course of the condition. Treatment may have helped in the rapid and complete resolution of his symptoms in this case. Poor patient positioning on hard surfaces, for extended periods may place pressure on superficial nerves resulting in nerve injury. In this case, the outcome was excellent, with complete resolution of symptoms less than one week later. The prognosis for this type of neuropraxia is usually good with conservative management. The patient history and chronological clinical course strongly suggest a causal association between the patient’s position during the procedure and the development of the ulnar neuropraxia. PMID:17549150

  6. Adipose Flap Versus Fascial Sling for Anterior Subcutaneous Transposition of the Ulnar Nerve.

    PubMed

    Verveld, Caroline J; Danoff, Jonathan R; Lombardi, Joseph M; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2016-02-01

    Perineural scarring is a major cause of recurrent symptoms after anterior subcutaneous transposition secured with a fascial sling. Use of a vascularized adipose flap to secure the anteriorly transposed ulnar nerve can help reduce nerve adherence and may enhance nerve recovery. In the study reported here, we retrospectively reviewed the long-term outcomes of ulnar nerve anterior subcutaneous transposition secured with either an adipose flap (16 patients) or a fascial sling (17 patients). The 33 patients underwent physical examinations and completed the DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) questionnaire, visual analog scales (VASs), and the Modified Bishop Rating Scale (MBRS). There were no significant differences in DASH (P = .673), VAS pain (P = .413), or VAS weakness (P = .362) scores between the adipose flap and fascial sling groups. Physical examinations revealed no significant differences in flexion-extension arc (P = .668) or supination-pronation arc (P = .226) between the operated and nonoperated extremities. Lateral pinch strength and grip strength were comparable. On the MBRS, excellent and good outcomes were reported by 62.5% and 37.5% of the adipose flap patients, respectively, and 59% and 41% of the fascial sling patients. The contribution of perineural scarring to postoperative recurrent ulnar neuropathy is well documented. We think the pedicled adipofascial flap benefits the peripheral nerve by providing a scar tissue barrier and an optimal milieu for vascular regeneration. For all patients in the present study, symptoms improved, though the adipose flap and fascial sling groups were not significantly different in their objective outcomes. Subjective results were slightly better for the adipose flap patients but not significantly so. These findings indicate that, compared with the current standard of care, adipose flaps are more efficacious in securing the anteriorly transposed nerve. PMID:26866320

  7. Chronic Posttraumatic Dislocation of Radial Head With Ulnar Nerve Entrapment in a Child: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiangyu; Wang, Wei; Yu, Shiyang; Yan, Hede; Zhan, Yulin; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-06-01

    We present an unusual case of chronic posttraumatic anteromedial dislocation of radial head with direct ulnar nerve entrapment in a child. Ulnar nerve decompression, open reduction of the radial head, and annular ligament reconstruction using a palmaris longus tendon graft were performed, and a satisfactory functional outcome was achieved at the 15-month follow-up. Through a review of literature, we conclude that early diagnosis and management for radial head dislocation are recommended to avoid nerve symptoms. Besides, open reduction and annular ligament reconstruction with a palmaris longus tendon graft would be an alternative surgery during chronic phase. PMID:27171922

  8. Pressure Monitoring of Intraneural an Perineural Injections Into the Median, Radial, and Ulnar Nerves; Lessons From a Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Andrzej; Szarko, Matthew; Vala, Arber; De Andres, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nerve damage after regional anesthesia has been of great concern to anesthetists. Various modalities have been suggested to recognize and prevent its incidence. An understudied area is the measurement of intraneural pressure during peripheral nerve blockade. Previous investigations have produced contradicting results with only one study being conducted on human cadavers. Objectives: The purpose of this investigation was to systematically record intraneural and perineural injection pressures on the median, ulnar, and radial nerves exclusively as a primary outcome. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography-guided injections of 1 mL of 0.9% NaCl over ten seconds were performed on phenol glycerine embalmed cadaveric median, ulnar, and radial nerves. A total of 60 injections were performed, 30 intraneural and 30 perineural injections. The injections pressure was measured using a controlled disc stimulation device. Anatomic dissection was used to confirm needle placement. Results: Intraneural needle placement produced significantly greater pressures than perineural injections did. The mean generated pressures in median, radial, and ulnar nerves were respectively 29.4 ± 9.3, 27.3 ± 8.5, and 17.9 ± 7.0 pound per square inch (psi) (1 psi = 51.7 mmHg) for the intraneural injections and respectively 7.2 ± 2.5, 8.3 ± 2.5, and 6.7 ± 1.8 psi for perineural injections. Additionally the intraneural injection pressures of the ulnar nerve were lower than those of the median and radial nerves. Conclusions: Obtained results demonstrate significant differences between intraneural and perineural injection pressures in the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. Intraneural injection pressures show low specificity but high sensitivity suggesting that pressure monitoring might be a valuable tool in improving the safety and efficacy of peripheral nerve blockade in regional anesthesia. Peripheral nerves “pressure mapping” hypothetically might show difference amongst various nerves depending on anatomic location, histologic structure, and ultrasonographic appearance. PMID:26161318

  9. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the elbow with rdial, median and ulnar nerve compression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Chen, Qiang; Shen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare, idiopathic proliferative disorder of the synovium. While, PVNS of elbow is extremely rare. We report an 82-year-old female patient with 20-year-history of gradually increased PVNS in her left elbow. The multiple masses were located in anterior, medial and lateral of elbow. Her radial, median and ulnar nerves were compressed by the tumor. We resected tumor of extra-articular part piecemeally and released the compression of nerves. After the surgery, the patient gained a functional recovery. Two years after surgery she had a tumor recurrence, but without any symptoms of nerve compression syndromes. We discussed its clinical diagnosis, radiological features, MRI findings, pathophysiology, and treatment. PMID:26823718

  10. A rare cause of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow area illustrated by six cases: The anconeus epitrochlearis muscle.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, J; Camuzard, O; Gauci, M-O; Winter, M

    2015-12-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment is the second most common compressive neuropathy after carpal tunnel syndrome. The accessory anconeus epitrochlearis muscle - present in 4% to 34% of the general population - is a known, but rare cause of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow. The aim of this article was to expand our knowledge about this condition based on six cases that we encountered at our hospital between 2011 and 2015. Every patient had a typical clinical presentation: hypoesthesia or sensory deficit in the fourth and fifth fingers; potential intrinsics atrophy of the fourth intermetacarpal space; loss of strength and difficulty with fifth finger abduction. Although it can be useful to have the patient undergo ultrasonography or MRI to aid in the diagnosis, only electromyography (EMG) was performed in our patients. EMG revealed clear compression in the ulnar groove, with conduction block and a large drop in nerve conduction velocity. Treatment typically consists of conservative treatment first (splint, analgesics). Surgical treatment should be considered when conservative treatment has failed or the patient presents severe neurological deficits. In all of our patients, the ulnar nerve was surgically released but not transposed. Five of the six patients had completely recovered after 0.5 to 4years follow-up. Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow by the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle is not common, but it must not be ignored. Only ultrasonography, MRI or, preferably, surgical exploration can establish the diagnosis. EMG findings such as reduced motor nerve conduction velocity in a short segment of the ulnar nerve provides evidence of anconeus epitrochlearis-induced neuropathy. PMID:26545312

  11. Development and validation of the patient-rated ulnar nerve evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Compression neuropathy at the elbow causes substantial pain and disability. Clinical research on this disorder is hampered by the lack of a specific outcome measure for this problem. A patient-reported outcome measure, The Patient-Rated Ulnar Nerve Evaluation (PRUNE) was developed to assess pain, symptoms and functional disability in patients with ulnar nerve compression at the elbow. Methods An iterative process was used to develop and test items. Content validity was addressed using patient/expert interviews and review; linking of the scale items to International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) codes; and cognitive coding of the items. Psychometric analysis of data collected from 89 patients was evaluated. Patients completed a longer version of the PRUNE at baseline. Item reduction was performed using statistical analyses and patient input to obtain the final 20 item version. Score distribution, reliability, exploratory factor analysis, correlational construct validity, discriminative known group construct validity, and responsiveness to change were evaluated. Results Content analysis indicated items were aligned with subscale concepts of pain and sensory/motor symptoms impairments; specific upper extremity-related tasks; and that the usual function subscale provided a broad view of self-care, household tasks, major life areas and recreation/ leisure. Four subscales were demonstrated by factor analysis (pain, sensory/motor symptoms impairments, specific activity limitations, and usual activity/role restrictions). The PRUNE and its subscales had high reliability coefficients (ICCs > 0.90; 0.98 for total score) and low absolute error. The minimal detectable change was 7.1 points. It was able to discriminate between clinically meaningful subgroups determined by an independent evaluation assessing work status, residual symptoms, motor recovery, sensory recovery and global improvement) p < 0.01. Responsiveness was excellent (SRM = 1.55). Conclusion The PRUNE is a brief, open-access, patient-reported outcome measure for patients with ulnar nerve compression that demonstrates strong measurement properties. PMID:23617407

  12. A histological analysis of human median and ulnar nerves following implantation of Utah slanted electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Michael B; Wark, Heather A C; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-01-01

    For decades, epineurial electrodes have been used in clinical therapies involving the stimulation of peripheral nerves. However, next generation peripheral nerve interfaces for applications such as neuroprosthetics would benefit from an increased ability to selectively stimulate and record from nerve tissue. This increased selectivity may require the use of more invasive devices, such as the Utah Slanted Electrode Array (USEA). Previous research with USEAs has described the histological response to the implantation of these devices in cats and rats; however, no such data has been presented in humans. Therefore, we describe here the degree of penetration and foreign body reaction to USEAs after a four-week implantation period in human median and ulnar nerves. We found that current array designs penetrate a relatively small percentage of the available endoneurial tissue in these large nerves. When electrode tips were located within the endoneurial tissue, labels for axons and myelin were found in close proximity to electrodes. Consistent with other reports, we found activated macrophages attached to explanted devices, as well as within the tissue surrounding the implantation site. Despite this inflammatory response, devices were able to successfully record single- or multi-unit action potentials and elicit sensory percepts. However, modifying device design to allow for greater nerve penetration, as well as mitigating the inflammatory response to such devices, would likely increase device performance and should be investigated in future research. PMID:26606449

  13. Improving the radial nerve neurodynamic test: An observation of tension of the radial, median and ulnar nerves during upper limb positioning.

    PubMed

    Manvell, Joshua J; Manvell, Nicole; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Reid, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve without increasing strain of adjacent tissue, though this has not been established. This study aimed to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the radial nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the radial nerve and the other two major nerves of the upper limb: median and ulnar. Tension (N) of the radial, median and ulnar nerves was measured simultaneously using three buckle force transducers during seven upper limb positions in the axilla of ten embalmed whole body human cadavers (n = 20 limbs). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc tests determined differences in tension between nerves and between limb positions. A Composite position consisting of ULNT2b (scapular depression, shoulder internal rotation, elbow extension, forearm pronation, wrist flexion) with the addition of shoulder abduction 40° and extension 25°, wrist ulnar deviation and thumb flexion demonstrated significantly greater tension of the radial nerve than any other tested position (mean tension 11.32N; 95% CI 10.25, 12.29, p < 0.01), including ULNT2b (2.20N; 1.84, 2.57; p < 0.01). Additionally, the Composite position demonstrated the greatest difference in tension between the radial and median (mean difference 4.88N; 95% CI 3.16, 6.61; p < 0.01) and radial and ulnar nerves (9.26N, 7.54, 10.99; p < 0.01). This position constitutes a biomechanically plausible test to detect neuropathic pain related to the radial nerve. PMID:25892706

  14. Pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy: a case report of electrodiagnostic, radiographic, and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Payne, Russell; Baccon, Jennifer; Dossett, John; Scollard, David; Byler, Debra; Patel, Akshal; Harbaugh, Kimberly

    2015-11-01

    Hansen's disease, or leprosy, is a chronic infectious disease with many manifestations. Though still a major health concern and leading cause of peripheral neuropathy in the developing world, it is rare in the United States, with only about 150 cases reported each year. Nevertheless, it is imperative that neurosurgeons consider it in the differential diagnosis of neuropathy. The causative organism is Mycobacterium leprae, which infects and damages Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, leading first to sensory and then to motor deficits. A rare presentation of Hansen's disease is pure neuritic leprosy. It is characterized by nerve involvement without the characteristic cutaneous stigmata. The authors of this report describe a case of pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy with corresponding radiographic, electrodiagnostic, and histopathological data. This 11-year-old, otherwise healthy male presented with progressive right-hand weakness and numbness with no cutaneous abnormalities. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings consistent with a severe ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse thickening and enhancement of the ulnar nerve and narrowing at the cubital tunnel. The patient underwent ulnar nerve decompression with biopsy. Pathology revealed acid-fast organisms within the nerve, which was pathognomonic for Hansen's disease. He was started on antibiotic therapy, and on follow-up he had improved strength and sensation in the ulnar nerve distribution. Pure neuritic leprosy, though rare in the United States, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of those presenting with peripheral neuropathy and a history of travel to leprosy-endemic areas. The long incubation period of M. leprae, the ability of leprosy to mimic other conditions, and the low sensitivity of serological tests make clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic evaluation necessary for diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is imperative to prevent permanent neurological injury. PMID:26047418

  15. Factors Influencing Outcomes after Ulnar Nerve Stability-Based Surgery for Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Jung; Oh, Won Taek; Koh, Il Hyun; Kim, Sungmin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Simple decompression of the ulnar nerve has outcomes similar to anterior transposition for cubital tunnel syndrome; however, there is no consensus on the proper technique for patients with an unstable ulnar nerve. We hypothesized that 1) simple decompression or anterior ulnar nerve transposition, depending on nerve stability, would be effective for cubital tunnel syndrome and that 2) there would be determining factors of the clinical outcome at two years. Materials and Methods Forty-one patients with cubital tunnel syndrome underwent simple decompression (n=30) or anterior transposition (n=11) according to an assessment of intra-operative ulnar nerve stability. Clinical outcome was assessed using grip and pinch strength, two-point discrimination, the mean of the disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) survey, and the modified Bishop Scale. Results Preoperatively, two patients were rated as mild, another 20 as moderate, and the remaining 19 as severe according to the Dellon Scale. At 2 years after operation, mean grip/pinch strength increased significantly from 19.4/3.2 kg to 31.1/4.1 kg, respectively. Two-point discrimination improved from 6.0 mm to 3.2 mm. The DASH score improved from 31.0 to 14.5. All but one patient scored good or excellent according to the modified Bishop Scale. Correlations were found between the DASH score at two years and age, pre-operative grip strength, and two-point discrimination. Conclusion An ulnar nerve stability-based approach to surgery selection for cubital tunnel syndrome was effective based on 2-year follow-up data. Older age, worse preoperative grip strength, and worse two-point discrimination were associated with worse outcomes at 2 years. PMID:26847300

  16. Results after simple decompression of the ulnar nerve in cubital tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Kristina; Lukschu, Sandra; Dunda, Sebastian E.; Krapohl, Bjrn Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome represents the second most common compression neuropathy of the upper limb. For more than four decades there has been a controversy about the best surgical treatment modality for cubital tunnel syndrome. In this study the results of 28 patients with simple ulnar nerve decompression are presented. Data analyses refers to clinical examination, personal interview, DASH-questionnaire, and electrophysiological measurements, which were assessed pre- and postoperatively. 28 patients (15 females, 13 males) were included in this study. The average age at time of surgery was 47.78 years (31.6873.10 years). The period from onset of symptoms to surgery ranged from 2 to 24 months (mean 6 months). The mean follow-up was 2.11 years (0.914.16 years). Postoperatively there was a significant decrease in DASH score from 52.6 points to 13.3 points (p<0.001). Also the electrophysiological findings improved significantly: motor nerve conduction velocity increased from 36.0 m/s to 44.4 m/s (p=0.008) and the motor nerve action potential reached 5,470 mV compared to 3,665 mV preoperatively (p=0.018). A significant increase of grip strength from 59% (in comparison to the healthy hand) to 80% was observed (p=0.002). Pain was indicated by means of a visual analog scale from 0 to 100. Preoperatively the median level of pain was 29 and postoperatively it was 0 (p=0.001). The decrease of the two-point-discrimination of the three ulnar finger nerves was also highly significant (p<0.001) from 11.3 mm to 5.0 mm. Significant postoperative improvement was also observed in the clinical examination concerning muscle atrophy (p=0.002), clawing (p=0.008), paresthesia (p=0.004), the sign of Froment (p=0.004), the sign of Hoffmann-Tinel (p=0.021), and clumsiness (p=0.002). Overall nearly 90% of all patients were satisfied with the result of the operation. In 96.4% of all cases, surgery improved the symptoms and in one patient (3.6%) the success was noted as poor because the symptoms remained unchanged. In 35.7% the success was graded as moderate, in 10.7% as good and in 50.0% as very good. PMID:26734540

  17. An anatomical study of the superficial palmar communicating branch between the median and ulnar nerves.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, S; Soames, R; Lamb, C

    2016-02-01

    The palmar communicating branch between the median and ulnar nerves was investigated in 98 hands with the aim of outlining its most common branching patterns and describing its relationship to well-defined anatomical landmarks, including the bistyloid line, wrist crease and flexor retinaculum. Five branching patterns were identified and classified based on their proximal and distal attachments. The palmar communicating branch was found to lie between 26%-79% of the total distance between the metacarpophalangeal joint of the long finger and the wrist crease, and 35%-75% of the total distance between the metacarpophalangeal joint of the long finger and the middle of the bistyloid line. With the aid of the morphometric indices obtained from this study, a risk area where the palmar communicating branch is most likely to be found is outlined. Knowledge of the branching patterns and location of the palmar communicating branch can help clinicians to better assess variations in the patterns of sensation, preserve the nerve during surgical interventions to the palm and better assess post-operative complications involving the branch. PMID:25770900

  18. Transfer of the radial branch of the superficial radial nerve to the sensory branch of the ulnar nerve for sensory restoration after C7-T1 brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we have reconstructed the motor function of patients with C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies through combined nerve and tendon transfers. However, these patients lose not only the motor function of the hand but also the sensation on the ulnar side of the hand. Without sensory recovery, the injured hand may be further damaged, particularly by burns in this contact zone. Therefore, we described a technique to restore the sensation at the ulnar aspect of the hand by performing a transfer of the radial branch of the superficial radial nerve to the sensory branch of the ulnar nerve. PMID:26626199

  19. [Ulnar nerve neuropathy in the elbow region: surgical findings and conclusions about the etiologic mechanism and indications for surgery].

    PubMed

    Nigst, H

    1976-01-01

    The operative findings of 191 cases of so-called tardy ulnar neuritis are demonstrated. They may be divided into 2 groups, neuropathies associated with (67 cases) and without dislocation or subluxation of the nerve (124 cases). Cases of ulnar neuritis associated with dislocation of the nerve showing no other pathologic changes indicate that dislocation of the nerve alone may account for clinical signs. The next step is the formation of adhesions followed at a later date by formation of a pseudoneuroma. As this condition is mostly of congenital origin an additional factor is needed for including clinical manifestations such as direct or chronic professional trauma. Not enough importance has been attached to the strong triceps, with large muscle mass reaching far down to the olecranon, which might cause irritation of the nerve by pressing it against the wall of the sulcus or dislocating it over the epicondyle. In cases of neuropathy without dislocation/subluxation there is always a pathological finding even when there is no pseudoneuroma. The m. epitrochleoanconaeus is found in this category (14 cases, 11%). The cubital tunnel syndrom of OSBORNE in a very large sense (all possible causes of compression distal to the sulcus) has been found 28 times. Therapeutic measures aim at taking the nerve away from the causative irritation (anterior transposition) or at erradicating the cause (resection of the epicondyle, section of the arcus tendineus, excision of a tumor etc.). OSBORNE's operation has been performed only thrice. Subluxation or dislocation of the nerve may follow this procedure or the nerve is left more exposed to pressure than before. Deep submuscular transposition is preferred in patients less than 50 years old but other factors may determine the choice between deep and subcutaneous transposition such as the cause of the neuropathy, arthritis of the elbow joint, strength of the flexor muscle mass etc. PMID:186363

  20. Preliminary Study on the Lesion Location and Prognosis of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome by Motor Nerve Conduction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhu; Jia, Zhi-Rong; Wang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: To study lesions’ location and prognosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CubTS) by routine motor nerve conduction studies (MNCSs) and short-segment nerve conduction studies (SSNCSs, inching test). Methods: Thirty healthy subjects were included and 60 ulnar nerves were studied by inching studies for normal values. Sixty-six patients who diagnosed CubTS clinically were performed bilaterally by routine MNCSs and SSNCSs. Follow-up for 1-year, the information of brief complaints, clinical symptoms, and physical examination were collected. Results: Sixty-six patients were included, 88 of nerves was abnormal by MNCS, while 105 was abnormal by the inching studies. Medial epicondyle to 2 cm above medial epicondyle is the most common segment to be detected abnormally (59.09%), P < 0.01. Twenty-two patients were followed-up, 17 patients’ symptoms were improved. Most of the patients were treated with drugs and modification of bad habits. Conclusions: (1) SSNCSs can detect lesions of compressive neuropathy in CubTS more precisely than the routine motor conduction studies. (2) SSNCSs can diagnose CubTS more sensitively than routine motor conduction studies. (3) In this study, we found that medial epicondyle to 2 cm above the medial epicondyle is the most vulnerable place that the ulnar nerve compressed. (4) The patients had a better prognosis who were abnormal in motor nerve conduction time only, but not amplitude in compressed lesions than those who were abnormal both in velocity and amplitude. Our study suggests that SSNCSs is a practical method in detecting ulnar nerve compressed neuropathy, and sensitive in diagnosing CubTS. The compound muscle action potentials by SSNCSs may predict prognosis of CubTS. PMID:25947398

  1. Gender Differences in Biochemical and Electroneurographic Parameters of Median and Ulnar Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tiric-Campara, Merita; Tupkovic, Emir; Denislic, Miro; Biscevic, Mirza; Skopljak, Amira; Zunic, Lejla; Djelilovic-Vranic, Jasminka; Alajbegovic, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this article are demonstrated differences in the aspects of the metabolic syndrome (MSy) between genders, as well as the association of MSy and neuropathy. The aim: The aim of our study was that in patients with newly discovered metabolic syndrome of both sexes make comparison of fasting blood glucose levels and after oral glucose tolerance test, as well as neurophysiological parameters of n.medianus and n.ulnaris. Patients and methods: All participants were examined dermatologically. The analysis included the 36 male and 36 female respondents with a newly discovered MSy. Results: The average age of men was 52.75±7.5 (40-65) years and women 52.1±7.7 (38-67) years. The average value of fasting blood glucose in women was 5.86±0.87 (4.5-8) mmol/L, and non significantly higher in men (p=0.0969) as 6.19±0.8 (4.7-8) mmol/L. Average values of blood sugar 120 minutes after oral glucose tolerance test were not significantly different (p=0.7052), and was 5.41±1.63 (3.3-9.7) mmol/L in women and 5.27±1.52 (2.7-9.8) mmol/L in men. Median motor velocity were significantly higher in women for n.medianus on the left (p=0.0024), n.ulnaris on the left (p=0.0081) and n.ulnaris on the right side (p=0.0293), and the median motor terminal latency were significantly longer in n.ulnaris on the left (p=0.0349) and n.ulnaris on the right side (p=0.011). There was no significant difference in the sensory conductivity velocity in n.medianus and n.ulnaris between the groups, but the amplitude with the highest peak of the sensory response was significantly higher in n.medianus on the left (p=0.0269) and n.ulnaris on the left side (p=0.0009) in female patients. Conclusion: The results indicate that there are differences in neurophysiological parameters of the investigated nerves between the genders, and that tested nerve structures in the course of MSy are affected slightly more in men. There were no significant differences in skin changes between genders. PMID:26862246

  2. Acute local nerve lesions induced by Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    PubMed

    de Souza Queiróz, Luciano; Marques, Maria Julia; Santo Neto, Humberto

    2002-10-01

    Myonecrosis is one of the most common effects of Bothrops jararacussu venom, but little is known about the action of this venom on other tissues. In this study, we used transmission electron microscopy to examine the influence of B. jararacussu venom on nerve tissue. A sublethal dose of venom (80 microg) was injected into the tibialis anterior muscle of mice which were then killed at various intervals up to 6 h after venom injection. The venom caused massive, progressive axonal damage beginning 2 min after inoculation and after 6 h, all intramuscular nerve bundles were completely depleted of nerve fibers. The most striking finding was myelin breakdown. The ultrastructural changes observed and the time course of the nerve lesions indicated that B. jararacussu venom acted directly on nerve tissue, possibly on the phospholipids of the myelin sheath. The axonal damage reported here may be of relevance to explain, at least in part, the muscular atrophy and poor recovery in muscle function seen in human and experimental envenomations. PMID:12368118

  3. Dermatological and immunological conditions due to nerve lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Domenico; Lupoli, Amalia; Caccavale, Stefano; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2013-01-01

    Summary Some syndromes are of interest to both neurologists and dermatologists, because cutaneous involvement may harbinger symptoms of a neurological disease. The aim of this review is to clarify this aspect. The skin, because of its relationships with the peripheral sensory nervous system, autonomic nervous system and central nervous system, constitutes a neuroimmunoendocrine organ. The skin contains numerous neuropeptides released from sensory nerves. Neuropeptides play a precise role in cutaneous physiology and pathophysiology, and in certain skin diseases. A complex dysregulation of neuropeptides is a feature of some diseases of both dermatological and neurological interest (e.g. cutaneous and nerve lesions following herpes zoster infection, cutaneous manifestations of carpal tunnel syndrome, trigeminal trophic syndrome). Dermatologists need to know when a patient should be referred to a neurologist and should consider this option in those presenting with syndromes of unclear etiology. PMID:24125557

  4. Ultrasonography for nerve compression syndromes of the upper extremity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Ryu, Dae Shik; Kang, Chae Hoon; Jung, Seung Mun; Park, Man Soo; Shin, Dong-Rock

    2015-01-01

    Nerve compression syndromes commonly involve the nerves in the upper extremity. High-resolution ultrasonography (US) can satisfactorily assess these nerves and may detect the morphological changes of the nerves. US can also reveal the causes of nerve compression when structural abnormalities or space-occupying lesions are present. The most common US finding of compression neuropathy is nerve swelling proximal to the compression site. This article reviews the normal anatomic location and US appearances of the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. Common nerve compression syndromes in the upper extremity and their US findings are also reviewed. PMID:25682987

  5. Using multiple high-count electrode arrays in human median and ulnar nerves to restore sensorimotor function after previous transradial amputation of the hand.

    PubMed

    Clark, Gregory A; Wendelken, Suzanne; Page, David M; Davis, Tyler; Wark, Heather A C; Normann, Richard A; Warren, David J; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve interfaces that can record from and stimulate large numbers of different nerve fibers selectively and independently may help restore intuitive and effective motor and sensory function after hand amputation. To this end, and extending previous work in two subjects, two 100-electrode Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) were implanted for four weeks in the residual ulnar and median nerves of a 50-year-old male whose left, dominant hand had been amputated 21 years previously. Subsequent experiments involved 1) recording from USEAs for real-time control of a virtual prosthetic hand; 2) stimulation to evoke somatosensory percepts; and 3) closed-loop sensorimotor control. Overall, partial motor control and sensation were achieved using USEAs. 1) Isolated action potentials recorded from nerve motor fibers, although sparse at these distal implant sites, were activated during fictive movements of the phantom hand. Unlike in our previous two subjects, electromyographic (EMG) activity contributed to most online recordings and decodes, but was reduced in offline analyses using common average referencing. Online and offline Kalman-filter decodes of thresholded neural or EMG spikes independently controlled different digits of the virtual hand with one or two degrees of freedom. 2) Microstimulation through individual electrodes of the two USEAs evoked up to 106 different percepts, covering much of the phantom hand. The subject discriminated among five perceived stimulus locations, and between two somatosensory submodalities at a single location. 3) USEA-evoked percepts, mimicking contact with either a near or distal virtual target, were used to terminate movements of the virtual hand controlled with USEA recordings comprised wholly or mostly of EMG. These results further indicate that USEAs can help restore sensory and motor function after hand loss. PMID:25570369

  6. CD-34 is expressed by a distinctive cell population in peripheral nerve, nerve sheath tumors, and related lesions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, S W; Nickoloff, B J

    1993-10-01

    The pattern of CD-34 antigen (human progenitor cell antigen) immunoreactivity was studied within normal nerve, and a variety of nerve sheath and neuroectodermal tumors. Besides normal nerves, 111 soft tissue tumors were studied, including 17 neurofibromas, 10 neurilemomas, 12 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 1 melanocytic schwannoma, 21 fibroblastic lesions, 31 fibrohistiocytic lesions, seven neuroectodermal lesions, and 10 miscellaneous tumors. CD-34-positive dendritic cells were consistently identified within the endoneurium of normal nerve, all neurofibromas, dermatofibrosarcomas, and Antoni B (but not Antoni A) areas of neurilemomas. CD-34 was not expressed in the majority (eight of 10 cases) of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. CD-34 was also lacking in all fibroblastic lesions (nodular fasciitis, fibromatosis, keloid, fibrosarcoma) and in neuroectodermal tumors that are not generally considered to show true nerve sheath differentiation (neurotropic melanoma, clear cell sarcoma, neuroepithelioma). We conclude that CD-34 (or a closely related epitope) defines a normally occurring nerve sheath cell that appears to be cytologically and immunophenotypically distinct from a fibroblast and conventional Schwann cell. The antigen can also be localized to benign nerve sheath tumors, but tends to be lost in malignant ones. The consistent presence of CD-34 within all 13 cases of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans can be used as evidence in support of the view that these lesions are variants of nerve sheath tumors, and distinct from benign fibrous histiocytomas which consistently lack the antigen. Finally, expression of CD-34 by one of three giant cell fibroblastomas reinforces the close relationship between this tumor and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. PMID:7690524

  7. [Ulnar-sided wrist pain in sports: TFCC lesions and fractures of the hook of the hamate bone as uncommon diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Plöger, M M; Kabir, K; Friedrich, M J; Welle, K; Burger, C

    2015-06-01

    Injuries to the hand and wrist are common sports injuries. The diagnosis and therapy of wrist injuries are becoming more important, especially in increasingly more popular ball-hitting sports, such as golf, tennis and baseball. Ulnar-sided wrist pain is initially often misdiagnosed and treated as tenosynovitis or tendinitis but tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and fractures of the hook of hamate bone, which can also occur in these sports are seldomly diagnosed. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature focussing on TFCC lesions and fractures of the hook of the hamate bone in racquet sports, baseball and golf. A systematic review of the literature was performed in PubMed on the occurrence of TFCC lesions and fractures of the hook of the hamate bone. All studies and case reports were included. Because of the rarity of these injuries there were no exclusion criteria concerning the number of cases. Injuries associated with ball-hitting sports, such as TFCC lesions and fractures of hook of the hamate bone are still underrepresented in the current literature on sports injuries. The diagnosis and treatment of these injuries are often delayed and can severely handicap the performance and career of affected professional as well as amateur athletes. PMID:25956726

  8. Low-power laser efficacy in peripheral nerve lesion treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Nacu, Mihaela; Bruckner, Ion I.; Bunila, Daniela; Vlaiculescu, Mihaela; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Ionescu, Elena

    1998-07-01

    In order to establish the low energy laser (LEL) effects on nervous tissue regeneration in clinical practice, we evaluated in double blind, placebo controlled study, the efficacy of LEL in the functional recovery of 46 patients with distal forearm post- traumatic nerve lesion, after surgical suture. The patients were divided into two groups: A-26 patients were treated with LEL; B- 20 patients, as control, were treated with placebo lasers and classical medical and physical therapy. Lasers used were: HeNe, 632.5 nm wavelength, 2 mW power, and GaAlAs diode laser, 880 nm wavelength, pulsed emission with an output power about 3 mW. Before, during and after the treatment, electromyography (EMG) and electroneurography (ENG) were done in order to measure objectively the efficacy of the treatment. We obtained good results after 4 - 5 months at 80.7% patients from group A and about the same results at 70% patients from group B, but after at least 8 months. The good results were noticed concerning the improvement of EMG and ENG registrations and on the involution of pain, inflammations, movements and force of the fingers. Finally we can say that the favorable results were obtained in at least half the time with LEL treatment faster than with classical therapy.

  9. High- and low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation delay sciatic nerve regeneration after crush lesion in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Abrahão F; Gomes, Joyce R S; Oliveira, Júlia T; Santos, Soraia M G; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Martinez, Ana M B

    2008-03-01

    The stimulation of peripheral nerve regeneration has been studied in different ways, including the use of electrical fields. The capacity of this modality to enhance nerve regeneration is influenced by the parameters used, including current type, frequency, intensity, and means of administration. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a frequently used form of administering electrical current to the body, but its effects on peripheral nerve regeneration are not known. This study assessed the influence of TENS on sciatic nerve regeneration, using a model of crush lesion in the mouse. Mice were stimulated 30 min a day, 5 days a week, for 5 weeks with both high- (100 Hz) and low- (4 Hz) frequency TENS. Control animals had the sciatic nerve crushed but were not stimulated. Assessment was performed weekly by functional analysis using the Static Sciatic Index for the mouse and at the end of the experiment by light and electron microscopy. The results showed that although there were no differences between the groups regarding the Static Sciatic Index values, TENS led to nerves with morphological signs of impaired regeneration. At light microscopy level, TENS nerves presented more axons with dark axoplasm, signs of edema, and a less organized cytoarchitecture. Electronmicrographs showed fewer and thinner thick myelinated fibers and increased number of Schwann cell nuclei. Myelinated axon diameters and density and diameter of nonmyelinated fibers were not affected by TENS, leading to the conclusion that this regimen of electrical stimulation leads to a delayed regeneration after a crush lesion of the sciatic nerve in the mouse. All these effects were more pronounced on high-frequency TENS nerves. PMID:18346233

  10. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an array could provide intuitive control of a virtual prosthetic hand with broad sensory feedback.

  11. Rodent Facial Nerve Recovery After Selected Lesions and Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, Tessa A.; Kowaleski, Jeffrey; Lo, David; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Heaton, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Measuring rodent facial movements is a reliable method for studying recovery from facial nerve manipulation, and for examining the behavioral correlates of aberrant regeneration. We quantitatively compared recovery of vibrissal and ocular function following three types of clinically relevant nerve injury. Methods 178 adult rats underwent facial nerve manipulation and testing. In the experimental groups, the left facial nerve was either crushed, transected and repaired epineurially, or transected and the stumps suture-secured into a tube with a 2 mm gap between them. Facial recovery was measured for the ensuing 1–4 months. Data were analyzed for whisking recovery. Previously developed markers of co-contraction of the upper and midfacial zones (possible synkinesis markers) were also examined. Results Animals in the crush groups recovered nearly normal whisking parameters within 25 days. The distal branch crush group showed improved recovery over the main trunk crush group for several days during early recovery. By week 9, the transection/repair groups showed evidence of recovery that trended further upward throughout the study period. The entubulation groups followed a similar recovery pattern, though they did not maintain significant recovery levels by the study conclusion. Markers of potential synkinesis increased in selected groups following facial nerve injury. Conclusions Rodent vibrissial function recovers in a predictable fashion following manipulation. Generalized co-contraction of the upper and midfacial zones emerges following facial nerve manipulation, possibly related to aberrant regeneration, polyterminal axons, or hypersensitivity of the rodent to sensory stimuli following nerve manipulation. PMID:20048604

  12. Motor nerve conduction velocity is affected in segmental vitiligo lesional limbs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Zhong, Zhenyu; Li, Jian; Fu, Wenwen

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of segmental vitiligo (SV) on nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in different nerves, we compared the patient's lesional side of their body to the contralateral normal side. The 106 participants were selected from outpatients visiting the dermatological clinics of Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, from November 2011 to March 2014. NCVs were measured on the limbs and the face, including both motor and sensory nerves. The parameters for NCVs included motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) and its distal conduction latency, sensory nerve conduction velocity, sensory nerve action potentials amplitude, and compound muscle action potential amplitude. MCV on the limbs was compromised by SV state, which was significantly slower on the lesional side of the body compared with the normal contralateral side (P = 0.006). Furthermore, SV at the stable stage significantly impaired MCV compared with the SV at progressive stage. There was no significant difference in the other parameters of NCV between lesional and normal sides of the body. Compound muscle action potentials in the face did not differ between lesional and healthy sides. Motor nerves in the limbs were compromised by SV, particularly when the disease was at the stable stage. PMID:26916936

  13. A neuromuscular platform to extract electrophysiological signals from lesioned nerves: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Wells, M R; Vaidya, U; Ricci, J L; Christie, C

    2001-01-01

    The volitional control of prosthetic devices could be greatly enhanced if the information formerly supplied by peripheral nerves to the amputated limb could be utilized. So that practical access to this information could be gained, a method was established to form a stable biological interface with fascicles of lesioned nerves. A small strip of an intact muscle was isolated in rats with the use of a silicone tube cuff electrode and innervated by the lesioned peroneal branch of the sciatic nerve. After 4 weeks survival, stimulation of the nerve fascicle produced reliable signals from the neuromuscular platform in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 mV. Histologically, myotubes remained intact and axons could be identified growing in and over the surfaces of the isolated muscle strips. These or similar interface techniques may supply electrophysiological signals of sufficient amplitude and reliability to provide peripheral nerve-based guidance information for prosthetic devices. PMID:11563491

  14. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Christopher C.; Altchek, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) insufficiency of the elbow can be a debilitating injury that often prevents athletes from competing effectively. The overhead athlete is particularly susceptible to this injury because the anterior bundle of the UCL is the primary restraint to the valgus stress that is created during the throwing motion. Repetitive trauma from constant overhead or throwing activity can ultimately render the ligament incompetent and cause recurrent pain and instability. Results: The authors currently use a “docking” technique that provides excellent graft fixation and reduces ulnar nerve related complications. Conclusions: This article details the assessment of the throwing athlete with valgus instability secondary to UCL insufficiency and highlights the technical aspects for reconstruction. The majority of athletes who undergo UCL reconstruction of the elbow can successfully return to their preinjury function. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): A PMID:23016117

  15. Rat Whisker Movement after Facial Nerve Lesion: Evidence for Autonomic Contraction of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Hohman, Marc H.; Knox, Christopher J.; Weinberg, Julie S.; Kleiss, Ingrid J.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10 weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ≥18 weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (P<0.05), but individual rats overlapped in whisking amplitude across both groups. In the resected rats, non-facial-nerve mediated whisking was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ION, temporarily diminished following hexamethonium injection, abolished by transection of the ION, and rapidly and significantly (P<0.05) increased by snout cooling. Moreover, fibrillation-related whisker movements decreased in all rats during the initial recovery period (indicative of reinnervation), but re-appeared in the resected rats after undergoing ION transection (indicative of motor denervation). Cholinergic, parasympathetic axons traveling within the ION innervate whisker pad vasculature, and immunohistochemistry for vasoactive intestinal peptide revealed these axons branching extensively over whisker pad muscles and contacting neuromuscular junctions after facial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation of skeletal muscle after motor nerve lesion, which not only has implications for interpreting facial nerve reinnervation results, but also calls into question whether autonomic-mediated innervation of striated muscle occurs naturally in other forms of neuropathy. PMID:24480367

  16. Case report: Loiasis with peripheral nerve involvement and spleen lesions.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Federico; Boussinesq, Michel; Mascarello, Marta; Angheben, Andrea; Gobbo, Maria; Rossanese, Andrea; Corachán, Manuel; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2011-05-01

    Loiasis, which is caused by the filarial nematode Loa loa, affects millions of persons living in the rainforest areas and savannah regions of central Africa. Typical manifestations are calabar swellings and the eyeworm. We report a case of loiasis with unusual clinical complications: a peripheral neuropathy and focal hypo-echogenic lesions of the spleen, which disappeared after treatment with albendazole and ivermectin. The literature reports that L. loa infection can be associated with various manifestations, some of them being serious. More information is needed to better characterize the protean manifestations of the disease in loiasis-endemic areas to evaluate the true incidence of loiasis. PMID:21540382

  17. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy for Distal Radius Malunion

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Robin N.; Leversedge, Fraser J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Malunion is a common complication of distal radius fractures. Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) may be an effective treatment for distal radius malunion when appropriate indications are observed. Methods The use of USO for treatment of distal radius fracture malunion is described for older patients (typically patients >50 years) with dorsal or volar tilt less than 20 degrees and no carpal malalignment or intercarpal or distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) arthritis. Description of Technique Preoperative radiographs are examined to ensure there are no contraindications to ulnar shortening osteotomy. The neutral posteroanterior (PA) radiograph is used to measure ulnar variance and to estimate the amount of ulnar shortening required. An ulnar, mid-sagittal incision is used and the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve is preserved. An USO-specific plating system with cutting jig is used to create parallel oblique osteotomies to facilitate shortening. Intraoperative fluoroscopy and clinical range of motion are checked to ensure adequate shortening and congruous reduction of the ulnar head within the sigmoid notch. Results Previous outcomes evaluation of USO has demonstrated improvement in functional activities, including average flexion-extension and pronosupination motions, and patient reported outcomes. Conclusion The concept and technique of USO are reviewed for the treatment of distal radius malunion when specific indications are observed. Careful attention to detail related to surgical indications and to surgical technique typically will improve range of motion, pain scores, and patient-reported outcomes and will reduce the inherent risks of the procedure, such as ulnar nonunion or the symptoms related to unrecognized joint arthritis. Level of Evidence: Level IV PMID:25097811

  18. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy for Ulnar Impaction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Christopher; Gan, Bing Siang; Grewal, Ruby

    2014-01-01

    Background Ulnar impaction syndrome is a condition in which the ulna impacts on the ulnar carpus. This most commonly occurs when the ulna is longer than the radius, but it can also occur in wrists with ulnar neutral and ulnar negative variance. Materials and Methods In this paper we outline our surgical technique for ulnar shortening osteotomy. A previously published retrospective case series of 28 patients treated at our center is presented. Fifty consecutive patients who underwent ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) for ulnar impaction syndrome were approached for study, and 28 consented to review. Mean preoperative ulnar variance was +2.3 mm, and mean postoperative ulnar variance was –0.8 mm. Mean follow-up time was 21.2 months (8 to 41 months) and ten of 28 were receiving workers' compensation. Mean preoperative pain score (visual analog scale; VAS) was 7.9. Univariate analysis was performed to assess clinical and demographic data. In addition, subgroup analysis of workers' compensation patients and smokers was performed. Description of Technique A longitudinal incision over the subcutaneous border of the ulna is used to expose the ulna between the distal and middle third of the ulna from the ulna styloid. Preoperative posteroanterior (PA) X-rays are reviewed to determine the amount of shortening required, with a goal of creating –2 mm variance postoperatively. A 6-hole dynamic compression plate is predrilled distally prior to performing two oblique osteotomies separated by the desired shortening length. The fragments are reduced, controlling for rotation, and plated using compression. In some cases, a lag screw is employed across the oblique osteotomy site. Results Mean pain scores were significantly reduced postoperatively (VAS 7.9 versus 3.1, P < 0.0001). The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 37.2 postoperatively. Flexion, extension, and supination were reduced compared with the contralateral unaffected extremity (84.6%, 85.3%, and 86.9% of normal). Patients receiving workers' compensation and smokers had significantly more pain postoperatively (VAS 5.2 vs. 2.0, P = 0.0002 and VAS 4.4 vs 2.4, P < 0.05, respectively). Eleven of 28 patients required hardware removal for plate irritation, and five of 28 patients had a nonunion. Conclusion We present our surgical technique for ulnar shortening osteotomy. Pain was significantly improved in our population; however, patients receiving workers' compensation and smokers had less improvement in pain and higher disability scores. PMID:25032074

  19. Ultrasound-guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Lesioning of the Phrenic Nerve in a Patient with Intractable Hiccup

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keum Nae; Park, In Kyung; Suh, Jeong Hun; Leem, Jeong Gill

    2010-01-01

    Persistent and intractable hiccups (with respective durations of more than 48 hours and 1 month) can result in depression, fatigue, impaired sleep, dehydration, weight loss, malnutrition, and aspiration syndromes. The conventional treatments for hiccups are either non-pharmacological, pharmacological or a nerve block treatment. Pulsed radiofrequency lesioning (PRFL) has been proposed for the modulation of the excited nervous system pathway of pain as a safe and nondestructive treatment method. As placement of the electrode in close proximity to the targeted nerve is very important for the success of PRFL, ultrasound appears to be well suited for this technique. A 74-year-old man suffering from intractable hiccups that had developed after a coronary artery bypass graft and had continued for 7 years was referred to our pain clinic. He had not been treated with conventional methods or medications. We performed PRFL of the phrenic nerve guided by ultrasound and the hiccups disappeared. PMID:20830266

  20. Range of variations in motor unit potentials during reinnervation after traumatic nerve lesions in humans.

    PubMed

    Borenstein, S; Desmedt, J E

    1980-11-01

    Successive stages in the reinnervation of denervated muscle fibers following a complete or partial motor nerve lesion in humans were analyzed with the concentric needle electrode during voluntary contraction. Motor unit potential (MUP) patterns were displayed by coherent EMG, in which the potential triggers an oscilloscope sweep and a digital delay line enables the early part of the MUP to be displayed. After a complete nerve lesion, MUPs showing the response of as few as one to three muscle fibers can be observed. MUPs become highly polyphasic as more muscle fibers are incorporated. Marked latency jitter and intermittent blocking of components as well as the occurrence of linked potentials result in complex patterns that may be confused with a "myopathic" pattern of brief small spikes if conventional observation of free-running sweeps is used alone. After a partial nerve lesion, the healthy motor axons achieve extensive collateral reinnervation of the denervated muscle fibers whereby linked potentials of various latencies are added after the original MUP. Adequate understanding of these characteristic features can help clarify some current issues in electromyography. The mechanisms by which long-latency linked potentials and desynchronized components are produced during remodeling of motor units in the course of regeneration involve a number of factors such as slow conduction along regenerated axon branches, ectopic motor end-plates, insecure neuromuscular transmission, and muscle fiber atrophy. PMID:7436392

  1. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common surgery performed in professional, collegiate, and high school athletes. Purpose: To report patient demographics, surgical techniques, and outcomes of all UCLRs performed at a single institution from 2004 to 2014. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: All patients who underwent UCLR from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single institution were identified. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, sex, date of surgery, sport played, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications. Data were collected prospectively, and patients were contacted via phone calls to obtain the return-to-sport rate, Conway-Jobe score, Andrews-Timmerman score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Continuous variable data were reported as weighted means, and categorical variable data were reported as frequencies with percentages. Results: A total of 187 patients (188 elbows) underwent UCLR during the study period (92% male; mean age, 19.6 ± 4.7 years; 78.2% right elbows). There were 165 baseball players (87.8% of all patients), 155 of whom were pitchers (82.5% of all patients). Ninety-seven (51.6%) were college athletes, 68 (36.2%) high school athletes, and 7 (3.7%) professional athletes at the time of surgery. The docking technique was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while the double-docking technique was used in 78 (41.5%). An ipsilateral palmaris longus graft was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while a hamstring autograft was used in 48 (25.5%) patients. The ulnar nerve was subcutaneously transposed in 79 (42%) patients. Clinical follow-up data were available on 85 patients. Mean follow-up was 60 ± 30.8 months. Overall, 94.1% of patients were able to return to sport and had a Conway-Jobe score of good/excellent while 4.3% had a score of fair. The mean KJOC score was 90.4 ± 6.7 and mean Andrews-Timmerman score was 92.5 ± 7.1. Subsequent surgeries were performed in 5.3% of patients. Conclusion: UCLR was performed most commonly on collegiate athletes using an ipsilateral palmaris longus graft. Overall, 94.1% of patients who underwent UCLR were able to return to sport with a mean KJOC score of 90.4 and Andrews-Timmerman Score of 92.5. PMID:26862538

  2. IgG4-related disease initially presented as an orbital mass lesion mimicking optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Noshiro, Shouhei; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Akiyama, Yukinori; Okawa, Satoshi; Ohtaki, Shunya; Sugino, Toshiya; Iihoshi, Satoshi; Mikami, Takeshi; Sugita, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of an optic nerve mass lesion associated with IgG4-related disease. A 39-year-old man presented with right blurred vision and proptosis 8 years before admission. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion in the center of the right orbit, which was diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma by neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. Irradiation was selected for treatment of the lesion on the basis of the radiological diagnosis; subsequently, the lesion gradually reduced in size. However, regrowth of an optic nerve mass lesion observed during the previous 2 years caused remarkable exophthalmos, and removal of the orbital mass lesion was performed via a transcranial orbital approach. Pathological examinations resulted in a diagnosis of IgG4-related disease, and hematological tests revealed an elevated level of serum IgG4. Additional radiological examinations showed mass lesions in the left maxillary nerve, bilateral inferior alveolar nerves, paravertebral tissue, and left kidney. Treatment with oral steroids has produced a reduction in the size of these lesions. PMID:26037238

  3. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy After Distal Radius Fracture Malunion: Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Barbaric, Katarina; Rujevcan, Gordan; Labas, Marko; Delimar, Domagoj; Bicanic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Malunion of distal radius fracture is often complicated with shortening of the radius with disturbed radio- ulnar variance, frequently associated with lesions of triangular fibrocartilage complex and instability of the distal radioulnar joint. Positive ulnar variance may result in wrist pain located in ulnar part of the joint, limited ulnar deviation and forearm rotation with development of degenerative changes due to the overloading that occurs between the ulnar head and corresponding carpus. Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) is the standard procedure for correcting positive ulnar variance. Goal of this procedure is to minimize the symptoms by restoring the neutral radio - ulnar variance. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for ulnar shorthening osteotomy, their advantages and drawbacks. Methods of ulnar shortening osteotomies are divided into intraarticular and extraarticular. Intraarticular method of ulnar shortening can be performed arthroscopically or through open approach. Extraarticular methods include subcapital osteotomy and osteotomy of ulnar diaphysis, which depending on shape can be transverse, oblique, and step cut. All of those osteotomies can be performed along wrist arthroscopy in order to dispose and treat possibly existing triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. At the end we described surgical procedures that can be done in case of ulnar shorthening osteotomy failure. PMID:26157524

  4. Unusual brachial plexus lesion: Hematoma masquerading as a peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    PubMed Central

    Krisht, Khaled M.; Karsy, Michael; Shah, Lubdha M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) of the brachial plexus have unique radiographic and clinical findings. Patients often present with progressive upper extremity paresthesias, weakness, and pain. On magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, lesions are isointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences, while also demonstrating marked enhancement on MR studies with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. On the basis of their characteristic MR imaging features and rapid clinical progression, two brachial plexus lesions proved to be organizing hematomas rather than MPNST. Methods: A 51-year-old male and a 31-year-old female were both assessed for persistent and worsened left-sided upper extremity pain, paresthesias, and weakness. In both cases, the MR imaging of the brachial plexus demonstrated an extraspinal enhancing lesion located within the left C7–T1 neuroforamina. Results: Although the clinical and radiographic MR features for these 2 patients were consistent with MPNSTs, both lesions proved to be benign organizing hematomas. Conclusions: These two case studies emphasize that brachial plexus hematomas may mimic MPNSTs on MR studies. Accurate diagnosis of these lesions is critical for determining the appropriate management options and treatment plans. Delaying the treatment of a highly aggressive nerve sheath tumor can have devastating consequences, whereas many hematomas resolve without surgery. Therefore, if the patient has stable findings on neurological examination and a history of trauma, surgical intervention may be delayed in favor of repeat MR imaging in 2–3 months to re-evaluate the size of the mass. PMID:26904368

  5. The variable clinical manifestations of ulnar neuropathies at the elbow.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J D

    1987-01-01

    In twenty-five cases of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, the involvement of the fibres from three sensory and to four motor branches were examined clinically and, where possible, electrophysiologically. Of the sensory fibres, those from the terminal digital nerves were most commonly involved. The fibres to the hand muscles were much more frequently involved than those to the forearm muscles. These findings suggest that in ulnar neuropathies at the elbow there is variable damage to the fascicles within the nerve. PMID:3031220

  6. Nerve abscess in primary neuritic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dheeraj; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Goel, Madhu Mati; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Arun Kumar; Jain, Amita; Kohli, Neera; Singh, Shailesh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Nerve abscess is an infrequently reported complication of leprosy. We describe a patient with a pure neuritic type of leprosy with multiple nerve abscesses, who presented with tingling and numbness in the medial aspect of his right forearm and hand. Subsequently he developed pain, redness and swelling over the medial side of his right elbow and the flexor aspect of his right wrist. High-resolution ultrasound showed diffuse thickening of the right ulnar nerve with hypoechoic texture housing a cystic lesion with internal debris suggesting an abscess, at the cubital tunnel. Histopathological examination of the pus and tissue obtained from the abscess revealed presence of granulomas with lepra bacilli. The patient responded to surgery and multidrug therapy. In conclusion, the nerve abscess as the first manifestation of leprosy is uncommon and a high index of suspicion is required to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:24171239

  7. Central nervous system integration of sensorimotor signals in oral and pharyngeal structures: oropharyngeal kinematics response to recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Gould, Francois D H; Ohlemacher, Jocelyn; Lammers, Andrew R; Gross, Andrew; Ballester, Ashley; Fraley, Luke; German, Rebecca Z

    2016-03-01

    Safe, efficient liquid feeding in infant mammals requires the central coordination of oropharyngeal structures innervated by multiple cranial and spinal nerves. The importance of laryngeal sensation and central sensorimotor integration in this system is poorly understood. Recurrent laryngeal nerve lesion (RLN) results in increased aspiration, though the mechanism for this is unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of unilateral RLN lesion on the motor coordination of infant liquid feeding. We hypothesized that 1) RLN lesion results in modified swallow kinematics, 2) postlesion oropharyngeal kinematics of unsafe swallows differ from those of safe swallows, and 3) nonswallowing phases of the feeding cycle show changed kinematics postlesion. We implanted radio opaque markers in infant pigs and filmed them pre- and postlesion with high-speed videofluoroscopy. Markers locations were digitized, and swallows were assessed for airway protection. RLN lesion resulted in modified kinematics of the tongue relative to the epiglottis in safe swallows. In lesioned animals, safe swallow kinematics differed from unsafe swallows. Unsafe swallow postlesion kinematics resembled prelesion safe swallows. The movement of the tongue was reduced in oral transport postlesion. Between different regions of the tongue, response to lesion was similar, and relative timing within the tongue was unchanged. RLN lesion has a pervasive effect on infant feeding kinematics, related to the efficiency of airway protection. The timing of tongue and hyolaryngeal kinematics in swallows is a crucial locus for swallow disruption. Laryngeal sensation is essential for the central coordination in feeding of oropharyngeal structures receiving motor inputs from different cranial nerves. PMID:26679618

  8. Effects of catecholaminergic nerve lesion on endometrial development during early pregnancy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yulan; Liu, Guanhui; Wang, Zixu; Li, Jing; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-04-01

    Maternal stress is common during pregnancy and the postnatal period. This stress typically activates the sympathetic nervous system which releases catecholamines. This study explored the influence of sympathectomy by using neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on embryo implantation, and investigated the influence mechanism of sympathectomy on reconstruction of endometrial structure during early pregnancy. In the 6-OHDA-treated mice, uterine glands in the endometrium developed poorly, and the gland epithelia were arranged irregularly during early pregnancy. Furthermore, vacuoles, karyopykosis and plasmarrhexis appeared in some gland epithelia. The percentage of uterine glands and the density of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positivity were dramatically decreased, and Fas ligand (FasL) expression was decreased in cells from pregnancy days 5-9 (E5-9) in the treated group. Antioxidant enzyme activity levels in uteri were lower but the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were higher in the 6-OHDA mice than those in the control mice at E5-9. Similarly, the number of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) positive cells was significantly increased during early pregnancy following treatment with 6-OHDA. Our results have indicated that peripheral catecholaminergic nerve lesions induced by 6-OHDA cause adverse pregnancy outcomes through disruption of endometrial gland development, which increases oxidative stress and iNOS expression in the endometrium. Thus, catecholaminergic nerves might favourably influence blastocyst implantation, foetal survival and development during early pregnancy by oxidative state regulation and endometrial gland reconstruction. PMID:26554516

  9. Neuroprotective Activity of Thioctic Acid in Central Nervous System Lesions Consequent to Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Carla; Nwankwo, Innocent E.; Pacini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are heterogeneous disorders presenting often with hyperalgesia and allodynia. This study has assessed if chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and central nervous system (CNS) changes and if these changes are sensitive to treatment with thioctic acid. Thioctic acid is a naturally occurring antioxidant existing in two optical isomers (+)- and (−)-thioctic acid and in the racemic form. It has been proposed for treating disorders associated with increased oxidative stress. Sciatic nerve CCI was made in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and in normotensive reference cohorts. Rats were untreated or treated intraperitoneally for 14 days with (+/−)-, (+)-, or (−)-thioctic acid. Oxidative stress, astrogliosis, myelin sheets status, and neuronal injury in motor and sensory cerebrocortical areas were assessed. Increase of oxidative stress markers, astrogliosis, and neuronal damage accompanied by a decreased expression of neurofilament were observed in SHR. This phenomenon was more pronounced after CCI. Thioctic acid countered astrogliosis and neuronal damage, (+)-thioctic acid being more active than (+/−)- or (−)-enantiomers. These findings suggest a neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid on CNS lesions consequent to CCI and that the compound may represent a therapeutic option for entrapment neuropathies. PMID:24527432

  10. Slowed motor conduction in lumbosacral nerve roots in cauda equina lesions: a new diagnostic technique.

    PubMed Central

    Swash, M; Snooks, S J

    1986-01-01

    New techniques have been developed for the electrophysiological assessment of patients with suspected cauda equina lesions using transcutaneous spinal stimulation (500-1500 V: time constant 50 microseconds) to measure motor latencies to the external and sphincter and puborectalis muscles from L1 and L4 vertebral levels. These latencies represent motor conduction in the S3 and S4 motor roots of the cauda equina between these levels. Similarly motor latencies can be recorded from spinal stimulation to the anterior tibial muscles (L4 and L5 motor roots). Transrectal stimulation of the pudendal nerves is used to measure the pudendal nerve terminal motor latency. In 32 control subjects, matched for age and sex, mean motor latencies from L1 and L4 spinal stimulation were 5.5 +/- 0.4 ms and 4.4 +/- 0.4 ms (mean + SD). In the 10 patients with cauda equina disease including ependymoma, spinal stenosis, arachnoiditis and trauma, these latencies were 7.2 +/- 0.8 ms and 4.6 +/- 0.9 ms, a significant increase in the L1 latency. The L1/L4 latency ratios to the puborectalis muscle were 1.36 +/- 0.09 in control subjects and 1.72 +/- 0.13 in cauda equina patients. Pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies were normal in eight of the 10 patients with cauda equina disease. The single fibre EMG fibre density in the external and sphincter muscle (normal, 1.5 +/- 0.16) was increased in patients with cauda equina lesions (1.73 +/- 0.28), but was increased more than two standard deviations from the mean only in three patients. This increase in fibre density was not of diagnostic value since it was also found in two of the four patients with low back pain. Slowing of motor conduction in the cauda equina is thus a useful indication of damage to these intraspinal motor roots. These investigations can be used in the selection of patients for myelography, and to follow progress in patients managed conservatively. Images PMID:3018168

  11. Evidence from Auditory Nerve and Brainstem Evoked Responses for an Organic Brain Lesion in Children with Autistic Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Student, M.; Sohmer, H.

    1978-01-01

    In an attempt to resolve the question as to whether children with autistic traits have an organic nervous system lesion, auditory nerve and brainstem evoked responses were recorded in a group of 15 children (4 to 12 years old) with autistic traits. (Author)

  12. The endogenous cytokine profile and nerve fibre density in mouse ear Leishmania major-induced lesions related to nociceptive thresholds.

    PubMed

    Cangussú, Silvia D; Souza, Carolina C; Castro, Maria Salete A; Vieira, Leda Q; Cunha, Fernando Q; Afonso, Luís Carlos C; Arantes, Rosa Maria E

    2013-02-01

    Several reports have shown that cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions are painless, suggesting that Leishmania infection interferes with pain perception. Comparisons of inflammation-induced hyperalgesia between BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice have been little explored in the literature, and comparative data regarding nociception in leishmaniasis are non-existent. In susceptible BALB/c mice and resistant C57BL/6 mice that were intradermally inoculated with a low dose of Leishmania major in the ear, we investigated the variation in nociception over a 12-wk period post-infection and this variation's association with the structure of nerve fibres and the presence of endogenous cytokines that are classically considered hyper- or hypo-nociceptive. Infected BALB/c mice presented susceptibility and severe lesions. Infected C57BL/6 mice exhibited resistance and healing lesions. The immune response involved pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion, respectively. The infection-induced hypoalgesia in BALB/c mice after wks 9 was accompanied by decreased levels of IL-6 and IL-10 in ear tissue with intact nerves. C57BL/6 mice showed short-lived hyperalgesia in wks 2, which was related to increased local levels of IL-6, KC/CXCL-1, TNF-α and IL-10 and a decrease in nerve density. The increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6, KC/CXCL-1 and TNF-α levels during hyperalgesia suggested a role for these mediators in afferent nerve sensitisation, which was secondary to the inflammatory damage of nerve fibres stained by PGP 9.5. In contrast, the mechanisms of hypoalgesia may include the downregulation of cytokines, the preservation of the structure of nerve endings, and as yet uninvestigated unidentified differences in neurotransmitter release or a direct role of the parasites in the context of the progressive and permissive inflammatory response of BALB/c mice. PMID:23206953

  13. Neural fibrolipoma of a digital nerve of the index finger without macrodactyly.

    PubMed

    Avci, Gülden; Akan, Mithat; Taylan, Gaye; Akoz, Tayfun

    2010-11-01

    We present a case of neural fibrolipoma arising from the digital nerve in the index finger of the right hand. A 31-year-old man was referred with a soft tissue mass in the ulnar aspect of the index finger of his right hand, which had gradually enlarged during the past seven years. Histological examination of an excisional biopsy specimen identified a neural fibrolipoma, which is a differential diagnosis of a lipomatous lesion of the digits. PMID:20158413

  14. Reappraisal of nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Millesi, H

    1981-04-01

    In every case of acute injury involving the nerve, the surgeon must decide whether a primary repair of an elective early secondary repair is the treatment of choice. In a clean-cut nerve without defect, immediate primary repair, using trunk-to-trunk coaptation with epineurial sutures, offers an optimal solution. In the periphery of the median and the ulnar nerves, in which motor and sensory fascicles are already separated, fascicular dissection is performed, and coaptation of fascicle groups should be done. In medical centers with excellent facilities, such nerve repair will give good results even in very severe lesions. This repair can be performed also as a delayed primary procedure. If there is a nerve defect, a primary grafting procedure must be considered. We do not recommend this as a routine procedure because the nerve grafts might be lost if a complication occurs. The decision to perform a planned early secondary repair is an equally good alternative, especially in cases of a nerve defect, severe concomitant injuries, or both. In case of a combined nerve and tendon lesion in the carpal tunnel, the nerve repair can be performed at a later procedure without exposing the repaired flexor tendons, thus avoiding adhesion between tendons and nerves. If a decision is made in favor of an early secondary repair, the two stumps can be approximated by stitches to prevent retraction, if this can be achieved without tension. Approximation under tension in case of a larger defect would damage the two stumps and create an even larger defect. Marking the nerve ends by sutures is not necessary because exploration with always start in normal tissue, exposing the nerves from the proximal or the distal segments. Early secondary repair is performed during the third week, or later if this is demanded by local conditions. When indicated, plastic surgical procedures can eliminate constricting scars and provide an optimal soft tissue environment. After exploration and preparation of the two stumps, the surgeon must decide whether direct suturing or a nerve graft is indicated. If after very limited mobilization and slight flexion the nerve stumps cannot be coapted easily, a nerve graft should be used. The quality of motor recovery decreases steadily after a 6 month delay of repair. Late secondary repairs or reoperation of failure of primary repair should be performed within this time limit, although this does not mean that motor recovery cannot occur after a longer time interval. Useful motor recovery was achieved in certain cases after 18 months or more. Obviously the results might have been better if the time interval had been shorter. If a patient is seen with a nerve lesion after a long time interval, nerve repair is still indicated if sensibility is the main functional objective. In other long-standing cases, the nerve repair is combined with tendon transfer or capsulorrhaphy. After a particularly long time interval or in old patients, only palliative surgery is indicated. PMID:7233326

  15. Stem cell salvage of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Grimoldi, Nadia; Colleoni, Federica; Tiberio, Francesca; Vetrano, Ignazio G; Cappellari, Alberto; Costa, Antonella; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Giordano, Rosaria; Spagnoli, Diego; Pluderi, Mauro; Gatti, Stefano; Morbin, Michela; Gaini, Sergio M; Rebulla, Paolo; Bresolin, Nereo; Torrente, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a collagen tube filled with autologous skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) for bridging long rat sciatic nerve gaps. Here we present a case report describing a compassionate use of this graft for repairing the polyinjured motor and sensory nerves of the upper arms of a patient. Preclinical assessment was performed with collagen/SDSC implantation in rats after sectioning the sciatic nerve. For the patient, during the 3-year follow-up period, functional recovery of injured median and ulnar nerves was assessed by pinch gauge test and static two-point discrimination and touch test with monofilaments, along with electrophysiological and MRI examinations. Preclinical experiments in rats revealed rescue of sciatic nerve and no side effects of patient-derived SDSC transplantation (30 and 180 days of treatment). In the patient treatment, motor and sensory functions of the median nerve demonstrated ongoing recovery postimplantation during the follow-up period. The results indicate that the collagen/SDSC artificial nerve graft could be used for surgical repair of larger defects in major lesions of peripheral nerves, increasing patient quality of life by saving the upper arms from amputation. PMID:24268028

  16. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy for Ulnar-Sided Wrist Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tatebe, Masahiro; Nishizuka, Takanobu; Hirata, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Ryogo

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of ulnar shortening osteotomy is literally to shorten the ulna. It can tighten the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), ulnocarpal ligaments, and interosseous membrane. Nowadays, this method is used to treat ulnar-sided wrist pain, for which we have also started to use a treatment algorithm. The purpose of this study was to review the long-term and clinical results based on our algorithm. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with ulnocarpal impaction syndrome after a minimum follow-up of 5 years (Group A) and then retrospectively evaluated 66 patients with recalcitrant ulnar wrist pain treated based on our algorithm (Group B). Description of Technique Ulnocarpal abutment was confirmed arthroscopically. The distal ulna was approached through a longitudinal incision between the extensor carpi ulnaris and flexor carpi ulnaris. We performed a transverse resection of the ulna fixed with a small locking compression plate. The contralateral side served as the reference for the length of shortening (mean, 2.4 mm; range, 1–5 mm). Disappearance of ulnar abutment was then confirmed again arthroscopically. Results (Group A) Most patients showed good long-term clinical results. About half of the patients showed a bony spur at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), but the clinical results did not significantly correlate with presence of bony spurs. Radiological parameters wre not related to the presence of bony spurs. (Group B) Twenty-four of the 66 patients investigated prospectively underwent an ulnar shortening osteotomy, with all showing good clinical results at 18 months postoperatively. Conclusions Ulnar shortening osteotomy can change the load of the ulnar side of the wrist and appears useful for ulnar-sided wrist pain in the presence of ulnar impaction. Level of evidence IV PMID:25077045

  17. Relation between the neuronal and hemodynamic response in the lesioned rat spinal cord following peripheral nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubeau, S.; Beaumont, E.; Lesage, F.

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we explore the hemodynamic response in the lesioned rat spinal cord following peripheral nerve stimulation. Oxy and deoxy hemoglobin were measured (using a four color LED multispectral intrinsic optical imaging system) simultaneously with blood flow (laser speckle measurement). Both optical and electrophysiological data are compared spatially and against stimulation strength. When compared with non-lesioned animals, the hemodynamic response is seen to display significant differences exhibiting increased initial dip and decreased blood drain following stimulation. The origin of the difference is observed to be due to the vascular nature of the injury. The distinct hemodynamic responses may have a strong impact on General Linear Model based fMRI studies of spinal cord lesions due to the difficulty in separating vascular effects from neuronal plasticity following injury.

  18. The Retrograde Ulnar Dorsal Flap: Surgical Technique and Experience as Island Flap in Coverage of Hand Defects.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Flaps from the forearm are often used to reconstruct soft-tissue defects in the hand. The retrograde ulnar dorsal flap has the advantage that it does not sacrifice a major vascular axis. The anatomic bases of this flap are the proximal and distal branch of the ulnar dorsal artery. The distal branch is partially accompanied with the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve, and arrives under the abductor digiti quinti muscle making anastomoses with the deep branch of the ulnar artery. The proximal branch reaching the proximal third of the forearm, and anastomose with perforating branches of the ulnar artery. I used this island flap in 12 patients with coverage defects on the hand. The biggest flap was 13×6 cm. Only 1 flap had partial necrosis which did not lead to problems. The retrograde ulnar dorsal flap is a flap designed with reverse flow from the distal branch of the ulnar dorsal artery, and which does not sacrifice the ulnar artery. The donor defect on the forearm ulnar side had a greater esthetic acceptance. Knowing other distal anastomoses, described by other authors later, dorsal at the base of the fourth interdigital space grant greater security to the retrograde ulnar dorsal flap. It is worth highlighting the importance of preserving the adipofascial tissue around the pedicle. Experience with this flap permits us to state that it is a safe and reproducible flap to cover any defect on the dorsal of the hand as well as the first web space. PMID:26079665

  19. Unusual Anatomic Variations Associated With Bilateral Ulnar Artery Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ro, Hyung-Suk; Roh, Si-Gyun; Shin, Jin Yong; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo

    2016-05-01

    Variations and anomalies of upper extremities have been commonly reported in routine dissection, clinical practices, and cadaver studies. Despite ongoing research on arterial variations of upper extremities, the absence of bilateral ulnar artery is extremely rare with only 3 patients reported. As the authors are presenting a successfully treated patient, initially prepped for radial forearm osteocutaneous free flap for treatment on oromandibular defect after a wide resection of head and neck cancer lesion, being confirmed to have bilateral ulnar artery hypoplasia and due to this, the patient had to change her surgical plan to fibular osteocutaneous free flap. PMID:27100648

  20. Expression of the protein inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase in the adult rat retina before and after optic nerve lesion.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Gunnar P H; Schott, Michael; Labes, Monika; Bähr, Mathias

    2005-05-20

    The molecular messenger nitric oxide (NO) not only serves a number of physiologic functions, but is also involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. It is produced by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes. One of the many players regulating NOS activity is the Protein Inhibitor of NOS, PIN. To gain further insight into the mechanisms of NOS regulation and NO-mediated cell death after nerve trauma, we examined PIN expression in a standard model of lesion-induced neurodegeneration, the rat optic nerve transsection model. In both the axotomized retinae and the control retinae PIN expression was predominantly observed in the retinal ganglion cell layer. Optic nerve lesion did neither change the amount of PIN mRNA, as determined by in situ hybridization and real-time RT-PCR, nor did it change the amount of PIN as determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. These results suggest that in our model, NOS activity is not regulated by altered PIN levels, which contributes to our understanding of apoptotic mechanisms in injured neurons. PMID:15893595

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging for anatomical localization of cranial nerves and cranial nerve nuclei in pontine lesions: initial experiences with 3T-MRI.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Nils H; Ahmadli, Uzeyir; Woernle, Christoph M; Alzarhani, Yahea A; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Kollias, Spyros S

    2014-11-01

    With continuous refinement of neurosurgical techniques and higher resolution in neuroimaging, the management of pontine lesions is constantly improving. Among pontine structures with vital functions that are at risk of being damaged by surgical manipulation, cranial nerves (CN) and cranial nerve nuclei (CNN) such as CN V, VI, and VII are critical. Pre-operative localization of the intrapontine course of CN and CNN should be beneficial for surgical outcomes. Our objective was to accurately localize CN and CNN in patients with intra-axial lesions in the pons using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and estimate its input in surgical planning for avoiding unintended loss of their function during surgery. DTI of the pons obtained pre-operatively on a 3Tesla MR scanner was analyzed prospectively for the accurate localization of CN and CNN V, VI and VII in seven patients with intra-axial lesions in the pons. Anatomical sections in the pons were used to estimate abnormalities on color-coded fractional anisotropy maps. Imaging abnormalities were correlated with CN symptoms before and after surgery. The course of CN and the area of CNN were identified using DTI pre- and post-operatively. Clinical associations between post-operative improvements and the corresponding CN area of the pons were demonstrated. Our results suggest that pre- and post-operative DTI allows identification of key anatomical structures in the pons and enables estimation of their involvement by pathology. It may predict clinical outcome and help us to better understand the involvement of the intrinsic anatomy by pathological processes. PMID:24998855

  2. Deep Sequencing and Bioinformatic Analysis of Lesioned Sciatic Nerves after Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Leilei; Wu, Jiancheng; Zha, Guangbin; Zhou, Songlin; Gu, Xiaosong; Yu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The peripheral nerve system has an intrinsic regenerative capacity in response to traumatic injury. To better understand the molecular events occurring after peripheral nerve injury, in the current study, a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury was used. Injured nerves harvested at 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14 days post injury were subjected to deep RNA sequencing for examining global gene expression changes. According to the temporally differential expression patterns of a huge number of genes, 3 distinct phases were defined within the post-injury period of 14 days: the acute, sub-acute, and post-acute stages. Each stage showed its own characteristics of gene expression, which were associated with different categories of diseases and biological functions and canonical pathways. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that genes involved in inflammation and immune response were significantly up-regulated in the acute phase, and genes involved in cellular movement, development, and morphology were up-regulated in the sub-acute stage, while the up-regulated genes in the post-acute phase were mainly involved in lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton reorganization, and nerve regeneration. All the data obtained in the current study may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying peripheral nerve regeneration from the perspective of gene regulation, and to identify potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26629691

  3. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe; Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. PMID:20012039

  4. Unilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion in an Animal Model of Dysphagia and Its Effect on Sucking and Swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Malone, Regina; Holman, Shaina D.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; Fukuhara, Takako; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Thexton, Allan J.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2013-01-01

    We tested two hypotheses relating to the sensory deficit that follows a unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion in an infant animal model. We hypothesized that it would result in (1) a higher incidence of aspiration and (2) temporal changes in sucking and swallowing. We ligated the right-side SLN in six 2–3-week-old female pigs. Using videofluoroscopy, we recorded swallows in the same pre- and post-lesion infant pigs. We analyzed the incidence of aspiration and the duration and latency of suck and swallow cycles. After unilateral SLN lesioning, the incidence of silent aspiration during swallowing increased from 0.7 to 41.5 %. The durations of the suck containing the swallow, the suck immediately following the swallow, and the swallow itself were significantly longer in the post-lesion swallows, although the suck prior to the swallow was not different. The interval between the start of the suck containing a swallow and the subsequent epiglottal movement was longer in the post-lesion swallows. The number of sucks between swallows was significantly greater in post-lesion swallows compared to pre-lesion swallows. Unilateral SLN lesion increased the incidence of aspiration and changed the temporal relationships between sucking and swallowing. The longer transit time and the temporal coordinative dysfunction between suck and swallow cycles may contribute to aspiration. These results suggest that swallow dysfunction and silent aspiration are common and potentially overlooked sequelae of unilateral SLN injury. This validated animal model of aspiration has the potential for further dysphagia studies. PMID:23417250

  5. Digital sucking induced trophic ulcers caused by nerve deficit from amniotic constriction band.

    PubMed

    Beidas, Omar; Rayan, Ghazi M; Al-Harthy, A

    2010-08-01

    Two infants presented with amniotic constriction bands (ACB) in the distal third of the forearm. After teeth eruption they developed recurrent skin ulcerations mainly in the distribution of the median nerve from digital sucking. Both patients underwent reconstruction with multiple Z-plasties, followed by neurolysis of the ulnar nerve and sural nerve grafting of the median nerve. This neurological complication presented late in ACB as ulcerative lesions and secondary infection from digital sucking on the insensate digits. Thorough physical examination of the extremities at an early stage in children with ACB is essential to exclude an occult neurological dysfunction. Exploration of peripheral nerves is warranted in cases of deep forearm ACB during their soft tissue reconstruction. PMID:20347623

  6. Differentiating C8–T1 Radiculopathy from Ulnar Neuropathy: A Survey of 24 Spine Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Stoker, Geoffrey E.; Kim, Han Jo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Questionnaire. Objective To evaluate the ability of spine surgeons to distinguish C8–T1 radiculopathies from ulnar neuropathy. Methods Twenty-four self-rated “experienced” cervical spine surgeons completed a questionnaire with the following items. (1) If the ulnar nerve is cut at the elbow, which of the following would be numb: ulnar forearm, small and ring fingers; only the ulnar forearm; only the small and ring fingers; or none of the above? (2) Which of the following muscles are weak with C8–T1 radiculopathies but intact with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow: flexor digiti minimi brevis, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor digiti minimi, abductor pollicis brevis, adductor pollicis, opponens digiti minimi, opponens pollicis, medial lumbricals, lateral lumbricals, dorsal interossei, palmar interossei? Results Fifteen of 24 surgeons (63%) correctly answered the first question—that severing the ulnar nerve results in numbness of the fifth and fourth fingers. None correctly identified all four nonulnar, C8–T1-innervated options in the second question without naming additional muscles. Conclusion The ulnar nerve provides sensation to the fourth and fifth fingers and medial border of the hand. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve provides sensation to the medial forearm. The ulnar nerve innervates all intrinsic hand muscles, except the abductor and flexor pollicis brevis, opponens pollicis, and lateral two lumbricals, which are innervated by C8 and T1 via the median nerve. By examining these five muscles, one can clinically differentiate cubital tunnel syndrome from C8–T1 radiculopathies. Although all participants considered themselves to be experienced cervical spine surgeons, this study reveals inadequate knowledge regarding the clinical manifestations of C8–T1 radiculopathies and cubital tunnel syndrome. PMID:24494175

  7. Intraoperative high-resolution ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of peripheral nerve tumors and tumorlike lesions.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Maria Teresa; Antoniadis, Gregor; Scheuerle, Angelika; Pham, Mirko; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Koenig, Ralph W

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic workup and surgical therapy for peripheral nerve tumors and tumorlike lesions are challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging is the standard diagnostic tool in the preoperative workup. However, even with advanced pulse sequences such as diffusion tensor imaging for MR neurography, the ability to differentiate tumor entities based on histological features remains limited. In particular, rare tumor entities different from schwannomas and neurofibromas are difficult to anticipate before surgical exploration and histological confirmation. High-resolution ultrasound (HRU) has become another important tool in the preoperative evaluation of peripheral nerves. Ongoing software and technical developments with transducers of up to 17-18 MHz enable high spatial resolution with tissue-differentiating properties. Unfortunately, high-frequency ultrasound provides low tissue penetration. The authors developed a setting in which intraoperative HRU was used and in which the direct sterile contact between the ultrasound transducer and the surgically exposed nerve pathology was enabled to increase structural resolution and contrast. In a case-guided fashion, the authors report the sonographic characteristics of rare tumor entities shown by intraoperative HRU and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. PMID:26323823

  8. Effects of histidine and n-acetylcysteine on experimental lesions induced by doxorubicin in sciatic nerve of rats.

    PubMed

    Farshid, Amir Abbas; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Najafi, Sima

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effect of separate and combined intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of histidine and n-acetylcysteine were investigated on experimental damage induced by doxorubicin (DOX) in sciatic nerve of rats. DOX was i.p. injected at a dose of 4 mg/kg once weekly for four weeks. Histidine and n-acetylcysteine were i.p. injected at a same dose of 20 mg/kg. Cold and mechanical allodynia were recorded using acetone spray and von Frey filaments tests, respectively. The sciatic nerve damage was evaluated by light microscopy. Plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured. Histidine and especially n-acetylcysteine at a same dose of 20 mg/kg suppressed cold and mechanical allodynia, improved sciatic nerve lesions and reversed MDA and TAC levels in DOX-treated groups. Combination treatment with histidine and n-acetylcysteine showed better responses when compared with them used alone. The results of the present study showed peripheral neuroprotective effects for histidine and n-acetylcysteine. Reduction of free radical-induced toxic effects may have a role in neuroprotective properties of histidine and n-acetylcysteine. PMID:25427688

  9. Increased slow transport in axons of regenerating newt limbs after a nerve conditioning lesion made prior to amputation

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this study shows that axonal density is constant in the limb stump of the next proximal to the area of traumatic nerve degeneration caused by limb amputation. The results of the second part of this work reveal that a nerve conditioning lesion made two weeks prior to amputation is associated with accelerated limb regeneration and that this accelerated limb regeneration is accompanied by an earlier arrival of axons. This is the first demonstration of naturally occurring limb regeneration being enhanced. In this study SCb cytoskeletal proteins were identified and measured using SDS-PAGE and liquid scintillation counting. Proteins were measured at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after {sup 35}S-methionine injection and the normal rate of SCb transport determined to be 0.19 mm/day. A single axotomy does not enhance the rate of SCb transport but does increase the amount of labeled SCb proteins that are transported. When a conditioning lesion is employed prior to limb amputation and SCb proteins are measured at 7, 14, and 21 days after injection, there is a twofold acceleration in the rate of SCb transport and an increase in the amount of SCb proteins transported in conditioned axons.

  10. Contralateral ulnar neuropathy following total hip replacement and intraoperative positioning.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S; Bennett, D; Spence, D J; Mawhinney, I; Beverland, D E

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a rare but important complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and has previously been reported in the ipsilateral arm and associated with inflammatory arthritis. The results of 7004 primary hip arthroplasties performed between January 1993 and February 2009 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who reported ulnar neuropathy symptoms, with ten patients identified at mean follow-up of 57 months (range = 3-195 months). Eight patients experienced unilateral ulnar nerve symptoms in the contralateral upper limb post-surgery, one patient experienced symptoms in the ipsilateral upper limb and one patient experienced symptoms in both upper limbs. The incidence of post-THA ulnar neuropathy was 0.14%. All patients had a pre-operative diagnosis of osteoarthritis and none had diabetes, a previous history of neuropathy or inflammatory arthritis. All operations were primary arthroplasties and were performed under the care of a single surgeon in a single centre. Two of the ten patients (20%) had a general anaesthetic. The pattern of symptoms reported, i.e. mainly unilateral affecting the contralateral side with variable resolution, contrasts with previous studies and suggests that intraoperative patient positioning may be an important factor influencing ulnar neuropathy following THA. Attention to support and positioning of the contralateral arm may help reduce the incidence of this complication. PMID:26589446

  11. Diagnosis and Treatment of Work-Related Ulnar Neuropathy at the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory T; Weiss, Michael D; Friedman, Andrew S; Allan, Christopher H; Robinson, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE) is the second most common entrapment neuropathy after carpal tunnel syndrome and occurs most commonly at the elbow due to mechanical forces that produce traction or ischemia to the nerve. The primary symptom associated with UNE is diminished sensation or dysesthesias in the fourth or fifth digits, often coupled with pain in the proximal medial aspect of the elbow. Treatment may be conservative or surgical, but optimal management remains controversial. Surgery should include exploration of the ulnar nerve throughout its course around the elbow and release of all compressive structures. PMID:26231962

  12. Ulnar-sided wrist pain in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Nicholas E; Greenberg, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The athlete's wrist, especially those using bats, sticks, racquets, or clubs, is subjected to extremely high torque loads during athletic activities. These loads stress the stabilizing elements of the ulnocarpal and distal radioulnar complexes. Lesions of these regions can lead to painful dysfunction and instabilities that negatively impact athletic performance. This article reviews some of the common ulnar-sided maladies focusing on anatomy, biomechanics, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:25455400

  13. The parameters of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are critical to its regenerative effects when applied just after a sciatic crush lesion in mice.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante Miranda de Assis, Diana; Martins Lima, Êmyle; Teixeira Goes, Bruno; Zugaib Cavalcanti, João; Barbosa Paixão, Alaí; Vannier-Santos, Marcos André; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of two frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) applied immediately after lesion on peripheral nerve regeneration after a mouse sciatic crush injury. The animals were anesthetized and subjected to crushing of the right sciatic nerve and then separated into three groups: nontreated, Low-TENS (4 Hz), and High-TENS (100 Hz). The animals of Low- and High-TENS groups were stimulated for 2 h immediately after the surgical procedure, while the nontreated group was only positioned for the same period. After five weeks the animals were euthanized, and the nerves dissected bilaterally for histological and histomorphometric analysis. Histological assessment by light and electron microscopy showed that High-TENS and nontreated nerves had a similar profile, with extensive signs of degeneration. Conversely, Low-TENS led to increased regeneration, displaying histological aspects similar to control nerves. High-TENS also led to decreased density of fibers in the range of 6-12 μm diameter and decreased fiber diameter and myelin area in the range of 0-2 μm diameter. These findings suggest that High-TENS applied just after a peripheral nerve crush may be deleterious for regeneration, whereas Low-TENS may increase nerve regeneration capacity. PMID:25147807

  14. Endogenous Prostaglandins and Afferent Sensory Nerves in Gastroprotective Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide against Stress-Induced Gastric Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Magierowski, Marcin; Jasnos, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Drozdowicz, Danuta; Surmiak, Marcin; Strzalka, Malgorzata; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Wallace, John L.; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role in human physiology, exerting vasodilatory, neuromodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. H2S has been implicated in the mechanism of gastrointestinal integrity but whether this gaseous mediator can affect hemorrhagic lesions induced by stress has been little elucidated. We studied the effect of the H2S precursor L-cysteine, H2S-donor NaHS, the H2S synthesizing enzyme (CSE) activity inhibitor- D,L-propargylglycine (PAG) and the gastric H2S production by CSE/CBS/3-MST activity in water immersion and restraint stress (WRS) ulcerogenesis and the accompanying changes in gastric blood flow (GBF). The role of endogenous prostaglandins (PGs) and sensory afferent nerves releasing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the mechanism of gastroprotection induced by H2S was examined in capsaicin-denervated rats and those pretreated with capsazepine to inhibit activity of vanilloid receptors (VR-1). Rats were pretreated with vehicle, NaHS, the donor of H2S and or L-cysteine, the H2S precursor, with or without the concurrent treatment with 1) nonselective (indomethacin) and selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 (SC-560) or COX-2 (rofecoxib) inhibitors. The expression of mRNA and protein for COX-1 and COX-2 were analyzed in gastric mucosa pretreated with NaHS with or without PAG. Both NaHS and L-cysteine dose-dependently attenuated severity of WRS-induced gastric lesions and significantly increased GBF. These effects were significantly reduced by pretreatment with PAG and capsaicin denervation. NaHS increased gastric H2S production via CSE/CBS but not 3-MST activity. Inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activity significantly diminished NaHS- and L-cysteine-induced protection and hyperemia. NaHS increased expression of COX-1, COX-2 mRNAs and proteins and raised CGRP mRNA expression. These effects of NaHS on COX-1 and COX-2 protein contents were reversed by PAG and capsaicin denervation. We conclude that H2S exerts gastroprotection against WRS-induced gastric lesions by the mechanism involving enhancement in gastric microcirculation mediated by endogenous PGs, sensory afferent nerves releasing CGRP and the activation of VR-1 receptors. PMID:25774496

  15. Bridging the lesion-engineering a permissive substrate for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pires, Liliana R; Pêgo, Ana P

    2015-09-01

    Biomaterial-based strategies to restore connectivity after lesion at the spinal cord are focused on bridging the lesion and providing an favourable substrate and a path for axonal re-growth. Following spinal cord injury (SCI) a hostile environment for neuronal cell growth is established by the activation of multiple inhibitory mechanisms that hamper regeneration to occur. Implantable scaffolds can provide mechanical support and physical guidance for axon re-growth and, at the same time, contribute to alleviate the hostile environment by the in situ delivery of therapeutic molecules and/or relevant cells. Basic research on SCI has been contributing with the description of inhibitory mechanisms for regeneration as well as identifying drugs/molecules that can target inhibition. This knowledge is the background for the development of combined strategies with biomaterials. Additionally, scaffold design is significantly evolving. From the early simple hollow conduits, scaffolds with complex architectures that can modulate cell fate are currently being tested. A number of promising pre-clinical studies combining scaffolds, cells, drugs and/or nucleic acids are reported in the open literature. Overall, it is considered that to address the multi-factorial inhibitory environment of a SCI, a multifaceted therapeutic approach is imperative. The progress in the identification of molecules that target inhibition after SCI and its combination with scaffolds and/or cells are described and discussed in this review. PMID:26816642

  16. Unusual presentation of multiple nerve entrapment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Citisli, Veli; Kocaoglu, Murat; Göcmen, Selcuk; Korucu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is the most common form of ulnar nerve entrapment and the second most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity after carpal tunnel syndrome. However, bilateral compressive ulnar neuropathy is a rare condition. Electro diagnostic studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. PMID:25870738

  17. Unusual presentation of multiple nerve entrapment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Citisli, Veli; Kocaoglu, Murat; Göcmen, Selcuk; Korucu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is the most common form of ulnar nerve entrapment and the second most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity after carpal tunnel syndrome. However, bilateral compressive ulnar neuropathy is a rare condition. Electro diagnostic studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. PMID:25870738

  18. Loss of Aβ-nerve endings associated with the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Daniela Calderón; Korkmaz, Yüksel; Cho, Britta; Kopp, Marion; Bloch, Wilhelm; Addicks, Klaus; Niedermeier, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite complex initiates the perception of touch and mediates Aβ slowly adapting type I responses. Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with T-cell-mediated inflammation, whereas hyperkeratosis is characterized with or without epithelial dysplasia in the oral mucosa. To determine the effects of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis on the Merkel cell-neurite complex, healthy oral mucosal epithelium and lesional oral mucosal epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients were stained by immunohistochemistry (the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex and double immunofluorescence methods) using pan cytokeratin, cytokeratin 20 (K20, a Merkel cell marker), and neurofilament 200 (NF200, a myelinated Aβ- and Aδ-nerve fibre marker) antibodies. NF200-immunoreactive (ir) nerve fibres in healthy tissues and in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were counted and statistically analysed. In the healthy oral mucosa, K20-positive Merkel cells with and without close association to the intraepithelial NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected. In the lesional oral mucosa of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients, extremely rare NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected only in the lamina propria. Compared with healthy tissues, lichen planus and hyperkeratosis tissues had significantly decreased numbers of NF200-ir nerve fibres in the oral mucosal epithelium. Lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were associated with the absence of Aβ-nerve endings in the oral mucosal epithelium. Thus, we conclude that mechanosensation mediated by the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the oral mucosal epithelium is impaired in lichen planus and hyperkeratosis. PMID:27025263

  19. Triceps-sparing ulnar approach for total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, N; Suenaga, N; Yoshioka, C; Yamane, S

    2015-08-01

    To prevent insufficiency of the triceps after total elbow arthroplasty, we have, since 2008, used a triceps-sparing ulnar approach. This study evaluates the clinical results and post-operative alignment of the prosthesis using this approach. We reviewed 25 elbows in 23 patients. There were five men and 18 women with a mean age of 69 years (54 to 83). There were 18 elbows with rheumatoid arthritis, six with a fracture or pseudoarthrosis and one elbow with osteoarthritis. Post-operative complications included one intra-operative fracture, one elbow with heterotopic ossification, one transient ulnar nerve palsy, and one elbow with skin necrosis, but no elbow was affected by insufficiency of the triceps. Patients were followed for a mean of 42 months (24 to 77). The mean post-operative Japanese Orthopaedic Association Elbow Score was 90.8 (51 to 100) and the mean Mayo Elbow Performance score 93.8 (65 to 100). The mean post-operative flexion/extension of the elbow was 135/-8. The Manual Muscle Testing score of the triceps was 5 in 23 elbows and 2 in two elbows (one patient). The mean alignment of the implants examined by 3D-CT was 2.8 pronation (standard deviation (sd) 5.5), 0.3 valgus (sd 2.7), and 0.7 extension (sd 3.2) for the humeral component, and 9.3 pronation (sd 9.7), 0.3 valgus (sd 4.0), and 8.6 extension (sd 3.1) for the ulnar component. There was no radiolucent line or loosening of the implants on the final radiographs. The triceps-sparing ulnar approach allows satisfactory alignment of the implants, is effective in preventing post-operative triceps insufficiency, and gives satisfactory short-term results. PMID:26224827

  20. [Arthroscopic treatment of the ulnar impaction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, C

    2006-11-01

    The ulnar impaction syndrome is due to hyperpressure in the ulnocarpal joint. It occurs most frequently following distal radial fractures with shortening, but can also be secondary to a primitive length discrepancy between a short radius and a long ulna (positive ulnar variance). Symptoms and clinical findings, even though characteristic, are not specific. Standard X rays show a positive ulnar variance, and sometimes a hyperpressure cyst in the lunate. CT arthroscan and MRI studies demonstrate indirect signs of hyperpressure. If medical treatment fails to improve the condition, the choice surgical technique is arthroscopic, allowing debridement of the TFCC central tear, and shortening of the horizontal aspect of the ulnar head. PMID:17361891

  1. An Outcome Study for Ulnar Neuropathy at the Elbow: A Multicenter Study by the SUN study group

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae W.; Waljee, Jennifer F.; Burns, Patricia B.; Chung, Kevin C.; Gaston, R.Glenn; Haase, Steven C.; Hammert, Warren C.; Lawton, Jeffrey N.; Merrell, Greg A.; Nassab, Paul F.; Yang, Lynda J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many instruments have been developed to measure upper extremity disability, but few have been applied to ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE). Objective We measured patient outcomes following ulnar nerve decompression to 1) identify the most appropriate outcomes tools for UNE and 2) describe outcomes following ulnar nerve decompression. Methods Thirty-nine patients from 5 centers were followed prospectively after nerve decompression. Outcomes were measured preoperatively, 6-weeks, 3-months, 6-months, and 12-months postoperatively. Each patient completed the Michigan Hand Questionnaire (MHQ), Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (CTQ), and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaires. Grip, key-pinch strength, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) and 2-point discrimination (2PD were measured. Construct validity was calculated using Spearman correlation coefficients between questionnaire scores and physical and sensory measures. Responsiveness was assessed by standardized response means. Results Key pinch (p=0.008) and SWM testing of the ulnar ring (p<0.001) and small finger (radial: p=0.004; ulnar: p<0.001) improved following decompression. 2PD improved significantly across the radial (p=0.009) and ulnar (p=0.007) small finger. Improved symptoms and function were noted by the CTQ (Preoperative CTQ symptom score 2.73 vs. 1.90 postoperatively, p<0.001), DASH (p<0.001), and MHQ: function (p<0.001), activities of daily living (p=0.003), work (p=0.006), pain (p<0.001), and satisfaction (p<0.001). All surveys demonstrated strong construct validity, defined by correlation with functional outcomes, but MHQ and CTQ symptom instruments demonstrated the highest responsiveness. Conclusions Patient-reported outcomes improve following ulnar nerve decompression, including pain, function and satisfaction. The MHQ and CTQ are more responsive than the DASH for isolated UNE treated with decompression. PMID:23426153

  2. Low-energy laser action on median and radial nerve post-traumatic lesion after surgical suture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Bunila, Daniela; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Nacu, Mihaela; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Vasiliu, Virgil V.

    1996-01-01

    The low energy laser (LEL) biostimulatory effects on nervous tissue regeneration are well known. Thirty two patients with medial and/or radial nerve traumatic forearm lesion after surgical suture were divided into two groups: A-18 patients were treated with LEL; B-14 patients, witness, were treated with placebo lasers and classical medical and physical therapy. Lasers used were: HeNe, 632.5 nm wavelength, 2 mW power, and GaAlAs diode laser, 880 nm wavelength, pulsed emission with an output power 2 mW. Before, during, and after treatment EMG was done in order to measure objectively the efficiency of the treatment. We obtained good results after 4 - 5 months at 14 patients (77.7%) from group A and about the same results at 10 patients (71.3%) from group B, but after at least 8 months the good results were noticed concerning the improvements of EMG registration and on movements and force of the fingers. Finally we can say that the favorable results were obtained in at least twice shorter time with LEL treatment than with classical therapy.

  3. Efficient bridging of 20 mm rat sciatic nerve lesions with a longitudinally micro-structured collagen scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Boecker, A; Tank, J; Altinova, H; Deumens, R; Dabhi, C; Tolba, R; Weis, J; Brook, G A; Pallua, N; van Neerven, S G A

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of biomaterial nerve guides has been developed that await direct comparative testing with the 'gold-standard' autologous nerve graft in functional repair of peripheral nerve defects. In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were bridged with either a collagen-based micro-structured nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Axons regenerated well into the Perimaix scaffold and, the majority of these axons grew across the 20 mm defect into the distal nerve segment. In fact, both the total axon number and the number of retrogradely traced somatosensory and motor neurons extending their axons across the implant was similar between Perimaix and autologous nerve graft groups. Implantation of Schwann cell-seeded Perimaix scaffolds provided only a beneficial effect on myelination within the scaffold. Functional recovery supported by the implanted, non-seeded Perimaix scaffold was as good as that observed after the autologous nerve graft, despite the presence of thinner myelin sheaths in the Perimaix implanted nerves. These findings support the potential of the Perimaix collagen scaffold as a future off-the-shelf device for clinical applications in selected cases of traumatic peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26496383

  4. Two applications of end-to-side nerve neurorrhaphy in severe upper-extremity nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Fuat; Peker, Fatih; Celiköz, Bahattin

    2004-01-01

    End-to-side and side-to-side techniques (what we call alternative nerve repair techniques) have been investigated in detail in both experimental and clinical studies. There have not been any large series, but only some case reports describing either successful or disappointing functional results in the recent literature. Two cases presented here were of two extreme examples of nerve injuries that had no chance for direct repair; alternative choices were performed. One was a side-to-side neurorrhaphy between the ulnar and median nerves, and the other was an end-to-side nerve repair of the median and radial nerves to the ulnar nerve. Both patients regained their diminished protective sensation and returned to their occupations. Based on these results and our review of the current literature, we consider alternative nerve repair techniques to be reasonable, prudent, and scientific choices for the treatment of some challenging nerve injury cases. PMID:15378581

  5. Trend of Recovery after Simple Decompression for Treatment of Ulnar Neuropathy at the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Aviram M.; Gaston, R. Glenn; Haase, Steven C.; Hammert, Warren C.; Lawton, Jeffrey N.; Merrell, Greg A.; Nassab, Paul F.; Song, Jae W.; Yang, Lynda J. S.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although numerous studies have investigated long-term outcomes after surgical treatment of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow with simple decompression, no study has evaluated the trend of postoperative recovery. The authors assessed timing of recovery after simple decompression for ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Methods The five-center Surgery of the Ulnar Nerve Study Group prospectively recruited 58 consecutive subjects with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and treated them with simple decompression. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Patient-rated outcomes questionnaires included the Michigan Hand Questionnaire; the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire; and the Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Functional tests used were grip strength, key pinch strength, two-point discrimination, and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing. Postoperative improvement was assessed at each time point to establish the trend of recovery in reaching a plateau. Results Significant patient-reported symptomatic and functional recovery occurred over the first 6 weeks postoperatively as represented by improvements in questionnaire scores. Symptomatic recovery occurred earlier than functional recovery as measured by sensory and strength testing and the work domain of the Michigan Hand Questionnaire. Improvement in patient-reported outcomes continued and reached a plateau at 3 months, whereas measured strength and sensory recovery continued over 12 months. Conclusion The greatest clinical improvement after simple decompression for ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, according to questionnaire scores, occurs in the first 6 weeks postoperatively and reaches a plateau by 3 months. PMID:23542274

  6. Nerve injuries about the elbow in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D; Lintner, David M

    2014-09-01

    The athlete's elbow is a remarkable example of motion, strength, and durability. The stress placed on the elbow during sport, including the throwing motion, may lead to soft-tissue ligamentous and nerve injury. The thrower's elbow illustrates one example of possible nerve injury about the elbow in sport, related to chronic repetitive tensile and compressive stresses to the ulnar nerve associated with elbow flexion and valgus position. Besides the throwing athlete, nerve injury from high-energy direct-impact forces may also damage nerves around the elbow in contact sports. Detailed history and physical examination can often make the diagnosis of most upper extremity neuropathies. The clinician must be aware of the possibility of isolated or combined nerve injury as far proximal as the cervical nerve roots, through the brachial plexus, to the peripheral nerve terminal branches. Electrodiagnostic studies are occasionally beneficial for diagnosis with certain nerves. Nonoperative management is often successful in most elbow and upper extremity neuropathies. If conservative treatment fails, then surgical treatment should address all potentially offending structures. In the presence of medial laxity and concurrent ulnar neuritis, the medial ulnar collateral ligament warrants surgical treatment, in addition to transposition of the ulnar nerve. The morbidity of open surgical decompression of nerves in and around the elbow is potentially career threatening in the throwing athlete. This mandates an assessment of the adequacy of the nonsurgical treatment and a thorough preoperative discussion of the risks and benefits of surgery. PMID:25077754

  7. Injury to ulnar collateral ligament of thumb.

    PubMed

    Madan, Simerjit Singh; Pai, Dinker R; Kaur, Avneet; Dixit, Ruchita

    2014-02-01

    Injury of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of thumb can be incapacitating if untreated or not treated properly. This injury is notorious for frequently being missed by inexperienced health care personnel in emergency departments. It has frequently been described in skiers, but also occurs in other sports such as rugby, soccer, handball, basketball, volleyball and even after a handshake. The UCL of the thumb acts as a primary restraint to valgus stress and is injured if hyperabduction and hyperextension forces are applied to the first metacarpophalangeal joint. The diagnosis is best established clinically, though MRI is the imaging modality of choice. Many treatment options exist, surgical treatment being offered depending on various factors, including timing of presentation (acute or chronic), grade (severity of injury), displacement (Stener lesion), location of tear (mid-substance or peripheral), associated or concomitant surrounding tissue injury (bone, volar plate, etc.), and patient-related factors (occupational demands, etc.). This review aims to identify the optimal diagnostic techniques and management options for UCL injury available thus far. PMID:24590986

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) positive effects on muscle fiber degeneration and gait recovery after nerve lesion in MDX mice

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Gustavo F; Benitez, Suzana U; Oliveira, Alexandre L R

    2014-01-01

    Background G-CSF has been shown to decrease inflammatory processes and to act positively on the process of peripheral nerve regeneration during the course of muscular dystrophy. Aims The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of treatment of G-CSF during sciatic nerve regeneration and histological analysis in the soleus muscle in MDX mice. Methods Six-week-old male MDX mice underwent left sciatic nerve crush and were G-CSF treated at 7 days prior to and 21 days after crush. Ten and twenty-one days after surgery, the mice were euthanized, and the sciatic nerves were processed for immunohistochemistry (anti-p75NTR and anti-neurofilament) and transmission electron microscopy. The soleus muscles were dissected out and processed for H&E staining and subsequent morphologic analysis. Motor function analyses were performed at 7 days prior to and 21 days after sciatic crush using the CatWalk system and the sciatic nerve index. Results Both groups treated with G-CSF showed increased p75NTR and neurofilament expression after sciatic crush. G-CSF treatment decreased the number of degenerated and regenerated muscle fibers, thereby increasing the number of normal muscle fibers. Conclusions The reduction in p75NTR and neurofilament indicates a decreased regenerative capacity in MDX mice following a lesion to a peripheral nerve. The reduction in motor function in the crushed group compared with the control groups may reflect the cycles of muscle degeneration/regeneration that occur postnatally. Thus, G-CSF treatment increases motor function in MDX mice. Nevertheless, the decrease in baseline motor function in these mice is not reversed completely by G-CSF. PMID:25328849

  9. Ulnar impaction syndrome: Managed by wrist arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jiajie; Xu, Zhijie; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of handicraft industry and increase of various such works that need a large amount of repeated wrist ulnar deviation strength, the incidence of ulnar impaction syndrome (UIS) is increasing, but the traditional simple ulnar shortening osteotomy has more complications. This study aimed to explore the early diagnostic criteria of UIS and its wrist arthroscopic treatment experience. Materials and Methods: 9 UIS patients were enrolled in this study. According to magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray and endoscopic features, the diagnostic criteria of UIS were summarized and the individualized treatment schedule was made. If the ulnar positive variance was less than 4 mm, the arthroscopic wafer resection was performed. If the ulnar positive variance was more than 4 mm, the arthroscopic resection of injury and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar osteotomy were conducted. Results: In all patients, the wound healed without any complications. All patients returned to normal life and work, with no ulnar wrist pain again. One patient had wrist weakness. There was a significant difference of the wrist activity between the last followup and before operation (P < 0.05). According to the modified wrist function scoring system of Green and O’Brien, there were 6 cases of excellent, 2 cases of good and 1 case of appropriate and the overall excellent and good rate was 92.3%. Conclusion: In the treatment of UIS, the arthroscopy can improve the diagnosis rate, optimize the treatment plan, shorten the treatment cycle, with good treatment results. PMID:27053807

  10. Clinical research of percutaneous bilateral splanchnic nerve lesion for pain relief in patients with pancreatic cancer under X-ray guidance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghui; Yu, Hongli; Sun, Shiyu; Pan, Tao; Wang, Zhengping; Fu, Shukun; Lin, Fuqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to observe the therapeutic effects of percutaneous bilateral splanchnic nerves block in patients with intractable pain due to pancreatic cancer. Methods: twenty-fourpatients (advanced pancreatic cancer) with intractable pain were enrolled in the research. Through approach of the edge of T11 vertebral body with double-needle technique, the researchers carried out the bilateral lesion of the greater and the lesser splanchnic nerve with absolute ethyl alcohol under X-ray guidance. Follow-up was six months. Numerical rating scale (NRS) and quality of life (QOL) were all assessed pre- and post-procedure (1 d, 1 w, 2 w, 1 m, 2 m, 3 m, 4 m, 5 m, 6 m). The daily morphine consumption was recorded. Results: NRS and daily morphine consumption decreased when compared to pre-procedure while QOL increased. These differences were found to be statistically significant (P<0.05). 9 patients suffered from diarrhea temporally and recoveredin one week. Conclusion: Percutaneous bilateral splanchnic nerves lesion under X-ray guidancecan treat intractable pain caused by pancreatic cancer and improve patients’life quality with minor complication. PMID:26884922

  11. Non-invasive stimulation of the vibrissal pad improves recovery of whisking function after simultaneous lesion of the facial and infraorbital nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    Bendella, H; Pavlov, S P; Grosheva, M; Irintchev, A; Angelova, S K; Merkel, D; Sinis, N; Kaidoglou, K; Skouras, E; Dunlop, S A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2011-07-01

    We have recently shown that manual stimulation of target muscles promotes functional recovery after transection and surgical repair to pure motor nerves (facial: whisking and blink reflex; hypoglossal: tongue position). However, following facial nerve repair, manual stimulation is detrimental if sensory afferent input is eliminated by, e.g., infraorbital nerve extirpation. To further understand the interplay between sensory input and motor recovery, we performed simultaneous cut-and-suture lesions on both the facial and the infraorbital nerves and examined whether stimulation of the sensory afferents from the vibrissae by a forced use would improve motor recovery. The efficacy of 3 treatment paradigms was assessed: removal of the contralateral vibrissae to ensure a maximal use of the ipsilateral ones (vibrissal stimulation; Group 2), manual stimulation of the ipsilateral vibrissal muscles (Group 3), and vibrissal stimulation followed by manual stimulation (Group 4). Data were compared to controls which underwent surgery but did not receive any treatment (Group 1). Four months after surgery, all three treatments significantly improved the amplitude of vibrissal whisking to 30° versus 11° in the controls of Group 1. The three treatments also reduced the degree of polyneuronal innervation of target muscle fibers to 37% versus 58% in Group 1. These findings indicate that forced vibrissal use and manual stimulation, either alone or sequentially, reduce target muscle polyinnervation and improve recovery of whisking function when both the sensory and the motor components of the trigemino-facial system regenerate. PMID:21526334

  12. Analysis of the Papal Benediction Sign: The ulnar neuropathy of St. Peter.

    PubMed

    Futterman, Bennett

    2015-09-01

    The origin of the Papal Benediction Sign has been a source of controversy for many generations of medical students. The question has been whether the Papal Benediction Sign posture is the result of an injury to the median nerve or to the ulnar nerve. The increasingly popular use of online "chat rooms" and the vast quantities of information available on the internet has led to an increasing level of confusion. Looking in major anatomy texts, anatomy and board review books as well as numerous internet sites the answer remains unresolved. Through the analysis of functional anatomy of the hand, cultural and religious practices of the early centuries of the Common Era and church art a clear answer emerges. It will become apparent that this hand posture results from an ulnar neuropathy. PMID:26118346

  13. Poland anomaly with contralateral ulnar ray defect.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C V; Coombs, R C; David, T J

    1993-01-01

    We report an atypical case of the Poland anomaly. Unreported features are that the hand abnormality is on the contralateral side to the chest wall defect, there is an ulnar ray predominance, and lack of syndactyly. Images PMID:8320708

  14. Ulnar Head Replacement and Related Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Sauerbier, Michael; Arsalan-Werner, Annika; Enderle, Elena; Vetter, Miriam; Vonier, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A stable distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is mandatory for the function and load transmission in the wrist and forearm. Resectional salvage procedures such as the Darrach procedure, Bowers arthroplasty, and Sauvé-Kapandji procedure include the potential risk of radioulnar instability and impingement, which can lead to pain and weakness. Soft tissue stabilizing techniques have only limited success rates in solving these problems. In an attempt to stabilize the distal forearm mechanically following ulnar head resection, various endoprostheses have been developed to replace the ulnar head. The prostheses can be used for secondary treatment of failed ulnar head resection, but they can also achieve good results in the primary treatment of osteoarthritis of the DRUJ. Our experience consists of twenty-five patients (follow-up 30 months) with DRUJ osteoarthritis who were treated with an ulnar head prosthesis, with improvement in pain, range of motion, and grip strength. An ulnar head prosthesis should be considered as a treatment option for a painful DRUJ. PMID:24436786

  15. Ulnar head replacement and related biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Michael; Arsalan-Werner, Annika; Enderle, Elena; Vetter, Miriam; Vonier, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    A stable distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is mandatory for the function and load transmission in the wrist and forearm. Resectional salvage procedures such as the Darrach procedure, Bowers arthroplasty, and Sauvé-Kapandji procedure include the potential risk of radioulnar instability and impingement, which can lead to pain and weakness. Soft tissue stabilizing techniques have only limited success rates in solving these problems. In an attempt to stabilize the distal forearm mechanically following ulnar head resection, various endoprostheses have been developed to replace the ulnar head. The prostheses can be used for secondary treatment of failed ulnar head resection, but they can also achieve good results in the primary treatment of osteoarthritis of the DRUJ. Our experience consists of twenty-five patients (follow-up 30 months) with DRUJ osteoarthritis who were treated with an ulnar head prosthesis, with improvement in pain, range of motion, and grip strength. An ulnar head prosthesis should be considered as a treatment option for a painful DRUJ. PMID:24436786

  16. Congenital Ulnar Drift in a Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Desirae; Eliasson, Shannon; Griswold, John

    2015-01-01

    Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations. In 1994 Wood reviewed all of the descriptions of cases of windblown hand and pointed out how many variants of congenital ulnar drift there are, suggesting that the many variations seen may all belong to a larger type of arthrogryposis. While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud's arthropathy. While most hand surgeons are familiar with presentations of congenital ulnar drift, few of them are knowledgeable about Jaccoud's arthropathy as this is usually discussed within medical communities such as Rheumatology. We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s. We propose that the current case is a demonstration of a type of windblown hand that has some hereditary component but is not immediately obvious at birth and presents physically more like Jaccoud's arthropathy than traditional windblown hand. PMID:26167318

  17. The Effect of Bilateral Superior Laryngeal Nerve Lesion on Swallowing – A Novel Method to Quantitate Aspirated Volume and Pharyngeal Threshold in Videofluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    DING, Peng; FUNG, George Shiu-Kai; LIN, Ming De; HOLMAN, Shaina D.; GERMAN, Rebecca Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of bilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) lesion on swallowing threshold volume and the occurrence of aspiration, using a novel measurement technique for videofluorscopic swallowing studies (VFSS). Methods and Materials We used a novel radiographic phantom to assess volume of the milk containing barium from fluoroscopy. The custom made phantom was firstly calibrated by comparing image intensity of the phantom with known cylinder depths. Secondly, known volume pouches of milk in a pig cadaver were compared to volumes calculated with the phantom. Using these standards, we calculated the volume of milk in the valleculae, esophagus and larynx, for 205 feeding sequences from four infant pigs feeding before and after had bilateral SLN lesions. Swallow safety was assessed using the IMPAS scale. Results The log-linear correlation between image intensity values from the phantom filled with barium milk and the known phantom cylinder depths was strong (R2>0.95), as was the calculated volumes of the barium milk pouches. The threshold volume of bolus in the valleculae during feeding was significantly larger after bilateral SLN lesion than in control swallows (p<0.001). The IMPAS score increased in the lesioned swallows relative to the controls (p<0.001). Conclusion Bilateral SLN lesion dramatically increased the aspiration incidence and the threshold volume of bolus in valleculae. The use of this phantom permits quantification of the aspirated volume of fluid. The custom made phantom and calibration allow for more accurate 3D volume estimation from 2D x-ray in VFSS. PMID:25270532

  18. Posterior tibial and sural nerve somatosensory evoked potentials: a study in spastic paraparesis and spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Aalfs, C M; Koelman, J H; Posthumus Meyjes, F E; Ongerboer de Visser, B W

    1993-12-01

    In two groups of patients posterior tibial nerve (PTN) and sural nerve (SN) somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were compared to each other and related to classified neurological signs. Group A consisted of 7 patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) and 8 with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), with solely or primarily motor deficits. Group B consisted of 12 patients with different spinal cord diseases causing variable mixed sensory and motor impairments. Normal values were derived from 39 controls. A clear trend towards more frequently prolonged PTN SEP than SN SEP latencies was found in both groups and appears to make PTN SEPs more useful for clinical application than SN SEPs. No significant differences were found in SEP abnormalities when the two patient groups were compared to each other. No relationships were found between SEP abnormalities and spasticity, weakness or any single sensory modality, making the two SEPs questionable as a quantitative test for neurological deficits in our patients. PMID:7507431

  19. Variations in the motor nerve supply of the thenar and hypothenar muscles of the hand.

    PubMed Central

    Ajmani, M L

    1996-01-01

    The distribution pattern of the muscular branch of median and ulnar nerves and motor innervation of the thenar and hypothenar muscles were studied in 68 palmar regions taken from 34 adult cadavers of both sexes aged 40 to 70 y. The structure of the flexor pollicis brevis was examined in all 68 hands. In 13 of the 68 hands an anastomosis was seen between the ulnar and median nerves. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8771405

  20. Classification and treatment of ulnar styloid nonunion.

    PubMed

    Hauck, R M; Skahen, J; Palmer, A K

    1996-05-01

    Symptomatic nonunion of the ulnar styloid is an uncommon problem that is usually best treated by simple excision of the ulnar styloid fragment. Two types of nonunion of the ulnar styloid are described here on an anatomic basis, and their treatment differs. Type 1 is defined as a nonunion associated with a stable distal radioulnar joint. Type 2 is defined as a nonunion associated with subluxation of the distal radioulnar joint. The postoperative follow-up period for the two types ranged from 4 months to 13 years, with a mean of 5 years 2 months. Eleven type 1 wrists were treated with excision of the fragment, and all patients had satisfactory relief of pain. Nine type 2 wrists required restoration of the anatomy of the traingular fibrocartilage complex. Three of these had large fragments that were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. All three patients were completely relieved of their discomfort. Six other patients underwent excision of the fragment and repair of the triangular fibrocartilage complex to the distal ulna. This group had four excellent, one good, and one fair result. If the distal radioulnar joint is stable on presentation or if its stability is restored, then long-term relief of pain from ulnar styloid nonunion is achieved by treatment of the nonunion. PMID:8724472

  1. Anterior interosseous nerve syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bäumer, Philipp; Meinck, Hans-Michael; Schiefer, Johannes; Weiler, Markus; Bendszus, Martin; Kele, Henrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine lesion sites and spatial lesion patterns in spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve syndrome (AINS) with high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography (MRN). Methods: In 20 patients with AINS and 20 age- and sex-matched controls, MRN of median nerve fascicles was performed at 3T with large longitudinal anatomical coverage (upper arm/elbow/forearm): 135 contiguous axial slices (T2-weighted: echo time/repetition time 52/7,020 ms, time of acquisition: 15 minutes 48 seconds, in-plane resolution: 0.25 × 0.25 mm). Lesion classification was performed by visual inspection and by quantitative analysis of normalized T2 signal after segmentation of median nerve voxels. Results: In all patients and no controls, T2 lesions of individual fascicles were observed within upper arm median nerve trunk and strictly followed a somatotopic/internal topography: affected were those motor fascicles that will form the anterior interosseous nerve further distally while other fascicles were spared. Predominant lesion focus was at a mean distance of 14.6 ± 5.4 cm proximal to the humeroradial joint. Discriminative power of quantitative T2 signal analysis and of qualitative lesion rating was high, with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity (p < 0.0001). Fascicular T2 lesion patterns were rated as multifocal (n = 17), monofocal (n = 2), or indeterminate (n = 1) by 2 independent observers with strong agreement (kappa = 0.83). Conclusion: It has been difficult to prove the existence of fascicular/partial nerve lesions in spontaneous neuropathies using clinical and electrophysiologic findings. With MRN, fascicular lesions with strict somatotopic organization were observed in upper arm median nerve trunks of patients with AINS. Our data strongly support that AINS in the majority of cases is not a surgically treatable entrapment neuropathy but a multifocal mononeuropathy selectively involving, within the main trunk of the median nerve, the motor fascicles that continue distally to form the anterior interosseous nerve. PMID:24415574

  2. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. PMID:26773623

  3. Lateral Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction: An Analysis of Ulnar Tunnel Locations.

    PubMed

    Anakwenze, Oke A; Khanna, Krishn; Levine, William N; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2016-02-01

    We conducted a study to determine precise ulnar tunnel location during lateral ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction to maximize bony bridge and graft construct perpendicularity. Three-dimensional computer models of 15 adult elbows were constructed. These elbow models were manipulated for simulated 4-mm tunnel drilling. The proximal ulna tunnels were placed at the radial head-neck junction and sequentially 0, 5, and 10 mm posterior to the supinator crest. The bony bridges created by these tunnels were measured. Location of the humeral isometric point was determined and marked as the humeral tunnel location. Graft configuration was simulated. Using all the simulated ulna tunnels, we measured the proximal and distal limbs of the graft. In addition, we measured the degree of perpendicularity of the graft limbs. The ulnar tunnel bony bridge was significantly longer with more posterior placement of the proximal tunnel relative to the supinator crest. An increase in degree of perpendicularity of graft to ulnar tunnels was noted with posterior shifts in proximal tunnel location. Posterior placement of the proximal ulna tunnel allows for a larger bony bridge and a more geometrically favorable reconstruction. PMID:26866312

  4. Vascularized Nerve Grafts and Vascularized Fascia for Upper Extremity Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kostopoulos, Vasileios K.

    2009-01-01

    Since 1976, experimental and clinical studies have suggested the superiority of vascularized nerve grafts. In this study, a 27-year experience of the senior author is presented regarding vascularized nerve grafts and fascia for complex upper extremity nerve reconstruction. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts is presented. Since 1981, 21 vascularized nerve grafts, other than vascularized ulnar nerve, were used for reconstruction of nerve injuries in the upper extremity. Indications were prolonged denervation time, failure of the previously used conventional nerve grafts, and excessive scar in the recipient site. Injury was in the hand/wrist area (n = 5), in the forearm (n = 4), in the elbow (n = 2), in the arm (n = 4), or in the plexus (n = 6). Vascularized sural (n = 9), saphenous (n = 8), superficial radial (n = 3), and peroneal (superficial and deep) nerves were used. The mean follow-up was 31.4 months. Vascularized nerve grafts for upper extremity injuries provided good to excellent sensory return in severely scarred upper extremities in patients in whom conventional nerve grafts had failed. They have also provided relief of causalgia after painful neuroma resection and motor function recovery in selective cases even for above the elbow injuries. Small diameter vascularized nerve grafts should be considered for bridging long nerve gaps in regions of excessive scar or for reconstructions where conventional nerve grafts have failed. PMID:19381727

  5. A case of ulnar aneurysm. Clinical and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kutsal, A; Kivanç, O

    1988-01-01

    Although ulnar artery aneurysms have been known since the 17th century, fewer than 100 cases have been reported. Because of the rarity of this condition, a case of traumatic ulnar artery aneurysm which was operated on in our department is presented and the clinical findings, diagnosis and surgical implications are considered. PMID:3379093

  6. The impact and specificity of nerve perturbation on novel vibrotactile sensory letter learning.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Steven R; Bosse, Jessica; Murphy, Bernadette; Lee, Timothy D

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine if induced radiating paresthesia interferes with (a) acquisition and/or (b) utilization of complex tactile information, and (c) identify whether interference reflects tactile masking or response competition. Radiating ulnar (experiment 1) and median (experiment 2) nerve paresthesia was quantified on ulnar innervated vibrotactile Morse code letter acquisition and recollection tasks. Induced paresthesia differentially impacted letter acquisition and recollection, but only when presented to the same anatomical spatial location. PMID:24844345

  7. Ulnar drift in rheumatoid arthritis: a review of biomechanical etiology.

    PubMed

    Morco, Stephanie; Bowden, Anton

    2015-02-26

    The objective of this article is to summarize current understanding of biomechanical factors that cause ulnar drift in the hands of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This was done through literature review of published articles on the mechanical etiology of ulnar drift. There are several theories regarding the cause of ulnar drift, however conclusive evidence is still lacking. Current mechanical factors that are postulated to play a role include: failure of the collateral ligaments, intra-articular pressure changes, degenerative changes in the carpal and metacarpal anatomy, muscle hypoxia induced changes in wrist tension, and exacerbating activities of daily living. Although current theories regarding ulnar drift almost universally include an at least partially mechanical rationale, the causes may be multifactorial. Significantly more research is needed to elucidate the relative importance of mechanical factors leading to significant ulnar drift concurrent with advanced rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25614089

  8. Study of Electrophysiological Changes in Sensory Nerves Among Diabetic Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, Arsalan; Ahsan, Akif; Goel, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neuropathy is one of the most troublesome complication affecting individuals with diabetes. The resultant loss of function in peripheral nerves causes loss of protective sensations and impairs patient’s ability to perceive incipient or even apparent ulcerations in the feet. Aim This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis of alteration in electrophysiological parameters of nerve before actual manifestations of neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients and to analyse the effect of smoking on Sensory Nerve Conduction Velocity (SNCV) of diabetic subjects. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty diagnosed diabetics were taken as cases while 30 healthy non diabetics were taken as control. Case group was divided into diabetic non-smoker and diabetic smoker. Diabetic smoker were further subdivided into light smoker, moderate smoker and heavy smoker according to smoking index. After detailed history and physical examination SNCV of median and ulnar nerve in upper limb and sural nerve in lower limb was performed. Results On comparison of SNCV of median and ulnar nerve of upper limb and sural nerve of lower limb between control and diabetic non-smoker only sural nerve of diabetic non smoker showed significant bilateral decrease. There was significant bilateral decrease in SNCV of median and ulnar nerve of diabetic heavy smoker when compared to control and diabetic non smoker. Similarly, SNCV of sural nerve of diabetic heavy smoker was significantly decreased when compared with control, diabetic non-smoker, diabetic light and moderate smoker. A negative and statistically significant correlation was found between SNCV and smoking index. Conclusion Present study indicates that nerves of lower limbs are more susceptible to diabetic assault as compared to upper limb suggesting that long nerves are commonly affected. Also, apart from duration and severity of diabetes, smoking itself is an independent factor for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26894060

  9. Absolute refractory period of human nerve fibres during postnatal myelination.

    PubMed

    Duron, B; Khater-Boidin, J

    1991-01-01

    In order to study the absolute refractory period of a given group of nerve fibres during development we measured absolute refractory periods and conduction velocities of motor fibres and the most excitable fibres in the human ulnar nerve of newborns, children and adults. In each group of nerve fibres absolute refractory period was not correlated to conduction velocity (i.e. fibre diameters) and was rather constant during development. However, absolute refractory period of the most excitable fibres was smaller than absolute refractory period of motor fibres independently of the subject's age. Thus, it appears that already at birth, absolute refractory period is characteristic for a given group of nerve fibres. PMID:2014765

  10. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes. PMID:27149509

  11. Sural nerve defects after nerve biopsy or nerve transfer as a sensory regeneration model for peripheral nerve conduit implantation.

    PubMed

    Radtke, C; Kocsis, J D; Reimers, K; Allmeling, C; Vogt, P M

    2013-09-01

    Nerve repair after injury can be effectively accomplished by direct suture approximation of the proximal and distal segments. This is more successful if coadaptation can be achieved without tension. Currently, the gold standard repair of larger deficits is the transplantation of an autologous sensory sural nerve graft. However, a significant disadvantage of this technique is the inevitable donor morbidity (sensory loss, neuroma and scar formation) after harvesting of the sural nerve. Moreover, limitation of autologous donor nerve length and fixed diameter of the available sural nerve are major drawbacks of current autograft treatment. Another approach that was introduced for nerve repair is the implantation of alloplastic nerve tubes made of, for example, poly-L-lactide. In these, nerve stumps of the transected nerves are surgically bridged using the biosynthetic conduit. A number of experimental studies, primarily in rodents, indicate axonal regeneration and remyelination after implantation of various conduits. However, only limited clinical studies with conduit implantation have been performed in acute peripheral nerve injuries particularly on digital nerves. Clinical transfer of animal studies, which can be carefully calibrated for site and extent of injury, to humans is difficult to interpret due to the intrinsic variability in human nerve injuries. This prevents effective quantification of improvement and induces bias in the study. Therefore, standardization of lesion/repair in human studies is warranted. Here we propose to use sural nerve defects, induced due to nerve graft harvesting or from diagnostic nerve biopsies as a model site to enable standardization of nerve conduit implantation. This would help better with the characterization of the implants and its effectiveness in axonal regeneration and remyelination. Nerve regeneration can be assessed, for example, by recovery of sensation, measured non-invasively by threshold to von Frey filaments and cold allodynia. Moreover, the implantation of nerve conduits may not only serve as a model to examine nerve repair, but it could also prevent neuroma formation, which is a major morbidity of sural nerve extraction. PMID:23867139

  12. Ulnar collateral ligament injuries in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jeremy R; Andrews, James R

    2014-05-01

    Repetitive valgus forces on the throwing elbow place significant stress on that joint. This stress can cause structural damage and injury to the ulnar collateral ligament. Many acute injuries of the throwing elbow are caused by repetitive chronic wear. Although much work has been done on injury prevention in youth who are pitchers, overuse injury in throwing sports constitutes an epidemic. Failing nonsurgical management, ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction is a viable option to return the throwing athlete to competition. PMID:24788447

  13. Comparison of Surgical Techniques for Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Overhead Athletes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Edward S; Dodson, Christopher C; Ciccotti, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    Several surgical techniques and modifications for ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction have been proposed since this procedure was first performed in 1974. The goal of these techniques has been restoration of stability to the medial elbow with minimal alteration to the surrounding anatomy. Outcome studies and systematic reviews on modified techniques for UCL reconstruction have shown a trend toward increased return to play in patients, particularly overhead athletes. Abandonment of flexor pronator mass detachment in favor of a muscle-splitting or muscle-elevating approach, minimal handling of the ulnar nerve, and the docking technique may result in improved outcomes and decreased complications without diminished performance. Several biomechanical studies have compared the structural properties of these techniques with those of the native UCL. However, a clear, concise surgical algorithm for UCL reconstruction is lacking. Additional studies that use sport-specific outcome measures and performance metrics may better demonstrate the true return to preinjury performance after UCL reconstruction in overhead athletes. PMID:26890035

  14. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve.

    PubMed

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W

    2010-05-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter. PMID:20347243

  15. Axo-glial dysjunction. A novel structural lesion that accounts for poorly reversible slowing of nerve conduction in the spontaneously diabetic bio-breeding rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sima, A A; Lattimer, S A; Yagihashi, S; Greene, D A

    1986-01-01

    Biochemical abnormalities in peripheral nerve are thought to precede and condition the development of diabetic neuropathy, but metabolic intervention in chronic diabetic neuropathy produces only limited acute clinical response. The residual, metabolically unresponsive neurological deficits have never been rigorously defined in terms of either persistent metabolic derangements or irreversible structural defects because human nerve tissue is rarely accessible for anatomical and biochemical study and experimentally diabetic animals do not develop the structural hallmarks of human diabetic neuropathy. Detailed neuroanatomical-functional-biochemical correlation was therefore undertaken in long-term spontaneously diabetic BB-Wistar rats that functionally and structurally model human diabetic neuropathy. Vigorous insulin replacement in chronically diabetic BB rats essentially normalized both the sural nerve fiber caliber spectrum and the decreased sciatic nerve myo-inositol and (Na,K)-ATPase levels generally associated with conduction slowing in diabetic animals; yet, nerve conduction was only partially restored toward normal. Morphometric analysis revealed a striking disappearance of paranodal axo-glial junctional complexes that was not corrected by insulin replacement. Loss of these strategic junctional complexes, which are thought to limit lateral migration of axolemmal Na channels away from nodes of Ranvier, correlates with and can account for the diminished nodal Na permeability and resultant nodal conduction delay characteristic of chronic diabetic neuropathy in this animal model. Images PMID:3003160

  16. Adverse effects of GH self administration on peripheral nerve. A case report.

    PubMed

    Caliandro, P; Padua, L; Aprile, I; Conti, V; Pazzaglia, C; Pavone, A; Tonali, P

    2004-12-01

    To our knowledge there is no evidence of multientrapment neuropathy related to growth hormone (GH) administration. We observed the case of a 45-year-old bodybuilder complaining of paresthesias and dysesthesias of the hands and feet after self-administration of high-dose of recombinant GH therapy. The patient complained of transitory symptoms after each cycle of GH therapy. The electrodiagnosis showed: 1) moderate right carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and minimal left CTS; 2) mild right ulnar entrapment at elbow; 3) a reduction of motor nerve conduction velocity of the left ulnar nerve across elbow; 4) a reduction of the amplitude of the sensory nerve action potential of the left ulnar nerve in digit-wrist segment; 5) the absence of the ulnar F wave bilaterally registering from abductor digiti minimus. Our data suggest a multiple entrapment condition of the upper limbs; furthermore, based on the history (paresthesia at feet), we can hypothesize a mild involvement of distal sensory fibres in the legs (neurophysiologically negative). The anecdotal history and neurophysiological findings of this case suggest an increased awareness to the adverse effects of GH on peripheral nerve. PMID:15758859

  17. Superficial Ulnar Artery: A Case Report of its Unusual Course

    PubMed Central

    QUADROS, Lydia Shobha; BHAT, Nandini; D'SOUZA, Antony Sylvan

    2015-01-01

    After arising from the brachial artery in the cubital fossa the ulnar artery usually passes deep into the superficial flexor muscles of the forearm. In the lower two-thirds, it typically follows a sub-fascial course. In the present case, during a routine undergraduate course dissection of a cadaver, it was found that the ulnar artery arose normally as a terminal branch of the brachial artery in the cubital fossa, followed a sub-fascial course by lying superficial to the flexor muscles then completed the superficial palmar arch in hand. This artery gave only minute muscular branches in the forearm. Moreover, the main branches that usually arise from the ulnar artery were given off by the radial artery. This type of variation is of importance for both the clinicians and surgeons due to its vulnerability to injuries and of academic interest for anatomists. PMID:26715898

  18. Ossifying neuropathy of the median nerve at level of the distal forearm and carpal tunnel in a patient with familial history of heterotopic calcification.

    PubMed

    Villén, G Martínez; Canales, V; Panisello, J J; Herrera, A

    2009-10-01

    We report an uncommon case of heterotopic ossification affecting the median nerve at the level of the distal forearm and carpal tunnel with some unusual features: its length, the concomitant involvement of the ulnar nerve at Guyon's canal and a positive family history of heterotopic ossification. PMID:19665418

  19. Comparison of Automated versus Traditional Nerve Conduction Study Methods for Median Nerve Testing in a General Worker Population

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ann Marie; Agboola, Folasade; Yun, Amber; Zeringue, Angelique; Al-Lozi, Muhammed T.; Evanoff, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the validity of automated nerve conduction studies compared to traditional electrodiagnostic studies (EDS) for testing median nerve abnormalities in a working population. Design Agreement study and sensitivity investigation from two devices Setting Field research testing lab Participants Active workers from several industries participating in a longitudinal study of CTS. Methods Sixty-two subjects received bilateral median and ulnar nerve conduction testing across the wrist with a traditional device and the NC-stat automated device. We compared intermethod agreement of analogous measurements. Main outcome measurement Nerve conduction study parameters Results Median motor and sensory latency comparisons showed excellent agreement (intra-class correlation 0.85 and 0.80 respectively). Areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves were 0.97 and 0.96 respectively, using the optimal thresholds of 4.4ms median motor latency (sensitivity 100%, specificity 86%) and 3.9ms median sensory latency (sensitivity 100%, specificity 87%). Ulnar nerve testing results were less favorable. Conclusion The automated NC-stat device showed excellent agreement with traditional EDS for detecting median nerve conduction abnormalities in a general population of workers, suggesting that this automated nerve conduction device can be used to ascertain research case definitions of CTS in population health studies. Further study is needed to determine optimal thresholds for defining median conduction abnormalities in populations that are not seeking clinical care. PMID:25463687

  20. Multilocular True Ulnar Artery Aneurysm in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Mark W; Sanders, Christopher; Lago, Mary; Hilaire, Hugo St

    2016-01-01

    Ulnar artery aneurysms are an exceedingly rare entity in the pediatric population and have no consistent etiologic mechanism. We present the case of a 15-year-old male with a multilocular ulnar artery aneurysm in the setting of no antecedent history of trauma, no identifiable connective tissue disorders, and no other apparent etiological factors. Furthermore, the patient's arterial palmar arch system was absent. The aneurysm was resected, and arterial reconstruction was successfully performed via open surgical approach with cephalic vein interposition graft. We believe this treatment modality should be considered as the primary approach in all of these pediatric cases in consideration of the possible pitfalls of less comprehensive measures. PMID:27104094

  1. Optimal management of ulnar collateral ligament injury in baseball pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Hibberd, Elizabeth E; Brown, J Rodney; Hoffer, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The ulnar collateral ligament stabilizes the elbow joint from valgus stress associated with the throwing motion. During baseball pitching, this ligament is subjected to tremendous stress and injury if the force on the ulnar collateral ligament during pitching exceeds the physiological limits of the ligament. Injuries to the throwing elbow in baseball pitchers result in significant time loss and typically surgical intervention. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of current information to sports medicine clinicians on injury epidemiology, injury mechanics, injury risk factors, injury prevention, surgical interventions, nonsurgical interventions, rehabilitation, and return to play outcomes in baseball pitchers of all levels. PMID:26635490

  2. Facial nerve neuromas: radiologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Latack, J T; Gabrielsen, T O; Knake, J E; Kemink, J L; Graham, M D; Gebarski, S S; Yang, P J

    1983-12-01

    Eight patients who had facial nerve neuromas were examined, and the radiographic findings are reported. Thin section tomography, high resolution computed tomography, posterior fossa computed tomography, and cerebellopontine angle cisternography using Pantopaque (iophendylate) demonstrated bone erosions and soft tissue masses conforming to the course of the facial nerve. The lesions generally exhibited either a proximal or a distal pattern of nerve involvement. Radiologic imaging frequently permits a correct preoperative diagnosis and accurate definition of the extent of facial nerve neuromas, assessments that are important for proper patient management. PMID:6606188

  3. Evaluation of Nerve Conduction Studies in Obese Children With Insulin Resistance or Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ince, Hülya; Taşdemir, Haydar Ali; Aydin, Murat; Ozyürek, Hamit; Tilki, Hacer Erdem

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate nerve conduction studies in terms of neuropathic characteristics in obese patients who were in prediabetes stage and also to determine the abnormal findings. The study included 69 obese adolescent patients between April 2009 and December 2010. All patients and control group underwent motor (median, ulnar, tibial, and peroneal) and sensory (median, ulnar, sural, and medial plantar) nerve conduction studies and sympathetic skin response test. Sensory response amplitude of the medial plantar nerve was significantly lower in the patients with impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. To our knowledge, the present study is the first study demonstrating the development of sensory and autonomic neuropathy due to metabolic complications of obesity in adolescent children even in the period without development of diabetes mellitus. We recommend that routine electrophysiological examinations be performed, using medial plantar nerve conduction studies and sympathetic skin response test. PMID:25342307

  4. Comparison between open and arthroscopic-assisted foveal triangular fibrocartilage complex repair for post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Atzei, A; Cozzolino, R; Fairplay, T; Badur, N

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the objective and subjective functional outcomes after foveal reattachment of proximal or complete ulnar-sided triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions by two surgical procedures: an open technique or an arthroscopically assisted repair. The study was done prospectively on 49 wrists affected by post-traumatic distal radio-ulnar joint instability. Twenty-four patients were treated with the open technique (Group 1) and 25 by the arthroscopically assisted technique (Group 2). Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a clear foveal detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in 67% of the cases. Arthroscopy showed a positive ulnar-sided detachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (positive hook test) in all cases. Distal radio-ulnar joint stability was obtained in all but five patients at a mean follow-up of 6 months. Both groups had improvement of all parameters with significant differences in wrist pain scores, Mayo wrist score, Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire and Patient-Rated Wrist/Hand Evaluation questionnaire scores. There were no significant post-operative differences between the two groups in the outcome parameters except for the Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score, which was significantly better in Group 2 (p < 0.001). PMID:23962870

  5. [Use of a transcutaneous neuro-stimulator as peroperative stimulator in neurosurgical treatment of spasticity and traumatic lesions of the peripheral nerves and brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Finiels, P J; Privat, J M; Vlahovitch, B

    1996-01-01

    We have had the opportunity to use a standard percutaneous stimulator as an intraoperative stimulator, with the use of sterile leads, in order to palliate the sudden failure of our usual surgical stimulator. The simplicity and the possibility of modulation of the device, brought us to use it several times in different purposes of surgical work for spasticity, neurotization of the brachial plexus and treatment of fresh wounds of the nerves. Important features of this new way of using this device are simplicity of programation (width and frequency rates), good stability of chosen parameters, low diffusion allowing selective stimulation, and above all low cost versus standard devices used for this purpose. PMID:9084745

  6. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common procedure in both professional and high-level athletes. Purpose: To determine the effect of technique and level of play with UCLR on return to sport (RTS). Hypothesis: When comparing different surgical techniques or preoperative level of sports participation, there is no difference in rate of RTS after UCLR. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed following PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines using 3 publicly available free databases. Therapeutic clinical outcome investigations reporting UCLR outcomes with level of evidence 1 through 4 were eligible for inclusion. All study, subject, and surgical technique demographics were analyzed and compared between continents and countries. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and 2-proportion 2-sample z-test calculators with α = .05 were used to compare RTS between level of play and technique. Results: Twenty studies (2019 patients/elbows; mean age, 22.13 ± 4 years; 97% male; mean follow-up, 39.9 ± 16.2 months) were included. The majority of patients were baseball players (94.5%), specifically pitchers (80%). The most common level of play was collegiate (44.6%). Palmaris longus (71.2%) and the American Sports Medicine Institute (ASMI) technique (65.6%) were the most common graft choice and surgical technique, respectively. There was a pooled 86.2% RTS rate, and 90% of players scored excellent/good on the Conway-Jobe scale. RTS rates were higher among collegiate athletes (95.5%) than either high school (89.4%, P = .023) or professional athletes (86.4%, P < .0001). RTS rates were higher for the docking technique (97.0%, P = .001) and the ASMI technique (93.3%, P = .0034) than the Jobe technique (66.7%). Conclusion: UCLR is performed most commonly in collegiate athletes. Collegiate athletes have the highest RTS rate after UCLR of all levels of competition. The docking and ASMI techniques had higher RTS rates than the Jobe technique. PMID:26740956

  7. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries☆

    PubMed Central

    Ribak, Samuel; da Silva Filho, Paulo Roberto Ferreira; Tietzmann, Alexandre; Hirata, Helton Hiroshi; de Mattos, Carlos Augusto; da Gama, Sérgio Augusto Machado

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. Methods This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve) was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. Results The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. Conclusions Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources. PMID:26962502

  8. An audit of peripheral nerve blocks for hand surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Inglefield, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    A prospective audit of 140 median, radial and ulnar blocks, given for 70 hand operations is described. The surgery was completed successfully in every patient. A further injection of local anaesthetic was required in 13 operations. Four patients experienced severe tourniquet pain. The results of the audit have shown that if a careful technique is used, a wide range of minor hand operations can be performed under regional nerve block. PMID:8215147

  9. Dorsal Buttress Plate Fixation of Ulnar Carpometacarpal Joint Fracture Dislocations.

    PubMed

    Tan, En Si; Chao, Tay Shian

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for open reduction and internal fixation of early and unstable ulnar (fourth and/or fifth) carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) fracture subluxations or dislocations using a dorsal buttress plate. In ulnar CMCJ fracture dislocations, the metacarpal has a tendency to displace dorsally and proximally when there is an axial load. Using the dorsal buttress plate method of fixation, a plate is fixed proximally to the hamate, aligned parallel and dorsal to the metacarpal to act as a buttress, to resist this movement. To preserve the fourth and the fifth CMCJ mobility, the distal end of the plate is not fixed to the metacarpal base. We illustrate the use of this technique on 4 patients who had different patterns of injury at the ulnar CMCJ. All patients regained excellent range of motion and function. None of the patients had redisplacement or nonunion of fracture. The dorsal buttress plate is a viable option for fixation of early and unstable ulnar CMCJ fracture subluxations or dislocations. PMID:27077465

  10. Unusual complication of ligation of rudimentary ulnar digit.

    PubMed

    Heras, L; Barco, J; Cohen, A

    1999-12-01

    We report a case of rudimentary ulnar polydactyly of the hand of a 7-year-old female child. Histological examination revealed a central traumatic neuroma which branched into five digit-like projections covered with hyperkeratotic epidermis. We think this was a result of suture ligation during the postnatal period. PMID:10672820

  11. Pinched Nerve

    MedlinePlus

    ... people recover from pinched nerve. However, in some cases, the damage is irreversible. What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain research. NINDS vigorously pursues a ...

  12. Distal Metaphyseal Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy: Technique, Pearls, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khouri, Joseph S.; Hammert, Warren C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ulnar sided wrist pain is a commonly encountered complaint of the hand surgeon, and ulnar impaction is a common cause. Surgical treatment aims to reduce the force transmitted through the ulna and traditionally includes diaphyseal ulnar shortening osteotomy and the “wafer” procedure. These procedures have known shortcomings. We describe an alternative option known as the distal metaphyseal ulnar shortening osteotomy (DMUSO). Materials and Methods Retrospective review of eight procedures was undertaken to assess radiographic healing, objective measurements of wrist and forearm motion, grip and pinch strength, and subjective measures of Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), and Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) at a minimum of 12 months following surgery. Description of Technique A wedge osteotomy is made in the osteochondral region of the distal metaphysis of the ulna, and a headless compression screw is used for fixation. Results Five women and three men underwent DMUSO with average follow up at 13 months; the dominant wrist was affected in 7 of 8 patients. The affected wrist had less motion in all planes, and grip and pinch strength was also less in the affected wrist, but only wrist extension was significantly different from the contralateral side. These findings likely did not have an effect on the clinical outcome. Subjective outcomes included average DASH score of 13 (0–35), PRWE 19 (40–11), and MHQ score of 88 (85–100). Conclusions DMUSO is a viable option for patients with ulnar impaction syndrome. It requires intra-articular exposure of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) but is less invasive then diaphyseal shortening. It permits early and reliable return of joint motion and function while avoiding the potential need for hardware removal by using a buried screw. PMID:25097810

  13. Peripheral nerve injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J H; Nadler, S F; Krivickas, L S

    1997-12-01

    Peripheral nerves are susceptible to injury in the athlete because of the excessive physiological demands that are made on both the neurological structures and the soft tissues that protect them. The common mechanisms of injury are compression, traction, ischaemia and laceration. Seddon's original classification system for nerve injuries based on neurophysiological changes is the most widely used. Grade 1 nerve injury is a neuropraxic condition, grade 2 is axonal degeneration and grade 3 is nerve transection. Peripheral nerve injuries are more common in the upper extremities than the lower extremities, tend to be sport specific, and often have a biomechanical component. While the more acute and catastrophic neurological injuries are usually obvious, many remain subclinical and are not recognised before neurological damage is permanent. Early detection allows initiation of a proper rehabilitation programme and modification of biomechanics before the nerve injury becomes irreversible. Recognition of nerve injuries requires an understanding of peripheral neuroanatomy, knowledge of common sites of nerve injury and an awareness of the types of peripheral nerve injuries that are common and unique to each sport. The electrodiagnostic exam, usually referred to as the 'EMG', consists of nerve conduction studies and the needle electrode examination. It is used to determine the site and degree of neurological injury and to predict outcome. It should be performed by a neurologist or physiatrist (physician specialising in physical medicine and rehabilitation), trained and skilled in this procedure. Timing is essential if the study is to provide maximal information. Findings such as decreased recruitment after injury and conduction block at the site of injury may be apparent immediately after injury but other findings such as abnormal spontaneous activity may take several weeks to develop. The electrodiagnostic test assists with both diagnosis of the injury and in predicting outcome. Proximal nerve injuries have a poorer prognosis for neurological recovery. The most common peripheral nerve injury in the athlete is the burner syndrome. Though primarily a football injury, burners have been reported in wrestling, hockey, basketball and weight-lifting as a result of acute head, neck and/or shoulder trauma. Most burners are self-limiting, but they occasionally produce permanent neurological deficits. The axillary nerve is commonly injured with shoulder dislocations but is also susceptible to injury by direct compression. The sciatic and common peroneal nerves can be injured by trauma. The suprascapular, musculocutaneous, ulnar, median and tibial nerves are susceptible to entrapment. The long thoracic and femoral nerves can be injured by severe traction. PMID:9421863

  14. Piriformis syndrome surgery causing severe sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Justice, Phillip E; Katirji, Bashar; Preston, David C; Grossman, Gerald E

    2012-09-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a controversial entrapment neuropathy in which the sciatic nerve is thought to be compressed by the piriformis muscle. Two patients developed severe left sciatic neuropathy after piriformis muscle release. One had a total sciatic nerve lesion, whereas the second had a predominantly high common peroneal nerve lesion. Follow-up studies showed reinnervation of the hamstrings only. We conclude that piriformis muscle surgery may be hazardous and result in devastating sciatic nerve injury. PMID:22922582

  15. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  16. Multilocular True Ulnar Artery Aneurysm in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Mark W.; Sanders, Christopher; Lago, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Ulnar artery aneurysms are an exceedingly rare entity in the pediatric population and have no consistent etiologic mechanism. We present the case of a 15-year-old male with a multilocular ulnar artery aneurysm in the setting of no antecedent history of trauma, no identifiable connective tissue disorders, and no other apparent etiological factors. Furthermore, the patient’s arterial palmar arch system was absent. The aneurysm was resected, and arterial reconstruction was successfully performed via open surgical approach with cephalic vein interposition graft. We believe this treatment modality should be considered as the primary approach in all of these pediatric cases in consideration of the possible pitfalls of less comprehensive measures. PMID:27104094

  17. Ulnar dominant hand and forearm: an electrophysiologic approach.

    PubMed

    Abayev, Boris; Ha, Edward; Cruise, Cathy

    2005-09-01

    An ulnar-to-median anastomosis in the forearm is a rare condition, but may be present in any electromyographic case. A thorough approach to this condition is required to avoid misinterpretation of the electrodiagnostic report and confusion during the test. Prior to concluding that an anomaly is present, technical reason should be taken into consideration. The presence of volume-conducted potentials from various nearby muscles may confuse the electromyographer. Therefore, instead of using surface electrodes with unintended supramaximal intensity of stimulation, the needle electrodes may be used (in some cases) to localize specific muscles and to minimize volume-conducted potentials by not utilizing supramaximal stimulation intensity. The authors will discuss ulnar-to-median anastomosis in the forearm. This is the first attempt to put together all the information available in the literature about such an anastomosis. PMID:16148736

  18. Impact of Ulnar Collateral Ligament Tear on Posteromedial Elbow Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Anand, Prashanth; Parks, Brent G; Hassan, Sheref E; Osbahr, Daryl C

    2015-07-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament insufficiency has been shown to result in changes in contact pressure and contact area in the posteromedial elbow. This study used new digital technology to assess the effect of a complete ulnar collateral ligament tear on ulnohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and valgus laxity throughout the throwing motion. Nine elbow cadaveric specimens were tested at 90° and 30° of elbow flexion to simulate the late cocking/early acceleration and deceleration phases of throwing, respectively. A digital sensor was placed in the posteromedial elbow. Each specimen was tested with valgus torque of 2.5 Nm with the anterior band of the ulnar collateral ligament intact and transected. A camera-based motion analysis system was used to measure valgus inclination of the forearm with the applied torque. At 90° of elbow flexion, mean contact area decreased significantly (107.9 mm(2) intact vs 84.9 mm(2) transected, P=.05) and average maximum contact pressure increased significantly (457.6 kPa intact vs 548.6 kPa transected, P<.001). At 30° of elbow flexion, mean contact area decreased significantly (83.9 mm(2) intact vs 65.8 mm(2) transected, P=.01) and average maximum contact pressure increased nonsignificantly (365.9 kPa intact vs 450.7 kPa transected, P=.08). Valgus laxity increased significantly at elbow flexion of 90° (1.1° intact vs 3.3° transected, P=.01) and 30° (1.0° intact vs 1.7° transected, P=.05). Ulnar collateral ligament insufficiency was associated with significant changes in contact area, contact pressure, and valgus laxity during both relative flexion (late cocking/early acceleration phase) and relative extension (deceleration phase) moments during the throwing motion arc. PMID:26186314

  19. Recovery features in ulnar neuropathy at the elbow

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Pelin; Yildirim, Apdullah; Misirlioglu, Tugce Ozekli; Evcili, Gokhan; Karahan, Ali Yavuz; Gunduz, Osman Hakan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effect of age, sex, and entrapment localization on recovery time in patients treated conservatively for ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. [Subjects] Thirty-five patients (16 women and 15 men) who were diagnosed with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow using short segment conduction studies were evaluated retrospectively. [Methods] Definition of recovey was made based on patient satisfaction. The absence of symptoms was considered as the marker of recovery. Patients who recovered within 0–4 weeks were in Group 1, and patients who recovered within 4 weeks to 6 months were in Group 2. The differences between Group 1 and Group 2 in terms of age, sex and entrapment localization were investigated. [Results] Entrapment was most frequent in the retroepicondylar groove (54.3%). No significant difference was found in terms of age and entrapment localizations between Groups 1 and 2. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups for the male sex. [Conclusion] In ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, age and entrapment localization do not affect recovery time. However, male sex appears to be associated with longer recovery time. PMID:26157226

  20. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  1. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. Part I: anatomy and physical examination

    PubMed Central

    Vezeridis, Peter S.; Han, Roger; Blazar, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Ulnar-sided wrist pain is a common complaint, and it presents a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists. The complex anatomy of this region, combined with the small size of structures and subtle imaging findings, compound this problem. A thorough understanding of ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and a systematic clinical examination of this region are essential in arriving at an accurate diagnosis. In part I of this review, ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and clinical examination are discussed for a more comprehensive understanding of ulnar-sided wrist pain. PMID:19722104

  2. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the forelimb of the cat.

    PubMed

    Kitchell, R L; Canton, D D; Johnson, R D; Maxwell, S A

    1982-10-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the forelimb was investigated in 20 barbiturate-anesthetized cats by using electrophysiological techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least six cats by brushing the hair in the CA with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed larger overlap zones (OZ) than were noted in the dog. Remarkable findings were that the brachiocephalic nerve arose from the axillary nerve and the CA comparable to that supplied by the cutaneous branch of the brachiocephalic nerve in the dog was supplied by a cutaneous branch of the suprascapular nerve. The CA supplied by the communicating branch from the musculocutaneous to the median nerve was similar in both species except that the communicating branch arose proximal to any other branches of the musculocutaneous nerve in the cat, whereas it was a terminal branch in the dog. The superficial branch of the radial nerve gave off cutaneous brachial branches in the cat proximal to the lateral cutaneous antebrachial nerve. The CA of the palmar branches of the ulnar nerve did not completely overlap the CA of the palmar branches of the median nerve as occurred in the dog; thus an autonomous zone (AZ) for the CA of the palmar branches of the median nerve is present in the cat, whereas no AZ existed for the CA of this nerve in the dog. PMID:7142449

  3. Functional Recovery Following an End to Side Neurorrhaphy of the Accessory Nerve to the Suprascapular Nerve: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Kasukurthi, Rahul; Yee, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The use of end-to-side neurrorhaphy remains a controversial topic in peripheral nerve surgery. The authors report the long-term functional outcome following a modified end-to-side motor reinnervation using the spinal accessory to innervate the suprascapular nerve following a C5 to C6 avulsion injury. Additionally, functional outcomes of an end-to-end neurotization of the triceps branch to the axillary nerve and double fascicular transfer of the ulnar and medial nerve to the biceps and brachialis are presented. Excellent functional recoveries are found in respect to shoulder abduction and flexion and elbow flexion. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11552-009-9242-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19902308

  4. Heat generation during ulnar osteotomy with microsagittal saw blades.

    PubMed

    Firoozbakhsh, K; Moneim, M S; Mikola, E; Haltom, S

    2003-01-01

    Ulnar shortening osteotomy is a surgical treatment option for patients with symptomatic ulnar positive variance for a variety of reasons. Delayed healing and nonunion of the osteotomized sites have been reported and present problematic complications of this procedure. Studies have shown nonunion rate with transverse cuts ranging from 8-15%. The goal is to achieve parallel cuts, thus maximizing the contacting bony surface area for a better union rate. The senior surgeon attempted using a custom thick blade to insure parallel cuts. The concern is whether the heat generated during such a cut would contribute to non-union. It is our hypothesis that complications with ulnar shortening osteotomy using a thick blade are secondary to excess heat generation. When generated heat surpasses the threshold temperature of bone tissue, the organic matrix is irreversibly damaged and necrosis of the bony ends may occur. The present study measured the heat generation during ulnar osteotomy using different blade thicknesses. Thirty-five fresh turkey femurs, having similar size and cortical thickness of the human ulna, were used. Loading was done at three different speeds of 0.66, 1.0, and 1.5 mm/second corresponding respectively to 30, 20, and 10 seconds for the complete cut. A general linear statistical model was fitted relating temperature rise to three predictive factors: blade thickness, sensor distance, and initial bone temperature. There was a statistically significant relationship between temperature rise and all three predictor variables at the 99% confidence level. There was no statistically significant relationship between temperature rise and the number of cuts with the same blade up to 10 times. Compared with the single microsagital saw blade, the temperature rise for the double thickness blade was 14% higher and for the triple thickness blade was 23% higher. The temperature rise was inversely related to the speed of the cut. The temperature rise for the bone cut in 30 seconds was 1.5 times higher than the temperature rise when the bone was cut in 10 seconds. Complications with ulnar shortening osteotomy may be secondary to excess heat generation. A new thick saw blade design and the use of proper internal/external irrigation may overcome the problem. PMID:14575249

  5. Ultrasonographic reference values for assessing normal radial nerve ultrasonography in the normal population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Wu, Shan; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasound has been used recently to characterize median and ulnar nerves, but is seldom used to characterize radial nerves. The radial nerve is more frequently involved in entrapment syndromes than the ulnar and median nerves. However, the reference standard for normal radial nerves has not been established. Thus, this study measured the cross-sectional areas of radial nerves of 200 healthy male or female volunteers, aged 18 to 75, using high-resolution ultrasound. The results showed that mean cross-sectional areas of radial nerves at 4 cm upon the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and mid-humerus (midpoint between the elbow crease and axilla) were 5.14 ± 1.24 and 5.08 ± 1.23 mm2, respectively. The age and the dominant side did not affect the results, but the above-mentioned cross-sectional areas were larger in males (5.31 ± 1.25 and 5.19 ± 1.23 mm2) than in females (4.93 ± 1.21 and 4.93 ± 1.23 mm2, respectively). In addition, the cross-sectional areas of radial nerves were positively correlated with height and weight (r = 0.38, 0.36, respectively, both P < 0.05). These data provide basic clinical data for the use of high-resolution ultrasound for the future diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic evaluation of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:25422648

  6. Multifocal motor neuropathy: correlation of nerve ultrasound, electrophysiological, and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Kerasnoudis, Antonios; Pitarokoili, Kalliopi; Behrendt, Volker; Gold, Ralf; Yoon, Min-Suk

    2014-06-01

    We present nerve ultrasound findings in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and examine their correlation with electrophysiology and functional disability. Eighty healthy controls and 12 MMN patients underwent clinical, sonographic, and electrophysiological evaluation a mean of 3.5 years (standard deviation [SD] ± 2.1) after disease onset. Nerve ultrasound revealed significantly higher cross-sectional area (CSA) values of the median (forearm, p < 0.001), ulnar (p < 0.001), and tibial nerve (ankle, p < 0.001) when compared with controls. Electroneurography documented signs of significantly lower values of the motor conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials (cMAPs) in the upper arm nerves (median, ulnar, radial, p < 0.001). A significant correlation between sonographic and electrophysiological findings in the MMN group was found only between cMAP and CSA of the median nerve at the upper arm (r = 0.851, p < 0.001). Neither nerve sonography nor electrophysiology correlated with functional disability. MMN seems to show inhomogeneous CSA enlargement in various peripheral nerves, with weak correlation to electrophysiological findings. Neither nerve sonography nor electrophysiology correlated with functional disability. Multicentre, prospective studies are required to prove the applicability and diagnostic values of these findings. PMID:24862982

  7. In vivo nerve-macrophage interactions following peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Allison; Wolman, Marc A.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Granato, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, the peripheral nervous system has retained its regenerative capacity, enabling severed axons to reconnect with their original synaptic targets. While it is well documented that a favorable environment is critical for nerve regeneration, the complex cellular interactions between injured nerves with cells in their environment, as well as the functional significance of these interactions, have not been determined in vivo and in real time. Here we provide the first minute-by-minute account of cellular interactions between laser transected motor nerves and macrophages in live intact zebrafish. We show that macrophages arrive at the lesion site long before axon fragmentation, much earlier than previously thought. Moreover, we find that axon fragmentation triggers macrophage invasion into the nerve to engulf axonal debris, and that delaying nerve fragmentation in a Wlds model does not alter macrophage recruitment but induces a previously unknown nerve scanning behavior, suggesting that macrophage recruitment and subsequent nerve invasion are controlled by separate mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrate that macrophage recruitment, thought to be dependent on Schwann cell derived signals, occurs independently of Schwann cells. Thus, live cell imaging defines novel cellular and functional interactions between injured nerves and immune cells. PMID:22423110

  8. A rare variant of the ulnar artery with important clinical implications: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variations in the major arteries of the upper limb are estimated to be present in up to one fifth of people, and may have significant clinical implications. Case presentation During routine cadaveric dissection of a 69-year-old fresh female cadaver, a superficial brachioulnar artery with an aberrant path was found bilaterally. The superficial brachioulnar artery originated at midarm level from the brachial artery, pierced the brachial fascia immediately proximal to the elbow, crossed superficial to the muscles that originated from the medial epicondyle, and ran over the pronator teres muscle in a doubling of the antebrachial fascia. It then dipped into the forearm fascia, in the gap between the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus. Subsequently, it ran deep to the palmaris longus muscle belly, and superficially to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, reaching the gap between the latter and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, where it assumed is usual position lateral to the ulnar nerve. Conclusion As far as the authors could determine, this variant of the superficial brachioulnar artery has only been described twice before in the literature. The existence of such a variant is of particular clinical significance, as these arteries are more susceptible to trauma, and can be easily confused with superficial veins during medical and surgical procedures, potentially leading to iatrogenic distal limb ischemia. PMID:23194303

  9. Chronic desmitis and enthesiophytosis of the radio-ulnar interosseous ligament in a dog.

    PubMed

    Deffontaines, Jean-Baptiste; Lussier, Bertrand; Bolliger, Christian; Bédard, Agathe; Doré, Monique; Blevins, William E

    2016-05-01

    A 10-year-old golden retriever dog was presented for chronic right forelimb lameness associated with a painful swelling at the lateral aspect of the proximal ulna. Proximal ulnar ostectomy and stabilization resulted in a good clinical outcome. The proposed diagnosis is chronic desmitis and enthesiophytosis of the radio-ulnar interosseous ligament. PMID:27152034

  10. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  11. [Anatomical rationale for elevating revascularized ulnar forearm fasciocutaneous flap for head and neck reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Verbo, E V; Petrosyan, A A; Gileva, K S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we studied in detail features of the blood supply to the tissues of the forearm of the pools ulnar and radial arteries, the technique of line access and the formation of skin-fascial ulnar flap by using a layered dissection with contrast vessels on non fixed human cadavers. Blood supply of the forearm carried out by branches radial and ulnar arteries, which allows to create in this area radial flap and ulnar flap loo. The size of the skin-fascial ulnar flap can reach 3-10 cm in length, 2-6 cm in width, the length of vessel pedicle of the transplant can reach 12 cm. The research studied the characteristics of blood supply of the forearm and the comparative evaluation of tissue perfusion of the radial and ulnar arteries; proved localization forming ulnar flap. Studies have shown that revascularised skin-fascial ulnar flap may be can be an alternative donor material for elimination of soft tissue defects with less traumatization donor area and reduce upper limb function compared with radial flap. PMID:26145472

  12. Ulnar dimelia-diagnosis and management of a rare congenital anomaly of the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Bulandra, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    Ulnar dimelia is a rare congenital disorder, characterized by duplication of the ulna, absence of the radius and polydactyly. Authors present a case of a girl treated due to ulnar dimelia. Physical and radiological findings, surgical treatment and postoperative effects are described. PMID:26719621

  13. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer...

  15. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. Results: In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. Conclusions: The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh. PMID:26550216

  16. Ulnar shaft stress fracture in a high school softball pitcher.

    PubMed

    Bigosinski, Krystian; Palmer, Trish; Weber, Kathleen; Evola, Jennifer

    2010-03-01

    This article presents a case of a 17-year-old softball pitcher with insidious onset of right forearm pain. On presentation, the patient had tenderness on palpation of the midshaft of the ulna, pain with resisted pronation, and pain with fulcrum-type stressing of the forearm. A bone scan revealed increased uptake in the right ulna, and a subsequent magnetic resonance imaging revealed bone marrow edema and numerous small ulnar stress fractures. She was treated with bone stimulation and complete rest and is in the process of returning to pitching. PMID:23015929

  17. Complete digital duplication: a case report and review of ulnar polydactyly.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, J; Simpson, R L

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case is presented of bilateral, complete digital duplication on the hand of a 9-month-old boy. Radiographic evaluation showed duplication of intact phalanges and metacarpals. Although ulnar polydactyly has been described as one of the most common congenital anomalies of the extremities, it usually manifests itself as a rudimentary skin tag. Ulnar polydactyly can be classified on the basis of genetic, morphologic, and clinical implications. Although polydactyly is reported to occur among approximately 1 in 1000 live births, most of these malformations are rudimentary skin tags. Complete ulnar polydactyly is uncommon; it occurs among approximately 0.014% of all live births. The main goal of surgical treatment of patients with complete-duplication ulnar polydactyly is to establish adequate function. This case report describes the preoperative evaluation and management of complete bilateral duplication of the ulnar digits of the hand. PMID:9464703

  18. Individual finger strength: are the ulnar digits "powerful"?

    PubMed

    MacDermid, Joy C; Lee, Adrian; Richards, Robert S; Roth, James H

    2004-01-01

    This study determined the test-retest reliability of a grip device that measures the contribution of individual fingers to grip strength and described the pattern of contribution in subjects without hand pathology. Subjects repeated a set of three maximal grip efforts on two occasions separated by two to seven days. Intraclass correlation reliability coefficients were high (>0.75) for eight out of ten strength measures. The percentage contributions of the index, middle, ring, and small fingers to grip were approximately 25%, 35%, 25%, and 14%, respectively. Grip and finger strengths were highly correlated. Anthropometric measures of body size or finger length were moderately correlated with strength measures. These data suggest that there is a predictable pattern by which individual fingers contribute to overall grip strength, which is partially related to body size. The ulnar side of the hand contributes to the smaller proportion of overall grip (approximately 60% radial, 40% ulnar). The clinical utility of finger strength measures should be explored. PMID:15273677

  19. Epineurial Window Is More Efficient in Attracting Axons than Simple Coaptation in a Sutureless (Cyanoacrylate-Bound) Model of End-to-Side Nerve Repair in the Rat Upper Limb: Functional and Morphometric Evidences and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Papalia, Igor; Magaudda, Ludovico; Righi, Maria; Ronchi, Giulia; Viano, Nicoletta; Geuna, Stefano; Colonna, Michele Rosario

    2016-01-01

    End-to-side nerve coaptation brings regenerating axons from the donor to the recipient nerve. Several techniques have been used to perform coaptation: microsurgical sutures with and without opening a window into the epi(peri)neurial connective tissue; among these, window techniques have been proven more effective in inducing axonal regeneration. The authors developed a sutureless model of end-to-side coaptation in the rat upper limb. In 19 adult Wistar rats, the median and the ulnar nerves of the left arm were approached from the axillary region, the median nerve transected and the proximal stump sutured to the pectoral muscle to prevent regeneration. Animals were then randomly divided in two experimental groups (7 animals each, 5 animals acting as control): Group 1: the distal stump of the transected median nerve was fixed to the ulnar nerve by applying cyanoacrylate solution; Group 2: a small epineurial window was opened into the epineurium of the ulnar nerve, caring to avoid damage to the nerve fibres; the distal stump of the transected median nerve was then fixed to the ulnar nerve by applying cyanoacrylate solution. The grasping test for functional evaluation was repeated every 10–11 weeks starting from week-15, up to the sacrifice (week 36). At week 36, the animals were sacrificed and the regenerated nerves harvested and processed for morphological investigations (high-resolution light microscopy as well as stereological and morphometrical analysis). This study shows that a) cyanoacrylate in end-to-side coaptation produces scarless axon regeneration without toxic effects; b) axonal regeneration and myelination occur even without opening an epineurial window, but c) the window is related to a larger number of regenerating fibres, especially myelinated and mature, and better functional outcomes. PMID:26872263

  20. Nerve tumors of the hand and upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Forthman, Christopher L; Blazar, Philip E

    2004-08-01

    Tumors of peripheral nerve origin are usually slow growing and minimally symptomatic, making differentiation from other soft tissue neoplasms difficult. Yet failure to recognize a nerve tumor may result in irreversible loss of neurologic function. This article provides current information on the history, pathologic identification, and treatment of upper extremity nerve tumors. Other neoplastic and tumor-like lesions that occur within the peripheral nerve are also considered. PMID:15275682

  1. New sonographic measures of peripheral nerves: a tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve involvement in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lugão, Helena Barbosa; Furini, Renata Bazan; Marques, Wilson; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate ultrasonographic (US) cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of peripheral nerves, indexes of the differences between CSAs at the same point (∆CSAs) and between tunnel (T) and pre-tunnel (PT) ulnar CSAs (∆TPTs) in leprosy patients (LPs) and healthy volunteers (HVs). Seventy-seven LPs and 49 HVs underwent bilateral US at PT and T ulnar points, as well as along the median (M) and common fibular (CF) nerves, to calculate the CSAs, ∆CSAs and ∆TPTs. The CSA values in HVs were lower than those in LPs (p < 0.0001) at the PT (5.67/9.78 mm2) and T (6.50/10.94 mm2) points, as well as at the M (5.85/8.48 mm2) and CF (8.17/14.14 mm2) nerves. The optimum CSA- receiver operating characteristic (ROC) points and sensitivities/specificities were, respectively, 6.85 mm2 and 68-85% for the PT point, 7.35 mm2 and 71-78% for the T point, 6.75 mm2 and 62-75% for the M nerve and 9.55 mm2 and 81-72% for the CF nerve. The ∆CSAs of the LPs were greater than those of the HVs at the PT point (4.02/0.85; p = 0.007), T point (3.71/0.98; p = 0.0005) and CF nerve (2.93/1.14; p = 0.015), with no difference found for the M nerve (1.41/0.95; p = 0.17). The optimum ∆CSA-ROC points, sensitivities, specificities and p-values were, respectively, 1.35, 49%, 80% and 0.003 at the PT point, 1.55, 55-85% and 0.0006 at the T point, 0.70, 58-50% and 0.73 for the M nerve and 1.25, 54-67% and 0.022 for the CF nerve. The ∆TPT in the LPs was greater than that in the HVs (4.43/1.44; p <0.0001). The optimum ∆TPT-ROC point was 2.65 (90% sensitivity/41% specificity, p < 0.0001). The ROC analysis of CSAs showed the highest specificity and sensitivity at the PT point and CF nerve, respectively. The PT and T ∆CSAs had high specificities (> 80%) and ∆TPT had the highest specificity (> 90%). New sonographic peripheral nerve measurements (∆CSAs and ∆TPT) provide an important methodological improvement in the detection of leprosy neuropathy. PMID:23778664

  2. [Treatment of neglected Monteggia's fracture by ulnar lengthening using the Ilizarov technique].

    PubMed

    Gicquel, P; De Billy, B; Karger, C; Maximin, M C; Clavert, J M

    2000-12-01

    We present an original method for the treatment of neglected Monteggia fractures using the Ilizarov technique. This method allows reduction without accessing the radial head by progressive ulnar lengthening after proximal subperiosteal osteotomy of the ulnar bone. We used this method in a six and a half year old girl and achieved excellent radiographical and functional results with normal joint amplitudes. In our opinion, the quality of the outcome is related to the progressiveness of the bone lengthening enabled by this technique which allows restoration of the ulnar length, preservation of the axes of both forearm bones, and controlled reduction of the radial head. PMID:11148422

  3. Flexible adaptation to an artificial recurrent connection from muscle to peripheral nerve in man.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenji; Sasada, Syusaku; Nishimura, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    Controlling a neuroprosthesis requires learning a novel input-output transformation; however, how subjects incorporate this into limb control remains obscure. To elucidate the underling mechanisms, we investigated the motor adaptation process to a novel artificial recurrent connection (ARC) from a muscle to a peripheral nerve in healthy humans. In this paradigm, the ulnar nerve was electrically stimulated in proportion to the activation of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), which is ulnar-innervated and monosynaptically innervated from Ia afferents of the FCU, defined as the "homonymous muscle," or the palmaris longus (PL), which is not innervated by the ulnar nerve and produces similar movement to the FCU, defined as the "synergist muscle." The ARC boosted the activity of the homonymous muscle and wrist joint movement during a visually guided reaching task. Participants could control muscle activity to utilize the ARC for the volitional control of wrist joint movement and then readapt to the absence of the ARC to either input muscle. Participants reduced homonymous muscle recruitment with practice, regardless of the input muscle. However, the adaptation process in the synergist muscle was dependent on the input muscle. The activity of the synergist muscle decreased when the input was the homonymous muscle, whereas it increased when it was the synergist muscle. This reorganization of the neuromotor map, which was maintained as an aftereffect of the ARC, was observed only when the input was the synergist muscle. These findings demonstrate that the ARC induced reorganization of neuromotor map in a targeted and sustainable manner. PMID:26631144

  4. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  5. Direct nerve suture and knee immobilization in 90° flexion as a technique for treatment of common peroneal, tibial and sural nerve injuries in complex knee trauma

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Robert; Ciritsis, Bernhard; Giesen, Thomas; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    There are different ways to treat peripheral nerve injuries with concomitant defects in the lower extremity. One option is a direct nerve suture followed by immobilization of the knee in flexion as it is described for gunshot wounds that lead to lesions of the sciatic nerve and its terminal branches as well as isolated nerve lesions. We used this technique to treat a case of multiple nerve injuries of the lower extremity combined with a complex knee trauma including a lesion of both bones and the posterior capsule. To our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described for such a combined injury in literature. PMID:24968417

  6. Nerve conduction in relation to vibration exposure - a non-positive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is one of the principal clinical disorders in workers with hand-arm vibration syndrome. Electrophysiological studies aimed at defining the nature of the injury have provided conflicting results. One reason for this lack of consistency might be the sparsity of published longitudinal etiological studies with both good assessment of exposure and a well-defined measure of disease. Against this background we measured conduction velocities in the hand after having assessed vibration exposure over 21 years in a cohort of manual workers. Methods The study group consisted of 155 male office and manual workers at an engineering plant that manufactured pulp and paper machinery. The study has a longitudinal design regarding exposure assessment and a cross-sectional design regarding the outcome of nerve conduction. Hand-arm vibration dose was calculated as the product of self-reported occupational exposure, collected by questionnaire and interviews, and the measured or estimated hand-arm vibration exposure in 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2008. Distal motor latencies in median and ulnar nerves and sensory nerve conduction over the carpal tunnel and the finger-palm segments in the median nerve were measured in 2008. Before the nerve conduction measurement, the subjects were systemically warmed by a bicycle ergometer test. Results There were no differences in distal latencies between subjects exposed to hand-arm vibration and unexposed subjects, neither in the sensory conduction latencies of the median nerve, nor in the motor conduction latencies of the median and ulnar nerves. Seven subjects (9%) in the exposed group and three subjects (12%) in the unexposed group had both pathological sensory nerve conduction at the wrist and symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Conclusion Nerve conduction measurements of peripheral hand nerves revealed no exposure-response association between hand-arm vibration exposure and distal neuropathy of the large myelinated fibers in a cohort of male office and manual workers. PMID:20642848

  7. Vascular lesions induced by renal nerve ablation as assessed by optical coherence tomography: pre- and post-procedural comparison with the Simplicity® catheter system and the EnligHTN™ multi-electrode renal denervation catheter

    PubMed Central

    Templin, Christian; Jaguszewski, Milosz; Ghadri, Jelena R.; Sudano, Isabella; Gaehwiler, Roman; Hellermann, Jens P.; Schoenenberger-Berzins, Renate; Landmesser, Ulf; Erne, Paul; Noll, Georg; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Catheter-based renal nerve ablation (RNA) using radiofrequency energy is a novel treatment for drug-resistant essential hypertension. However, the local endothelial and vascular injury induced by RNA has not been characterized, although this importantly determines the long-term safety of the procedure. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables in vivo visualization of morphologic features with a high resolution of 10–15 µm. The objective of this study was to assess the morphological features of the endothelial and vascular injury induced by RNA using OCT. Methods and results In a prospective observational study, 32 renal arteries of patients with treatment-resistant hypertension underwent OCT before and after RNA. All pre- and post-procedural OCT pullbacks were evaluated regarding vascular changes such as vasospasm, oedema (notches), dissection, and thrombus formation. Thirty-two renal arteries were evaluated, in which automatic pullbacks were obtained before and after RNA. Vasospasm was observed more often after RNA then before the procedure (0 vs. 42%, P < 0.001). A significant decrease in mean renal artery diameter after RNA was documented both with the EnligHTN™ (4.69 ± 0.73 vs. 4.21 ± 0.87 mm; P < 0.001) and with the Simplicity® catheter (5.04 ± 0.66 vs. 4.57 ± 0.88 mm; P < 0.001). Endothelial-intimal oedema was noted in 96% of cases after RNA. The presence of thrombus formations was significantly higher after the RNA then before ablation (67 vs. 18%, P < 0.001). There was one evidence of arterial dissection after RNA with the Simplicity® catheter, while endothelial and intimal disruptions were noted in two patients with the EnligHTN™ catheter. Conclusion Here we show that diffuse renal artery constriction and local tissue damage at the ablation site with oedema and thrombus formation occur after RNA and that OCT visualizes vascular lesions not apparent on angiography. This suggests that dual antiplatelet therapy may be required during RNA. PMID:23620498

  8. Nerve invasion by epithelial cells in benign breast diseases.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yu-Jan; Chen, Shan-Long

    2009-03-01

    Nerve invasion by glandular epithelial cells in a lesion is usually regarded as invasive carcinoma. However, some benign conditions in the pancreas, prostate, breast and other organs may show involvement of nerve bundles by benign epithelial cells. We report an 18-year-old female with nerve invasion in benign breast disease. The lesion in her right breast revealed fibrocystic changes with ductal hyperplasia and stromal sclerosis. Perineural and intraneural involvement by bland-looking small ducts lined by 2 layers of cells including an outer layer of myoepithelial cells were found, suggestive of benign nerve invasion. There was no evidence of malignant cells in any of the sections. The patient remains well after 31 months of follow-up. About 44 cases of nerve invasion in benign breast diseases have been reported in the literature. It is necessary to carefully evaluate nerve involvement in breast lesions to avoid over-diagnosis and inappropriate operation. PMID:19299223

  9. Vascular Anatomy and Clinical Application of the Free Proximal Ulnar Artery Perforator Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yitao; Shi, Xiaotian; Yu, Yaling; Zhong, Guiwu; Tang, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a dearth of detailed published work on the anatomy of ulnar artery perforators. The objective of this study was to fully document the vascular basis of the free proximal ulnar artery perforator flap and report its use in reconstruction of the hand. Methods: (1) The ulnar artery perforators were studied in 25 fresh cadavers and 10 cast preparations. Cadavers were injected with lead oxide for 3-dimensional reconstruction. The origin, course, and distribution of the ulnar artery perforators were comprehensively documented. (2) Between August 2011 and January 2013, 29 free proximal ulnar artery perforator flaps were utilized for reconstruction of soft-tissue defects of the hand in 25 patients. Flap size varied from 3.5 × 2.0 cm to 24.0 × 4.0 cm, with a consistent thickness of approximately 3 mm. Results: (1) There were 7 ± 2.0 ulnar artery perforators. The average external diameter was 0.6 ± 0.2 mm. Each perforator supplied an average area of 26 ± 7.0 cm2. Extensive anastomoses were found between the ulnar artery perforators and multiple adjacent source arteries. (2) All flaps survived. The clinical results were satisfactory after 10.2 ± 5.3 months of follow-up. The flaps were considered cosmetically acceptable by both patients and doctors. Conclusions: The main advantage of the proximal ulnar artery perforator flap is that it is a thin flap that is ideal for upper extremity reconstruction, either as proximally or distally based local perforator flap or as a free flap. The donor site is excellent, and the vascular anatomy is very consistent. PMID:25426362

  10. Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Vagus Nerve in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Yap, Fui; Pratschke, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    A peripheral nerve sheath tumor was diagnosed in a female, neutered Labrador retriever with a 6 mo history of coughing, retching, ptyalism, and left-sided Horner's syndrome. Computed tomography scan of the neck revealed a mass lesion between the carotid artery and esophagus in the mid-cervical region. Exploratory surgery was performed and an 18 cm section of thickened vagus nerve was excised. Histopathological findings and immunochemistry staining confirmed a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The tumor showed microscopic signs of malignancy, but there were no macroscopic signs of local extension or distant metastasis. This report documents a peripheral nerve sheath tumor of rare origin in dogs. PMID:26606206

  11. Extratemporal Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumor of Facial Nerve with Coexistent Intratemporal Neurofibroma Mimicking Malignant Intratemporal Extension

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Saito, Naoko; Sugasawa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    We present an extremely unusual case of an extratemporal facial nerve malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising from preexistent intratemporal neurofibroma, illustrating a difficulty in discriminating between perineural spread of the MPNST and the preexistent intratemporal neurofibroma on preoperative radiographic images. The most interesting point was that preoperative CT scan and MR images led to misinterpretation that MPNST extended proximally along the facial nerve canal. It is important to recognize that the intratemporal perineural spread of neurofibromas and MPNST share common imaging characteristics. This is the first report (to our knowledge) of these 2 lesions coexisting in the facial nerve, leading to misinterpretation on preoperative images. PMID:26347326

  12. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the thoracic limb of the dog.

    PubMed

    Kitchell, R L; Whalen, L R; Bailey, C S; Lohse, C L

    1980-01-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the thoracic limb was investigated in 36 barbiturate-anesthetized dogs, using electrophysiologic techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least five dogs by stroking the hair in the area with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed areas of considerable overlapping. The part of the CA of a given nerve supplied by only that nerve is referred to as its autonomous zone. Of all nerves arising from the brachial plexus, only the suprascapular, subscapular, lateral thoracic, thoracodorsal, and cranial and caudal pectoral nerves lacked cutaneous afferents. The dorsal cutaneous branch of C6 had a CA, but no grossly demonstrable dorsal cutaneous branches for C7 C8, or T1 were found. The cervical nerves had ventral cutaneous branches, but no lateral cutaneous branches. Thoracic nerves T2-T4 had dorsal, ventral, and lateral cutaneous branches. The cutaneous branches of the brachiocephalic, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial, median, and ulnar nerves all had CA which were overlapped by adjacent CA, thus their autonomous zones were much smaller than the cutaneous areas usually depicted for these nerves in anatomy and neurology textbooks. PMID:7362125

  13. Advances of Peripheral Nerve Repair Techniques to Improve Hand Function: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    P, Mafi; S, Hindocha; M, Dhital; M, Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Concepts of neuronal damage and repair date back to ancient times. The research in this topic has been growing ever since and numerous nerve repair techniques have evolved throughout the years. Due to our greater understanding of nerve injuries and repair we now distinguish between central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we have chosen to concentrate on peripheral nerve injuries and in particular those involving the hand. There are no reviews bringing together and summarizing the latest research evidence concerning the most up-to-date techniques used to improve hand function. Therefore, by identifying and evaluating all the published literature in this field, we have summarized all the available information about the advances in peripheral nerve techniques used to improve hand function. The most important ones are the use of resorbable poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB), epineural end-to-end suturing, graft repair, nerve transfer, side to side neurorrhaphy and end to side neurorrhaphy between median, radial and ulnar nerves, nerve transplant, nerve repair, external neurolysis and epineural sutures, adjacent neurotization without nerve suturing, Agee endoscopic operation, tourniquet induced anesthesia, toe transfer and meticulous intrinsic repair, free auto nerve grafting, use of distal based neurocutaneous flaps and tubulization. At the same time we found that the patient’s age, tension of repair, time of repair, level of injury and scar formation following surgery affect the prognosis. Despite the thorough findings of this systematic review we suggest that further research in this field is needed. PMID:22431951

  14. [Paraganglioma of the vagus nerve].

    PubMed

    Torres-Carranza, E; Infante-Cossío, P; García-Perla, A; Belmonte, R; Menéndez, J; Gutiérrez-Pérez, J L

    2006-06-01

    Paragangliomas of the vagus nerve are uncommon vascular benign neoplasms of neuroectodermic origin. Initial clinical manifestation is usually as an asymptomatic cervical mass, although sometimes may cause lower cranial nerve palsies. These paragangliomas seldom associate to high levels of circulating catecholamines. Diagnosis is based on the clinics aided by imaging, where CT and MRI play an important role. Angiography is not only diagnostic, but it also allows preoperative embolization of the mass. Most accepted treatment is surgical removal, even though some paragangliomas are suitable for radiation therapy in very specific patients. In this paper we describe a new case of paraganglioma of the vagus nerve in a cervical location, with hypertensive episodes and high catecholamine-levels. The authors review the literature describing the clinical presentation, the diagnosis and the treatment of this rare lesion. PMID:16855784

  15. Symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular block in an obese man.

    PubMed

    Erickson, John M; Louis, Dean S; Naughton, Norah N

    2009-05-01

    Regional anesthesia has an expanding role in upper extremity surgery. Brachial plexus blocks offer several advantages including providing effective analgesia, reducing narcotic requirements, and facilitating ambulatory care surgery. Despite the popularity of nerve blocks, the surgeon must not forget the complications associated with regional anesthesia. This article describes a case of symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block in an obese man. A 46-year-old obese man underwent a left-sided supraclavicular block in preparation for decompression of Guyon's canal for ulnar mononeuropathy at the wrist. The patient experienced acute-onset dyspnea, chest discomfort, and anxiety, and physical examination demonstrated reduced breath sounds in the left hemithorax. Chest radiographs documented elevation of the left hemidiaphragm consistent with an iatrogenic phrenic nerve palsy. The patient was admitted for 23-hour observation and underwent an uncomplicated ulnar nerve decompression under Bier block anesthesia 1 week later. No long-term sequelae have been identified; however, there was a delay in surgical care, admission to the hospital, and transient pulmonary symptoms. We attribute this complication to significant abdominal obesity causing compromised pulmonary reserve and poor tolerance of transient hemidiaphragmatic paresis. In recent studies, waist circumference and abdominal height were inversely related to pulmonary function. We suspect that the incidence of symptomatic phrenic nerve palsy associated with brachial plexus blocks will increase as the prevalence of obesity increases in this country. PMID:19472948

  16. Deep peroneal nerve transfer for established plantar sensory loss.

    PubMed

    Koshima, Isao; Nanba, Yuzaburo; Tsutsui, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2003-10-01

    Patients with established or irreversible plantar sensory loss often have normal sensation on the dorsal aspect of the foot, due to an intact deep peroneal nerve. A new method of deep peroneal nerve transfer is proposed for repair of plantar sensory loss caused by extensive nerve gaps or high-level lesions of the posterior tibial nerve. Two cases in which this technique was used are described. The surgical technique is relatively easy, with a short operating time, rapid nerve regeneration after surgery, accurate sensory recovery, and minimal donor-site morbidity with sensory loss only on the first web space of the foot. PMID:14634907

  17. Ulnar collateral ligament injury of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Ritting, Andrew W; Baldwin, Paul C; Rodner, Craig M

    2010-03-01

    Injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the thumb metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint is a common entity encountered by the sports physician and orthopedic surgeon. The term "gamekeeper's thumb," which is sometimes used incorrectly to mean any injury to this ligament, refers to a chronic injury to the UCL in which it becomes attenuated through repetitive stress. In contrast, the term "skier's thumb" refers to an acute ligament injury as seen in skiers who fall on an abducted thumb or athletes who sustain a valgus force on an abducted thumb. If the patient allows a clinical examination, valgus stress testing can diagnose a complete UCL rupture when there is no solid endpoint with the thumb held in 30 degrees of MCP flexion and with the thumb held in extension. In cases with complete UCL tears, operative treatment has been shown to produce excellent results and is recommended. If there is a firm endpoint to valgus stress testing, a partial UCL tear is diagnosed and nonoperative treatment usually favored. PMID:20215892

  18. Optimisation of composite bone plates for ulnar transverse fractures.

    PubMed

    Chakladar, N D; Harper, L T; Parsons, A J

    2016-04-01

    Metallic bone plates are commonly used for arm bone fractures where conservative treatment (casts) cannot provide adequate support and compression at the fracture site. These plates, made of stainless steel or titanium alloys, tend to shield stress transfer at the fracture site and delay the bone healing rate. This study investigates the feasibility of adopting advanced composite materials to overcome stress shielding effects by optimising the geometry and mechanical properties of the plate to match more closely to the bone. An ulnar transverse fracture is characterised and finite element techniques are employed to investigate the feasibility of a composite-plated fractured bone construct over a stainless steel equivalent. Numerical models of intact and fractured bones are analysed and the mechanical behaviour is found to agree with experimental data. The mechanical properties are tailored to produce an optimised composite plate, offering a 25% reduction in length and a 70% reduction in mass. The optimised design may help to reduce stress shielding and increase bone healing rates. PMID:26875147

  19. Effect of low-level laser therapy (685 nm, 3 J/cm(2)) on functional recovery of the sciatic nerve in rats following crushing lesion.

    PubMed

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Jahanbakhsh, Fatemeh; Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Yousefi, Kambiz; Allahverdi, Amin

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) promotes posttraumatic nerve regeneration. The objective of the present study was to assess the efficacy of 685-nm LLLT at the dosage of 3 J/cm(2) in the functional recovery of the sciatic nerve in rats following crushing injury. The left sciatic nerves of 20 male Wistar rats were subjected to controlled crush injury by a hemostatic tweezers, and the rats were randomly allocated into two experimental groups as follows: control group and laser group. Laser irradiation (685 nm wavelength; 15 mW, CW, 3 J/cm(2), spot of 0.028 cm(2)) was started on the postsurgical first day, above the site of injury, and was continued for 21 consecutive days. Functional recovery was evaluated at 3 weeks postoperatively by measuring the sciatic functional index (SFI) and sciatic static index (SSI) at weekly intervals. The treated rats showed improvement in motion pattern. The SFI and SSI results were significant when comparing two groups on the 14th and 21st postoperative days (p < 0.05). There were intra-group differences detected in laser group in different periods (p < 0.05). Low-level laser irradiation, with the parameters used in the present study, accelerated and improved sciatic nerve function in rats after crushing injury. PMID:25595127

  20. Optic Nerve Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a special laser that produces a three-dimensional high-resolution image of the optic nerve. This ... the nerve fiber layer and create a three dimensional representation of the optic nerve. Last reviewed on ...

  1. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... normal body temperature. Being too cold slows nerve conduction. Tell your doctor if you have a cardiac ...

  2. The effect of ulnar styloid fractures on patient-rated outcomes after volar locking plating of distal radius fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sammer, Douglas M.; Shah, Hriday M.; Shauver, Melissa J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ulnar styloid fractures commonly occur in association with distal radius fractures. Ulnar styloid fractures that involve the insertion of the radioulnar ligaments can result in distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability, and the literature suggests that these fractures should be treated with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). However, in the absence of DRUJ instability, the effects of ulnar styloid fractures are not known. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of ulnar styloid fractures without DRUJ instability on patient-rated outcomes after distal radius fracture ORIF. Materials and Methods Between 2003 and 2008, a prospective cohort of distal radius fracture subjects treated with volar locking plating was enrolled. Patients with DRUJ instability treated at the time of distal radius ORIF were excluded. Radiographs were evaluated to identify ulnar styloid fractures, fracture size, amount of displacement, and evidence of healing. Patient-rated outcomes were measured at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after surgery using the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ). Physical examination, including a specific evaluation of the DRUJ, was performed at each postoperative visit. Regression analysis was performed to determine if the presence of an ulnar styloid fracture, the size or displacement of the ulnar styloid fracture, or the healing status of the ulnar styloid fracture (union versus non-union) was predictive of MHQ scores. Results One hundred forty-four patients were enrolled; 88 patients had associated ulnar styloid fractures, and 56 did not. During the collection period, three patients with ulnar styloid fractures had DRUJ instability found intraoperatively and underwent ulnar styloid ORIF. These patients were excluded. The remaining patients with a stable DRUJ after ORIF were included in the study, and maintained DRUJ stability postoperatively. The presence of an ulnar styloid fracture was not found to be an independent predictor of MHQ scores (p=0.55). In addition, neither the size of the ulnar styloid fracture (p=0.18), nor the degree of displacement (p=0.25) was found to be a significant independent predictor of MHQ scores. Furthermore, the healing status of the fracture (union versus non-union) was not predictive of MHQ scores (p=0.95). Conclusion In patients with a stable DRUJ after distal radius ORIF with a volar locking plate, the presence of an ulnar styloid fracture did not affect subjective outcomes as measured by the MHQ. Furthermore, neither the size of the ulnar styloid fracture, the degree of displacement, nor the presence or absence of radiographic union affected subjective outcomes as measured by the MHQ. PMID:19896004

  3. Detection of peripheral nerve pathology

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, Michael J.; Baker, Jonathan C.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare accuracy of ultrasound and MRI for detecting focal peripheral nerve pathology, excluding idiopathic carpal or cubital tunnel syndromes. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients referred for neuromuscular ultrasound to identify patients who had ultrasound and MRI of the same limb for suspected brachial plexopathy or mononeuropathies, excluding carpal/cubital tunnel syndromes. Ultrasound and MRI results were compared to diagnoses determined by surgical or, if not performed, clinical/electrodiagnostic evaluation. Results: We identified 53 patients who had both ultrasound and MRI of whom 46 (87%) had nerve pathology diagnosed by surgical (n = 39) or clinical/electrodiagnostic (n = 14) evaluation. Ultrasound detected the diagnosed nerve pathology (true positive) more often than MRI (43/46 vs 31/46, p < 0.001). Nerve pathology was correctly excluded (true negative) with equal frequency by MRI and ultrasound (both 6/7). In 25% (13/53), ultrasound was accurate (true positive or true negative) when MRI was not. These pathologies were typically (10/13) long (>2 cm) and only occasionally (2/13) outside the MRI field of view. MRI missed multifocal pathology identified with ultrasound in 6 of 7 patients, often (5/7) because pathology was outside the MRI field of view. Conclusions: Imaging frequently detects peripheral nerve pathology and contributes to the differential diagnosis in patients with mononeuropathies and brachial plexopathies. Ultrasound is more sensitive than MRI (93% vs 67%), has equivalent specificity (86%), and better identifies multifocal lesions than MRI. In sonographically accessible regions ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality for anatomic evaluation of suspected peripheral nervous system lesions. PMID:23553474

  4. Ulnar aplasia, dysplastic radius and preaxial oligodactyly: Rare longitudinal limb defect in a sporadic male child

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sajid; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Ulnar hypoplasia is a rare longitudinal limb deficiency in which the ulna shows various degrees of deficiency. The condition is normally associated with radial defects, and in severe cases there is a reduction of postaxial/ulnar digits. Ulnar deficiency is an integral part of several syndromic malformations like Weyer's oligodactyly syndrome, limb/pelvis hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome, and ulnar-mammary syndrome. Here, we report an isolated unilateral ulnar deficiency in a boy who was a product of a consanguineous marriage. The subject demonstrated mesomelic shortening of the left arm with reduced zeugopod and autopod, and preaxial absence of two fingers. Additional findings in the affected limb were severe flexion contracture at the elbow joint, reduced and narrow palm, hypoplastic digits, and clinodactyly. Roentgenographic study revealed rudimentary ulna, dysplastic and posteriorly dislocated radius, crowding of carpals, and complete absence of digit rays of the thumb and index finger. Despite this anomaly, the subject could manage his daily life activities well. We present detailed clinical features and differential diagnosis of this rare limb malformation. PMID:24381628

  5. Percutaneous trans-ulnar artery approach for coronary angiography and angioplasty; A case series study

    PubMed Central

    Roghani-Dehkordi, Farshad; Hadizadeh, Mahmood; Hadizadeh, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coronary angiography is the gold standard method for diagnosis of coronary heart disease and usually performed by femoral approach that has several complications. To reduce these complications, upper extremity approach is increasingly used and is becoming preferred access site by many interventionists. Although radial approach is relatively well studied, safety, feasibility and risk of applying ulnar approach in not clearly known yet. METHODS We followed 97 patients (man = 56%, mean standard deviation of age = 57 18) who had undergone coronary angiography or angioplasty via ulnar approach for 6-10 months and recorded their outcomes. RESULTS In 97 patients out of 105 ones (92.38%), procedure through ulnar access were successfully done. Unsuccessful puncture (3 patients), wiring (2 patients), passing of sheet (2 patients), and anatomically unsuitable ulnar artery (1 patient) were the reasons of failure. In 94 patients (89.52%), the angiography and angioplasty was done without any complications. Five patients (5.1%) hematoma and 11 patients (11%) experienced low-grade pain that resolved with painkiller. No infection, amputation or need for surgery was reported. CONCLUSION This study demonstrated that ulnar access in our patients was a safe and practical approach for coronary angiography or angioplasty, without any major complication. Bearing in mind its high success rate, it can be utilized when a radial artery is not useful for the catheterization and in cases such as prior harvesting of the radial artery (in prior coronary artery bypass grafting). PMID:26715936

  6. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Felice, KJ. Focal neuropathies of the femoral, obturator, lateral femoral cutaneous and other nerves of the thigh and pelvis. In: Bromberg MB, Smith ...

  7. Blue lesions.

    PubMed

    Longo, Caterina; Scope, Alon; Lallas, Aimilios; Zalaudek, Iris; Moscarella, Elvira; Gardini, Stefano; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Blue color is found in a wide range of malignant and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions and in lesions that result from penetration of exogenous materials, such as radiation or amalgam tattoo or traumatic penetration of particles. Discriminating between different diagnostic entities that display blue color relies on careful patient examination and lesion assessment. Dermoscopically, the extent, distribution, and patterns created by blue color can help diagnose lesions with specificity and differentiate between benign and malignant entities. This article provides an overview of the main diagnoses whereby blue color can be found, providing simple management rules for these lesions. PMID:24075551

  8. The vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for reconstruction of the inferior alveolar nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Hiroto, Saijo; Morooka, Shin; Kuwabara, Kaoru; Fujioka, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    The sural nerve has been described for nerve reconstruction of the maxillofacial region since it provides many advantages. We report a case of a vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for immediate reconstruction after the removal of intraosseous neuroma originating in the inferior alveolar nerve. The patient had a neuroma caused by iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. A 4-cm long neuroma existed in the inferior alveolar nerve and was resected. A peroneal perforator was chosen as the pedicle of the vascularized sural nerve graft for the nerve gap. The graft including the skin paddle for monitoring the perfusion supplied by this perforator was transferred to the lesion. The nerve gap between the two stumps of the inferior alveolar nerve was repaired using the 6-cm long vascularized sural nerve. The perforator of the peroneal artery was anastomosed to the branch of the facial artery in a perforator-to-perforator fashion. There was no need to sacrifice any main arteries. The skin paddle with 1 cm × 3 cm in size was inset into the incised medial neck. Perceptual function tests with a Semmes-Weinstein pressure esthesiometer and two-point discrimination in the lower lip and chin at 10 months after surgery showed recovery almost to the level of the normal side. This free vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator may be a good alternative for reconstruction of inferior alveolar nerve defects. PMID:25346479

  9. Effects of deep heating provided by therapeutic ultrasound on demyelinating nerves

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Elif; Tastaban, Engin; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Turan, Yasemin; Şendur, Ömer Faruk

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physiotherapeutic heating agents are classified into two groups: superficial-heating agents and deep-heating agents. Therapeutic ultrasound is a deep-heating agent used to treat various musculosketal disorders. Numerous studies have attempted to determine the impact of ultrasound on healthy nerve conduction parameters. However, the instantaneous effects of deep heating via ultrasound on demyelinating nerves do not appear to have been described previously. The present study aimed to assess and compare the impact of ultrasound on demyelinating nerve and healthy nerve conduction parameters. [Subjects and Methods] Carpal tunnel syndrome was used as a focal demyelination model. Thirty-two hands of 25 participants with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in the study. Ultrasound parameters were 3.3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 8 minutes, and continuous wave. Electrodiagnostic studies were performed initially, at the midpoint (4th min), and immediately after (8th min) ultrasound application. [Results] Reduced motor conduction velocity was found in demyelinating nerves at the 4th and 8th minutes. Ulnar nerve onset latency was significantly prolonged in the 8th minute recording, compared to the initial value. There were no significant differences in relative velocity and latency changes between demyelinating and normal nerves. [Conclusion] Deep heating via ultrasound may inversely affect conduction velocity in demyelinating nerves. PMID:27190467

  10. Influence of recreational activity and muscle strength on ulnar bending stiffness in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myburgh, K. H.; Charette, S.; Zhou, L.; Steele, C. R.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1993-01-01

    Bone bending stiffness (modulus of elasticity [E] x moment of inertia [I]), a measure of bone strength, is related to its mineral content (BMC) and geometry and may be influenced by exercise. We evaluated the relationship of habitual recreational exercise and muscle strength to ulnar EI, width, and BMC in 51 healthy men, 28-61 yr of age. BMC and width were measured by single photon absorptiometry and EI by mechanical resistance tissue analysis. Maximum biceps strength was determined dynamically (1-RM) and grip strength isometrically. Subjects were classified as sedentary (S) (N = 13), moderately (M) (N = 18), or highly active (H) (N = 20) and exercised 0.2 +/- 0.2; 2.2 +/- 1.3; and 6.8 +/- 2.3 h.wk-1 (P < 0.001). H had greater biceps (P < 0.0005) and grip strength (P < 0.05), ulnar BMC (P < 0.05), and ulnar EI (P = 0.01) than M or S, who were similar. Amount of activity correlated with grip and biceps strength (r = 0.47 and 0.49; P < 0.001), but not with bone measurements, whereas muscle strength correlated with both EI and BMC (r = 0.40-0.52, P < 0.005). EI also correlated significantly with both BMC and ulnar width (P < 0.0001). Ulnar width and biceps strength were the only independent predictors of EI (r2 = 0.67, P < 0.0001). We conclude that levels of physical activity sufficient to increase arm strength influence ulnar bending stiffness.

  11. Traumatic ulnar artery pseudoaneurysm following a grenade blast: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Belyayev, Leonid; Rich, Norman M; McKay, Patricia; Nesti, Leon; Wind, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Vascular injuries comprised a small percentage of total injuries requiring medevac in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts; however, their impact cannot be overstated. This case highlights an individual who sustained a grenade blast injury leading to hemorrhage, and forearm compartment syndrome. He was initially treated with irrigation and debridement, forearm fasciotomy, and delayed primary closure. The patient developed persistent ulnar neuropathy and hypothenar atrophy despite a normal initial vascular examination. During reconstructive surgery, he was discovered to have a proximal ulnar artery pseudoaneurysm. Upper extremity pseudoaneurysms are a rare sequelae following vascular injury, but have significant consequences for the patient and are identifiable by imaging. PMID:26032392

  12. [Peripheral nerve damage in patients with leprosy].

    PubMed

    Grimaud, J

    2012-12-01

    Leprosy is one of the six diseases that the WHO considers as the major threat in developing countries. Damage to nerves can occur before, during, and after treatment and can result in disabilities and long-term disfigurement, which is associated with stigma. Considered exotic and rare in European countries, it is important for neurologists to be able to make the diagnosis of leprosy early in order to rapidly alleviate patient suffering and prevent and reverse nerve damage. Leprosy must be considered in the differential diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy, even in the absence of skin lesions and especially when present in a patient from an endemic country. Immune response and mechanisms involved in nerve damage are not clearly understood. There is no predictive test for the extent of nerve damage and no good evidence on the best treatment. PMID:23107882

  13. Hamartomatous tongue lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Kreiger, Portia A; Ernst, Linda M; Elden, Lisa M; Kazahaya, Ken; Alawi, Faizan; Russo, Pierre A

    2007-08-01

    The incidence and spectrum of tongue lesions in children, in particular tongue hamartomas, is relatively unknown. We report a retrospective review of all tongue lesions seen at a major tertiary care children's hospital over an 18-year period with an emphasis on describing tongue hamartomas. A total of 135 tongue lesions were identified. Vascular/lymphatic lesions (36/135) were the most common followed by mucus extravasation phenomenon (22/135). Interestingly, hamartomatous lesions (18/135) were the third most common lesion category identified. Lingual hamartomas were predominantly submucosal in location and were classified histologically by tissue composition as follows: neurovascular (2/18), smooth muscle predominant (5/18), fat predominant (1/18), and smooth muscle and fat containing (10/18). All 5 smooth muscle predominant hamartomas also contained vasculature, and 1 case additionally contained salivary gland tissue. The single fat predominant hamartoma additionally contained vessels and salivary gland. The final 10 hamartomas contained varying amounts of both smooth muscle and fat, and also admixed combinations of vessels, nerves, and salivary glands. Two of these 10 cases additionally contained foci of choristomatous elements, including cutaneous adnexal structures and cartilage. Most patients with hamartomatous lesions were young, 2 years or less. Eight cases were congenital in origin. Females outnumbered males by 2:1. The majority of lesions (16/18) were dorsal in location, and 4 patients had a syndromic association, all oral-facial-digital syndrome. PMID:17667541

  14. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  15. Large-Scale Functional Reorganization in Adult Monkey Cortex after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraghty, Preston E.; Kaas, Jon H.

    1991-08-01

    In adult monkeys, peripheral nerve injuries induce dramatic examples of neural plasticity in somatosensory cortex. It has been suggested that a cortical distance limit exists and that the amount of plasticity that is possible after injury is constrained by this limit. We have investigated this possibility by depriving a relatively large expanse of cortex by transecting and ligating both the median and the ulnar nerves to the hand. Electrophysiological recording in cortical areas 3b and 1 in three adult squirrel monkeys no less than 2 months after nerve transection has revealed that cutaneous responsiveness is regained throughout the deprived cortex and that a roughly normal topographic order is reestablished for the reorganized cortex.

  16. Workup and Management of Persistent Neuralgia following Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Weyker, Paul David; Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Pham, Thoha M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological injuries following peripheral nerve blocks are a relatively rare yet potentially devastating complication depending on the type of lesion, affected extremity, and duration of symptoms. Medical management continues to be the treatment modality of choice with multimodal nonopioid analgesics as the cornerstone of this therapy. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who developed a clinical common peroneal and lateral sural cutaneous neuropathy following an uncomplicated popliteal sciatic nerve block. Workup with electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance neurography revealed injury to both the femoral and sciatic nerves. Diagnostic studies and potential mechanisms for nerve injury are discussed. PMID:26904304

  17. Comminuted fracture of the ulnar carpal bone in a Labrador retriever dog.

    PubMed

    Vedrine, Bertrand

    2013-11-01

    A 4-year-old male Labrador retriever dog was evaluated for acute lameness without weight-bearing in the right forelimb after an 8-meter fall. Radiographs revealed a comminuted fracture of the ulnar carpal bone that required removal of bone fragments. This appears to be the first report of such a condition. PMID:24179242

  18. Plexiform Neurofibroma of the Penis and Facial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, L Lawson; Cadogan, CAM

    2014-01-01

    A case of plexiform neurofibroma of the penis is presented. It is a rare condition often found in association with congenital neurofibromatosis. This case is unique because of the accompanying lesion of the facial nerve above the right eye, an association not previously reported. The patient was managed effectively by adequate resection of the penile lesion. PMID:25303261

  19. Effect of skilled and unskilled training on nerve regeneration and functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, A.S.; Michaelsen, S.M.; Achaval, M.; Ilha, J.; Hermel, E.E.S.; Back, F.P.; Netto, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The most disabling aspect of human peripheral nerve injuries, the majority of which affect the upper limbs, is the loss of skilled hand movements. Activity-induced morphological and electrophysiological remodeling of the neuromuscular junction has been shown to influence nerve repair and functional recovery. In the current study, we determined the effects of two different treatments on the functional and morphological recovery after median and ulnar nerve injury. Adult Wistar male rats weighing 280 to 330?g at the time of surgery (N = 8-10 animals/group) were submitted to nerve crush and 1 week later began a 3-week course of motor rehabilitation involving either skilled (reaching for small food pellets) or unskilled (walking on a motorized treadmill) training. During this period, functional recovery was monitored weekly using staircase and cylinder tests. Histological and morphometric nerve analyses were used to assess nerve regeneration at the end of treatment. The functional evaluation demonstrated benefits of both tasks, but found no difference between them (P > 0.05). The unskilled training, however, induced a greater degree of nerve regeneration as evidenced by histological measurement (P < 0.05). These data provide evidence that both of the forelimb training tasks used in this study can accelerate functional recovery following brachial plexus injury. PMID:22584636

  20. Cortical brain mapping of peripheral nerves using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Younghoon R; Jones, Seth R; Pawela, Christopher P; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis S; Schulte, Marie L; Runquist, Matthew L; Yan, Ji-Geng; Hudetz, Anthony G; Jaradeh, Safwan S; Hyde, James S; Matloub, Hani S

    2008-11-01

    The regions of the body have cortical and subcortical representation in proportion to their degree of innervation. The rat forepaw has been studied extensively in recent years using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), typically by stimulation using electrodes directly inserted into the skin of the forepaw. Here we stimulate the nerve directly using surgically implanted electrodes. A major distinction is that stimulation of the skin of the forepaw is mostly sensory, whereas direct nerve stimulation reveals not only the sensory system but also deep brain structures associated with motor activity. In this article, we seek to define both the motor and sensory cortical and subcortical representations associated with the four major nerves of the rodent upper extremity. We electrically stimulated each nerve (median, ulnar, radial, and musculocutaneous) during fMRI acquisition using a 9.4-T Bruker scanner (Bruker BioSpin, Billerica, MA). A current level of 0.5 to 1.0 mA and a frequency of 5 Hz were used while keeping the duration constant. A distinct pattern of cortical activation was found for each nerve that can be correlated with known sensorimotor afferent and efferent pathways to the rat forepaw. This direct nerve stimulation rat model can provide insight into peripheral nerve injury. PMID:18924070

  1. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating median nerve dysfunction in CTS patients. PMID:26764488

  2. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating median nerve dysfunction in CTS patients. PMID:26764488

  3. Parenchymal Anaplastic Astrocytoma presenting with Visual Symptoms due to Bilateral Optic Nerve Sheath Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Kelly M; Farooq, Asim V; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Villano, J. Lee; Moss, Heather E

    2013-01-01

    A 23 year old man presented with transient visual obscurations and was found to have optic nerve edema and a thalamic lesion that did not enhance on magnetic resonance imaging. Lumbar puncture opening pressure was normal. Subsequent magnetic resonance images demonstrated optic nerve sheath enhancement. Pathological diagnosis of the thalamic mass was anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO grade III). Visual symptoms were attributed to spread of high grade parenchymal glioma to the optic nerve sheaths causing intraorbital optic nerve compression. PMID:23838764

  4. Amplitude of sensory nerve action potential in early stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy: an analysis of 500 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunqian; Li, Jintao; Wang, Tingjuan; Wang, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is important for the successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we recruited 500 diabetic patients from the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University in China from June 2008 to September 2013: 221 cases showed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (symptomatic group) and 279 cases had no symptoms of peripheral impairment (asymptomatic group). One hundred healthy control subjects were also recruited. Nerve conduction studies revealed that distal motor latency was longer, sensory nerve conduction velocity was slower, and sensory nerve action potential and amplitude of compound muscle action potential were significantly lower in the median, ulnar, posterior tibial and common peroneal nerve in the diabetic groups compared with control subjects. Moreover, the alterations were more obvious in patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Of the 500 diabetic patients, neural conduction abnormalities were detected in 358 cases (71.6%), among which impairment of the common peroneal nerve was most prominent. Sensory nerve abnormality was more obvious than motor nerve abnormality in the diabetic groups. The amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was the most sensitive measure of peripheral neuropathy. Our results reveal that varying degrees of nerve conduction changes are present in the early, asymptomatic stage of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25221597

  5. The Temporal Profiles of Changes in Nerve Excitability Indices in Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hsing-Jung; Chiang, Ya-Wen; Yang, Chih-Chao; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang; Chao, Chi-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) caused by a mutation in transthyretin (TTR) gene is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder. The aim of this study is to explore the pathophysiological mechanism of FAP. We prospectively recruited 12 pauci-symptomatic carriers, 18 patients who harbor a TTR mutation, p.A97S, and two-age matched control groups. Data of nerve excitability test (NET) from ulnar motor and sensory axons were collected.NET study of ulnar motor axons of patients shows increased threshold and rheobase, reduced threshold elevation during hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus (TE), and increased refractoriness. In sensory nerve studies, there are increased threshold reduction in depolarizing TE, lower slope of recovery and delayed time to overshoot after hyperpolarizing TE, increased refractoriness and superexcitability in recovery cycle. NET profiles obtained from the ulnar nerve of carriers show the increase of threshold and rheobase, whereas no significant threshold changes in hyperpolarizing TE and superexcitability. The regression models demonstrate that the increase of refractoriness and prolonged relative refractory period are correlated to the disease progression from carriers to patients. The marked increase of refractoriness at short-width stimulus suggests a defect in sodium current which may represent an early, pre-symptomatic pathophysiological change in TTR-FAP. Focal disruption of basal lamina and myelin may further increase the internodal capacity, manifested by the lower slope of recovery and delayed time to overshoot after hyperpolarization TE as well as the increase of superexcitability. NET could therefore make a pragmatic tool for monitoring disease progress from the very early stage of TTR-FAP. PMID:26529114

  6. Sensory nerve action potentials and sensory perception in women with arthritis of the hand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arthritis of the hand can limit a person’s ability to perform daily activities. Whether or not sensory deficits contribute to the disability in this population remains unknown. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if women with osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the hand have sensory impairments. Methods Sensory function in the dominant hand of women with hand OA or RA and healthy women was evaluated by measuring sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) from the median, ulnar and radial nerves, sensory mapping (SM), and vibratory and current perception thresholds (VPT and CPT, respectively) of the second and fifth digits. Results All SNAP amplitudes were significantly lower for the hand OA and hand RA groups compared with the healthy group (p < 0.05). No group differences were found for SNAP conduction velocities, SM, VPT, and CPT. Discussion We propose, based on these findings, that women with hand OA or RA may have axonal loss of sensory fibers in the median, ulnar and radial nerves. Less apparent were losses in conduction speed or sensory perception. PMID:22575001

  7. Successful Bone Healing of Nonunion After Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy for Smokers Treated With Teriparatide.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    Ulnar shortening osteotomy is widely performed as the standard surgical treatment for ulnar impaction syndrome and has a high percentage of success for pain relief. However, delayed union and nonunion of the osteotomy site remain the most concerning complications. In particular, smokers have a higher incidence of nonunion, which amounts to 30% of cases. For the treatment of nonunion, secondary surgical interventions such as bone grafting will be necessary but are extremely challenging. Recently, teriparatide (recombinant human parathyroid hormone [PTH 1-34]) administration has been reported in several clinical studies as a noninvasive pharmacological systemic treatment for fracture healing or nonunion. The authors present 2 cases of smokers, a 62-year-old man and a 42-year-old woman, with nonunion after ulnar shortening osteotomy and fixation with 6-hole non-locking plate for ulnar impaction syndrome. For treatment of nonunion, noninvasive therapy with teriparatide (20-µg, subcutaneous injection) in addition to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound was underwent. In both cases, partial bone union began to be observed on radiographs after the first 4 weeks of teriparatide administration and successful bone healing without additional surgical interventions was achieved after 10 and 6 months of treatment with teriparatide, respectively. The current case reports showed that non-invasive combination therapy of teriparatide and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound were a possible alternative to surgical intervention. In the future, teriparatide therapy might be applied actively to patients who have risk factors for delayed union, such a heavy smoking habit, and are expected to experience nonunion after ulnar shortening osteotomy. PMID:26270762

  8. Evaluation of Tookad-mediated photodynamic effect on peripheral nerve and pelvic nerve in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Dole, Kenneth C.; Blanc, Dominique; Whalen, Lawrence R.; Gould, Daniel H.; Huang, Zheng

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a novel vascular targeting photosensitizer pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad) has been investigated as an alternative modality for the treatment of prostate cancer and other diseases. This study investigated, for the first time, the vascular photodynamic effects of Tookad-PDT on nerve tissues. We established an in situ canine model using the cutaneous branches of the saphenous nerve to evaluate the effect of Tookad-PDT secondary to vascular damage on compound-action potentials. With Tookad dose of 2 mg/kg, treatment with 50 J/cm2 induced little change in nerve conduction. However, treatment with 100 J/cm2 resulted in decreases in nerve conduction velocities, and treatment with 200 J/cm2 caused a total loss of nerve conduction. Vasculature surrounding the saphenous nerve appeared irritated. The nerve itself looked swollen and individual fibers were not as distinct as they were before PDT treatment. Epineurium had mild hemorrhage, leukocyte infiltration, fibroplasias and vascular hypertrophy. However, the nerve fascicles and nerve fibers were free of lesions. We also studied the effect of Tookad-PDT secondary to vascular damage on the pelvic nerve in the immediate vicinity of the prostate gland. The pelvic nerve and saphenous nerve showed different sensitivity and histopathological responses to Tookad-PDT. Degeneration nerve fibers and necrotic neurons were seen in the pelvic nerve at a dose level of 1 mg/kg and 50 J/cm2. Adjacent connective tissue showed areas of hemorrhage, fibrosis and inflammation. Our preliminary results suggest that possible side effects of interstitial PDT on prostate nerve tissues need to be further investigated.

  9. Diabetic neuropathy increases stimulation threshold during popliteal sciatic nerve block†

    PubMed Central

    Heschl, S.; Hallmann, B.; Zilke, T.; Gemes, G.; Schoerghuber, M.; Auer-Grumbach, M.; Quehenberger, F.; Lirk, P.; Hogan, Q.; Rigaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve stimulation is commonly used for nerve localization in regional anaesthesia, but recommended stimulation currents of 0.3–0.5 mA do not reliably produce motor activity in the absence of intraneural needle placement. As this may be particularly true in patients with diabetic neuropathy, we examined the stimulation threshold in patients with and without diabetes. Methods Preoperative evaluation included a neurological exam and electroneurography. During ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block, we measured the current required to produce motor activity for the tibial and common peroneal nerve in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Proximity to the nerve was evaluated post-hoc using ultrasound imaging. Results Average stimulation currents did not differ between diabetic (n=55) and non-diabetic patients (n=52). Although the planned number of patients was not reached, the power goal for the mean stimulation current was met. Subjects with diminished pressure perception showed increased thresholds for the common peroneal nerve (median 1.30 vs. 0.57 mA in subjects with normal perception, P=0.042), as did subjects with decreased pain sensation (1.60 vs. 0.50 mA in subjects with normal sensation, P=0.038). Slowed ulnar nerve conduction velocity predicted elevated mean stimulation current (r=−0.35, P=0.002). Finally, 15 diabetic patients required more than 0.5 mA to evoke a motor response, despite intraneural needle placement (n=4), or required currents ≥2 mA despite needle-nerve contact, vs three such patients (1 intraneural, 2 with ≥2 mA) among non-diabetic patients (P=0.003). Conclusions These findings suggest that stimulation thresholds of 0.3–0.5 mA may not reliably determine close needle-nerve contact during popliteal sciatic nerve block, particularly in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Clinical trial registration NCT01488474 PMID:26994231

  10. Nerve Sheath Myxoma: Report of A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Amoolya; C, Vijaya; VK, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma defined by Harkin and Reed is an uncommon benign neoplasm with nerve sheath like features. It has several cytological and histological differential diagnoses. One such lesion is neurothekeoma, which can be differentiated using immunohistochemistry. In most of the previous reports nerve sheath myxoma and neurothekeoma were considered synonymous and were often confused for one another. This case report separates the two using immunohistochemistry. Also, the cytological features of nerve sheath myxoma are not well documented in the past. This case report attempts to display the cyto-morphology of nerve sheath myxoma. We report a rare case of nerve sheath myxoma diagnosed on cytological features confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in a 32-year-old lady who presented with an asymptomatic nodule over the left cervical area and discuss its cyto-histological mimics. PMID:26023558

  11. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Infraorbital Nerve.

    PubMed

    D'Addino, José Luis; Piccoletti, Laura; Pigni, María Mercedes; de Gordon, Maria José Rodriguez Arenas

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to report a large, rare, and ulcerative infiltrated skin lesion. Its diagnosis, therapeutic management, and progress are described. The patient is a 78-year-old white man, who presented with a 12-month ulcerative perforated lesion that had affected and infiltrated the skin, with easy bleeding. He had a history of hypertension, although controlled, was a 40-year smoker, had chronic atrial fibrillation, diabetes, and microangiopathy. During the consultation, the patient also presented with ocular obstruction due to an inability to open the eye. He mentioned having reduced vision. The computed tomography scan showed upper maxilla osteolysis without eye involvement. We underwent a radical resection in which upper maxilla and the anterior orbital margin were included. We used a Becker-type flap that allowed us to rebuild the cheek and to complete a modified neck dissection. Progress was favorable; the patient recovered ocular motility and his vision improved to 20/200. The final biopsy result was "malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, malignant schwannoma." Malignant schwannoma of the peripheral nerve is extremely rare. The total resection and reconstruction being completed in one surgery represented a challenge due to the difficulty in obtaining tissues in addition to the necessity of an oncological resection. PMID:27162577

  12. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  13. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  14. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect nerves. Medical conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease can damage nerves. In these cases, treatment is directed at the medical condition. Physical therapy exercises may help some peoplemaintain muscle strength. Orthopedic ...

  15. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of movement or sensation in the foot from damage to the tibial nerve. ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral ... the calf and foot muscles. A problem in function with a single ...

  16. [The effect of cytokines on regeneration results of compressed nerve roots and transsected peripheral nerves].

    PubMed

    Wehling, P; Wirths, J; Evans, C H

    1993-01-01

    The possible beneficial effect of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) on nerve regeneration was studied using clinical, neurophysiological and histomorphological methods. The sciatic nerves of Wistar rats were transsected and the severed ends abutted, sewn together and covered with fibrin adhesive. In a second group the lumbar-sacral nerve roots were exposed, IL-1 was injected and compression of the nerve roots was carried out. The region surrounding the lesion was infused with either saline (controls) or IL-1 (treatment group) in both groups. Compared to the controls, the treated animals showed a significant improvement of nerve regeneration as measured by clinical and neurophysiological parameters. After 3 months of observation, the total number of myelinated axons distal to the site of lesion was increased, while the fiber diameter distribution was unchanged. It is likely that cloned IL-1 will soon become available for human treatment. The present results indicate that it may be worthwhile to investigate its usefulness in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury in primates and humans. PMID:8386893

  17. Isolated plexiform neurofibroma mimicking a vascular lesion*

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Paola Cecilia; Apa, Sebastian Nicolas; Lanoël, Agustina Maria; María, Josefina Sala; Sierre, Sergio; Pierini, Adrián Martin

    2016-01-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas are benign tumors originating from peripheral nerve sheaths, generally associated with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). They are diffuse, painful and sometimes locally invasive, generating cosmetic problems. This report discusses an adolescent patient who presented with an isolated, giant plexiform neurofibroma on her leg that was confused with a vascular lesion due to its clinical aspects. Once the diagnosis was confirmed by surgical biopsy, excision of the lesion was performed with improvement of the symptoms.

  18. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  19. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  20. Sciatic Nerve Injury Related to Hip Replacement Surgery: Imaging Detection by MR Neurography Despite Susceptibility Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marcel; Bäumer, Philipp; Pedro, Maria; Dombert, Thomas; Staub, Frank; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Sciatic nerve palsy related to hip replacement surgery (HRS) is among the most common causes of sciatic neuropathies. The sciatic nerve may be injured by various different periprocedural mechanisms. The precise localization and extension of the nerve lesion, the determination of nerve continuity, lesion severity, and fascicular lesion distribution are essential for assessing the potential of spontaneous recovery and thereby avoiding delayed or inappropriate therapy. Adequate therapy is in many cases limited to conservative management, but in certain cases early surgical exploration and release of the nerve is indicated. Nerve-conduction-studies and electromyography are essential in the diagnosis of nerve injuries. In postsurgical nerve injuries, additional diagnostic imaging is important as well, in particular to detect or rule out direct mechanical compromise. Especially in the presence of metallic implants, commonly applied diagnostic imaging tests generally fail to adequately visualize nervous tissue. MRI has been deemed problematic due to implant-related artifacts after HRS. In this study, we describe for the first time the spectrum of imaging findings of Magnetic Resonance neurography (MRN) employing pulse sequences relatively insensitive to susceptibility artifacts (susceptibility insensitive MRN, siMRN) in a series of 9 patients with HRS procedure related sciatic nerve palsy. We were able to determine the localization and fascicular distribution of the sciatic nerve lesion in all 9 patients, which clearly showed on imaging predominant involvement of the peroneal more than the tibial division of the sciatic nerve. In 2 patients siMRN revealed direct mechanical compromise of the nerve by surgical material, and in one of these cases indication for surgical release of the sciatic nerve was based on siMRN. Thus, in selected cases of HRS related neuropathies, especially when surgical exploration of the nerve is considered, siMRN, with its potential to largely overcome implant related artifacts, is a useful diagnostic addition to nerve-conduction-studies and electromyography. PMID:24558483

  1. Cervicothoracic lesions in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Castellote, A; Vázquez, E; Vera, J; Piqueras, J; Lucaya, J; Garcia-Peña, P; Jiménez, J A

    1999-01-01

    Cervicothoracic lesions are not uncommon in children. All cervicothoracic lesions except superficial lesions extend from the neck to the thorax through the thoracic inlet. Evaluation of this area involves multiple imaging modalities: plain radiography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, MR imaging is the method of choice for assessing the full extents of cervicothoracic lesions and their relationships to neurovascular structures. Cervicothoracic lesions can be classified as congenital lesions, inflammatory lesions, benign tumors, malignant tumors, and traumatic lesions. Lymphangioma is the most common cervicothoracic mass in children; other congenital lesions include hemangioma, thymic cyst, and vascular anomalies. Inflammatory adenopathy reactive to tuberculosis, mononucleosis, tularemia, cat-scratch fever, infection with human immunodeficiency virus, or other upper respiratory tract infections can manifest as cervicothoracic lesions; tuberculous abscesses and abscesses of other origins can also be seen. Lipoma, lipoblastoma, aggressive fibromatosis, and nerve sheath tumors (either isolated lesions or those associated with neurofibromatosis) can also occur as cervicothoracic masses. Malignant cervicothoracic tumors include lymphoma, thyroid carcinoma, neuroblastoma, and chest wall tumors (rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, and neuroectodermal tumor). Traumatic cervicothoracic lesions include pneumomediastinum of traumatic origin, traumatic pharyngeal pseudodiverticulum, esophageal foreign-body granuloma, and cervicothoracic hematoma. PMID:10336190

  2. The effect of conservative management in extensor plus finger after partial amputation to the ulnar digits--a case report.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Gangatharam; Le blanc, Monique

    2012-03-01

    The extensor plus finger after partial amputation of ulnar digits can affect the functions of the hand. The therapist intricate knowledge of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanism of fingers and creative approach in therapy would solve the puzzle when managing complex problem (extensor plus finger). Here we study a case of extensor plus finger after partial amputation of ulnar digits, its mechanism, and our experience with conservative management in managing extensor plus finger. PMID:22411113

  3. Treatment of grade III thumb metacarpophalangeal ulnar collateral ligament injuries with early controlled motion using a hinged splint.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Ernest J; Flinn, Sharon; Seitz, William H

    2010-01-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries of the thumb metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint are some of the more common injuries to the thumb and are usually treated with immobilization. There are benefits, however, to early active motion for healing ligaments. Therefore, these authors incorporated some of the concepts related to early controlled motion and its role in healing, and created a hinged thumb MCP radial and ulnar deviation restriction splint for use with Grade III UCL injuries. PMID:20142008

  4. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The Proximal Medial Sural Nerve Biopsy Model: A Standardised and Reproducible Baseline Clinical Model for the Translational Evaluation of Bioengineered Nerve Guides

    PubMed Central

    van Neerven, Sabien G. A.; Claeys, Kristl G.; O'Dey, Dan mon; Brook, Gary A.; Sellhaus, Bernd; Schulz, Jörg B.; Weis, Joachim; Pallua, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Autologous nerve transplantation (ANT) is the clinical gold standard for the reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects. A large number of bioengineered nerve guides have been tested under laboratory conditions as an alternative to the ANT. The step from experimental studies to the implementation of the device in the clinical setting is often substantial and the outcome is unpredictable. This is mainly linked to the heterogeneity of clinical peripheral nerve injuries, which is very different from standardized animal studies. In search of a reproducible human model for the implantation of bioengineered nerve guides, we propose the reconstruction of sural nerve defects after routine nerve biopsy as a first or baseline study. Our concept uses the medial sural nerve of patients undergoing diagnostic nerve biopsy (≥2 cm). The biopsy-induced nerve gap was immediately reconstructed by implantation of the novel microstructured nerve guide, Neuromaix, as part of an ongoing first-in-human study. Here we present (i) a detailed list of inclusion and exclusion criteria, (ii) a detailed description of the surgical procedure, and (iii) a follow-up concept with multimodal sensory evaluation techniques. The proximal medial sural nerve biopsy model can serve as a preliminarynature of the injuries or baseline nerve lesion model. In a subsequent step, newly developed nerve guides could be tested in more unpredictable and challenging clinical peripheral nerve lesions (e.g., following trauma) which have reduced comparability due to the different nature of the injuries (e.g., site of injury and length of nerve gap). PMID:25006574

  6. Treatment of late-presenting Monteggia variant with an isolated, simple flexion ulnar osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ray, Robbie; Gaston, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Radial head dislocation in children is usually associated with complete elbow dislocation or occurs as a part of a Monteggia injury. In patients without an obvious fracture of the ulna, recognizing that plastic deformation of the ulna leads to pathological bowing is a key concept in the management of this injury. Although good results have been published using osteotomy of the ulna to maintain stability after open reduction, we hypothesize that ulnar osteotomy alone may be enough to enable stable enlocation of an irreducible radial head in patients who are identified early. We present two cases of irreducible radial head dislocation, treated with ulnar osteotomy and closed radial head reduction. Both osteotomies united and both patients had an excellent functional outcome with the absence of pain or deformity and early return to function. We explain the surgical technique and compare the outcomes with alternative surgical treatments. PMID:24869904

  7. The Lesion Game: a special communication.

    PubMed

    Guiteras, D J

    1989-10-01

    The Lesion Game is a personal computer program that allows the user to view and study muscle innervations and nerve lesions of the brachial plexus. The core of the program is a table that consists of 44 brachial plexus lesions, 50 muscles, and 2 sensations (for brachium and forearm) of the upper extremity, which are innervated by the brachial plexus. After the program randomly selects a lesion, the user attempts to find the lesion in as few guesses (manual muscle tests) as possible. As muscles are selected (muscle tested), the computer searches the table to find the appropriate "strength" of weak or normal, based on the location of the randomly selected lesion. After displaying the strength of the muscle selected, a graphic representation of the strength is shown on a diagram of the brachial plexus. The graphic aspect of the program helps the user to visualize areas of the brachial plexus that may still contain the lesion. While playing the Lesion Game, the user can view a detailed picture of the brachial plexus, view all the possible lesions of the Lesion Game, or view charts of upper extremity innervations. An additional program mode allows beginning users to view and study muscle innervations without having to solve lesions. The program is extremely simple to use because it is entirely mouse-driven. PMID:2550973

  8. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare tumour of peripheral nerves which is characterised by an excessive infiltration of the epineurium and perineurium by fibroadipose tissue. To the best of our knowledge, only approximately 88 cases are reported in the literature. We report a rare case of lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve causing secondary carpal tunnel syndrome in a 25 year old patient. This patient was treated conservatively with decompression and biopsy and experienced a complete resolution of symptoms post-operatively. Magnetic resonance imaging may be used to diagnose this lesion as it has very distinctive characteristics. Multiple conditions have been associated with this lesion and a greater understanding of these associations may clarify the pathogenesis. The architecture of the tumour makes excision very challenging and the surgical management remains controversial. A review of the literature regarding the etiology, pathogenesis and surgical management of lipofibromatous hamartoma is included. PMID:20920178

  9. Transfixation pinning and casting of radial-ulnar fractures in calves: A review of three cases

    PubMed Central

    St-Jean, Guy; Debowes, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of three calves with radial-ulnar fractures which were reduced and stabilized by transfixation pinning and casting. Multiple Steinmann pins were placed transversely through proximal and distal fracture fragments and the pin ends were incorporated in fiberglass cast material after fracture reduction. Cast material was placed from proximal to distal radius and served as an external frame to maintain pin position and fracture reduction. At the time of injury, the calves ranged in age from one day to two months and weighed from 37-102 kg. Two fractures were comminuted and one was transverse. All fractures were closed. After surgery, all calves could walk within 24 hours. Radiographic and clinical evidence of fracture healing was present five to seven weeks (mean 6) after surgery. At that time, the pins and cast material were removed. Return to normal function was rapid and judged to be excellent at follow-up evaluation five to nine months later. Advantages of transfixation pinning and casting in management of radial-ulnar fractures include flexibility in pin positioning, adequate maintenance of reduction, early return to weight-bearing status, preservation of joint mobility, and ease of ambulation. The inability to adjust fixation and alignment after cast application is a disadvantage of this technique compared with other external fixators. We concluded that transfixation pinning is a useful means of stabilizing radial-ulnar fractures in pediatric bovine patients. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17423985

  10. In vitro models for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Geuna, S; Raimondo, S; Fregnan, F; Haastert-Talini, K; Grothe, C

    2016-02-01

    The study of peripheral nerve repair and regeneration is particularly relevant in the light of the high clinical incidence of nerve lesions. However, the clinical outcome after nerve lesions is often far from satisfactory and the functional recovery is almost never complete. Therefore, a number of therapeutic approaches are being investigated, ranging from local delivery of trophic factors and other molecules to bioactive biomaterials and complex nerve prostheses. Translation of the new therapeutic approaches to the patient always requires a final pre-clinical step using in vivo animal models. The need to limit as much as possible animal use in biomedical research, however, makes the preliminary use of in vitro models mandatory from an ethical point of view. In this article, the different types of in vitro models available today for the study of peripheral nerve regeneration have been ranked by adopting a three-step stair model based on their increasing ethical impact: (i) cell line-based models, which raise no ethical concern; (ii) primary cell-based models, which have low ethical impact as animal use, although necessary, is limited; and (iii) organotypic ex vivo-based models, which raise moderate ethical concerns as the use of laboratory animals is required although with much lower impact on animal wellbeing in comparison to in vivo models of peripheral nerve regeneration. This article aims to help researchers in selecting the best experimental approach for their scientific goals driven by the 'Three Rs' (3Rs) rules (Replacement, Reduction or Refinement of animal use in research) for scientific research. PMID:26309051

  11. [A royal eye lesion].

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Ib

    2007-01-01

    The 67-year old danish King Christian IV commanded one of the battle ships called "Trefoldigheden" ("Trinity") in a confrontation with the Swedish navy at Kolberger Heide july 1.st 1644. He himself was injured when a Swedish canon ball hit the dolphin (the handle of the canon) and both exploded. A large number of metal fragments were spread over the deck and 2 noble men standing beside the king were mortally injured. Christian's lesions were in his right face, forehead and eye and he lost his vision on this eye. It has been suggested that this was due to a later infection with shrinking of the eye. The King however claimed that nothing was to observe on the eye ball. The King lived until 1648. No paintings exist from the period 1644-48 that reveals his right eye. The author has found a medal portrait of the king from 1645 made by Johan Blum showing a dilated pupil on the right site and some eksophtalmus leading to the conclusion that a direct lesion of the optic nerve either caused by a metal piece or a retro-bulbar haematoma was responsible for the permanent loss of vision. The dilated pupil was caused by a Marcus Gunn phenomena or paradox pupil reaction which the king could not observe himself when he looked in his mirror. PMID:18350698

  12. [Facial nerve paralysis and mandibular fracture].

    PubMed

    Salonna, I; Fanizzi, P; Quaranta, A

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe three cases of peripheral facial nerve paralysis in patients with a mandibular fracture. In two cases, in which the onset of palsy was uncertain, the facial nerve injury was contralateral to the fractured side. Topodiagnostic tests showed neural damage at the third intrapetrosal portion and at the genicular ganglion. In one of the two patients tomography revealed a fracture line through the anterio-superior wall of the external auditory canal homolateral to the facial palsy. In the third subject palsy set in immediately after the trauma and was ipsilateral to the mandibular fracture; the facial lesion was localized at the genicular ganglion. In the first two cases, functional recovery was spontaneous (40 and 0 days after the trauma respectively). In the third subject, the nerve was decompressed surgically with a complete functional recovery two months later. The functional and clinical findings of these three cases show that a contralateral facial palsy secondary to a mandibular fracture resolves spontaneously while the traumatic displacement of the mandibular condyle may determine a temporal bone fracture sometimes followed by a lesion in the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve. An event such as the latter may delay functional recovery and thus warrant surgery such as in cases of Bell's palsy. PMID:1298156

  13. Laparoscopic approach to intrapelvic nerve entrapments

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Nucelio; Possover, Marc

    2015-01-01

    It is long known that a large portion of the lumbosacral plexus is located intra-abdominally, in the retroperitoneal space. However, most of literature descriptions of lesions on this plexus refer to its extra-abdominal parts whereas its intra-abdominal portions are often neglected. The objective of this review article is to describe the laparoscopic anatomy of intrapelvic nerve bundles, as well as the findings and advances already achieved by Neuropelveology practitioners. PMID:27011825

  14. On the spinal pathways mediating scalp-SEPs to upper and lower limb nerve stimulation: case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Rossini, P M; Gigli, G L; Zarola, F; Marciani, M G; Caramia, M; Bernardi, G

    1986-09-01

    Scalp-SEPs to peroneal nerve stimulation were abnormal in a patient with an intradural meningeoma which was compressing the antero-lateral quadrant of the 1st and, partly, the 2nd cervical myelomers. In contrast, spine and scalp-SEPs were symmetrically normal during the sural, median and ulnar nerve stimulation of either side. On surgery, it was observed that the tumor had left the dorsal columns (DCs) almost unaffected. It is argued, in agreement with the bulk of experimental evidence, that in humans the scalp-SEPs to lower mixed nerve stimulation are also mediated, at the rostral cord level, by fast-propagating tracts ascending outside the DCs. PMID:3788487

  15. Neuromagnetic recordings of the human peripheral nerve with planar SQUID gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, G.; Shahani, U.; Weir, A. I.; Maas, P.; Pegrum, C. M.; Donaldson, G. B.

    1998-08-01

    Magnetic fields produced by a travelling volley in the human ulnar nerve have been successfully measured in a lightly shielded environment. Recordings of the tangential component of the magnetic field were made using a planar second-order gradiometer integrated with a first-order gradiometric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Devices were fabricated in our clean-room facility at the University of Strathclyde and measurements taken in an eddy-current shielded room at the Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit. We use no additional shielding and no electronic differencing or field-nulling techniques. Evoked magnetic fields of 60 fT peak-to-peak were obtained after 1536 averages but they could be seen easily as early as 512 averages. Measurements were made over four points above the ulnar nerve on the upper arm and from these the conduction velocity was calculated as .

  16. Proximal ulnar fractures in adults: a review of 163 cases.

    PubMed

    Niéto, H; Billaud, A; Rochet, S; Lavoinne, N; Loubignac, F; Pietu, G; Baroan, C; Espie, A; Bonnevialle, P; Fabre, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the epidemiological characteristics and the experience of 5 departments of trauma, in France, in the management of fractures of the proximal ulna. 163 patients with fractures of the proximal ulna with a mean age of 49.9 years (range 16-97) were managed. The most common mode of injury was a motor vehicle collision (48%). 18% sustained associated injuries to the ipsilateral limb. Open fractures were present in 42 patients (25%). A total of 109 patients had a fracture of the olecranon, with the Mayo 2A and B types most frequently seen (66%). The patients were invited for clinical examination at a mean duration of 16 months, retrospectively. Validated patient-oriented assessment scores involving the Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI) and the Broberg and Morrey score were evaluated. All patients had follow-up radiographs. The mean arc of elbow motion was 130° (70-150°). The mean MEPI was 91 (20-100) with good results in 23% and excellent results in 52% of the patients. The mean Broberg and Morrey score was 90 after isolated olecranon fracture, and decreased with the complexity of the lesion. 117 fractures (72%) healed with ulnohumeral congruity. 9 fracture non-unions occurred (6%). Although the fracture of the proximal ulna can be described in several classifications, none of them accommodate it satisfactorily, because of the complexity of the lesion. The coronoid process is the keystone for the stability of the elbow. It forms the anterior buttress with the radial head. Tension band wire fixation is by far the commonest technique of internal fixation used for the treatment of non-comminuted olecranon fractures. Dorsal plate fixation is a useful option by providing improved fixation of complex comminuted fractures and fracture-dislocations. The radiocapitellar joint has to be restored appropriately, preserving the radial head when possible and replacing it with a prosthesis otherwise. The lateral collateral ligament complex is commonly disrupted and usually can be reattached to its origin from the lateral epicondyle. In addition, a brief period of hinged external fixation should be considered. PMID:26528935

  17. CONDUCTION IN NERVE FIBRES

    PubMed Central

    Blair, H. A.

    1934-01-01

    Data by E. A. Blair and Erlanger on the voltage-capacity curves and the nerve impulse velocities of each of several fibres in the same nerve trunk are related to Rashevsky's equation for the velocity of transmission in nerve. The results lend support to Rashevsky's analysis. Other empirical relations between the velocity and the parameters of the excitation equations indicate the correctness of the hypothesis that the action current is the primary factor in transmission, which process is carried on by the electrical excitation of successive regions of the nerve fibre by means of its action current according to the ordinary laws of electrical excitation. PMID:19872822

  18. Radiation therapy for primary optic nerve meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Vuksanovic, M.M.; Yates, B.M.; Bienfang, D.C.

    1981-06-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas, formerly thought to be rare, have been encountered with surprising frequency since the widespread use of computed tomography. Early diagnosis led to an enthusiastic surgical approach to these lesions, but this has been tempered by the realization that even in the best of hands, blindness followed such surgery with distressing frequency. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas may be divided into primary, secondary, and multiple meningioma groups. Five patients with primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas treated with irradiation therapy are presented in this report. Improvement in visual acuity, stabilization to increase in the visual field, and decrease in size to total regression of optociliary veins, have been documented following irradiation therapy of the posterior orbital and intracanalicular portions of the optic nerve in some of these cases. Although each patient must be carefully individualized, there is no question that visual palliation can be achieved in some cases of optic nerve sheath meningioma. Further investigation of this therapeutic modality in selected cases in advised.

  19. Effect of long-term implanted nerve cuff electrodes on the electrophysiological properties of human sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Slot, P J; Selmar, P; Rasmussen, A; Sinkjaer, T

    1997-03-01

    During a long-term implantation (307 days) of a tripolar split cuff electrode around the palmar digital nerve to the radial side of the left index finger, branching off the median nerve in a medullary lesioned C6 patient, the physiological state of the nerve was intensively monitored. The resulting sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude was recorded, using both near-nerve electrodes and the implanted cuff electrode. The SNAP amplitude declined within 10 days to approximately 50% of the first SNAP cuff amplitude measured on Day 2 after implantation and recovered to the initial amplitude within 3 months. The SNAP amplitude measurements made with near-nerve electrodes were consistent with the cuff results; the SNAP conduction velocity (CV) recorded by the near-nerve electrodes and the cuff electrode was constant during the whole implantation period. This is in agreement with the results from two other patients: one with a cuff implanted around the sural nerve, and the other with a cuff implanted around a branch of the tibial nerve. These results and animals studies show that the cuff electrode is an electrically stable neural-electrical transducer. PMID:9148706

  20. Are human peripheral nerves sensitive to X-ray imaging?

    PubMed

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O'Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  1. The Mouse Median Nerve Experimental Model in Regenerative Research

    PubMed Central

    Buskbjerg Jager, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Sciatic nerve crush injury in rat animal model is one of the most common experimental models used in regenerative research. However, the availability of transgenic mouse for nerve regeneration studies is constantly increasing and, therefore, the shift from rat model to mouse model is, in some cases, necessary. Moreover, since most of the human nerve lesions occur in the upper limb, it is also advantageous to shift from sciatic nerve to median nerve. In this study we described an experimental model which involves lesions of the median nerve in the mouse. Data showed that the finger flexor muscle contraction strength, assessed to evaluate the motor function recovery, and reached values not different from the control already 20 days after injury. The degree of nerve regeneration evaluated with stereological methods in light microscopy showed that, 25 days after injury, the number of regenerated myelinated fibers was comparable to the control, but they were smaller with a thinner myelin thickness. Stereological analysis made in electron microscopy confirmed these results, although the total number of fibers quantified was significantly higher compared to light microscopy analysis, due to the very small size of some fibers that can be detected only in electron microscopy. PMID:25180190

  2. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  3. Simultaneous Quantification of Unmyelinated Nerve Fibers in Sural Nerve and in Skin.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Mathilde; Magy, Laurent; Richard, Laurence; Ingrand, Pierre; Neau, Jean-Philippe; Mathis, Stéphane; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral polyneuropathies are common and their diagnosis may be challenging. We compared the results from sural-nerve and skin biopsies in 33 patients with a polyneuropathy and neuropathic pain examined in our hospital over a 6-year period. The biopsies were all from the same lower limb of each patient. Intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) densities in the skin were determined by fluorescence microscopy; unmyelinated fiber densities in sural-nerve biopsies (UFNB) were determined by electron microscopy. There was no correlation with age or gender in either biopsy type; there was a weak trend to correlation between UFNB density and IENF density, possibly because of the small sample size. The sensitivity of detection of quantitative abnormalities of unmyelinated fibers was better in the skin than in the nerves. Proximal and distal IENF densities were strongly correlated; and counts of UFNB were highly reproducible. Thus, quantification of unmyelinated fibers in sural-nerve and skin biopsies seem to be complementary. Sural-nerve biopsy may be required to confirm a specific diagnosis, to identify lesion mechanisms, and to devise therapeutic strategies, whereas skin biopsy seems to be more efficient in the follow-up of length-dependent polyneuropathies and in the diagnosis of neuropathic pain. PMID:26705410

  4. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sbastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  5. Somatotopic fascicular organization of the human sciatic nerve demonstrated by MR neurography

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Markus; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether the human sciatic nerve might have a consistent somatotopic organization according to proximal fascicle input by spinal nerves. Methods: Twelve patients (55.3 ± 15.5 years) with confirmed lesions of either the L5 or S1 spinal nerve root underwent magnetic resonance neurography of sciatic nerve fascicles including thigh and knee levels (T2-weighted sequence with fat saturation, repetition time/echo time 7,552/52 milliseconds, voxel size 0.27 × 0.27 × 3.0 mm3). Twenty healthy subjects and 12 additional patients with an established diagnosis of peripheral polyneuropathy served as 2 separate age- and sex-matched control groups. Two blinded readers assessed patients and controls for presence of distinct lesion patterns. Spatial maps of normalized T2 signal were rendered after segmentation and coregistration of sciatic nerve voxels to detect fascicle lesion patterns. Results: A clear somatotopic distribution of nerve fascicles was observed on cross-sections along the entire course of the sciatic nerve and was distinct between patients with L5 and those with S1 lesions. Fascicles emerging from L5 were ordered in anterolateral positions within sciatic nerve cross-sections, while fascicles emerging from S1 appeared posteromedially. Visual assessment discriminated these somatotopic lesions in all cases from both healthy and polyneuropathy controls. Conclusion: A distinct pattern of somatotopy was identified within the sciatic nerve according to proximal fascicle input by L5 and S1 spinal nerves. Knowledge of human nerve somatotopy may have clinically useful implications in imaging-aided diagnosis of neuropathies. PMID:25841030

  6. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. PMID:26420473

  7. Viral lesion culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A viral lesion culture is performed to confirm herpes simplex virus present in a skin lesion. The specimen is collected by scraping the suspected skin lesion or aspirating fluid from the lesion. Results are ...

  8. Sciatica due to malignant nerve sheath tumour of sciatic nerve in the thigh.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R R; Pawar, S J; Mahapatra, A K; Doctor, M; Musa, M M

    2001-06-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare malignant neoplasm arising from the supportive non-neural component of the peripheral nerves. An unusual case of pain and weakness of the foot and calf muscles due to a giant MPNST of the sciatic nerve in the posterior compartment of the thigh is presented. The patient was already investigated as a case of sciatica due to a lumbar disc disease with a negative magnetic resonance imaging and then unsuccessfully operated elsewhere twice, with a misdiagnosis of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Neurosurgical referral prompted a diagnostic magnetic resonance study of the thigh, revealing the lesion, which was completely excised microsurgically with total relief in the pain and partial improvement in the weakness and sensations in the sole of the foot. PMID:11447444

  9. Rare case report of Traumatic neuroma of anterior superior alveolar nerve associated with high frenal attachment

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Srilekha, Namala; Guduru, Vijay Srinivas; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2015-01-01

    We present an incredible case of traumatic neuroma (TN) in the anterior superior alveolar nerve leading to the swelling in the upper labial mucosa. This paper attempts to highlight the rarity of site of occurrence of this lesion and reports the first case of TN of anterior superior alveolar nerve. PMID:25972959

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Popliteal Nerve Block in a Patient with Malignant Degeneration of Neurofibromatosis 1

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Arjun; Carvalho, Brendan; Hansen, Jenna; Hill, Jonay

    2012-01-01

    A 41-year-old female patient with neurofibromatosis 1 presented with new neurologic deficits secondary to malignant degeneration of a tibial lesion. Ultrasound mapping of the popliteal nerve revealed changes consistent with an intraneural neurofibroma. Successful popliteal nerve blockade was achieved under ultrasound guidance. PMID:22649742

  11. Prophylactic corticosteroid injection in ulnar wrist pain in distal radius fracture

    PubMed Central

    Saied, Alireza; Heshmati, Afshin; Sadeghifar, Amirreza; Mousavi, Alia Ayatollahi; Arabnejad, Fateme; Pooladsanj, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ulnar sided wrist pain is one of the most common complications of distal radius fractures. The simplest method for decreasing pain for this affliction is corticosteroid injection. The present study was designed to assess the effect of corticosteroid injection in the prevention of ulnar sided wrist pain. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial patients with distal radius fractures scheduled for closed reduction and percutaneous pin fixation were divided into control and corticosteroid groups. In the corticosteroid group, the patient received a single betamethasone injection in the dorsoulnar side of the wrist before reduction, while the control group received placebo. The patients were to be followed for at least 6 months. Results: 82 patients were followed for 6 months. At the end of the 3 months followup the difference between the two groups about the number of individuals without ulnar sided wrist pain was statistically significant (P = 0.038), so that less patients in the control group were painless, while this was not the case in the 6 months followup (P = 0.507), but in the both time frames the mean grip power, visual analog pain score and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score showed statistically significant difference between the two groups, so that the corticosteroid groups demonstrated greater power grip and less scores in pain and DASH (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study it seems that prophylactic corticosteroid injection will be associated with a decrease in the severity of wrist pain in patients with acute distal radius fractures. With regard to the decrease in the number of painless individuals, it seems that the decrease is not persistent. Overall the need for a study with longer followup is obvious. PMID:26229158

  12. Point-of-care Ultrasound to Identify Distal Ulnar Artery Thrombosis: Case of Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ken, Jonathan; Khangura, Darshan; Stickles, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS) is a rare condition of distal ulnar artery injury and thrombosis secondary to repetitive blunt trauma to the hypothenar area. We present a case of HHS for which point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) was used as the initial means of imaging, prompting management and disposition without further imaging studies ordered in the emergency department (ED). This case demonstrates the utility of POCUS to aid the Emergency Physician in the diagnosis and management of patients with extremity vascular issues in the ED, and details a rarely seen clinical entity in the ED. PMID:26265969

  13. Elbow ulnar collateral ligament injuries in athletes: Can we improve our outcomes?

    PubMed

    Redler, Lauren H; Degen, Ryan M; McDonald, Lucas S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-04-18

    Injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) most commonly occurs in the overhead throwing athlete. Knowledge surrounding UCL injury pathomechanics continues to improve, leading to better preventative treatment strategies and rehabilitation programs. Conservative treatment strategies for partial injuries, improved operative techniques for reconstruction in complete tears, adjunctive treatments, as well as structured sport specific rehabilitation programs including resistive exercises for the entire upper extremity kinetic chain are all important factors in allowing for a return to throwing in competitive environments. In this review, we explore each of these factors and provide recommendations based on the available literature to improve outcomes in UCL injuries in athletes. PMID:27114930

  14. Rapid Diagnosis of an Ulnar Fracture with Portable Hand-Held Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Brown, Ross; Diebel, Lawrence N.; Nicolaou, Savvas; Marshburn, Tom; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic fractures are a common injury in operational activities, injuries that often occur in isolated or hostile environments. Clinical ultrasound devices have become more user friendly and lighter allowing them to be easily transported with forward medical teams. The bone-soft tissue interface has a very large acoustic impedance, with a high reflectance that can be used to visualize breaks in contour including fractures. Herein reported is a case of an ulnar fracture that was quickly visualized in the early phase of a multi-system trauma resuscitation with a hand-held ultrasound device. The implications for operational medicine are discussed.

  15. Bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and ulnar neuropathy at the elbow in a pizza chef.

    PubMed

    Vimercati, Luigi; Lorusso, Antonio; L'abbate, Nicola; Assennato, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A case of bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and ulnar neuropathy at the elbow in a 22-year-old pizza chef is described. An on-site analysis revealed that job tasks performed by the worker exposed him to a combination of biomechanical risk factors. Patient history and workplace observations suggest that occupational physical exposure may have caused the bilateral entrapment neuropathies. The present report underlines the advisability of a detailed occupational history in the case of entrapment neuropathies of the upper limbs commonly regarded as being related to biomechanical occupational exposure. PMID:21686375

  16. Elbow ulnar collateral ligament injuries in athletes: Can we improve our outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Lauren H; Degen, Ryan M; McDonald, Lucas S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) most commonly occurs in the overhead throwing athlete. Knowledge surrounding UCL injury pathomechanics continues to improve, leading to better preventative treatment strategies and rehabilitation programs. Conservative treatment strategies for partial injuries, improved operative techniques for reconstruction in complete tears, adjunctive treatments, as well as structured sport specific rehabilitation programs including resistive exercises for the entire upper extremity kinetic chain are all important factors in allowing for a return to throwing in competitive environments. In this review, we explore each of these factors and provide recommendations based on the available literature to improve outcomes in UCL injuries in athletes. PMID:27114930

  17. Rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb - a review.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Mandhkani; Rhemrev, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Skier's thumb is a partial or complete rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. It is an often-encountered injury and can lead to chronic pain and instability when diagnosed incorrectly. Knowledge of the anatomy and accurate physical examination are essential in the evaluation of a patient with skier's thumb. This article provides a review of the relevant anatomy, the correct method of physical examination and the options for additional imaging and treatment with attention to possible pitfalls. PMID:23938194

  18. Rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb – a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Skier’s thumb is a partial or complete rupture of the ulnar collateral ligament of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. It is an often-encountered injury and can lead to chronic pain and instability when diagnosed incorrectly. Knowledge of the anatomy and accurate physical examination are essential in the evaluation of a patient with skier’s thumb. This article provides a review of the relevant anatomy, the correct method of physical examination and the options for additional imaging and treatment with attention to possible pitfalls. PMID:23938194

  19. Radiocephalic Fistula Complicated by Distal Ischemia: Treatment by Ulnar Artery Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, Alain; Novelli, Luigi Rovani, Xavier; Carreres, Thierry; Bourquelot, Pierre; Hermelin, Alain; Angel, C.; Beyssen, B.

    2010-02-15

    Hand ischemic steal syndrome due to a forearm arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. However, its frequency is increasing with the rise in numbers of elderly and diabetic patients. This complication, which is more common for proximal than for distal accesses, can be very severe and may cause loss of hand function, damage to fingers, and even amputation of fingers or the hand. Its treatment is difficult and often leads to access loss. We report here a case of severe hand ischemia related to a radiocephalic fistula successfully treated by ulnar artery dilatation.

  20. The distribution of acetylcholine in normal and in regenerating nerves

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C. A. N.; Saunders, N. R.

    1967-01-01

    1. The distribution of acetylcholine (ACh) in various nerves which had been regenerating for different periods after crushing has been compared with that in uncrushed nerves. 2. Normal ventral roots from cats contained 78·1 ± 22·7 (S.D.) μmole ACh/kg (blotted wet wt.); rabbit ventral roots contained 48·0 μmole/kg ± 19·0 (S.D.) and rabbit sciatic nerves 16·6 ± 7·3 (S.D.) μmole/kg. In the sciatic nerves the distal cm of 5 cm lengths taken from the thigh contained 30% more ACh than the most central cm portion. Possible explanations for this difference have been discussed. 3. After both sciatic nerves and ventral roots had been crushed, there was an initial build-up (4 times control) of ACh central to the lesion and a decline (¼ control) distal to the lesion. These changes were maximum around 5 days after crushing. In sciatic nerves in which long periods of regeneration were investigated, the central build-up fell off to 1½ times control by 25 days and the distal decline reversed to 2 times control in about 10 days. It then again decreased towards the control level by 25 days after crushing. These changes have been discussed in relation to the morphological changes which occur in a nerve following crushing. 4. A peak of ACh content moved distally along the nerve from the crushed region at a rate of 1·0-1·5 mm/day. This was considered to represent an average rate of regeneration of the bulk of the axons. The amplitude of the peak declined progressively with time in the more distal parts of the nerve, probably because of dispersion as axons regenerated at different rates. PMID:6051808

  1. Skin-derived stem cells transplanted into resorbable guides provide functional nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve resection.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, C; Pluderi, M; Colleoni, F; Belicchi, M; Meregalli, M; Farini, A; Parolini, D; Draghi, L; Fruguglietti, M E; Gavina, M; Porretti, L; Cattaneo, A; Battistelli, M; Prelle, A; Moggio, M; Borsa, S; Bello, L; Spagnoli, D; Gaini, S M; Tanzi, M C; Bresolin, N; Grimoldi, N; Torrente, Y

    2007-03-01

    The regeneration in the peripheral nervous system is often incomplete and the treatment of severe lesions with nerve tissue loss is primarily aimed at recreating nerve continuity. Guide tubes of various types, filled with Schwann cells, stem cells, or nerve growth factors are attractive as an alternative therapy to nerve grafts. In this study, we evaluated whether skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) can improve peripheral nerve regeneration after transplantation into nerve guides. We compared peripheral nerve regeneration in adult rats with sciatic nerve gaps of 16 mm after autologous transplantation of GFP-labeled SDSCs into two different types of guides: a synthetic guide, obtained by dip coating with a L-lactide and trimethylene carbonate (PLA-TMC) copolymer and a collagen-based guide. The sciatic function index and the recovery rates of the compound muscle action potential were significantly higher in the animals that received SDSCs transplantation, in particular, into the collagen guide, compared to the control guides filled only with PBS. For these guides the morphological and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an increased number of myelinated axons expressing S100 and Neurofilament 70, suggesting the presence of regenerating nerve fibers along the gap. GFP positive cells were found around regenerating nerve fibers and few of them were positive for the expression of glial markers as S-100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the expression of S100 and myelin basic protein in the animals treated with the collagen guide filled with SDSCs. These data support the hypothesis that SDSCs could represent a tool for future cell therapy applications in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:17203471

  2. Lateral Pectoral Nerve Injury Mimicking Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Ilknur; Palamar, Deniz; Akgun, Kenan

    2015-07-01

    The lateral pectoral nerve (LPN) is commonly injured along with the brachial plexus, but its isolated lesions are rare. Here, we present a case of an isolated LPN lesion confused with cervical radiculopathy. A 41-year-old man was admitted to our clinic because of weakness in his right arm. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination revealed right posterolateral protrusion at the C6-7 level. At the initial assessment, atrophy of the right pectoralis major muscle was evident, and mild weakness of the right shoulder adductor, internal rotator, and flexor muscles was observed. Therefore, electrodiagnostic evaluation was performed, and a diagnosis of isolated LPN injury was made. Nerve injury was thought to have been caused by weightlifting exercises and traction injury. Lateral pectoral nerve injury can mimic cervical radiculopathy, and MRI examination alone may lead to misdiagnosis. Repeated physical examinations during the evaluation and treatment phase will identify the muscle atrophy that occurs 1 or more months after the injury. PMID:25290103

  3. Treadmill exercise induced functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair is associated with increased levels of neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Sung; Hke, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Benefits of exercise on nerve regeneration and functional recovery have been reported in both central and peripheral nervous system disease models. However, underlying molecular mechanisms of enhanced regeneration and improved functional outcomes are less understood. We used a peripheral nerve regeneration model that has a good correlation between functional outcomes and number of motor axons that regenerate to evaluate the impact of treadmill exercise. In this model, the median nerve was transected and repaired while the ulnar nerve was transected and prevented from regeneration. Daily treadmill exercise resulted in faster recovery of the forelimb grip function as evaluated by grip power and inverted holding test. Daily exercise also resulted in better regeneration as evaluated by recovery of compound motor action potentials, higher number of axons in the median nerve and larger myofiber size in target muscles. Furthermore, these observations correlated with higher levels of neurotrophic factors, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), in serum, nerve and muscle suggesting that increase in muscle derived neurotrophic factors may be responsible for improved regeneration. PMID:24618564

  4. Predominant patterns of median nerve displacement and deformation during individual finger motion in early carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liong, Kyrin; Lahiri, Amitabha; Lee, Shujin; Chia, Dawn; Biswas, Arijit; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common neuropathy, yet the pathologic changes do not explain the fleeting dynamic symptoms. Dynamic nerve-tendon interaction may be a contributing factor. Based on dynamic ultrasonographic examination of the carpal tunnel, we quantified nerve-tendon movement in thumb, index finger and middle finger flexion in normal subjects and those with mild-idiopathic CTS. Predominant motion patterns were identified. The nerve consistently moves volar-ulnarly. In thumb and index finger flexion, the associated tendons move similarly, whereas the tendon moves dorsoradially in middle finger flexion. Nerve displacement and deformation increased from thumb to index finger to middle finger flexion. Predomination motion patterns may be applied in computational simulations to prescribe specific motions to the tendons and to observe resultant nerve pressures. By identification of the greatest pressure-inducing motions, CTS treatment may be better developed. Symptomatic subjects displayed reduced nerve movement and deformation relative to controls, elucidating the physiologic changes that occur during mild CTS. PMID:24785444

  5. What's a Funny Bone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your elbow is a nerve called the ulnar nerve . The ulnar nerve lets your brain know about feelings in ... hand. You get that funny feeling when the ulnar nerve is bumped against the humerus (say: HYOO- ...

  6. US of the Peripheral Nerves of the Upper Extremity: A Landmark Approach.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jordan M; Yablon, Corrie M; Morag, Yoav; Brandon, Catherine J; Jacobson, Jon A

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) has become a first-line modality for the evaluation of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity. The benefits of US over magnetic resonance (MR) imaging include higher soft-tissue resolution, cost effectiveness, portability, real-time and dynamic imaging, and the ability to scan an entire extremity quickly and efficiently. US can be performed on patients who are not eligible for MR imaging. Metallic implant artifacts are usually not problematic. US has been shown to have equal specificity and greater sensitivity than MR imaging in the evaluation of peripheral nerves. Any abnormal findings can be easily compared with the contralateral side. The published literature has shown that US has demonstrated clinical utility in patients with suspected peripheral nerve disease by guiding diagnostic and therapeutic decisions as well as by confirming electrodiagnostic findings. Common indications for upper extremity peripheral nerve US are the evaluation for injury due to penetrating trauma, entrapment by scar tissue, and tumor. US of the upper extremity is most commonly performed to evaluate carpal and cubital tunnel syndrome. It is important for the radiologist or sonographer to have a detailed knowledge of anatomy and specific anatomic landmarks for each nerve to efficiently and accurately perform an examination. The goal of this article is to introduce readers to the basics of US of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity with a focus on the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. Common sites of disease and the location of important anatomic landmarks will be reviewed. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:26963456

  7. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  8. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  9. Mouse Tbx3 Mutants Suggest Novel Molecular Mechanisms for Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Deborah U.; Emechebe, Uchenna; Thomas, Kirk R.; Moon, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor TBX3 plays critical roles in development and TBX3 mutations in humans cause Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Efforts to understand how altered TBX3 dosage and function disrupt the development of numerous structures have been hampered by embryonic lethality of mice bearing presumed null alleles. We generated a novel conditional null allele of Tbx3: after Cre-mediated recombination, no mRNA or protein is detectable. In contrast, a putative null allele in which exons 1-3 are deleted produces a truncated protein that is abnormally located in the cytoplasm. Heterozygotes and homozygotes for this allele have different phenotypes than their counterparts bearing a true null allele. Our observations with these alleles in mice, and the different types of TBX3 mutations observed in human ulnar-mammary syndrome, suggest that not all mutations observed in humans generate functionally null alleles. The possibility that mechanisms in addition to TBX3 haploinsufficiency may cause UMS or other malformations merits investigation in the human UMS population. PMID:23844108

  10. Cranial Nerve VIII

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Cranial nerve VIII brings sound and information about one's position and movement in space into the brain. The auditory and vestibular systems subserve several functions basic to clinical medicine and to psychiatry. This article covers the basics of cranial nerve VIII, hearing and vestibular systems, including common problems with hearing and balance, problems with hearing and balance that tend to be found in psychiatric patients, and some simple assessments of value in clinical practice. PMID:20436771

  11. Optic nerve aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lisi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 55-year-old woman with optic nerve Aspergillosis. Aspergillus is an ubiquitous airborne saprophytic fungus. Inhaled Aspergillus conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms; however, in immunosuppressed patients, they can cause disease. The woman had a past medical history of hypertension and migraines. She presented 1 year prior to death with a new onset headache behind the left eye and later developed blurred vision and scotoma. A left temporal artery biopsy was negative for giant cell arteritis. One month prior to the current admission, she had an MRI showing optic nerve thickening with no other findings. Because of the visual loss and a positive antinuclear antibody test, she was given a trial of high dose steroids and while it significantly improved her headache, her vision did not improve. At autopsy, the left optic nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and extending into the optic chiasm was enlarged in diameter and there was a 1.3 cm firm nodule surrounding the left optic nerve. Histologically, an abscess surrounded and involved the left optic nerve. Acute angle branching, angioinvasive fungal hyphae were identified on Grocott's methenamine silver stained sections, consistent with Aspergillus spp. No gross or microscopic evidence of systemic vasculitis or infection was identified in the body. The literature on optic nerve Aspergillosis is reviewed. PMID:25861888

  12. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Cyclic AMP signaling: a molecular determinant of peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Knott, Eric P; Assi, Mazen; Pearse, Damien D

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of axonal integrity during injury to the peripheral nerve system (PNS) sets into motion a cascade of responses that includes inflammation, Schwann cell mobilization, and the degeneration of the nerve fibers distal to the injury site. Yet, the injured PNS differentiates itself from the injured central nervous system (CNS) in its remarkable capacity for self-recovery, which, depending upon the length and type of nerve injury, involves a series of molecular events in both the injured neuron and associated Schwann cells that leads to axon regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional restitution. Herein we discuss the essential function of the second messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP), in the PNS repair process, highlighting the important role the conditioning lesion paradigm has played in understanding the mechanism(s) by which cyclic AMP exerts its proregenerative action. Furthermore, we review the studies that have therapeutically targeted cyclic AMP to enhance endogenous nerve repair. PMID:25177696

  14. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence. PMID:18305440

  15. Combined effect of motor imagery and peripheral nerve electrical stimulation on the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kei; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Yoshida, Naoshin; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Sugawara, Kenichi

    2013-06-01

    Although motor imagery enhances the excitability of the corticospinal tract, there are no peripheral afferent inputs during motor imagery. In contrast, peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (ES) can induce peripheral afferent inputs; thus, a combination of motor imagery and ES may enhance the excitability of the corticospinal tract compared with motor imagery alone. Moreover, the level of stimulation intensity may also be related to the modulation of the excitability of the corticospinal tract during motor imagery. Here, we evaluated whether a combination of motor imagery and peripheral nerve ES influences the excitability of the corticospinal tract and measured the effect of ES intensity on the excitability induced during motor imagery. The imagined task was a movement that involved touching the thumb to the little finger, whereas ES involved simultaneous stimulation of the ulnar and median nerves at the wrist. Two different ES intensities were used, one above the motor threshold and another above the sensory threshold. Further, we evaluated whether actual movement with afferent input induced by ES modulates the excitability of the corticospinal tract as well as motor imagery. We found that a combination of motor imagery and ES enhanced the excitability of the motor cortex in the thenar muscle compared with the other condition. Furthermore, we established that the modulation of the corticospinal tract was related to ES intensity. However, we found that the excitability of the corticospinal tract induced by actual movement was enhanced by peripheral nerve ES above the sensory threshold. PMID:23591692

  16. The femoral nerve in the repair of inguinal hernia: well worth remembering.

    PubMed

    García-Ureña, M A; Vega, V; Rubio, G; Velasco, M A

    2005-12-01

    Injury to the nerves after inguinal hernia surgery is uncommon. The femoral nerve may be damaged by suture or staples, tissue scar entrapment, local anesthesia blockade or direct compression. We present a case of a transient lesion of the femoral nerve after mesh hernioplasty for a re-recurrent inguinal hernia, confirmed by radiological studies, electrophysiology and clinical recovery. The diagnosis, mechanism of injury and surgical approach are reviewed. Surgery to a recurrent hernia may be underestimated. The role of electromyography nerve conducting studies is emphasized insisting on the importance of clinical evolution for the successful management of these infrequent injuries. PMID:15999220

  17. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the lower extremity nerves.

    PubMed

    Burge, Alissa J; Gold, Stephanie L; Kuong, Sharon; Potter, Hollis G

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the nerves, commonly known as MR neurography is increasingly being used as noninvasive means of diagnosing peripheral nerve disease. High-resolution imaging protocols aimed at imaging the nerves of the hip, thigh, knee, leg, ankle, and foot can demonstrate traumatic or iatrogenic injury, tumorlike lesions, or entrapment of the nerves, causing a potential loss of motor and sensory function in the affected area. A thorough understanding of normal MR imaging and gross anatomy, as well as MR findings in the presence of peripheral neuropathies will aid in accurate diagnosis and ultimately help guide clinical management. PMID:24210318

  18. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2 43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7 1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures. PMID:26413963

  19. GLIAL RESPONSES AFTER CHORDA TYMPANI NERVE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Dianna L.

    2013-01-01

    The chorda tympani (CT) nerve innervates lingual taste buds and is susceptible to damage during dental and inner ear procedures. Interruption of the CT results in a disappearance of taste buds, which can be accompanied by taste disturbances. Because the CT usually regenerates to reinnervate taste buds successfully in a few weeks, a persistence of taste disturbances may indicate alterations in central nervous function. Peripheral injury to other sensory nerves leads to glial responses at central terminals, which actively contribute to abnormal sensations arising from nerve damage. Therefore, the current study examined microglial and astrocytic responses in the first central gustatory relay -the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS)- after transection of the CT. Damage to the CT resulted in significant microglial responses in terms of morphological reactivity and an increased density of microglial cells from 2-20 days after injury. This increased microglial population primarily resulted from microglial proliferation from 1.5-3 days, which was supplemented by microglial migration within sub-divisions of the nTS between days 2-3. Unlike other nerve injuries, CT injury did not result in recruitment of bone marrow-derived precursors. Astrocytes also reacted in the nTS with increased levels of GFAP by 3 days, although none showed evidence of cell division. GFAP levels remained increased at 30 days by which time microglial responses had resolved. These results show that nerve damage to the CT results in central glial responses, which may participate in long lasting taste alterations following CT lesion. PMID:22315167

  20. [The pronator teres syndrome. Clinical aspects, pathogenesis and therapy of a non-traumatic median nerve compression syndrome in the space of the elbow joint].

    PubMed

    Bayerl, W; Fischer, K

    1979-01-01

    The proximal compression neuropathy of the median nerve is described by 11 personal cases and a review of literature. The most reliable diagnostic sign is "pronation-pain", discomfort in the forearm localised under the pronator teres, produced by passive supination of the wrist, by active pronation from this position against resistance, okr by local pressure. A nearly constant finding is weakness of grip and paraesthesia or hypaesthesia of the fingers, not always following the normal median nerve distribution. Three different anatomic points of possible compression are described: 1. The supracondylar process of the humerus, or Struthers' ligament, a rare compression mechanism. 2. The passing of the nerve through the two variable heads of the pronator teres muscle. 3. The sharp edged superficialis bridge. Apart from compression of the entire median nerve single branches of the median nerve can be entrapped seperately (the anterior interosseus nerve, the Martin-Gruber-anastomosis to the ulnar nerve) Conservative treatment with immobilisation and local electric interference current application may be satisfactory. If clinical improvement is insufficient, surgical decompression is indicated. PMID:317710

  1. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  2. Injection nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kakati, Arindhom; Bhat, Dhananjaya; Devi, Bhagavathula Indira; Shukla, Dhaval

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical profile and outcome of surgery for injection nerve palsies. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with INP who were treated at our institute during May 2000 to May 2009. Clinical, electroneuromyography (ENMG), and operative findings were noted. Intraoperative nerve action potential monitoring was not used in any case. Outcome of patients who were followed was reviewed. Results: INP comprised 92 (11%) of 837 nerve injury patients. Seventy one patients were children less than 16 years. The nerves involved were sciatic in 80 patients, radial in 8, and others in four. Fifty seven patients had power, grade 0/5. ENMG studies revealed absent compound muscle action potential in 64 and absent sensory nerve action potential in 67 patients. Thirty nine (42.3%) of 92 patients underwent surgery. The mean duration since injury in these patients was 5.2 months (3 months to 11 months). All underwent neurolysis. Only 18 patients who underwent surgery had a follow up of more than 3 months. Ten (55.5%) patients had good or fair outcome after surgery. Except for grade of motor deficit prior to surgery, none of the variables were found to significantly affect the outcome. Conclusion: The outcome of INP is generally good and many patients recover spontaneously. The outcome of surgery is dependent on preoperative motor power. PMID:23546341

  3. Correlation Analysis of Histomorphometry and Motor Neurography in the Median Nerve Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Theodora; Werdin, Frank; Gruessinger, Hannes; Sinis, Nektarios; Schiefer, Jennifer Lynn; Jaminet, Patrick; Geuna, Stefano; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Standard methods to evaluate the functional regeneration after injury of the rat median nerve are insufficient to identify any further differences of axonal nerve regeneration after restitution of motor recovery is completed. An important complementary method for assessing such differences is a histomorphometric analysis of the distal to lesion nerve fibers. Recently, an electrophysiological method has been proposed as a sensitive method to examine the quality of axonal nerve regeneration. Methods: A linear regression analysis has been performed to correlate histomorphometric and neurographic data originating from 31 rats subjected to neurotmesis and immediate reconstruction of their right median nerve. Results: A significant linear correlation between the velocity of neuromuscular conduction and the total number of nerve fibers (P = .037) as well as between the amplitude of compound muscle action potential and the total number of nerve fibers (P = .026) has been identified. Interestingly, a significant correlation between the velocity of neuromuscular conduction and the square root of the cross-sectional area of the nerve could be found (P = .008). This corresponds to a linear correlation between the velocity of neuromuscular conduction and the radius of the nerve. Conclusion: These results contribute in a better interpretation of morphological predictors of nerve regeneration and verify the previously described electrophysiological assessment in the median nerve rat model as a valid method. PMID:24904711

  4. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Repair: An Old Idea With a New Wrinkle.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    At our practice, we have successfully treated thousands of overhead athletes with the modified Jobe technique of ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) repair. We used this technique regardless of the amount and location of the pathology encountered at the time of surgery. We asked whether the availability of modern anchor and suture technology, vast clinical experience with these injuries and their outcomes, and even biologic additives could be applied to some of these patients to achieve an equal or superior outcome in less time. This led us to create a construct that could be used to not only repair the torn native UCL tissue to bone, but also span the anatomic native ligament from its origin to its insertion. This construct includes an ultra-strong collagen coated tape attached at the anatomic insertions of the ligament using two 3.5-mm nonabsorbable PEEK corkscrew anchors and a suture through the eyelet of one of the anchors. PMID:26991563

  5. Complications of suture ligation ablation for ulnar polydactyly: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Patillo, Dominic; Rayan, Ghazi M

    2011-03-01

    We report two cases resulting in complications following suture ligation treatment for ulnar polydactyly. One case consisted of bilateral, retained gangrene and cellulitis, and a second case consisted of a residual, sensitive skin tag. The case involving gangrene and cellulitis developed after an unsuccessful suture ligation of bilateral pedunculated duplicated digits. The second case developed after suture ligature ablation of a rudimentary digit in the nursery but presented 3 years later with a residual symptomatic nubbin. Both cases were treated by surgical excision of the residual tissue in the operating room. The first case illustrates a morbid complication following unsuccessful ligature while the second case demonstrates the inevitable suboptimal long-term outcome associated with what has traditionally been considered "successful" suture ligation. PMID:22379449

  6. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. PMID:27094894

  7. Promising Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction in Extended Parotidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Ithzel Maria; Rodríguez-Valiente, Antonio; Castelló, Jose Ramon; Górriz, Carmen; Montero, Oscar Alvarez; García-Berrocal, Jose Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant tumors of the parotid gland account scarcely for 5% of all head and neck tumors. Most of these neoplasms have a high tendency for recurrence, local infiltration, perineural extension, and metastasis. Although uncommon, these malignant tumors require complex surgical treatment sometimes involving a total parotidectomy including a complete facial nerve resection. Severe functional and aesthetic facial defects are the result of a complete sacrifice or injury to isolated branches becoming an uncomfortable distress for patients and a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Case Report: A case of a 54-year-old, systemically healthy male patient with a 4 month complaint of pain and swelling on the right side of the face is presented. The patient reported a rapid increase in the size of the lesion over the past 2 months. Imaging tests and histopathological analysis reported an adenoid cystic carcinoma. A complete parotidectomy was carried out with an intraoperative notice of facial nerve infiltration requiring a second intervention for nerve and defect reconstruction. A free ALT flap with vascularized nerve grafts was the surgical choice. A 6 month follow-up showed partial facial movement recovery and the facial defect mended. Conclusion: It is of critical importance to restore function to patients with facial nerve injury. Vascularized nerve grafts, in many clinical and experimental studies, have shown to result in better nerve regeneration than conventional non-vascularized nerve grafts. Nevertheless, there are factors that may affect the degree, speed and regeneration rate regarding the free fasciocutaneous flap. In complex head and neck defects following a total parotidectomy, the extended free fasciocutaneous ALT (anterior-lateral thigh) flap with a vascularized nerve graft is ideally suited for the reconstruction of the injured site. Donor–site morbidity is low and additional surgical time is minimal compared with the time of a single ALT flap transfer. PMID:26788494

  8. Finger interaction during maximal radial and ulnar deviation efforts: experimental data and linear neural network modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize finger interactions during radial/ulnar deviation, including interactions with flexion movements. Subjects performed single-finger and multi-finger maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and maximal forces and various indices of interaction among the fingers were quantified. MVCs in radial/ulnar deviation were 50–80% as strong as in flexion. Along with the ‘master’ fingers (i.e., those explicitly instructed to produce force), substantial force production was also observed in ‘slave’ fingers (i.e., those not explicitly instructed to produce force), a phenomenon termed: force ‘enslaving’. In addition, a drop in MVC during multi-finger tasks as compared to single finger tasks (force ‘deficit’) was also observed. A previously unreported phenomenon that we term: ‘preferred direction enslaving’ was also apparent; both master and slave fingers produced force in the instructed direction with a non-zero perpendicular component. Due to the architectural separation of the involved muscles, preferred direction enslaving provides strong evidence that enslaving results from neural rather than biomechanical factors. A final new phenomenon: ‘negative deficit’, or force ‘facilitation’ was observed in 46.4% of the trials in 21 out of 23 subjects during multi-finger lateral efforts and was further demonstrative of extensive interconnection among neurons serving hand muscles. The data were modeled with high accuracy (~4% mean square error) using a linear neural network with motor ‘commands’ as inputs and finger forces as outputs. The proposed network, equivalent to linear regression, can be used to determine the extent to which finger forces are influenced by peripheral constraints during functional prehensile activities. PMID:17334750

  9. Syndrome of canal of Guyon - definition, diagnosis, treatment and complication.

    PubMed

    Depukat, Paweł; Mizia, Ewa; Kuniewicz, Marcin; Bonczar, Tomasz; Mazur, Małgorzata; Pełka, Piotr; Mróz, Izabela; Lipski, Marcin; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Syndrome of canal of Guyon is the second after carpal tunnel syndrome, compression syndrome in the wrist. Opposite to median nerve compression, ulnar nerve compression is not very popular. However it impairs functioning of the hand even more than median nerve lesion. Authors deal with definition, possible diagnostic methods, treatment and most frequent complication. PMID:26774628

  10. A forgotten facial nerve tumour: granular cell tumour of the parotid and its implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Lerut, B; Vosbeck, J; Linder, T E

    2011-04-01

    We present a rare case of a facial nerve granular cell tumour in the right parotid gland, in a 10-year-old boy. A parotid or neurogenic tumour was suspected, based on magnetic resonance imaging. Intra-operatively, strong adhesions to surrounding structures were found, and a midfacial nerve branch had to be sacrificed for complete tumour removal. Recent reports verify that granular cell tumours arise from Schwann cells of peripheral nerve branches. The rarity of this tumour within the parotid gland, its origin from peripheral nerves, its sometimes misleading imaging characteristics, and its rare presentation with facial weakness and pain all have considerable implications on the surgical strategy and pre-operative counselling. Fine needle aspiration cytology may confirm the neurogenic origin of this lesion. When resecting the tumour, the surgeon must anticipate strong adherence to the facial nerve and be prepared to graft, or sacrifice, certain branches of this nerve. PMID:21106139

  11. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  12. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Pawel; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. MATERIAL AND METHODS After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. CONCLUSIONS The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  13. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Re, Michela; Blanco, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2016-03-01

    Superficial nerves can be visualized through ultrasonography in the cattle and facilitate local anesthetic disposition around nerve structures. Expected advantages include a higher successful rate of nerve block improving the degree and duration of the block. Among others, conduction nerves of clinical interest in cattle include the paravertebral nerves, nerves of the epidural space, the brachial plexus, and the sciatic and femoral nerves, and nerves of the head. PMID:26922116

  15. Ulnar Artery Compression: A Feasible and Effective Approach to Prevent the Radial Artery Occlusion after Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jun; Chu, Yu-Shun; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Tie-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radial artery (RA) occlusion (RAO) is not rare in patients undergoing coronary intervention by transradial approach (TRCI). Predictors of and prevention from RAO have not been systematically studied. This study aimed to analyze the risk factors of the weakness of RA pulsation (RAP) and its predictive value for RAO after TRCI, and simultaneously to describe a feasible and effective approach to maintain RA patency. Methods: Between June 2006 and March 2010, all patients who underwent TRCI were classified according to the weakness of RAP after removing compression bandage with confirmation by Doppler ultrasound for the first 30 consecutive patients. Among a total of 2658 patients studied, 187 (7%) patients having a weaker RAP were prospectively monitored. At 1 h after bandage removal, the ulnar artery in puncture side of all patients was blocked with manual compression to favor brachial and collateral artery blood flow through the RA until a good RAP was restored. The primary analysis was the occurrence of RAO. Results: Doppler ultrasound demonstrated the significant reduction of both systolic velocity (61.24 ± 3.95 cm/s vs. 72.31 ± 3.57 cm/s) and diastolic velocity (1.83 ± 0.32 cm/s vs. 17.77 ± 3.97 cm/s) in RA at access side as compared to the contralateral RA (all P < 0.001), but these velocities in ipsilateral ulnar artery (81.2 ± 2.16 cm/s and 13.1 ± 2.86 cm/s, respectively) increased profoundly. The average time of ulnar artery compression was 4.1 ± 1.2 h (ranged 2.5–6.5 h). There were two patients experienced persistent RAO with a success rate of 98.9% and RAO in 0.075% of patients after ulnar artery compression was applied. The pulsation of the ulnar artery after compression was removed had not been influenced by the compression. Conclusions: After intervention using TRCI approach, the presence of a weaker RAP is an indicator of imminent RAO. The continuing compression of ipsilateral ulnar artery is an effective approach to maintain RA patency. PMID:25758275

  16. Malignant granular cell tumor of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve: report of a case with cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Luca; Magrini, Elisabetta; Consales, Alessandro; Poppi, Massimo; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Dorji, Tsering; Benedetti, Giovanni; Baccarini, Paola

    2002-12-01

    Malignant granular cell tumors (MGCTs) are rare neoplasms of uncertain histogenesis. We report a case of MGCT involving a peripheral nerve with peritoneal and omental dissemination in which cytogenetic findings are available. Our results show that MGCTs share some cytogenetic abnormalities with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), supporting the hypothesis that they may represent histogenetically related lesions. PMID:12514794

  17. Histomorphometric study of the superficial peroneal nerve in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamida, M; Letaief, F; Ben Hamida, C

    1987-01-01

    A histomorphometric analysis of the superficial peroneal nerve was made in 15 cases of leprosy. Thirteen patients presented clinical signs of leprous neuropathy, while the other two showed only cutaneous signs of leprosy. The presence of M. leprae in all the nerves sampled, and the appearance of the histologic lesions, made it possible to confirm the diagnosis of leprosy and to specify the type of leprosy in each case, even in the absence of clinical signs of leprous neuropathy. Correlation of the histomorphometric results with the duration of development of the disease and with the time elapsing before treatment showed, in the beginning stage, a considerable reduction in myelinated and unmyelinated never fibres and a proliferation of Schwann cells, as well as segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of the teased fibres. When treated early, the evolution of the lepromatous type (LL) appears favourable, with apparent regeneration of the nerve fibres. When treatment is not instituted early, gradual loss of nerve fibres, axonal degeneration of all the teased fibres, proliferation of the Schwann cell processes devoid of axons, and increase in endoneural connective tissue lead to a severe degeneration of the nerve. This unfavorable development appears to progress faster in the absence of treatment or when treatment is irregular. In the borderline lepromatous (BL) and borderline tuberculoid (BT) types, nerve degeneration appears to be more rapid than in the type LL. PMID:3039779

  18. Benign Jaw Lesions.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Anita; Villa, Alessandro; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    There are both odontogenic and nonodontogenic benign lesions in the maxilla and mandible. These lesions may have similar imaging features, and the key radiographic features are presented to help the clinician narrow the differential diagnosis and plan patient treatment. Both intraoral and panoramic radiographs and advanced imaging features are useful in assessing the benign lesions of the jaws. The location, margins, internal contents, and effects of the lesions on adjacent structures are important features in diagnosing the lesions. PMID:26614952

  19. Intra-temporal facial nerve centerline segmentation for navigated temporal bone surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voormolen, Eduard H. J.; van Stralen, Marijn; Woerdeman, Peter A.; Pluim, Josien P. W.; Noordmans, Herke J.; Regli, Luca; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, Jan W.; Viergever, Max A.

    2011-03-01

    Approaches through the temporal bone require surgeons to drill away bone to expose a target skull base lesion while evading vital structures contained within it, such as the sigmoid sinus, jugular bulb, and facial nerve. We hypothesize that an augmented neuronavigation system that continuously calculates the distance to these structures and warns if the surgeon drills too close, will aid in making safe surgical approaches. Contemporary image guidance systems are lacking an automated method to segment the inhomogeneous and complexly curved facial nerve. Therefore, we developed a segmentation method to delineate the intra-temporal facial nerve centerline from clinically available temporal bone CT images semi-automatically. Our method requires the user to provide the start- and end-point of the facial nerve in a patient's CT scan, after which it iteratively matches an active appearance model based on the shape and texture of forty facial nerves. Its performance was evaluated on 20 patients by comparison to our gold standard: manually segmented facial nerve centerlines. Our segmentation method delineates facial nerve centerlines with a maximum error along its whole trajectory of 0.40+/-0.20 mm (mean+/-standard deviation). These results demonstrate that our model-based segmentation method can robustly segment facial nerve centerlines. Next, we can investigate whether integration of this automated facial nerve delineation with a distance calculating neuronavigation interface results in a system that can adequately warn surgeons during temporal bone drilling, and effectively diminishes risks of iatrogenic facial nerve palsy.

  20. A Novel Cytokine Pathway Suppresses Glial Cell Melanogenesis after Injury to Adult Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Tilat A.; Huang, Yuan; Sidani, Amer; Atit, Radhika; Largaespada, David A.; Boissy, Raymond E.; Ratner, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    The neural crest gives rise to numerous cell types, including Schwann cells, neurons, and melanocytes. The extent to which adult neural crest-derived cells retain plasticity has not been tested previously. We report that cutting adult mouse sciatic nerve induces pigmentation around nerve fascicles, among muscle bundles, and in the hypodermis. Pigmented cells are derived from adult nerve, because pigmentation occurs even when nerve fragments are grafted into tyrosinase null albino mice. Pigmentation defects are pervasive in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Mice hemizygous for Nf1 mutations show enhanced pigmentation after nerve lesion and occasionally form pigmented and unpigmented tumors. The Nf1 nerve and the Nf1 host environment both contribute to enhanced pigmentation. Grafted purified Nf1 mutant glial cells [S100+–p75NGFR+–GFAP+–EGFR+ or S100+–p75NGFR+–GFAP+–EGFR−] mimic nerve-derived pigmentation. The NF1 protein, neurofibromin, is a Ras-GAP that acts downstream of a few defined receptor tyrosine kinases, including [β-common (βc)] the shared common receptor for granulocyte and monocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3 (IL3), and IL5. Cytokines in the environment have the potential to suppress pigmentation as shown by nerve injury experiments in null mice; when is βc absent or Nf1 is mutant, melanogenesis is increased. Thus, the adult nerve glial cell phenotype is maintained after nerve injury by response to cytokines, through neurofibromin. PMID:12427839

  1. Ipsilateral cortical fMRI responses after peripheral nerve damage in rats reflect increased interneuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Pelled, Galit; Bergstrom, Debra A.; Tierney, Patrick L.; Conroy, Richard S.; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Yu, David; Leopold, David A.; Walters, Judith R.; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2009-01-01

    In the weeks following unilateral peripheral nerve injury, the deprived primary somatosensory cortex (SI) responds to stimulation of the ipsilateral intact limb as demonstrated by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses. The neuronal basis of these responses was studied by using high-resolution fMRI, in vivo electrophysiological recordings, and juxtacellular neuronal labeling in rats that underwent an excision of the forepaw radial, median, and ulnar nerves. These nerves were exposed but not severed in control rats. Significant bilateral increases of fMRI responses in SI were observed in denervated rats. In the healthy SI of the denervated rats, increases in fMRI responses were concordant with increases in local field potential (LFP) amplitude and an increased incidence of single units responding compared with control rats. In contrast, in the deprived SI, increases in fMRI responses were associated with a minimal change in LFP amplitude but with increased incidence of single units responding. Based on action potential duration, juxtacellular labeling, and immunostaining results, neurons responding to intact forepaw stimulation in the deprived cortex were identified as interneurons. These results suggest that the increases in fMRI responses in the deprived cortex reflect increased interneuron activity. PMID:19666522

  2. Neuronal loss after transsection of the facial nerve: a morphological and neurophysiological study in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, M; Vedung, S; Stålberg, E

    2001-06-01

    Functional recovery after nerve lesions seems to depend on peripheral as well as central factors. To investigate the central neuronal loss after transsection of a pure motor nerve, the middle branch of the facial nerve on one side was transsected and immediately repaired microsurgically by epineural suturing. After a period of 6-15 months, a quantitative neurophysiological recording was made to estimate muscle response. A nerve tracer was injected into the mimic muscles innervated by the nerve to label the surviving motor neurons within the facial nucleus. The opposite side was used as the control in all cases. After the regenerative period, a mean loss of 15% of the total cell number was observed within the facial nucleus compared with the opposite side. The cell loss comprised all types of neurons. This amount of neuronal loss was followed by an even greater loss of muscle response when a quantitative neurophysiological recording was made after nerve regeneration. The results are discussed in relation to loss of nerve elements after nerve lesions and its effect on functional recovery. PMID:11484522

  3. An Investigation of Modifying Effects of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Metabolism-related Genes on the Relationship between Peripheral Nerve Function and Mercury Levels in Urine and Hair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Werner, Robert; Gillespie, Brenda; Basu, Niladri; Franzblau, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a potent neurotoxicant. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes coding glutathione-related proteins, selenoproteins and metallothioneins may modify the relationship of mercury biomarkers with changes in peripheral nerve function. Dental professionals (n=515) were recruited in 2009 and 2010. Sensory nerve function (onset latency, peak latency and amplitude) of the median, ulnar and sural nerves were recorded. Samples of urine, hair and DNA were collected. Covariates related to demographics, nerve function and elemental and methyl- mercury exposure were also collected. Subjects included 244 dentists (47.4%) and 269 non-dentists (52.2%; mostly dental hygienists and dental assistants). The mean mercury levels in urine (1.06μg/L) and hair (0.51μg/g) were not significantly different from the US general population (0.95 μg/L and 0.47μg/g, respectively). In multivariate linear models predicting nerve function adjusting for covariates, only 3 out of a total of 504 models showed stable and statistically significant interaction of SNPs with mercury biomarkers. Overall, given the possibility of false positives, the results suggested little evidence of effect modification of the SNPs on the relationship between mercury biomarkers with peripheral nerve function at exposure levels that are relevant to the general US population. PMID:22236634

  4. The normal sensibility of the hand declines with age--a proclamation for the use of delta two-point discrimination values for sensibility assessment after nerve reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Schmauss, Daniel; Finck, Tom; Megerle, Kai; Machens, Hans-Guenther; Lohmeyer, Joern A

    2014-09-01

    The scores used to evaluate sensibility after digital nerve reconstruction do not take the patient's age into consideration, although there is evidence that the outcome after digital nerve reconstruction is age-dependent. However, it is not clear if the normal sensibility of the hand is also age-dependent, as the existing studies have major limitations. We evaluated the normal sensibility of the hand in 232 patients using static and moving two-point discrimination (2PD) tests and the Semmes-Weinstein-monofilament test. We found the climax of sensibility in the third decade with age-dependent deterioration afterwards in all three tests. Mean 2PD values of the radial digital nerve of the index finger (N3) showed to be significantly lower than values of the ulnar digital nerve of the small finger (N10). To overcome shortcomings of classification systems that do not consider the patient's age and inter-individual differences, we suggest using the difference of the static 2PD values of the injured to the uninjured contralateral nerve (delta 2PD) for assessment of sensibility after digital nerve reconstruction. PMID:25400078

  5. A novel and robust conditioning lesion induced by ethidium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Edmund R; Ishiko, Nao; Tolentino, Kristine; Doherty, Ernest; Rodriguez, Maria J.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Zou, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the peripheral conditioning lesion remain unsolved. We show here that injection of a chemical demyelinating agent, ethidium bromide, into the sciatic nerve induces a similar set of regeneration-associated genes and promotes a 2.7-fold greater extent of sensory axon regeneration in the spinal cord than sciatic nerve crush. We found that more severe peripheral demyelination correlates with more severe functional and electrophysiological deficits, but more robust central regeneration. Ethidium bromide injection does not activate macrophages at the demyelinated sciatic nerve site, as observed after nerve crush, but briefly activates macrophages in the dorsal root ganglion. This study provides a new method for investigating the underlying mechanisms of the conditioning response and suggests that loss of the peripheral myelin may be a major signal to change the intrinsic growth state of adult sensory neurons and promote regeneration. PMID:25541322

  6. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  7. Mesenchymal breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Schickman, R; Leibman, A J; Handa, P; Kornmehl, A; Abadi, M

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal breast lesions encompass a variety of breast diseases. Many of these lesions are rare with only a few case reports in the literature. This article reviews the imaging findings of selected mesenchymal breast lesions, their clinical presentations and method of diagnosis. Mesenchymal lesions are diverse and include haemangioma, granular cell tumour, myofibroblastoma, fibromatosis, pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. It is important for radiologists to be aware of these lesions as some of them may have malignant potential or demonstrate imaging features that overlap with other malignant lesions. PMID:25638601

  8. Chemotherapy-induced bone marrow nerve injury impairs hematopoietic regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Daniel; Scheiermann, Christoph; Chow, Andrew; Kunisaki, Yuya; Bruns, Ingmar; Barrick, Colleen; Tessarollo, Lino; Frenette, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-cancer chemotherapy drugs challenge hematopoietic tissues to regenerate, but commonly produce long-term sequelae. Deficits in hematopoietic stem or stromal cell function have been described, but the mechanisms mediating chemotherapy-induced hematopoietic dysfunction remain unclear. Administration of multiple cycles of cisplatin chemotherapy causes significant sensory neuropathy. Here, we demonstrate that chemotherapy-induced nerve injury in the bone marrow is a critical lesion impairing hematopoietic regeneration. We show using various pharmacological and genetic models that the selective loss of adrenergic innervation in the BM alters its regeneration following genotoxic insult. Sympathetic nerves in the marrow promote the survival of stem cell niche constituents that initiate recovery. Neuroprotection by deletion of Trp53 in sympathetic neurons or neuro-regeneration using 4-methylcatechol or glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) administration can restore hematopoietic recovery. Thus, these results shed light on the potential benefit of adrenergic nerve protection to shield hematopoietic niches from injury. PMID:23644514

  9. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  10. Optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B S; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-05-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  11. Retroperitoneal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bayar, Mehmet Akif; Caydere, Muzaffer; Deger, Hakki; Tayfur, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    Malignant nerve sheath tumours (MPNST) are rare neoplasias and retroperitoneal cases are fairly rare and clinically difficult to be detected, but they are very agressive neoplasias. MPNST are frequently seen in head, neck and upper extremities. In patients with NF1; MPNST, a poor-prognostic lesion, may result from a malignant degeneration of a former plexiform neurofibroma. It is necessary to be aware of a potential malignancy in patients diagnosed with plexiform neurofibroma. We present a 21-year-old female with a diagnosis of MPNST. The patient was admited to the hospital because of a tumour in the subcutaneous region on her left buttock. The surgeon’s clinical diagnosis was lipoma. After the pathological examination of biopsy specimen, the lesion was identified as “plexiform neurofibroma” and then the patient was diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Simultaneously, another mass on the retroperitoneal region was identified as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST). PMID:26500915

  12. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Alroughani, R; Behbehani, R

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  13. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma Masquerading as Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Alroughani, R.; Behbehani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuritis is a common presentation of demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. It typically presents with acute painful monocular vision loss, whereas chronic optic neuropathy can be caused by compressive lesions along the anterior visual pathway, genetic, toxic, or nutritional causes. We report an unusual presentation mimicking optic neuritis, which was subsequently diagnosed as optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Misinterpretation of white matter lesions on MRI of brain and the failure to image the optic nerves at the time of acute loss of vision led to the misdiagnosis of optic neuritis in this case. A comprehensive accurate history and ordering the appropriate imaging modality remain paramount in diagnosing progressive visual deterioration. PMID:26904329

  14. Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy secondary to an atlantooccipital joint juxtafacet synovial cyst.

    PubMed

    Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Farhat, Hamad; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Morcos, Jacques J

    2009-03-01

    Juxtafacet cysts of the atlantooccipital joint that present with isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy are rare and may mimic more common pathological entities. The authors report on the third such case in the literature and discuss the differential diagnosis, imaging hallmarks, preoperative recognition, and surgical management of this lesion, and provide a review of the literature. The authors discuss their experience with the treatment of a 67-year-old woman who presented with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a nonenhancing cystic septated lesion abutting the lateral medulla just medial to the left hypoglossal canal. The lesion was presumed to be a necrotic hypoglossal schwannoma or epidermoid tumor. Intradural surgical exploration failed to demonstrate an intradural lesion, but confirmed the presence of an extradural mass caudal to the hypoglossal nerve. Extradural exploration revealed a synovial cyst of the atlantooccipital joint, which was then resected. Postoperatively, the patient developed worsening dysphagia and hoarseness. Failure to recognize this rare entity preoperatively resulted in unnecessary intradural exploration and cranial nerve morbidity. In retrospect, the preoperative diagnosis of this lesion was suggested by lack of central enhancement, absence of dumbbell formation and the presence of erosive synovial changes. Regardless, the extreme rarity of this lesion at this location will always make its recognition challenging. PMID:19320583

  15. Active skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response in the hand following nerve injury and repair in human upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Deng, Aidong; Liu, Dan; Gu, Chen; Gu, Xiaosong; Gu, Jianhui; Hu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous vasoconstriction/vasodilatation occurs in response to whole body and local cooling/heating, and the vasomotor activities play a pivotal role in thermal control of the human body. The mechanisms underlying regulation of skin blood flow involve both neurogenic and humeral/local chemical influence, contributing to the initial response to thermal stimuli and the prolonged phase of response, respectively. Previous studies have suggested the impairment of cutaneous thermal regulation after nerve injury. However, the evidence regarding how the skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response evolve after nerve injury and repair remains limited. Here we observed, by utilizing laser-Doppler perfusion imaging, baseline skin perfusion and perfusion change in response to thermal stimuli after median and ulnar nerve injury, and the results showed that baseline perfusion in autonomous skin area profoundly decreased and active rewarming after clod stress dramatically diminished before sensory recovery of the skin became detectable. In addition, baseline cutaneous perfusion was recovered as the skin regained touch sensation, and exhibited positive correlation to touch sensibility of the skin. These data indicate that both active perfusion and thermoregulatory response of the skin are markedly compromised during skin denervation and can be recovered by re-innervation. This suggests the importance of timely repair of injured nerve, especially in the practice of replantation. PMID:26529641

  16. Skin lesion of blastomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcers Bleed easily Occur in the nose or mouth Over time, these skin lesions can lead to scarring and loss of skin ... fungus in a culture taken from a skin lesion. This usually requires a skin biopsy .

  17. Temporary Mental Nerve Paresthesia Originating from Periapical Infection

    PubMed Central

    Genc Sen, Ozgur; Kaplan, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Many systemic and local factors can cause paresthesia, and it is rarely caused by infections of dental origin. This report presents a case of mental nerve paresthesia caused by endodontic infection of a mandibular left second premolar. Resolution of the paresthesia began two weeks after conventional root canal treatment associated with antibiotic therapy and was completed in eight weeks. One year follow-up radiograph indicated complete healing of the radiolucent periapical lesion. The tooth was asymptomatic and functional. PMID:26345692

  18. Sphenoid sinus mucocele presenting with oculomotor nerve palsy and affecting the functions of trigeminal nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei-Wei; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of first-episode sphenoid mucocele successfully treated via transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele. A 55 year-old female presented with persistent right-side facial numbness (in the areas of the first and second branches of the trigeminal nerve) and right-side ptosis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed opacification and expansion of the right-side sphenoid sinus lesion. The lesion was diagnosed as right-side sphenoid mucocele affecting the functions of the trigeminal (first and second branches), and oculomotor nerves. Transnasal endoscopic drainage and marsupialization of the mucocele result in rapid regression of these symptoms. PMID:26629234

  19. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  20. Oropharynx lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Throat lesion biopsy; Biopsy - mouth or throat; Mouth lesion biopsy ... procedure. All or part of the problem area (lesion) is removed. It is sent to the laboratory to check for problems. If a growth in the mouth or throat needs to be removed, the biopsy ...

  1. In vivo assessment of forearm bone mass and ulnar bending stiffness in healthy men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myburgh, K. H.; Zhou, L. J.; Steele, C. R.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cross-sectional bending stiffness EI of the ulna was measured in vivo by mechanical resistance tissue analysis (MRTA) in 90 men aged 19-89 years. MRTA measures the impedance response of low-frequency vibrations to determine EI, which is a reflection of elastic modulus E and moment of inertia I for the whole ulna. EI was compared to conventional estimates of bone mineral content (BMC), bone width (BW), and BMC/BW, which were all measured by single-photon absorptiometry. Results obtained from the nondominant ulna indicate that BW increases (r = 0.27, p = 0.01) and ulnar BMC/BW decreases (r = -0.31, p < or = 0.005) with age. Neither BMC nor EI declined with age. The single best predictor of EI was BW (r2 = 0.47, p = 0.0001), and further small but significant contributions were made by BMC (r2 = 0.53, p = 0.0001) and grip strength (r2 = 0.55, p = 0.0001). These results suggest that the resistance of older men to forearm fracture is related to age-associated changes in the moment of inertia achieved by redistributing bone mineral farther from the bending axis. We conclude that the in vivo assessment of bone geometry offers important insights to the comprehensive evaluation of bone strength.

  2. TBX3 Regulates Splicing In Vivo: A Novel Molecular Mechanism for Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar P., Pavan; Franklin, Sarah; Emechebe, Uchenna; Hu, Hao; Moore, Barry; Lehman, Chris; Yandell, Mark; Moon, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24675841

  3. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar P, Pavan; Franklin, Sarah; Emechebe, Uchenna; Hu, Hao; Moore, Barry; Lehman, Chris; Yandell, Mark; Moon, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24675841

  4. Clinical analysis of a large kindred with the pallister ulnar-mammary syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bamshad, M.; Root, S.; Carey, J.C.

    1996-11-11

    The ulnar-mammary syndrome (UMS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by posterior limb deficiencies or duplications, apocrine/mammary gland hypoplasia and/or dysfunction, abnormal dentition, delayed puberty in males, and genital anomalies. We present the clinical descriptions of 33 members of a six generation kindred with UMS. The number of affected individuals in this family is more than the sum of all previously reported cases of UMS. The clinical expression of UMS is highly variable. While most patients have limb deficiencies, the range of abnormalities extends from hypoplasia of the terminal phalanx of the 5th digit to complete absence of the ulna and 3rd, 4th, and 5th digits. Moreover, affected individuals may have posterior digital duplications with or without contralateral limb deficiencies. Apocrine gland abnormalities range from diminished axillary perspiration with normal breast development and lactation, to complete absence of the breasts and no axillary perspiration. Dental abnormalities include misplaced or absent teeth. Affected males consistently undergo delayed puberty, and both sexes have diminished to absent axillary hair. Imperforate hymen were seen in some affected women. A gene for UMS was mapped to chromosome area 12q23-q24.1. A mutation in the gene causing UMS can interfere with limb patterning in the proximal/distal, anterior/posterior, and dorsal/ventral axes. This mutation disturbs development of the posterior elements of forearm, wrist, and hand while growth and development of the anterior elements remain normal. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Biologic Augmentation of the Ulnar Collateral Ligament in the Elbow of a Professional Baseball Pitcher

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, James K.; Protzman, Nicole M.; Malhotra, Amit D.

    2015-01-01

    Tears of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow are common injuries in overhead athletes. Although surgical reconstruction of the UCL has improved outcomes, not all athletes return to their previous level of competition and when this goal is achieved, the time required averages one to two years. Therefore, additional techniques are needed to further improve return to play and the rate of return to play in overhead athletes. A construct comprising a dermal allograft, platelet rich plasma (PRP), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to successfully improve healing in the rotator cuff. Given the promising provisional findings, we postulated that this construct could also improve healing if applied to the UCL. Therefore, the purpose of the present report was to examine the feasibility of utilizing a dermal allograft, PRP, and MSC construct to augment UCL reconstruction in a professional baseball pitcher. No complications were encountered. Although limited to minimal follow-up, the patient has demonstrated excellent progress and has returned to activity. PMID:26240769

  6. Multiple myeloma presenting with unilateral abducens and trigeminal nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, Sushrut S; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Petrous apex masses can manifest with neurologic symptoms due to their involvement of various structures, including cranial nerves (CN) V and VI. The differential diagnosis of petrous masses is broad and includes a variety of both non-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions. We report a rare case of multiple myeloma confined to the right petrous apex, presenting with ipsilateral abducens and trigeminal nerve palsies. A 63-year-old woman presented with a 6-8week history of facial numbness and a 2week history of diplopia, with examination showing right-sided facial hypoesthesia in the CN V1-V3 region and right-sided lateral rectus palsy. MRI of the brain showed a solitary 2.0cm lesion confined to the right petrous apex involving the right cavernous internal carotid artery and Meckel's cave. A transnasal biopsy showed a proliferation of plasmacytoid cells, which showed diffuse immunoreactivity with antibodies to CD138 and kappa, consistent with a plasma cell dyscrasia. A bone scan subsequently revealed multiple lytic bone lesions involving the skull, left humerus, bilateral femurs and possibly the L4 vertebral body. Bone marrow biopsy and serum laboratory results confirmed the diagnosis of kappa-type multiple myeloma. Although rare, multiple myeloma may initially present with petrous involvement and associated cranial nerve deficits. PMID:26602603

  7. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  8. Nerve Regenerative Effects of GABA-B Ligands in a Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Erica; Pajardi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the peripheral somatosensory system. It may be associated with allodynia and increased pain sensitivity. Few studies correlated neuropathic pain with nerve morphology and myelin proteins expression. Our aim was to test if neuropathic pain is related to nerve degeneration, speculating whether the modulation of peripheral GABA-B receptors may promote nerve regeneration and decrease neuropathic pain. We used the partial sciatic ligation- (PSL-) induced neuropathic model. The biochemical, morphological, and behavioural outcomes of sciatic nerve were analysed following GABA-B ligands treatments. Simultaneous 7-days coadministration of baclofen (10 mg/kg) and CGP56433 (3 mg/kg) alters tactile hypersensitivity. Concomitantly, specific changes of peripheral nerve morphology, nerve structure, and myelin proteins (P0 and PMP22) expression were observed. Nerve macrophage recruitment decreased and step coordination was improved. The PSL-induced changes in nociception correlate with altered nerve morphology and myelin protein expression. Peripheral synergic effects, via GABA-B receptor activation, promote nerve regeneration and likely ameliorate neuropathic pain. PMID:25165701

  9. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  10. Atorvastatin is beneficial for muscle reinnervation after complete sciatic nerve section in rats.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Frédéric-Charles; Rouleau, Dominique M; Hébert-Davies, Jonah; Beaumont, Pierre H; Beaumont, Eric

    2013-12-01

    Nerve regeneration and functional recovery are often incomplete after peripheral neurotmetic lesion. Atorvastatin has been shown to be neuroprotective after transient ischaemia or traumatic injury. The aim of this study was to establish if systemic administration of Atorvastatin could improve functional muscle reinnervation after complete sciatic nerve section. Sixteen female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. After a complete right sciatic nerve section, end-to-end microsuture repair was performed and fibrin glue was added. Three groups were studied: (1) sutures (S) + fibrin glue (F) only + saline administration for 14 days; (2) S+F+Atorvastatin administration for 14 days; and (3) uninjured nerve. Five months later, the sciatic nerve and the gastrocnemius muscle were isolated to perform in vivo electrophysiological measurements. Better kinematics was observed in atorvastatin-treated rats 5 months after its administration. Indeed, a larger excursion of the hip-ankle-toe angle during walking was observed. This effect was associated with the preservation of electromyographic activity (2.91 mV vs 0.77 mV) and maximal muscle force (85.1 g vs 28.6 g) on stimulation of the proximal nerve section. Five months after a neurotmetic lesion, the recovery is incomplete when using suture and fibrin glue only. Furthermore, the systemic administration of Atorvastatin for 14 days after lesion was beneficial in improving locomotion capability associated with the re-establishment of muscle strength and EMG activity. PMID:23848426

  11. Altered thermal sensitivity in injured and demyelinated nerve

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Floyd A.; Jacobson, Samuel

    1971-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies were performed on frog and guinea-pig peripheral nerves to determine the effect of temperature on conduction at the site of pressure and demyelinating lesions. An increased susceptibility to thermally-induced conduction blockade has been demonstrated. In pressure-injured frog and guinea-pig nerves, conduction blocks occur at temperatures approximately 6°C lower than in normal nerves. A similar phenomenon occurs in guinea-pig demyelinated nerve (experimental allergic neuritis) and in some cases at temperatures around 15°C lower than in controls. It is suggested that these effects are the result of a critical lowering by temperature of an already markedly depressed conduction safety factor. In support of this, it has been shown that calcium ion depletion, which would be expected to increase the conduction safety factor by lowering the threshold for excitation, counteracts the increased thermal sensitivity of frog pressure-injured nerve. These findings are discussed in relation to well-known temperature effects in multiple sclerosis. They add support to an earlier proposed hypothesis that the changes in signs and symptoms with a change of body temperature in multiple sclerosis may be caused by an effect of temperature on axonal conduction. Images PMID:5122383

  12. Benign nerve tumors of the hand and the forearm.

    PubMed

    Lincoski, Chris J; Harter, G Dean; Bush, David C

    2007-03-01

    We used a hand surgeon's 1978-1994 pathology reports to retrospectively review the incidence, preoperative and postoperative diagnoses, and presenting signs and symptoms of benign nerve tumors. Twenty-four (11.5%) of our series of 208 soft-tissue tumors of the hand and the forearm were benign nerve tumors. Nerve tumors were the third most common tumor after giant cell tumors of tendon sheath and inclusion cysts. Correct preoperative diagnosis was made in only 1 (4.2%) of the 24 cases. Schwannomas and neurofibromas were equally distributed (12 each), and 2 cases of neurofibromatosis (8.3%) were documented. Two (16.7%) of the 12 patients with schwannomas and 4 (33.3%) of the 12 patients with neurofibromas had neurologic symptoms. Six (85.7%) of the 7 digital tumors were dorsally located. In the literature, incidence of benign nerve tumors is much lower (ie, 1%-5%), and preoperative diagnosis consistently incorrect in our study. Incidence of neurologic symptoms (numbness, paresthesia) as presenting symptoms was higher in our study than previously documented. Although benign nerve tumors are most often located on the volar surface of the hand, 25% of the lesions we found were on the dorsal surface of the fingers. PMID:17690764

  13. Parallel Changes in Structural and Functional Measures of Optic Nerve Myelination after Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Walt, Anneke; Kolbe, Scott; Mitchell, Peter; Wang, Yejun; Butzkueven, Helmut; Egan, Gary; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Klistorner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Visual evoked potential (VEP) latency prolongation and optic nerve lesion length after acute optic neuritis (ON) corresponds to the degree of demyelination, while subsequent recovery of latency may represent optic nerve remyelination. We aimed to investigate the relationship between multifocal VEP (mfVEP) latency and optic nerve lesion length after acute ON. Methods Thirty acute ON patients were studied at 1,3,6 and 12 months using mfVEP and at 1 and 12 months with optic nerve MRI. LogMAR and low contrast visual acuity were documented. By one month, the mfVEP amplitude had recovered sufficiently for latency to be measured in 23 (76.7%) patients with seven patients having no recordable mfVEP in more than 66% of segments in at least one test. Only data from these 23 patients was analysed further. Results Both latency and lesion length showed significant recovery during the follow-up period. Lesion length and mfVEP latency were highly correlated at 1 (r = 0.94, p = <0.0001) and 12 months (r = 0.75, p < 0.001). Both measures demonstrated a similar trend of recovery. Speed of latency recovery was faster in the early follow-up period while lesion length shortening remained relatively constant. At 1 month, latency delay was worse by 1.76ms for additional 1mm of lesion length while at 12 months, 1mm of lesion length accounted for 1.94ms of latency delay. Conclusion A strong association between two putative measures of demyelination in early and chronic ON was found. Parallel recovery of both measures could reflect optic nerve remyelination. PMID:26020925

  14. Effects of nerve growth factor on nerve regeneration after corneal nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Yan, Naihong; Huang, Yongzhi; Cao, Guiqun; Deng, Jie; Deng, Yingping

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to determine the relation between the effects of mouse nerve growth factor (mNGF) and nerve regeneration after corneal surgery nerve damage. Mechanical nerve injury animal model was established by LASIK (the excimer laser keratomileusis) surgery in 12 Belgian rabbits. mNGF and the balanced salt solution (BBS) were alternatively administered in the left and right eye two times every day for 8 weeks. The morphous and growth of the sub-basal nerve plexus and superficial stroma were observed by in vivo confocal microscopy at the end of weeks 1, 2, 4 and 8 after the surgery. The animal model is successfully established. The morphology and density of corneal nerve have been observed and demonstrated by confocal microscopy. A systematic administration of mNGF can significantly promote the nerve regeneration at the end of weeks 1, 2, 4 and 8, which comparing to the administration of balanced salt solution (P < 0.05). mNGF has effect on sub-basal nerve plexus and superficial stroma after corneal nerve damage which is caused by LASIK. The experimental results suggested that the mNGF may solve the problem of dry eye after LASIK. PMID:25550989

  15. Transverse Plane Tendon and Median Nerve Motion in the Carpal Tunnel: Ultrasound Comparison of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Patients and Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    van Doesburg, Margriet H. M.; Henderson, Jacqueline; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The median nerve and flexor tendons are known to translate transversely in the carpal tunnel. The purpose of this study was to investigate these motions in differential finger motion using ultrasound, and to compare them in healthy people and carpal tunnel syndrome patients. Methods Transverse ultrasounds clips were taken during fist, index finger, middle finger and thumb flexion in 29 healthy normal subjects and 29 CTS patients. Displacement in palmar-dorsal and radial-ulnar direction was calculated using Analyze software. Additionally, the distance between the median nerve and the tendons was calculated. Results We found a changed motion pattern of the median nerve in middle finger, index finger and thumb motion between normal subjects and CTS patients (p<0.05). Also, we found a changed motion direction in CTS patients of the FDS III tendon in fist and middle finger motion, and of the FDS II and flexor pollicis longus tendon in index finger and thumb motion, respectively (p<0.05). The distance between the median nerve and the FDS II or FPL tendon is significantly greater in patients than in healthy volunteers for index finger and thumb motion, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion Our results suggest a changed motion pattern of the median nerve and several tendons in carpal tunnel syndrome patients compared to normal subjects. Such motion patterns may be useful in distinguishing affected from unaffected individuals, and in studies of the pathomechanics of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:22606333

  16. Nerve injury reduces responses of hypoglossal motoneurones to baseline and chemoreceptor-modulated inspiratory drive in the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    González-Forero, David; Portillo, Federico; Sunico, Carmen R; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2004-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve lesions on the membrane and synaptic properties of motoneurones have been extensively studied. However, minimal information exists about how these alterations finally influence discharge activity and motor output under physiological afferent drive. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of hypoglossal (XIIth) nerve crushing on hypoglossal motoneurone (HMN) discharge in response to the basal inspiratory afferent drive and its chemosensory modulation by CO2. The evolution of the lesion was assessed by recording the compound muscle action potential evoked by XIIth nerve stimulation, which was lost on crushing and then recovered gradually to control values from the second to fourth weeks post-lesion. Basal inspiratory activities recorded 7 days post-injury in the nerve proximal to the lesion site, and in the nucleus, were reduced by 51.6% and 35.8%, respectively. Single unit antidromic latencies were lengthened by lesion, and unusually high stimulation intensities were frequently required to elicit antidromic spikes. Likewise, inspiratory modulation of unitary discharge under conditions in which chemoreceptor drive was varied by altering end-tidal CO2 was reduced by more than 60%. Although the general recruitment scheme was preserved after XIIth nerve lesion, we noticed an increased proportion of low-threshold units and a reduced recruitment gain across the physiological range. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin in the hypoglossal nuclei revealed significant reductions of this synaptic marker after nerve injury. Morphological and functional alterations recovered with muscle re-innervation. Thus, we report here that nerve lesion induced changes in the basal activity and discharge modulation of HMNs, concurrent with the loss of afferent inputs. Nevertheless, we suggest that an increase in membrane excitability, reported by others, and in the proportion of low-threshold units, could serve to preserve minimal electrical activity, prevent degeneration and favour axonal regeneration. PMID:15090609

  17. Nerve injury reduces responses of hypoglossal motoneurones to baseline and chemoreceptor-modulated inspiratory drive in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    González-Forero, David; Portillo, Federico; Sunico, Carmen R; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2004-06-15

    The effects of peripheral nerve lesions on the membrane and synaptic properties of motoneurones have been extensively studied. However, minimal information exists about how these alterations finally influence discharge activity and motor output under physiological afferent drive. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of hypoglossal (XIIth) nerve crushing on hypoglossal motoneurone (HMN) discharge in response to the basal inspiratory afferent drive and its chemosensory modulation by CO(2). The evolution of the lesion was assessed by recording the compound muscle action potential evoked by XIIth nerve stimulation, which was lost on crushing and then recovered gradually to control values from the second to fourth weeks post-lesion. Basal inspiratory activities recorded 7 days post-injury in the nerve proximal to the lesion site, and in the nucleus, were reduced by 51.6% and 35.8%, respectively. Single unit antidromic latencies were lengthened by lesion, and unusually high stimulation intensities were frequently required to elicit antidromic spikes. Likewise, inspiratory modulation of unitary discharge under conditions in which chemoreceptor drive was varied by altering end-tidal CO(2) was reduced by more than 60%. Although the general recruitment scheme was preserved after XIIth nerve lesion, we noticed an increased proportion of low-threshold units and a reduced recruitment gain across the physiological range. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin in the hypoglossal nuclei revealed significant reductions of this synaptic marker after nerve injury. Morphological and functional alterations recovered with muscle re-innervation. Thus, we report here that nerve lesion induced changes in the basal activity and discharge modulation of HMNs, concurrent with the loss of afferent inputs. Nevertheless, we suggest that an increase in membrane excitability, reported by others, and in the proportion of low-threshold units, could serve to preserve minimal electrical activity, prevent degeneration and favour axonal regeneration. PMID:15090609

  18. Saphenous nerve entrapment manifested as proximal cruralgia.

    PubMed

    Camargo Júnior, J N; Nucci, A

    1997-01-01

    A 16 year old boy had continuous pain in the right testis, groin, and the medial aspect of the thigh and knee for 16 months. The onset of symptoms was acute and pain distribution included a retrograde area in relation to the entrapment site. Tinel's sign was the clue for diagnosis. Diagnosis was confirmed at operation and division of the aponeurosis of Hunter's canal relieved the symptoms for three days. A second surgical exploration, proximal to the former one, was performed after five months. The right femoral nerve was found normal. This new operation was therapeutically ineffective. Causes of pain distribution and relapsed pain are discussed. The relapse was attributed to myofascial pain syndrome. This diagnosis should be considered independently of the correct treatment of the primary lesion. PMID:9609075

  19. Relationship of estimated dietary intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish with peripheral nerve function after adjusting for mercury exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Werner, Robert; Gillespie, Brenda; Basu, Niladri; Franzblau, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Some clinical studies have suggested that ingestion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve function. However, few epidemiological studies have examined the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA intake from fish consumption on peripheral nerve function, and none have controlled for co-occurrence of methylmercury exposure from fish consumption. Objectives We evaluated the effect of estimated dietary n-3 PUFA intake on peripheral nerve function after adjusting for biomarkers of methylmercury and elemental mercury in a convenience sample of 515 dental professionals. Methods We measured sensory nerve conduction (peak latency and amplitude) of the median, ulnar and sural nerves and total mercury concentrations in hair and urine samples. We estimated daily intake (mg/day) of the total n-3 PUFA, n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) based on a self-administrated fish consumption frequency questionnaire. We also collected information on mercury exposure, demographics and other covariates. Results The estimated median intakes of total n-3 PUFA, n-3 EPA, and n-3 DHA were 447, 105, and 179 mg/day, respectively. The mean mercury concentrations in urine (1.05μg/L) and hair (0.49μg/g) were not significantly different from the US general population. We found no consistent association between n-3 PUFA intake and sensory nerve conduction after adjusting for mercury concentrations in hair and urine although some positive associations were observed with the sural nerve. Conclusions In a convenience sample of dental professionals, we found little evidence suggesting that dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs from fish has any impact on peripheral nerve function after adjustment for methylmercury exposure from fish and elemental mercury exposure from dental amalgam. PMID:23538138

  20. Odanacatib increases mineralized callus during fracture healing in a rabbit ulnar osteotomy model.

    PubMed

    Pennypacker, Brenda L; Gilberto, David; Gatto, Nicholas T; Samadfam, Rana; Smith, Susan Y; Kimmel, Donald B; Duong, Le Thi

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib (ODN) on fracture healing were monitored for ~6 and 15 weeks post-fracture in two separate studies using the unilateral transverse mid-ulnar osteotomy model in skeletally mature female rabbits. Rabbits were pre-treated for 3-4 weeks with vehicle (Veh), ODN (2 mg/kg, po, daily), or alendronate (ALN) (0.3 mg/kg, sc, twice-weekly) prior to osteotomy. In Study 1, the animals were maintained on the same respective treatment for ~6 weeks. In Study 2, the animals were also continued on the same therapy or switched from Veh to ODN or ODN to Veh for 15 weeks. No treatment-related impairment of fracture union was seen by qualitative histological assessments in the first study. Cartilage retention was detected in the calluses of ALN-treated rabbits at week-6, while calluses in the ODN and Veh groups contained bony tissue with significantly less residual cartilage. ODN treatment also markedly increased the number of cathepsin K-(+) osteoclasts in the callus, indicating enhanced callus remodeling. From the second study, ex vivo DXA and pQCT confirmed that ODN treatment pre- and post-osteotomy increased callus bone mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) versus Veh (p < 0.001) and discontinuation of ODN post-surgery returned callus BMD to Veh. Peak load of ODN- or ALN-treated calluses were comparable to Veh. ODN increased callus yield load (20%, p = 0.056) and stiffness (26%, p < 0.05) versus Veh. These studies demonstrated that ODN increased mineralized callus during the early phase of fracture repair without impairing callus formation or biomechanical integrity at the fracture site. PMID:26178170

  1. Curvature Radius Measurements From the Ulnar Trochlear Notch in Large Dogs.

    PubMed

    Alves-Pimenta, Sofia; Ginja, Mário Manuel; Colaço, Jorge; Fernandes, Armando Manuel; Melo-Pinto, Pedro; Colaço, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    Assessing the ulnar trochlear notch (UTN) radiographic anatomy has been considered important, but difficult, in the diagnosis of elbow dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate UTN curvature of natural elbows in radiographs, using a methodology applied to disarticulated joints. The methodology was implemented and validated using dedicated software created by the authors. Mediolateral extended (MLE) and mediolateral flexed (MLF) elbow views were used from 20 joints from canine cadavers that were over 20 kg. After arranging the bones to avoid radiographic overlapping of the bones, an additional mediolateral radioulnar (MLRU) view was made. Curvature radius measurements from the central ridge of the UTN of each elbow were acquired in the MLRU view, using the software. The measurements were repeated in a second session, to determine repeatability. Then similar UTN measurements were taken from the MLE and MLF views, to determine reproducibility. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for repeatability and reproducibility of measurements were above 0.98 (95% confidence interval limits >0.75). The 95% limits of agreement (LA) for repeatability were -2.98 to 3.19 mm. The 95% LA for reproducibility between MLRU and MLE views were -4.32 to 3.75 mm. The 95% LA for reproducibility between MLRU and MLF views were -5.02 to 4.07 mm. The methodology and software are determined to be both precise and suitable to evaluate the UTN in MLE and MLF elbow views of large breed dogs, for anatomical and clinical purposes. In the future it would be useful to characterize normal and dysplastic UTN of different dog breeds. PMID:26138926

  2. Proconsul heseloni distal radial and ulnar epiphyses from the Kaswanga Primate Site, Rusinga Island, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Daver, Guillaume; Nakatsukasa, Masato

    2015-03-01

    Only two distal epiphyses of a radius and ulna are consensually attributed to the holotype skeleton of Proconsul heseloni, KNM-RU 2036. Here, we describe seven adult and immature distal antebrachial (radial and ulnar) epiphyses from two other individuals of P. heseloni from the Lower Miocene deposits of the Kaswanga Primate Site (KPS), Rusinga Island, Kenya. Because KNM-RU 2036 and KNM-KPS individuals III and VIII are conspecific and penecontemporaneous, their comparison provides the opportunity i) to characterize, for the first time, the morphological variation of the distal radioulnar joint in a Miocene ape, P. heseloni, and ii) to investigate the functional and evolutionary implications. Our results show that the distal antebrachial epiphyses of KNM-KPS III and VIII correspond to stages of bone maturation that are more advanced than those of KNM-RU 2036 (larger articulations and sharper articular borders and ligament attachments that are more developed). Accordingly, functional interpretations based solely on the skeleton of KNM-RU 2036 have involved an underestimation of the forearm rotation abilities of P. heseloni. In particular, the KPS fossils do not exhibit the primitive morphology of distal radioulnar syndesmosis, as those of KNM-RU 2036 and most nonhominoid primates, but rather the morphology of an incipient diarthrosis (as in extant lorisines and hominoids). The distal radioulnar diarthrosis permits more mobility and maintenance of the wrist during repeated and slow rotation of the forearms, which facilitates any form of quadrupedal locomotion on discontinuous and variably oriented supports. By providing the oldest evidence of a distal radioulnar joint in an early Miocene hominoid, the main conclusions of this study are consistent with the role of cautious climbing as a prerequisite step for the emergence of positional adaptations in apes. PMID:25577018

  3. Peroneal nerve entrapment in runners.

    PubMed

    Leach, R E; Purnell, M B; Saito, A

    1989-01-01

    In a practice involving large groups of athletes, seven runners and one soccer player with peroneal nerve compression neuropathy secondary to exercise have been found. Running incited pain, numbness and tingling to varying degrees in all patients, and examination after running revealed muscle weakness and a positive percussion test as the nerve winds around the fibular neck. Nerve conduction velocity studies confirmed the diagnosis in the five patients on whom the test was performed; other studies served primarily to exclude other causes of pain. All patients were treated surgically by neurolysis of the peroneal nerve as it travels under the sharp fibrous edge of the peroneus longus origin. Seven of eight had excellent results and returned to their previous level of physical exertion without further symptoms. We think entrapment of the peroneal nerve at the fibular neck is a more common entity than previously recognized, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of exertional lateral leg pain. PMID:2757134

  4. Measurement of ulnar variance and radial inclination on X-rays of healed distal radius fractures. With the axis of the distal radius or ulna?

    PubMed

    Thuysbaert, Gilles; Ringburg, Akkie; Petronilia, Steven; Vanden Berghe, Alex; Hollevoet, Nadine

    2015-06-01

    Ulnar variance and radial inclination are radiological parameters frequently used to evaluate displacement of distal radius fractures. In most studies measurements are based on the long central axis of the distal radius, although the axis of the distal ulna can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine which axis is more reliable. Four observers performed measurements on standard anteroposterior digital wrist X-rays of 20 patients taken 1 and 2 months after sustaining an extra-articular distal radius fracture. Intraobserver reliability was similar with both methods. No difference was found in interobserver reliability between both methods for ulnar variance, but for radial inclination it was better with the axis through the radius. Measurements on two X-rays of the same wrist taken at a different moment were similar with both methods. It can be concluded that the central axis of the distal radius can remain the basis to determine ulnar variance and radial inclination. PMID:26280972

  5. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  6. SIDELINE ASSESSMENT AND RETURN‐TO‐PLAY DECISION‐MAKING FOR AN ACUTE ELBOW ULNAR COLLATERAL LIGAMENT SPRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Throwing athletes are at high risk for elbow injuries. The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow, in particular, must resist large valgus forces during the throwing motion. An acute UCL sprain requires the sports medicine professional on the sidelines to thoroughly assess the injury and reach a return‐to‐play decision in a timely manner. A sports medicine professional who makes an accurate diagnosis, reaches a correct return‐to‐play decision, and initiates early treatment gives the athlete the best chance for a rapid, successful return to their sport. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:23593559

  7. Benign pigmented lesions.

    PubMed

    Bogdan Allemann, Inja; Goldberg, David J

    2011-01-01

    Benign pigmented lesions are a frequent complaint in dermatological patients, especially those seeking advice and therapy in a laser or cosmetic practice. Significant advances in laser technology over the last decades now allow us to effectively and safely treat various benign pigmented lesions. However, a thorough understanding of the biology of the lesion to be treated, the physical properties of the lasers to be used, and laser-tissue interactions is crucial for a successful and safe treatment. This chapter will give an overview of the types of benign pigmented lesions that can be treated with lasers and the specific lasers used to treat them. PMID:21865801

  8. Ethanol Ablation of a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Presenting as a Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chin, Matthew; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chang, Kenneth; Lee, John; Samarasena, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Ethanol has historically been used as an ablative agent for a variety of lesions. One of the more common applications of this technique is celiac plexus neurolysis; however, recent reports have suggested a role for the endoscopic alcohol ablation of a variety of solid and cystic lesions. We report a novel case of endoscopic ethanol ablation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as a small bowel obstruction. PMID:26504873

  9. Ethanol Ablation of a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Presenting as a Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Lin; Chang, Kenneth; Lee, John; Samarasena, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has historically been used as an ablative agent for a variety of lesions. One of the more common applications of this technique is celiac plexus neurolysis; however, recent reports have suggested a role for the endoscopic alcohol ablation of a variety of solid and cystic lesions. We report a novel case of endoscopic ethanol ablation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as a small bowel obstruction. PMID:26504873

  10. Median nerve electrophysiologic parameters and psychomotor performance in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodriquez, A A; Radwin, R G; Jeng, O J

    1993-01-01

    Psychomotor performance (PMP) involving a repeated, rapid pinch and release task was correlated with median nerve electrophysiologic parameters for control subjects (16 hands) and subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) (14 hands). The psychomotor task was used because of its functional resemblance to many work related activities. A strain gauge dynamometer was repeatedly pinched to a predetermined force level using the index finger and thumb and then released as rapidly as possible, while measuring the actual isometric force exerted. Discrete visual and auditory feedback was provided. Median and ulnar nerve motor latencies and amplitudes, as well as median antidromic sensory latencies and amplitudes, and transcarpal latencies and amplitudes were obtained. CTS subjects had longer median motor and sensory latencies and were weaker than controls, however median motor and sensory amplitudes were not statistically different. A strong relationship was observed between electrophysiologic variables and PMP, which could not be accounted for by age differences alone. It is unclear whether the measured differences in PMP are related to sensory or motor deficits. PMID:8404568

  11. [Management of a foot deformity, caused by paralysis of the peroneal nerve, by transfer of the tendon of the posterior tibial muscle].

    PubMed

    Simonka, J A

    1991-01-01

    Author describes two cases: in the first, in consequence of a lesion of the deep peroneal nerve during operation, the development a paralytic drop foot, in the second, in consequence of a lesion of unknown etiology of the common peroneal nerve, paralytic club foot could be observed. In both cases the intraosseal transposition of the tendon of the posterior tibial muscle on the second cuneiform bone was performed with good result. PMID:1681153

  12. In vivo detection of nerve injury in familial amyloid polyneuropathy by magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Kollmer, Jennifer; Hund, Ernst; Hornung, Benjamin; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan O; Kimmich, Christoph; Kristen, Arnt V; Purrucker, Jan; Röcken, Christoph; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2015-03-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy is a rare, autosomal-dominant inherited multisystem disorder usually manifesting with a rapidly progressive, axonal, distally-symmetric polyneuropathy. The detection of nerve injury by nerve conduction studies is limited, due to preferential involvement of small-fibres in early stages. We investigated whether lower limb nerve-injury can be detected, localized and quantified in vivo by high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography. We prospectively included 20 patients (12 male and eight female patients, mean age 47.9 years, range 26-66) with confirmed mutation in the transthyretin gene: 13 with symptomatic polyneuropathy and seven asymptomatic gene carriers. A large age- and sex-matched cohort of healthy volunteers served as controls (20 male and 20 female, mean age 48.1 years, range 30-73). All patients received detailed neurological and electrophysiological examinations and were scored using the Neuropathy Impairment Score-Lower Limbs, Neuropathy Deficit and Neuropathy Symptom Score. Magnetic resonance neurography (3 T) was performed with large longitudinal coverage from proximal thigh to ankle-level and separately for each leg (140 axial slices/leg) by using axial T2-weighted (repetition time/echo time = 5970/55 ms) and dual echo (repetition time 5210 ms, echo times 12 and 73 ms) turbo spin echo 2D sequences with spectral fat saturation. A 3D T2-weighted inversion-recovery sequence (repetition time/echo time 3000/202 ms) was acquired for imaging of the spinal nerves and lumbar plexus (50 axial slice reformations). Precise manual segmentation of the spinal/sciatic/tibial/common peroneal nerves was performed on each slice. Histogram-based normalization of nerve-voxel signal intensities was performed using the age- and sex-matched control group as normative reference. Nerve-voxels were subsequently classified as lesion-voxels if a threshold of >1.2 (normalized signal-intensity) was exceeded. At distal thigh level, where a predominant nerve-lesion-voxel burden was observed, signal quantification was performed by calculating proton spin density and T2-relaxation time as microstructural markers of nerve tissue integrity. The total number of nerve-lesion voxels (cumulated from proximal-to-distal) was significantly higher in symptomatic patients (20 405 ± 1586) versus asymptomatic gene carriers (12 294 ± 3199; P = 0.036) and versus controls (6536 ± 467; P < 0.0001). It was also higher in asymptomatic carriers compared to controls (P = 0.043). The number of nerve-lesion voxels was significantly higher at thigh level compared to more distal levels (lower leg/ankle) of the lower extremities (f-value = 279.22, P < 0.0001). Further signal-quantification at this proximal site (thigh level) revealed a significant increase of proton-density (P < 0.0001) and T2-relaxation-time (P = 0.0011) in symptomatic patients, whereas asymptomatic gene-carriers presented with a significant increase of proton-density only. Lower limb nerve injury could be detected and quantified in vivo on microstructural level by magnetic resonance neurography in symptomatic familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and also in yet asymptomatic gene carriers, in whom imaging detection precedes clinical and electrophysiological manifestation. Although symptoms start and prevail distally, the focus of predominant nerve injury and injury progression was found proximally at thigh level with strong and unambiguous lesion-contrast. Imaging of proximal nerve lesions, which are difficult to detect by nerve conduction studies, may have future implications also for other distally-symmetric polyneuropathies. PMID:25526974

  13. Long-term results of nervous tissue alterations caused by epineurial electrode application: an experimental study in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Koller, R; Girsch, W; Liegl, C; Gruber, H; Holle, J; Losert, U; Mayr, W; Thoma, H

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate the long-term effects of epineurial electrode application for functional electrical stimulation (FES) the left sciatic nerve of seven rats was exposed. Four ring-shaped stainless steel wire electrodes were sutured to the epineurium of each nerve in the same manner as performed clinically for carrousel stimulation in man. The nerves were reexposed 1 year after implantation and the stimulation threshold to obtain a tetanic contraction in the lower limb was determined for each electrode. Afterwards the animals were sacrificed. The electrodes were excised and cross sections of the sciatic nerve directly at site of the electrodes, 2-mm proximal and 2-mm distal to them were harvested for histologic and planimetric assessment of nerve lesions. The area of damaged neural tissue was expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area within the perineural sheath. The sciatic nerves of the right side served as controls. The values for the stimulation thresholds ranged between 0.1 and 1.0 mA (mean 0.43 mA). By morphometric examination five of seven nerves were seen altered, the altered areas captured between 1% and 4.8% of the total cross-sectional area of the nerves within the perineural sheath. Besides two specimens, all altered nerve segments exhibited distinct signs of nerve fiber regeneration. The clinical implications of the results for long-term electrical stimulation, such as phrenic pacing, are discussed. PMID:1370990

  14. Monitoring the Laryngeal Nerves During Thyroidectomy. Initial 115 Cases Experience.

    PubMed

    Popescu, R; Ponoran, D; Ignat, O; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    The lesions of the laryngeal nerves, despite low incidence, are the most severe long term complications after thyroidectomy. Visualization after careful dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is now the golden standard among thyroid surgeons. We assessed traditional landmarks for the identification of RLN and anatomic high risk situation. The study also presented our initial experience using neuro monitoring of RLN (IONM) during surgery. The results show a recognizable Zuckerkandl tubercle in 162 of the 222 cases (72,97%). After dissection RLN was found posterior from TZ in 154 cases (95,06%) and lateral from TZ in 8 cases (4,93%). The identification of the Zuckerkandl tubercle is a useful landmark for RLN localization. As concerning high risk situations we found 2 non recurrent laryngeal nerves (both on the right side). Extra laryngeal ramification of RLN is an anatomical reality with significant incidence (23,8% in our study) and major surgical involvement. Extra laryngeal ramification of RLN occurs more often between the cross point with inferior thyroid artery and larynx entry point. Monitoring the branches of RLN we obtain major EMG signal on the anterior one. The surgical meaning is that the anterior branch carries the most important motor fibers and we have to pay extra care in the correct identification and preservation of it. From a total of 222 visually identified RLN we have 215 nerves (96,84%) with positive EMG signal on monitoring. For 7 nerves (3,15%) we had no EMG signal. In 3 cases (2 total thyroidectomies and 1 lobectomy) involving 5 RLN there was a false negative result caused by electrode malposition or desoldering from endotracheal tube. Our initial experience shows that IONM is harmless, easy to handle and a useful tool for identifying the nerve and confirm its integrity. More extended studies are needed to show if intraoperative monitoring decreases the rate of RLN iatrogenic injury. PMID:26305195

  15. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  16. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  17. Sagittal mandibular osteotomy for removal of intraosseous lesion.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Júlio César Silva; Garcia, Idelmo Rangel; de Melo, Willian Morais; de Matos Barbosa, Saulo; Rabêlo, Paulo Maria Santos; Bastos, Eider Guimarães

    2014-05-01

    The ramus sagittal split osteotomy or mandibular body is an established technique for correction of dentofacial deformities but can have an accurate indication in cases requiring surgical access to remove lesions or more teeth included in the region of the mandibular angle. The main advantages of this technique are the possibility of preservation of the inferior alveolar nerve bundle and significant reduction in postoperative morbidity. In this article, the authors show a case in which the sagittal osteotomy of the mandible was used to gain access for removal of a lesion (complex odontoma). PMID:24820725

  18. Modified technique for correction of isolated radial head dislocation without apparent ulnar bowing: a retrospective case study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lei; Li, Yan-Hui; Sun, Da-Hui; Zhu, Dong; Ning, Shu-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: There is currently no general consensus on the optimal treatment of chronic radial head dislocation. Material and Methods: Considering that the annular ligament is important in maintaining elbow stability, we developed a modified method for annular ligament reconstruction in pediatric cases of radial head dislocation without ulnar bowing. We retrospectively investigated the therapeutic outcomes of this technique in a series of cases. We used our modified technique for the treatment of five patients between January 2006 and January 2012. The average age of the patients at the time of injury was 9 years (range, 6-14 years), and the patients were followed up for 1 to 3 years. Results: The perioperative and follow-up data of the patients were examined. All five surgical procedures were completed uneventfully and had been tolerated well by the patients, with minimal complications. Remarkable improvement was noted in all the cases at the end of the follow-up period. Conclusions: Our modified technique for annular ligament reconstruction was effective in achieving good reduction of the radial head dislocation with minimal complications in pediatric cases of isolated radial head dislocation without apparent ulnar bowing. PMID:26770420

  19. Stabilization of Volar Ulnar Rim Fractures of the Distal Radius: Current Techniques and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Maureen A; Shin, Alexander Y; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    Background Distal radius fractures involving the lunate facet can be challenging to manage. Reports have shown the volar carpal subluxation/dislocation that can occur if the facet is not appropriately stabilized. Literature Review Recent emphasis in the literature has underscored the difficulty in managing this fracture fragment, suggesting standard volar plates may not be able to adequately stabilize the fragment. This article reviews the current literature with a special emphasis on fixation with a specifically designed fragment-specific hook plate to secure the lunate facet. Case Description An extended flexor carpi radialis volar approach was made which allows access to the distal volar ulnar fracture fragment. Once provisionally stabilized with Kirschner wire fixation, a volar hook plate was applied to capture this fragment. Additional fracture stabilization was used as deemed necessary to stabilize the remaining distal radius fracture. Clinical Relevance The volar marginal rim fragment remains a challenge in distal radius fracture management. Use of a hook plate to address the volar ulnar corner allows for stable fixation without loss of reduction at intermediate-term follow-up. PMID:27104076

  20. Does Geographic Location Matter on the Prevalence of Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Collegiate Baseball Pitchers?

    PubMed Central

    Zaremski, Jason L.; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Donlan, Robert M.; Brisbane, Sonya Tang; Farmer, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There has been a significant amount of research in the prevention of throwing injuries. However, one area of research that is lacking is geographic location of play. Warm climates may permit year-round play and increased exposure to throwing arm injury risk. Hypotheses: (1) Pitchers from southern institutions would have greater rates of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCL-R) compared with pitchers from northern institutions. (2) Pitchers originating from high school teams in warm weather states would have a greater risk of undergoing UCL-R while in college. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: This study was completed by reviewing publicly obtained records of male collegiate baseball players during the 2008 through 2014 seasons. Data were accessed through online search engines, online baseball media guides, and school websites. Results: A total of 5315 player-years and 2575 pitcher-years were identified. Fifty-eight UCL-R cases were found in collegiate pitchers, 40 of which occurred in the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and 18 in the Big Ten. More injuries (36/58) occurred in pitchers who participated in high school baseball in southern states as compared with northern states (22/58), regardless of location of collegiate participation (χ2 = 28.8, P < .05). The injury rate for pitchers who participated in high school baseball in southern states was 25.3 per 1000 player-years versus 19.1 per 1000 player-years in northern states, with a risk ratio of 1.32 (χ2 = 0.89, P = .35). The injury rate for the SEC versus Big Ten pitchers was 13.3 per 1000 player-years versus 7.8 per 1000 player-years, with a risk ratio of 1.71 (χ2 = 1.45, P = .23). Conclusion: There is a greater likelihood of undergoing UCL-R in the SEC compared with the Big Ten. There is also an increased risk for UCL-R for pitchers who played high school baseball in southern states versus northern states, irrespective of collegiate play location. Clinical Relevance: Pitchers originating from high schools in a warm weather climate may be more likely to undergo UCL-R. PMID:26740953

  1. Stress Sonography of the Ulnar Collateral Ligament of the Elbow in Professional Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Ciccotti, Michael G.; Atanda, Alfred; Nazarian, Levon N.; Dodson, Christopher C.; Holmes, Laurens; Cohen, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Background An injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow is potentially career threatening for elite baseball pitchers. Stress ultrasound (US) of the elbow allows for evaluation of both the UCL and the ulnohumeral joint space at rest and with stress. Hypothesis Stress US can identify morphological and functional UCL changes and may predict the risk of a UCL injury in elite pitchers. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A total of 368 asymptomatic professional baseball pitchers underwent preseason stress US of their dominant and non-dominant elbows over a 10-year period (2002-2012). Stress US examinations were performed in 30° of flexion at rest and with 150 N of valgus stress by a single musculoskeletal radiologist. Ligament thickness, ulnohumeral joint space width, and ligament abnormalities (hypoechoic foci and calcifications) were documented. Results There were 736 stress US studies. The mean UCL thickness in the dominant elbow (6.15 mm) was significantly greater than that in the nondominant elbow (4.82 mm) (P < .0001). The mean stressed ulnohumeral joint space width in the dominant elbow (4.56 mm) was significantly greater than that in the nondominant elbow (3.72 mm) (P < .02). In the dominant arm, hypoechoic foci and calcifications were both significantly more prevalent (28.0% vs 3.5% and 24.9% vs 1.6%, respectively; P < .001). In the 12 players who incurred a UCL injury, there were nonsignificant (P > .05) increases in baseline ligament thickness, ulnohumeral joint space gapping with stress, and incidence of hypoechoic foci and calcifications. More than 1 stress US examination was performed in 131 players, with a mean increase of 0.78 mm in joint space gapping with subsequent evaluations. Conclusion Stress US indicates that the UCL in the dominant elbow of elite pitchers is thicker, is more likely to have hypoechoic foci and/or calcifications, and has increased laxity with valgus stress over time. PMID:24473498

  2. Risk Stratification for Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury in Major League Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    DeFroda, Steven F.; Kriz, Peter K.; Hall, Amber M.; Zurakowski, David; Fadale, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injury has become increasingly common in Major League Baseball (MLB) players in recent years. Hypothesis: There is a significant difference in preinjury fastball velocity between MLB pitchers with tears and matched controls without UCL injury. Pitchers with injuries are throwing harder and getting injured earlier in their MLB careers. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From 2007 to 2014, a total of 170 documented UCL injuries (156 pitchers, 14 position players) occurred in MLB. Inclusion criteria for this study consisted of any player who tore his UCL in MLB during this time frame. There were 130 regular-season tears (April-September). From this group, 118 players who pitched more than 100 innings prior to tear were matched to subjects with no tear and were compared using a logistic regression analysis. A subgroup of “early tear” players who threw less than 100 career innings (n = 37) was also identified and compared with the larger tear group using a logistic regression analysis. Results: Of the 130 tears that occurred during the regular season, a significantly larger number (62%) occurred in the first 3 months (P = .011). The rate of UCL tears per MLB player (P = .001) was statistically significant. In the group of 118 matched tears, the mean fastball velocity was greater in the tear group (91.7 mph) compared with the control group (91.0 mph; P = .014). Furthermore, relief pitchers made up a greater percentage of the early tear group (<100 innings) compared with the later tear group (P = .011). Sixteen of the 170 UCL tears (9.4%) were recurrent tears, with 5 of 16 experiencing both tear and retear within the past 4 years. Conclusion: There is a statistically significant difference in the mean fastball velocity of pitchers who injure their UCL. Small increases in pitcher fastball velocity are a main contribution to the increased rate of tear in MLB. In addition, there has been an increased incidence of injury in the first 3 months of the season. Finally, early tears are more likely to occur in relief pitchers than starters. PMID:26848482

  3. Fiber components of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gacek, R R; Lyon, M J

    1976-01-01

    Experimental neuroanatomical methods were employed in 21 adult cats to determine 1) the number and size of myelinated motor and sensory fibers in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and 2) the fiber components originating in the nucleus ambiguus (NA) and retrofacial nucleus (RFN) of the brain stem. Intracranial transection of the X and XI cranial nerves and selective destruction of the NA or RFN were the experimental lesions inflicted in order to obtain the following results. About 55% (312) of the right RLN (565 fibers) is composed of myelinated motor nerve fibers which measure 4 mu - 9 mu in diameter. Nine percent come from the RFN and are smaller (4-6 mu) than the 46% which emanate from the NA and measure 6-9 mu in diameter. The remaining 45% of the RLN is made up of sensory neurons which can be divided into three groups. 1) The largest numerical group (32%) is very small in caliber (1-3 mu) and supplies extralaryngeal regions (trachea, esophagus). 2) The intermediate size fiber group (4-9 mu) comprises 11% of the RLN and probably supplies the subglottic mucosa. 3) The smallest group (2%) of sensory fibers is the largest in diameter (10-15 mu) and may represent either the innervation of muscle spindles or afferents from the superior laryngeal nerve coursing down into the chest. PMID:949153

  4. Mechanisms of insulin action on sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Anderson, Erling A.; Johnson, Alan Kim; Mark, Allyn L.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of arterial hypertension. Although insulin may elevate arterial pressure, in part, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the sites and mechanisms of insulin-induced sympathetic excitation remain uncertain. While sympathoexcitation during insulin may be mediated by the baroreflex, or by modulation of norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve endings, it has been shown repeatedly that insulin increases sympathetic outflow by actions on the central nervous system. Previous studies employing norepinephrine turnover have suggested that insulin causes sympathoexcitation by acting in the hypothalamus. Recent experiments from our laboratory involving direct measurements of regional sympathetic nerve activity have provided further evidence that insulin acts in the central nervous system. For example, administration of insulin into the third cerebralventricle increased lumbar but not renal or adrenal sympathetic nerve activity in normotensive rats. Interestingly, this pattern of regional sympathetic nerve responses to central neural administration of insulin is similar to that seen with systemic administration of insulin. Further, lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle hypothalamic (AV3V) region abolished increases in sympathetic activity to systemic administration of insulin with euglycemic clamp, suggesting that AV3V-related structures are critical for insulin-induced elevations in sympathetic outflow.

  5. Nerve Transfers for the Restoration of Wrist, Finger, and Thumb Extension After High Radial Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Pet, Mitchell A; Lipira, Angelo B; Ko, Jason H

    2016-05-01

    High radial nerve injury is a common pattern of peripheral nerve injury most often associated with orthopedic trauma. Nerve transfers to the wrist and finger extensors, often from the median nerve, offer several advantages when compared to nerve repair or grafting and tendon transfer. In this article, we discuss the forearm anatomy pertinent to performing these nerve transfers and review the literature surrounding nerve transfers for wrist, finger, and thumb extension. A suggested algorithm for management of acute traumatic high radial nerve palsy is offered, and our preferred surgical technique for treatment of high radial nerve palsy is provided. PMID:27094891

  6. Case Report: Intraneural Intracanalicular Ganglion Cyst of the Hypoglossal Nerve Treated by Extradural Transcondylar Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin-Freiert, Arzu; Fugleholm, Kåre; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an intraneural ganglion cyst of the hypoglossal canal. The patient presented with unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a small lesion in the hypoglossal canal with no contrast enhancement and high signal on T2-weighted imaging. The lesion was assumed to be a cystic schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve. Stereotactic irradiation was considered, but in accordance with the patient's wishes, surgical exploration was performed. This revealed that, rather than a schwannoma, the patient had an intraneural ganglion cyst, retrospectively contraindicating irradiation as an option. This case illustrates a very rare location of an intraneural ganglion cyst in the hypoglossal nerve. To our knowledge there are no previous reports of an intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the hypoglossal canal. PMID:26251801

  7. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  8. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePlus

    ... supply (as occurs in diabetes), drugs, and toxins. Did You Know... Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with ... depends on the cause. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  9. Optic nerve monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Paul; Kokemüller, Horst; Tavassol, Frank; Lindhorst, Daniel; Lemound, Juliana; Essig, Harald; Rücker, Martin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-06-01

    Orbital and anterior skull base surgery is generally performed close to the prechiasmatic visual pathway, and clear strategies for detecting and handling visual pathway damage are essential. To overcome the common problem of a missed clinical examination because of an uncooperative or unresponsive patient, flash visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms should be used. These electrophysiologic examination techniques can provide evidence of intact, pathologic, or absent conductivity of the visual pathway when clinical assessment is not feasible. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms are thus essential diagnostic procedures not only for primary diagnosis but also for intraoperative evaluation. A decision for or against treatment of a visual pathway injury has to be made as fast as possible due to the enormous importance of the time elapsed with such injuries; this can be achieved additionally using multislice spiral computed tomography. The first-line conservative treatment of choice for such injuries is megadose methylprednisolone therapy. Surgery is used to decompress the orbital compartment by exposure of the intracanalicular part of the optic nerve in the case of optic canal compression. Modern craniomaxillofacial surgery requires detailed consideration of the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic visual pathway damage with the ultimate goal of preserving visual acuity. PMID:24436741

  10. Optic Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Paul; Kokemüller, Horst; Tavassol, Frank; Lindhorst, Daniel; Lemound, Juliana; Essig, Harald; Rücker, Martin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Orbital and anterior skull base surgery is generally performed close to the prechiasmatic visual pathway, and clear strategies for detecting and handling visual pathway damage are essential. To overcome the common problem of a missed clinical examination because of an uncooperative or unresponsive patient, flash visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms should be used. These electrophysiologic examination techniques can provide evidence of intact, pathologic, or absent conductivity of the visual pathway when clinical assessment is not feasible. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms are thus essential diagnostic procedures not only for primary diagnosis but also for intraoperative evaluation. A decision for or against treatment of a visual pathway injury has to be made as fast as possible due to the enormous importance of the time elapsed with such injuries; this can be achieved additionally using multislice spiral computed tomography. The first-line conservative treatment of choice for such injuries is megadose methylprednisolone therapy. Surgery is used to decompress the orbital compartment by exposure of the intracanalicular part of the optic nerve in the case of optic canal compression. Modern craniomaxillofacial surgery requires detailed consideration of the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic visual pathway damage with the ultimate goal of preserving visual acuity. PMID:24436741

  11. Noninvasive imaging of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Rangavajla, Gautam; Mokarram, Nassir; Masoodzadehgan, Nazanin; Pai, S Balakrishna; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of peripheral nerve imaging extend the capabilities of imaging modalities to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with peripheral nerve maladies. Methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its derivative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), ultrasound (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) are capable of assessing nerve structure and function following injury and relating the state of the nerve to electrophysiological and histological analysis. Of the imaging methods surveyed here, each offered unique and interesting advantages related to the field. MRI offered the opportunity to visualize immune activity on the injured nerve throughout the course of the regeneration process, and DTI offered numerical characterization of the injury and the ability to develop statistical bases for diagnosing injury. US extends imaging to the treatment phase by enabling more precise analgesic applications following surgery, and PET represents a novel method of assessing nerve injury through analysis of relative metabolism rates in injured and healthy tissue. Exciting new possibilities to enhance and extend the abilities of imaging methods are also discussed, including innovative contrast agents, some of which enable multimodal imaging approaches and present opportunities for treatment application. PMID:25766202

  12. Problematic lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Moscarella, Elvira; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Lallas, Aimilios; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Pizzigoni, Stefania; Zalaudek, Iris

    2013-10-01

    Melanoma in childhood is rare, and appears more commonly either in association with a preexisting (congenital) nevus, or with spitzoid features than de novo. Thus, problematic melanocytic lesions in children are essentially represented by congenital nevi and Spitz nevi that can be regarded as melanoma precursors and melanoma simulators, respectively. As a consequence, clinical and dermoscopic features of melanoma in children differ from those in an adult population. Herein we describe common clinical and dermoscopic features of problematic lesions in children, focusing on congenital and Spitz/Reed nevi, and including other problematic lesions, such as atypical, blue, acral, and scalp nevi. PMID:24075543

  13. Roundworm-associated median nerve compression: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Jose M; Ramirez, Miguel A; Essilfie, Anthony; Taylor, Cristina E; Stearns, Harry C; Mollano, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Human dirofilariasis is a rare zoonotic infection caused by the bite of a blood-feeding mosquito infected with a filarial nematode (roundworm). these infections can manifest as stationary or migratory subcutaneous or conjunctival nodules. We report an unusual case of Dirofilaria tenuis (D.tenuis) infection that developed into a space- occupying lesion in the wrist leading to median nerve compression pathology in an otherwise healthy young woman. We also comment on the natural history of the disease and report the outcome after surgical excision. To our knowledge, we are the first to report a case of median nerve compression caused by a growing subcutaneous nodule from a D.tenuis infection. PMID:24027489

  14. Recurrent largngeal nerve paralysis: a laryngographic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, F.P.

    1983-07-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a relatively common entity, usually resulting from a pathologic process of the vagus nerve or its recurrent larynegeal branch. It is rarely caused by intralargngeal lesions. Four teen patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP) were evaluated by laryngography, computed tomography (CT), or both. In the evaluation of the paramedian cord, CT was limited in its ability to differentiate between tumor or RLNP as the cause of the fixed cord, but it yielded more information than laryngography on the structural abnormalities of the larynx and pre-epiglottic and paralaryngeal spaces. Laryngography revealed distinct features of RLNP and is the procedure of choice for evaluation of functional abnormalities of the larynx until further experience with faster CT scanners and dynamic scanning of the larynx is gained.

  15. Intrathoracic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor: Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Features

    PubMed Central

    Ralli, Megha; Singh, Sunita; Hasija, Sonia; Verma, Renuka

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare nerve sheath tumor derived from Schwann cells or pleuripotent cells of neural crest. Neurogenic tumors make about 10-20% of all mediastinal tumors. Incidence of MPNST is 0.001% in general population and 0.16% in patients with neurofibromatosis I (NF I). We report a case of 60 year female presenting with progressive cough and breathlessness for 2 years. The CECT revealed multiple focal enhancing lesions along inferior mediastinal pleural surface and along lateral pleural surface. A thoracotomy and tumor excision was done and MPNST was diagnosed on microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This case highlights that this unusual tumor may involve lung parenchyma. So this possibility should be kept in mind in patients with intrathoracic mass. PMID:26516330

  16. Reversible facial nerve palsy due to parotid abscess☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Hajiioannou, Jiannis K.; Florou, Vasiliki; Kousoulis, Panagiotis; Kretzas, Dimitris; Moshovakis, Eustratios

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A facial nerve palsy combined with parotid enlargement usually suggests malignancy. It is highly unusual for facial nerve palsy to result from a benign situation such as inflammation or infection of the gland. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a rare case of facial nerve palsy due to parotid abscess. DISCUSSION A literature search retrieved thirty-two cases of facial nerve palsy due to benign parotid lesions since 1969. Only nine reported the presence of a parotid abscess. The etiology of paralysis remains unknown although certain factors such as the virulence of the offending organisms or perineuritis, have been suggested. Best diagnostic evaluation and management are discussed. CONCLUSION In clinical practice, exclusion of malignancy is mandatory, as it represents the most common cause of facial palsy in the presence of a parotid lump. PMID:24096025

  17. [Unusual manifestation of zoster sine herpete as unilateral caudal cranial nerve syndrome].

    PubMed

    Terborg, C; Förster, G; Sliwka, U

    2001-12-01

    Multiple lower cranial nerve palsies are a rare complication following varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation, especially if typical herpetic eruptions are lacking. We report a case of a 45-year-old, immunocompetent male with unilateral involvement of the cranial nerves VIII, IX, X, and XI without skin lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies revealed mononuclear pleocytosis with intrathecal antibody synthesis against VZV, while polymerase chain reaction (PCR) did not detect VZV or HSV (herpes simplex virus). The patient almost completely recovered after aciclovir administration. VZV reactivation without rash (zoster sine herpete) may lead to multiple cranial nerve palsies. PCR is a useful tool to detect VZV-DNA in CSF, but negative results do not exclude a reactivation. In case of multiple cranial nerve palsies of unknown etiology with mononuclear pleocytosis in CSF tumors of the skull base, meningitis tuberculosis, and meningeosis have to be excluded, and antiviral therapy should be discussed. PMID:11789442

  18. A longitudinal study of pain, personality, and brain plasticity following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ruma; Anastakis, Dimitri J; Katz, Joel; Davis, Karen D

    2016-03-01

    We do not know precisely why pain develops and becomes chronic after peripheral nerve injury (PNI), but it is likely due to biological and psychological factors. Here, we tested the hypotheses that (1) high Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores at the time of injury and repair are associated with pain and cold sensitivity after 1-year recovery and (2) insula gray matter changes reflect the course of injury and improvements over time. Ten patients with complete median and/or ulnar nerve transections and surgical repair were tested ∼3 weeks after surgical nerve repair (time 1) and ∼1 year later for 6 of the 10 patients (time 2). Patients and 10 age-/sex-matched healthy controls completed questionnaires that assessed pain (patients) and personality and underwent quantitative sensory testing and 3T MRI to assess cortical thickness. In patients, pain intensity and neuropathic pain correlated with pain catastrophizing. Time 1 pain catastrophizing trended toward predicting cold pain thresholds at time 2, and at time 1 cortical thickness of the right insula was reduced. At time 2, chronic pain was related to the time 1 pain-PCS relationship and cold sensitivity, pain catastrophizing correlated with cold pain threshold, and insula thickness reversed to control levels. This study highlights the interplay between personality, sensory function, and pain in patients following PNI and repair. The PCS-pain association suggests that a focus on affective or negative components of pain could render patients vulnerable to chronic pain. Cold sensitivity and structural insula changes may reflect altered thermosensory or sensorimotor awareness representations. PMID:26588697

  19. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy . Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and ...

  20. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  1. Cystic lesion around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  2. From nerve net to nerve ring, nerve cord and brain - evolution of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Detlev; Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Marlow, Heather

    2015-12-17

    The puzzle of how complex nervous systems emerged remains unsolved. Comparative studies of neurodevelopment in cnidarians and bilaterians suggest that this process began with distinct integration centres that evolved on opposite ends of an initial nerve net. The 'apical nervous system' controlled general body physiology, and the 'blastoporal nervous system' coordinated feeding movements and locomotion. We propose that expansion, integration and fusion of these centres gave rise to the bilaterian nerve cord and brain. PMID:26675821

  3. Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Several systemic diseases initially present with various oral manifestations. Investigation of these oral symptoms may at times lead to the diagnosis of grave underlying life-threatening conditions. We present one such case, where the patient manifested with gross enlargement of the mandible, along with lesions in the lower limbs. These lesions were the initial manifestation and on further investigations the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:24516769

  4. Evaluation of Parotid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a parotid lesion is broad, and the otolaryngologist must consider inflammatory, neoplastic, autoimmune, traumatic, infectious, or congenital causes. A comprehensive history and physical examination, in conjunction with judicious use of radiographic imaging (MRI, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine studies), laboratory studies, and pathologic analysis (fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, incisional biopsy), facilitates making an accurate diagnosis. This article reviews the key history and physical elements and adjunctive diagnostic tools available for working up parotid lesions. PMID:26902978

  5. Spontaneous Age-related Changes of Peripheral Nerves in Cattle: Morphological and Biochemical Studies.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, E; Bisanzio, D; Mioletti, S; Amedeo, S; Iuliano, A; Bianco, P; Capucchio, M T

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral nerve function is significantly affected by ageing. During ageing process, multiple changes occur on tissue cells and extracellular matrix. The aim of this work was to study the ageing-associated changes of peripheral nerves in adult and old regularly slaughtered cattle compared with young calves, and correlate them to the features reported in humans and laboratory animals. Samples of axial dorsal metacarpal nerves from 44 cows were collected immediately after slaughtering. Each nerve was dissected and divided into two fragments: one used for morphological evaluation (n = 43) and the other one for biochemical analysis (n = 31). Axonal degeneration, demyelination, thickness of perineurium and endoneurium and increase of mast cells were the most important features detected. The mean amount of glycosaminoglycan quantitative content recorded in the samples increased with the age. Axonal degeneration, demyelination and thickness of endoneurium were positively and significantly correlated with biochemistry. The presence of changes affecting the different elements of the peripheral nerves, similar to that reported in humans and in laboratory species, the easy availability of the nerve tissue in this species, the considerable size of the samples and the life conditions more similar to humans than to laboratory animals, allows the authors to consider cattle as a potential good model for the comparative study of spontaneous ageing nerve lesions. PMID:25823666

  6. The transcriptional landscape of dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiying; Xue, Chengbin; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Ruirui; Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Yongjun; Yu, Bin; Liu, Jie; Ding, Fei; Yang, Yuming; Gu, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury, transcriptional responses are orchestrated to regulate the expression of numerous genes in the lesioned nerve, thus activating the intrinsic regeneration program. To better understand the molecular regulation of peripheral nerve regeneration, we aimed at investigating the transcriptional landscape of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) after sciatic nerve transection in rats. The cDNA microarray analysis was used to identify thousands of genes that were differentially expressed at different time points post nerve injury (PNI). The results from Euclidean distance matrix, principal component analysis, and hierarchical clustering indicated that 2 nodal transitions in temporal gene expressions could segregate 3 distinct transcriptional phases within the period of 14 d PNI. The 3 phases were designated as “a stress response phase”, “a pre-regeneration phase”, and “a regeneration phase”, respectively, by referring to morphological observation of post-nerve-injury changes. The gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed the distinct features of biological process, cellular component, and molecular function at each transcriptional phase. Moreover, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes, mainly transcription factors and genes associated with neurite/axon growth, might be integrated into regulatory networks to mediate the regulation of peripheral nerve regeneration in a highly cooperative manner. PMID:26576491

  7. A rare localization of neurothekeomas of radial nerve: A case report.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, L; Camerota, F; Celletti, C; Ioppolo, F; Santilli, V; David, E

    2015-01-01

    Neurothekeoma is a very rare benign connective tissue tumour that presumably derived from nerve sheath cells. We described the case of a rare localization of neurothekeoma in the upper limb with a strange presentation. A 49 years-old woman presented to the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Division of the Umberto I Hospital referring an intensive pain associated to paresthesias at the left forearm lasting from six months. The patient had a history of epicondylitis confirmed with an elbow RMN showing an increased thickness of the tendon insertions on the epicondiloidea region of the elbow. Rehabilitative and physical therapy has been done without symptoms remission. An ultrasound evaluation showed an oval formation well circumscribed in the context of the radial nerve. It was easy to demonstrate the relevance of the radial nerve, following it from the arch of Frohse until the humeral sulcus of the radial nerve. A MRI that showed a mass, mildly hypointense on T1- weighted sequences and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, with nonhomogeneous enhancement post-contrast, attributable to expansionary pathology of the radial nerve. A biopsy was done and the lesion was described as a benign tumor of nerve sheath, i.e., a Neurothekeoma of the radial nerve. Patients was surgically treated, the tumor has been removed and she referred the resolution of symptomatology. PMID:26794820

  8. Neuromuscular hamartoma of the sciatic nerve: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Sandi; Grandhi, Ramesh; Wong, Ricky; Hamilton, Ronald; Greene, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular hamartomas are rare benign tumors with mature skeletal elements mixed with mature neural elements. They present typically as solitary lesions in childhood and have been reported to be associated with cranial nerves or large peripheral nerves such as the brachial plexus, median nerve, and sciatic nerve. To date, eight cases of sciatic nerve neuromuscular hamartomas have been reported. We present a case along with an outline for the natural history of the disease with a review of the literature of the reported cases dating back to 1895. Case Description: An 11-year-old boy presented with progressive right lower extremity pain and atrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large right sciatic nerve mass, and electromyography demonstrated evidence of ongoing denervation and reinnervation. Initial computed tomography-guided biopsy was unrevealing and subsequent open biopsy was consistent with neuromuscular choristoma. Conclusion: Neuromuscular choristomas represent a rare disease. Symptoms of foot deformity, leg size discrepancy, and pain merit a complete work-up including spinal and peripheral nerve etiologies. PMID:23493803

  9. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  10. A Case of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Hypoglossal Nerve after Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tong; Juric-Sekhar, Gordana; Born, Donald; Sekhar, Laligam N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hypoglossal schwannomas are rare. Surgical resection has been the standard treatment modality. Radiosurgery has been increasingly used for treatment. Radiation-associated secondary malignancy/malignant transformation has not been documented in the literature for the treatment of nonvestibular schwannomas. Setting The patient was a 52-year-old man with an enlarging high cervical/skull base lesion 8.5 years after CyberKnife treatment of a presumed vagal schwannoma. A decision was made for surgical resection, and the tumor was found to originate from the hypoglossal nerve intraoperatively. Final pathology diagnosis was malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Results Patient had a gross total resection. Three months after resection, he received fractionated radiation of 50 Gy in 25 fractions and a boost gamma knife radiosurgery of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose surface. He remained tumor free on repeat magnetic resonance imaging 9 months after the resection. Conclusion Although extremely rare, radiation treatment of nonvestibular schwannomas can potentially cause malignant transformation. PMID:25083387

  11. Ophthalmic Features of Outpatient Children Diagnosed with Intracranial Space-Occupying Lesions by Ophthalmologists

    PubMed Central

    Alswaina, Nayef; Elkhamary, Sahar M.; Shammari, Mansour A.; Khan, Arif O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Brain tumors in children often involve the visual system, but most retrospective series are by neurologists or oncologists. In this study we highlight the ophthalmic findings of outpatient children with visual complaints and/or strabismus who, based on ophthalmic examination, were suspected to and confirmed to harbor intracranial space-occupying lesions by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Retrospective case series of children (less than 18 years) who for visual complaints and/or strabismus underwent cranial MRI at a referral eye hospital (2005–2012), which revealed intracranial space-occupying lesions. Exclusion criteria were known preexisting orbital or ocular trauma, ocular tumor, or neurological disease. Results: For 26 patients (3 months-17 years; mean 7 years; median 9 years; and 14 boys), the most common clinical presentation was decreased vision with disc pallor (10) or swelling (three). Other presentations were strabismus with disc pallor or swelling (four; two of which were left sixth nerve palsies), acquired esotropia with diplopia (three; one bilateral and two left sixth nerve palsies), acquired exotropia (four; two of which were bilateral third nerve palsies, one of which was left partial third nerve palsy, and one of which was associated with headache), nystagmus (one), and disc swelling with headache (one). Most lesions were in the sellar/suprasellar space (10), posterior fossa (six), or optic nerve/chasm (four). Conclusions: The majority of outpatient children diagnosed by ophthalmologists with intracranial space-occupying lesions presented with disc swelling or pallor in the context of decreased vision or strabismus. Two strabismus profiles that did not include disc swelling or pallor were acquired sixth nerve palsy and acquired exotropia (with ptosis (third nerve palsy), nystagmus, or headache). PMID:26180471

  12. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the digital branches of the median nerve presenting as carpal tunnel syndrome: A rare case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ranjan; Garg, Cheena; Agarwal, Arjun; Kumar, Parbodh

    2016-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma (LFH) is a rare, benign fibrofatty tumor composed of a proliferation of mature adipocytes within peripheral nerves, which form a palpable neurogenic mass. It affects the median nerve in 66-80% of cases, causing pain and sensory and motor deficits in the affected nerve distribution. Patients typically present with gradually enlarging nontender lesions in the distribution of the affected nerve. The lesion is also seen to be associated with macrodactyly. The pathophysiology of LFH is unknown. Treatment of LFH is based on symptoms of the condition. Histopathology is characteristic. We present a case of young male diagnosed as lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve involving the right index finger. The case is presented due to its rarity. PMID:26960649

  13. Sensory conduction in medial and lateral plantar nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsford, S N

    1988-01-01

    A simple and reliable method of recording medial and lateral plantar nerve sensory action potentials is described. Potentials are recorded with surface electrodes at the ankle using surface electrodes stimulating orthodromically at the sole. The normal values obtained are higher in amplitude than those obtained by the method described by Guiloff and Sherratt and are detectable in older subjects aged over 80 years. The procedure is valuable in the diagnosis of early peripheral neuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, tarsal tunnel syndrome and in differentiation between pre and post ganglionic L5 S1 lesions. PMID:2831304

  14. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  15. Neuropathic Pain: Sensory Nerve Injury or Motor Nerve Injury?

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Guo; Pang, Rui-Ping; Zhou, Li-Jun; Wei, Xu-Hong; Zang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury often induces chronic neuropathic pain. Peripheral nerve is consisted of sensory fibers and motor fibers, it is questioned injury to which type of fibers is responsible for generation of neuropathic pain? Because neuropathic pain is sensory disorder, it is generally believed that the disease should be induced by injury to sensory fibers. In recent years, however, emergent evidence shows that motor fiber injury but not sensory fiber injury is necessary and sufficient for induction of neuropathic pain. Motor fiber injury leads to neuropathic pain by upregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in pain pathway. PMID:26900063

  16. Facial-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis using laser nerve welding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding to microsurgical suturing of hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HFA), and a result of immediate to delayed repair, and to evaluate the effect of laser nerve welding on HFA for reanimation of facial palsy. The first group of five rats underwent immediate HFA by microsurgical suturing and the second group of five rats by CO2 laser welding. The third group of five rats underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing, and the fourth group of five rats by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of five rats served as controls, with intact hypoglossal and facial nerve. In all rats of the four different treatment groups, cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative 6th week and in the normal hypoglossal nerve in the five rats of the control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically, and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 751 +/- 247 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 888 +/- 60 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.117). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 749 +/- 54 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 590 +/- 169 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). The difference was not significant (P = 0.116). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.600), but there was significance between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.009). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1,003 +/- 52. No dehiscence in the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis was seen at the time of re-exploration for injection of CTb in all 10 rats. This study shows that the regeneration of anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by laser welding and microsurgical suturing, and more effective, especially in delayed repair. PMID:16877915

  17. A complex injury of the distal ulnar physis: a case report and brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Thomas; Reddy, Deepak; Hussain, Waqas M; Mangla, Jimmi; Atanda, Alfred; Bielski, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Physeal fractures of the distal forearm are common injuries in children and adolescents. However, Salter-Harris type III and type IV fractures of the distal ulnar epiphysis are often high-energy injuries that require open reduction for restoration of anatomical alignment. These injuries are uncommon and there are few descriptions of them in the contemporary literature. Here we report the case of a 13-year-old boy with a type IV distal ulna fracture not diagnosed with standard radiography. After closed manipulation, an incompletely reduced physis was suspected on the basis of fluoroscopic imaging and comparison radiographs of the contralateral wrist. Computed tomography showed a large, displaced physeal fragment. The patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation. Thorough radiographic assessment should be conducted when there is a high suspicion for these fracture patterns. Appropriate diagnosis can lead to expedient reduction and expectant management of sequelae associated with these injuries. PMID:22389897

  18. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients. PMID:19627573

  19. “Crevasse” Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Goljan, Peter; Devitt, Brian M.; Peixoto, Lourenço P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to report on a distinctive pattern of linear femoral head chondral lesions that were observed in 7 patients who underwent hip arthroscopy for the treatment of mixed-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Design: Between 2010 and 2012, 702 patients were treated with hip arthroscopy at our institution for symptomatic FAI. Among those patients, 7 were found to have a unique vertical chondral fissure located on the posterior femoral head. A retrospective review of the preoperative history, physical examination, and radiographic findings in addition to the intraoperative findings and surgical procedures performed was carried out for each patient. Results: All patients were diagnosed with mixed-type FAI by dynamic examination intraoperatively. The femoral head cartilage lesions were noted to be both linear and deep and resembled the appearance of a crevasse. Three of the 7 patients in whom these lesions were identified reported an acute event preceding their pain. Of the other 4 patients, 3 were involved in sports that involved vigorous rotational hip movements: golf, tennis, and wrestling. Notably, none of these lesions were identifiable on preoperative 3-T MRI scans. Conclusions: This series reports on a previously undefined femoral head cartilage lesion. It is hypothesized that increased pathologic translational movements and perching of the femoral head on the posterior rim of the acetabulum create this pattern of chondral damage. Recognition of this pattern of damage on the femoral head is important in the setting of mixed-type FAI. PMID:26069680

  20. [Extrapulmonary lesions of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Seki, K; Sakatani, M; Tachibana, T

    1990-01-01

    Varieties of extrapulmonary sarcoidosis lesions have been detected in Japan, mostly in the past ten years, including heart, CNS, liver, spleen, bone marrow stomach, colon, esophagus, pancreas, gall bladder, abdominal lymph node, kidney, muscle, bone, joint and others. Most of these were detected mainly at onset with sarcoid changes on chest film. Hepatic lesions have frequently been found by peritoneoscopy and liver biopsy, irrespective of the age of patients or stage of sarcoid change on chest film. Therefore hepatic lesions are very important in the diagnosis and following the clinical course of sarcoidosis. Recent diagnostic procedures of extrapulmonary lesion include abdominal, cardiac and muscle echography; brain, chest, abdominal and muscle CT; cardiac and muscle MRI; gallium scan; thallium myocardial scan, cardiac pool scan and Holter ECG. Extrapulmonary sarcoidosis lesions causing disability were located in the heart, CNS, eye, liver, kidney, muscle and bone. These disabilities were found predominantly in cases older than 40 years old, and were mainly detected at onset in the past 10 years. The duration of some of these disabilities was more than 10 years. PMID:2192189

  1. Asymmetric Nerve Enlargement: A Characteristic of Leprosy Neuropathy Demonstrated by Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Marques Jr., Wilson; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurological involvement occurs throughout the leprosy clinical spectrum and is responsible for the most feared consequences of the disease. Ultrasonography (US) provides objective measurements of nerve thickening and asymmetry. We examined leprosy patients before beginning multi-drug therapy aiming to describe differences in US measurements between classification groups and between patients with and without reactions. Methodology/Principal Findings Eleven paucibacillary (PB) and 85 multibacillary (MB) patients underwent nerve US. Twenty-seven patients had leprosy reactions (type 1, type 2 and/or acute neuritis) prior to US. The ulnar (at the cubital tunnel–Ut–and proximal to the tunnel–Upt), median (M) and common fibular (CF) nerves were scanned to measure cross-sectional areas (CSAs) in mm2 and to calculate the asymmetry indexes ΔCSA (absolute difference between right and left CSAs) and ΔUtpt (absolute difference between Upt and Ut CSAs). MB patients showed greater (p<0.05) CSAs than PB at Ut (13.88±11.4/9.53±6.14) and M (10.41±5.4/6.36±0.84). ΔCSAs and ΔUtpt were similar between PB and MB. The CSAs, ΔCSAs and ΔUtpt were similar between PB patients with reactions compared to PB patients without reactions. MB patients with reactions showed significantly greater CSAs (Upt, Ut and M), ΔCSAs (Upt and Ut) and ΔUtpt compared to MB patients without reactions. PB and MB showed similar frequencies of abnormal US measurements. Patients with reactions had higher frequency of nerve thickening and similar frequency of asymmetry to those without reactions. Conclusions/Significance This is the first study to investigate differences in nerve involvement among leprosy classification groups using US before treatment. The magnitude of thickening was greater in MB and in patients with reactions. Asymmetry indexes were greater in patients with reactions and did not significantly differ between PB and MB, demonstrating that asymmetry is a characteristic of leprosy neuropathy regardless of its classification. PMID:26646143

  2. Comparison of the Effects of Flexion and Extension of the Thumb and Fingers on the Position and Cross-Sectional Area of the Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Toge, Yasushi; Nishimura, Yukihide; Basford, Jeffrey R.; Nogawa, Takako; Yamanaka, Midori; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yoshida, Munehito; Nagano, Akira; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the separate effects of thumb and finger extension/flexion on median nerve position and cross-sectional area. Methods Ultrasonography was used to assess median nerve transverse position and cross-sectional area within the carpal tunnel at rest and its movement during volitional flexion of the individual digits of the hand. Both wrists of 165 normal subjects (11 men, 4 women, mean age, 28.6, range, 22 to 38) were studied. Results Thumb flexion resulted in transverse movement of the median nerve in radial direction (1.2±0.6 mm), whereas flexion of the fingers produced transverse movement in ulnar direction, which was most pronounced during flexion of the index and middle fingers (3.2±0.9 and 3.1±1.0 mm, respectively). Lesser but still statistically significant movements were noted with flexion of the ring finger (2.0±0.8 mm) and little finger (1.2±0.5 mm). Flexion of the thumb or individual fingers did not change median nerve cross-sectional area (8.5±1.1 mm2). Conclusions Volitional flexion of the thumb and individual fingers, particularly the index and middle fingers, produced significant transverse movement of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel but did not alter the cross-sectional area of the nerve. The importance of these findings on the understanding of the pathogenesis of the carpal tunnel syndrome and its treatment remains to be investigated. PMID:24367601

  3. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodrguez-Vzquez, J F; Mrida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-Lpez, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jimnez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length. PMID:19330282

  4. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  5. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  6. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in a sow.

    PubMed

    Resende, Talita P; Pereira, Carlos E R; Vannucci, Fabio A; Araujo, Fernando S; dos Santos, José Lúcio; Cassali, Geovanni D; Damasceno, Karine A; Guedes, Roberto M C

    2015-01-01

    Nodular lung lesions in swine are frequently due to abscesses or granulomatous pneumonia. Although tumours are rarely reported in modern pig farming, they should be considered as a differential diagnosis when nodular lung lesions are found. A first-parity sow exhibiting respiratory signs was euthanized. Several whitish firm nodules, not encapsulated, ranging in diameter from 0.5 to 5 cm were present in all lung lobes. Microscopically, the nodules were composed of dense neoplastic cells, mainly in Antoni types A and B patterns, infiltrative and with development of emboli. All neoplastic cells stained positively by immunohistochemistry for vimentin and S-100 protein, with variable immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and stained negative for cytokeratin. Based on the gross, histological and immunohistochemical features, the tumor was diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour. PMID:26407677

  7. Nerve agent intoxication: Recent neuropathophysiological findings and subsequent impact on medical management prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Collombet, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-15

    This manuscript provides a survey of research findings catered to the development of effective countermeasures against nerve agent poisoning over the past decade. New neuropathophysiological distinctive features as regards organophosphate (OP) intoxication are presented. Such leading neuropathophysiological features include recent data on nerve agent-induced neuropathology, related peripheral or central nervous system inflammation and subsequent angiogenesis process. Hence, leading countermeasures against OP exposure are down-listed in terms of pre-treatment, protection or decontamination and emergency treatments. The final chapter focuses on the description of the self-repair attempt encountered in lesioned rodent brains, up to 3 months after soman poisoning. Indeed, an increased proliferation of neuronal progenitors was recently observed in injured brains of mice subjected to soman exposure. Subsequently, the latter experienced a neuronal regeneration in damaged brain regions such as the hippocampus and amygdala. The positive effect of a cytokine treatment on the neuronal regeneration and subsequent cognitive behavioral recovery are also discussed in this review. For the first time, brain cell therapy and neuronal regeneration are considered as a valuable contribution towards delayed treatment against OP intoxication. To date, efficient delayed treatment was lacking in the therapeutic resources administered to patients contaminated by nerve agents. - Highlights: > This review focuses on neuropathophysiology following nerve agent poisoning in mice. > Extensive data on long-term neuropathology and related inflammation are provided here. > Delayed self-repair attempts encountered in lesioned rodent brains are also described. > Cell therapy is considered as a valuable treatment against nerve agent intoxication.

  8. Peripheral nerve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Autumn

    2013-06-01

    Neuropathies during pregnancy and the postpartum period are common and are usually due to compression around pregnancy and childbirth. The most common peripheral neuropathies are Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and lower extremity neuropathies. Although most neuropathies are usually reversible, associated disabilities or morbidities can limit functioning and require therapy. Nerve conduction study tests and imaging should only be considered if symptoms are unusual or prolonged. Some neuropathies may be associated with preeclampsia or an inherent underlying neuropathy that increases the risk of nerve injury. All neuropathies in pregnancy should be followed as some may be persistent and require follow-up. PMID:23563878

  9. Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration in Hansen's disease: A retrospective analysis of our experience

    PubMed Central

    Prasoon, Dev; Mandal, Swapan Kumar; Agrawal, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy affects peripheral nerves. As Mycobacterium leprae has unique tropism for Schwann cells, thickened sensory cutaneous nerves provide an easy target for the detection of lepra bacilli and other changes associated with the disease. Materials and Methods: The data of patients with sensory cutaneous nerve involvement were retrieved from our record for the period January 2006 to December 2014. The hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)- and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG)-stained slides were screened for Schwann cells, granuloma, and necrosis. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN)-stained smears were searched for lepra bacilli and globi. Morphological index was calculated in multibacillary lesions. Result: Twenty-nine sensory cutaneous nerves were aspirated in 23 patients. While 15 cases showed skin and nerve involvement, 8 cases showed only nerve involvement. Terminal cutaneous branch of the radial nerve was most often aspirated. No motor loss was observed after aspiration. Five cytologic pictures were seen — Epithelioid cell granuloma only in 6 cases, epithelioid cell granuloma with necrosis in 1 case, epithelioid cell granuloma with lepra bacilli in 3 cases, necrosis with lepra bacilli in 1 case, and only lepra bacilli in 12 cases. Morphological index ranged from 20% to 80%. Conclusion: Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a feasible, viable, effective, and safe procedure. It adds to diagnostic FNA yield in patients with concomitant skin involvement and offers a way to evaluate patients with only nerve involvement. Calculation of morphological index allows prognostication and may have a role in assessing response to therapy and/or relapse. PMID:26729977

  10. Consequences and adaptation in daily life – patients’ experiences three decades after a nerve injury sustained in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To explore the patients’ experiences during the three decades following repair of a nerve injury in the forearm and its consequences for daily life. Strategies that were used to facilitate adaptation were also investigated. Methods Fifteen participants with a complete median and/or ulnar nerve injury repaired in the ages from 13–20 years were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The median follow-up time was 31 years (range 23–40). The participants were asked to describe the past and present symptoms of the injured hand, the consequences of the injury for daily life, personal qualities and support from others. In addition, they were asked to describe strategies used to facilitate adaptation. The interviews were subjected to content analysis. Results The nerve injury lead to sensory and motor deficits in the injured hand, as well as sensitivity to cold and secondary back problems. Emotional reactions to trauma and symptoms related to post-traumatic stress disorder were described, as well as how they managed to cope with such reactions. There was a noticeable impact on education, leisure, professional or domestic life for some, while others could continue by changing e.g. their performance pattern. The participants’ life roles and relations were also affected. Both emotion- and problem-based strategies were used to manage challenges in daily life. Conclusions The present qualitative study can help us to provide the patient with honest and realistic information about what to expect after a nerve injury at forearm level, without eliminating hope. Emotional reactions to trauma should be identified and dealt with. In addition, health-care professionals can promote a variety of coping mechanisms to facilitate daily living for the injured patients. PMID:23968274

  11. Motor-Unit Number Estimation Is Sensitive in Detecting Motor Nerve Involvement in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Orhan; Sunter, Gulin; Salcini, Celal; Koytak, Pınar Kahraman; Tanridag, Tulin; Us, Onder

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We compared the motor-unit number estimation (MUNE) findings in patients who presented with signs and/or findings associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy controls, with the aim of determining if motor-unit loss occurs during the clinically silent period and if there is a correlation between clinical and MUNE findings in CTS patients. Methods The study investigated 60 hands of 35 patients with clinical CTS and 60 hands of 34 healthy controls. Routine median and ulnar nerve conduction studies and MUNE analysis according to the multipoint stimulation method were performed. Results The most common electrophysiological abnormality was reduced conduction velocity in the median sensory nerve (100% of the hands). The MUNE value was significantly lower for the patient group than for the control group (p=0.0001). ROC analysis showed that a MUNE value of 121 was the optimal cutoff for differentiating between patients and controls, with a sensitivity of 63.3% and a specificity of 68.3%. MUNE values were lower in patients with complaints of numbness, pain, and weakness in the median nerve territory (p<0.05, for all comparisons), and lower in patients with hypoesthesia than in patients with normal neurological findings (p=0.023). Conclusions The MUNE technique is sensitive in detecting motor nerve involvement in CTS patients who present with sensorial findings, and it may be useful in detecting the loss of motor units during the early stages of CTS. Larger-scale prospective clinical trials assessing the effect of early intervention on the outcome of these patients would help in confirming the possible benefit of detecting subclinical motor-unit loss in CTS. PMID:26790466

  12. Neural mechanisms of pupillary abnormality following thalamic lesions: experimental lesion and stimulation studies in cats, and consideration of pupillary findings in thalamic vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Shoumura, K; Ichinohe, N; Yun, S

    1992-01-01

    Neural mechanisms of the pupillary abnormality in thalamic lesions were experimentally studied in cats. Moderate to considerable anisocoria appeared after kainic acid lesions involving the medial thalamus. The pupil on the side of the lesion was larger than its partner. Only subtle or no pupillary inequality was produced by lateral thalamic lesions. Electrical stimulation of the midline and medial thalamus evoked dilation bilaterally in sympathectomized pupils. Thus, pupillary dilation produced by stimulation of the thalamus was shown to be mediated in part by the oculomotor parasympathetic nerve (OPN). There was no threshold difference between ipsilateral (ipsi) and contralateral (contra) pupils. However, amplitude of dilation was significantly larger in the contra pupil than in the ipsi, when stimulus was given to the pupillo-dilatory medial thalamic nuclei. In these, the mediodorsal, parataenial, central dorsal, paracentral (Pc), and parafascicular nuclei and the medial division of the medial pulvinar nucleus were included. Pupillary dilation mediated by the ocular sympathetic nerve (OSN) was investigated by stimulating Pc and comparing the ipsi-contra difference in the amplitude of dilation between sympathectomized and non-sympathectomized pairs of pupils. In contrast to the results in sympathectomized pairs, there was no ipsi-contra difference in the amplitude of dilation or it was larger in the ipsi pupil in non-sympathectomized pairs. From these, it was inferred that stimulation of Pc activated OSN ipsilaterally or bilaterally with ipsi dominance. It was concluded that the medial and midline thalamus exerts pupillo-dilatory effects through a set of neural mechanisms; 1) ipsi-dominant bilateral OPN inhibition, and 2) ipsi or ipsi-dominant bilateral OSN activation. Neural mechanisms of the pupillary abnormality in thalamic vascular lesions were also considered. PMID:1479196

  13. Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Español Diabetic Neuropathies: The Nerve Damage of Diabetes Page Content On ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders ...

  14. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nerve Changes

    MedlinePlus

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Nerve Changes “My fingers and toes felt numb ... stools or constipation l Stomach pain Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nerve Changes Try these tips from others: “Prevent ...

  15. [Ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block].

    PubMed

    Ota, Junichi; Hara, Kaoru

    2008-05-01

    Theoretically, sciatic nerve block can be used alone or in combination with lumbar plexus block or femoral nerve block for anesthesia and/or analgesia of lower limb surgery. However, clinical use of sciatic nerve block was limited by technical difficulties in performing the block since techniques used relies only on surface anatomical landmarks. Recent advances in ultrasound technology allow direct visualization of nerves and other surrounding structures and have increased the interest in performing many kinds of peripheral nerve blocks including sciatic nerve block. Preliminary data suggest that ultrasound-guided technique can help perform the sciatic nerve block more reliably and safely. In this article we describe the anatomy of the sciatic nerve, sonographic features, and technique of three major approaches including subgluteal, anterior, and popliteal approaches. The use of this technique for postoperative analgesia is also discussed. PMID:18516885

  16. Prediabetes May Damage Nerves More Than Thought

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158274.html Prediabetes May Damage Nerves More Than Thought Early pain and tingling ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prediabetes may cause more nerve damage than previously believed, researchers say. "The results of ...

  17. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  18. Growth of injured rabbit optic axons within their degenerating optic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Lavie, V.; Murray, M.; Solomon, A.; Ben-Bassat, S.; Belkin, M.; Rumelt, S.; Schwartz, M. )

    1990-08-15

    Spontaneous growth of axons after injury is extremely limited in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). It is now clear, however, that injured CNS axons can be induced to elongate when provided with a suitable environment. Thus injured CNS axons can elongate, but they do not do so unless their environment is altered. We now show apparent regenerative growth of injured optic axons. This growth is achieved in the adult rabbit optic nerve by the use of a combined treatment consisting of: (1) supplying soluble substances originating from growing axons to be injured rabbit optic nerves, and (2) application of low energy He-Ne laser irradiation, which appears to delay degenerative changes in the injured axons. Two to 8 weeks after this treatment, unmyelinated and thinly myelinated axons are found at the lesion site and distal to it. Morphological and immunocytochemical evidence indicate that these thinly myelinated and unmyelinated axons are growing in close association with glial cells. Only these axons are identified as being growing axons. These newly growing axons transverse the site of injury and extend into the distal stump of the nerve, which contains degenerating axons. Axons of this type could be detected distal to the lesion only in nerves subjected to the combined treatment. No unmyelinated or thinly myelinated axons in association with glial cells were seen at 6 or 8 weeks postoperatively in nerves that were not treated, or in nerves in which the two stumps were completely disconnected. Two millimeters distal to the site of injury, the growing axons are confined to a compartment comprising 5%-30% of the cross section of the nerve. A temporal analysis indicates that axons have grown as far as 6 mm distal to the site of injury, by 8 weeks postoperatively.

  19. βB2-Crystallin Promotes Axonal Regeneration in the Injured Optic Nerve in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Michael R R; Prokosch, Verena; Brückner, Matthias; Pfrommer, Sarah; Melkonyan, Harutyun; Thanos, Solon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to further scrutinize the potential of βB2-crystallin in supporting regeneration of injured retinal ganglion cell axons both in vitro and in vivo. Retinal explants obtained from animals after treatment either with lens injury (LI) alone or with combined LI 5 days or 3 days before or simultaneously with an optic nerve crush (ONC) were cultured for 96 h under regenerative conditions, and the regenerating axons were quantified and compared with untreated controls. These measurements were then repeated with LI replaced by intravitreal injections of γ-crystallin and β-crystallin at 5 days before ONC. Finally, βB2-crystallin-overexpressing transfected neural progenitor cells (βB2-crystallin-NPCs) in the eye were studied after crushing the optic nerve in vivo. Regeneration was monitored with the aid of immunoblotting of the retina and optic nerve both distal and proximal to the lesion site, and this was compared with controls that received injections of phosphate buffer only. LI performed 5 days or 3 days before ONC significantly promoted axonal outgrowth in vitro (p < 0.001), while LI performed alone before explantation did not. Intravitreal injections of β-crystallin and γ-crystallin mimicked the effects of LI and significantly increased axonal regeneration in culture at the same time intervals (p < 0.001). Western blot analysis revealed that crystallins were present in the proximal optic nerve stump at the lesion site in ONC, but were neither expressed in the undamaged distal optic nerve nor in uninjured tissue. βB2-crystallin-NPCs supported the regeneration of cut optic nerve axons within the distal optic nerve stump in vivo. The reported data suggest that βB2-crystallin-producing "cell factories" could be used to provide novel therapeutic drugs for central nervous system injuries. PMID:25299378

  20. [Traumatic vasculo-orthopedic combined lesions: 18-years retrospective evaluation of epidemiology and risks factors for amputation].

    PubMed

    Pires, Luis; Rodriguez, José Maria; Romero, Madalena; Silva Nunes, J; Cunha E Sá, Diogo; Dinis da Gama, A

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess retrospectively the epidemiology and risk factors for amputation of combined vasculo-orthopaedic traumatic lesions, during a 18-year period, from March 1987 to May 2005, comprising the review of the clinical charts of 149 patients. The series includes a predominance of male patients (84%) with an average age of 34 years. Eighty-five per cent of the lesions resulted from traffic accidents (49% velocipedes, 39% automobiles, 12% trampling), 10% were consequence of falls and 5% resulted from agriculture activities. Orthopaedic lesions include 83 fractures of upper limbs (22 open), 123 of lower limbs (67 open), 21 scapulo-thoracic dissociations and 27 knee dislocations. Vascular lesions include 8 subclavian, 20 axillary, 25 braquial, 10 radial, 6 ulnar and 2 diverse, in the upper limbs; and in lower limbs 4 iliac, 27 femoral, 52 popliteal, 5 tibio-peroneal trunk, 5 anterior tibial, 12 posterior tibial and 12 peroneal. Overall mortality was 3.3% and the amputation rate was 17%. Knee dislocations were responsible for one third of amputations, followed by fractures of bone legs. The association of femur to bone legs fractures from one side and of the knee to bone legs fractures from the other, coursed with high levels of amputation, together with lacerations and crushing of the limbs. The prompt diagnosis of the lesions and the immediate, hierarchic and multidisciplinary approach were considered also as relevant prognostic factors in the management of these most demanding conditions. PMID:16474864

  1. Erector Spinal Muscular Schwannoma of the Dorsal Ramus Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Chang Hyun; Moon, Jae Gon; Lee, Ho Kook

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of intramuscular schwannoma originating from the dorsal ramus nerve in a 62-year-old woman. The mass grew slowly, with pain developing upon touch five years prior. No neurological deficit was detected. The mass was observed in the erector spinae muscles in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical excision was performed. The mass was well encapsulated with clear margin. The lesion appeared to originate from the cranial side. We completely removed the mass including the origin. Histopathology confirmed a schwannoma diagnosis. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a dorsal ramus-nerve schwannoma within the erector spinae muscles. PMID:26512285

  2. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  3. Surgical Approaches to Facial Nerve Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Birgfeld, Craig; Neligan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The facial nerve is one of the most commonly injured cranial nerves. Once injured, the effects on form, function, and psyche are profound. We review the anatomy of the facial nerve from the brain stem to its terminal branches. We also discuss the physical exam findings of facial nerve injury at various levels. Finally, we describe various reconstructive options for reanimating the face and restoring both form and function. PMID:22451822

  4. Surgical approaches to facial nerve deficits.

    PubMed

    Birgfeld, Craig; Neligan, Peter

    2011-05-01

    The facial nerve is one of the most commonly injured cranial nerves. Once injured, the effects on form, function, and psyche are profound. We review the anatomy of the facial nerve from the brain stem to its terminal branches. We also discuss the physical exam findings of facial nerve injury at various levels. Finally, we describe various reconstructive options for reanimating the face and restoring both form and function. PMID:22451822

  5. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  6. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-01-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the globe in adduction related to the innervation of the lateral rectus by the III nerve causing co-contraction in adduction. Clinical features that may be of concern in adulthood may not be relevant in childhood; whereas the presence of mydriasis in III palsy suggests a compressive aetiology in adults, this is not the case in children. However, the frequency of associated CNS abnormalities in III palsy and the risk of tumour in VI palsy can be indications for early neuroimaging depending on presenting features elicited through a careful history and clinical examination. The latter should include the neighbouring cranial nerves. We discuss the impact of our evolving knowledge of congenital cranial dysinnervation syndromes on this field. PMID:25572578

  7. Modern concepts in facial nerve reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reconstructive surgery of the facial nerve is not daily routine for most head and neck surgeons. The published experience on strategies to ensure optimal functional results for the patients are based on small case series with a large variety of surgical techniques. On this background it is worthwhile to develop a standardized approach for diagnosis and treatment of patients asking for facial rehabilitation. Conclusion A standardized approach is feasible: Patients with chronic facial palsy first need an exact classification of the palsy's aetiology. A step-by-step clinical examination, if necessary MRI imaging and electromyographic examination allow a classification of the palsy's aetiology as well as the determination of the severity of the palsy and the functional deficits. Considering the patient's desire, age and life expectancy, an individual surgical concept is applicable using three main approaches: a) early extratemporal reconstruction, b) early reconstruction of proximal lesions if extratemporal reconstruction is not possible, c) late reconstruction or in cases of congenital palsy. Twelve to 24 months after the last step of surgical reconstruction a standardized evaluation of the therapeutic results is recommended to evaluate the necessity for adjuvant surgical procedures or other adjuvant procedures, e.g. botulinum toxin application. Up to now controlled trials on the value of physiotherapy and other adjuvant measures are missing to give recommendation for optimal application of adjuvant therapies. PMID:21040532

  8. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  9. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma ... these factors do not lead to facial nerve palsy or birth trauma. ... The most common form of facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma ... This part controls the muscles around the lips. The muscle ...

  10. Estradiol is a critical mediator of macrophage-nerve cross talk in peritoneal endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Erin; Temp, Julia; Esnal-Zufiurre, Arantza; Mechsner, Sylvia; Horne, Andrew W; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2015-08-01

    Endometriosis occurs in approximately 10% of women and is associated with persistent pelvic pain. It is defined by the presence of endometrial tissue (lesions) outside the uterus, most commonly on the peritoneum. Peripheral neuroinflammation, a process characterized by the infiltration of nerve fibers and macrophages into lesions, plays a pivotal role in endometriosis-associated pain. Our objective was to determine the role of estradiol (E2) in regulating the interaction between macrophages and nerves in peritoneal endometriosis. By using human tissues and a mouse model of endometriosis, we demonstrate that macrophages in lesions recovered from women and mice are immunopositive for estrogen receptor β, with up to 20% being estrogen receptor α positive. In mice, treatment with E2 increased the number of macrophages in lesions as well as concentrations of mRNAs encoded by Csf1, Nt3, and the tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptor, TrkB. By using in vitro models, we determined that the treatment of rat dorsal root ganglia neurons with E2 increased mRNA concentrations of the chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 that stimulated migration of colony-stimulating factor 1-differentiated macrophages. Conversely, incubation of colony-stimulating factor 1 macrophages with E2 increased concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin 3, which stimulated neurite outgrowth from ganglia explants. In summary, we demonstrate a key role for E2 in stimulating macrophage-nerve interactions, providing novel evidence that endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent neuroinflammatory disorder. PMID:26073038

  11. Nerve injury associated with orthognathic surgery. Part 1: UK practice and motor nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Bowe, D C; Gruber, E A; McLeod, N M H

    2016-05-01

    The head and neck is anatomically complex, and several nerves are at risk during orthognathic operations. Some injuries to nerves are reported more commonly than others. To find out what consultant surgeons tell their patients about the prevalence of common nerve injuries before orthognathic operations, we did a postal survey of fellows of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS). We also reviewed published papers to find out the reported incidence of injuries to cranial motor nerves during orthognathic operations. Only injuries to the facial nerve were commonly reported, and we found only case reports about injuries to the oculomotor, abducens, and trochlear nerves. The risk of temporary facial nerve palsy reported was 0.30/100 nerves (95% CI 0.23 to 0.50) and permanent facial nerve palsy was 0.06/100 nerves (95% CI 0.02 to 0.15). PMID:26935213

  12. Intrinsic and therapeutic factors determining the recovery of motor function after peripheral nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Skouras, Emmanouil; Ozsoy, Umut; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Angelov, Doychin N

    2011-07-01

    Insufficient recovery after peripheral nerve injury has been attributed to (i) poor pathfinding of regrowing axons, (ii) excessive collateral axonal branching at the lesion site and (iii) polyneuronal innervation of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJ). The facial nerve transection model has been used initially to measure restoration of function after varying therapies and to examine the mechanisms underlying their effects. Since it is very difficult to control the navigation of several thousand axons, efforts concentrated on collateral branching and NMJ-polyinnervation. Treatment with antibodies against trophic factors to combat branching improved the precision of reinnervation, but had no positive effects on functional recovery. This suggested that polyneuronal reinnervation--rather than collateral branching--may be the critical limiting factor. The former could be reduced by pharmacological agents known to perturb microtubule assembly and was followed by recovery of function. Because muscle polyinnervation is activity-dependent and can be manipulated, attempts to design a clinically feasible therapy were performed by electrical stimulation or by soft tissue massage. Electrical stimulation applied to the transected facial nerve or to paralysed facial muscles did not improve vibrissal motor performance and failed to diminish polyinnervation. In contrast, gentle stroking of the paralysed muscles (vibrissal, orbicularis oculi, tongue musculature) resulted in full recovery of function. This manual stimulation was also effective after hypoglossal-facial nerve suture and after interpositional nerve grafting, but not after surgical reconstruction of the median nerve. All these findings raise hopes that clinically feasible and effective therapies could be soon designed and tested. PMID:21458252

  13. Pulsed radiofrequency on radial nerve under ultrasound guidance for treatment of intractable lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dae Seok; Kang, Tae Hyung; Kim, Hyae Jin

    2016-06-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a painful and functionally limiting disorder. Although lateral elbow pain is generally self-limiting, in a minority of people symptoms persist for a long time. When various conservative treatments fail, surgical approach is recommended. Surgical denervation of several nerves that innervate the lateral humeral epicondyle could be considered in patients with refractory pain because it denervates the region of pain. Pulsed radiofrequency is a minimally invasive procedure that improves chronic pain when applied to various neural tissues without causing any significant destruction and painful complication. This procedure is safe, minimally invasive, and has less risk of complications relatively compared to the surgical approach. The radial nerve can be identified as a target for pulsed radiofrequency lesioning in lateral epicondylitis. This innovative method of pulsed radiofrequency applied to the radial nerve has not been reported before. We reported on two patients with intractable lateral epicondylitis suffering from elbow pain who did not respond to nonoperative treatments, but in whom the ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency neuromodulation of the radial nerve induced symptom improvement. After a successful diagnostic nerve block, radiofrequency probe adjustment around the radial nerve was performed on the lateral aspect of the distal upper arm under ultrasound guidance and multiple pulsed treatments were applied. A significant reduction in pain was reported over the follow-up period of 12 weeks. PMID:26896944

  14. The role of autophagy in axonal degeneration of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jan Christoph; Lingor, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Different pathological conditions including glaucoma, optic neuritis, hereditary optic atrophy and traumatic injury lead to a degeneration of retinal ganglion cell axons in the optic nerve. Besides this clinical relevance, several experimental models employ the optic nerve as a model system to examine general mechanisms of axonal degeneration in the central nervous system. Several experimental studies have demonstrated that an activation of autophagy is a prominent feature of axonal degeneration in the optic nerve independent of the underlying pathological condition. However, the function of autophagy in axonal degeneration remains still unclear. Inhibition of autophagy was found to attenuate axonal degeneration within the first hours after optic nerve lesion. Other studies focusing on survival of retinal ganglion cells at later postlesional time points report contradicting results, where both inhibition and induction of autophagy were beneficial for survival, depending on the model system or examination time. Therefore, a more precise understanding of the role and the kinetics of autophagy in axonal degeneration is mandatory to develop new therapies for diseases of the optic nerve. Here, we review the literature on the pathophysiological role of autophagy in axonal degeneration in the optic nerve and discuss its implications for future therapeutic approaches in diseases of the eye and the central nervous system involving axonal degeneration. PMID:26315785

  15. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase. PMID:23809191

  16. [Perineural tumor spread from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fontanarosa, Antonio; Scialpi, Michele; Macarini, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Stabile Ianora, Antonio Amato; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    Perineural tumor spread of head and neck malignancies is a well known form of metastatic disease in which a lesion can migrate away from the primary site along the cranial nerves. Nerve function can be preserved even in advanced stages of the disease, making neuroradiological assessment of perineural tumor location and extension of utmost importance, as radiological or pathological examination may reveal normal or nonspecific nerve function. Computed Tomography is useful in detecting foraminal enlargement or more destructive bone patterns. Magnetic Resonance imaging is the modality of choice because it can provide direct (nerve enlargement and enhancement) and indirect evidence of the disease (neuropathic muscular atrophy, obliteration of fat planes) owing to its superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, its multiplanar imaging and the decreased amount artifacts from dental hardware. Fat suppression images after contrast injection are mandatory to better detect nerve enhancement. We report the case of a female patient with perineural diffusion along the ophthalmic branch. This clinical picture is very rare, compared to those involving the mandibular and maxillary branches of the fifth cranial nerve. PMID:23096748

  17. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern. PMID:23634273

  18. Single lesion multibacillary leprosy, a treatment enigma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Leprosy exhibits a wide spectrum of presentation, varying from the tuberculoid to the lepromatous pole, with immunologically unstable borderline forms in-between, depending upon the immune status of the individual. The clinical system of classification for the purpose of treatment includes the number of skin lesions and nerves involved as the basis for classifying the patients into multibacillary and paucibacillary. Case presentation A 20-year-old man belonging to a moderately endemic leprosy area in the Terai region of Nepal reported a large single, hypopigmented, well defined anaesthetic lesion on his left thigh extending to his knee which had been present for 2 years. There was no other nerve involvement. Clinical diagnosis was tuberculoid leprosy and immunological lateral flow test for anti-Phenolic glycolipid-I antibody was positive. Six months of paucibacillary multidrug treatment was advised immediately. However, the patient was reclassified as multibacillary on the basis of a positive skin smear and appropriate treatment of 24 months multibacillary multidrug regimen was commenced after only 1 week. Slit skin smear examination for Mycobacterium leprae from the lesion revealed a bacterial index of 4+ while it was negative from the routine sites. Histopathological examination from skin biopsy of the lesion further supported the bacterial index of the lesion granuloma which was 2+ and the patient was diagnosed as borderline tuberculoid. Bacteriological, histological, and immunological findings of this patient were borderline tuberculoid leprosy and he should have been treated with multibacillary regimen from the beginning. Five months after commencement of treatment, the patient developed a leprae reaction of Type 1 or reversal reaction with some nerve function impairment and enlargement of the lateral popliteal nerve of the left leg. This reversal reaction was managed by standard oral prednisolone whilst continuing the multibacillary multidrug regimen. Conclusion This case illustrates and emphasizes the importance of slit-skin smear and biopsy as routine in all new cases to help differentiate multibacillary from paucibacillary for correct treatment. It further suggests that there are factors yet undetermined which play a significant role in determining the host response to M. leprae which is a remaining challenge in this disease. PMID:19144101

  19. Orbital masses: CT and MRI of common vascular lesions, benign tumors, and malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sarah N.; Sepahdari, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of space occupying lesions may be encountered in the orbit. CT and MR imaging frequently help confirm the presence of a mass and define its extent. Characteristic imaging features may help distinguish among lesions that have overlapping clinical presentations. This review focuses on some of the common orbital masses. Common vascular lesions that are reviewed include: capillary (infantile) hemangioma, cavernous hemangioma (solitary encapsulated venous-lymphatic malformation), and lymphangioma (venous-lymphatic malformation). Benign tumors that are reviewed include: optic nerve sheath meningioma, schwannoma, and neurofibroma. Malignancies that are reviewed include: lymphoma, metastasis, rhabdomyosarcoma, and optic glioma. Key imaging features that guide radiological diagnosis are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23961022

  20. Intra-articular fractures of the distal radius: bridging external fixation in slight flexion and ulnar deviation along articular surface instead of radial shaft.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2014-03-01

    Forty-one patients with intra-articular fracture of the distal radius (AO Type C) were treated with a double joint-bridging external fixator placed radial side of the fracture site and the wrist placed in slight flexion and ulnar deviation equal to the palmar tilt and radial inclination of the uninjured wrist. The patients were evaluated according to the system of Gartland and Werley an average of 43 months (range, 34 to 53 mo) after surgery. There were 14 excellent, 18 good, 7 fair, and 2 poor results. The average flexion was 94% of the normal side, extension 91%, pronation 95%, and supination 84%. The average radial inclination was 22 ± 10 degrees, palmar tilt 8 ± 14 degrees, and maximum articular step or gap was 2 mm. Bridging external fixation with slight wrist flexion and ulnar deviation equal to preinjured palmar tilt and radial inclination provides acceptable clinical and radiologic results. PMID:24487283

  1. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  2. A Triple-Masked, Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus and Distal Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia for Outpatient Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Nicholas C. K.; Mercer, Deana; Soneru, Codruta; Dillow, Jennifer; Jaime, Francisco; Petersen, Timothy R.; Mariano, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. For hand surgery, brachial plexus blocks provide effective anesthesia but produce undesirable numbness. We hypothesized that distal peripheral nerve blocks will better preserve motor function while providing effective anesthesia. Methods. Adult subjects who were scheduled for elective ambulatory hand surgery under regional anesthesia and sedation were recruited and randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block or distal block of the ulnar and median nerves. Each subject received 15 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine at the assigned location with 15 mL of normal saline injected in the alternate block location. The primary outcome (change in baseline grip strength measured by a hydraulic dynamometer) was tested before the block and prior to discharge. Subject satisfaction data were collected the day after surgery. Results. Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) strength loss in the distal group was 21.4% (14.3, 47.8%), while all subjects in the supraclavicular group lost 100% of their preoperative strength, P = 0.001. Subjects in the distal group reported greater satisfaction with their block procedures on the day after surgery, P = 0.012. Conclusion. Distal nerve blocks better preserve motor function without negatively affecting quality of anesthesia, leading to increased patient satisfaction, when compared to brachial plexus block. PMID:24839439

  3. Enhanced early sensory outcome after nerve repair as a result of immediate post-operative re-learning: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rosén, B; Vikström, P; Turner, S; McGrouther, D A; Selles, R W; Schreuders, T A R; Björkman, A

    2015-07-01

    We assessed the use of guided plasticity training to improve the outcome in the first 6 months after nerve repair. In a multicentre randomized controlled trial, 37 adults with median or ulnar nerve repair at the distal forearm were randomized to intervention, starting the first week after surgery with sensory and motor re-learning using mirror visual feedback and observation of touch, or to a control group with re-learning starting when reinnervation could be detected. The primary outcome at 3 and 6 months post-operatively was discriminative touch (shape texture identification test, part of the Rosen score). At 6 months, discriminative touch was significantly better in the early intervention group. Improvement of discriminative touch between 3 and 6 months was also significantly greater in that group. There were no significant differences in motor function, pain or in the total score. We conclude that early re-learning using guided plasticity may have a potential to improve the outcomes after nerve repair. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE II. PMID:25294735

  4. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  5. Cranial nerves XIII and XIV: nerves in the shadows

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over a century that these cranial nerves exist, and that they are not typographical errors nor a sensational event reported in the medical literature. A number of scientific articles on anatomy highlight how textbooks on descriptive anatomy do not always consider variables such as differences related to the geographical areas where people live, and these differences do exist. This is an important concept not only for surgeons, but also for all medical professionals who use manual techniques when treating their patients, ie, osteopaths, chiropractors, physiotherapists, and other manual therapists. This paper highlights the latest developments regarding these cranial nerves, offering at the same time some ideas for further reflection when looking at clinical scenarios that appear to bear little relationship to each other. Inclusion of these concepts in everyday anamnesis is encouraged. PMID:23516138

  6. Designing ideal conduits for peripheral nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Godard C. W.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Spinner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Nerve tubes, guides, or conduits are a promising alternative for autologous nerve graft repair. The first biodegradable empty single lumen or hollow nerve tubes are currently available for clinical use and are being used mostly in the repair of small-diameter nerves with nerve defects of < 3 cm. These nerve tubes are made of different biomaterials using various fabrication techniques. As a result these tubes also differ in physical properties. In addition, several modifications to the common hollow nerve tube (for example, the addition of Schwann cells, growth factors, and internal frameworks) are being investigated that may increase the gap that can be bridged. This combination of chemical, physical, and biological factors has made the design of a nerve conduit into a complex process that demands close collaboration of bioengineers, neuroscientists, and peripheral nerve surgeons. In this article the authors discuss the different steps that are involved in the process of the design of an ideal nerve conduit for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:19435445

  7. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration with synkinesis. FNP after acoustic neuroma surgery remains the most common indication for FN rehabilitation. PMID:25859138

  8. About a case of missed diagnosis of a post-traumatic aneurysm in the ulnar artery. Medical-legal aspects in respect to the professional liability.

    PubMed

    Prezioso, Virginia; Mangiulli, Tatiana; Bolino, Giorgio; Sciacca, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Compartment syndrome of the left hand from a late diagnosed post-traumatic ulnar artery pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of 27 years old boy with a tipping and cutting wound on his left wrist, generating an ulnar artery pseudoaneurysm, that was late diagnosed, and therefore complicated by a compartment syndrome in the wrist. Immediately after the trauma the subject went to the emergency room where the severity of the injury was undestimated; in fact, it was sutured and medicated, without further investigation. When he went to the same hospital for the second time, symptoms (pulsatile mass, redness and irritation of the skin) were interpreted as an infectious process and treated in an incongruous way. Then, when he went to another hospital in which imaging studies (ultrasound) were performed, the pseudo- aneurysm of the ulnar artery was diagnosed and surgically treated. The delay in diagnosis led to a compartment syndrome that is still appreciable as a sensory-motor deficit of the hand, especially of the fourth and fifth finger. This pseudo- aneurysm complication and its debilitating outcomes are known in literature, so the diagnostic delay makes the sanitary staff guilty of the suffered damage. PMID:24394807

  9. Amniotic membrane covering for facial nerve repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Murat; Tuncel, Arzu; Sheidaei, Shahrouz; Şenol, Mehmet Güney; Karabulut, Murat Hakan; Deveci, Ildem; Karaman, Nihan

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic membranes have been widely used in ophthalmology and skin injury repair because of their anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we measured therapeutic efficacy and determined if amniotic membranes could be used for facial nerve repair. The facial nerves of eight rats were dissected and end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Amniotic membranes were covered on the anastomosis sites in four rats. Electromyography results showed that, at the end of the 3rd and 8th weeks after amniotic membrane covering, the latency values of the facial nerves covered by amniotic membranes were significantly shortened and the amplitude values were significantly increased. Compared with simple facial nerve anastomosis, after histopathological examination, facial nerve anastomosed with amniotic membrane showed better continuity, milder inflammatory reactions, and more satisfactory nerve conduction. These findings suggest that amniotic membrane covering has great potential in facial nerve repair. PMID:25206390

  10. Implementation and evaluation of a statistical framework for nerve conduction study reference range calculation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xuan; Schoenfeld, David A; Lesser, Eugene A; Gozani, Shai N

    2010-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) play a central role in the clinical evaluation of neuropathies. Their clinical utilization depends on reference ranges that define the expected parameter values in disease-free individuals. In this paper, a statistical framework is proposed and described in detail for deriving NCS parameter reference ranges. The bootstrap technique is used to identify demographic and physiologic covariates that influence the NCS measurements. Multi-variate linear regression is used to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of NCS interpretation by reducing parameter variance. Non-linear mappings are used to transform parameters into a Gaussian distribution in order to minimize the influence of outliers. Modeling of heteroscedasticity observed in this and other studies leads to more sensible normal limits for several parameters. The proposed reference range method is automated using the MATLAB programming language. Data from a large sample of healthy subjects are used to establish reference ranges for 24 commonly measured NCS parameters. All but three parameters follow Gaussian distributions in their respective transformed domains. Excluding the distal motor latency difference between median and ulnar nerves, the reduction of the parameter variance as a result of regression in the transform domain is greater than 50% for all F-wave latency parameters and at least 10% for all other NCS parameters. Subject age is found to influence normal limits of all but one parameter and height has a statistically significant impact on all but three parameters. These reference range specifications provide clinicians with an alternative to developing their own reference ranges as long as their NCS techniques are consistent with those described in this paper. The proposed method should also be applicable to reference range development for other NCS techniques and physiological measurements. PMID:19497634

  11. [Delayed paresis of the femoral nerve after total hip arthroplasty associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP)].

    PubMed

    Schuh, A; Dürr, V; Weier, H; Zeiler, G; Winterholler, M

    2004-07-01

    Delayed lesions of the femoral or sciatic nerve are a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty. Several cases in association with cement edges, scar tissue, broken cerclages, deep hematoma, or reinforcement rings have been published. We report about a 62-year-old female who developed a pure motor paresis of the quadriceps muscle 2 weeks after total hip arthroplasty. After electrophysiological evaluation had revealed an isolated femoral nerve lesion, revision of the femoral nerve was performed. During operative revision no pathologic findings could be seen. One week later the patient developed paralysis of the left wrist and finger extensors after using crutches. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed several nerve conduction blocks in physiological entrapments and the diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was established. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a rare disease with increased vulnerability of the peripheral nerve system with mostly reversible sensorimotor deficits. It should be taken into consideration in cases of atypical findings of compression syndromes of peripheral nerves or delayed neuropathy, e. g., after total hip arthroplasty. PMID:15083272

  12. Neurological Complications in Thyroid Surgery: A Surgical Point of View on Laryngeal Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Varaldo, Emanuela; Ansaldo, Gian Luca; Mascherini, Matteo; Cafiero, Ferdinando; Minuto, Michele N.

    2014-01-01

    The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB) is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle) varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified, the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN) runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction, and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve, which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a low range. PMID:25076936

  13. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia. Anat Rec, 299:111-117, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26529568

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma and suspect peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a 10-year-old Paint horse

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    A round mass 4 cm in diameter was present on the proximal rostro-lateral border of the right pinna of a 10-year-old, gelded, Paint horse. A preliminary histopathological diagnosis of a potential squamous cell carcinoma and peripheral nerve sheath tumor was made, and the lesion was resected at the base of the lateral edge of the ear. PMID:20119546

  15. In vivo detection of nerve injury in familial amyloid polyneuropathy by magnetic resonance neurography

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Ernst; Hornung, Benjamin; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan O.; Kimmich, Christoph; Kristen, Arnt V.; Purrucker, Jan; Röcken, Christoph; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy is a rare, autosomal-dominant inherited multisystem disorder usually manifesting with a rapidly progressive, axonal, distally-symmetric polyneuropathy. The detection of nerve injury by nerve conduction studies is limited, due to preferential involvement of small-fibres in early stages. We investigated whether lower limb nerve-injury can be detected, localized and quantified in vivo by high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography. We prospectively included 20 patients (12 male and eight female patients, mean age 47.9 years, range 26–66) with confirmed mutation in the transthyretin gene: 13 with symptomatic polyneuropathy and seven asymptomatic gene carriers. A large age- and sex-matched cohort of healthy volunteers served as controls (20 male and 20 female, mean age 48.1 years, range 30–73). All patients received detailed neurological and electrophysiological examinations and were scored using the Neuropathy Impairment Score–Lower Limbs, Neuropathy Deficit and Neuropathy Symptom Score. Magnetic resonance neurography (3 T) was performed with large longitudinal coverage from proximal thigh to ankle-level and separately for each leg (140 axial slices/leg) by using axial T2-weighted (repetition time/echo time = 5970/55 ms) and dual echo (repetition time 5210 ms, echo times 12 and 73 ms) turbo spin echo 2D sequences with spectral fat saturation. A 3D T2-weighted inversion-recovery sequence (repetition time/echo time 3000/202 ms) was acquired for imaging of the spinal nerves and lumbar plexus (50 axial slice reformations). Precise manual segmentation of the spinal/sciatic/tibial/common peroneal nerves was performed on each slice. Histogram-based normalization of nerve–voxel signal intensities was performed using the age- and sex-matched control group as normative reference. Nerve-voxels were subsequently classified as lesion-voxels if a threshold of >1.2 (normalized signal-intensity) was exceeded. At distal thigh level, where a predominant nerve–lesion–voxel burden was observed, signal quantification was performed by calculating proton spin density and T2-relaxation time as microstructural markers of nerve tissue integrity. The total number of nerve–lesion voxels (cumulated from proximal-to-distal) was significantly higher in symptomatic patients (20 405 ± 1586) versus asymptomatic gene carriers (12 294 ± 3199; P = 0.036) and versus controls (6536 ± 467; P < 0.0001). It was also higher in asymptomatic carriers compared to controls (P = 0.043). The number of nerve–lesion voxels was significantly higher at thigh level compared to more distal levels (lower leg/ankle) of the lower extremities (f-value = 279.22, P < 0.0001). Further signal-quantification at this proximal site (thigh level) revealed a significant increase of proton-density (P < 0.0001) and T2-relaxation-time (P = 0.0011) in symptomatic patients, whereas asymptomatic gene-carriers presented with a significant increase of proton-density only. Lower limb nerve injury could be detected and quantified in vivo on microstructural level by magnetic resonance neurography in symptomatic familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and also in yet asymptomatic gene carriers, in whom imaging detection precedes clinical and electrophysiological manifestation. Although symptoms start and prevail distally, the focus of predominant nerve injury and injury progression was found proximally at thigh level with strong and unambiguous lesion-contrast. Imaging of proximal nerve lesions, which are difficult to detect by nerve conduction studies, may have future implications also for other distally-symmetric polyneuropathies. PMID:25526974

  16. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang-shuai; Li, Qing-feng; Dong, Ming-min; Zan, Tao; Ding, Shuang; Liu, Lin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8β and complement factor D) in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  17. Acute periodontal lesions.

    PubMed

    Herrera, David; Alonso, Bettina; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Santa Cruz, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    This review provides updates on acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious processes not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, mucocutaneous disorders and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important because it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodontal prognosis of the affected tooth and bacteria within the abscess can spread and cause infections in other body sites. Different types of abscesses have been identified, mainly classified by their etiology, and there are clear differences between those affecting a pre-existing periodontal pocket and those affecting healthy sites. Therapy for this acute condition consists of drainage and tissue debridement, while an evaluation of the need for systemic antimicrobial therapy will be made for each case, based on local and systemic factors. The definitive treatment of the pre-existing condition should be accomplished after the acute phase is controlled. Necrotizing periodontal diseases present three typical clinical features: papilla necrosis, gingival bleeding and pain. Although the prevalence of these diseases is not high, their importance is clear because they represent the most severe conditions associated with the dental biofilm, with very rapid tissue destruction. In addition to bacteria, the etiology of necrotizing periodontal disease includes numerous factors that alter the host response and predispose to these diseases, namely HIV infection, malnutrition, stress or tobacco smoking. The treatment consists of superficial debridement, careful mechanical oral hygiene, rinsing with chlorhexidine and daily re-evaluation. Systemic antimicrobials may be used adjunctively in severe cases or in nonresponding conditions, being the first option metronidazole. Once the acute disease is under control, definitive treatment should be provided, including appropriate therapy for the pre-existing gingivitis or periodontitis. Among other acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, but not caused by the microorganisms present in oral biofilms, infectious diseases, mucocutaneous diseases and traumatic or allergic lesions can be listed. In most cases, the gingival involvement is not severe; however, these conditions are common and may prompt an emergency dental visit. These conditions may have the appearance of an erythematous lesion, which is sometimes erosive. Erosive lesions may be the direct result of trauma or a consequence of the breaking of vesicles and bullae. A proper differential diagnosis is important for adequate management of the case. PMID:24738591

  18. Signal propagation in nerve fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayko, Yuriy N.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the problem of signal propagation in nerve fiber is considered. Ohm losses and heat processes were taken into account. These permit to combine the two stages (metabolic and non-metabolic) of propagation and Na + and K + ions transmission through cell membrane due propagation. Electrodynamics of nerve fiber with losses is described by telegraph equations. Heat processes in fiber are described by an equation of entropy transfer. Ion motion at metabolic stage against the electro-chemical potential is described by negative conductance, responsible for the escape flow. The running- wave-type solutions of these equations are studied. An integral and an explicit solution of the given system are obtained. The solution represented by a series of quasi-harmonic pulses is investigated numerically. This proves the applicability of telegraph equation to the problem considered. Different types of solitary waves corresponding to various types of conductivity are also investigated.

  19. Optogenetic control of nerve growth.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjun; Koppes, Ryan A; Froriep, Ulrich P; Jia, Xiaoting; Achyuta, Anil Kumar H; McLaughlin, Bryan L; Anikeeva, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Due to the limited regenerative ability of neural tissue, a diverse set of biochemical and biophysical cues for increasing nerve growth has been investigated, including neurotrophic factors, topography, and electrical stimulation. In this report, we explore optogenetic control of neurite growth as a cell-specific alternative to electrical stimulation. By investigating a broad range of optical stimulation parameters on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) expressing channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2), we identified conditions that enhance neurite outgrowth by three-fold as compared to unstimulated or wild-type (WT) controls. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of ChR2 expressing DRGs induces directional outgrowth in WT DRGs co-cultured within a 10 mm vicinity of the optically sensitive ganglia. This observed enhancement and polarization of neurite growth was accompanied by an increased expression of neural growth and brain derived neurotrophic factors (NGF, BDNF). This work highlights the potential for implementing optogenetics to drive nerve growth in specific cell populations. PMID:25982506

  20. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866