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1

Effect of Ultimate pH on Postmortem Myofibrillar Protein Degradation and Meat Quality Characteristics of Chinese Yellow Crossbreed Cattle  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the complex effects of postmortem ultimate pH (pHu) on Chinese Yellow crossbreed cattle quality during postmortem ageing and provides an explanation of how pHu affects beef tenderness. High pHu beef had the highest initial tenderness (P < 0.05) compared with other groups at 1 day postmortem. Intermediate and low pHu beef had similar initial WBSF at 1 day postmortem, but intermediate pHu beef had slower tenderization rate than low pHu beef (P < 0.05). Purge loss, cooking loss, L*, a*, and b* values decreased with increasing pHu during ageing (P < 0.05). Myofibril fragmentation index (MFI) was higher in high pHu beef than intermediate and low pHu beef throughout ageing (P < 0.05). Protein degradation studies found that desmin and troponin-T appeared degraded within 0.5?h postmortem for high and low pHu beef, compared to >2 days for intermediate pHu beef. Overall, Chinese Yellow crossbred cattle tenderness is related to pHu, which may be affected by proteolytic enzymatic activity. Therefore, pHu may be used to predict beef tenderness and other quality characteristics during postmortem ageing. To achieve consistent tenderness, different ageing times should be used, depending on pHu. PMID:25197695

Wang, Tiantian; Mao, Yanwei; Zhang, Yimin; Niu, Lebao; Liang, Rongrong; Zhu, Lixian; Luo, Xin

2014-01-01

2

The development of meat tenderness is likely to be compartmentalised by ultimate pH.  

PubMed

Bull Musculus longissimus dorsi (n=63) were categorised into high (pH?6.2), intermediate (pH 5.8-6.19) and low (?5.79) ultimate pH (pHu) and aged up to 28 days post mortem at -1°C. High pHu samples were acceptably tender at 1 day post mortem and significantly more tender than low pHu meat at all ageing timepoints (p<0.05). Rapid autolysis of ?-calpain in high pHu meat was linked with the more rapid degradation of titin, nebulin and filamin in this pHu group. Desmin degraded faster in low pHu meat and was concurrent with an increase of cathepsin B levels. The results from this study support the hypothesis that beef tenderisation is pHu compartmentalised with tenderness in high and low pHu meat characterised by variable rate of degradation of high and low molecular weight myofibrillar proteins during ageing, which are in turn regulated by ?-calpain and cathepsin B activities. PMID:24060535

Lomiwes, D; Farouk, M M; Wu, G; Young, O A

2014-01-01

3

The effects of the ultimate pH of meat on tenderness changes during ageing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A range of ultimate pH (pHu) values, from 5.4 to 7.2, was produced in the m. longissimus thoracicum et lumborum (LD) of 55 sheep by subcutaneous injections of adrenaline, or by injection and subsequent exercise.The rate constant of ageing for each of 47 animals was calculated from shear force measurements, taken at intervals for up to 5 days from the

A. Watanabe; C. C. Daly; C. E. Devine

1996-01-01

4

Small heat shock proteins and toughness in intermediate pHu beef.  

PubMed

Bull M. longissimus dorsi (n=94) categorised into high (n=28), intermediate (n=14) and low (n=52) ultimate pH (pHu) were aged at -1.5°C for 28days. Shear force was higher and more variable (p<0.05) in intermediate pHu samples during ageing. Titin, filamin and desmin degradation was also less extensive in intermediate pHu samples compared to the other two pH categories. The extent of the decline of HSP20, HSP27 and ??-crystallin concentrations during post mortem ageing was pHu related such that high pHu meat maintained the highest concentration of small heat shock proteins followed by intermediate and low pHu meat. ?-Calpain autolysis was slowest in intermediate pHu and cathepsin B activities remained consistently low during ageing in this group (p<0.05). Meat toughness in the intermediate pHu group may be attributed to the combination of a larger pool of sHSP with a sub-optimal cathepsin B activity and intermediary ?-calpain activities. PMID:23793082

Lomiwes, D; Farouk, M M; Frost, D A; Dobbie, P M; Young, O A

2013-11-01

5

Breed differences in the biochemical determinism of ultimate pH in breast muscles of broiler chickens--a key role of AMP deaminase?  

PubMed

The biochemical determinism of ultimate pH (pHu) was studied in the pectoralis muscle of broiler chickens. Thirty birds of 3 genetic types (a fast-growing standard (FG), a slow-growing French "Label Rouge" (SG), and a heavy line type (HL)) were kept under conventional breeding methods until the usual marketing age (6, 12, and 6 wk for FG, SG, and HL birds, respectively). The birds were divided into 3 different antemortem treatment groups: minimum stress, shackling for a longer time (2 min), and heat stress (exposure to 35 degrees C for 3.5 h and shackling for 2 min before stunning). The birds were slaughtered on the same day. The pHu differed (P < 0.001) among the 3 genetic types, ranking as follows: FG (5.95+/-0.01) > HL (5.85+/-0.02) > SG (5.73+/-0.02). In SG and HL birds, pHu was strongly correlated with muscle glycogen content at slaughter (r = -0.74 and -0.82; P < 0.01 respectively), whereas this correlation was weak in FG birds. Regardless of genetic type, neither buffering capacity nor lactate accumulation significantly contributed to pHu variations (P > 0.05). The activity of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPd) was significantly higher in FG chickens (0.98+/-0.31; P < 0.05) than in HL and SG birds (0.46+/-0.24 and 0.34+/-0.18, respectively). Significant correlations were found between AMPd activity, pHu, and glycolytic potential (GP) at slaughter (r = 0.34 and -.29; P < 0.01, respectively). Further research is needed to study in more detail the role of AMPd in the determinism of pHu, particularly in fast-growing broilers. PMID:15339023

El Rammouz, R; Berri, C; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Babilé, R; Fernandez, X

2004-08-01

6

Influence of ultimate pH and storage temperatures on qualitative components of packaged pork chops  

E-print Network

Influence of ultimate pH and storage temperatures on qualitative components of packaged pork chops of ultimate pH and storage temperatures on the quality of blister-packed pork chops. After a one-day storage. In meats with a low ultimate pH (pH

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

7

Effect of meat ultimate pH on rate of titin and nebulin degradation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The processes involved in the tenderisation of meat were studied on muscles with a range of ultimate pH values (5.4–7.0), produced by subcutaneous injection of various doses of adrenaline and exercise. The m. longissimus thoracicum et lumborum (LD) was removed from carcasses stored at 10 °C and held for 1, 3 or 6 days after slaughter, then frozen until tenderness

Akira Watanabe; Carrick Devine

1996-01-01

8

The effects of early post-mortem pH and ultimate pH on level and amount of destructured zones in cooked cured hams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effects of early (1h p.m. and 3h p.m.) and ultimate pH (24h p.m.) on level and amount of destructured zones in cooked cured hams were evaluated. In experiment 1, electrically stimulated (50V, 14Hz, 2×90s) and non-stimulated carcass halves, both in combination with two cooling procedures (2°C from 30min p.m. vs. 120min p.m.) resulted in 1.5–35.2g\\/kg destructured zones in silversides and

Gabriel Hugenschmidt; Ruedi Hadorn; Martin R. L. Scheeder; Paolo Silacci; Daniel Scherrer; Caspar Wenk

2010-01-01

9

Effects of fasting prior to slaughter on pH development and energy metabolism post-mortem in M. longissimus dorsi of pigs.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pre-slaughter fasting time, sex and feeding regime on the development of energy metabolism and pH in M. longissimusdorsi (LD) post-mortem in pigs. Two hundred and seventy pigs of the commercial Norwegian crossbreed Noroc (LYLD) were used involving two sexes (gilts and castrates), two feeding regimes (restricted and ad libitum) and four different fasting treatments: (F4) 4h fasting, (F175) 17.5h fasting on the farm, (FO175) 17.5h fasting overnight at the abattoir, and (FO265) 26.5h fasting overnight at the abattoir. Additionally the pigs experienced two different abattoir lairage times as fasting treatment F4 and F175 had a lairage time of 1.5h, while fasting treatment FO175 and FO265 had a lairage time of 23.0 h. A short fasting time of 4 h led to a delayed degradation of glycogen, slow decline in pH and a lower ultimate pH(45 h) post-mortem (pHu) in the LD compared with a fasting time of 26.5 h which resulted in a rapid breakdown of glycogen and pH decline early post-mortem and a high pHu. Proglycogen was degraded in favour of macroglycogen under anaerobic conditions post-mortem. Feeding the animals in the morning before delivery if slaughtered the same day, results in low pH reduction rate and a low pHu compared with pigs fasted overnight either on farm or at the abattoir. Aiming a higher pHu in LD it should be recommended not to feed the pigs in the morning at the day of slaughter. PMID:20374759

Sterten, H; Oksbjerg, N; Frøystein, T; Ekker, A S; Kjos, N P

2010-01-01

10

The P. aeruginosa Heme Binding Protein PhuS is a Heme Oxygenase Titratable Regulator of Heme Uptake  

PubMed Central

The Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme utilization (Phu) system encodes several proteins involved in the acquisition of heme as an iron source. Once internalized heme is degraded by the iron-regulated heme oxygenase, HemO to biliverdin (BV) IX? and ?. In vitro studies have shown holo-PhuS transfers heme to the iron-regulated HemO. This protein-protein interaction is specific for HemO as PhuS does not interact with the ?-regioselective heme oxygenase, BphO. Bacterial genetics and isotopic labeling (13C-heme) studies confirmed extracellular heme is converted to 13C-BVIX ? and ? through the catalytic action of HemO. In an effort to further understand the role of PhuS similar studies were performed on the P. aeruginosa PAO1 ?phuS and ?phuS/?hemO strains. In contrast to wild type strain the absence of PhuS results in extracellular heme uptake and degradation via the catalytic action of HemO and BphO. At low heme concentrations loss of PhuS leads to inefficient extracellular heme uptake supported by the fact the mRNA levels of PhuR, HemO and BphO remain elevated when compared to the wild type PAO1. On increasing extracellular heme concentrations the elevated levels of PhuR, HemO and BphO allow “leaky uptake” and degradation of heme via HemO and BphO. Similarly, in the ?phuS/?hemO strain the higher heme concentrations combined with elevated levels of PhuR and BphO leads to non-specific heme uptake and degradation by BphO. Thus we propose heme flux into the cell is driven by the catalytic action of HemO with PhuS acting as a “control-valve” to regulate extracellular heme flux. PMID:23947366

O’Neill, Maura J.; Wilks, Angela

2013-01-01

11

Effect of Acacia karroo Supplementation on Growth, Ultimate pH, Colour and Cooking Losses of Meat from Indigenous Xhosa Lop-eared Goats  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study was to determine the effect of Acacia karroo supplementation on growth, ultimate pH, colour and cooking losses of meat from indigenous Xhosa lop-eared goats. Eighteen castrated 4-month-old kids were used in the study until slaughter. The kids were subdivided in two treatment groups A. karroo supplemented (AK) and non-supplemented (NS). The supplemented goats were given 200 g per head per d of fresh A. karroo leaves. The kids were slaughtered on d 60 and sample cuttings for meat quality assessment were taken from the Longistimus dorsi muscle. The supplemented kids had higher (p<0.05) growth rates than the non-supplemented ones. The meat from the A. karroo supplemented goats had lower (p<0.05) ultimate pH and cooking loss than the meat from the non-supplemented goats. Acacia karroo supplemented goats produced higher (p<0.05) b* (yellowness) value, but supplementation had no significant effect on L* (lightness) and a* (redness) of the meat. Therefore, A. karroo supplementation improved growth performance and the quality of meat from goats. PMID:25049715

Ngambu, S.; Muchenje, V.; Marume, U.

2013-01-01

12

Ultimate Frisbee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ultimate Frisbee is a highly competitive noncontact sport similar to football or soccer, played by two teams of seven or more members. Various aspects of the game are described, including: (1) equipment; (2) playing field; and (3) the rules and scoring system. (JN)

Clark, Ed; And Others

1981-01-01

13

Implications of river morphology response to Dien Bien Phu fault in NW Vietnam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In northern Vietnam, most rivers are flowing southeastward sub- or parallel to the valley of Red River and characterized by long but narrow catchments. The Dien Bien Phu fault is associated with the most seismically active zone in Vietnam and situated in the potential eastern boundary of the rotating southeastern Tibetan block. It cuts the Da River, the largest tributary of Red River in northwest Vietnam and has distorted the drainage basin resulting in complex river patterns. To assess the river morphology response to active Dien Bien Phu fault, we use 1/50,000 topographic data and ASTER images to map the precise river courses and digital elevation model data of SRTM to retrieve and analyze the river profiles. From the mapping results, the N-S striking fault results in three conspicuous north-trending river valleys coincided with the different fault segments to facilitate the measurement and reconstruction of the offsets along the fault. Further combining the longitudinal profile analysis we obtain ca. 10 km offsets by deflected river as the largest left-lateral displacement recorded along the active fault. The restored results show the downstream paleochannel of the Da River had been abandoned and becomes two small tributaries in opposite flow directions at present due to differential crustal uplift. Also the present crisscross valley at the junction of the Da River and the fault is resulted from the capture by another river which has been also deflected by the neotectonics. Based on our observations on river response, the Dien Bien Phu fault is a sinistral dominant fault with an uplift occurring in its eastern block. Furthermore the active Dien Bien Phu fault does not cut through the Red River northward indicating the western block of the fault can not be regarded as a single rigid block. There should be possible to find NW-SE trending faults paralleling to Red River to accommodate the deformation of the western block of the fault.

Lai, K.; Chen, Y.; Lam, D.

2004-12-01

14

Implications of river morphology response to Dien Bien Phu fault in NW Vietnam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In northern Vietnam, most rivers are flowing southeastward sub- or parallel to the valley of Red River and characterized by long but narrow catchments. The Dien Bien Phu fault is associated with the most seismically active zone in Vietnam and situated in the potential eastern boundary of the rotating southeastern Tibetan block. It cuts the Da River, the largest tributary of Red River in northwest Vietnam and has distorted the drainage basin resulting in complex river patterns. To assess the river morphology response to active Dien Bien Phu fault, we use 1/50,000 topographic data and ASTER images to map the precise river courses and digital elevation model data of SRTM to retrieve and analyze the river profiles. From the mapping results, the N-S striking fault results in three conspicuous north-trending river valleys coincided with the different fault segments to facilitate the measurement and reconstruction of the offsets along the fault. Further combining the longitudinal profile analysis we obtain ca. 10 km offsets by deflected river as the largest left-lateral displacement recorded along the active fault. The restored results show the downstream paleochannel of the Da River had been abandoned and becomes two small tributaries in opposite flow directions at present due to differential crustal uplift. Also the present crisscross valley at the junction of the Da River and the fault is resulted from the capture by another river which has been also deflected by the neotectonics. Based on our observations on river response, the Dien Bien Phu fault is a sinistral dominant fault with an uplift occurring in its eastern block. Furthermore the active Dien Bien Phu fault does not cut through the Red River northward indicating the western block of the fault can not be regarded as a single rigid block. There should be possible to find NW-SE trending faults paralleling to Red River to accommodate the deformation of the western block of the fault.

Lai, K.; Chen, Y.; Lam, D.

2007-12-01

15

Insight of the reactivated Dien Bien Phu fault, northwest Vietnam: Implication of the kinematics in north Indochina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As one of the most conspicuous fault systems in the Indochina, the NNE-trending Dien Bien Phu fault zone extends over a distance of 150 km from Yunnan, China through the NW Vietnam into Laos and may dextrally displaces the Paleozoic-Triassic granitoids and Song Ma suture, performing a great geological discontinuity. Detailed active fault mapping, compiled from stereographic aerial photos, topographic maps, ASTER satellite imageries, and field reconnaissance, along the Dien Bien Phu fault reveals information about the fault geometry, the magnitude and distribution of displacement along the fault, and the relationship between river offset and activity of fault. The modern Dien Bien Phu fault is complex, including step-overs and branches, and is dominated by left-lateral strike-slip displacement. Numerous multiple offsets along the fault can be detected and reconstructed, and the largest sinistral displacement on the Dien Bien Phu fault is probably ca. 12.5 km. Since sinistral motion is likely to have initiated around 5 Ma, the most reasonable Pliocene to present-day average slip rate on the Dien Bien Phu fault is at an order of 2.5 mm/yr. There are several basins developed along the fault and the strongest evidence for an extensional component of displacement is along the southern part of the fault where the basin developed by a half graben with growing strata. Based on the combined Global Positioning System velocity fields observed from northwest Vietnam and south China, about 2 to 3 mm/yr left-lateral slip is measured across the Dien Bien Phu fault, implying the order of ~10 mm/yr left-lateral slip of the Xianshuihe-Xiaojang fault is transferred southward to Dien Bien Phu fault but with an abrupt decrease in magnitude. Further the western block of Dien Bien Phu fault represents more significant E-W extensional behavior as non-rigid block with internal deformation. Results of this study suggest the modern Dien Bien Phu fault performs as a reactivated fault, yet different slip sense, and acts as an eastern boundary of the crustal deformation in north Indochina. However, the present-day kinematics in north Indochina may be dominated by E-W extension and be accommodated by internal distributed deformation different from the crustal fragment defined by Xianshuihe-Xiaojang fault with a clockwise rotating around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis.

Lai, Kuang-Yin; Chen, Yue-Gau; Lâm, Doãn.

2010-05-01

16

Molecular dynamics simulations of the bacterial periplasmic heme binding proteins ShuT and PhuT.  

PubMed

ShuT and PhuT are two periplasmic heme binding proteins that shuttle heme between the outer and inner membranes of the Gram-negative bacteria. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) generally exhibit considerable conformational changes during the ligand binding process, whereas ShuT and PhuT belong to a class of PBPs that do not show such behavior based on their apo and holo crystal structures. By employing a series of molecular dynamic simulations on the ShuT and the PhuT, the dynamics and functions of the two PBPs were investigated. Through monitoring the distance changes between the two conserved glutamates of ShuT and PhuT, it was found the two PBPs were more flexible than previously assumed, exhibiting obvious opening-closing motions which were more remarkable in the apo runs of ShuT. Based on the results of the domain motion analysis, large scale conformational transitions were found in all apo runs of ShuT and PhuT, hinting that the domain motions of the two PBPs may be intrinsic. On the basis of the results of the principle component analysis, distinct opening-closing and twisting motion tendencies were observed not only in the apo, but also in the holo simulations of the two PBPs. The Gaussian network model was applied in order to analyze the hinge bending regions. The most important bending regions of ShuT and PhuT are located around the midpoints of their respective connecting helixes. Finally, the flexibilities and the details of the simulations of ShuT and PhuT were discussed. Characterized by the remarkably large flexibilities, the loop constituted by Ala 169, Gly170 and Gly171 of ShuT and the beta-turn constituted by Ala176, Gly177 and Gly178 of PhuT may be important for the functions of the two PBPs. Furthermore, the Asn254 of ShuT and the Arg228 of PhuT may be indispensable for the binding or unbinding of heme, since it is involved in the important hydrogen bonding to the propionate side-chains of heme. PMID:18818010

Liu, Ming; Su, Ji Guo; Kong, Ren; Sun, Ting Guang; Tan, Jian Jun; Chen, Wei Zu; Wang, Cun Xin

2008-11-01

17

The ultimate vacuum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ultimate vacuum, defined as the lowest pressure that can be produced and measured reproducibly in a vacuum system at room temperature, has decreased by a factor of about 1014 since the first measurement of sub-atmospheric pressure by Robert Boyle in about 1660. A brief historical review is presented of the key advances that caused significant decreases in the ultimate

P. A. Redhead

1999-01-01

18

The Ultimate Flag Games.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes six Ultimate Flag Games which offer a change from traditional games and sports that are usually geared toward athletically inclined students. These new games, aimed at middle school through college students, allow for success from the least-skilled through the most athletically talented students. Players are ability grouped…

Angel, Kenny; Sutton, Nancy

19

Registration of "Ultimate" Zoysiagrass  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Ultimate’ (Reg. No. ________, PI 652947) zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.) was developed at the Everglades Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL and initially approved for release in 2004. A plant patent was submitted in mid-2005 and presently awaits exami...

20

Six-Channel Spectrophotometers (PH) Onboard JEM-GLIMS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Six-channel spectrophotometers (PH) are the science instruments of JEM-GLIMS to measure absolute intensity of the emission originated from lightning discharges and upper atmospheric transient luminous events (TLEs). PH unit-1 (PH-U1) consists of four spectrophotometer channels named from PH1 to PH4, while PH unit-2 (PH-U2) two spectrophotometer channels named PH5 and PH6. Optical filters of these spectrophotometers are selected to detect TLE emission lines of N2 1PG, N2 2PG, N2+ 1NG, and N2 LBH. Since the bandwidth of the optical filter of PH2, 3, 5, and 6 is 10 nm and since PH1 measures NUV emission, photomultiplier tubes with high-voltage converters are used as a photon detector. To the contrary, PH4 uses a photodiode as a photon detector because the pass-band of the optical filter is enough wide to detect transient optical emission. Though PH does not equip spatial resolution, it can acquire light curve data with a high time resolution of 50 ?s with a 12-bit resolution. Thus, the combinational analysis of PH data and Lightning and Sprite Imager (LSI) data, it is possible to clarify the relationship between TLEs and their parent lightning discharges, the occurrence condition of TLEs, and the energy of the electrons which excite TLE emission.

Sato, Mitsuteru; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Ushio, Tomoo

21

Pliocene-to-present morphotectonics of the Dien Bien Phu fault in northwest Vietnam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The north- to northeast-trending Dien Bien Phu fault (DBPF) zone appears to the south of the Red River fault (RRF) zone, sharing the spatial alignment of the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault (XXF) and extending over a distance of 150 km from Yunnan, China, through northwest Vietnam into Laos. Although the DBPF is one of the most conspicuous active fault systems in Indochina, it is less studied than the RRF and XXF, and its quantified kinematics remain mostly unknown. Our detailed modern fault trace mapping, compiled from topographic maps, stereographic aerial photos, ASTER satellite imageries, and field reconnaissance reveals new information on the fault geometry, the slip magnitude and distribution along the fault, and the relationship between river-channel offset and fault activity. The geometry of the modern DBPF is complex, consisting of single strands and stepovers. Abundant geomorphic expressions along the DBPF illustrate that the modern fault is dominated by sinistral motion and the present left-lateral component of motion is also clearly demonstrated by the existence of numerous rivers offsets. Multiple offsets of geomorphic features along the fault are recognized and reconstructed, and the largest sinistral displacement on the DBPF is ca. 12.5 km based on drainage network restoration. Because sinistral motion likely initiated approximately 5 Ma, the most probable Pliocene-to-present average slip rate on the DBPF is on the order of 2.5 mm/yr. Based on the slip rate, the DBPF could generate an earthquake with a magnitude greater than Mw 7 and a recurrence interval of 500 to 1000 yr. The combined GPS velocity fields observed from northwest Vietnam and south China reveal approximately 2 to 3 mm/yr left-lateral slip across the DBPF, and significant east-west extension exists in the western crustal block of DBPF. Although the boundary fault system of the active crust rotation around the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis (i.e., XXF) does not cut the RRF, the Pliocene-to-present activity along the DBPF favors the possibility that the tectonic shear has been transmitted across the RRF and taken up on the DBPF. The results of this study suggest that the modern DBPF zone acts as a reactivated fault, with a different slip sense from its previous phase, and plays a role as an eastern boundary of the crustal deformation in northern Indochina.

Lai, Kuang-Yin; Chen, Yue-Gau; Lâm, Doãn ?ình

2012-11-01

22

Landscape ecological planning based on change analysis: A case study of mangrove restoration in Phu Long - Gia Luan area, Cat Ba Archipelago  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mangroves play an important role in coastal zones in many aspects e.g. extremely essential habitats for many species, coastlines protection from natural hazards, and so on. However, in Vietnam, like in other developing countries, these mangrove areas have been destroyed and encroached as a consequence of a poorly planned economic development. The study has been conducted in Phu Long -

Nguyen An Thinh; Nguyen Xuan Huan; Pham Duc Uy; Nguyen Son Tung

23

Crustal contamination of Late Neogene basalts in the Dien Bien Phu Basin, NW Vietnam: Some insights from petrological and geochronological studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Early Pliocene (Zanclean) basalts in the Dien Bien Phu pull-apart basin in NW Vietnam, associated with the presently sinistral Dien Bien Phu Fault Zone, have been dated by the K-Ar method at 4.4-4.9 and 5.4-5.2 Ma. Rapid migration of basaltic magma to the surface in the Dien Bien Phu Fault Zone may be due to Pliocene transtension of the crust in this region, resulting from asthenospheric upwelling induced by lateral displacement of the mantle. The basalts are moderately phyric ( < 10%) and consist of olivine (hyalosiderite), plagioclase (bytownite-labradorite) and orthopyroxene (bytownite-labradorite) phenocrysts, and a fine-grained crystalline matrix (olivine-hortonolite, plagioclase-labradorite, clinopyroxene-pigeonite and augite, K-feldspar). The presence of Fe-rich olivine and orthopyroxene phenocrysts indicates that the basalts are SiO 2-saturated/oversaturated olivine tholeiites which formed under water-undersaturated conditions. The Dien Bien Phu basalts contain both mantle-derived (pyroxenites, dunites, gabbros) and crustal (sillimanite/mullite + Mg-Fe spinel), wallrock xenoliths, indicative of crustal contamination during the ascent of the basaltic magma. The basalts show selective enrichment in some mobile elements (K, Rb, Sr and Th), a feature considered to be a result of metasomatism. These rocks, classified on the basis of their normative composition as quartz tholeiites, could represent primary olivine tholeiites/basalts, in which the geochemical signatures were modified by the processes of contamination.

Koszowska, Ewa; Wolska, Anna; Zuchiewicz, Witold; Cuong, Nguyen Quoc; Pécskay, Zoltan

2007-01-01

24

The Ultimate Fizz  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many recipes for elementary science activities suggest making carbon dioxide from baking soda and vinegar; however, they often do not give exact measurements of the ingredients. The author was able to turn this "drawback" into a plus by challenging her fifth-grade students to find the ultimate fizz--i.,e. , "What amount of baking soda added to a set amount of vineagar gives the maximum reaction without having leftover baking soda?" As students investigated this question with enthusiasm, graphing and measurement skills developed in the process.

Heckscher, Mary

2008-12-01

25

Information: the ultimate frontier.  

PubMed

Although long-term forecasting is best left to science fiction writers, scientists can illumine basic technological trends, as in the 100-year scenario presented here. Computers will continue the "small is beautiful" trend, but they are not likely to follow the semilog trail because extrapolation from the current base would lead to absurdities such as a computer cost of 3/100 of a cent. To achieve inexpensive high speed and Lilliputian size, new techniques are likely to replace silicon technology. The ultimate computer might be biological and patterned on DNA. Future computers will reacquire information when needed rather than store it, and we will see personalized products at mass production prices. Light wave communication will broaden communications exchange, but software that is more friendly to human users will be needed. By taking over knowledge distribution, electronic information systems will let universities concentrate on new knowledge. More importantly, they will expand everyone's right to information and free expression through the existing media system and to protection from misuse of information by others. PMID:17834703

Branscomb, L M

1979-01-12

26

The Ultimate Alternative. A Curriculum for Teaching Ultimate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A curriculum for teaching Ultimate, a cardiovascular frisbee disc sport alternative to traditional ball sports, is presented, covering cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills at three different levels. (CB)

Caporali, John Martin

1988-01-01

27

Ultimate Cognition à la Gödel  

Microsoft Academic Search

All life is problem solving,'' said Popper. To deal with arbitrary problems in arbitrary environments, an ultimate cognitive agent should use its limited hardware in the ''best'' and ''most efficient'' possible way. Can we formally nail down this informal statement, and derive a mathematically rigorous blueprint of ultimate cognition? Yes, we can, using Kurt Godel's celebrated self-reference trick of 1931

Jürgen Schmidhuber

2009-01-01

28

Informed consent: The ultimate right  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the informed consent process permits the nurse to advocate for patient care safety and to promote good ethical and legal practice. This article has identified and highlighted the importance of the informed consent process. It is the ultimate right of all individuals, and the patient with a psychiatric illness is no less deserving of this ultimate right.

Amy Wysoker

2000-01-01

29

Sintering densification and microstructural evolution of injection molding grade 17-4 PH stainless steel powder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Densification behavior is investigated by means of dilatometry for powder-injection-molded (PIM) and die-compacted 17-4 PH\\u000a stainless steel during sintering in pure H2 and H2 + N2. The corresponding microstructural evolution is examined by quenching in a vertical furnace at various stages of sintering.\\u000a The results show that in comparison with pure H2, the H2 + N2 atmosphere retards densification and

Yunxin Wu; Debby Blaine; Connie Schlaefer; Brian Marx; Randall M. German

2002-01-01

30

Quaternary basin formation along the Dien Bien Phu fault zone and its neotectonic implication of northwestern Vietnam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Dien Bien Phu (DBP) fault zone is one of the most conspicuous fault systems in the Indochina, extending over a distance of 150 km from Yunnan, China through the NW Vietnam into Laos. Recent Global Positioning system (GPS) data in China yielded that the present clockwise rotation of the southeastern Tibet block geologically corresponds to a region of left-lateral strike-slip faults, such as the Xianshuihe-Xiaojang fault and Dien Bien Phu fault, which appear to have accommodated clockwise rotation; whereas other GPS data from the network of Southeast Asia proposed that Indochina constitutes a stable tectonic block moving approximately east with respect to Eurasia. Although above GPS data show insignificant differential motion along DBP fault, active sinistral slip can be identified by clear geomorphic features, focal solutions and seismicity distribution in a NNE-striking zone parallel to the fault zone. Mapping of surface fault traces along the DBP fault zone using field outcrops, geophysical data, and geomorphologic features recognized by the aerial photos, SRTM, ASTER imageries and derived digital elevation models shows that virtually all active faults are reactivated structures sub-parallel to chronostratigraphic boundary. Along the DBF fault, three larger basins have been developed by different kinematics from north to south. The northern one at Chan Nua is rhomboidal in shape with a dimension of 2.5 km?.5 km, which can be defined as a pull-apart basin resulted by the strike-slip motion of the DBP fault. The fault configuration associated with the central one changes to two parallel sinistral and sinistral-normal faults forming a narrow subsiding weak zone (10 km?.5 km) filled with Quaternary deposits. The southern one is, however, created by that the main DBP fault bends the strike from NNE to NE where branches out a sinistral- normal fault with N-striking controlling a half-graben basin (17 km? km) filled with Quaternary deposits about 200 m in depth above the late Neogene olivine basalt. The late Neogene basalt of age ca. 5 Ma seems being at least displaced 10 km by the branched sinistral-normal fault, giving a rate of ca. 2 mm/yr by left-lateral strike-slip since volcanic eruption. For the southern two basins, normal faulting has been confirmed occurring along their east margin, implying the NW-striking fault systems, i.e. Son La and Song Ma faults, in northwestern Vietnam are active. Although the proposed mechanisms of above-mentioned basins are still tentative, the DBP fault zone is undoubtedly undergoing extensional tectonic environment in rigid Indochina block. Further studies on basin depositional history and age determination are needed for the purpose of establishing the dynamic model of each basin and recognizing the neotectonic behavior of DBP fault.

Lai, K.; Chen, Y.; Chung, L.; Li, P.; Lam, D.

2006-12-01

31

GPS measurements of horizontal deformation across the Lai Chau-Dien Bien (Dien Bien Phu) fault, in Northwest of Vietnam, 2002-2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from Feb. 2002 through Mar. 2004 were used to estimate the recent crustal movement along the Lai Chau - Dien Bien (Dien Bien Phu) fault (LC-DBF) system in the Northwest of Vietnam. Four GPS campaign data were processed to estimate ITRF2000 and local horizontal velocities, as well as extensive and compressive strain rates across the LC-DBF. ITRF2000 velocities are consistent with east-southeastward movement of Sundaland i.e. Indochina. Local velocities did not reveal much left-lateral strike-slip of the fault system and the derived strain rates were insignificantly different from zero at 95% confidence.

Duong, C. C.; Yun, H.-S.; Cho, J.-M.

2006-05-01

32

Ultimate Realities: Deterministic and Evolutionary  

PubMed Central

References to ultimate reality commonly turn up in the behavioral literature as references to determinism. However, this determinism is often difficult to interpret. There are different kinds of determinisms as well as different kinds of ultimate realities for a behaviorist to consider. To clarify some of the issues involved, the views of ultimate realities are treated as falling along a continuum, with extreme views of complete indeterminism and complete determinism at either end and various mixes in between. Doing so brings into play evolutionary realities and the movement from indeterminism to determinism, as in Peirce's evolutionary cosmology. In addition, this framework helps to show how the views of determinism by B. F. Skinner and other behaviorists have shifted over time. PMID:22478489

Moxley, Roy A

2007-01-01

33

Prediction of urinary and blood pH in non-lactating dairy cows fed anionic diets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anionic diets are fed to non-lactating pre-parturient cows to lower the dietary cation–anion difference index (DCAD), thereby limiting their risk of contracting milk fever, and other associated metabolic diseases, in early lactation. Data from 21 studies (86 dietary treatments) with dry dairy cows, published in referred scientific journals, were identified for meta-analysis to predict urinary and blood pH (pHu and

M Spanghero

2004-01-01

34

Intramural Sports Ultimate Disc "Hat"  

E-print Network

not provide health or accident insurance that covers intramural sports participants. The Intramural SportsIntramural Sports Ultimate Disc "Hat" Tournament Summer 2014 Intramural Sports Calendar of Events on the day of the tournament, teams will be drawn out of a hat and mixed for play. Sports and Special

Escher, Christine

35

Morphotectonics of the Dien Bien Phu fault, northwest Vietnam and its implications for present-day kinematics in northern Indochina  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The north- to northeast-trending Dien Bien Phu fault (DBPF) zone is one of the most conspicuous fault systems in Indochina, extending over a distance of 150 km from Yunnan, China through northwest Vietnam into Laos, and dextrally displaces the northwest-trending Song Ma suture, and Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata, acting as a great geological discontinuity. Detailed mapping, compiled from topographic maps, stereographic aerial photos, ASTER satellite imageries, and field reconnaissance discovers new information on the fault geometry, the slip magnitude and distribution along the fault, and the relationship between river-channel offset and fault activity. The geometry of the modern DBPF is complex, consisting of step-overs and strands, and is currently dominated by left-lateral strike-slip displacement. Numerous multiple offsets along the fault are recognized and reconstructed, and the largest sinistral displacement on the DBPF is ca. 12.5 km. Since sinistral motion is likely to have initiated around 5 Ma, the most probable Pliocene to present average slip rate on the DBPF is on the order of 2.5 mm/yr. Based on the combined Global Positioning system velocity fields observed from northwest Vietnam and south China, about 2 to 3 mm/yr left-lateral slip is measured across the DBPF, indicating the left-lateral slip rate of ~10 mm/yr of the Xianshuihe-Xiaojiang fault (XSHF-XJF) has been transferred to DBPF but with an drastic decrease in magnitude. Furthermore, northern Indochina located at the western side of DBPF represents more significant east-west extension, implying the non-rigid block with internal deformation. Results of this study suggest that the modern DBPF zone performs as a reactivated fault, with a different slip sense from its previous phase, and plays a role as an eastern boundary of the crustal deformation in northern Indochina. However, the present-day kinematics in northern Indochina may be dominated by east-west extension and be accommodated by internal distributed deformation different from the crustal fragment defined by XSHF-XJF zone with a clockwise rotation around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis.

Lai, K.; Chen, Y.; Lam, D.

2011-12-01

36

Ultimate Cognition a` la Godel Jurgen Schmidhuber  

E-print Network

, and derive a mathematically rigorous blueprint of ultimate cognition? Yes, we can, using Kurt Go¨delUltimate Cognition a` la Go¨del Ju¨rgen Schmidhuber Published online: 5 March 2009 � Springer's celebrated self-reference trick of 1931 in a new way. Go¨del exhibited the limits of mathematics

Schmidhuber, Juergen

37

Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific  

E-print Network

Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate Device Part of Thermo integration cycle Ultimate Isotope Precision for Carbonates The Thermo Scientific KIEL IV Carbonate DeviceV Thermo Scientific MAT 253 or the 3-kV DELTA V isotope ratio mass spectrometer meets the requirements

Lachniet, Matthew S.

38

Original article Genetic parameters of backfat thickness,  

E-print Network

Hi), ultimate pH (pHu), drip loss (DL) and cooking loss (CL) of a sample of Semimembranosus muscle, were to 100 kg liveweight, and 4 meat quality traits, pH of Semispinalis muscle at 45 min post mortem (p kg, d'autre part, le pH du muscle Semispinalis mesuré 40 mn post mortem (pHi le pH ultime (pH,,), les

Boyer, Edmond

39

handbook2011 Ultimate Clubs at UNSW  

E-print Network

Clubs & soCieties handbook2011 Ultimate Guide for Clubs at UNSW #12;Contents section 1: about About: affiliation What is Affiliation? 5 How do I affiliate a Club? 5-6 Club Categories 7-8 section 3: how arc Can support Your Club So now you're affiliated... 9 Resources 10-11 Facilities and room bookings 12-13 Funding

Blennerhassett, Peter

40

Ultimate survival in anomalous ?(2S) decays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hierarchy among the radiative ?(?0,?,??) decay channels for the ?? looks quite different from the J/? one. The fate of charm, namely an ultimate survival of on-shell ccbar intermediate states, might give us the clue for this new puzzle in exclusive charmonium decays. A similar self-preservation has already been invoked in the past to solve the so-called ?? puzzle.

Gérard, Jean-Marc; Martini, Antony

2014-03-01

41

hal00265902, Digital holography with ultimate sensitivity  

E-print Network

hal­00265902, version 1 ­ 20 Mar 2008 Digital holography with ultimate sensitivity M. Gross and M of the heterodyne holography scheme, which combines the properties of o#11;-axis and phase-shifting holography of photons. Digital holography is a fast-growing research #12;eld that has drawn increasing attention [1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

Methods of ultimate carbonaceous BOD determination  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Studies were conducted to provide an accurate and practical technique for determining the concentration of ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and the rate at which this demand is exerted. The three methods evaluated were carbon derived, nitrification adjusted, and nitrification inhibited. The studies indicate that comparable concentrations and reaction rates can be determined from either non-nitrified samples using no chemical nitrifying inhibitor, or from partially nitrified samples using the chemical inhibitors, 1-allyl-2 thiourea or nitrapyrin, and that the combined use of time-series analysis and Lee's graphical method provide a reliable and accurate technique for determining ultimate biochemical oxygen demand concentration and reaction rate in 5 to 7 days.

Stamer, J.K.; McKenzie, S.W.; Cherry, R.N.

1979-01-01

43

Ultimate computing. Biomolecular consciousness and nano Technology  

SciTech Connect

The book advances the premise that the cytoskeleton is the cell's nervous system, the biological controller/computer. If indeed cytoskeletal dynamics in the nanoscale (billionth meter, billionth second) are the texture of intracellular information processing, emerging ''NanoTechnologies'' (scanning tunneling microscopy, Feynman machines, von Neumann replicators, etc.) should enable direct monitoring, decoding and interfacing between biological and technological information devices. This in turn could result in important biomedical applications and perhaps a merger of mind and machine: Ultimate Computing.

Hameroff, S.R.

1987-01-01

44

Is space the ultimate high ground?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Military experts often refer to space as the ultimate high ground under the premise that placing systems in orbit provides advantages consistent with the military doctrine of high ground. Although space provides the ultimate "observation post", it has none of the other advantages traditionally associated with high ground. Army Field Manual (FM) 34-130 states the other advantages of holding key terrain: commanding avenues of approach, overcoming obstacles, and affording cover and concealment as additional benefits of high ground. Yet systems in orbit incur none of these additional advantages. Finally, international restrictions and reciprocity concerns limit the employment of weapons in space nullifying many of the unique capability advantages that would otherwise support the "high ground" aspect of space. As the ultimate observation post, satellites provide a large quantity of vital data to military decision makers. This massive amount of data needs to have as much context as possible to convert this data to useful knowledge. To use space assets optimally, the military needs to learn from the past and make space and cyber products distributed and tactical. It is absolutely essential to distribute the right information to the lowest level (tactical elements) of the organization or the "boots on the ground" in a timely manner.

Meyer, Gregory J.; Stallings, Francis P.

2011-06-01

45

SNPs detection in DHPS-WDR83 overlapping genes mapping on porcine chromosome 2 in a QTL region for meat pH  

PubMed Central

Background The pH is an important parameter influencing technological quality of pig meat, a trait affected by environmental and genetic factors. Several quantitative trait loci associated to meat pH are described on PigQTL database but only two genes influencing this parameter have been so far detected: Ryanodine receptor 1 and Protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 3 non-catalytic subunit. To search for genes influencing meat pH we analyzed genomic regions with quantitative effect on this trait in order to detect SNPs to use for an association study. Results The expressed sequences mapping on porcine chromosomes 1, 2, 3 in regions associated to pork pH were searched in silico to find SNPs. 356 out of 617 detected SNPs were used to genotype Italian Large White pigs and to perform an association analysis with meat pH values recorded in semimembranosus muscle at about 1 hour (pH1) and 24 hours (pHu) post mortem. The results of the analysis showed that 5 markers mapping on chromosomes 1 or 3 were associated with pH1 and 10 markers mapping on chromosomes 1 or 2 were associated with pHu. After False Discovery Rate correction only one SNP mapping on chromosome 2 was confirmed to be associated to pHu. This polymorphism was located in the 3’UTR of two partly overlapping genes, Deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS) and WD repeat domain 83 (WDR83). The overlapping of the 3’UTRs allows the co-regulation of mRNAs stability by a cis-natural antisense transcript method of regulation. DHPS catalyzes the first step in hypusine formation, a unique amino acid formed by the posttranslational modification of the protein eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A in a specific lysine residue. WDR83 has an important role in the modulation of a cascade of genes involved in cellular hypoxia defense by intensifying the glycolytic pathway and, theoretically, the meat pH value. Conclusions The involvement of the SNP detected in the DHPS/WDR83 genes on meat pH phenotypic variability and their functional role are suggestive of molecular and biological processes related to glycolysis increase during post-mortem phase. This finding, after validation, can be applied to identify new biomarkers to be used to improve pig meat quality. PMID:24103193

2013-01-01

46

Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions  

PubMed Central

Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale. PMID:25635386

Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

2015-01-01

47

Probabilistic metrology defeats ultimate deterministic bound  

E-print Network

Quantum-enhanced measurements exploit quantum mechanical effects to provide ultra-precise estimates of physical variables for use in advanced technologies, such as frequency calibration of atomic clocks, gravitational waves detection, and biosensing. Quantum metrology studies the fundamental limits in the estimation precision given a certain amount of resources (e.g. the number of probe systems) and restrictions (e.g. limited interaction time, or coping with unavoidable presence of noise). Here we show that, even in the presence of noise, probabilistic measurement strategies (which have a certain probability of failure or abstention) can provide, upon a heralded successful outcome, estimates with a precision that violates the deterministic bounds. This establishes a new ultimate quantum metrology limit. For probe systems subject to local dephasing, we quantify such precision limit as a function of the probability of failure that can be tolerated. We show that the possibility of abstaining can substantially set back the detrimental effects of noise.

J. Calsamiglia; B. Gendra; R. Munoz-Tapia; E. Bagan

2014-07-25

48

Bilabiate Flowers: The Ultimate Response to Bees?  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Bilabiate flowers have evolved in many lineages of the angiosperms, thus representing a convincing example of parallel evolution. Similar to keel blossoms, they have obviously evolved in order to protect pollen against pollen-collecting bees. Although many examples are known, a comprehensive survey on floral diversity and functional constraints of bilabiate flowers is lacking. Here, the concept is widened and described as a general pattern. Methods The present paper is a conceptional review including personal observations of the authors. To form a survey on the diversity of bilabiate blossoms, a search was made for examples across the angiosperms and these were combined with personal observations collected during the last 25 years, coupled with knowledge from the literature. New functional terms are introduced that are independent of morphological and taxonomic associations. Key Results Bilabiate constructions occur in at least 38 angiosperm families. They are characterized by dorsiventral organization and dorsal pollen transfer. They are most often realised on the level of a single flower, but may also be present in an inflorescence or as part of a so-called ‘walk-around flower’. Interestingly, in functional terms all nototribic blossoms represent bilabiate constructions. The great majority of specialized bee-flowers can thus be included under bilabiate and keel blossoms. The syndrome introduced here, however, also paves the way for the inclusion of larger animals such as birds and bats. The most important evolutionary trends appear to be in the saving of pollen and the precision of its transfer. With special reference to the Lamiales, selected examples of bilabiate flowers are presented and their functional significance is discussed. Conclusions Bilabiate blossoms protect their pollen against pollen-collecting bees and at the same time render their pollination more precisely. The huge diversity of realised forms indicate the high selection pressure towards the bilabiate syndrome. As bees are very inventive, however, bilabiate constructions will not represent the ultimate response to bees. PMID:17652341

Westerkamp, Christian; Claßen-Bockhoff, Regine

2007-01-01

49

"Got Disc?" The "Ultimate" Experience in Physical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A quality physical education program is one in which students are exposed to and can participate in a variety of sports and activities. One activity that is increasing in popularity in and outside of physical education is the game of "Ultimate." Opportunities to play Ultimate are increasing rapidly in intramural programs and community and…

Johnson, Tyler G.; Darst, Paul W.; Brusseau, Timothy A.

2006-01-01

50

Beam ion instability in the ultimate storage ring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultimate storage ring light sources have electron emittances near the X-ray diffraction limit. Beam ion instability is a great concern for such ultra-small emittance rings. Beam ion instability in the ultimate storage ring belongs to a special regime where most ions are not trapped along the bunch train. This paper investigates the beam-ion dynamics in such special regimes.

Wang, Lanfa

2014-11-01

51

An Approximate Solution for Ph/Ph/1 and Ph/Ph/1/N Queues  

E-print Network

An Approximate Solution for Ph/Ph/1 and Ph/Ph/1/N Queues Alexandre Brandwajn Baskin School approximation to assess the steady-state probabilities of the number of customers in Ph/Ph/1 and Ph/Ph/1/N for the Ph/Ph/1/N queue. The phase-type distributions considered are assumed to be acyclic. Our method

Begin, Thomas

52

Some remarks on discrete physics as an ultimate dynamical theory  

SciTech Connect

The standard model of quarks and leptons currently fails to meet `t Hooft`s criterion for an ``Ultimate Dynamical Theory`` in that it contains 19 parameters which must be taken from experiment. Evaluating discrete physics in the same way we find that it requires 17 parameters and has already succeeded in computing 7 of them. While we are confident that the rest can also be computed, the very concept of an ultimate theory is incompatible with our attitude toward physics.

Noyes, H.P.

1995-10-01

53

Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) static ultimate load structural tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of tests were conducted on the jettisonable metallic shroud used on the Titan/Centaur launch vehicle to verify its structural capabilities and to evaluate its structural interaction with the Centaur stage. A flight configured shroud and the interfacing Titan/Centaur structural assemblies were subjected to tests consisting of combinations of applied axial and shear loads to design ultimate values, including a set of tests on thermal conditions and two dynamic response tests to verify the analytical stiffness model. The strength capabilities were demonstrated at ultimate (125 percent of design limit) loads. It was also verified that the spring rate of the flight configured shroud-to-Centaur forward structural deflections of the specimen became nonlinear, as expected, above limit load values. This test series qualification program verified that the Titan/Centaur shroud and the Centaur and Titan interface components are qualified structurally at design ultimate loads.

1975-01-01

54

Open MRI at UConn Experience ultimate comfort and today's  

E-print Network

#12;Open MRI at UConn Experience ultimate comfort and today's most precise technologies with the new open MRI at UConn Health Center. Located on the first floor of UConn's state-of-the-art Medical Arts and Research Building, our open MRI offers advanced features, allowing for faster 263 Farmington

Holsinger, Kent

55

SMART LIGHTING SYSTEMS ULTIMATE LIGHTING The Smart Lighting  

E-print Network

SMART LIGHTING SYSTEMS ­ ULTIMATE LIGHTING 1 The Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center Smart and Systems Engineering And Director, Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center ©2012 Rensselaer Polytechnic is Smart Lighting ­ vision and associated technologies · What will (might) drive the adoption of Smart

Linhardt, Robert J.

56

Proximate and Ultimate Mechanisms of Spiny Lobster Gregariousness  

E-print Network

Abstract Proximate and Ultimate Mechanisms of Spiny Lobster Gregariousness Ken Sercy and Michael show clear differences in spiny lobster gregariousness. Panulirus argus is usually found sharing variation in lobster distribution and fitness. Spiny lobsters are a convenient model system for studying

Childress, Michael J.

57

Welcome to Hawaii The Ultimate Global Gathering Place  

E-print Network

Aloha Welcome to Hawaii The Ultimate Global Gathering Place On behalf of Professor Mike Jensen to the beautiful Islands of Hawaii. Besides the beauty of the State, we are delighted to offer you an informative. The tropical Islands of Hawaii offer ample opportunities to relax and unwind. Possibly more than any place else

Park, Seong-Ook

58

Modelling Primate Social Order: Ultimate and Proximate Explanations  

E-print Network

Modelling Primate Social Order: Ultimate and Proximate Explanations Hagen Lehmann and Joanna J.Lehmann@bath.ac.uk, J.J.Bryson@bath.ac.uk Abstract. For many species of primates, arguably including humans, social be understanding the bases of our social interaction. For many primate species social be- haviour has been

Bryson, Joanna J.

59

A homogenization approach to the ultimate strength of brick masonry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A continuum model for assessing the ultimate failure of masonry as a homogenized material is presented in this paper. It is shown in particular how a homogenization technique implemented within the framework of the yield design theory, makes it possible to construct a macroscopic strength criterion for masonry described as a regular assemblage of bricks separated by joint interfaces. Making

Patrick de Buhan; Gianmarco de Felice

1997-01-01

60

Ultimate Success Rates on National Board Examinations: A Research Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study investigated the percentage of optometry students successfully completing the four-component National Board of Examiners in Optometry examination at graduation between 1995 to 1997. Ultimate pass rates for all four components ranged from 87.0% to 90.9%. Results are discussed in relation to the 1993 test-sequence expansion and to the number…

Gross, Leon J.; Wallis, Norman E.; Present, Richard K.

1999-01-01

61

Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience  

E-print Network

Dulye Leadership Experience The Ultimate Professional Development Experience: Dulye Leadership Experience Do YOU have what it takes to join the team? Find out more at dle.dulye.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DulyeLeadershipExperience Twitter: DLE4SU #12;Dulye Leadership Experience Program Overview Dulye Leadership Experience The Dulye

Crowston, Kevin

62

The Ultimate Sampling Dilemma in Experience-Based Decision Making  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer simulations and 2 experiments demonstrate the ultimate sampling dilemma, which constitutes a serious obstacle to inductive inferences in a probabilistic world. Participants were asked to take the role of a manager who is to make purchasing decisions based on positive versus negative feedback about 3 providers in 2 different product…

Fiedler, Klaus

2008-01-01

63

User-central wireless system: ultimate dynamic channel allocation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a new wireless architecture that creates ultimate freedom for dynamic channel allocation (DCA). The architecture is implemented based on the capabilities of cognitive radios. In the current wireless systems, users should subscribe to a service provider (vendor) and receive the service through the spectrum assigned to that vendor at all times. Hence, we call the current wireless

Seyed A. Zekavat; Xiukui Li

2005-01-01

64

The protection of bovine skeletal myofibrils from proteolytic damage post mortem by small heat shock proteins.  

PubMed

This study aimed to determine how small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) protect myofibrillar proteins from ?-calpain degradation during ageing. Immunoprecipitation experiments with M. longissimus dorsi (LD) from Angus heifers (n = 14) examined the interaction between ??-crystallin, desmin, titin, HSP20, HSP27 and ?-calpain. Results showed that ??-crystallin associated with desmin, titin, HSP20, HSP27 and ?-calpain. Exogenous ??-crystallin reduced desmin and titin degradations in myofibrillar extracts and attenuated ?-calpain activity. In a second experiment, bull LD (n = 94) were aged at -1.5°C for up to 28 days post mortem. ?-Calpain autolysed faster in high ultimate pH (pH(u)) meat (pH(u)?6.2) and this was concomitant with the more rapid degradation of titin and filamin in this pH(u) group. Desmin stability in intermediate pH(u) meat (pH(u) 5.8 to 6.19) may be due to the protection of myofibril-bound sHSPs combined with the competitive inhibition of ?-calpain by sHSPs. PMID:24769876

Lomiwes, D; Hurst, S M; Dobbie, P; Frost, D A; Hurst, R D; Young, O A; Farouk, M M

2014-08-01

65

26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview...under which certain registered ultimate vendors of taxed kerosene may claim the...

2012-04-01

66

26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview...under which certain registered ultimate vendors of taxed kerosene may claim the...

2013-04-01

67

26 CFR 48.6427-11 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending). 48.6427-11 Section...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending). (a) Overview. This...under which certain registered ultimate vendors of taxed kerosene may claim...

2011-04-01

68

26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview...under which certain registered ultimate vendors of taxed kerosene may claim the...

2011-04-01

69

26 CFR 48.6427-11 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending). 48.6427-11 Section...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending). (a) Overview. This...under which certain registered ultimate vendors of taxed kerosene may claim...

2012-04-01

70

26 CFR 48.6427-11 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending). 48.6427-11 Section...Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blending). (a) Overview. This...under which certain registered ultimate vendors of taxed kerosene may claim...

2013-04-01

71

Ultimate resolution for refractometric sensing with whispering gallery mode microcavities.  

PubMed

Many proposed microfluidic biosensor designs are based on the measurement of the resonances of an optical microcavity. Fluorescence-based resonators tend to be simpler and more robust than setups that use evanescent coupling from tuneable laser to probe the cavity. In all sensor designs the detection limits depend on the wavelength resolution of the detection system, which is a limitation of fluorescence-based devices. In this work, we explore the ultimate resolution and detection limits of refractometric microcavity sensor structures. Because many periodic modes are collected simultaneously from fluorescent resonators, standard Fourier methods can be best suited for rapid and precise analysis of the resonance shifts. Simple numerical expressions to calculate the ultimate sensor resolution and detection limits were found, and the results compared to experiments in which the resonances of fluorescent-core microcapillaries responded to various sucrose concentrations in water. PMID:22513540

Silverstone, J W; McFarlane, S; Manchee, C P K; Meldrum, A

2012-04-01

72

Suicide: The Ultimate Inside-Out ad Hominem Argument  

E-print Network

SUICIDE: THE ULTIMATE INSIDE-OUT ad Hominem ARGUMENT BRUCE B. SUTTLE Parkland College I One of the major recurring themes in the literature on suicide is that of the desirability of a more nearly neutral definition of the concept.... And despite the numerous disagreements over the various aspects of suicide, many of the combatants agree that a more nearly value-free explication of the concept would not only serve to clarify the nature of suicide, but also enhance the subsequent moral...

Suttle, Bruce B.

73

Preventing Ultimate Harm as the Justification for Biomoral Modification.  

PubMed

Most advocates of biogenetic modification hope to amplify existing human traits in humans in order to increase the value of such traits as intelligence and resistance to disease. These advocates defend such enhancements as beneficial for the affected parties. By contrast, some commentators recommend certain biogenetic modifications to serve social goals. As Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu see things, human moral psychology is deficient relative to the most important risks facing humanity as a whole, including the prospect of Ultimate Harm, the point at which worthwhile life is forever impossible on the planet. These risks can be mitigated, they say, by enhancing moral psychology in novel ways. Persson and Savulescu argue that some parents should modify the underlying biogenetics of their children's moral psychology, if such measures were safe and effective, but they admit these interventions may not decouple humanity from Ultimate Harm. Neither are these modifications the only options, they concede, for addressing risks to humanity. Even with these concessions, saving humanity from itself is a fairly poor reason to modify the moral psychology of children. In most ways, adults would be better candidates, morally speaking, for modifications of psychology. Even then, there is no direct link between morally enhanced human beings and the hoped-for effect of better protection from Ultimate Harm. Asserting a general duty of all to contribute to the avoidance of Ultimate Harm is a better moral strategy than intervening in the moral psychology of some, even though meeting that duty may involve substantial interference with the free exercise of one's interests. PMID:25186171

Murphy, Timothy F

2014-09-01

74

pH Protocol  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this resource is to measure the pH of water. Students use either a pH meter or pH paper to measure the pH. If using the pH meter, the meter needs to be calibrated with buffer solutions that have pH values of 4, 7, and 10.

The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

2005-06-02

75

The Ultimate Challenge: Prove B. F. Skinner Wrong  

PubMed Central

For much of his career, B. F. Skinner displayed the optimism that is often attributed to behaviorists. With time, however, he became less and less sanguine about the power of behavior science to solve the major problems facing humanity. Near the end of his life he concluded that a fair consideration of principles revealed by the scientific analysis of behavior leads to pessimism about our species. In this article I discuss the case for Skinner's pessimism and suggest that the ultimate challenge for behavior analysts today is to prove Skinner wrong. PMID:22478494

Chance, Paul

2007-01-01

76

pH inactivation of phosphofructokinase arrests postmortem glycolysis.  

PubMed

Fresh meat quality development is influenced by pH decline that results from muscle glycolyzing energy substrates postmortem. The exact reason why glycolysis stops in the presence of residual glycogen remains unclear. We hypothesized that a critical glycolytic enzyme loses activity near the ultimate pH of meat. Porcine longissimus muscle samples were subjected to an in vitro system that mimics postmortem anaerobic metabolism at buffered pH values (7.0, 6.5, 6.0, 5.5 or 5.0). At pH7.0, 6.5, and 6.0, glycogenolysis and glycolysis proceeded normally while pH5.5 stopped lactate formation. Additional experimentation indicated that phosphofructokinase lost activity at pH5.5 while all other glycolytic enzymes remained active. A similar inactivation of phosphofructokinase was observed when using chicken and beef muscle. Elevated temperature hastened pH decline and phosphofructokinase activity loss. Thus, pH inactivates phosphofructokinase and arrests postmortem glycolysis, which may explain the similar ultimate pH across meat of different species. PMID:25179446

England, Eric M; Matarneh, Sulaiman K; Scheffler, Tracy L; Wachet, Céline; Gerrard, David E

2014-12-01

77

Ultimate Decoherence Border for Matter-Wave Interferometry  

SciTech Connect

Stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves are intrinsic fluctuations of spacetime which lead to an unavoidable decoherence mechanism. This mechanism manifests itself as a degradation of the contrast of quantum interferences. It defines an ultimate decoherence border for matter-wave interferometry using larger and larger molecules. We give a quantitative characterization of this border in terms of figures involving the gravitational environment as well as the sensitivity of the interferometer to gravitational waves. The known level of gravitational noise determines the maximal size of the molecular probe for which interferences may remain observable. We discuss the relevance of this result in the context of ongoing progresses towards more and more sensitive matter-wave interferometry.

Lamine, Brahim; Herve, Remy; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, case74, Campus Jussieu, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

2006-02-10

78

Ultimate boundedness stability and controllability of hereditary systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

By generalizing the Liapunov-Yoshizawa techniques, necessary and sufficient conditions are given for uniform boundedness and uniform ultimate boundedness of a rather general class of nonlinear differential equations of neutral type. Among the applications treated by the methods are the Lienard equation of neutral type and hereditary systems of Lurie type. The absolute stability of this later equation is also investigated. A certain existence result of a solution of a neutral functional differential inclusion with two point boundary values is applied to study the exact function space controllability of a nonlinear neutral functional differential control system. A geometric growth condition is used to characterize both the function space and Euclidean controllability of another nonlinear delay system which has a compact and convex control set. This yields conditions under which perturbed nonlinear delay controllable systems are controllable.

Chukwu, E. N.

1979-01-01

79

Ultimate Informational Capacity of a Volume Photosensitive Media  

E-print Network

The ultimate information capacity of a three-dimensional hologram for the case of an optimal use of the dynamic range of a storage medium, number of pages, the readout conditions is considered. The volume hologram is regarded as an object of the information theory. For the first time the formalism of the reciprocal lattice has been introduced in order to estimate the informational properties of the hologram. The diffraction-limited holographic recording is analyzed in the framework of the reciprocal lattice formalism. Calculations of the information capacity of a three-dimensional hologram involve analysis of a set of multiplexed holograms, each of which has a finite signal-to-noise ratio determined by the dynamic range of the holographic medium and the geometry of recording and readout. An optimal number of pages that provides a maxi-mum information capacity at angular multiplexing is estimated.

Kuzmin, Yuriy I

2015-01-01

80

Atmospheric effects and ultimate ranging accuracy for lunar laser ranging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The deployment of next generation lunar laser retroreflectors is planned in the near future. With proper robotic deployment, these will support single shot single photo-electron ranging accuracy at the 100 micron level or better. There are available technologies for the support at this accuracy by advanced ground stations, however, the major question is the ultimate limit imposed on the ranging accuracy due to the changing timing delays due to turbulence and horizontal gradients in the earth's atmosphere. In particular, there are questions of the delay and temporal broadening of a very narrow laser pulse. Theoretical and experimental results will be discussed that address estimates of the magnitudes of these effects and the issue of precision vs. accuracy.

Currie, Douglas G.; Prochazka, Ivan

2014-10-01

81

Plug nozzles: The ultimate customer driven propulsion system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the results of a study applying the plug cluster nozzle concept to the propulsion system for a typical lunar excursion vehicle. Primary attention for the design criteria is given to user defined factors such as reliability, low volume, and ease of propulsion system development. Total thrust and specific impulse are held constant in the study while other parameters are explored to minimize the design chamber pressure. A brief history of the plug nozzle concept is included to point out the advanced level of technology of the concept and the feasibility of exploiting the variables considered in this study. The plug cluster concept looks very promising as a candidate for consideration for the ultimate customer driven propulsion system.

Aukerman, Carl A.

1991-01-01

82

Approaching ultimate resolution for soft x-ray spectrometers.  

PubMed

We explore the potential performance of soft x-ray spectrometers based on the use of varied-line-spacing spherical diffraction gratings (VLS-SG). The quantitative assessment is based on an optimization procedure to obtain both negligible optical aberrations at full illumination of the grating and a quasi linear focal curve. It involves high-order optical aberration cancellation to calculate the focal curves. We also examine the validity of small divergence closed-form formulas describing the light path function. Optimizing the optical and geometric parameters gives an ultimate resolving power, at 930 eV, of between 10,800 for a 3 m long instrument and 34,000 for an 11 m spectrometer according to the Rayleigh criterion. Typical fabrication tolerances would scale these values down by about 10%. The findings are validated by ray-tracing simulations. PMID:22781243

Chiuzb?ian, Sorin G; Hague, Coryn F; Lüning, Jan

2012-07-10

83

Ultimate photovoltage in perovskite oxide heterostructures with critical film thickness  

SciTech Connect

One order larger photovoltage is obtained with critical thicknesses of La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} films in both kinds of heterostructures of La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} (0.8 wt % Nb-doped) and La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}/Si fabricated at various oxygen pressures. Our self-consistent calculation reveals that the critical thickness of the La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} film with the ultimate value of photovoltage is just the thickness of the depletion layer of La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} in both heterojunctions, respectively.

Wang Cong; Jin Kuijuan; Zhao Ruiqiang; Lu Huibin; Guo Haizhong; Ge Chen; He Meng; Wang Can; Yang Guozhen [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-05-02

84

pH  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab activity is designed to teach students how to test for pH and understand its relationship to them and their environment. They will learn what pH is, draw and label a pH scale, measure the pH of various items, and explain why it's important to understand pH, for example, the danger presented by substances having very high or low pH.

85

Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend achromatic cell, we have made significant progress with the design of PEP-X, a USR that would inhabit the decommissioned PEP-II tunnel at SLAC. The enlargement of the dynamic aperture is largely a result of the cancellations of the 4th-order resonances in the 3rd-order achromats and the effective use of lattice optimization programs. In this paper, we will show those cancellations of the 4th-order resonances using an analytical approach based on the exponential Lie operators and the Poisson brackets. Wherever possible, our analytical results will be compared with their numerical counterparts. Using the derived formulae, we will construct 4th-order geometric achromats and use them as modules for the lattice of the PEP-X USR, noting that only geometric terms are canceled to the 4th order.

Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

2012-04-09

86

26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10 Section 48.6427-10...by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview. This section...relate to kerosene sold from a blocked pump. Claims relating to kerosene...

2010-04-01

87

Interindividual variability in social insects - proximate causes and ultimate consequences.  

PubMed

Individuals within social groups often show consistent differences in behaviour across time and context. Such interindividual differences and the evolutionary challenge they present have recently generated considerable interest. Social insects provide some of the most familiar and spectacular examples of social groups with large interindividual differences. Investigating these within-group differences has a long research tradition, and behavioural variability among the workers of a colony is increasingly regarded as fundamental for a key feature of social insects: division of labour. The goal of this review is to illustrate what we know about both the proximate mechanisms underlying behavioural variability among the workers of a colony and its ultimate consequences; and to highlight the many open questions in this research field. We begin by reviewing the literature on mechanisms that potentially introduce, maintain, and adjust the behavioural differentiation among workers. We highlight the fact that so far, most studies have focused on behavioural variability based on genetic variability, provided by e.g. multiple mating of the queen, while other mechanisms that may be responsible for the behavioural differentiation among workers have been largely neglected. These include maturational, nutritional and environmental influences. We further discuss how feedback provided by the social environment and learning and experience of adult workers provides potent and little-explored sources of differentiation. In a second part, we address what is known about the potential benefits and costs of increased behavioural variability within the workers of a colony. We argue that all studies documenting a benefit of variability so far have done so by manipulating genetic variability, and that a direct test of the effect of behavioural variability on colony productivity has yet to be provided. We emphasize that the costs associated with interindividual variability have been largely overlooked, and that a better knowledge of the cost/benefit balance of behavioural variability is crucial for our understanding of the evolution of the mechanisms underlying the social organization of insect societies. We conclude by highlighting what we believe to be promising but little-explored avenues for future research on how within-colony variability has evolved and is maintained. We emphasize the need for comparative studies and point out that, so far, most studies on interindividual variability have focused on variability in individual response thresholds, while the significance of variability in other parameters of individual response, such as probability and intensity of the response, has been largely overlooked. We propose that these parameters have important consequences for the colony response. Much more research is needed to understand if and how interindividual variability is modulated in order to benefit division of labour, homeostasis and ultimately colony fitness in social insects. PMID:24341677

Jeanson, Raphaël; Weidenmüller, Anja

2014-08-01

88

Predicted ultimate capacity of laterally loaded piles in clay using support vector machine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The determination of ultimate capacity of laterally loaded pile in clay is a key parameter for designing the laterally loaded pile. The available methods for determination of ultimate resistance of pile in clay are not reliable. This study investigates the potential of a support vector machine (SVM)-based approach to predict the ultimate capacity of laterally loaded pile in clay. The

Pijush Samui

2008-01-01

89

78 FR 55117 - Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft Regulatory Guide  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0203] Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants; Draft Regulatory...guide (DG), DG-1275, ``Ultimate Heat Sink for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This...GDC) that are applicable to the ultimate heat sink (UHS) features of plant...

2013-09-09

90

The ultimate band compression factor in gradient elution chromatography  

SciTech Connect

The equations predicting the ultimate time band compression factor, G = (t{sub R}-t{sub F})/t{sub p} in linear gradient elution chromatography, for an infinitely narrow injection (injection time t{sub p} {yields} 0) were derived for an ideal-model column (dispersionless chromatography, H = 0) assuming the Linear Solvent Strength Model for the retention behavior of the analyte. Numerical solutions can readily be obtained when the LSSM model does not apply. The results can be generalized to any retained organic modifier (k'{sub A}) in the mobile phase. The stronger the retention of the organic modifier, the more effective the band compression. Dispersion in real chromatographic column (H {ne} 0) affects the limits that can be reached in linear gradients but poorly in step gradients. Examples based on a conventional HETP of about 12 {micro}m using a 5 {micro}m particle packed column reveal that the best time compression factor that could be expected is twice the one predicted with an ideal column.

Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

2008-01-01

91

Ultimate VHF Broadband Interferometer Zen KAWASAKI and Manabu AKITA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lightning Research Group of Osaka University (LRGOU) has been developing an interferometer for thunderstorm monitoring during these two decades. When LRGOU initiated this project, many related scientists claimed that LRGOU's system was a time of arrival and it must be a sophisticated TOA system. However the key technology of the system were broad band and digital data processing, and it is named the VHF broad band digital interferometer (BDITF), because the phase difference of Fourier components played the very important role. Then the BDITF finally has been realized as a quasi-real time lightning monitoring system, and LRGOU has been operating their BDITFs around Osaka area. Since the BDITF captures the VHF impulses associated with lightning discharges by amplitude triggering, it occasionally misses one of the bi-directional leader progressions because of relatively small amplitude VHF impulses mainly emitted by positive leader tips. All of high density of VHF pulses associated with recoil leaders may not be recorded. Then the ordinary BDITF is able to be accepted as the practical operational system, but from the aspect of science it has been sioriously expected to be improved its performance. To overcome the difficulty New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT) and LRGOU have started the joint project, and a continuous recording system for digital signals is adopted [M. Stock et al, and M Akita et al,]. The field campaigns have been conducting in New Mexico and in Japan, and successful observations are accomplished. The algorithm to identify individual VHF pulses associated with lightning discharges from back ground noise and/or artificial noise, the dispersion of phase differences for all Fourier components is examined. In case by of small dispersion it is concluded that analyzed VHF pulse has high possibility to be emitted by lightning discharges. This interpretation means that the recorded VHF pulse shape might maintain without deformation during propagation, like electromagnetic wave propagation in non-dispersive medium. This procedure presented exciting results of lightning channel imaging, and the bi-directional leader propagation can be visualized in terms of azimuth and elevation as a function of time. Moreover all of the VHF radiation process for an entire lightning flash from initiation to termination can be imaged, and it is concluded that the system might be an ultimate broad band digital interferometer. The authors would like to show their appreciation to Paul Krehbiel, NMIMT, who gave a chance and suggestion of a continuous recording scheme for BDITF. M. Stock et al. : Continuous Broadband Digital Interferometry of Lightning using a Generalized Cross Correlation Algorithm M. Akita et al. : Data Processing Procedure 1 using Distribution of Slopes of Phase Differences for Broadband VHF Interferometer

Kawasaki, Z.; Akita, M.

2013-12-01

92

Effect of load eccentricity and substructure deformation on ultimate strength of shuttle orbiter thermal protection system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect of load eccentricity and substructure deformation on the ultimate strength and stress displacement properties of the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) was determined. The LI-900 Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) tiles mounted on the .41 cm thick Strain Isolator Pad (SIP) were investigated. Substructure deformations reduce the ultimate strength of the SIP/tile TPS and increase the scatter in the ultimate strength data. Substructure deformations that occur unsymmetric to the tile can cause the tile to rotate when subjected to a uniform applied load. Load eccentricity reduces SIP/tile TPS ultimate strength and causes tile rotation.

Sawyer, J. W.

1981-01-01

93

BOOK REVIEW: Seeking Ultimates. An Intuitive Guide to Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physics has the reputation of being a difficult and dry subject. Many books have been written in attempts to show that the difficulties are not insurmountable, even for the layman, and to convey some of the fascination it provides for those within it. In Seeking Ultimates Peter Landsberg avoids mathematics, the source of so many difficulties, entirely, and seeks to make physics comprehensible by what he terms intuition. He also emphasizes that there is almost no part of science that is completely understood; there are always areas of incompleteness and uncertainty, capable of providing exciting new results, and examples of this are highlighted throughout the book. After an introduction Landsberg starts with macroscopic phenomena for ease of understanding, though one might question whether the chosen topic of thermodynamics is ever going to be easy. Next he looks at microscopic effects, from atomic structure to the fundamental particles of the standard model and their interactions. There follow chapters on time and entropy, on chaos theory, on quantum mechanics and then cosmology. The final chapters look at physical constants (including the anthropic principle), whether physics has room for a creator God (the conclusion is that this is not the province of science), and some thoughts on science as a human activity. The chosen topics are those which have been important in the late twentieth century and remain important. Each chapter cites an eminent scientist as a `hero', though little is made of this. There are occasional historical notes, set in boxes, and a few short poems to leaven the text. What the book achieves is difficult to assess. Removing mathematics and adding a glossary of technical terms do not necessarily allow non-scientists to enjoy the text, as the publisher's note on the back cover suggests. The concepts can baffle the layman even more than the mathematics, and one of the most difficult of all physical concepts permeates so much of this book: entropy. It is physicists who can benefit most from discarding mathematics and seeking intuitive understanding. It is often too easy to put the numbers into a formula, with little real comprehension of the underlying physics. For layman or physicist the book is hard work. It is not a volume to be read from cover to cover; each section needs to be considered and digested, with frequent turning backwards (or sometimes forwards) to other pages. Even then the outcome may leave questions that can only be answered by access to an academic library to look up some of the copious references to original papers (which, of course, do not eschew mathematics or make concessions to conceptual difficulties). Unfortunately the book is marred by an impression of haste and lack of care, leading to errors that should not have reached the final print. For example, a graph of increase of population with generation number is shown as and stated to be a straight line. It should be exponential. This sort of thing undermines confidence in the whole text. High temperature superconductivity may have a revolutionary effect on electrical machines in the future, but for the time being magnets for magnetic resonance imaging machines and the like still use the old superconductors. Amusing anecdotes make for interesting reading, but the one about Faraday is garbled: he had nothing to do with frogs' legs (that was Galvani), and the quip about taxing electricity one day, if not apocryphal, was made either to Peel or to Gladstone, not to the King. In at least one case a topic mentioned in the index and glossary does not appear on the stated page in the text, apparently having been cut out at a late stage. Personally I did not find the book satisfying, but others will differ. Especially when dealing with intuitive appreciation, what is straightforward to one person may be utterly opaque to another. Making physics comprehensible and conveying its fascination is a daunting and often thankless task, but a very necessary one. The more it is attempted by those with a command of the subject, the more likely i

Brown, Neil

2000-05-01

94

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday PH 1110 PH 1110  

E-print Network

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday PH 1110 PH 1110 Muhammad Muhammad CS 1101 CS 1101 CS 1101 Mairaj Mairaj Mairaj Ph 1111 Ph 1111 PH 1111 Zhen Zhen Zhen CH 1010 CH 1010 Elisabeth Elisabeth MA 1023 MA 1021 MA 1023 MA 1021 Kushi Han Li Murtaza Jeffrey MA 1021 MA 1023 PH 1110 Han Li Murtaza Muhammad

Weekes, Suzanne L.

95

Ultimate Controlling Structures and Firm Value: Evidence from the Chinese Listed Companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data on ultimate controlling structures of Chinese listed companies, we identify three issues in this article: (1) how common is the listed companies held by the state ultimately? (2) how does the state maintain the control of these companies? (3) the impacts of different controlling structures on firm value. It's found that more than 70% of Chinese listed companies

Kun Wang; Xing Xiao

96

Optimal Stock Selling/Buying Strategy with reference to the Ultimate Average*  

E-print Network

Optimal Stock Selling/Buying Strategy with reference to the Ultimate Average* Min Dai and Yifei are concerned with the optimal decision to sell or buy a stock in a given period with reference to the ultimate average of the stock price. More precisely, we aim to determine an optimal selling (buying) time

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

97

Mechanical State Analysis of Load-Bearing Systems. Part 1. The Ultimate State  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study presents fundamentals of the ultimate state theory for the load-bearing systems operating under complex loading (mechanical fatigue, friction and wear, temperature, electrochemical corrosion). Energy criteria of the ultimate state and methods for calculating its parameters are proposed. Strength conditions taking into account both cyclic and contact loads have been set.

L. A. Sosnovskii

2003-01-01

98

Local MSU instructors Courtney Fitzpatrick and Mackenzie Brosious will guide the first ultimate  

E-print Network

: Ultimate RESTORATIVE YOGA Experience Relax, restore and release the mind and body from stress. Search ultimate restorative yoga experience. This relaxing extended practice is designed to restore the nervous yoga is suitable for all levels of practitioners and will certainly leave you feeling recharged

Maxwell, Bruce D.

99

pH Calculation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This pair of pH calculation programs serves as an excellent tool for anyone wishing to calculate the pH of a solution containing multiple acids and bases. These programs allow practitioners to predict the pH of simple and complex acid/base solutions and buffers. They may be downloaded free of charge via the website. Users are encouraged to carefully read the guides provided by the author.

Johansson, Stig

100

pH Scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Test the pH of things like coffee, spit, and soap to determine whether each is acidic, basic, or neutral. Visualize the relative number of hydroxide ions and hydronium ions in solution. Switch between logarithmic and linear scales. Investigate whether changing the volume or diluting with water affects the pH. Or you can design your own liquid!

Simulations, Phet I.; Adams, Wendy; Barbera, Jack; Langdon, Laurie; Loeblein, Patricia; Malley, Chris

2008-07-01

101

Reviewing appeals Constructive dialog on manuscripts and publishing decisions ultimately improves manuscript quality.  

E-print Network

Reviewing appeals Constructive dialog on manuscripts and publishing decisions ultimately improves manuscript quality. A t Nature Immunology we receive far more manuscripts than we can publish in our pages

Cai, Long

102

Japanese quail meat quality: characteristics, heritabilities, and genetic correlations with some slaughter traits.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic parameters of several breast meat quality traits and their genetic relationships with some slaughter traits [BW, breast yield (BRY), and abdominal fat yield (AFY)]. In total, 1,093 pedigreed quail were slaughtered at 35 d of age to measure BRY, AFY, and breast meat quality traits [ultimate pH (pHU), Commission Internationale d'Eclairage color parameters (L*, lightness; a*, redness; and b*, yellowness), thawing and cooking loss (TL and CL, respectively), and Warner-Bratzler shear value (WB)]. The average pHU, L*, a*, and b* were determined to be 5.94, 43.09, 19.24, and 7.74, respectively. In addition, a very high WB average (7.75 kg) indicated the firmness of breast meat. High heritabilities were estimated for BW, BRY, and AFY (0.51, 0.49, and 0.35). Genetic correlations of BW between BRY and AFY were found to be high (0.32 and 0.58). On the other hand, the moderate negative relationship between BRY and AFY (-0.24) implies that selection for breast yield should not increase abdominal fat. The pHU was found to be the most heritable trait (0.64), whereas the other meat quality traits showed heritabilities in the range of 0.39 to 0.48. Contrary to chickens, the genetic correlation between pHU and L* was low. The pHU exhibited a negative and high correlation with BW and AFY, whereas L* showed a positive but smaller relationship with these traits. Moreover, pHU exhibited high negative correlations (-0.43 and -0.62) with TL and WB, whereas L* showed a moderate relationship (0.24) with CL. This genetic study confirmed that the multi-trait selection could be used to improve meat quality traits. Further, the ultimate pH of breast meat is a relevant selection criterion due to its strong relationships with either water-holding capacity and texture or low abdominal fatness. PMID:23776259

Narinc, Dogan; Aksoy, Tulin; Karaman, Emre; Aygun, Ali; Firat, Mehmet Ziya; Uslu, Mustafa Kemal

2013-07-01

103

Combined wind turbine fatigue and ultimate load reduction by individual blade control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If each blade of the wind turbine has individual pitch actuator, there is possibility of employing the pitch system to mitigate structural loads through advanced control methods. Previously, considerable reduction of blade lifetime equivalent fatigue loads has been achieved by Individual Blade Control (IBC) and in addition, it has also been shown the potential in blade ultimate loads reduction. However, both fatigue and ultimate loads impact on the design and life of wind turbine blades. In this paper, the design and application of IBC that concurrently reduce both blade fatigue and ultimate loads is investigated. The contributions of blade load spectral components, which are 1P, 2P and edgewise mode from blade in-plane and/or out-of-plane bending moments, are firstly explored. Four different control options for reducing various combinations of these load components are compared. In response to the different spectral peaks of both fatigue and ultimate loads, the controller has been designed so that it can act on different frequency components which vary with wind speed. The performance of the IBC controller on fatigue and ultimate load reduction is assessed by simulating a 5MW exemplar wind turbine. Simulation results show that with a proper selection of controlling inputs at different wind speed, the use of a single combined IBC can achieve satisfactory reduction on both fatigue and ultimate loads.

Han, Y.; Leithead, W. E.

2014-06-01

104

Calculation of the Ultimate Bearing Capacity of Soil Slope Based on the Unified Strength Theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At present, the failure criteria used in calculating the ultimate bearing capacity of soil slope are the Tresca and Mohr-Coulomb criteria. But the results are conservative and the potential strength of soil mass cannot be utilized sufficiently because these two criteria do not take into account the effect of the intermediate principal stress. In this paper the unified strength theory was used to analyze the ultimate bearing capacity of soil slope. The formula for calculating the ultimate bearing capacity of soil slope using the unified strength theory was established. At the end, a case history was analyzed and it indicated that the result of the unified strength theory is larger than that of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion. This indicates that calculation of ultimate bearing capacity of soil slope with the unified strength theory can sufficiently exploit the strength of material. Therefore, the calculation of ultimate bearing capacity of the soil slope based on the unified strength theory will be of great significance in future applications.

Liao, Hongjian; Ma, Zongyuan; Su, Lijun

105

Universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations: The ULTIMATE conservative difference scheme  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A fresh approach is taken to the embarrassingly difficult problem of adequately modeling simple pure advection. An explicit conservative control-volume formation makes use of a universal limiter for transient interpolation modeling of the advective transport equations. This ULTIMATE conservative difference scheme is applied to unsteady, one-dimensional scalar pure advection at constant velocity, using three critical test profiles: an isolated sine-squared wave, a discontinuous step, and a semi-ellipse. The goal, of course, is to devise a single robust scheme which achieves sharp monotonic resolution of the step without corrupting the other profiles. The semi-ellipse is particularly challenging because of its combination of sudden and gradual changes in gradient. The ULTIMATE strategy can be applied to explicit conservation schemes of any order of accuracy. Second-order schemes are unsatisfactory, showing steepening and clipping typical of currently popular so-called high resolution shock-capturing of TVD schemes. The ULTIMATE third-order upwind scheme is highly satisfactory for most flows of practical importance. Higher order methods give predictably better step resolution, although even-order schemes generate a (monotonic) waviness in the difficult semi-ellipse simulation. Little is to be gained above ULTIMATE fifth-order upwinding which gives results close to the ultimate for which one might hope.

Leonard, B. P.

1988-01-01

106

Ph.D. Manual PH.D. PROGRAM  

E-print Network

Ph.D. Manual 1 PH.D. PROGRAM IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY Manual of Policies and Procedures College://www.lehigh.edu/education/sp/phd_sp.html Approved: May 1985 Last Revision: July 2010 #12;Ph.D. Manual 2 Table of Contents Program Philosophy..................................................................................... 3 Differentiation of Ph.D. & Ed.S. Programs................................................... 8

Gilchrist, James F.

107

02/03/2011 09:46The Last Word On Ultimate Explanations? | Evolutionary Psychology Blog Page 1 of 7http://www.epjournal.net/blog/2011/02/the-last-word-on-ultimate...1+Newsletter&utm_term=The+Last+Word+On+Ultimate+Explanations_3F  

E-print Network

-Phillips et al. use the example of crying infants in the article ­ babies cry (ultimately) to signal needs in trying to explain ­ in the ultimate sense ­ cooperation among humans. Why do people have systems designed

West, Stuart

108

arXiv:astro-ph/0009259v219Sep2000 How the Sun Shines  

E-print Network

arXiv:astro-ph/0009259v219Sep2000 How the Sun Shines John N. Bahcall What makes the sun shine? How does the sun produce the vast amount of energy necessary to support life on earth? These questions 1833 Treatise on Astronomy: The sun's rays are the ultimate source of almost every motion which takes

Walter, Frederick M.

109

Temperature dependent elastic constants and ultimate strength of graphene and graphyne.  

PubMed

Based on the first principles calculation combined with quasi-harmonic approximation in this work, we focus on the analysis of temperature dependent lattice geometries, thermal expansion coefficients, elastic constants, and ultimate strength of graphene and graphyne. For the linear thermal expansion coefficient, both graphene and graphyne show a negative region in the low temperature regime. This coefficient increases up to be positive at high temperatures. Graphene has superior mechanical properties with Young's modulus E = 350.01 N/m and ultimate tensile strength of 119.2 GPa at room temperature. Based on our analysis, it is found that graphene's mechanical properties have strong resistance against temperature increase up to 1000 K. Graphyne also shows good mechanical properties with Young's modulus E = 250.9 N/m and ultimate tensile strength of 81.2 GPa at room temperature, but graphyne's mechanical properties have a weaker resistance with respect to the increase of temperature than that of graphene. PMID:23181329

Shao, Tianjiao; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Yao, Shan; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Tian, Yongjun

2012-11-21

110

Intra-Beam Scattering, Impedance, and Instabilities in Ultimate Storage Rings  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated collective effects in an ultimate storage ring, i.e. one with diffraction limited emittances in both planes, using PEP-X as an example. In an ultimate ring intra-beam scattering (IBS) sets the limit of current that can be stored. In PEP-X, a 4.5 GeV ring running round beams at 200 mA in 3300 bunches, IBS doubles the emittances to 11.5 pm at the design current. The Touschek lifetime is 11 hours. Impedance driven collective effects tend not to be important since the beam current is relatively low. We have investigated collective effects in PEP-X, an ultimate storage ring, i.e. one with diffraction limited emittances (at one angstrom wavelength) in both planes. In an ultimate ring intra-beam scattering (IBS) sets the limit of current that can be stored. In PEP-X, IBS doubles the emittances to 11.5 pm at the design current of 200 mA, assuming round beams. The Touschek lifetime is quite large in PEP-X, 11.6 hours, and - near the operating point - increases with decreasing emittance. It is, however, a very sensitive function of momentum acceptance. In an ultimate ring like PEP-X impedance driven collective effects tend not to be important since the beam current is relatively low. Before ultimate PEP-X can be realized, the question of how to run a machine with round beams needs serious study. For example, in this report we assumed that the vertical emittance is coupling dominated. It may turn out that using vertical dispersion is a preferable way to generate round beams. The choice will affect IBS and the Touschek effect.

Bane, Karl; /SLAC

2012-03-28

111

The pH Game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This learning activity engages students in measurement of pH in water and soil samples, plants and other natural materials. By mixing different substances, they observe how pH changes, and become familiar with the pH of common household products. Through discussion, they learn how pH can be modified in the environment.

112

Space simulation ultimate pressure lowered two decades by removal of diffusion pump oil contaminants during operation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The complex problem why large space simulation chambers do not realize the true ultimate vacuum was investigated. Some contaminating factors affecting diffusion pump performance have been identified and some advances in vacuum/distillation/fractionation technology have been achieved which resulted in a two decade or more lower ultimate pressure. Data are presented to show the overall or individual contaminating effect of commonly used phthalate ester plasticizers of 390 to 530 molecular weight on diffusion pump performance. Methods for removing contaminants from diffusion pump silicone oil during operation and reclaiming contaminated oil by high vacuum molecular distillation are described.

Buggele, A. E.

1973-01-01

113

Getting “Just Deserts” or Seeing the “Silver Lining”: The Relation between Judgments of Immanent and Ultimate Justice  

PubMed Central

People can perceive misfortunes as caused by previous bad deeds (immanent justice reasoning) or resulting in ultimate compensation (ultimate justice reasoning). Across two studies, we investigated the relation between these types of justice reasoning and identified the processes (perceptions of deservingness) that underlie them for both others (Study 1) and the self (Study 2). Study 1 demonstrated that observers engaged in more ultimate (vs. immanent) justice reasoning for a “good” victim and greater immanent (vs. ultimate) justice reasoning for a “bad” victim. In Study 2, participants' construals of their bad breaks varied as a function of their self-worth, with greater ultimate (immanent) justice reasoning for participants with higher (lower) self-esteem. Across both studies, perceived deservingness of bad breaks or perceived deservingness of ultimate compensation mediated immanent and ultimate justice reasoning respectively. PMID:25036011

Harvey, Annelie J.; Callan, Mitchell J.

2014-01-01

114

pH optrode  

DOEpatents

A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Langry, Kevin C. (Tracy, CA)

1993-01-01

115

Ph.D. shortage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

116

bleaching may ultimately help reef corals to survive the recurrent and increasingly  

E-print Network

bleaching may ultimately help reef corals to survive the recurrent and increasingly severe warming events projected by current climate models of the next half-century3 . Bleaching is an ecological gamble in that it sacrifices short-term benefits for long-term advantage. This counters conventional wisdom that bleaching

Pretoria, University of

117

VenueTM 11 Pro The ultimate 2-in-1 flexibility: power of  

E-print Network

VenueTM 11 Pro The ultimate 2-in-1 flexibility: power of an Ultrabook, functionality of a desk- top social media app with Dual-Band 2x2 Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0, and mobile broadband2 options. In addition with the Dell Tablet Desktop Dock #12;Discover the entire line of Dell's amazing tablet family at Dell

Fiebig, Peter

118

Ultimate Government Control Structures and Firm Value: Evidence from Chinese Listed Companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that 70% of Chinese listed companies are ultimately controlled by government agencies, thereby indicating that state ownership remains widespread in China's stock markets. Three questions are considered that are related to government control structures and their impact on firm value: (1) how do government agencies maintain their control of listed companies; (2) what are the impacts of different

Kun Wang; Xing Xiao

119

Student's Ultimate Career Coursework, Employment, & Student Services Handbook. "SUCCESS Handbook" Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Student's Ultimate Career Coursework, Employment and Student Services (SUCCESS) Handbook project was undertaken to identify student support services available through the California Community Colleges (CCC), increase student retention among special needs vocational education students, and identify common barriers to employment. The project…

Foothill-De Anza Community Coll. District, Cupertino, CA. Occupational Training Inst.

120

Prediction of Local Ultimate Strain and Toughness of Trabecular Bone Tissue by Raman Material Composition Analysis  

PubMed Central

Clinical studies indicate that bone mineral density correlates with fracture risk at the population level but does not correlate with individual fracture risk well. Current research aims to better understand the failure mechanism of bone and to identify key determinants of bone quality, thus improving fracture risk prediction. To get a better understanding of bone strength, it is important to analyze tissue-level properties not influenced by macro- or microarchitectural factors. The aim of this pilot study was to identify whether and to what extent material properties are correlated with mechanical properties at the tissue level. The influence of macro- or microarchitectural factors was excluded by testing individual trabeculae. Previously reported data of mechanical parameters measured in single trabeculae under tension and bending and its compositional properties measured by Raman spectroscopy was evaluated. Linear and multivariate regressions show that bone matrix quality but not quantity was significantly and independently correlated with the tissue-level ultimate strain and postyield work (r = 0.65–0.94). Principal component analysis extracted three independent components explaining 86% of the total variance, representing elastic, yield, and ultimate components according to the included mechanical parameters. Some matrix parameters were both included in the ultimate component, indicating that the variation in ultimate strain and postyield work could be largely explained by Raman-derived compositional parameters.

Stüssi, Edgar; Müller, Ralph

2015-01-01

121

Measurements of near-ultimate strength for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and  

E-print Network

, experimental measurements to date6­9 , which have all involved multiwalled carbon nanotubes, have observedMeasurements of near-ultimate strength for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and irradiation.211 The excellent mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are being exploited in a growing number of applications

Espinosa, Horacio D.

122

Predicting the heating value of sewage sludges in Thailand from proximate and ultimate analyses  

Microsoft Academic Search

There have been various methods used for determining a heating value of solid fuel such as coal, biomass and municipal solid waste (MSW) either by experiment using a bomb calorimeter or by modeling based on its compositions. This work proposes another aspect in developing models to predict the heating value of sewage sludge from its proximate and ultimate analyses data.

Puchong Thipkhunthod; Vissanu Meeyoo; Pramoch Rangsunvigit; Boonyarach Kitiyanan; Kitipat Siemanond; Thirasak Rirksomboon

2005-01-01

123

Ultimate truth vis `a vis stable truth School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, England.  

E-print Network

Ultimate truth vis `a vis stable truth P.D. Welch School of Mathematics, University settings. Keywords: theories of truth, fixed points, revision sequence, constructible set* *s of a theory of truth over ground models M, with an additional conditional operator ! in the language. We shall

Welch, Philip

124

Ultimate truth vis `a vis stable truth School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, England.  

E-print Network

Ultimate truth vis `a vis stable truth P.D. Welch School of Mathematics, University of Bristol order number theory with a © -Comprehension Axiom scheme) is insufficient. Keywords: theories of truth) Field constructs a system of a theory of truth over ground models , with an additional conditional

Welch, Philip

125

Ultimate truth vis `a vis stable truth School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, England.  

E-print Network

Ultimate truth vis `a vis stable truth P.D. Welch School of Mathematics, University of Bristol of a "determinately true" operator can be introduced in other settings. Keywords: theories of truth, fixed points a system of a theory of truth over ground models M, with an additional conditional operator

Welch, Philip

126

Predicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis of AE signals  

E-print Network

progressed, the majority of the existing codes assess the load carrying capacity of bridges by usingPredicting the ultimate bending capacity of concrete beams from the ``relaxation ratio'' analysis capacity 1. Introduction Bridges make up part of the asset of a country and their assessment

127

SPORT & RECREATION SERVICES-ULTIMATE FRISBEE INTRAMURALS RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS,  

E-print Network

SPORT & RECREATION SERVICES- ULTIMATE FRISBEE INTRAMURALS RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS THE POSSIBILITY OF BODILY INJURY, DISABILITY, DEATH, DAMAGE TO PROPERTY OR LOSSES RESULTING THEREFROM. HEALTH CARE liability for any personal injury, disability, death, property damage or loss I may suffer as a result of my

Burg, Theresa

128

SPORT & RECREATION SERVICES-ULTIMATE FRISBEE INTRAMURALS RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS,  

E-print Network

SPORT & RECREATION SERVICES- ULTIMATE FRISBEE INTRAMURALS RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS"), INCLUDING ANY FAILURE TO SAFEGUARD OR PROTECT ME FROM THE POSSIBILITY OF BODILY INJURY, DISABILITY, DEATH in the Activity, I hereby: · RELEASE the RELEASEES from any and all liability for any personal injury, disability

Seldin, Jonathan P.

129

17-4 PH and 15-5 PH  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

Johnson, Howard T.

1995-01-01

130

Predicting the ultimate axial load capacity of joints formed using V-band retainers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

V-band retainers are widely used in the automotive, aircraft and aerospace industries to connect a pair of circular flanges to provide a joint with good axial strength and torsional rigidity. V-band retainers are manufactured using a cold roll forming process. Despite their wide application, once assembled to a pair of flanges little is known about the interaction between flange and band. Moreover the failure mode of V-band retainers when applying an axial load is not fully understood. In this thesis the ultimate axial load capacity of V-band retainers is predicted using finite element and theoretical models and validated using experimental testing. It was shown that the ultimate axial load capacity was strongly dependent on the joint diameter, increasing between 114mm and 235mm, and decreasing beyond that. Moreover, the peak in ultimate axial load capacity was dependent on parameters such as the axial clamping load and coefficient of friction, and its position lay between 235mm and 450mm, as predicted by the finite element models. Other geometrical parameters such as flange and band thickness showed large impacts on the ultimate axial load capacity as well.. A theoretical model was developed that allowed the ultimate axial load capacity to be calculated from a single formula for larger bands and using a simple algorithm for smaller bands. This model supported the findings that, depending on the band diameter, the ultimate axial load capacity had a peak, but predicted its position at approximately 181mm. This position at 181mm was validated by the experimental data. However, when compared to the tests, the finite element and theoretical models both over-predicted the ultimate axial load capacity. Both the finite element models and practical tests showed that for small V-bands axial failure is due to a combination of section deformation and ring expansion, whereas large V-bands fail due to ring expansion only. These two distinct types of behaviour were incorporated into the theoretical model. The hardness development throughout the cold roll forming process was predicted using finite element models. This was validated by hardness measurements, for which a new technique was generated, directly linking plastic strain and hardness values..

Muller, Matthias

131

In vitro colonization of the muscle extracellular matrix components by Escherichia coli O157:H7: the influence of growth medium, temperature and pH on initial adhesion and induction of biofilm formation by collagens I and III.  

PubMed

Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 are responsible for repeated food-poisoning cases often caused by contaminated burgers. EHEC infection is predominantly a pediatric illness, which can lead to life-threatening diseases. Ruminants are the main natural reservoir for EHEC and food contamination almost always originates from faecal contamination. In beef meat products, primary bacterial contamination occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the most exposed part of the skeletal muscles in beef carcasses. Investigating the adhesion to the main muscle fibrous ECM proteins, insoluble fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV, laminin-?2 and elastin, results demonstrated that the preceding growth conditions had a great influence on subsequent bacterial attachment. In the tested experimental conditions, maximal adhesion to fibril-forming collagens I or III occurred at 25°C and pH 7. Once initially adhered, exposure to lower temperatures, as applied to meat during cutting and storage, or acidification, as in the course of post-mortem physiological modifications of muscle, had no effect on detachment, except at pHu. In addition, dense biofilm formation occurred on immobilized collagen I or III and was induced in growth medium supplemented with collagen I in solution. From this first comprehensive investigation of EHEC adhesion to ECM proteins with respect to muscle biology and meat processing, new research directions for the development of innovative practices to minimize the risk of meat contamination are further discussed. PMID:23516631

Chagnot, Caroline; Agus, Allison; Renier, Sandra; Peyrin, Frédéric; Talon, Régine; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

2013-01-01

132

In Vitro Colonization of the Muscle Extracellular Matrix Components by Escherichia coli O157:H7: The Influence of Growth Medium, Temperature and pH on Initial Adhesion and Induction of Biofilm Formation by Collagens I and III  

PubMed Central

Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 are responsible for repeated food-poisoning cases often caused by contaminated burgers. EHEC infection is predominantly a pediatric illness, which can lead to life-threatening diseases. Ruminants are the main natural reservoir for EHEC and food contamination almost always originates from faecal contamination. In beef meat products, primary bacterial contamination occurs at the dehiding stage of slaughtering. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the most exposed part of the skeletal muscles in beef carcasses. Investigating the adhesion to the main muscle fibrous ECM proteins, insoluble fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV, laminin-?2 and elastin, results demonstrated that the preceding growth conditions had a great influence on subsequent bacterial attachment. In the tested experimental conditions, maximal adhesion to fibril-forming collagens I or III occurred at 25°C and pH 7. Once initially adhered, exposure to lower temperatures, as applied to meat during cutting and storage, or acidification, as in the course of post-mortem physiological modifications of muscle, had no effect on detachment, except at pHu. In addition, dense biofilm formation occurred on immobilized collagen I or III and was induced in growth medium supplemented with collagen I in solution. From this first comprehensive investigation of EHEC adhesion to ECM proteins with respect to muscle biology and meat processing, new research directions for the development of innovative practices to minimize the risk of meat contamination are further discussed. PMID:23516631

Chagnot, Caroline; Agus, Allison; Renier, Sandra; Peyrin, Frédéric; Talon, Régine; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

2013-01-01

133

Ultimate strength assessment of a tanker hull based on experimentally developed master curves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A geometrically similar scaling was made from small-scale specimen to full-scale stiffened panels and then their collapse behaviour is investigated. It is considered that the stiffened panel compressive ultimate strength test was designed according to geometrical scaling laws so that the output of the test could be used as representative of the stiffened panels of the compressive zone of a tanker hull subjected to vertical bending moment. The ultimate strength of a tanker hull is analysed by a FE analysis using the experimentally developed master stress-strain curves which are obtained by the beam tension test and the compressive test of the stiffened panel, and are then compared with the result achieved by the progressive collapse method.

Xu, Mingcai; Garbatov, Y.; Guedes Soares, C.

2013-06-01

134

Ultimate kinematic characteristics of rail electromagnetic launchers with metal armatures in an external magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the results of numerical simulation of the Joule heating of the armature and rails in rail launchers of metal bodies with one or two augmenting rails generating an external magnetic field. The ultimate projectile velocity is calculated under the assumption that the Joule heating of the armature and rails during acceleration does not exceed the melting temperature of the materials of which they are made. It is shown that, with an appropriate choice of the position of the coils generating the augmenting magnetic field with respect to the launcher channel and the current magnitude in them, the heat load on the rails and armature in electromagnetic launchers of solids can be substantially reduced and the ultimate kinematic characteristics of these launchers in crisis-free regimes can be considerably increased.

Stankevich, S. V.; Shvetsov, G. A.

2014-09-01

135

Prediction of pork quality with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS): 1. Feasibility and robustness of NIRS measurements at laboratory scale.  

PubMed

The objective was to study prediction of pork quality by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology in the laboratory. A total of 131 commercial pork loin samples were measured with NIRS. Predictive equations were developed for drip loss %, colour L*, a*, b* and pH ultimate (pHu). Equations with R(2)>0.70 and residual prediction deviation (RPD)?1.9 were considered as applicable to predict pork quality. For drip loss% the prediction equation was developed (R(2) 0.73, RPD 1.9) and 76% of those grouped superior and inferior samples were predicted within the groups. For colour L*, test-set samples were predicted with R(2) 0.75, RPD 2.0, colour a* R(2) 0.51, RPD 1.4, colour b* R(2) 0.55, RPD 1.5 and pHu R(2) 0.36, RPD 1.3. It is concluded that NIRS prediction equations could be developed to predict drip loss% and L*, of pork samples. NIRS equations for colour a*, b* and pHu were not applicable for the prediction of pork quality on commercially slaughtered pigs. PMID:22410119

Kapper, C; Klont, R E; Verdonk, J M A J; Urlings, H A P

2012-07-01

136

Esophageal pH monitoring  

MedlinePLUS

pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... to stay in the hospital for the esophageal pH monitoring. ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how ...

137

The pH scale  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Some animals tolerate broad changes in pH well while others do not. Human activities can create acid rain. Acid rain can change the pH of the environment and destroy entire ecosystems and habitats. For an ecosystem to function properly, its pH must be able to accommodate all of the organisms living in it.

Olivia Worland (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)

2008-05-26

138

Downy woodpecker pair bond maintenance in winter: Proximate and ultimate mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

In most birds, the pair bond relationship during the reproductive period is ubiquitous and often necessary for reproductive success. However, trade-offs between the costs and benefits of pair bond maintenance (PBM) make this relationship more variable in the non-breeding season. I determined some of the proximate and ultimate factors that could contribute to inter- and intra-specific variation observed in avian

James Scott Kellam

2003-01-01

139

Ultimate-state scaling in a shell model for homogeneous turbulent convection  

E-print Network

An interesting question in turbulent convection is how the heat transport depends on the strength of thermal forcing in the limit of very large thermal forcing. Kraichnan predicted [Phys. Fluids {\\bf 5}, 1374 (1962)] that the heat transport measured by the Nusselt number (Nu) would depend on the strength of thermal forcing measured by the Rayleigh number (Ra) as Nu $\\sim$ Ra$^{1/2}$ with possible logarithmic corrections at very high Ra. This scaling behavior is taken as a signature of the so-called ultimate state of turbulent convection. The ultimate state was interpreted in the Grossmann-Lohse (GL) theory [J. Fluid Mech. {\\bf 407}, 27 (2000)] as a bulk-dominated state in which both the kinetic and thermal dissipation are dominated by contributions from the bulk of the flow with the boundary layers either broken down or playing no role in the heat transport. In this paper, we study the dependence of Nu and the Reynolds number (Re) measuring the root-mean-squared velocity fluctuations on Ra and the Prandtl number (Pr) using a shell model for homogeneous turbulent convection where buoyancy is acting directly on most of the scales. We find that Nu$\\sim$ Ra$^{1/2}$Pr$^{1/2}$ and Re$\\sim$ Ra$^{1/2}$Pr$^{-1/2}$, which resemble the ultimate-state scaling behavior for fluids with moderate Pr, but the presence of a drag acting on the large scales is crucial in giving rise to such scaling. This suggests that if buoyancy acts on most of the scales in the bulk of turbulent convection at very high Ra, then the ultimate state cannot be a bulk-dominated state.

Emily S. C. Ching; T. C. Ko

2008-04-16

140

An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

Gordon, Stephen S.

1992-01-01

141

Capturing Hydrolysis Products in the Solid State: Effects of pH on Uranyl Squarates under Ambient Conditions  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the relationship between hydrolysis prior to crystallization and its subsequent manifestation in the solid state through a study of uranyl squarates as a function of pH. We report the synthesis and characterization of two new uranyl squarates and discuss the expression of hydrolysis in these products, wherein increasing solution pH results in polymerization from uranyl monomers to trimers and ultimately chains.

Rowland, Clare E.; Cahill, Christopher L.

2010-01-01

142

26 CFR 48.6427-9 - Diesel fuel and kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use). 48.6427-9 Section...claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use). (a) Overview...and kerosene sold for use on a farm for farming purposes and by a State. Claims...

2012-04-01

143

26 CFR 48.6427-9 - Diesel fuel and kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use). 48.6427-9 Section...claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use). (a) Overview...and kerosene sold for use on a farm for farming purposes and by a State. Claims...

2013-04-01

144

26 CFR 48.6427-9 - Diesel fuel and kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use). 48.6427-9 Section...claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use). (a) Overview...and kerosene sold for use on a farm for farming purposes and by a State. Claims...

2010-04-01

145

26 CFR 48.6427-9 - Diesel fuel and kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use). 48.6427-9 Section...claims by registered ultimate vendors (farming and State use). (a) Overview...and kerosene sold for use on a farm for farming purposes and by a State. Claims...

2011-04-01

146

arXiv:astro-ph/0408456v21Dec2004 Measuring Dark Energy Clustering with CMB-Galaxy Correlations  

E-print Network

arXiv:astro-ph/0408456v21Dec2004 Measuring Dark Energy Clustering with CMB-Galaxy Correlations opportunity to study the dynamics of the dark energy through its large scale clustering properties. Ultimately 3% changes in the gravitational potential or total density fluctuation due to dark energy clustering

Hu, Wayne

147

Effects of acidic pH on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in stream microcosms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of acid (HNO3) on drift and survival of benthic invertebrate communities were assessed in stream microcosms over\\u000a a 7-day exposure period. Communities were obtained from the Cache la Poudre River, Colorado, using artificial substrates colonized\\u000a in the stream for 30 days and then transferred to stream microcosms. Streams receiving the highest acid concentration (pH\\u000a 4.0) contained significantly fewer

Lisa A. Courtney; William H. Clements

1998-01-01

148

Proximate and ultimate causes of signal diversity in the electric fish Gymnotus.  

PubMed

A complete understanding of animal signal evolution necessitates analyses of both the proximate (e.g. anatomical and physiological) mechanisms of signal generation and reception, and the ultimate (i.e. evolutionary) mechanisms underlying adaptation and diversification. Here we summarize the results of a synthetic study of electric diversity in the species-rich neotropical electric fish genus Gymnotus. Our study integrates two research directions. The first examines the proximate causes of diversity in the electric organ discharge (EOD) - which is the carrier of both the communication and electrolocation signal of electric fishes - via descriptions of the intrinsic properties of electrocytes, electrocyte innervation, electric organ anatomy and the neural coordination of the discharge (among other parameters). The second seeks to understand the ultimate causes of signal diversity - via a continent-wide survey of species diversity, species-level phylogenetic reconstructions and field-recorded head-to-tail EOD (ht-EOD) waveforms (a common procedure for characterizing the communication component of electric fish EODs). At the proximate level, a comparative morpho-functional survey of electric organ anatomy and the electromotive force pattern of the EOD for 11 species (representing most major clades) revealed four distinct groups of species, each corresponding to a discrete area of the phylogeny of the genus and to a distinct type of ht-EOD waveform. At the ultimate level, our analyses (which emphasize the ht-EOD) allowed us to conclude that selective forces from the abiotic environment have had minimal impact on the communication component of the EOD. In contrast, selective forces of a biotic nature - imposed by electroreceptive predators, reproductive interference from heterospecific congeners, and sexual selection - may be important sources of diversifying selection on Gymnotus signals. PMID:23761477

Crampton, W G R; Rodríguez-Cattáneo, A; Lovejoy, N R; Caputi, A A

2013-07-01

149

Application of SERS Nanoparticles for Intracellular pH Measurements  

SciTech Connect

We present an alternative approach to optical probes that will ultimately allow us to measure chemical concentrations in microenvironments within cells and tissues. This approach is based on monitoring the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of functionalized metal nanoparticles (50-100 nm in diameter). SERS allows for the sensitive detection of changes in the state of chemical groups attached to individual nanoparticles and small clusters. Here, we present the development of a nanoscale pH meter. The pH response of these nanoprobes is tested in a cell-free medium, measuring the pH of the solution immediately surrounding the nanoparticles. Heterogeneities in the SERS signal, which can result from the formation of small nanoparticle clusters, are characterized using SERS correlation spectroscopy and single particle/cluster SERS spectroscopy. The response of the nanoscale pH meters is tested under a wide range of conditions to approach the complex environment encountered inside living cells and to optimize probe performance.

Laurence, T; Talley, C; Colvin, M; Huser, T

2004-10-21

150

Ultimate Fate of the Leaking Intestinal Anastomosis: Does Leak Mean Permanent Stoma?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The ultimate fate of the leaking intestinal anastomosis is unknown. We sought to analyze long-term outcomes of anastomotic\\u000a leak with an emphasis on identifying the likelihood of re-establishing intestinal continuity and the potential for releak\\u000a with corrective surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  All consecutive subjects treated for clinical anastomotic leak from January 2001 through December 2007 were retrospectively\\u000a reviewed. Patients were stratified by management

Todd D. Francone; Abdulaziz Saleem; Thomas A. Read; Patricia L. Roberts; Peter W. Marcello; David J. Schoetz; Rocco Ricciardi

2010-01-01

151

Optimal estimation of losses at the ultimate quantum limit with non-Gaussian states  

E-print Network

We address the estimation of the loss parameter of a bosonic channel probed by arbitrary signals. Unlike the optimal Gaussian probes, which can attain the ultimate bound on precision asymptotically either for very small or very large losses, we prove that Fock states at any fixed photon number saturate the bound unconditionally for any value of the loss. In the relevant regime of low-energy probes, we demonstrate that superpositions of the first low-lying Fock states yield an absolute improvement over any Gaussian probe. Such few-photon states can be recast quite generally as truncations of de-Gaussified photon-subtracted states.

G. Adesso; F. Dell'Anno; S. De Siena; F. Illuminati; L. A. M. Souza

2009-04-23

152

Is Auger recombination the ultimate performance limiter in concentrator solar cells?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In principle, Auger recombination should constitute the ultimate limiting mechanism for concentrator photovoltaic performance as optical concentration, and hence current densities, are raised to progressively higher values. In reality, however, the effect will be rate-limiting only in indirect-band-gap solar cells—a point well established for silicon but not yet explored for germanium which comprises the lowest-energy junction in today's ultraefficient commercial multijunction concentrator solar cells. Detailed calculations of when Auger recombination should play a substantial role are presented, and reinforced by existing data.

Vossier, Alexis; Hirsch, Baruch; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

2010-11-01

153

Engineering Ultimate Self-Protection in Autonomic Agents for Space Exploration Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Exploration Initiative (EI) will push space exploration missions to the limit. Future missions will be required to be self-managing as well as self-directed, in order to meet the challenges of human and robotic space exploration. We discuss security and self protection in autonomic agent based-systems, and propose the ultimate self-protection mechanism for such systems-self-destruction. Like other metaphors in Autonomic Computing, this is inspired by biological systems, and is the analog of biological apoptosis. Finally, we discus the role it might play in future NASA space exploration missions.

Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

2005-01-01

154

Family of exactly solvable models with an ultimate quantum paramagnetic ground state.  

PubMed

We present a family of two-dimensional frustrated quantum magnets solely based on pure nearest-neighbor Heisenberg interactions which can be solved quasiexactly. All lattices are constructed in terms of frustrated quantum cages containing a chiral degree of freedom protected by frustration. The ground states of these models are dubbed ultimate quantum paramagnets and exhibit an extensive entropy at zero temperature. We discuss the unusual and extensively degenerate excitations in such phases. Implications for thermodynamic properties as well as for decoherence free quantum computation are discussed. PMID:20867263

Schmidt, Kai Phillip; Laad, Mukul

2010-06-11

155

1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

2014-02-24

156

The Ultimate Ungulate Page: Your Guide to the World's Hoofed Mammals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A very nicely-crafted website, The Ultimate Ungulate Page: Your Guide to the World's Hoofed Mammals was created by ungulate enthusiast Brent Huffman to provide the internet community with a reliable source for information, images, and links for the world's ungulates. The website contains introductory pages for the different ungulate orders including pictures, distribution maps, diagnostic characteristics, and literature cited. Each order page also provides a species list with links to individual species pages. The separate species pages contain great photos and information about ontogeny and reproduction, behavior, taxonomic classification, and more. The site links to a Glossary, Guestbook, and site guide as well.

Huffman, Brent

157

The fiber-optic gyroscope: Challenges to become the ultimate rotation-sensing technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Taking advantage of the development of optical-fiber communication technologies, the fiber-optic gyroscope started to be investigated in the mid 1970s, opening the way for a fully solid-state rotation sensor. It was firstly seen as dedicated to medium-grade applications, but today, it reaches strategic-grade performance and surpasses its well-established competitor, the ring-laser gyroscope, in terms of bias noise and long-term stability. Further progresses remain possible, the challenge being the ultimate inertial navigation performance of one nautical mile per month corresponding to a long-term bias stability of 10-5°/h.

Lefèvre, Hervé C.

2013-12-01

158

Feedback control of a bipedal walker / runner The ultimate goal of my PhD Research is to achieve running on  

E-print Network

, and was featured in several media outlets, including the Discovery Channel and Nippon Television. Hardware MABEL various PCBs, interfacing sensors, developing low-level embedded software libraries, and developing all

Sreenath, Koushil

159

Simultaneous analysis of PhIP, 4'-OH-PhIP, and their precursors using UHPLC-MS/MS.  

PubMed

A novel method allowing simultaneous analysis of PhIP, 4'-OH-PhIP, and their precursors (phenylalanine, tyrosine, creatine, creatinine, glucose) has been developed as a robust kinetic study tool by using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). A direct hydrochloric acid (HCl) extraction was applied to achieve the simultaneous extraction of all seven analytes, with the mean recoveries ranging from 60% to 120% at two concentration levels. Then, an Atlantis dC18 column selected from four different chromatographic columns was ultimately used to separate these compounds within 15 min. The limits of detection range of allseven analytes were calculated as 0.14-325.00 ?g L(-1). The intra- and interday precision of the proposed method were less than 15.4 and 19.9%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to depict the kinetic profiles of PhIP, 4'-OH-PhIP, and their precursors in pork model, reducing the analysis time and cost in the kinetic study. PMID:25407701

Yan, Yan; Zeng, Mao-Mao; Zheng, Zong-Ping; He, Zhi-Yong; Tao, Guan-Jun; Zhang, Shuang; Gao, Ya-Hui; Chen, Jie

2014-12-01

160

Experimental evaluation of the post-ultimate strength behavior of a ship's hull girder in waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental investigations into the collapse behavior of a box-shape hull girder subjected to extreme wave-induced loads are presented. The experiment was performed using a scaled model in a tank. In the middle of the scaled model, sacrificial specimens with circular pillar and trough shapes which respectively show different bending moment-displacement characteristics were mounted to compare the dynamic collapse characteristics of the hull girder in waves. The specimens were designed by using finite element (FE)-analysis. Prior to the tank tests, static four-point-bending tests were conducted to detect the load-carrying capacity of the hull girder. It was shown that the load-carrying capacity of a ship including reduction of the capacity after the ultimate strength can be reproduced experimentally by employing the trough type specimens. Tank tests using these specimens were performed under a focused wave in which the hull girder collapses under once and repetitive focused waves. It was shown from the multiple collapse tests that the increase rate of collapse becomes higher once the load-carrying capacity enters the reduction path while the increase rate is lower before reaching the ultimate strength.

Xu, Weijun; Iijima, Kazuhiro; Wada, Ryota; Fujikubo, Masahiko

2012-03-01

161

Toward The Ultimate Accuracy Of The GlobalAstrometric Grid With The Space Interferometry Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global astrometric reference frames may be ultimately limited to 1 micro-arcsecond accuracy by the effects of gravitational scintillation (stochastic microlensing), non-stationary gravitational bending of light in the Galactic potential, gravitational waves, acceleration of the Sun in the Galaxy, and acceleration of the Galaxy. The Space Interferometry Mission is expected to construct an optical reference frame to unprecedented accuracy based on a limited number of grid objects uniformly positioned across the sky. The global accuracy of this frame may be brought close to the ultimate threshold if the SIM grid is anchored to a number of extragalactic objects (mostly QSOs), whose positions can be considered fixed in the cosmological frame. These objects, observed by SIM alongside the regular grid stars, will help to constrain sky-correlated errors in parallaxes and, possibly, proper motions of science targets. They can be used to determine the residual position rotation of the SIM coordinate system and the residual spin of the proper motion system with respect to the quasi-inertial (non-rotating) extragalactic reference system. We estimate the gain in accuracy of the SIM astrometric grid and of the extragalactic tie, given realistic assumptions on the number and brightness of grid quasars, available mission time and observing schedule.

Makarov, Valeri V.; Johnston, K. J.; Zacharias, N.

2006-06-01

162

The theoretical ultimate magnetoelectric coefficients of magnetoelectric composites by optimization design  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates what is the largest magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient of ME composites, and how to realize it. From the standpoint of energy conservation, a theoretical analysis is carried out on an imaginary lever structure consisting of a magnetostrictive phase, a piezoelectric phase, and a rigid lever. This structure is a generalization of various composite layouts for optimization on ME effect. The predicted theoretical ultimate ME coefficient plays a similar role as the efficiency of ideal heat engine in thermodynamics, and is used to evaluate the existing typical ME layouts, such as the parallel sandwiched layout and the serial layout. These two typical layouts exhibit ME coefficient much lower than the theoretical largest values, because in the general analysis the stress amplification ratio and the volume ratio can be optimized independently and freely, but in typical layouts they are dependent or fixed. To overcome this shortcoming and achieve the theoretical largest ME coefficient, a new design is presented. In addition, it is found that the most commonly used electric field ME coefficient can be designed to be infinitely large. We doubt the validity of this coefficient as a reasonable ME effect index and consider three more ME coefficients, namely the electric charge ME coefficient, the voltage ME coefficient, and the static electric energy ME coefficient. We note that the theoretical ultimate value of the static electric energy ME coefficient is finite and might be a more proper measure of ME effect.

Wang, H.-L.; Liu, B., E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, CNMM, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-03-21

163

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A 32-ELEMENT HEAD ARRAY WITH RESPECT TO THE ULTIMATE INTRINSIC SNR  

PubMed Central

The quality of an RF detector coil design is commonly judged on how it compares with other coil configurations. The aim of this article is to develop a tool for evaluating the absolute performance of RF coil arrays. An algorithm to calculate the ultimate intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was implemented for a spherical geometry. The same imaging tasks modeled in the calculations were reproduced experimentally using a 32-element head array. Coil performance maps were then generated based on the ratio of experimentally measured SNR to the ultimate intrinsic SNR, for different acceleration factors associated with different degrees of parallel imaging. The relative performance in all cases was highest near the center of the samples (where the absolute SNR was lowest). The highest performance was found in the unaccelerated case and a maximum of 85% was observed with a phantom whose electrical properties are consistent with values in the human brain. The performance remained almost constant for 2-fold acceleration, but deteriorated at higher acceleration factors, suggesting that larger arrays are needed for effective highly-accelerated parallel imaging. The method proposed here can serve as a tool for the evaluation of coil designs, as well as a tool to guide the development of original designs which may begin to approach the optimal performance. PMID:19904727

Lattanzi, Riccardo; Grant, Aaron K.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Wiggins, Graham C.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Sodickson, Daniel K.

2010-01-01

164

Cyclic pitch control for the reduction of ultimate loads on wind turbines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we study the use of individual blade pitch control as a way to reduce ultimate loads. This load alleviation strategy exploits the fact that cyclic pitching of the blades induces in general a reduction of the average loading of a wind turbine, at least for some components as the main bearing, the yaw bearing, or the tower. When ultimate loads are generated during shutdowns, the effect of the use of cyclic pitch results in reduced peak loads. In fact, as the machine starts from a less stressed condition, the response to an extreme gust or other event will result in reduced loading on its components. This form of load mitigation can be seen as a preventative load mitigation strategy: the effect on load reduction is obtained without the need to detect and react to an extreme event, but by simply unloading the machine so that, in case an extreme event happens, the result will be less severe. The effect of peak load mitigation by preventative cyclic pitch is investigated with reference to a multi-MW wind turbine, by using high-fidelity aeroelastic simulations in a variety of operating conditions.

Bottasso, C. L.; Croce, A.; Riboldi, C. E. D.; Salvetti, M.

2014-06-01

165

The n-of-1 clinical trial: the ultimate strategy for individualizing medicine?  

PubMed Central

N-of-1 or single subject clinical trials consider an individual patient as the sole unit of observation in a study investigating the efficacy or side-effect profiles of different interventions. The ultimate goal of an n-of-1 trial is to determine the optimal or best intervention for an individual patient using objective data-driven criteria. Such trials can leverage study design and statistical techniques associated with standard population-based clinical trials, including randomization, washout and crossover periods, as well as placebo controls. Despite their obvious appeal and wide use in educational settings, n-of-1 trials have been used sparingly in medical and general clinical settings. We briefly review the history, motivation and design of n-of-1 trials and emphasize the great utility of modern wireless medical monitoring devices in their execution. We ultimately argue that n-of-1 trials demand serious attention among the health research and clinical care communities given the contemporary focus on individualized medicine. PMID:21695041

Lillie, Elizabeth O; Patay, Bradley; Diamant, Joel; Issell, Brian; Topol, Eric J; Schork, Nicholas J

2011-01-01

166

Plasticity and constraints on social evolution in African mole-rats: ultimate and proximate factors  

PubMed Central

Here, we review comparative studies of African mole-rats (family Bathyergidae) to explain how constraints acting at the ultimate (environmental) and proximate (organismal) levels have led to convergent gains and losses of sociality within this extensive adaptive radiation of subterranean rodents endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. At the ultimate level, living in environments that range from mesic through to arid has led to both variation and flexibility in social organization among species, culminating in the pinnacle of social evolution in the eusocial naked and Damaraland mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber and Fukomys damarensis). The common mole-rat (Cryptomys hottentotus) provides a model example of how plasticity in social traits exists within a single species inhabiting areas with different ecological constraint. At the proximate level, reproductive strategies and cooperative breeding may be constrained by the correlated evolution of a suite of traits including physiological suppression of reproduction, the development of physiological and morphological castes, and the mode of ovulatory control and seasonality in breeding. Furthermore, recent neurobiological advances indicate that differential patterns of neurotransmitter expression within the forebrain may underpin (and limit) either a solitary or group living/cooperative lifestyle not only in mole-rats, but also more widely among disparate mammalian taxa. PMID:23569295

Faulkes, Chris G.; Bennett, Nigel C.

2013-01-01

167

Ultimate strength performance of tankers associated with industry corrosion addition practices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the ship and offshore structure design, age-related problems such as corrosion damage, local denting, and fatigue damage are important factors to be considered in building a reliable structure as they have a significant influence on the residual structural capacity. In shipping, corrosion addition methods are widely adopted in structural design to prevent structural capacity degradation. The present study focuses on the historical trend of corrosion addition rules for ship structural design and investigates their effects on the ultimate strength performance such as hull girder and stiffened panel of double hull oil tankers. Three types of rules based on corrosion addition models, namely historic corrosion rules (pre-CSR), Common Structural Rules (CSR), and harmonised Common Structural Rules (CSRH) are considered and compared with two other corrosion models namely UGS model, suggested by the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS), and Time-Dependent Corrosion Wastage Model (TDCWM). To identify the general trend in the effects of corrosion damage on the ultimate longitudinal strength performance, the corrosion addition rules are applied to four representative sizes of double hull oil tankers namely Panamax, Aframax, Suezmax, and VLCC. The results are helpful in understanding the trend of corrosion additions for tanker structures

Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Han Byul; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Chen Guang; Paik, Jeom Kee

2014-09-01

168

Ph.D. Astronomy Program Ph.D. in Astronomy  

E-print Network

Ph.D. Astronomy Program Ph.D. in Astronomy Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences 1 physics at the graduate level 4. understand observational astronomy techniques 5. understand astrophysics strong background of knowledge and expertise in physics and astronomy #12;2. Curriculum Alignment

Hemmers, Oliver

169

Ph.D. Physics Program Ph.D. in Physics  

E-print Network

Ph.D. Physics Program Ph.D. in Physics Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences Program Assessment Coordinator Michael Pravica pravica@physics.unlv.edu 895-1723 Five-Year Implementation Dates (2010 for physics at the graduate level 4. understand statistical physics at the graduate level 5. perform

Hemmers, Oliver

170

The pH Game.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

Chemecology, 1996

1996-01-01

171

Jeanne Murhpy, PhD  

Cancer.gov

Jeanne Murphy, PhD, CNM is a postdoctoral Cancer Prevention Fellow in the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention. She comes to BGCRG with a PhD from Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She also completed a graduate certificate in Health Disparities and Health Inequality at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

172

PhDProgramS BIOENGINEERING  

E-print Network

through a strong interdisciplinary education in engineering, mathematics, medical and biological knowledge is complemented by an educational offer which proposes ad hoc advanced courses specifically projected for PhD audience. The courses are given at the Campus Leonardo. The Ph. D study track is organized in three years

173

Secret Plans Tab by Eagles Of Death Metal, www.Ultimate-Guitar.Com SECRET PLANS -Eagles of Death Metal  

E-print Network

Secret Plans Tab by Eagles Of Death Metal, www.Ultimate-Guitar.Com ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SECRET PLANS - Eagles of Death Metal 4] (What I want!) And that's it! Another simple but great song by the Eagles of Death Metal. #12;

Reiners, Peter W.

174

Keiji TANAKA, Ph.D. Hitoshi OKAMOTO, M.D., Ph.D.  

E-print Network

Keiji TANAKA, Ph.D. Hitoshi OKAMOTO, M.D., Ph.D. Atsushi MIYAWAKI, M.D., Ph.D. Tadaharu TSUMOTO, M.D., Ph.D. Shin OHKOUCHI Masao ITO, M.D., Ph.D. Shun-ichi AMARI, D.Eng. Susumu TONEGAWA, Ph Committee Senior Advisor Charles YOKOYAMA, Ph.D. Neural Circuit Function Developmental Gene Regulation

Kazama, Hokto

175

Jacob Bernoulli, Ph.D. Erhard Weigel, Ph.D. Universitt Leipzig 1650  

E-print Network

Jacob Bernoulli, Ph.D. Erhard Weigel, Ph.D. Universität Leipzig 1650 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Dr. jur. Universität Altdorf 1666 Johann Bernoulli, Ph.D. 1694 Leonhard Euler, Ph.D. Universität Basel 1726 Joseph Louis Lagrange, Ph.D. Simeon Denis Poisson, Ph.D. Jean-Baptiste Joseph Fourier, Ph

Matta, Abraham "Ibrahim"

176

The fiber-optic gyroscope, a century after Sagnac's experiment: The ultimate rotation-sensing technology?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Taking advantage of the development of optical-fiber communication technologies, the fiber-optic gyroscope (often abbreviated FOG) started to be investigated in the mid-1970s, opening the way for a fully solid-state rotation sensor. It was firstly seen as dedicated to medium-grade applications (1 ° / h range), but today, it reaches strategic-grade performance (10-4 ° / h range) and surpasses its well-established competitor, the ring-laser gyroscope, in terms of bias noise and long-term stability. Further progresses remain possible, the challenge being the ultimate inertial navigation performance of one nautical mile per month corresponding to a long-term bias stability of 10-5 ° / h. This paper is also the opportunity to recall the historical context of Sagnac's experiment, the origin of all optical gyros. xml:lang="fr"

Lefèvre, Hervé C.

2014-12-01

177

Biomimetics and the Development of Humanlike Robots as the Ultimate Challenge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Evolution led to effective solutions to nature's challenges and they were improved over millions of years. Humans have always made efforts to use nature as a model for innovation and problems solving. These efforts became more intensive in recent years where systematic studies of nature are being made towards better understanding and applying more sophisticated capabilities. Making humanlike robots, including the appearance, functions and intelligence, poses the ultimate challenges to biomimetics. For many years, making such robots was considered science fiction, but as a result of significant advances in biologically inspired technologies, such robots are increasingly becoming an engineering reality. There are already humanlike robots that walk, talk, interpret speech, make eye-contact and facial expressions, as well as perform many other humanlike functions. In this paper, the state-of-the-art of humanlike robots, potential applications and issues of concern will be reviewed.

Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

2011-01-01

178

Predicting ultimate methane yields of Jatropha curcus and Morus indica from their chemical composition.  

PubMed

In this study, all the components of Jatropha curcus and Morus indica were chemically characterized and their biochemical methane potentials (BMP) were determined. From the variables that showed strong influence on the ultimate methane yield (B(o)) of J. curcus, a multiple regression Jatropha model was developed. This model comprised of total carbohydrates, protein, lipid, acid-detergent fiber (ADF), cellulose and ash in ADF as independent variables, with r(2) value of 0.943. The Jatropha model was validated on 7 samples of M. indica parts and wastes from silkworm rearing trays of this study and 13 samples of heterogeneous organic wastes of earlier studies, to judge the prediction quality. It was found that most of the predicted values differed by less than 15% of their experimental B(o). PMID:19286374

Gunaseelan, V Nallathambi

2009-07-01

179

Assessing Fatigue and Ultimate Load Uncertainty in Floating Offshore Wind Turbines Due to Varying Simulation Length  

SciTech Connect

With the push towards siting wind turbines farther offshore due to higher wind quality and less visibility, floating offshore wind turbines, which can be located in deep water, are becoming an economically attractive option. The International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) 61400-3 design standard covers fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines, but there are a number of new research questions that need to be answered to modify these standards so that they are applicable to floating wind turbines. One issue is the appropriate simulation length needed for floating turbines. This paper will discuss the results from a study assessing the impact of simulation length on the ultimate and fatigue loads of the structure, and will address uncertainties associated with changing the simulation length for the analyzed floating platform. Recommendations of required simulation length based on load uncertainty will be made and compared to current simulation length requirements.

Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Haid, L.; Matha, D.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

2013-07-01

180

Determination of ultimate carbonaceous BOD and the specific rate constant (K1)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BODu) and the specific rate constant (K1) at which the demand is exerted are important parameters in designing biological wastewater treatment plants and in assessing the impact of wastewater on receiving streams. An analytical method is presented which uses time-series concentrations of BOD, defined as the calculated sum of dissolved oxygen (DO) losses at each time of measurement, for determining BODu and K1. Time-series DO measurements are obtained from a water sample that is incubated in darkness at 20 degrees Celsius in the presence of nitrapyrin, a chemical nitrification inhibitor. Time-series concentrations of BOD that approximate first order kinetics can be analyzed graphically or mathematically to compute BODu and K1.

Stamer, J.K.; Bennett, J.P.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

1982-01-01

181

An experimental investigation on the ultimate strength of epoxy repaired braced partial infilled RC frames  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to earthquake, buildings are damaged partially or completely. Particularly structures with soft storey are mostly affected. In general, such damaged structures are repaired and reused. In this regard, an experimental investigation was planned and conducted on models of single-bay, single-storey of partial concrete infilled reinforced concrete (RC) frames up to collapse with corner, central and diagonal steel bracings. Such collapsed frames were repaired with epoxy resin and retested. The initiative was to identify the behaviour, extent of restored ultimate strength and deflection of epoxy-retrofitted frames in comparison to the braced RC frames. The performance of such frames has been considered only for lateral loads. In comparison to bare RC frames, epoxy repaired partial infilled frames have significant increase in the lateral load capacity. Central bracing is more effective than corner and diagonal bracing. For the same load, epoxy repaired frames have comparable deflection than similar braced frames.

Dubey, Shailendra Kumar Damodar; Kute, Sunil

2014-09-01

182

Relax dude, we just play for fun! The flatlining trajectory of recreation specialization in the context of ultimate frisbee  

E-print Network

RELAX DUDE, WE JUST PLAY FOR FUN! THE FLATLINING TRAJECTORY OF RECREATION SPECIALIZATION IN THE CONTEXT OF ULTIMATE FRISBEE A Thesis by ANDREW JAMES KERINS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... IN THE CONTEXT OF ULTIMATE FRISBEE A Thesis by ANDREW JAMES KERINS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair...

Kerins, Andrew James

2007-04-25

183

Stapledon's Interplanetary Man: A Commonwealth of Worlds and the Ultimate Purpose of Space Colonisation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In his 1948 lecture to the British Interplanetary Society Stapledon considered the ultimate purpose of colonising other worlds. Having examined the possible motivations arising from improved scientific knowledge and access to extraterrestrial raw materials, he concludes that the ultimate benefits of space colonisation will be the increased opportunities for developing human (and post-human) diversity, intellectual and aesthetic potential and, especially, `spirituality'. By the latter concept he meant a striving for ``sensitive and intelligent awareness of things in the universe (including persons), and of the universe as a whole.'' A key insight articulated by Stapledon in this lecture was that this should be the aspiration of all human development anyway, with or without space colonisation, but that the latter would greatly increase the scope for such developments. Another key aspect of his vision was the development of a diverse, but connected, `Commonwealth of Worlds' extending throughout the Solar System, and eventually beyond, within which human potential would be maximised. In this paper I analyse Stapledon's vision of space colonisation, and will conclude that his overall conclusions remain sound. However, I will also argue that he was overly utopian in believing that human social and political unity are prerequisites for space exploration (while agreeing that they are desirable objectives in their own right), and that he unnecessarily downplayed the more prosaic scientific and economic motivations which are likely to be key drivers for space exploration (if not colonisation) in the shorter term. Finally, I draw attention to some recent developments in international space policy which, although probably not influenced by Stapledon's work, are nevertheless congruent with his overarching philosophy as outlined in `Interplanetary Man?'.

Crawford, Ian A.

184

PhET Simulation: Microwaves  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an interactive simulation on the topic of microwave radiation. Users adjust the frequency and amplitude of microwaves in an oven-shaped cavity and watch water molecules rotate, bounce, and behave as dipoles. They can view the microwave field as a wave, a single line of vectors, or the entire field. This item is part of a larger and growing collection by the Physics Education Technology Project (PhET). Each PhET resource was developed using principles from physics education research. SEE RELATED MATERIALS BELOW for an activity designed by the PhET team specifically for use with the Microwaves simulation.

2008-10-30

185

Advanced Biotelemetry Systems for Space Life Sciences: PH Telemetry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SENSORS 2000! (S2K!) program at NASA's Ames Research Center is currently developing a biotelemetry system for monitoring pH and temperature in unrestrained subjects. This activity is part of a broader scope effort to provide an Advanced Biotelemetry System (ABTS) for use in future space life sciences research. Many anticipated research endeavors will require biomedical and biochemical sensors and related instrumentation to make continuous inflight measurements in a variable-gravity environment. Since crew time is limited, automated data acquisition, data processing, data storage, and subject health monitoring are required. An automated biochemical and physiological data acquisition system based on non invasive or implantable biotelemetry technology will meet these requirements. The ABTS will ultimately acquire a variety of physiological measurands including temperature, biopotentials (e.g. ECG, EEG, EMG, EOG), blood pressure, flow and dimensions, as well as chemical and biological parameters including pH. Development activities are planned in evolutionary, leveraged steps. Near-term activities include 1) development of a dual channel pH/temperature telemetry system, and 2) development of a low bandwidth, 4-channel telemetry system, that measures temperature, heart rate, pressure, and pH. This abstract describes the pH/temperature telemeter.

Hines, John W.; Somps, Chris; Ricks, Robert; Kim, Lynn; Connolly, John P. (Technical Monitor)

1995-01-01

186

David Cheresh, PhD  

Cancer.gov

Meetings & Events Home Agenda Speaker Biosketches Abstracts Logistics Contact Speaker Biosketches David Cheresh, PhD(University of California, San Diego) Dr. David Cheresh studies the mechanism of action of signaling networks that regulate

187

Philip Prorok, PhD  

Cancer.gov

Philip Prorok, PhD, mirum est notare quam littera gothica, quam nunc putamus parum claram, anteposuerit litterarum formas humanitatis per seacula quarta decima et quinta decima. Eodem modo typi, qui nunc nobis videntur parum clari, fiant sollemnes in futurum.

188

NEOCE: a new external occulting coronagraph experiment for ultimate observations of the chromosphere, corona and interface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several ground facilities and space missions are currently dedicated to the study of the Sun at high resolution and of the solar corona in particular. However, and despite significant progress with the advent of space missions and UV, EUV and XUV direct observations of the hot chromosphere and million-degrees coronal plasma, much is yet to be achieved in the understanding of these high temperatures, fine dynamic dissipative structures and of the coronal heating in general. Recent missions have shown the definite role of a wide range of waves and of the magnetic field deep in the inner corona, at the chromosphere-corona interface, where dramatic and physically fundamental changes occur. The dynamics of the chromosphere and corona is controlled and governed by the emerging magnetic field. Accordingly, the direct measurement of the chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields is of prime importance. The solar corona consists of many localised loop-like structures or threads with the plasmas brightening and fading independently. The plasma evolution in each thread is believed to be related to the formation of filaments, each one being dynamic, in a non-equilibrium state. The mechanism sustaining this dynamics, oscillations or waves (Alfvén or other magneto-plasma waves), requires both very high-cadence, multi-spectral observations, and high resolution and coronal magnetometry. This is foreseen in the future Space Mission NEOCE (New External Occulting Coronagraph Experiment), the ultimate new generation high-resolution coronagraphic heliospheric mission, to be proposed for ESA M4. NEOCE, an evolution of the HiRISE mission, is ideally placed at the L5 Lagrangian point (for a better follow-up of CMEs), and provides FUV imaging and spectro-imaging, EUV and XUV imaging and spectroscopy, and ultimate coronagraphy by a remote external occulter (two satellites in formation flying 375 m apart minimizing scattered light) allowing to characterize temperature, densities and velocities up to the solar upper chromosphere, transition zone and inner corona with, in particular, 2D very high resolution multi-spectral imaging-spectroscopy and direct coronal magnetic field measurement: a unique set of tools to understand the structuration and onset of coronal heating. We give a detailed account of the proposed mission profile, and its major scientific objectives and model payload (in particular of the SuperASPIICS package of visible, NIR and UV, Lyman-Alpha and OVI, coronagraphs).

Damé, Luc; Fineschi, Silvano; Kuzin, Sergey; Von Fay-Siebenburgen, Erdélyi Robert

189

[Temporary total fecal diversion--ultimate solution for complex recurrent anal fistula].  

PubMed

Anal fistula is a frequent disease, but complex fistulae are relatively uncommon. The treatment for this pathology remains debated all over the world, and in cases of complex fistulae represents a challenge. We present a 55 years old male, operated more than 40 times in the last 15 years for perianal recurrent fistulas and abscesses. The fistula has had a progressive evolution despite all kind of surgery and has extended finally to entire perineal and gluteal region; more than 30 orifices were founded on skin surface and many internal anorectal orifices as well. The patient is weakened, anemic, in chronic sepsis. As a last resort, we decided to perform a terminal fecal diverting stoma at the level of sigmoid colon, with closure of distal end. There were subsequent operations necessary to resolve perineal and gluteal disease: extensive excisions of altered tissues, various full-thickness skin grafts and covering flaps. After 12 months the perineal region was clean, so remaking of colic continuity was possible. Continuous follow-up until 12 months revealed no sign of recurrence. We conclude that temporary total fecal diversion followed by wide excisions of perianal fistulous tissues represents an ultimate solution to complex recurrent perianal fistula, with good results at least in our case. PMID:20187479

Oni?a, M; Dumnici, A; Hornung, E; Papiu, H; Tar?a, C; Aiordachioaei, G; Goldi?s, D; Oni?a, C

2009-01-01

190

The Ultimate Monte Carlo: Studying Cross-Sections With Cosmic Rays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high-energy physics community has been discussing for years the need to bring together the three principal disciplines that study hadron cross-section physics - ground-based accelerators, cosmic-ray experiments in space, and air shower research. Only recently have NASA investigators begun discussing the use of space-borne cosmic-ray payloads to bridge the gap between accelerator physics and air shower work using cosmic-ray measurements. The common tool used in these three realms of high-energy hadron physics is the Monte Carlo (MC). Yet the obvious has not been considered - using a single MC for simulating the entire relativistic energy range (GeV to EeV). The task is daunting due to large uncertainties in accelerator, space, and atmospheric cascade measurements. These include inclusive versus exclusive cross-section measurements, primary composition, interaction dynamics, and possible new physics beyond the standard model. However, the discussion of a common tool or ultimate MC might be the very thing that could begin to unify these independent groups into a common purpose. The Offline ALICE concept of a Virtual MC at CERN s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be discussed as a rudimentary beginning of this idea, and as a possible forum for carrying it forward in the future as LHC data emerges.

Wilson, Thomas L.

2007-01-01

191

Dynamic Aperture and Tolerances for PEP-X Ultimate Storage Ring Design  

SciTech Connect

A lattice for the PEP-X ultimate storage ring light source, having 11 pm-rad natural emittance at a beam energy of 4.5 GeV at zero current, using 90 m of damping wiggler and fitting into the existing 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel, has been recently designed. Such a low emittance lattice requires very strong sextupoles for chromaticity correction, which in turn introduce strong non-linear field effects that limit the beam dynamic aperture. In order to maximize the dynamic aperture we choose the cell phases to cancel the third and fourth order geometric resonances in each 8-cell arc. Four families of chromatic sextupoles and six families of geometric (or harmonic) sextupoles are added to correct the chromatic and amplitude-dependent tunes. To find the best settings of the ten sextupole families, we use a Multi-Objective Genetic Optimizer employing elegant to optimize the beam lifetime and dynamic aperture simultaneously. Then we evaluate dynamic aperture reduction caused by magnetic field multipole errors, magnet fabrication errors and misalignments. A sufficient dynamic aperture is obtained for injection, as well as workable beam lifetime.

Borland, M.; /Argonne; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wang, M.-H.; /SLAC; Hettel, R.O.; /SLAC

2011-12-13

192

Effect of Load Rate on Ultimate Tensile Strength of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The strengths of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-II, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, were determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 to 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for composite materials, at least for short range of lifetimes and when ultimate strength is used as the failure criterion.

Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

2001-01-01

193

A novel pathway to the ultimate mutagens of aromatic amino and nitro compounds  

SciTech Connect

Photolysis of arylazides in aqueous media was recently found to generate presumed nitrenium ions, species which are generally considered as the ultimate mutagens/carcinogens derived from arylamines and nitroarenes. the primary photolysis products of arylazides, the arylnitrenes, can possibly react as electrophiles themselves, or they can be protonated and thus form the electrophilic nitrenium ions. Numerous arylazides and aryldiazides can be photoactivated to short-lived mutagens detectable in Salmonella typhimurium TA98. Structure-activity comparisons between arylazides and the matching arylamines and nitroarenes show correlations; e.g., phenyl azide and methyl-substituted phenyl azides are not mutagenic or only weakly mutagenic like aniline, nitrogenzene, and their methyl homologues, whereas 4-azidodiphenyl, 2-azidofluorene, 1-azidopyrene, azido-IQ, and azido-isoIQ are increasingly mutagenic in that order, like the matching amino and nitrogen compounds. It is hypothesized on the basis of these data that the nitrene/nitrenium ion is the reactive intermediate common to the three mutagenic pathways and that the reaction of the nitrene/nitrenium ion with DNA is rate limiting for the overall mutagenic process in Salmonella. The photochemical generation from arylazides of the reactive species, the nitrene/nitrenium ions, opens new perspectives for the understanding of the genotoxic activity of arylamines and nitroarenes in general and, specifically, of the food mutagens/carcinogens of the IQ type.

Wild, D. (Univ. of Wuerzburg (West Germany))

1990-08-01

194

NDM-1, the ultimate promiscuous enzyme: substrate recognition and catalytic mechanism  

PubMed Central

The specter of a return to an era in which infectious disease looms as a significant threat to human health is not just hyperbole; there are serious concerns about the widespread overuse and misuse of antibiotics contributing to increased antibiotic resistance in pathogens. The recent discovery of a new enzyme, first identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae from a patient from New Delhi and denoted as NDM-1, represents an example of extreme promiscuity: It hydrolyzes and inactivates nearly all known ?-lactam-based antibiotics with startling efficiency. NDM-1 can utilize different metal cofactors and seems to exploit an alternative mechanism based on the reaction conditions. Here we report the results of a combined experimental and theoretical study that examines the substrate, metal binding, and catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. We utilize structures obtained through X-ray crystallography, biochemical assays, and numerical simulation to construct a model of the enzyme catalytic pathway. The NDM-1 enzyme interacts with the substrate solely through zinc, or other metals, bound in the active site, explaining the observed lack of specificity against a broad range of ?-lactam antibiotic agents. The zinc ions also serve to activate a water molecule that hydrolyzes the ?-lactam ring through a proton shuttle.—Kim, Y., Cunningham, M. A.; Mire, J., Tesar, C., Sacchettini, J., Joachimiak, A. NDM-1, the ultimate promiscuous enzyme: substrate recognition and catalytic mechanism. PMID:23363572

Kim, Youngchang; Cunningham, Mark A.; Mire, Joseph; Tesar, Christine; Sacchettini, James; Joachimiak, Andrzej

2013-01-01

195

The ultimate constant of head and neck oncology-the physician-patient relationship.  

PubMed

Head and neck surgeons have the unique opportunity to engage with humans in life and death situations. We are confronting cancer, cure, failure, self-image, and most of all, a bond with the patient and family. We would like to view our expertise in head and neck surgery and the world of caring for our patients much like a Brigadoon. However, we daily are confronted with ever-changing and evolving approaches to health care that do not involve the physician or the patient. What kind of world is healthcare without a physician-patient interaction? Yes, there is the government-supported electronic medical record, which is here to stay (until our electrical and/or wired network fails). Yes, there is new technology, including robotic surgery and telemedicine and efforts to link these to our cell phones and applications, making care and expertise more available across long distances. And yes, there exist goals to extend care beyond the physician to other health care professions as the buffer between the physician and the patient, sometimes to reduce cost and sometimes to make care more ubiquitous. However, an Internet search will show that most say that the only constant in healthcare is change. I propose that the ultimate constant in healthcare is the physician-patient relationship. PMID:25068431

Day, Terry A

2014-12-01

196

The initial freezing point temperature of beef rises with the rise in pH: a short communication.  

PubMed

This study tested the hypothesis that the initial freezing point temperature of meat is affected by pH. Sixty four bovine M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum were classified into two ultimate pH groups: low (<5.8) and high pH (>6.2) and their cooling and freezing point temperatures were determined. The initial freezing temperatures for beef ranged from -0.9 to -1.5°C (?=0.6°C) with the higher and lower temperatures associated with high and low ultimate pH respectively. There was a significant correlation (r=+0.73, P<0.01) between beef pH and freezing point temperature in the present study. The outcome of this study has implications for the meat industry where evidence of freezing (ice formation) in a shipment as a result of high pH meat could result in a container load of valuable chilled product being downgraded to a lower value frozen product. PMID:23410892

Farouk, M M; Kemp, R M; Cartwright, S; North, M

2013-05-01

197

Consequences of EEG electrode position error on ultimate beamformer source reconstruction performance  

PubMed Central

Inaccuracy of EEG electrode coordinates forms an error term in forward model generation and ultimate source reconstruction performance. This error arises from the combination of both intrinsic measurement noise of the digitization apparatus and manual coregistration error when selecting corresponding points on anatomical MRI volumes. A common assumption is that such an error would lead only to displacement of localized sources. Here, we measured electrode positions on a 3D-printed full-scale replica head, using three different techniques: a fringe projection 3D scanner, a novel “Flying Triangulation” 3D sensor, and a traditional electromagnetic digitizer. Using highly accurate fringe projection data as ground truth, the Flying Triangulation sensor had a mean error of 1.5 mm while the electromagnetic digitizer had a mean error of 6.8 mm. Then, again using the fringe projection as ground truth, individual EEG simulations were generated, with source locations across the brain space and a range of sensor noise levels. The simulated datasets were then processed using a beamformer in conjunction with the electrode coordinates registered with the Flying Triangulation and electromagnetic digitizer methods. The beamformer's output SNR was severely degraded with the digitizer-based positions but less severely with the Flying Triangulation coordinates. Therefore, the seemingly innocuous error in electrode registration may result in substantial degradation of beamformer performance, with output SNR penalties up to several decibels. In the case of low-SNR signals such as deeper brain structures or gamma band sources, this implies that sensor coregistration accuracy could make the difference between successful detection of such activity or complete failure to resolve the source. PMID:24653671

Dalal, Sarang S.; Rampp, Stefan; Willomitzer, Florian; Ettl, Svenja

2014-01-01

198

Consequences of EEG electrode position error on ultimate beamformer source reconstruction performance.  

PubMed

Inaccuracy of EEG electrode coordinates forms an error term in forward model generation and ultimate source reconstruction performance. This error arises from the combination of both intrinsic measurement noise of the digitization apparatus and manual coregistration error when selecting corresponding points on anatomical MRI volumes. A common assumption is that such an error would lead only to displacement of localized sources. Here, we measured electrode positions on a 3D-printed full-scale replica head, using three different techniques: a fringe projection 3D scanner, a novel "Flying Triangulation" 3D sensor, and a traditional electromagnetic digitizer. Using highly accurate fringe projection data as ground truth, the Flying Triangulation sensor had a mean error of 1.5 mm while the electromagnetic digitizer had a mean error of 6.8 mm. Then, again using the fringe projection as ground truth, individual EEG simulations were generated, with source locations across the brain space and a range of sensor noise levels. The simulated datasets were then processed using a beamformer in conjunction with the electrode coordinates registered with the Flying Triangulation and electromagnetic digitizer methods. The beamformer's output SNR was severely degraded with the digitizer-based positions but less severely with the Flying Triangulation coordinates. Therefore, the seemingly innocuous error in electrode registration may result in substantial degradation of beamformer performance, with output SNR penalties up to several decibels. In the case of low-SNR signals such as deeper brain structures or gamma band sources, this implies that sensor coregistration accuracy could make the difference between successful detection of such activity or complete failure to resolve the source. PMID:24653671

Dalal, Sarang S; Rampp, Stefan; Willomitzer, Florian; Ettl, Svenja

2014-01-01

199

Effects of abiotic factors (temperature, pH, heavy metals) on activities of glycosidases in invertebrate animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Differences in amylolytical activity have been established in the whole body of some invertebrate animals (larvae of chironomids\\u000a Chironomus plumosus, pond snail Limnaea stagnalis, orb snail Planorbis corneus, faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, and zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha-potential objects of nutrition of fish benthophages under separate and combined actions of temperature (0, 10 or 20°C), pH\\u000a (5.0, 7.4 or 8.3), and

I. L. Golovanova

2011-01-01

200

PhET: Masses & Springs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation provides a realistic virtual mass-and-spring laboratory. Users can explore spring motion by manipulating stiffness of the spring and mass of the hanging weight. Concepts of Hooke's Law and elastic potential energy are further clarified through charts showing kinetic, potential, and thermal energy for each spring. This item is part of a larger collection of simulations developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET). The simulations are animated, interactive, and game-like environments in which students learn through exploration. All of the sims are freely available from the PhET website for incorporation into classes.

2008-07-29

201

Radka Stoyanova, PhD  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Radka Stoyanova, PhD has extensive background in developing approaches to best utilize imaging techniques in cancer research, diagnosis and treatment, as well as in developing approaches for the analysis, mining, and interpretation of "big data" generated by high-throughput approaches such as genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. She received her Masters Degree in Mathematics from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria. Dr. Stoyanova obtained her doctoral training and PhD degree at the Imperial College London, under the mentorship of Profs.

202

pH Meter Calibration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The North Carolina Community College System BioNetwork's interactive eLearning tools (IETs) are reusable chunks of training that can be deployed in a variety of courses or training programs. IETs are designed to enhance, not replace hands-on training. Learners are able to enter a hands-on lab experience better prepared and more confident. This particular IET delves into pH Meter Calibration, where visitors practice performing a three point calibration of a pH meter using buffer solutions.

203

Combining Proximate and Ultimate Approaches to Understand Life History Variation in Steelhead Trout with Application to Stream Flow  

E-print Network

are an Iteroparous Oncorhynchus #12;Previous work on the life-history of Atlantic salmon · In juvenile development at the completion of the particular phase of the life cycle and do not attempt to characterize the mechanismsCombining Proximate and Ultimate Approaches to Understand Life History Variation in Steelhead Trout

Mangel, Marc

204

COMBINING PROXIMATE AND ULTIMATE APPROACHES TO UNDERSTAND LIFE HISTORY VARIATION IN SALMONIDS WITH APPLICATION TO FISHERIES, CONSERVATION, AND AQUACULTURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the great challenges of biology is to understand pattern and variation simultaneously. In the salmonids, this challenge arises in the context of the ma - jor life-history events of migration from freshwater to the sea and returning from seawater to freshwater. We have developed life-history models that combine proxi - mate (physiological mechanism) and ultimate (natural selection) considerations

Marc Mangel; William H. Satterthwaite

205

Management of Ultimate Risk of Nuclear Power Plants by Source Terms - Lessons Learned from the Chernobyl Accident  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term 'ultimate risk' is used here to describe the probabilities and radiological consequences that should be incorporated in siting, containment design and accident management of nuclear power plants for hypothetical accidents. It is closely related with the source terms specified in siting criteria which assures an adequate separation of radioactive inventories of the plants from the public, in the

Genn Saji

2006-01-01

206

26 CFR 48.6420-1 - Credits or payments to ultimate purchaser of gasoline used on a farm.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... If gasoline is used on a farm for farming purposes after June 30, 1965...meaning of the terms “Used on a farm for farming purposes,” “farm,” “gasoline,” “ultimate...section 4081 on gasoline used on a farm for farming purposes may be obtained only by...

2010-04-01

207

26 CFR 48.6420-1 - Credits or payments to ultimate purchaser of gasoline used on a farm.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... If gasoline is used on a farm for farming purposes after June 30, 1965...meaning of the terms “Used on a farm for farming purposes,” “farm,” “gasoline,” “ultimate...section 4081 on gasoline used on a farm for farming purposes may be obtained only by...

2012-04-01

208

26 CFR 48.6420-1 - Credits or payments to ultimate purchaser of gasoline used on a farm.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... If gasoline is used on a farm for farming purposes after June 30, 1965...meaning of the terms “Used on a farm for farming purposes,” “farm,” “gasoline,” “ultimate...section 4081 on gasoline used on a farm for farming purposes may be obtained only by...

2013-04-01

209

26 CFR 48.6420-1 - Credits or payments to ultimate purchaser of gasoline used on a farm.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... If gasoline is used on a farm for farming purposes after June 30, 1965...meaning of the terms “Used on a farm for farming purposes,” “farm,” “gasoline,” “ultimate...section 4081 on gasoline used on a farm for farming purposes may be obtained only by...

2011-04-01

210

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2065816 Ultimate Ownership Structure and Bank Regulatory Capital Adjustment  

E-print Network

empirically investigates whether a bank's decision to adjust its capital is influenced by the existence of a divergence between the voting and the cash-flow rights of its ultimate owner. We use a novel hand is significantly slower for banks controlled by a shareholder with a divergence between voting and cash-flow rights

Boyer, Edmond

211

Queerspawn Speak out: A Review of "Let's Get This Straight: The Ultimate Handbook for Youth with LGBTQ Parents"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Let's Get This Straight: The Ultimate Handbook for Youth With LGBTQ Parents" provides an engaging and accessible set of tools for youth from LGBTQ-headed families. The stories and resources shared encourage these youth to take pride in their families, value their diverse experiences, and work against homophobia, transphobia, and other forms of…

Ryan, Caitlin L.

2012-01-01

212

Identification of QTL controlling meat quality traits in an F2 cross between two chicken lines selected for either low or high growth rate  

PubMed Central

Background Meat technological traits (i.e. meat pH, water retention and color) are important considerations for improving further processing of chicken meat. These quality traits were originally characterized in experimental lines selected for high (HG) and low (LG) growth. Presently, quantitative trait loci (QTL) for these traits were analyzed in an F2 population issued from the HG × LG cross. A total of 698 animals in 50 full-sib families were genotyped for 108 microsatellite markers covering 21 linkage groups. Results The HG and LG birds exhibit large differences in body weight and abdominal fat content. Several meat quality traits [pH at 15 min post-slaughter (pH15) and ultimate pH (pHu), breast color-redness (BCo-R) and breast color-yellowness (BCo-Y)] were lower in HG chickens. In contrast, meat color-lightness (BCo-L) was higher in HG chickens, whereas meat drip loss (DL) was similar in both lines. HG birds were more active on the shackle line. Association analyses were performed using maximum-likelihood interval mapping in QTLMAP. Five genome-wide significant QTLs were revealed: two for pH15 on GGA1 and GGA2, one for DL on GGA1, one for BCo-R and one for BCo-Y both on GGA11. In addition, four suggestive QTLs were identified by QTLMAP for BCo-Y, pHu, pH15 and DL on GGA1, GGA4, GGA12 and GGA14, respectively. The QTL effects, averaged on heterozygous families, ranged from 12 to 31% of the phenotypic variance. Further analyses with QTLExpress confirmed the two genome-wide QTLs for meat color on GGA11, failed to identify the genome-wide QTL for pH15 on GGA2, and revealed only suggestive QTLs for pH15 and DL on GGA1. However, QTLExpress qualified the QTL for pHu on GGA4 as genome-wide. Conclusion The present study identified genome-wide significant QTLs for all meat technological traits presently assessed in these chickens, except for meat lightness. This study highlights the effects of divergent selection for growth rate on some behavioral traits, muscle biochemistry and ultimately meat quality traits. Several QTL regions were identified that are worthy of further characterization. Some QTLs may in fact co-localize, suggesting pleiotropic effects for some chromosomal regions. PMID:17559654

Nadaf, Javad; Gilbert, Hélène; Pitel, Frédérique; Berri, Cécile M; Feve, Katia; Beaumont, Catherine; Duclos, Michel J; Vignal, Alain; Porter, Tom E; Simon, Jean; Aggrey, Samuel E; Cogburn, Larry A; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth

2007-01-01

213

Optical and tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at the ultimate spatial limit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combination of optical detection system with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) leads to the possibility of resolving radiative transition probability with the ultrahigh spatial resolution of STM in real space. This opens an innovative approach toward revealing the correlation between molecular structure, electronic characteristics, and optical properties. This thesis describes a series of experiments that manifests this correlation, including atomic silver chains and single porphine molecules. In atomic silver chains, the number and positions of the emission maxima in the photon images match the nodes in the dI/d V images of "particle-in-a-box" states. This surprising correlation between the emission maxima and nodes in the density of states is a manifestation of Fermi's golden rule in real space for radiative transitions, which provides an understanding of the mechanism of STM induced light emission. From single porphine molecules, orthogonal spatial contrast of two types of vibronic coupling is resolved by both photon spectroscopy and vibronic-mode-selected photon images. Intramolecular transitions from the two orthogonal LUMOs individually couple to different molecular normal modes. This is the first demonstration of the photon emission probability of a single molecule and its direct correlations with the molecular orbitals. This also provides the first real space experimental evidence to separate the tangled effects of molecular conformations and nano-environments on the inhomogeneity of molecular emission. DSB molecules are found to have two conformational isomers and one of them shows surface chirality. All these conformers and enantiomers can be switched to each other by electron injection. Different DSB conformers present distinct manipulation dynamics, which demonstrate how different conformations and their preferred adsorption geometries can have pronounced influence on the molecular mechanics on the surface. Overall, this thesis studies the very fundamental nature of single molecules and artificial nanostructures by integrating all kinds of important functions of STM: topography, spectroscopy, manipulation, and photon emission. Detailed correlations between the emission patterns and orbital structures are revealed by the ultimate spatial resolution of our "STM photon microscopy".

Chen, Chi

2009-12-01

214

Proximate and ultimate causes of adoption in ring-billed gulls.  

PubMed

From 1987 to 1994, the annual frequency of adoption by breeding pairs at a Lake Erie ring-billed gull, Larus delawarensis, colony ranged from 3 to 37% (average 8%/year, N=7 years) and, on average, foster parents raised 0.5 fewer of their own chicks to fledging than pairs that did not adopt. The key evolutionary question is: why do some individuals apparently suffer the costs associated with a behaviour that appears to enhance the fitness of others? From 1992 to 1995, I investigated the proximate and ultimate causes of adoption in ring-billed gulls from the perspectives of both the foster parents and adopted chicks, and tested predictions that differentiated between various competing adaptive and nonadaptive hypotheses that have been proposed to explain it. While I was able to demonstrate a breeding cost, I failed to identify any benefits to foster parents. Thus, the adaptive hypotheses that rely on the foster parents benefiting were not supported (e.g. kin selection, reciprocal altruism, acquisition of parenting experience). From the foster parent's perspective, adoption was mediated through errors in parent-offspring recognition. Under natural conditions, most fostering pairs were tending small chicks (<6 days old) at the time of adoptions; in chick-transfer experiments, resident parents did not discriminate against foreign chicks until their own chicks were 7-9 days old. Chicks (N=25) that subsequently abandoned their natal nests were lighter, and grew at a slower rate, than chicks that survived to fledging in their home broods. Thus, departing chicks were at a survival disadvantage in their home broods. Chicks that gained acceptance into foreign broods where they were older/larger than the resident chicks realized high survival at the expense of their foster siblings and parents. Based upon individual growth rates and the corresponding survival probabilities, disadvantaged chicks approximately doubled their survival chances through foster care. Why has selection not eliminated adoption? I argue that adoption is an evolutionary arms race between the two principle actor groups; disadvantaged chicks, which benefit through foster care, and host parents, which avoid providing foster care (e.g. infanticide). In ring-billed gulls, selection has failed to eliminate adoption because the long-term reproductive cost (estimated at 4%, this study) of an occasional adoption is probably offset by the relatively higher costs associated with stricter kin discrimination mechanisms (e.g. parental infanticide). (c) 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9933551

Brown

1998-12-01

215

Predictors of binge drinking in adolescents: ultimate and distal factors - a representative study  

PubMed Central

Background As epidemiological surveys have shown, binge drinking is a constant and wide-spread problem behavior in adolescents. It is not rare to find that more than half of all adolescents engage in this behavior when assessing only the last 4 weeks of time independent of the urbanity of the region they live in. There have been several reviews on predictors of substance consumption in adolescents in general, but there has been less high quality research on predictors of binge drinking, and most studies have not been theoretically based. The current study aimed to analyze the ultimate and distal factors predicting substance consumption according to Petraitis' theory of triadic influence. We assessed the predictive value of these factors with respect to binge drinking in German adolescents, including the identification of influence direction. Methods In the years 2007/2008, a representative written survey of N = 44,610 students in the 9th grade of different school types in Germany was carried out (net sample). The return rate of questionnaires was 88% regarding all students whose teachers or school directors had agreed to participate in the study. In this survey, prevalence of binge drinking was investigated as well as potential predictors from the social/interpersonal, the attitudinal/environmental, and the intrapersonal fields (3 factors of Petraitis). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, these variables were included after testing for multicollinearity in order to assess their ability to predict binge drinking. Results Prevalence of binge drinking in the last 30 days was 52.3% for the surveyed adolescents with a higher prevalence for boys (56.9%) than for girls (47.5%). The two most influential factors found to protect against binge drinking with p < .001 were low economic status and importance of religion. The four most relevant risk factors for binge drinking (p < .001) were life-time prevalence of school absenteeism/truancy, academic failure, suicidal thoughts, and violence at school in the form of aggressive behavior of teachers. The model of Petraitis was partly confirmed for Binge Drinking in German adolescents and the direction of influence factors was clarified. Conclusions Whereas some of the risk and protective factors for binge drinking are not surprising since they are known for substance abuse in general, there are two points that could be targeted in interventions that do not focus on adolescents alone: (a) training teachers in positive, reassuring behavior and constructive criticism and (b) a focus on high risk adolescents either because they have a lack of coping strategies when in a negative mood or because of their low academic achievement in combination with absenteeism from school. PMID:22469235

2012-01-01

216

. , ..., PhD / : 30 1977,  

E-print Network

; . , ..., PhD 2010 2 BOOK CHAPTER (in press) Invited Book Chapter for the Book: "Modelling of Masonry and Damage Analysis in Masonry Arches, Vietnam Journal of Mechanics, 31(3-4) (2009) 185-190 Betti M of Failure of Masonry Arches, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 336 (2008), 42-53 Drosopoulos G.A., Stavroulakis G

Stavroulakis, Georgios E.

217

Sashwati Roy, PhD  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Sashwati Roy is an Associate Professor of Surgery and Director of the Laser Capture Molecular Core at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. In 1994 she received her PhD degree in Physiology and Environmental Sciences and later completed her postdoctoral training at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr.

218

Ph.D. Requirements Fall, 2009 and Forward Approved Ph.D. Training Requirements  

E-print Network

Ph.D. Requirements Fall, 2009 and Forward 1 Approved Ph.D. Training Requirements Requirements effective for Ph.D. programs enrolling students in Fall 2009 and forward Critical Outcomes of a Research-Oriented Ph.D. Program In terms of an overall vision of the Curry Ph.D. graduate, the aims include student

Acton, Scott

219

An ultrasensitive method of real time pH monitoring with complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor.  

PubMed

CMOS sensors are becoming a powerful tool in the biological and chemical field. In this work, we introduce a new approach on quantifying various pH solutions with a CMOS image sensor. The CMOS image sensor based pH measurement produces high-accuracy analysis, making it a truly portable and user friendly system. pH indicator blended hydrogel matrix was fabricated as a thin film to the accurate color development. A distinct color change of red, green and blue (RGB) develops in the hydrogel film by applying various pH solutions (pH 1-14). The semi-quantitative pH evolution was acquired by visual read out. Further, CMOS image sensor absorbs the RGB color intensity of the film and hue value converted into digital numbers with the aid of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to determine the pH ranges of solutions. Chromaticity diagram and Euclidean distance represent the RGB color space and differentiation of pH ranges, respectively. This technique is applicable to sense the various toxic chemicals and chemical vapors by situ sensing. Ultimately, the entire approach can be integrated into smartphone and operable with the user friendly manner. PMID:25597802

Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo

2015-02-01

220

Richard Mazurchuk, PhD  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Richard Mazurchuk received a BS in Physics and MS and PhD in Biophysics from SUNY Buffalo. His research focused on developing novel multi-modality imaging techniques, contrast (enhancing) agents and methods to assess the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. He subsequently joined the faculty of SUNY Buffalo School of Medicine and Roswell Park Cancer Institute attaining the rank of Assoc Prof in the Departments of Diagnostic Imaging and Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry and Biophysics.

221

Christos Patriotis, PhD  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Christos Patriotis obtained his MSc in Biochemistry from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria in 1985 and his PhD in Molecular Biology from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 1990. Postdoctoral training focused on signal transduction and tumor cell biology. He joined the faculty at Fox Chase Cancer Center in 1998; his research was directed toward understanding mechanisms of breast and ovarian cancer pathogenesis and identification of biomarkers associated with the early stages of the two types of cancer.

222

A kinetic study of autohydrogenotrophic denitrification at the optimum pH and sodium bicarbonate dose.  

PubMed

In this study the kinetics of autohydrogenotrophic denitrification was studied under optimum solution pH and bicarbonate concentration. The optimal pH and bicarbonate concentration were firstly obtained using a design of experiment (DOE) methodology. For this purpose a total of 11 experiments were carried out. Sodium bicarbonate concentrations ranging of 20-2000 mg/L and pH values from 6.5 to 8.5 were used in the optimization runs. It was found that the pH has a more pronounced effect on the denitrification process as compared to the bicarbonate dose. The developed quadratic model predicted the optimum conditions at pH 8 and 1100 mg NaHCO(3)/L. Using these optimal conditions, the kinetics of denitrification for nitrate and nitrite degradation were investigated in separate experiments. Both processes were found to follow a zero order kinetic model. The ultimate specific degradation rates for nitrate and nitrite remediation were 29.60 mg NO(3)(-)-N/g MLVSS/L and 34.85 mg NO(3)(-)-N/g MLVSS/L respectively, when hydrogen was supplied every 0.5h. PMID:20015639

Ghafari, Shahin; Hasan, Masitah; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine

2010-04-01

223

Coral resilience to ocean acidification and global warming through pH up-regulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapidly rising levels of atmospheric CO2 are not only causing ocean warming, but also lowering seawater pH hence the carbonate saturation state of the oceans, on which many marine organisms depend to calcify their skeletons. Using boron isotope systematics, we show how scleractinian corals up-regulate pH at their site of calcification such that internal changes are approximately one-half of those in ambient seawater. This species-dependent pH-buffering capacity enables aragonitic corals to raise the saturation state of their calcifying medium, thereby increasing calcification rates at little additional energy cost. Using a model of pH regulation combined with abiotic calcification, we show that the enhanced kinetics of calcification owing to higher temperatures has the potential to counter the effects of ocean acidification. Up-regulation of pH, however, is not ubiquitous among calcifying organisms; those lacking this ability are likely to undergo severe declines in calcification as CO2 levels increase. The capacity to up-regulate pH is thus central to the resilience of calcifiers to ocean acidification, although the fate of zooxanthellate corals ultimately depends on the ability of both the photosymbionts and coral host to adapt to rapidly increasing ocean temperatures.

McCulloch, Malcolm; Falter, Jim; Trotter, Julie; Montagna, Paolo

2012-08-01

224

Can the chemical reactivity of an ultimate carcinogen be related to its carcinogenicity? An application to propylene oxide.  

PubMed

In this article we report calculations of the activation free energy for a chemical reaction between propylene oxide and DNA, in particular with the guanine at the N7 position. Calculations were performed using Hartree-Fock and MP2 methods in conjunction with flexible basis sets. The effects of solvation were considered using the Langevin dipoles and solvent reaction field methods. The calculated activation free energies are in good agreement with the experimental value of 25.36 kcal/mol. Moreover, the reactivities of a series of ultimate carcinogens of the epoxy type toward DNA are shown to be related to their carcinogenicities. Higher reactivity is generally associated with higher carcinogenicity, although transport properties, reactions with ultimate carcinogen scavengers, and the DNA correction mechanism are also very important. It is very likely that the window of reactivity rather than a high reactivity value is the relevant measure of carcinogenicity, since highly reactive ultimate carcinogens interact with water and proteins before they reach DNA. PMID:22889582

Mavri, Janez

2013-02-01

225

(August 29, 2014) Neuroscience Ph.D.  

E-print Network

HANDBOOK (August 29, 2014) Neuroscience Ph.D. Program Daniel Tranel, PhD Program Director Michael ...................................................................................................4 B. Neuroscience Program Graduate Research Assistantships .................................5 C ......................................................................................................................7 A. Required Core Neuroscience Courses

226

(November 20, 2014) Neuroscience Ph.D.  

E-print Network

HANDBOOK (November 20, 2014) Neuroscience Ph.D. Program Daniel Tranel, PhD Program Director Michael ...................................................................................................4 B. Neuroscience Program Graduate Research Assistantships .................................5 C ......................................................................................................................7 A. Required Core Neuroscience Courses

227

Ph.D. Assessment Form Student Name  

E-print Network

Ph.D. Assessment Form Student Name: Major Advisor: Date: Outcome 1: Graduates will be able to successfully design and conduct original research in their specialty areas. Criterion: Ph.D. candidates related disciplinary areas. Criterion: Ph.D. students will pass their initial preliminary examination

228

Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH

Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

2010-01-01

229

University College Dublin PhD Scholarships  

E-print Network

University College Dublin PhD Scholarships UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School invites excellent applications for a number of PhD scholarships starting in September 2014. This provides four years of support for full-time PhD study. The Scholarships are open to full-time EU and non-EU students

230

My PhD Plan Completed Work  

E-print Network

Background My PhD Plan Completed Work Planned Work Hierarchical Biped Control A Exam Matthew Kelly August 4, 2014 Matthew Kelly Hierarchical Biped Control 1 / 34 #12;Background My PhD Plan Completed Work Planned Work Table of Contents 1 Background 2 My PhD Plan 3 Completed Work 4 Planned Work Push Hold Free

Ruina, Andy L.

231

Soil pH and Fertilizers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site by the Mississippi State University Extension Service discusses why fertilizers are added to soils. The Web site begins by introducing the concept of the pH of the soil and how nutrients are affected by this pH level. Students can then learn about the pH logarithmic scale and about the factors that affect soil pH. At the end of the site, users will find a clear and concise table concerning different fertilizer materials characteristics including their speed of reaction and effect on pH in soils.

232

Soils - Part 4: Soil pH  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Soil pH is defined and its implications for crop production are described in this lesson. How are soil pH and buffer pH determined? How are these assessments used in lime recommendations? The factors that influence pH variations in soils, the chemistry involved in changing the pH of a soil, and the benefits associated with liming acid soils will be discussed.[This lesson, as well as the other nine lessons in the Soils series, is taken from the "Soils Home Study Course," published in 1999 by the University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension.

233

An experimental study on the ultimate strength of the adventitia and media of human atherosclerotic carotid arteries in circumferential and axial directions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atherosclerotic plaque may rupture without warning causing heart attack or stroke. Knowledge of the ultimate strength of human atherosclerotic tissues is essential for understanding the rupture mechanism and predicting cardiovascular events. Despite its great importance, experimental data on ultimate strength of human atherosclerotic carotid artery remains very sparse. This study determined the uniaxial tensile strength of human carotid artery sections

Zhongzhao Teng; Dalin Tang; Jie Zheng; Pamela K. Woodard; Allen H. Hoffman

2009-01-01

234

Evolution of stress-resultant loading and ultimate strength surfaces in cyclic plasticity of steel wide-flange cross-sections  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evolution of the shape of limit surfaces during plastic excursions is a key component of the inelastic response of structural members. However, stress-resultant-based computational plasticity formulations rarely account for any change in shape of the loading or ultimate strength surfaces. This research documents the evolution of the shape, size, and position of the loading and ultimate strength surfaces in

Jerome F. Hajjar

2003-01-01

235

PhD in Sustainable Development PhD in Sustainable Development  

E-print Network

PhD in Sustainable Development PhD in Sustainable Development 2013-2014 Handbook John Colin Mutter................................................................................................ 39 #12;3 PhD in Sustainable Development I. About the Program The sustainability of development in the social, natural, engineering or health sciences. The PhD in Sustainable Development combines

Qian, Ning

236

Large-deflection-theory Analysis of the Effect of Web Initial Curvature on the Ultimate Strength of Steel Plate Girder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of the paper is to analyze the influence of initial imperfections on the behaviour of thin-walled girders welded of slender plate elements. In parallel with experiments, one of the ultimate load tests was computer modelled. In so doing, the girder was modelled, using the geometrically and materially non-linear variant of the shell finite element method, by the ANSYS program. The shape changing during loading process is often accompanying with sudden "snap-through" i. e. rapid curvature change.

Kala, Ji?í; Kala, Zden?k

2011-09-01

237

Effect of pre-slaughter physiological conditions on the oxidative stability of colour and lipid during chill storage of pork.  

PubMed

The physiological condition of the live animal was found to significantly affect colour, lipid oxidation and water holding capacity of chill stored pork chops (M. Longissimus dorsi) in a study, where various pre-slaughter conditions were achieved by the following four treatments: (A) control; (B) subjected to treadmill exercise immediately prior to stunning; (C) given epinephrine injection 15 h prior to slaughter; and (D) given epinephrine injection 15 h before slaughter and further subjected to treadmill exercise immediately before stunning. The treatments resulted in variations in energy metabolites (glycogen, lactate, creatine phosphate, ATP) and ultimate pH (pH(u)), with the lowest pH(u) in chops from treatments A and B, and in significantly different tristimulus colour L(?)-, a(?)- and b(?)-parameters, although the effect of treatment on colour was not consistent during the chill storage period of 6 days. Overall, chops from treatments A and B had significantly higher L(?)- and b(?)-values (were paler and less blue) than chops from C and D during storage under conditions typical for retail trade. The initial a(?)-values were higher (redder) in chops from treatments A and B, but the colour, as judged by the a(?)-values, was less stable in meat from these treatments compared with treatments C and D. Lipid oxidation, evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in the fresh meat, and drip loss, measured after 6 days of storage, were both significantly higher in chops from treatments A and B compared to chops obtained from treatments C and D. Statistical analysis relating the pH and the level of various energy metabolites post-mortem in the individual animals to the measured quality parameters, revealed that pH(u) was the most important factor affecting product quality. In conclusion, over all product quality depends on obtaining a pH(u) in the narrow range where both meat quality parameters such as colour, lipid oxidation and drip loss as well as microbiological aspects have to be considered. PMID:22062424

Juncher, D; Rønn, B; Mortensen, E; Henckel, P; Karlsson, A; Skibsted, L; Bertelsen, G

2001-08-01

238

The pH Factor  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Miami Museum of Science's learning site, The pH Factor, gives teachers a fun and interactive way to teach elementary and middle school students some basics of science. Material is divided into seven learning areas: excite, explore, explain, expand, extend, exchange, and examine. Each contains an interactive screen that can be used directly in the classroom and lesson plans that correspond with each subject. For example, the excite area contains the "tasting tongue" that, when clicked, shows the location on the tongue where you taste bitter or sour things. The site's teaching style is based on the proposition that learners need to build their own understanding of new ideas. The unique material that is offered on this site provides educators with an excellent alternative for teaching these sometimes difficult concepts to grade school students.

239

PhET Simulation: Sound  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive simulation allows users to analyze the properties of sound waves. Frequency and amplitude can be controlled, and users can enable audio tones to explore how pitch is related to frequency. Other options allow users to experiment with constructive and destructive interference by moving positions of speakers and listeners. Tools are also provided to measure wavelengths of various frequencies. Experimenting with interference from a wall and exploring sound in environments without air pressure are also possible. This simulation is part of a large and growing collection developed by the Physics Educational Technology Project using research-based principles. See the Related Materials below for a link to clicker questions and tutorials designed specifically for this simulation by the PhET team.

2008-10-29

240

Effect of Strain Rate on Cathodic Reaction During Stress Corrosion Cracking of X70 Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of strain rate on cathodic reactions of X70 pipeline steel during stress corrosion cracking in a near-neutral pH\\u000a solution was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscope and potentiodynamic polarization curve measurements as\\u000a well as slow strain rate tests. A local additional potential model was used to understand mechanistically the role of strain\\u000a rate in electrochemical cathodic reaction. It was

Z. Y. Liu; X. G. Li; Y. F. Cheng

241

Anthropogenic carbon and ocean pH  

Microsoft Academic Search

ocean 1 with potentially adverse consequences for marine biota 2-4 . We quantify pH changes that may result from continued release of fossil-fuel CO 2 to the atmosphere, and compare these with pH changes inferred from geological and historical records. We conclude that releasing fossil-fuel CO 2 to the atmosphere over several centuries may result in ocean pH changes greater

K. Caldeira; Michael E. Wickett

2003-01-01

242

Middle School and pH?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. As a result, the grade-appropriate, hands-on laboratory, "Creating the pH Scale" was developed to help students grasp the fundamentals of pH.

Susan Herricks

2007-02-01

243

Pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies of pyrite oxidation kinetics have concentrated primarily on the reaction at low pH, where Fe(III) has been assumed to be the dominant oxidant. Studies at circumneutral pH, necessitated by effective pH buffering in some pyrite oxidation systems, have often implicitly assumed that the dominant oxidant must be dissolved oxygen (DO), owing to the diminished solubility of Fe(III). In

C. O Moses; J. S Herman

1991-01-01

244

Poster Presentations Marcella Alsan, MD, MPH, PhD  

E-print Network

vaccination: Evidence from the 1985 Turkish campaign Michele Barry, MD; Stephen Luby, MD; Nancy Federspiel, Ph and pain outcomes of diverse interventions Susan Gage, MD; Jeffrey B. Gould, MD; John Oehlert MS; Gary M, PhD; Jay Mitchell, JD; Patrick Archie, PhD; Rebecca Bird, PhD; Doug Bird, PhD; Jennifer Brody, Ph

Kay, Mark A.

245

pH Meter probe assembly  

DOEpatents

An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

Hale, Charles J. (San Jose, CA)

1983-01-01

246

pH Meter probe assembly  

DOEpatents

An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

Hale, C.J.

1983-11-15

247

Administration Donald B. Thomason, PhD  

E-print Network

D Cell Biology & Physiology Radhakrishna Rao, PhD Microbiology, Immunology & Biochemistry Elizabeth Affairs Medical Center, the University of Memphis, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Oak Ridge

Cui, Yan

248

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE STUDY September 2010 Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Pennsylvania 229

Carpick, Robert W.

249

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE STUDY September 2011 Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Pennsylvania 229

Carpick, Robert W.

250

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE STUDY September 2009 Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Pennsylvania 229

Carpick, Robert W.

251

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE STUDY September 2013 Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Pennsylvania 229

Carpick, Robert W.

252

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA Ph.D. PROGRAM GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE STUDY September 2012 Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics School of Engineering and Applied Science University of Pennsylvania 229

Carpick, Robert W.

253

pH jump induced ?-helix folding.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

pH can be used to impact the folding equilibrium of peptides and proteins. This fact is utilized, similarly to temperature jumps, in pH jump experiments employing laser time-resolved spectroscopy to study the function and structural dynamics of these molecules. Here the application of pH jumps in folding experiments was investigated. Experiments with poly-L-glutamic acid alpha-helix formation shown the critical aspects of pH jump experiments and yielded direct information about the folding kinetics monitored with the amide I IR band.

Donten, M. L.; Hamm, P.

2013-03-01

254

Bruising in Slaughter Cattle and Its Relationship with Creatine Kinase Levels and Beef Quality as Affected by Animal Related Factors  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study was to determine the effects of animal related factors on bruising in slaughter cattle, creatine kinase (CK) and beef quality. Three hundred and twenty one cattle from three breeds (108 Bonsmara, 130 Beefmaster and 83 Brahman) were used in this study. The animals were grouped as follows: Group 1 (16 months old), Group 2 (18 months old) and Group 3 (24 months old). At exsanguinations, blood samples for CK determination were collected using disposable vacutainer tubes. Muscularis longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) was collected 24 h after slaughter to determine the colour (L*, a*, and b*) and ultimate pH (pHu) of beef. Breed, sex and age had significant effects (p<0.05) on bruising score, CK levels and beef quality. Bonsmara breed had the highest (80%) bruising score percentage, CK (705.3±80.57 U/L) and pHu (6.3±0.05) values while the Bonsmara had the highest L* (24.8±0.78) a* (17.5±0.53) and b* (12.8±0.53) values. Higher CK levels were also observed in winter compared to summer, spring and autumn respectively. Therefore, animal factors (sex, breed and animal age at slaughter) contribute to the development of bruises and have an effect on the levels of CK and meat quality. It was also concluded that there is no significant relationship between meat parameters (L,* a*, and b*) and CK levels. PMID:25050007

Mpakama, T.; Chulayo, A. Y.; Muchenje, V.

2014-01-01

255

Prediction of pork quality with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) 2. Feasibility and robustness of NIRS measurements under production plant conditions.  

PubMed

Longissimus dorsi samples (685) collected at four processing plants were used to develop prediction equations for meat quality with near infrared spectroscopy. Equations with R(2)>0.70 and residual prediction deviation (RPD)?2.0 were considered as applicable for screening. One production plant showed R(2) 0.76 and RPD 2.05, other plants showed R(2)<0.70 and RPD<2.0 for drip loss %. RPD values were ?2.05 for drip loss%, for colour L*?1.82 and pH ultimate (pHu)?1.57. Samples were grouped for drip loss%; superior (<2.0%), moderate (2-4%), inferior (>4.0%). 64% from the superior group and 56% from the inferior group were predicted correctly. One equation could be used for screening drip loss %. Best prediction equation for L* did not meet the requirements (R(2) 0.70 and RPD 1.82). pHu equation could not be used. Results suggest that prediction equations can be used for screening drip loss %. PMID:22405914

Kapper, C; Klont, R E; Verdonk, J M A J; Williams, P C; Urlings, H A P

2012-07-01

256

Ultimate crack and lack of any security in the statistical key exchange protocol with random signals and feedback  

E-print Network

We deterministically crack the secure, statistical key exchange protocol based on feedback proposed by Pao-Lo Liu [ J. Lightwave Techology 27 (2009) pp. 5230-34]. The crack is ultimate and absolute because it works under idealized conditions, and produces much higher data visibility for the eavesdropper than the protocol provides for Alice and Bob. Even with the most idealistic driving noise spectrum stated by Liu, during the most secure phase of the protocol, far away from the transients, where the system is already in its most secure steady-state, the eavesdropper has 100% success rate in identifying the key bits, at the same time when Alice and Bob have less than 100% success rate while using the Liu protocol. No statistics is needed, Eve can extract the secure bit from two samples of the signal in the two direction. Thus the Liu-protocol offers no security against the attack described in this paper.

Zoltan Gingl; Laszlo B. Kish

2010-10-31

257

Stress-resultant models for ultimate load design of reinforced concrete frames and multi-scale parameter estimates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we present a new finite element for (geometrically linear) Timoshenko beam model for ultimate load computation of reinforced concrete frames. The proposed model combines the descriptions of the diffuse plastic failure in the beam-column followed by the creation of plastic hinges due to the failure or collapse of the concrete and of the re-bars. A modified multi-scale analysis is performed in order to identify the parameters for stress-resultant-based macro model, which is used to described the behavior of the Timoshenko beam element. For clarity, we focus upon the micro-scale models using the multi-fiber elements with embedded displacement discontinuities in mode I, which would typically be triggered by bending failure mode. More general case of micro-scale model capable of describing shear failure is described by Ibrahimbegovic et al. (Int J Numer Methods Eng 83(4):452-481, 2010).

Pham, B. H.; Brancherie, D.; Davenne, L.; Ibrahimbegovic, A.

2013-03-01

258

Effect of cooling rate on eutectic cell count, grain size, microstructure, and ultimate tensile strength of hypoeutectic cast iron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes a series of microstructural and strength studies performed on hypoeutectic cast iron, which was sand cast using a variety of end chills (metallic, nonmetallic, water-cooled, and subzero, respectively). The effects of cooling rate on the eutectic cell count (ECC), grain size, and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) were evaluated. Attempts were also made to explain these effects and to correlate the UTS with ECC. It was found that subzero chilled and water-cool, chilled cast iron exhibit severe undercooling compared to normal sand cast iron. It was concluded from this investigation that nucleation conditions are completely altered but growth conditions prevail as usual. Therefore, undercooling during solidification is considered to be responsible for variation in ECC, grain size, microstructure, and tensile strength.

Hemanth, J.; Rao, K. V. S.

1999-08-01

259

2.4 ?m GaInAsSb Mesa Photodiode Detectors: Leakage Currents and Ultimate Performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Short-wave infrared photodiodes play an important role in areas such as molecular sensing, thermophotovoltaics, and astronomical study of galaxy, star, and planetary formation. Here we present results and analysis of uncoated, unpassivated, GaInAsSb mesa photodiodes. We have currently achieved room temperature peak specific detectivity D*=6x10^10 Jones, dynamic resistance of 25 ?-cm^2, and quantum efficiency of 50%. Devices are limited primarily by sidewall leakage currents, initially due to generation-recombination, and over time due to Ohmic leakage from buildup of sidewall oxides. Based on material parameters obtained in this as well as other studies, ultimate diode performance is predicted, and compared to extended-wave InGaAs/InP and HgCdTe detectors.

Prineas, John; Yager, Jeff; Olesberg, Jon; Seydmohamadi, Shahram

2008-03-01

260

MEASURING THE ULTIMATE HALO MASS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS: REDSHIFTS AND MASS PROFILES FROM THE HECTOSPEC CLUSTER SURVEY (HeCS)  

SciTech Connect

The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a {Lambda}CDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these halos. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1 < z < 0.3. The survey includes 22,680 unique MMT/Hectospec redshifts for individual galaxies; 10,145 of these galaxies are cluster members. For each cluster, we acquired high signal-to-noise spectra for {approx}200 cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. We demonstrate that the determination of velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a {Lambda}CDM universe) is on average (1.99 {+-} 0.11)M{sub 200}, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in M{sub 200} and in L{sub X} demonstrate that the predicted Navarro-Frenk-White form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.

Rines, Kenneth [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy)

2013-04-10

261

Dose-dependent effects of an immune challenge at both ultimate and proximate levels in Drosophila melanogaster.  

PubMed

Immune responses are highly dynamic. The magnitude and efficiency of an immune response to a pathogen can change markedly across individuals, and such changes may be influenced by variance in a range of intrinsic (e.g. age, genotype, sex) and external (e.g. abiotic stress, pathogen identity, strain) factors. Life history theory predicts that up-regulation of the immune system will come at a physiological cost, and studies have confirmed that increased investment in immunity can reduce reproductive output and survival. Furthermore, males and females often have divergent reproductive strategies, and this might drive the evolution of sex-specific life history trade-offs involving immunity, and sexual dimorphism in immune responses per se. Here, we employ an experiment design to elucidate dose-dependent and sex-specific responses to exposure to a nonpathogenic immune elicitor at two scales--the 'ultimate' life history and the underlying 'proximate' immune level in Drosophila melanogaster. We found dose-dependent effects of immune challenges on both male and female components of reproductive success, but not on survival, as well as a response in antimicrobial activity. These results indicate that even in the absence of the direct pathogenic effects that are associated with actual disease, individual life histories respond to a perceived immune challenge--but with the magnitude of this response being contingent on the initial dose of exposure. Furthermore, the results indicate that immune responses at the ultimate life history level may indeed reflect underlying processes that occur at the proximate level. PMID:24731072

Nystrand, M; Dowling, D K

2014-05-01

262

Acid loading test (pH)  

MedlinePLUS

The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the kidneys to send acid to the urine when there is too much acid in the ... Urine with a pH less than 5.3 is normal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different ...

263

pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

264

Nursing PhD 2010 Edition  

E-print Network

Nursing PhD Handbook 2010 Edition 107 Wiggins Rd, Saskatoon SK S7N 5E5 Phone: (306) 966-8239 Fax: (306) 966-6703 Email: grad.nursing@usask.ca #12;Welcome to the College of Nursing Graduate Program & Continuing Nursing Education #12;PhD Manual 2 Table of Contents General Information

Saskatchewan, University of

265

Middle School and pH?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

Herricks, Susan

2007-01-01

266

PhET Simulation: Balancing Act  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this PhETsimulation, you can investigate how a teeter-totter balances, by moving objects of different masses to various positions. Can you make the teeter-totter balance? This is one of a large number of physics simulations produced at the University of Colorado in the PhET project.

2012-04-24

267

CALCULATING THE PH OF CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Two new expressions for the pH of saturation (pH subs) were derived. One is a simplified equation developed from an aqueous carbonate equilibrium system in which correction for ionic strength was considered. The other is a more accurate quadratic formula that involves computerize...

268

PhD Studentships Biomedical Cell Biology  

E-print Network

PhD Studentships Biomedical Cell Biology Funding available for UK and non-UK applicants The Division of Biomedical Cell Biology at Warwick Medical School seeks applications from candidates for Ph edge of medically relevant cell biology, preparing students for careers in academia, industry

Goldschmidt, Christina

269

The Ultimate Practitioner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A solid idea coupled with savvy marketing has enabled Rick DuFour's vision of professional learning communities to revolutionize how teachers work with each other. The author of 13 books and 80 articles has presented to an estimated quarter million educators over the last eight years and is beginning to reach beyond the U.S. with books and…

Richardson, Joan

2011-01-01

270

Ultimate Cary Grant Pages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Maintained and developed by Debbie Dunlap, a devoted fan, this site pays homage to Cary Grant (whose real name was the slightly less marquee-friendly, Archibald Leach), one of Hollywood's leading men during the 20th century. The site provides a host of material about Grant, his films, and his life, including a filmography, movie reviews, a photo gallery, a sound gallery, and links to old radio shows in which Cary Grant appeared. The sound gallery is an excellent part of the site, as visitors can listen to audio clips from Grant vehicles like North by Northwest, Arsenic and Old Lace, and Charade. Visitors will learn quite a bit about Cary Grant from the site, including the fact that he never won an Academy Award for his acting, although he was awarded an honorary Oscar in 1970 for his life's work.

271

The ultimate high tide  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the possible coastal impacts of a rise in sea level. Control measures that are available to coastal communities are emphasized, including pumping of seawater into the ground, replenishing beach sand, protection or moving of potable-water intakes, elevating roadways, and building dikes. Economics will determine which, if any, measures are reasonable at a particular site. There is an upward trend in the mean CO{sub 2} concentration and predictions about the greenhouse effect are creating a rising tide of concern.

Dean, R.G. (Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee (USA))

1990-01-01

272

Toward ultimate nanoplasmonics modeling.  

PubMed

Advances in the field of nanoplasmonics are hindered by the limited capabilities of simulation tools in dealing with realistic systems comprising regions that extend over many light wavelengths. We show that the optical response of unprecedentedly large systems can be accurately calculated by using a combination of surface integral equation (SIE) method of moments (MoM) formulation and an expansion of the electromagnetic fields in a suitable set of spatial wave functions via fast multipole methods. We start with a critical review of volume versus surface integral methods, followed by a short tutorial on the key features that render plasmons useful for sensing (field enhancement and confinement). We then use the SIE-MoM to examine the plasmonic and sensing capabilities of various systems with increasing degrees of complexity, including both individual and interacting gold nanorods and nanostars, as well as large random and periodic arrangements of ?1000 gold nanorods. We believe that the present results and methodology raise the standard of numerical electromagnetic simulations in the field of nanoplasmonics to a new level, which can be beneficial for the design of advanced nanophotonic devices and optical sensing structures. PMID:25077678

Solís, Diego M; Taboada, José M; Obelleiro, Fernando; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; García de Abajo, F Javier

2014-08-26

273

The Ultimate Innovation?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Author concludes that the central problem in educational improvement in determining content that will be useful to students. Both teachers and students must choose content that will make a difference. (Author)

Svoboda, William S.

1974-01-01

274

The Ultimate Upgrade Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Computers, as everyone knows, seems to get cheaper every day. Many users find that they can now buy twice the computer for half the money they spent a few years ago. A brand new computer, however, may not be the only answer for users wishing for better performance or simply a level playing field, as prices for computer components have kept pace with whole computers. This new report from PC Magazine Online is designed to help users decide if and how to upgrade their present hardware to get a few more years out of their original investment. The report is composed of three main sections (Core Components, Multimedia, and Internet and I/O Connections), each of which analyzes the merits and prices of various upgrades, and offers tips and instructions for installation.

275

The Ultimate Private Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An amateur astronomer from Washington Parish, Southeast Louisiana, USA has designed and built an amazing observatory. It is not only an astronomical observatory, but a home theater, and tornado shelter designed to take a direct hit from an F5 tornado. The facility is fully equipped and automated, with a hydraulically driven roof that weighs 20,571 lbs., which lifts up, then rolls away to the end of the tracks. This leaves the user sitting inside of four 14-foot high walls open to the night sky. It has two premium quality telescopes for viewing deep space and objects inside the solar system. The chair that the observer sits on is also hydraulically driven.

Aymond, J.

2009-03-01

276

Effects of low doses of lactitol on faecal microflora, pH, short chain fatty acids and gastrointestinal symptomology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Lactitol (4-?-d-galactopyranosyl-d-glucitol) is a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener. Previous studies have shown that it has a beneficial effect on intestinal\\u000a microflora.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aims of the study  To determine whether low doses of lactitol had beneficial effects without eliciting adverse gastrointestinal symptoms.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Faecal bacterial populations (total anaerobes, total aerobes, enterobacteria, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli), faecal pH\\u000a and faecal short chain fatty acids

Michelle Finney; Joanne Smullen; Howard A. Foster; Saskia Brokx; David M. Storey

2007-01-01

277

Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction  

DOEpatents

Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

Maynard, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hendee, Shonn P. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohrscheib, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nunez, David (Albuquerque, NM); Alam, M. Kathleen (Cedar Crest, NM); Franke, James E. (Franklin, TN); Kemeny, Gabor J. (Madison, WI)

2005-09-13

278

Colorimetric determination of pH  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for a simple, rapid, reliable means for determining pH values of concentrated, high salt solutions without reliance on human eye and ambient light. The method comprises the steps of preparing a set of reference solutions, measuring the light absorption by each reference solution, adding indicator dye to each reference solution, measuring the light absorption by each such reference mixture, comparing the two solutions to determine the dye color at each pH, normalizing the spectra of mixture to the isosbestic point, and matching the color of the pH of the solution to one of the colors of the pHs in the reference solution set. In this way, the pH can be determined to within 0.1 pH unit, a far more precise method than using the human eye.

Baumann, E.W.; Buchanan, B.R.

1991-12-31

279

Parameters affecting downhole pH  

SciTech Connect

The presence of acetic and formic acids in the produced water of gas condensate wells has been known for some time by the industry. In traditional water analysis, it has been titrated and reported as alkalinity. The calculation of accurate downhole pH values requires that these ions be analyzed separately in the water and that an organic acid material balance be performed on all three phases in the separator. In this manner, it is then possible to use phase distribution coefficients involving ionic equilibrium to determine how these acids distribute themselves between phases as the pH calculation proceeds downhole. In this paper, the above method of calculation of pH and {Delta}pH is used to examine the effect that various concentrations of these acids have on the downhole pH. Various concentrations of acids are examined, and two cases are calculated in which the effect of condensate on the pH is examined.

Garber, J.D. [Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States). Corrosion Research Center; Jangama, V.R. [CLI International, Houston, TX (United States); Willmon, J. [Weatherly Labs., Lafayette, LA (United States)

1997-09-01

280

Acidified seawater impacts sea urchin larvae pH regulatory systems relevant for calcification.  

PubMed

Calcifying echinoid larvae respond to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry with reduced growth and developmental delay. To date, no information exists on how ocean acidification acts on pH homeostasis in echinoderm larvae. Understanding acid-base regulatory capacities is important because intracellular formation and maintenance of the calcium carbonate skeleton is dependent on pH homeostasis. Using H(+)-selective microelectrodes and the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, we conducted in vivo measurements of extracellular and intracellular pH (pH(e) and pH(i)) in echinoderm larvae. We exposed pluteus larvae to a range of seawater CO(2) conditions and demonstrated that the extracellular compartment surrounding the calcifying primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) conforms to the surrounding seawater with respect to pH during exposure to elevated seawater pCO(2). Using FITC dextran conjugates, we demonstrate that sea urchin larvae have a leaky integument. PMCs and spicules are therefore directly exposed to strong changes in pH(e) whenever seawater pH changes. However, measurements of pH(i) demonstrated that PMCs are able to fully compensate an induced intracellular acidosis. This was highly dependent on Na(+) and HCO(3)(-), suggesting a bicarbonate buffer mechanism involving secondary active Na(+)-dependent membrane transport proteins. We suggest that, under ocean acidification, maintained pH(i) enables calcification to proceed despite decreased pH(e). However, this probably causes enhanced costs. Increased costs for calcification or cellular homeostasis can be one of the main factors leading to modifications in energy partitioning, which then impacts growth and, ultimately, results in increased mortality of echinoid larvae during the pelagic life stage. PMID:23077257

Stumpp, Meike; Hu, Marian Y; Melzner, Frank; Gutowska, Magdalena A; Dorey, Narimane; Himmerkus, Nina; Holtmann, Wiebke C; Dupont, Sam T; Thorndyke, Michael C; Bleich, Markus

2012-10-30

281

Acidified seawater impacts sea urchin larvae pH regulatory systems relevant for calcification  

PubMed Central

Calcifying echinoid larvae respond to changes in seawater carbonate chemistry with reduced growth and developmental delay. To date, no information exists on how ocean acidification acts on pH homeostasis in echinoderm larvae. Understanding acid–base regulatory capacities is important because intracellular formation and maintenance of the calcium carbonate skeleton is dependent on pH homeostasis. Using H+-selective microelectrodes and the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF, we conducted in vivo measurements of extracellular and intracellular pH (pHe and pHi) in echinoderm larvae. We exposed pluteus larvae to a range of seawater CO2 conditions and demonstrated that the extracellular compartment surrounding the calcifying primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) conforms to the surrounding seawater with respect to pH during exposure to elevated seawater pCO2. Using FITC dextran conjugates, we demonstrate that sea urchin larvae have a leaky integument. PMCs and spicules are therefore directly exposed to strong changes in pHe whenever seawater pH changes. However, measurements of pHi demonstrated that PMCs are able to fully compensate an induced intracellular acidosis. This was highly dependent on Na+ and HCO3?, suggesting a bicarbonate buffer mechanism involving secondary active Na+-dependent membrane transport proteins. We suggest that, under ocean acidification, maintained pHi enables calcification to proceed despite decreased pHe. However, this probably causes enhanced costs. Increased costs for calcification or cellular homeostasis can be one of the main factors leading to modifications in energy partitioning, which then impacts growth and, ultimately, results in increased mortality of echinoid larvae during the pelagic life stage. PMID:23077257

Stumpp, Meike; Hu, Marian Y.; Melzner, Frank; Gutowska, Magdalena A.; Dorey, Narimane; Himmerkus, Nina; Holtmann, Wiebke C.; Dupont, Sam T.; Thorndyke, Michael C.; Bleich, Markus

2012-01-01

282

Capturing hydrolysis products in the solid state: effects of pH on uranyl squarates under ambient conditions.  

PubMed

Two uranyl squarates, (UO(2))(6)(C(4)O(4))(3)(OH)(6)O(2)·9H(2)O·4NH(4) (1; a = 16.6897(7) Å, cubic, I23) and (UO(2))(C(4)O(4))(OH)(2)·2NH(4) (2; a = 8.5151(4), b = 15.6822(8), c = 7.3974, orthorhombic, Pbcm), have been synthesized from ambient aqueous solutions as a function of pH. Oligomerization of the uranyl cation from monomeric pentagonal bipyramids (pH < 5) to [(UO(2))(3)O(OH)(3)] trimers (5 < pH < 8) in 1 and ultimately [(UO(2))(OH)(2)](n) chains (7 < pH < 8) in 2 is observed. This evolution of speciation versus pH is consistent with what has been observed in solution and thus may be represented by the uranyl hydrolysis equilibrium, mUO(2)(2+) + nH(2)O ? [(UO(2))(m)(OH)(n)](2m - n) + nH(+). Structural systematics, physical properties, and a discussion of species selectivity by squarate anions are presented. PMID:20222717

Rowland, Clare E; Cahill, Christopher L

2010-10-01

283

Management of Ultimate Risk of Nuclear Power Plants by Source Terms - Lessons Learned from the Chernobyl Accident  

SciTech Connect

The term 'ultimate risk' is used here to describe the probabilities and radiological consequences that should be incorporated in siting, containment design and accident management of nuclear power plants for hypothetical accidents. It is closely related with the source terms specified in siting criteria which assures an adequate separation of radioactive inventories of the plants from the public, in the event of a hypothetical and severe accident situation. The author would like to point out that current source terms which are based on the information from the Windscale accident (1957) through TID-14844 are very outdated and do not incorporate lessons learned from either the Three Miles Island (TMI, 1979) nor Chernobyl accident (1986), two of the most severe accidents ever experienced. As a result of the observations of benign radionuclides released at TMI, the technical community in the US felt that a more realistic evaluation of severe reactor accident source terms was necessary. In this background, the 'source term research project' was organized in 1984 to respond to these challenges. Unfortunately, soon after the time of the final report from this project was released, the Chernobyl accident occurred. Due to the enormous consequences induced by then accident, the one time optimistic perspectives in establishing a more realistic source term were completely shattered. The Chernobyl accident, with its human death toll and dispersion of a large part of the fission fragments inventories into the environment, created a significant degradation in the public's acceptance of nuclear energy throughout the world. In spite of this, nuclear communities have been prudent in responding to the public's anxiety towards the ultimate safety of nuclear plants, since there still remained many unknown points revolving around the mechanism of the Chernobyl accident. In order to resolve some of these mysteries, the author has performed a scoping study of the dispersion and deposition mechanisms of fuel particles and fission fragments during the initial phase of the Chernobyl accident. Through this study, it is now possible to generally reconstruct the radiological consequences by using a dispersion calculation technique, combined with the meteorological data at the time of the accident and land contamination densities of {sup 137}Cs measured and reported around the Chernobyl area. Although it is challenging to incorporate lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident into the source term issues, the author has already developed an example of safety goals by incorporating the radiological consequences of the accident. The example provides safety goals by specifying source term releases in a graded approach in combination with probabilities, i.e. risks. The author believes that the future source term specification should be directly linked with safety goals. (author)

Genn Saji [Ex-Secretariate of Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (Japan)

2006-07-01

284

Existing Facility (Ph I) Includes Water intake, screens,  

E-print Network

#12;#12;#12;Existing Facility (Ph I) Includes Water intake, screens, and pumps sufficient for proposed Ph II #12;Existing Facility (Ph I) Includes Ozone water treatment and settling pond sufficient for proposed Ph II #12;Location of proposed Ph II Facilities #12;WW Hatchery Program Current vs. WW Hatchery

285

Fibril formation pH controls intrafibrillar collagen biomineralization in vitro and in vivo.  

PubMed

We demonstrate that intrafibrillar, homogenous collagen biomineralization can be achieved by controlling self-assembly under mildly alkaline conditions. Using dense collagen (DC) gels as an osteoid model, we modulated their fibrillogenesis environment to evaluate the effects of fibrillogenesis pH on the protein charge distribution and ultimately on biomineralization. Cationic and anionic dye staining and electron cryomicroscopy analyses established that fibrillogenesis under mildly alkaline conditions promotes the formation of electronegative charges within the protein (anionic DC gels). These charges are stable upon titration of the gel pH to physiological values. Subsequent exposure of anionic DC gels to simulated body fluid induced the intrafibrillar biomineralization of the gels, promoting a rapid, extensive formation of carbonated hydroxyapatite, and strongly impacting gel mechanical properties. The generality and significance of this approach has been addressed by implanting freshly made anionic DC gels in vivo, in a rat subcutaneous model. Subcutaneous implants showed an extensive, homogenous biomineralization as early as at day 7, indicating that anionic collagen gels rapidly self-mineralize upon contact with body fluids in a non-osseous implantation site. The control of collagen fibrillogenesis pH provides not only new interpretations to what has been called the collagen mineralization enigma by demonstrating that neat collagen can intrafibrilarly self-mineralize, but it will also set a new starting point for the use of DC gels in bone regenerative medicine, in addition as potential applications as mineralized tissue model or as slow-release delivery carriers. PMID:25453955

Marelli, Benedetto; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Zhang, Yu Ling; Rouiller, Isabelle; Barralet, Jake E; Nazhat, Showan N

2014-10-30

286

Administration Noma Bennett Anderson, PhD  

E-print Network

Kenwright, MS, MT(ASCP)SI, MB Cytotechnology, Histotechnology and Graduate Program Director Barbara DuBray-Benstein, PhD Medical Laboratory Science Program Director Kathleen Kenwright, MS, MT(ASCP)SI, MB Department

Cui, Yan

287

Aryan Hazeghi PhD candidate  

E-print Network

: Prof. Yoshio Nishi Ranked 5/143 applicants in the PhD qualification exam Non-volatile Memory Technology current and future equipment and process needs Member of the Stanford Students Environmental Consulting

Nishi, Yoshio

288

Mary Fennell, PhD Chair  

Cancer.gov

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program Evaluation Oversight Committee Roster CHAIR Mary Fennell, Ph.D. Chair, Department of Sociology and Community Health Brown University Box 1916, 211 Maxcy Hall 112 George Street Providence, RI 02912

289

Fetal scalp pH testing  

MedlinePLUS

Sometimes fetal heart monitoring doesn't provide enough information about the well-being of a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus is getting enough oxygen ...

290

Paul Pinsky, PhD, MPH  

Cancer.gov

Division of Cancer Prevention Staff Paul Pinsky, PhD, MPH Acting ChiefEarly Detection Research Group Location Division of Cancer PreventionNational Cancer Institute9609 Medical Center Drive, Room 5E444 Rockville, MD 20850 Phone

291

Colorimetric Determination of pH.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is an activity in which the pH of a solution can be quantitatively measured using a spectrophotometer. The theory, experimental details, sample preparation and selection, instrumentation, and results are discussed. (CW)

Tucker, Sheryl; And Others

1989-01-01

292

Multiple pH Levels in Chromatograms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lines of buffer solutions drawn longitudinally on chromatograms with a capillary pipette provide different levels of pH which affect the Rf values, color, fluorescence, and other properties of the chromatographed substances.

A. A. Bitancourt; Alexandra P. Nogueira

1959-01-01

293

Development of FRP composite structural biomaterials: ultimate strength of the fiber/matrix interfacial bond in in vivo simulated environments.  

PubMed

Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are being developed as alternatives to metals for structural orthopedic implant applications. FRP composite fracture behavior and environmental interactions are distinctly different from those which occur in metals. These differences must be accounted for in the design and evaluation of implant performance. Fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength in a FRP composite is known to strongly influence fracture behavior. The interfacial bond strength of four candidate fiber/matrix combinations (carbon fiber/polycarbonate, carbon fiber/polysulfone, polyaramid fiber/polycarbonate, polyaramid fiber/polysulfone) were investigated at 37 degrees C in dry and in vivo simulated (saline, exudate) environments. Ultimate bond strength was measured by a single fiber-microdroplet pull-out test. Dry bond strengths were significantly decreased following exposure to either saline or exudate with bond strength loss being approximately equal in both the saline and exudate. Bond strength loss is attributed to the diffusion of water and/or salt ions into the sample and their interaction with interfacial bonding. Because bond degradation is dependent upon diffusion, diffusional equilibrium must be obtained in composite test samples before the full effect of the test environment upon composite mechanical behavior can be determined. PMID:1512281

Latour, R A; Black, J

1992-05-01

294

Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), an ultimate marker-assisted selection (MAS) tool to accelerate plant breeding  

PubMed Central

Marker-assisted selection (MAS) refers to the use of molecular markers to assist phenotypic selections in crop improvement. Several types of molecular markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), have been identified and effectively used in plant breeding. The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has led to remarkable advances in whole genome sequencing, which provides ultra-throughput sequences to revolutionize plant genotyping and breeding. To further broaden NGS usages to large crop genomes such as maize and wheat, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) has been developed and applied in sequencing multiplexed samples that combine molecular marker discovery and genotyping. GBS is a novel application of NGS protocols for discovering and genotyping SNPs in crop genomes and populations. The GBS approach includes the digestion of genomic DNA with restriction enzymes followed by the ligation of barcode adapter, PCR amplification and sequencing of the amplified DNA pool on a single lane of flow cells. Bioinformatic pipelines are needed to analyze and interpret GBS datasets. As an ultimate MAS tool and a cost-effective technique, GBS has been successfully used in implementing genome-wide association study (GWAS), genomic diversity study, genetic linkage analysis, molecular marker discovery and genomic selection under a large scale of plant breeding programs. PMID:25324846

He, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Laroche, André; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Liu, HongKui; Li, Ziqin

2014-01-01

295

Procedure for calculating estimated ultimate recoveries of Bakken and Three Forks Formations horizontal wells in the Williston Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Estimated ultimate recoveries (EURs) are a key component in determining productivity of wells in continuous-type oil and gas reservoirs. EURs form the foundation of a well-performance-based assessment methodology initially developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS; Schmoker, 1999). This methodology was formally reviewed by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists Committee on Resource Evaluation (Curtis and others, 2001). The EUR estimation methodology described in this paper was used in the 2013 USGS assessment of continuous oil resources in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations and incorporates uncertainties that would not normally be included in a basic decline-curve calculation. These uncertainties relate to (1) the mean time before failure of the entire well-production system (excluding economics), (2) the uncertainty of when (and if) a stable hyperbolic-decline profile is revealed in the production data, (3) the particular formation involved, (4) relations between initial production rates and a stable hyperbolic-decline profile, and (5) the final behavior of the decline extrapolation as production becomes more dependent on matrix storage.

Cook, Troy A.

2013-01-01

296

The influence of deposition solution pH and ionic strength on the quality of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel-based thin films and etalons.  

PubMed

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylic acid (pNIPAm-co-AAc) microgel-based thin films and etalons were fabricated via "painting" a pNIPAm-co-AAc microgel monolayer on a Au-coated substrate, followed by the deposition of another Au overlayer. Herein, in situ observation of how the pH and ionic strength (I.S.) of the painting solution influenced microgel deposition and, ultimately, the optical homogeneity and pH sensitivity of the etalon was carried out. It was shown that microgels closely pack on the Au substrate when they are deposited at pH 3.0, leading to a good optical homogeneity. Additionally, increasing the painting solution I.S. leads to a slight decrease in microgel packing density on the substrate, but enhances the ability of the microgel layer to swell, exhibiting thicker polymer layers when immersed in pH 3.0 solutions. When painting at pH 7.5, the optical homogeneity of the etalon is improved at the expense of swellability, exaggerated high I.S. We also determined the device's sensitivity to pH changes and found a maximum sensitivity when the microgels were deposited at pH 7.5 with an I.S. of 10 mM. PMID:24191757

Hu, Liang; Serpe, Michael J

2013-11-27

297

Measurement of soil pH  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of experimental results are presented which show the variation of the pH values of several soils when samples of each are shaken with CaClâ solutions of different concentrations. These results are then interpreted on the basis of the ratio law-derived from the Gouy theory of the electrical double layer - and it is shown that the pH values

R. K. Schofield; A. Wormald Taylor

1955-01-01

298

Articles Student Understanding of pH \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

In foundation biochemistry and biological chemistry courses, a major problem area that has been identified is students' lack of understanding of pH, acids, bases, and buffers and their inability to apply their knowledge in solving acid\\/base problems. The aim of this study was to explore students' conceptions of pH and their ability to solve problems associated with the behavior of

Dianne J. Watters; James J. Watters

299

Ambulatory Esophageal pH Monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux may be best diagnosed using ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. This test involves the placemenmt of a thin pH probe in the esophagus, which is connected to a small box on a waistbelt. Studies are done in an ambulatory state in the patient’s home and work environment. Data collected assesses acid exposure time over the circadian

Joel E Richter

1997-01-01

300

Effect of two mouthwashes on salivary ph.  

PubMed

To analyze the effect of two mouthwashes on salivary pH and correlate it with age, buffer capacity and saliva flow rate in healthy volunteers, a crossover phase IV clinical study involving three age-based groups was designed. Two commercial mouthwashes (MW), Cool Mint ListerineR (MWa) and Periobacter R (MWb) were used. The unstimulated saliva of each individual was first characterized by measuring flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. Salivary pH was evaluated before rinsing with a given MW, immediately after rinsing, 5 minutes later, and then every 10 min (at 15, 25, 35 min) until the baseline pH was recovered. Paired t-test, ANOVA with a randomized block design, and Pearson correlation tests were used. Averages were 0.63 mL/min, 7.06, and 0.87 for flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity, respectively. An immediate significant increase in salivary pH was observed after rinsing, reaching average values of 7.24 (MWb) and 7.30 (MWa), which declined to an almost stable value 15 minutes. The great increase in salivary pH, after MW use shows that saliva is a dynamic system, and that the organism is capable of responding to a stimulus with changes in its composition. It is thus evident that pH of the external agent alone is not a good indicator for its erosive potential because biological systems tend to neutralize it. The results of this study enhance the importance of in vivo measurements and reinforce the concept of the protective action of saliva. PMID:25523957

Belardinelli, Paola A; Morelatto, Rosana A; Benavidez, Tomás E; Baruzzi, Ana M; López de Blanc, Silvia A

2014-01-01

301

Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks. PMID:23858281

Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

2012-06-01

302

IMPEE PhD Opportunity Project title: LightFoot PhD A PhD Investigation Lightning Protection of HV Overhead Lines with Non-Ideal  

E-print Network

IMPEE PhD Opportunity Project title: LightFoot PhD ­ A PhD Investigation Lightning Protection of HV.swingler@hw.ac.uk Abstract LightFoot PhD ­ A PhD Investigation Lightning Protection of HV Overhead Lines with Non-Ideal Tower to the understanding of the effect of lightning strikes on an overhead transmission line in terms of its electrical

Greenaway, Alan

303

@2012 Mehran Mehregany, Ph.D. Mehran Mehregany, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

connectivity cloud computing social networks #12;@2012 Mehran Mehregany, Ph.D. Nonintrusive Monitoring unprecedented mobility...working, entertainment, shopping, socializing, gaming, etc., anytime, anywhere

Rollins, Andrew M.

304

MRF with adjustable pH  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Deterministic final polishing of high precision optics using sub-aperture processing with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is an accepted practice throughout the world. A wide variety of materials can be successfully worked with aqueous (pH 10), magnetorheological (MR) fluids, using magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) and either ceria or nanodiamond nonmagnetic abrasives. Polycrystalline materials like zinc sulfide (ZnS) and zinc selenide (ZnSe) are difficult to polish at pH 10 with MRF, due to their grain size and the relatively low stiffness of the MR fluid lap. If microns of material are removed, the grain structure of the material begins to appear. In 2005, Kozhinova et al. (Appl. Opt. 44 4671-4677) demonstrated that lowering pH could improve MRF of ZnS. However, magnetic CI particle corrosion rendered their low pH approach unstable and unsuitable for commercial implementation. In 2009, Shafrir et al. described a sol-gel coating process for manufacturing a zirconia-coated CI particle that protects the magnetic core from aqueous corrosion (Appl. Opt .48 6797-6810). The coating process produces free nanozirconia polishing abrasives during the coating procedure, thereby creating an MR polishing powder that is "self-charged" with the polishing abrasive. By simply adding water, it was possible to polish optical glasses and ceramics with good stability at pH 8 for three weeks. The development of a corrosion resistant, MR polishing powder, opens up the possibility for polishing additional materials, wherein the pH may be adjusted to optimize effectiveness. In this paper we describe the CI coating process, the characterization of the coated powder, and procedures for making stable MR fluids with adjustable pH, giving polishing results for a variety of optical glasses and crystalline ceramics.

Jacobs, Stephen D.

2011-10-01

305

Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes  

PubMed Central

Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

2013-01-01

306

Phosphate availability and the ultimate control of new nitrogen input by nitrogen fixation in the tropical Pacific Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the low atmospheric input of phosphate into the open ocean, it is one of the key nutrients that could ultimately control primary production and carbon export into the deep ocean. The observed trend over the last 20 years has shown a decrease in the dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) pool in the North Pacific gyre, which has been correlated to the increase in di-nitrogen (N2) fixation rates. Following a NW-SE transect, in the Southeast Pacific during the early austral summer (BIOSOPE cruise), we present data on DIP, dissolved organic phosphate (DOP) and particulate phosphate (PP) pools along with DIP turnover times (TDIP) and N2 fixation rates. We observed a decrease in DIP concentration from the edges to the centre of the gyre. Nevertheless the DIP concentrations remained above 100 nmol L-1 and T DIP was more than 6 months in the centre of the gyre; DIP availability remained largely above the level required for phosphate limitation to occur and the absence of Trichodesmium spp and low nitrogen fixation rates were likely to be controlled by other factors such as temperature or iron availability. This contrasts with recent observations in the North Pacific Ocean at the ALOHA station and in the western Pacific Ocean at the same latitude (DIAPALIS cruises) where lower DIP concentrations (<20 nmol L-1) and T DIP <50 h were measured during the summer season in the upper layer. The South Pacific gyre can be considered a High Phosphate Low Chlorophyll (HPLC) oligotrophic area, which could potentially support high N2 fixation rates and possibly carbon dioxide sequestration, if the primary ecophysiological controls, temperature and/or iron availability, were alleviated.

Moutin, T.; Karl, D. M.; Duhamel, S.; Rimmelin, P.; Raimbault, P.; van Mooy, B. A. S.; Claustre, H.

2008-01-01

307

The FP7 ULTimateCO2 project: a study of the long term fate of CO2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objectives of the European FP7 ULTimateCO2 project are to study specific processes that could influence the long-term fate of geologically stored CO2, mainly: the trapping mechanisms occurring in the storage reservoir, the influence of fluid-rock interactions on mechanical integrity of caprock and well vicinity, and also the modifications induced at the regional scale (brine displacement, fault reactivation, hydrogeology changes...). A comprehensive approach combining laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and natural analogue studies is developed to assess all the processes mentioned above. A collection of data has been generated from natural and industrial (oil industry) analogues on the fluid flow and mechanical properties, structure, and mineralogy of faults and fractures that could affect the long-term storage capacity of underground CO2 storage sites. To address geochemical trapping at reservoir scale, an experimental approach is developed using sandstone core materials in batch reactive mode with CO2 and impurities at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions. Three inter-related lines of laboratory experiments investigate the long-term evolution of the mechanical properties and sealing integrity of fractured and faulted caprocks using Opalinus clay of Mont Terri Gallery (Switzerland), an analogue for caprock well investigated in the past for nuclear waste disposal purpose. To evaluate the interactions between CO2 (and formation fluid) and the well environment (formation, cement, casing) and to assess the consequences of these interactions on the transport properties of well materials, a 1 to 1 scale experiment has been set in the Mont Terri Gallery Opalinus clay to reproduce classical well objects (cemented annulus, casing and cement plug) perforating caprock formations. An extensive program of numerical modeling is also developed to calibrate, to reproduce and to extrapolate the experimental results at longer time scales including uncertainty assessment methods. www.ultimateco2.eu

Audigane, Pascal; Waldmann, Svenja; Pearce, Jonathan; Dimier, Alain; Le Gallo, Yann; Frykman, Peter; Maurand, Nicolas; Gherardi, Fabrizio; Yalamas, Thierry; Cremer, Holger; Spiers, Chris; Nussbaum, Christophe

2014-05-01

308

Version 3.0 SOP 6a --pH October 12, 2007 pH (total hydrogen  

E-print Network

Version 3.0 SOP 6a -- pH October 12, 2007 117 SOP 6a pH - / 1. pH (total hydrogen ion concentration pH scale) . , [H+ ] 1 kg . 2. . F T S F 4 [H ] [H ] (1 / ) [H ] [HSO ] S K+ + + - = + + (1) [H+ ]F (free concentration), ST ([HSO4 - ]+[SO4 2- ]) KS [HSO4 - ] . pH . 10 1 [H ] pH

309

pH Dependent Transitions in Xanthorhodopsin  

PubMed Central

Xanthorhodopsin (XR), the light-driven proton pump of the halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber, exhibits substantial homology to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) of archaea and proteorhodopsin (PR) of marine bacteria, but unlike them contains a light-harvesting carotenoid antenna, salinixanthin, as well as retinal. We report here the pH dependent properties of XR. The pKa of the retinal Schiff base is as high as in BR, i.e., ? 12.4. Deprotonation of the Schiff base and the ensuing alkaline denaturation causes large changes in the absorption bands of the carotenoid antenna, which lose intensity and become broader making the spectrum similar to that of salinixanthin not bound to XR. A small red shift of the retinal chromophore band and increase of its extinction, as well as the pH dependent amplitude of the M intermediate indicate that in detergent-solubilized XR the pKa of the Schiff base counter-ion and proton acceptor is about 6 (compared to 2.6 in BR, and 7.5 in PR). The protonation of the counter-ion is accompanied by a small blue shift of the carotenoid absorption bands. The pigment is stable in the dark upon acidification to pH 2. At pH < 2 a transition to a blue shifted species absorbing around 440 nm occurs, accompanied by loss of resolution of the carotenoid absorption bands. At pH < 3 illumination of XR with continuous light causes accumulation of long-lived photoproducts(s) with an absorption maximum around 400 nm. The photocycle of XR was examined between pH 4 and 10 in solubilized samples. The pH dependence of recovery of the initial state slows at both acid and alkaline pH, with pKa’s of 6.0 and 9.3. The decrease in the rates with pKa 6.0 is apparently caused by protonation of the counter-ion and proton acceptor while that at high pH reflects the pKa of the internal proton donor, Glu94, at the times in the photocycle when this group equilibrates with the bulk. PMID:16649816

Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Balashov, Sergei P.; Wang, Jennifer M.; Lanyi, Janos K.

2009-01-01

310

Ileal pH in cystic fibrosis.  

PubMed

In cystic fibrosis jejunal hyperacidity has an adverse effect on lipid digestion. It is not known whether hyperacidity extends to the ileum. We have studied pH through the whole length of the small bowel in 42 normal and 6 cystic fibrosis subjects by means of pH-sensitive radiotelemetry capsules. In cystic fibrosis subjects the time spent below pH 6.0 was significantly greater during the 1st h in the small bowel than in normal subjects. In the rest of the small bowel the pH remained above 6.0 in both groups. The recordings in the cystic fibrosis group did not show the clear distinction between ileum and colon which is seen in normal subjects. In cystic fibrosis low pH conditions are confined to the proximal small intestine. There is adequate time at optimal pH in the small bowel for dissolution of enzyme supplements and assimilation of nutrients. PMID:3164499

Gilbert, J; Kelleher, J; Littlewood, J M; Evans, D F

1988-01-01

311

Mississippi State Physics Labs: pH and pH Indicators  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This item is an introductory lab that examines heat and energy. In the lab, students measure the pH of various chemicals using different pH indicators. Materials are inexpensive and readily available. This item is part of a larger collection of online physics labs by the authors.

Ferguson, Joe; Denson, Jack

2009-12-06

312

Andrew A. Shapiro, Ph.D. Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering  

E-print Network

Andrew A. Shapiro, Ph.D. EDUCATION Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering University of California-SiO2." M.S. Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Los Angeles, 1989 Thesis Materials Science and Engineering 2000- 2005 Lecturer - Materials Science and Engineering 1998- 2000 Co

Mease, Kenneth D.

313

Differential genotoxicity of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2  

PubMed Central

Organoselenium compounds have been pointed out as therapeutic agents. In contrast, the potential therapeutic aspects of tellurides have not yet been demonstrated. The present study evaluated the comparative toxicological effects of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 and diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2 in mice after in vivo administration. Genotoxicity (as determined by comet assay) and mutagenicicity were used as end-points of toxicity. Subcutaneous administration of high doses of (PhSe)2 or (PhTe)2 (500 µmol/kg) caused distinct genotoxicity in mice. (PhSe)2 significantly decreased the DNA damage index after 48 and 96 h of its injection (p < 0.05). In contrast, (PhTe) caused a significant increase in DNA damage (p < 0.05) after 48 and 96 h of intoxication. (PhSe)2 did not cause mutagenicity but (PhTe)2 increased the micronuclei frequency, indicating its mutagenic potential. The present study demonstrated that acute in vivo exposure to ditelluride caused genotoxicity in mice, which may be associated with pro-oxidant effects of diphenyl ditelluride. In addition, the use of this compound and possibly other related tellurides must be carefully controlled. PMID:24711962

Meinerz, Daiane Francine; Allebrandt, Josiane; Mariano, Douglas O.C.; Waczuk, Emily P.; Soares, Felix Antunes

2014-01-01

314

Ph.D SCHOOL DIRETTORE Ph.D. Programme MAIL TO 1.1 Prehistoric Archaeology  

E-print Network

and Genetics 9.5 Genetics and Molecular Biology 9.6 Experimental Medicine 9.7 Cell Techonology Sciences 9 Molecular Biology and Medicine #12;Appendix 1 Ph.D SCHOOL DIRETTORE Ph.D. Programme MAIL TO 13.1 Philology.3 Modern Philology, Linguistics, and Literatures 13.4 French Studies 13.5 Literatures in English 13.6 Greek

Di Pillo, Gianni

315

PhET Teacher Activities: Hooke's Law  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This two-hour activity for high school physics was created to accompany the PhET simulation Masses & Springs. In the first lesson, students will use the simulation to explore how displacement of a spring is mathematically related to the load applied to it. In the next day's exploration, learners analyze the energy of a mass oscillating on a spring by observing distribution and transfer of kinetic, elastic potential, and gravitational potential energy. Materials include learning goals, explicit directions for use of the simulation, homework problems, and answer key. The spring motion simulation (which is required to complete this activity) is available from PhET at: Masses & Springs. This lesson is part of the PhET (Physics Education Technology Project), a large collection of free interactive science simulations.

2012-09-25

316

Occurrence of the antidiabetic drug Metformin and its ultimate transformation product Guanylurea in several compartments of the aquatic cycle.  

PubMed

In 2030, the World Health Organization estimates that more than 350 million people will be diagnosed with diabetes. Consequently, Metformin - the biguanide drug of choice orally administered for diabetes type II - is anticipated to see a spike in production. Unlike many pharmaceutical drugs, Metformin (Met) is not metabolized by humans but passes through the body unchanged. Entering aquatic compartments, such as in sewage, it can be bacterially transformed to the ultimate transformation product Guanylurea (Gua). Sampling over one week (n=5) from a Southern German sewage treatment plant revealed very high average (AV) concentrations in influent (AVMet=111,800ng/L, AVGua=1300ng/L) and effluent samples (AVMet=4800ng/L, AVGua=44,000ng/L). To provide a more complete picture of the distribution and potential persistence of these compounds in the German water cycle, a new, efficient and highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometric method with direct injection was used for the measurement of Metformin and Guanylurea in drinking, surface, sewage and seawater. Limits of quantification (LOQ) ranging from 2-10ng/L allowed the detection of Metformin and Guanylurea in different locations such as: Lake Constance (n=11: AVMet=102ng/L, AVGua=16ng/L), river Elbe (n=12: AVMet=472ng/L, AVGua=9ng/L), river Weser (n=6: AVMet=349ng/L, AVGua=137ng/L) and for the first time in marine North Sea water (n=14: AVMet=13ng/L, AVGua=11ng/L). Based on daily water discharges, Metformin loads of 15.2kg/d (Elbe) and 6.4kg/d (Weser) into the North Sea were calculated. Lake Constance is used to abstract potable water which is further purified to be used as drinking water. A first screening of two tap water samples contained 2ng/L and 61ng/L of Metformin, respectively. The results of this study suggest that Metformin and Guanylurea could be distributed over a large fraction of the world's potable water sources and oceans. With no natural degradation processes, these compounds can be easily reintroduced to humans as they enter the food chain. PMID:24954924

Trautwein, Christoph; Berset, Jean-Daniel; Wolschke, Hendrik; Kümmerer, Klaus

2014-09-01

317

Microbiology Ph.D. Admissions Data -Fall 2012 Entering Class  

E-print Network

Microbiology Ph.D. Admissions Data - Fall 2012 Entering Class Admissions data for Biological and Biomedical Sciences can be found here. Ph.D. Degree Information Number of registered students, Fall 2012 19 Number of degrees awarded 2011-2012 4 Median years to Ph.D. 5.7 Percent of students awarded Ph.D. 94

318

Recommended Soil pH and Lime Requirement Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil pH is defined as the negative logarithm (base 10) of the H+ activity (moles per liter) in the soil solution. As the activity of H+ in the soil solution increases, the soil pH value decreases. Soils with pH values below pH 7 are referred to as \\

Donald Eckert; J. Thomas Sims

319

2011 Cecilia J. Hillard, PhD Douglas R. Campbell  

E-print Network

Roger W. Byhardt, MD Marlene D. Melzer-Lange, MD 2009 Owen W. Griffith, PhD Karen J. Marcdante, MD John Robert Montgomery, MD James Sebastian, MD 2005 William Hendee, PhD Jeffrey Kelly, PhD Jerry Taylor, Ph

320

Inhibition of protein translation as a mechanism of acidotic pH protection against ischaemic injury through inhibition of CREB mediated tRNA synthetase expression.  

PubMed

Ischaemia associated reduction in local tissue pH is well documented but the mechanisms through which it influences cell survival remain poorly understood. Using renal epithelial HK-2 cells we demonstrate acidotic pH6.4 protects against oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) induced cell death. Initial exploration of the mechanisms responsible using microarray analysis revealed acidotic inhibition of OGD induced aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) gene expression. These genes are key components of protein translation, which was markedly attenuated by reduced pH. Inhibition of protein synthesis using the ARS inhibitor halofuginone or cycloheximide protected against OGD induced injury. To explore further we focussed on the transcription factor CREB, identified by pathway analysis of microarray data and observed a pH dependent decrease in OGD induced activation. Inhibition of CREB/CBP interaction prevented OGD induced isoleucyl-ARS (IARS) expression, reduced protein synthesis and protected against OGD induced cellular injury. In addition we also observed that acidotic pH attenuated the OGD induced pro-apoptotic unfolded protein response (UPR) activated gene DDIT3. We suggest that maladaptive activation of CREB and ARS gene expression, through the maintenance of protein synthesis contributes to ER stress and UPR activation and that acidotic pH through inhibition of CREB activation inhibits protein synthesis and ultimately UPR activated apoptotic signals. PMID:23896026

Crean, Daniel; Felice, Luca; Pierre, Philippe; Jennings, Paul; Leonard, Martin O

2013-12-10

321

NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program Ronald E. McNair PhD Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Ronald E. McNair PHD Program was funded in September 1995. Implementation began during the spring of 1996. The deferment of the actual program initial semester enabled the program to continue support through the fall semester of 1998. This was accomplished by a no-cost extension from August 15, 1998 through December 31, 1998. There were 12 fellows supported by the program in 1996, 15 fellows in 1997, and 15 fellows 1998. Current program capacity is 15 fellows per funding support. Support for the academic outreach component began in spring 1998. The program was named the "Good Enough" Crew Activity (GECA) in honor of Dr. McNair's philosophy of everyone being good enough to achieve anything they want bad enough. The program currently enrolls 65 students from the third through the eight grades. The program is held 12 Saturdays per semester. The time is 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM each Saturday Morning. Program direction and facilitation is jointly administered with the PHD fellows and the Saturday Academy staff. Dr. John Kelly, REM-PHD Principal Investigator serves in a program oversight and leadership capacity. Ms. Sunnie Howard, The NASA REM-PHD Administrative Coordinator serves in an administrative and logistical capacity. Mr. Aaron Hatch, the NASA-AMES Liaison Officer, serve@'in a consultative and curriculum review capacity. The first recognition activity will be held on December 12, 1998, with the students, parents, faculty, PHD fellows, and other local student support services persons. Program outreach efforts are jointly supported by the NASA REM-PHD Program and the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. The Ph.D. program reached its first milestone in May 1998. North Carolina A&T State University graduated the first Ph.D. fellows. The first three Ph.D. Alumni were Ronald E. McNair PHD Program Fellows. It is hoped that this is just the beginning of a highly acclaimed doctoral program. The ultimate program success will be recognized when the program begins to graduate 15 fellows per year. The Ph.D. Program is only three and a half years old and the expectations of graduating PH.D's in that timeframe, is a phenomenal accomplishment for any program in the country. Since inception of the NASA REM-PHD program, tuitions and fees have increased. Stipend support was increased to offer the Ph.D. program on a competitive basis. These increases will place allocation restraints on r_ the current level of funding. These issues are being addressed in the proposal and will bear their own merit.

Howard, Sunnie

1998-01-01

322

AU FEBRUARY 2012 Open House: The AU Ph. D.  

E-print Network

AU FEBRUARY 2012 1 OPEN house Open House: The AU Ph. D. House Magazine By Alejandra Zaragoza Scherman Page 2 The AU PhD House Activity Group By Zsuzsanna Sukosd Page 3 The AU PhD House Activity Group By Gitte Haahr-Andersen Page 6 The AU PhD World: Talent Development By Kristian Thorn Page 7/8 The Ph

323

Tiffany Niemoller Eady, Ph.D. Major Professor: Nicolas G. Bazan, M.D., Ph.D.  

E-print Network

May, 2011 Tiffany Niemoller Eady, Ph.D. Major Professor: Nicolas G. Bazan, M.D., Ph.D. Dissertation: Docosahexaenoic Acid, Neurolipidomics, and the Ischemic Penumbra of Stroke Hongbo He, Ph.D. Major Professor: Jeffrey D. Erickson, Ph.D. Dissertation: Functional Distinctions between Vesicular Glutamate Transporter

324

PhD Journey: Some Shared Experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Academic interest in the PhD journey predominately concerns the technical aspects of the doctorate. It tends to concentrate on a number of pragmatic areas, such as, deciding on and narrowing down the topic area; choosing a supervisor; the pitfalls associated with supervision; alternative methodological approaches to research; and writing up the thesis (Dunleavy, 2003, Graves and Varma, 1997, Pearson and

Lucie Crawford

325

The Ph.D. Value Proposition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

Cooper, Kenneth J.

2012-01-01

326

Ph.D. Program in Machine Learning  

E-print Network

Page 1 Ph.D. Program in Machine Learning Student Handbook Revised 7/20/12 #12;Page 2 Table Machine Learning Journal Club...................................................................................................17 #12;Page 3 Introduction The field of machine learning is concerned with the question of how

327

Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

2009-01-01

328

December 1996 quant-ph 9804023  

E-print Network

, 05.30.-d. KEY WORDS: decoherence; Dirac equation; entropy; Zitterbewegung. 1 #12;DecoherenceDecember 1996 quant-ph 9804023 DECOHERENCE IN THE DIRAC EQUATION David A. Meyer Project in Geometry the occurence of decoherence in the Dirac equation upon tracing over position. We conclude that the physics

Meyer, David A.

329

Barbara E Engelhardt, PhD Information  

E-print Network

, exams, homework assignments, and grading. Professional Experience 23andMe, Mountain View, California USA for calling SNPs. Google, Mountain View, California USA Summer Intern, Research Group May 2005 - August 2005 expression association studies. Education University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California USA Ph

Pritchard, Jonathan

330

PhET Simulation: Vector Addition  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet allows user to learn how to add vectors. Users may drag vectors onto a graph, changing their length and angle, and calculate their sum. The magnitude, angle, and components of each vector can be displayed in several formats. Teaching ideas and activities are included. This is part of a larger collection developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

2008-07-13

331

Ph.D. PSYCHOLOGY Application Checklist  

E-print Network

Ph.D. PSYCHOLOGY Application Checklist IMPORTANT NOTES 1. Please submit all Application Materials.D. in Psychology must have both a Bachelors and Masters degree, at least one of which must be in Psychology (Maximum 10 pages). GRE Test Scores: Applicants who do not have a Master's degree in Psychology must submit

Northern British Columbia, University of

332

Curriculum Vitae Christopher Dehon, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

.P.H. Functioned as the sole therapist responsible for piloting a new treatment for PTSD in young children and their mothers following trauma. Treatment addressed both the classic symptoms of PTSD and parent training for externalizing problems that were comorbid with children's symptoms of PTSD. Analyzed the overall effectiveness

Li, X. Rong

333

Graduate Student Guidelines Ph.D. Program  

E-print Network

..........................................................................................................................................3 Minimum Number of Credits for Ph.D. Degree CALENDAR: Fall semester 2012: First day of classes August 20 Last day of classes December 7 Close of Finals week December 14 Spring semester 2013: First day of classes January 22 Last day of classes May 10 Close

334

Rosemarie Hunziker, PhD Program Director  

E-print Network

9/2/2014 1 Rosemarie Hunziker, PhD Program Director Tissue Engineering/Regenerative Medicine Development Just Send It Now it's our turn: The Review Process - Find the Best Review Committee - Understand the Assessment - Respond to the Evaluation TODAY'S AGENDA: THE DEEP DIVE INTO NIH GRANTS ... improving health

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

335

Scholarly Integrity Julie Simpson, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

information ~ http://unh.edu/research/rcr-training- unh #12;GRAD 930: Ethics in Research & Scholarship Data Use of Human Subjects in Research Care & Use of Vertebrate Animals Use of Controlled SubstancesScholarly Integrity at UNH Julie Simpson, Ph.D. Director, Research Integrity Services #12;Scholarly

New Hampshire, University of

336

Scholarly Integrity Julie Simpson, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

- based modules before attendance at in- person sessions #12;GRAD 930: Ethics in Research & Scholarship & Management of Research Data Use of Human Subjects in Research Care & Use of Vertebrate Animals UseScholarly Integrity at UNH Julie Simpson, Ph.D. Director, Research Integrity Services #12;Scholarly

New Hampshire, University of

337

Valerie Paton, Ph.D. Interim Dean  

E-print Network

at Highland Lakes/ Marble Falls Amy Fernandez Administrative Business Assistant FTE 1.0 Jerrie Dooley Advisor Tech University FY13 Transition Julie Martenson. Ph.D. Director TTU at Fredericksburg and TTU at Marble Falls/ Highland Lakes FTE 1.0 Robert Stubblefield Director TTU Center at Junction FTE 1.0 Donna Hamilton

Rock, Chris

338

Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

2010-01-01

339

Effect of electrolyte pH on CIEF with narrow pH range ampholytes.  

PubMed

CIEF of components following sequential injection of ampholytes and the sample zone offers unique advantages for analysis. The most important one of these is the efficient separation of amphoteric compounds having pIs outside the pH range of the ampholytes applied, but the resolution of the components can be increased by an adequate setup in the injection protocol. In this study, the effect of the pH of the anolyte and catholyte on the selectivity and speed of the isoelectric focusing was investigated. Changes in the pH values significantly influenced the resolution and the length of the pH gradient, while changes in the charge state of components were also observed. Three ampholyte solutions (from different suppliers) covering only two pH units were used for the analyses of substituted nitrophenol dyes in uncoated capillary. With appropriate setup, the components, with pIs not covered by the ampholyte pH range, migrated in charged state outside the pH gradient. This phenomenon is preferable for coupling isoelectric focusing to MS detection, by evading the undesirable ion suppression effect of ampholytes. PMID:23086725

Páger, Csilla; Vargová, Andrea; Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Dörnyei, Ágnes; Kilár, Ferenc

2012-11-01

340

Variation in hydraulic conductivity with decreasing pH in a biologically-clogged porous medium (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial biomass can clog porous media and ultimately affect both structural and mineral trapping of CO2 in geological carbon storage reservoirs. Whether biomass can remain intact following a sudden decrease in groundwater pH, a geochemical change associated with CO2 injection, is unclear. We examined this question using twelve biologically-active and three control column-reactor experiments. Cell abundance and distribution was monitored using confocal microscopy, plating, and direct counting. Hydraulic conductivity (K) was monitored using pressure sensors. Growth occurred for four days at neutral pH. During that time, K within the clogged portion of the reactors decreased from 0.013 to 0.0006 cm s-1 on average, a 1.47 log reduction. Next, the pH of the inflowing aqueous medium was lowered to pH 4 in six experiments and pH 5.7 in six experiments. As a result, K increased in five of the pH 4 experiments and two of the pH 5.7 experiments. Despite this increase, however, the columns remained largely clogged. Compared to pre-inoculation K values, log reductions averaged 1.13 and 1.44 in pH 4 and pH 5.7 experiments, respectively. Our findings show that biomass can largely remain intact following acidification and continue to reduce K, even when considerable cell stress and death occurs. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Altman, S. J.; Kirk, M. F.; Santillan, E. U.; McGrath, L. K.

2013-12-01

341

The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student  

PubMed Central

Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one’s life that one spends to “hit the nail on the head” in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are “sine quibus non” for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed.

Skaik, Younis

2014-01-01

342

Logarithmic temperature profiles of turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard convection in the classical and ultimate state for a Prandtl number of 0.8  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on experimental determinations of the temperature field in the interior (bulk) of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection for a cylindrical sample with aspect ratio (diameter over height) of 0.50, both in the classical and in the ultimate state. The Prandtl number was close to 0.8. We find a "logarithmic layer" in which the temperature varies as A*ln(z/L) + B with the distance z from the bottom plate of the sample. The amplitude A varies with radial position r. In the classical state these results are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations (DNS); in the ultimate state there are as yet no DNS. A close analogy between the temperature field in the classical state and the "Law of the Wall" for the time-averaged down-stream velocity in shear flow is discussed.

Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; He, Xiaozhou

2014-11-01

343

PhET Simulation: States of Matter  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation helps learners visualize how molecules behave in solids, liquids, and gases. Add or remove heat and watch the motion of the molecules as they change phase. Push the pump and change the volume of matter in the closed container and watch the pressure gauge respond. More advanced students can compare the potential energy graphs for neon, argon, oxygen, and water -- which all have different interaction potential. Editor's Note: This particular activity would be well paired with the PhET "Gas Properties" simulation, which goes into more depth to explore the behavior of gas molecules in a closed container. Together, the simulations promote understanding of gas laws, states of matter, phase change, and kinetic theory. See Related Materials for a link to an exemplary lesson plan developed to accompany "States of Matter" simulation. This item is part of a larger collection of simulations developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

2011-07-18

344

PhET Simulation: Gravity Force Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive simulation helps the user to visualize the gravitational force that two objects exert on each other. It features two spherical objects whose masses can be changed by the user from 1-100 kg. It was designed to build understanding of how the gravitational force between two objects is affected by their masses and by the distance between them. Also included are teaching tips and lesson plans for use in high school and lower-level undergraduate physical science courses. This item is part of a larger collection of simulations developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET). The simulations are animated, interactive, and game-like environments in which students learn through exploration. All of the simulations are freely available from the PhET web site for incorporation into classes.

2010-11-12

345

Re-envisioning the PhD  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This new site, sponsored by the Pew Charitable Trusts, is home to the Re-envisioning the PhD project, which is tasked with investigating change in doctoral education, in particular, helping to expand the career choices available to PhD students. In the Re-envisioning Project Resources section, visitors will find conference materials, recommendations from studies, summaries of interviews, a bibliography, career resources, and more. The Promising Practices section contains information on the different ways in which groups (universities, associations, organizations, and more) are responding to concerns about doctoral education. The other two main sections of the site, National/ International Resources and News and Updates contain links to even more resources, studies, current news, related projects, and more.

2001-01-01

346

Highlights From PhUn Week 2007  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an article from The Physiologist. "More than 100 APS physiologists volunteered their time in reaching out to more than 3000 students last November during Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn Week), the APS member-based annual outreach program to local area K-12 schools (http://www.PhUnWeek.org). APS members partnered with more than 70 teachers and science educators from across the nation to develop engaging classroom or campus presentations for students at all grade levels, from day care through twelfth grades. The following vignettes are only a few samples of the excitement and fun generated by the focus on the physiology of health and exercise during the first week in November. All events with the primary APS member and lead teacher coordinators are listed in Table 1.".

2008-02-01

347

Bridging the Reef gaps: first evidence for corals surviving under low pH conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following two major extinction events, the late Permian and Triassic/Jurassic, there is a long absence of corals from the geological record followed by a recurrence coral fossils. This unusual disappearance and reappearance, referred to commonly as 'reef gaps', was explained as a failure in sampling effort, and/or the movement of these species into geographic 'refugia' that have not been found. Because the phylogeny of recent corals suggests their origin in the pre-Permian-extinction , an alternative explanation for reef gaps hypothesized that corals have a means of alternating between soft bodies and fossilizing forms. This study supports this hypothesis. Thirty coral fragments from 5 coral colonies of the scleractinian Mediterranean corals Oculina patagonica (encrusting) and Madracis pharencis (bulbous) were subjected to pH 7.4-7.6 (in accordance with the pH projected by the IPCC for the year 2300) and 30 fragments to pH 8.0-8.3 (ambient) over a period of 12 months. 100% of the colonies in the experiment and 90% of all polyps survived to the end the experiment. The corals grown in acidified conditions, where skeleton-building conditions were absent, maintained basic life functions as a solitary skeleton-less ecophenotype resembling a sea anemone. On an evolutionary scale, these results provide a possible explanation to coral survival over major extinction events such as the Permian/Triassic and Triassic/Jurassic events. It is important to note that these results only demonstrate that corals can persist as soft bodied ecophoenotypes, but the loss of reef framework has major ramifications to the entire structure and function of coral reef ecosystems, ultimately impacting the services they provide to human society.

Tchernov, D.; Fine, M.

2007-12-01

348

MRF with adjustable pH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deterministic final polishing of high precision optics using sub-aperture processing with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is an accepted practice throughout the world. A wide variety of materials can be successfully worked with aqueous (pH 10), magnetorheological (MR) fluids, using magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) and either ceria or nanodiamond nonmagnetic abrasives. Polycrystalline materials like zinc sulfide (ZnS) and zinc selenide (ZnSe) are

Stephen D. Jacobs

2011-01-01

349

Hua Zhang, PhD, Biologist  

Cancer.gov

Hua Zhang received his Bachelor of Medicine at Shanghai Second Medical University then a PhD in Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Arizona. Dr. Zhang has had a longstanding interest in the development of immunotherapies for cancer. He first postdoctoral fellowship was in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Texas where he worked to develop scFv antibody derived biologics (Zhang et al, Cancer Research 1995) and then he subsequently studied with Dr.

350

Peter F. Carmeliet, MD, PhD  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Peter Carmeliet is Director of the VIB — Vesalius Research Center, at the University of Leuven in Belgium. He graduated as Doctor in Medicine in 1984, and completed his Ph.D. in Medicine in 1989. After his return to Leuven in 1992, Dr. Carmeliet started his own research group with a focus on how blood vessels grow (angiogenesis) in health and disease. By developing transgenic mice lacking VEGF, he discovered that VEGF is a key player in angiogenesis. Dr.

351

PH 501 Philosophy of Christian Religion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aristotle, Categories, Section I. Translated by E. M. Edghill; Provided by The Internet Classics Archive. Available online at http:\\/\\/classics.mit.edu\\/\\/Aristotle\\/categories.html Hasker, William, Metaphysics, Downers Grove, IVP, 1983. Helm, Paul, Objective Knowledge, Leicester: InterVarsity Press, 1987. - selections Ille, George, Hermeneutical Explorations of Agency as Prolegomena for a Theological Epistemology, PhD Thesis, King’s College, University of London, 2000). – selections (provided in

George Ille

2003-01-01

352

PhET Simulation: Charges and Fields  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation allows users to move point charges in an electric field. Tools allow them to display voltage, field lines, and equipotential lines surrounding a point charge. Users may add, move, or delete charges and view the resulting changes. This item is part of a larger collection of materials developed and maintained by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET) based on principles of physics education research.

2008-11-20

353

PhET Simulation: Balloons & Buoyancy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet experiments with a helium balloon, a hot air balloon, or a rigid sphere filled with different gases. The user can discover what makes some balloons float and others sink. Teaching ideas and activities are included. The direct link to the simulation is given as a mirror URL. This is part of a larger collection developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

2008-07-15

354

Not Your Father's Ph.D.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes how the author, a devoted blogger, confronts his fear that his virtual life is damaging his career prospects in academe. As a new Ph.D. in religious studies, the author has every reason to believe he will find a tenure-track job. He has read the numbers and know that, on average, job candidates spend two to five years in…

Withrow, Brandon G.

2008-01-01

355

Highlights from PhUn Week 2010  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article is on pages 59-60 of the PDF file. Nearly 9,000 students from kindergarten through twelfth grade met a physiologist during Physiology Understanding Week (http://www.PhUnWeek.org). As part of the APS member-based annual outreach program to local classrooms in the fall, the visits and engaging activities highlighted physiology topics ranging from exercise and health, respiration, anatomy,and thermoregulation.

APS Education Office (American Physiological Society Education Office)

2011-04-01

356

Cellulose based bulk pH optomembranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents an efficient technique for the preparation of pH-sensitive bulk optomembranes for fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS). The method is based on the physical entrapment of the reagent molecules in the bulk of cellulose acetate membranes. The durable immobilization of a pH indicator is achieved by the addition of an appropriate ion-balance reagent to the cellulose matrix. The

Wojciech Wróblewski; Ewa Ro?niecka; Artur Dybko; Zbigniew Brzózka

1998-01-01

357

Robert S. Kerbel, PhD  

Cancer.gov

After graduating from the University of Toronto, Dr. Robert Kerbel commenced graduate studies receiving a PhD in 1972; he then undertook postdoctoral training in London after which he started his independent research program in 1975 at Queen's University in Kingston, in the Cancer Research Laboratories, becoming its Director in 1981. In 1985 he was recruited to develop and direct a cancer biology research division at Mt.

358

Steven Highfill PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow  

Cancer.gov

Steven Highfill received his Bachelor of Science in Biology at the University of South Florida (USF) and pursued research at the Moffitt Cancer Research Center, which primarily focused on studying the molecular interactions of a novel gene (LRBA) implicated in cancer cell growth and survival. Steven then received his Ph.D. from the Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology (MICaB) graduate program at the University of Minnesota under the direction of Dr. Bruce Blazar.

359

Advancing the Science of Team Science Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, Ph.D.1  

E-print Network

Advancing the Science of Team Science Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, Ph.D.1 , Katy Börner, Ph.D.2 , Noshir Contractor, Ph.D.3 , Stephen M. Fiore, Ph.D.4 , Kara L. Hall, Ph.D.5 , Joann Keyton, Ph.D.6 , Bonnie Spring, Ph.D.7 , Daniel Stokols, Ph.D.8 , William Trochim, Ph.D.9 , and Brian Uzzi, Ph.D.10 DOI

Indiana University

360

The Ph.D. in Communication: 2013 -2014  

E-print Network

, media forms and social contexts. The graduate program blends two traditions: critical communication ultimately with the Department of Communication faculty as a whole. Requirements and policies change. New we vigorously engage in the social investigation and transformation of communication practices

361

The Ph.D. in Communication: 2012 -2013  

E-print Network

, media forms and social contexts. The graduate program blends two traditions: critical communication ultimately with the Department of Communication faculty as a whole. Requirements and policies change. New we vigorously engage in the social investigation and transformation of communication practices

362

¹³C, ¹?N and ¹H backbone and side chain chemical shift assignment of acid-stress bacterial chaperone HdeA at pH 6.  

PubMed

HdeA is a small chaperone found in the periplasm of several common pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri and Brucella abortus) which are the leading causes of dysentery worldwide, especially in developing countries. Its job is to protect other periplasmic proteins from aggregating as the bacteria pass through the low pH environment of the human stomach on their way to infect the intestines. HdeA is an inactive folded dimer at neutral pH, but becomes a disordered active monomer at pH < 3. To initiate NMR characterization of HdeA at pH 6, 94% of the backbone and 86% of the side chain chemical shifts have been assigned. The loop linking helices B and C remains largely unassigned due to missing peaks in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC and other spectra, most likely due to intermediate timescale chemical exchange. Many of the weakest intensity backbone peaks correspond to residues that surround this loop within the tertiary structure. Assignment experiments have therefore helped to provide preliminary clues about the region of the protein that may be most responsible for initiating unfolding as the pH drops, and constitute an important first step in improving our understanding of, and ultimately combatting, HdeA activity. PMID:23835624

Crowhurst, K A

2014-10-01

363

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Susan Kane, Ph.D.  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Susan Kane, Ph.D. Home Disparities Research Programs CRCHD Ongoing Research PACHE PACHE Partnership Listing Susan Kane, Ph.D. CRCHD Research Ongoing Research

364

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Susan Kane, Ph.D.  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Susan Kane, Ph.D. Home Health Disparities Research CRCHD Research Ongoing Research PACHE PACHE Partnership Listing Susan Kane, Ph.D. CRCHD Research Ongoing Research

365

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Bruce Macher, Ph.D.  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Bruce Macher, Ph.D. Home Disparities Research Programs CRCHD Ongoing Research PACHE PACHE Partnership Listing Bruce Macher, Ph.D. CRCHD Research Ongoing Research

366

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Bruce Macher, Ph.D.  

Cancer.gov

CRCHD - CRCHD Research - Principal Investigator: Bruce Macher, Ph.D. Home Health Disparities Research CRCHD Research Ongoing Research PACHE PACHE Partnership Listing Bruce Macher, Ph.D. CRCHD Research Ongoing

367

Vaginal pH: Home-Use Tests  

MedlinePLUS

... Vitro Diagnostics Home Use Tests Cholesterol Hepatitis C Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Menopause Fecal Occult Blood Ovulation (Saliva Test) Ovulation (Urine Test) Pregnancy Prothrombin Vaginal pH Vaginal pH What does this test do? This ...

368

SEEDLING EFFECT ON ROOT SUBSTRATE pH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paper used for seed germination tests may or may not contain limestone. The presence of limestone presented a pH buffer in this study that could interfere with studies addressing pH, calcium (Ca), or magnesium (Mg) effects on seedling development. Alternatively, pH of unbuffered chromatography paper was changed sufficiently by seedlings to confound research objectives that are pH dependent. Gradients across

Jin-Sheng Huang; Paul V. Nelson; Ji-Weon Lee

2001-01-01

369

Conceptual model of digital pH meter in telemedicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

pH level plays a vital role in the maintenance of human metabolic activity. pH levels of different bodily fluids i.e. blood, serum, urine etc are important parameters in diagnosing any condition, as unbalanced pH levels can interrupt all cellular activities and corrodes body tissues. In this paper a concept of implementing pH parameters in HL7v3 that is XML based is

Rabiya Rehman; Murtaza Halai

2011-01-01

370

Acidogenesis of dairy wastewater at various pH levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Continuous experiments were conducted to study the influence of pH in the range 4.0-6.5 on the acidification of dairy wastewater at 37°C with 12 hours of hydraulic retention in an upflow reactor. Results showed that degradation of dairy pollutants increased with pH from pH 4.0 to 5.5. At pH 5.5, 95% of carbohydrate, 82% of protein and 41% of lipid

H.-Q. Yu; H. H. P. Fang

2002-01-01

371

Ph.D. Program Handbook Industrial & Systems Engineering Department  

E-print Network

Ph.D. Program Handbook Industrial & Systems Engineering Department Wayne State University 4815-8833 http://www.ise.wayne.edu Last Revision: December 17, 2010 Table of Contents Ph.D. Admissions.................................................................................................... 2 General Instructions for Applying to the Ph.D. Program

Berdichevsky, Victor

372

Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring using a wireless system  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesLimitations of catheter-based esophageal pH monitoring are discomfort, inconvenience, and interference with normal activity. An alternative to conventional pH monitoring is the wireless Medtronic Bravo pH System. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, performance, and tolerability of this system.

John E Pandolfino; Joel E Richter; Tina Ours; Jason M Guardino; Jennifer Chapman; Peter J Kahrilas

2003-01-01

373

21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400... Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure...

2012-04-01

374

21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400... Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure...

2011-04-01

375

21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400... Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure...

2014-04-01

376

Investigating pH of common household substances  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is a classroom lab where students test common household liquids for pH level on the pH continuum, 1-14. They compare and contrast everyday use of the liquids, and how this relates to the liquids' pH property.

377

Intelligent Best Practices Analysis Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

Intelligent Best Practices Analysis Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Ph.D. West Virginia University 1 A New. Mohaghegh, Ph.D. West Virginia University 2 was performed both for gas and oil bearing formations. The Best Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Ph.D. West Virginia University 3 algorithms and fuzzy logic to achieve its objective

Mohaghegh, Shahab

378

21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400... Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure...

2013-04-01

379

21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400... Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure...

2010-04-01

380

Nutrient Management Module No. 8 Soil pH and  

E-print Network

4449-8 May 2009 Nutrient Management Module No. 8 Soil pH and Organic Matter by Ann McCauley, Soil a list of additional resources and contacts for those wanting more in-depth information about soil pH with the focus on soil pH and organic matter: soil reactions and soil amendments, and soil test reports

Lawrence, Rick L.

381

Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

1989-01-01

382

EFFECTS OF pH ON ELECTROFLOTATION OF SPHALERITE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electroflotation studies on sphalerite fine particles, conducted under careful pH control using buffer electrolytes, reveal that for either H2 or 02 electrolytic gases there exists an optimum pH range at which electroflotation is most effective. This can be explained by the observed dependence of electrolytic gas bubble size on the pH of the electrolyte.

C. LLERENA; J. C. K. HO; D. L. PIRON

1996-01-01

383

Writing your own activities - PhET Activity Guidelines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You can create your own lectures, homework, and labs around any PhET simulation by using the PhET Activity Guidelines . These guidelines will help you create "guided inquiry activities which encourage students to construct their own understanding," which are the most effective way to use PhET simulations.

Sam McKagan

384

Summary PhD candidate satisfaction survey 2011 Introduction  

E-print Network

D candidates completed their prior education in the Netherlands. The majority of them are from Germany, Italy combine a PhD with other activities) make up 12 percent of the PhD population. Funding Most PhD tracks

Utrecht, Universiteit

385

EFFECT OF DIET pH ON THE CONSUMPTION, BROOD REARING, AND pH OF WORKER JELLY  

E-print Network

EFFECT OF DIET pH ON THE CONSUMPTION, BROOD REARING, AND pH OF WORKER JELLY PRODUCED BY CAGED HONEY Laboratory, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA SUMMARY There were no significant differences in the pH of worker jelly produced by caged bees offered a pollen substitute ranging in pH from 4.1-8.0. Over 80 % of all jelly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

386

PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

2008-01-01

387

On the ?? to ? transformation in maraging (grade 350), PH 13-8 Mo and 17-4 PH steels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The martensite to austenite transformation during continuous heating was studied over a range of heating rates for 350 grade maraging steel (M350), PH 13-8 Mo, and 17-4 PH stainless steel using a programmable dilatometer. The ???? transformation splits into two steps at lower heating rates for the M350 and PH 13-8 Mo, whereas occurs in one step for 17-4 PH.

Rajeev Kapoor; I. S. Batra

2004-01-01

388

Carolyn Bliss, PhD Jeff Webb, PhD Carolan Ownby, PhD Director of LEAP Associate Director of LEAP c.ownby@leap.utah.edu  

E-print Network

Carolyn Bliss, PhD Jeff Webb, PhD Carolan Ownby, PhD Director of LEAP Associate Director of LEAP c.ownby@leap.utah.edu c.bliss@leap.utah.edu Jeff.Webb@utah.edu Director of the Peer Advisors 801 581-3283 801 581-3214 801 International LEAP Liz Taylor Dylan Mace liz.taylor@utah.edu d.mace@leap.utah.edu 801 581-8920 801 581

389

PH phenomena in relation to stomatal opening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The following figures are the main pH optima for stomatal opening found for the various species in the three main buffer solutions used, in the ordercitrate, acetate, phosphate.1.Coffea arabica — 5.6, 5.7, 6.6.2.Kniphofia sp. — 5.6, 5.9, 6.0 (also 4.8 for citrate, 4.5 for acetate).3.Vicia faba leaf — 5.1, 5.0, 7.9 (also 3.3 for citrate and 6.2 for acetate).4.Narcissus

J. Small; K. M. Maxwell

1939-01-01

390

PhET Simulation: Reactions & Rates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This applet is designed for study of the kinetics of chemical reactions. It uses a model gas of three atomic species to illustrate the formation and disassociation of the different possible diatomic molecules. The user can run experiments with either one of each atom type or a gas of many atoms, controlling the density of the various species, the temperature, and energetics of the reaction. Data collection tools are available to calculate rate coefficients. Tips for teachers, ideas and activities are included. The direct link to the simulation is given as a mirror URL. This is part of a larger collection developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

2008-11-03

391

PhET Simulation: Battery Voltage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page contains a simple Java applet that gives users a look inside a battery to see how it works. It features a cross-sectional battery filled with blue spheres representing charges. As users change the voltage, little stick figures move the blue charges from one end of the battery to the other. A voltmeter displays the resulting battery voltage. Students must determine which side of the battery is positive or negative from the information at hand. This item is part of a larger collection of materials developed and maintained by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET) based on principles of physics education research.

2008-11-19

392

PhET Simulation: Energy Skate Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive simulation allows students to explore energy concepts by studying the motion of a skateboarder. The user can design ramps, jumps, and arbitrarily shaped tracks and observe the subsequent motion. The mass of the skateboarder, gravitational constant, and friction of the track can all be modified. A measuring tape is available for making measurements of height and distance. The relationships between kinetic, potential, thermal, and total energy are illustrated by simultaneous graphs of energy vs. time and energy vs. position. This item is part of a larger collection of interactive simulations developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

2006-10-03

393

PhET Simulation: Simplified MRI  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an interactive simulation on the topic of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The user can change the applied magnetic field and the RF signal and observe the effect on magnetic spins. In the NMR mode, the user can choose between different atoms. In the MRI mode, the user can include gradients to the magnetic field and add a tumor to the head being visualized. This is part of a larger collection developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

2010-03-12

394

Biotechnology Curriculum Freshmen Year: pH  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

During this unit, students will be learning about the terms acid and base. Water is neutral and can be formed from equal amounts of acid and base. What makes a solution an acid? What makes it a base? How is this important to living things? Most living things exist in a pH around 7.0, which is neutral. If they are exposed to either basic or acidic solutions they will be injured or die. Students will learn how to measure the amount of acid or base present in a solution using an indicator dye present in red cabbage.

Kurtz, Mary Jane

395

PhD School of the Politecnico di Milano Regulations of the PhD Programme in  

E-print Network

PhD School of the Politecnico di Milano Regulations of the PhD Programme in: BIOENGINEERING Cycle Engineering. Bio-artificial interfaces and devices. Neuro-prostheses. Movement analysis. Cardiovascular and Chemical Engineering Department. The PhD Board is responsible of all the candidate activities. The external

396

Time course of pH change in plant epidermis using microscopic pH imaging system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We established a microscopic pH imaging system to track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis in vivo. In the previous research, we have found out that anthocyanin containing cells have higher pH. However, it was not clear whether the anthocyanin increased the pH or anthocyanin was synthesized result from the higher pH. Therefore, we further investigated the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change. To track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis, we established a system using luminescent imaging technique. We used HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-Trisulfonate) as pH indicator and applied excitation ratio imaging method. Luminescent image was converted to a pH distribution by obtained in vitro calibration using known pH solution. Cellular level observation was enabled by merging microscopic color picture of the same region to the pH change image. The established system was applied to epidermal cells of red-tip leaf lettuce, Lactuca Sativa L. and the time course was tracked in the growth process. We would discuss about the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change in plant epidermis.

Dan, Risako; Shimizu, Megumi; Kazama, Haruko; Sakaue, Hirotaka

2010-11-01

397

Roadmap: Public Health Pre-Medicine Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-PMD  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Pre-Medicine ­Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-PMD] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 11-Jun-12/LNHD This roadmap I Laboratory 1 PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First

Sheridan, Scott

398

Roadmap: Public Health Pre-Medicine Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-PMD  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Pre-Medicine ­Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-PMD] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap Fulfills Kent Core Additional PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

399

Calculation of Estimated Ultimate Recovery for wells in continuous-type oil and gas accumulations of the Uinta-Piceance Province  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The calculation of Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) from oil and gas production data of individual wells and the development of EUR distributions from all producing wells in an assessment unit are important steps in the quantitative assessment of continuous-type hydrocarbon resources. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a method of calculating EURs for wells in continuous-type accumulations, including coal-bed gas accumulations. The EUR distribution of producing wells is used as a guide for the estimation of an EUR distribution for potential wells in areas of undiscovered resources. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Cook, T.

2003-01-01

400

The pH of Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Viking labeled release (LR) experiments provided data that can be used to determine the acid-base characteristics of the regolith. Constraints on the acid-base properties and redox potentials of the Martian surface material would provide additional information for determining what reactions are possible and defining formation conditions for the regolith. Calculations devised to determine the pH of Mars must include the amount of soluble acid species or base species present in the LR regolith sample and the solubility product of the carbonate with the limiting solubility. This analysis shows that CaCO3, either as calcite or aragonite, has the correct K(sub sp) to have produced the Viking LR successive injection reabsorption effects. Thus CaCO3 or another MeCO3 with very similar solubility characteristics must have been present on Mars. A small amount of soluble acid, but no more than 4 micro-mol per sample, could also have been present. It is concluded that the pH of the regolith is 7.2 +/- 0.1.

Plumb, R. C.; Bishop, J. L.; Edwards, J. O.

1993-01-01

401

PhET Simulation: Balancing Chemical Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation provides practice for beginners in balancing chemical equations. Introductory activities include separating a water molecule and making ammonia (a compound composed of sodium and hydrogen). The user clicks up or down arrows to add/delete atoms, while bar charts and balance scales are displayed to show when the equation is in balance. Next, apply what you've learned and play the "Balancing Game", with three levels of difficulty. Editor's Note: The game-like nature of this activity not only gives students practice with chemical equations, but goes much deeper. By viewing the distribution of individual atoms in real-time charts alongside the equation, the learner is building a basis to understand conservation of matter and chemical interactions. See Related Materials for a link to downloadable lessons and student guides developed specifically for use with this PhET simulation. This item is part of a larger collection of simulations developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

2011-08-15

402

Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

2014-01-01

403

Nanomechanical DNA Origami pH Sensors  

PubMed Central

Single-molecule pH sensors have been developed by utilizing molecular imaging of pH-responsive shape transition of nanomechanical DNA origami devices with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Short DNA fragments that can form i-motifs were introduced to nanomechanical DNA origami devices with pliers-like shape (DNA Origami Pliers), which consist of two levers of 170-nm long and 20-nm wide connected at a Holliday-junction fulcrum. DNA Origami Pliers can be observed as in three distinct forms; cross, antiparallel and parallel forms, and cross form is the dominant species when no additional interaction is introduced to DNA Origami Pliers. Introduction of nine pairs of 12-mer sequence (5?-AACCCCAACCCC-3?), which dimerize into i-motif quadruplexes upon protonation of cytosine, drives transition of DNA Origami Pliers from open cross form into closed parallel form under acidic conditions. Such pH-dependent transition was clearly imaged on mica in molecular resolution by AFM, showing potential application of the system to single-molecular pH sensors. PMID:25325338

Kuzuya, Akinori; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Yusei; Tamaki, Takuya; Kaino, Masafumi; Ohya, Yuichi

2014-01-01

404

Nanomechanical DNA origami pH sensors.  

PubMed

Single-molecule pH sensors have been developed by utilizing molecular imaging of pH-responsive shape transition of nanomechanical DNA origami devices with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Short DNA fragments that can form i-motifs were introduced to nanomechanical DNA origami devices with pliers-like shape (DNA Origami Pliers), which consist of two levers of 170-nm long and 20-nm wide connected at a Holliday-junction fulcrum. DNA Origami Pliers can be observed as in three distinct forms; cross, antiparallel and parallel forms, and cross form is the dominant species when no additional interaction is introduced to DNA Origami Pliers. Introduction of nine pairs of 12-mer sequence (5'-AACCCCAACCCC-3'), which dimerize into i-motif quadruplexes upon protonation of cytosine, drives transition of DNA Origami Pliers from open cross form into closed parallel form under acidic conditions. Such pH-dependent transition was clearly imaged on mica in molecular resolution by AFM, showing potential application of the system to single-molecular pH sensors. PMID:25325338

Kuzuya, Akinori; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Yusei; Tamaki, Takuya; Kaino, Masafumi; Ohya, Yuichi

2014-01-01

405

Tapered optical fibres for local pH detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with preparation of optical probes based on tapered optical fibres and their using for local detection of pH in samples simulating native conditions of plant cells. Optical probes, so-called V-tapers were prepared for this purpose. Fluorescence pH transducer 2',7'-Bis(2-carbonylethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein was immobilized onto the end-face of cut V-tapers in a thin xerogel layer. Changes of fluorescence-intensity spectra caused by pH changes were employed for pH measurements. Indium-tin oxide or aluminium coated fibre probes with suitable optical and mechanical properties were successfully tested. It has been confirmed that the selected pH transducer is suitable for pH detection from 5.0 to 7.0. This approach has allowed us to determine extra-cellular pH of in-vitro samples.

Martan, T.; Pospisilova, M.; Aubrecht, J.; Mrazek, J.; Podrazky, O.; Kasik, I.; Matejec, V.

2010-02-01

406

Line positions and intensities of the phosphine (PH3) Pentad near 4.5 ?m  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to improve the spectroscopic database for remote sensing of the giant planets, line positions and intensities are determined for the five bands (2?2, ?2 + ?4, 2?4, ?1 and ?3) that comprise the Pentad of PH3 between 1950 and 2450 cm-1. Knowledge of PH3 spectral line parameters in this region is important for the exploration of dynamics and chemistry on Saturn, (using existing Cassini/VIMS observations) and future near-IR data of Jupiter from Juno and ESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). For this study, spectra of pure PH3 from two Fourier transform spectrometers were obtained: (a) five high-resolution (0.00223 cm-1), high signal-to-noise (?1800) spectra recorded at room temperature (298.2 K) with the Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington and (b) four high-resolution (at 0.0115 cm-1 resolution), high signal-to-noise (?700) spectra recorded at room temperature in the region 1800-5200 cm-1 using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak. Individual line parameters above 2150 cm-1 were retrieved by simultaneous multispectrum fittings of all five Bruker spectra, while retrievals with the four Kitt Peak spectra were done in the 1938-2168 cm-1 range spectrum by spectrum and averaged. In all, positions and intensities were obtained for more than 4400 lines. These included 53 A+A- split pairs of transitions (arising due to vibration-rotation interactions (Coriolis-type interaction) between the ?3 and ?1 fundamental bands) for K? = 3, 6, and 9. Over 3400 positions and 1750 intensities of these lines were ultimately identified as relatively unblended and modeled up to J = 14 and K = 12 with rms values of 0.00133 cm-1 and 7.7%, respectively. The PH3 line parameters (observed positions and measured intensities with known quantum assignments) and Hamiltonian constants are reported. Comparisons with other recent studies are discussed.

Malathy Devi, V.; Kleiner, Isabelle; Sams, Robert L.; Brown, Linda R.; Benner, D. Chris; Fletcher, Leigh N.

2014-04-01

407

Line positions and intensities of the phosphine (PH3) Pentad near 4.5 ?m  

SciTech Connect

In order to improve the spectroscopic database for remote sensing of the giant planets, line positions and intensities are determined for the five bands (2?2, ?2 + ?4, 2?4, ?1 and ?3) that comprise the Pentad of PH3 between 1950 and 2450 cm?1. Knowledge of PH3 spectral line parameters in this region is important for the exploration of dynamics and chemistry on Saturn, (using existing Cassini/VIMS observations) and future near-IR data of Jupiter from Juno and ESA’s Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). For this study, spectra of pure PH3 from two Fourier transform spectrometers were obtained: (a) five high-resolution (0.00223 cm?1), high signal-to-noise (?1800) spectra recorded at room temperature (298.2 K) with the Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington and (b) four high-resolution (at 0.0115 cm?1 resolution), high signal-to-noise (?700) spectra recorded at room temperature in the region 1800–5200 cm?1 using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer located at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak. Individual line parameters above 2150 cm?1 were retrieved by simultaneous multispectrum fittings of all five Bruker spectra, while retrievals with the four Kitt Peak spectra were done in the 1938–2168 cm?1 range spectrum by spectrum and averaged. In all, positions and intensities were obtained for more than 4400 lines. These included 53 A+A? split pairs of transitions (arising due to vibration–rotation interactions (Coriolis-type interaction) between the ?3 and ?1 fundamental bands) for K? = 3, 6, and 9. Over 3400 positions and 1750 intensities of these lines were ultimately identified as relatively unblended and modeled up to J = 14 and K = 12 with rms values of 0.00133 cm?1 and 7.7%, respectively. The PH3 line parameters (observed positions and measured intensities with known quantum assignments) and Hamiltonian constants are reported. Comparisons with other recent studies are discussed.

Devi, V. Malathy; Kleiner, Isabelle; Sams, Robert L.; Brown, Linda R.; Benner, D. C.; Fletcher, Leigh N.

2014-04-01

408

The National Institute of Nursing Research Graduate Partnerships Program (NINR-GPP): an opportunity for PhD students.  

PubMed

The Institutional Graduate Partnerships Program (GPP) offered by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) provides an exceptional opportunity for students who are enrolled in any PhD program in nursing across the nation to complete dissertation research on the premier research campus of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. The goal of this doctoral fellowship program, which is up to 3 years in length, is to train promising doctoral students in basic and clinical research. This knowledge and skill set is necessary for the next generation of nurse scientists to ultimately conduct translational research. In this article, the authors describe the program, eligibility requirements, application procedures, and selection criteria for NINR-supported GPP nursing students. Also provided are tips for interested students and outcomes of current and former NINR-supported GPP students (NINR-GPP). PMID:25261387

Engler, Mary B; Austin, Joan K; Grady, Patricia

2014-01-01

409

Elementary PhUn Fair - PhUn Week Poster Session EB 2012  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Approximately 40 high school students, enrolled in the Clinton High School Human Anatomy & Physiology course, organized and hosted a community PhUn Fair. During a week early in the semester, students researched various human physiological systems. The following week, students developed and planned learning stations based on their research. Students received input and feedback from a visiting physiologist, their instructor, and their peers. The culminating event was the PhUn Fair, during which more than 100 second-graders spent an afternoon rotating through eight active learning stations taught by the high school students. All learning stations introduced a different physiological concept through inquiry-based activities. The PhUn Fair concluded with a question and answer period with the visiting physiologist. While the high school students conducted the research and planning during the two weeks prior to the PhUn Fair, initial organization was conducted by the authors during the APS Frontiers in Physiology Fellowship summer research experience. P. Schork was supported by 2011 The American Physiological Society Frontiers in Physiology Fellowship.

Pauline Schork (Clinton High School)

2012-04-22

410

Key role of work hardening in superconductivity/superfluidity, heat conductivity and ultimate strain increase, evolution, cancer, aging and other phase transitions  

E-print Network

The shear/laminar flow of liquids/gas/plasma/biological cells (BC), etc. is equivalent to dislocation-like shear of solids. The turbulent flow is the next stage of deformation/ multiplication of dislocation-like defects and their ordering in sub-grains and grain-boundaries, then grains slip-rotation in the direction approximately perpendicular to the shear flow. It is shown that phase transitions are governed by unified deformation hardening/softening under hydrostatic pressure, particle irradiation and impurity (isotope) chemical pressure, hard confining conditions and cooling, etc. thus changing electric, magnetic, ferroelectric, thermal, optical properties.1-2 Dislocation-like work hardening, DWH, is determined by non-monotonous properties of dislocation double edge-cross-jog slip, and ultrastrong DWH gives the lowest drag for any dislocation-like plasticity at phase transitions. This provides the same micromechanisms of the ultimate stage of conventional deformation (superfluidity) of ordinary liquids, i.e., water, kerosene and glycerin, liquid and solid He, quasi-particle condensates. The key role of DWH is confirmed for superconductivity, integer and fractional quantum Hall effects and the enhancement of ultimate strain and diffusion under deformation down to nanostructures, etc. Phase transformations in biological cells (explosive events of diversity and population of species and diseases - for example, locust and plaque bacteria, evolution, aging and cancer,2 bursts in the development of human intellectual possibilities (languages, culture, arts and sciences, history, etc.) depend on the same deformation effects in biological evolution.

V. P. Kisel

2009-05-27

411

Simultaneous monitoring of gastric and oesophageal pH reveals limitations of conventional oesophageal pH monitoring in milk fed infants  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUNDMonitoring oesophageal pH conventionally detects “acid reflux” (pH less than 4). The pH of the gastric contents determines whether or not reflux can be detected.AIMTo monitor gastric and oesophageal pH simultaneously in order to determine the effect of milk feeds on gastric pH and how this would influence interpretation of the oesophageal pH record.METHODSMilk fed infants for whom oesophageal pH

D J Mitchell; B G McClure; T R J Tubman

2001-01-01

412

Should MD-PhD Programs Encourage Graduate Training in Disciplines Beyond Conventional Biomedical or Clinical Sciences?  

PubMed

The goal of MD-PhD training programs is to produce physician-scientists with unique capacities to lead the future biomedical research workforce. The current dearth of physician-scientists with expertise outside conventional biomedical or clinical sciences raises the question of whether MD-PhD training programs should allow or even encourage scholars to pursue doctoral studies in disciplines that are deemed nontraditional, yet are intrinsically germane to major influences on health. This question is especially relevant because the central value and ultimate goal of the academic medicine community is to help attain the highest level of health and health equity for all people. Advances in medical science and practice, along with improvements in health care access and delivery, are steps toward health equity, but alone they will not come close to eliminating health inequalities. Addressing the complex health issues in our communities and society as a whole requires a biomedical research workforce with knowledge, practice, and research skills well beyond conventional biomedical or clinical sciences. To make real progress in advancing health equity, educational pathways must prepare physician-scientists to treat both micro and macro determinants of health. The authors argue that MD-PhD programs should allow and encourage their scholars to cross boundaries into less traditional disciplines such as epidemiology, statistics, anthropology, sociology, ethics, public policy, management, economics, education, social work, informatics, communications, and marketing. To fulfill current and coming health care needs, nontraditional MD-PhD students should be welcomed and supported as valuable members of our biomedical research workforce. PMID:25354071

O'Mara, Ryan J; Hsu, Stephen I; Wilson, Daniel R

2015-02-01

413

Some Effects of Low pH on Chloride  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT In order to test the range of pH values over which the titratable carrier model for inorganic anion exchange is valid, chloride self-exchange across human red blood cells was examined between pH 4.75 and 5.7 at 0°C. It was found that chloride self-exchange flux had a minimum near pH 5 and increased again with further increase in hydrogen ion activity. The Arrhenius activation energy for chloride exchange was greatly reduced at low pH values. The chloride flux at pH 5. l did not show the saturation kinetics reported at higher pH values but was proportional to the value of the chloride concentration squared. In addition, the extent of inhibition of chloride self-exchange flux by phlorctin was reduced at low pH. Our interpretation of these findings is that the carrier-mediated flux becomes a progressively smaller fraction of the total flux at lower pH values and that a different transport mode requiring two chloride ions to form the pcrmeant species and having a low specificity and temperature dependence becomes significant below pH 5. A possible mechanism for this transport is that chloride crosses red cell membranes as dimers of HCI at these very low pH values.

Exchange Human; Red Blood Cells; R. B. Gunn; J. O. Wieth; D. C. Tosteson

414

Derivatization of deltahedral Zintl ions by nucleophilic addition: [Ph-Ge9-SbPh2]2- and [Ph2Sb-Ge9-Ge9-SbPh2]4-.  

PubMed

The type of the reactions of addition of exo-bonded groups to deltahedral Zintl ions such as Ge9(n-) has been established as addition of anionic nucleophiles. Various nucleophiles such as Ph2Bi-, Ph2Sb-, Ph- interact with the relatively low-lying LUMO of Ge9(2-) and/or the half filled HOMO of Ge9(3-) and bond to the clusters. The title anions, characterized in their (K-crypt) salts where crypt = 4,7,13,16,21,24-hexaoxa-1,10-diazabicyclo-[8.8.8]-hexacosane, and the previously characterized [Ph2Sb-Ge9-SbPh2](2-) are made by a reaction of K4Ge9 with SbPh3 in ethylenediamine. [Ph-Ge9-SbPh2](2-) is the first ogranically functionalized deltahedral Zintl ion, i.e., a deltahedral ion with a direct carbon-cluster covalent bond, that can exists without the substituents as well. The Ge(9) clusters resemble tricapped trigonal prisms with one elongated edge (one of the three edges parallel to the pseudo 3-fold axis). The two substituents are always bonded to the vertexes of such an elongated edge. The same is true for the intercluster bond in [Ph2Sb-Ge9-Ge9-SbPh2)](4-). PMID:14611242

Ugrinov, Angel; Sevov, Slavi C

2003-11-19

415

PhET Simulation: Magnet and Compass  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this simulation, students explore how a compass works to point to Earth's poles. By moving a virtual compass around a bar magnet, users can predict the direction of the magnetic field for different locations. Now superimpose a planet Earth over the bar magnet and see the surprising results in the orientation of the poles! The simulation can be adapted well for use in middle school. For older students, add the field meter. Editor's Note: In a unit on magnetism, teachers may wish to introduce a hands-on experiment prior to introducing the simulation. See Related Materials for recommended hands-on magnet labs. This resource is part of a large collection of simulations developed by the Physics Education Technology project (PhET).

2011-01-23

416

Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD  

PubMed Central

This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

Brown, Douglas M

2004-01-01

417

Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.  

PubMed

Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

2014-08-01

418

In Memoriam; Recent Ph.D.; Honors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Byron Boville, 51, 6 June 2006; Atmospheric Sciences, 1991 David Cummings, 87, 5 September 2006; retired member, Tectonophysics, 1963 Andrew Godfrey, 66, 18 August 2006; Hydrology, 1995 Henry M. Morris, 87, 26 February 2006; Hydrology, 1948 Fred N. Spiess, 86, 8 September 2006; Life Fellow, Marine Geology and Geophysics, 1957 Recent Ph.D. Jeremy Shannon, Geology, Michigan Technological University, April 2006. ``Development and application of new techniques for sulfur dioxide monitoring at active volcanoes.'' Advisor: Gregg Bluth. Honors Mark D. Zoback of Stanford University received the Emil Wiechert Medal in March 2006 from the German Geophysical Society. Zoback was honored for his original and essential scientific contributions to the investigation of the distribution of tectonic stresses on the globe and at depth, which are fundamental for the understanding of the tectonic processes in the lithosphere.

2006-10-01

419

Urostomy and urinary pH.  

PubMed

Significant variations of urinary pH can cause problems for all human beings, but these problems are magnified when an individual has a urostomy. Most significant stomal and peristomal complications are related to an alkaline urine including hyperkeratosis; stoma bleeding, incrustation, and ulceration; stoma stenosis; urinary tract infection; odor; and urinary calculi. Treatment of these conditions includes both external and internal measures. External methods of treatment involve keeping urine away from the stoma and the peristomal skin by use of a correctly fitting clean appliance and a night drainage system. Vinegar solution compresses can help to restore the acid mantle of the skin. Internal methods of treatment that are advocated in the literature include ingestion of cranberry juice and ascorbic acid to promote urine acidity. Increasing oral intake of fluids is the least risky method to promote the production of acidic, dilute urine, and results are equally effective. PMID:1637908

Walsh, B A

1992-01-01

420

PhET Simulation: Magnets and Electromagnets  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this interactive simulation, users explore the interactions between a compass and a bar magnet and investigate characteristics of electromagnets. This resource was developed to help students build a foundation to understand electromagnetism and factors affecting magnetic field strength. It is appropriate for use in middle school and high school, and could also be adapted for use in college physics preparatory courses. This resource is part of the PhET project (Physics Education Technology) a growing collection of simulations and curriculum support for teachers and learners of physics, biology, chemistry, and earth science. See Related Items for a link to a standards-based lesson plan and elicitation questions developed specifically to accompany the "Magnets and Electromagnets" simulation.

2010-12-02

421

BREN SCHOOL PH.D. PROGRAM GUIDE 2009-2010 Academic Year  

E-print Network

BREN SCHOOL PH.D. PROGRAM GUIDE 2009-2010 Academic Year TIMELINE SUMMARY ..................................................................................3 THE BREN SCHOOL PH.D. PROGRAM ....................................................4 REQUIRED SCHOOL PH.D. PROGRAM COMMITTEE.......................................................... 4 THE PH

California at Santa Barbara, University of

422

77 FR 64102 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Amended Final Results and Partial...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2012, the Minh Phu Group,\\2\\ Phu Cuong Jostoco Seafood Corporation, Thuan Phuoc...and Trading Corporation; and (3) Phu Cuong Jostoco Seafood Corporation. Furthermore...Joint Stock Company (Nha Trang Fisco) Phu Cuong Seafood Processing and...

2012-10-18

423

Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

1984-01-01

424

Chapter A6. Section 6.4. pH  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurement of pH is critical to the understanding of the viability and vulnerability of environmental waters and is considered a master variable in determining the aqueous geochemistry of an aqueous system. pH is a measure that represents the hydrogen-ion concentration (activity) of a solution. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for measurement of pH in ground and surface waters.

Wilde, Franceska D.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Radtke, Dean B.

2006-01-01

425

Cytoplasmic ph and free mg2+ in lymphocytes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements have been made of cytoplasmic pH, (pHi) and free Mg ~÷ concentra- tion, ((Mg2+)~), in pig and mouse lymphocytes, pH~ was measured in four ways: by a digitonin null-point technique; by direct measurement of the pH of freeze-thawed cell pellets; from the 31p nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of intracellular inorganic phosphate; and by the use of a newly

T. J. Rink; R. Y. TSIEN; T. POZZAN

1982-01-01

426

Pathologie vgtale Relation entre le pH des sols  

E-print Network

Pathologie végétale Relation entre le pH des sols et leur niveau de réceptivité à Fusarium solani pH des sols et leur niveau de réceptivité à Fusarium roseum var sambu- cinum et à F solani var sols de culture dont les pH s'échelonnent de 5,1 à 6,2, un lien direct existe entre les faibles valeurs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

427

A droplet-based pH regulator in microfluidics.  

PubMed

In this paper, we develop a strategy to form on-demand droplets with specific pH values. The pH control is based on electrolysis of water in microfluidics, and the produced hydrogen and hydroxyl ions are separated and confined in individual containers during the droplet generation, triggered by a pressure pulse. By tuning the applied voltages and pressure pulses, we can control on demand the pH value in a droplet. PMID:24745036

Zhou, Hongbo; Li, Gang; Yao, Shuhuai

2014-06-01

428

Ambulatory Esophageal pH Monitoring Using a Wireless System  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:Limitations of catheter-based esophageal pH monitoring are discomfort, inconvenience, and interference with normal activity. An alternative to conventional pH monitoring is the wireless Medtronic Bravo pH System. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, performance, and tolerability of this system.METHODS:A total of 44 healthy subjects and 41 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were studied for a

John E. Pandolfino; Joel E. Richter; Tina Ours; Jason M. Guardino; Jennifer Chapman; Peter J. Kahrilas

2003-01-01

429

Normal 24Hr ambulatory esophageal pH values  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the most sensitive and specific test for diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease, normal standards for prolonged esophageal pH monitoring are based on small sample sizes with questions raised about the effects of pH electrode, older age, gender, and methods of data analysis on pH variables. Recently three groups have established normal data bases using similar methodology. Multiple regression and nonparametric

Joel E. Richter; Laurence A. Bradley; Tom R. DeMeester; Wallace C. Wu

1992-01-01

430

Optrodes of photonic fiber to pH sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, design of optrodes of photonic optical fiber to a pH sensor with a pH dye is described. The sensor is prepared by immobilizing blue bromophenol, as a pH dye, using sol-gel technique with a photonic optical fiber. The physical principle is based in the absorption of the optrodes of the light from a laser diode as an emitter, and as transducer we use a photoresist for electronic conditioning of the signal.

Rendón-Romero, A.; Peña-Gomar, M.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.

2012-10-01

431

Pnicogen and hydrogen bonds: complexes between PH3X(+) and PH2X systems.  

PubMed

The charge-assisted complexes between PH3X(+) and PH2X have been analyzed. MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations were performed and the results were supported by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach and the Natural Bond Orbitals method. It was found that three different configurations could be formed, i.e. those linked through a PP or a PX pnicogen bond and those linked through a P-HP hydrogen bond. The PP configurations are the most stable ones corresponding to the strongest interactions; for all complexes the PP configuration exists, while the PX and P-HP ones are present only for some of them. Different relations between the parameters were found, especially for the PP interactions where there are correlations between the PP distance and the electron density at the PP bond critical point (?PP) as well as between ?PP and the charge transfer energy. PMID:25521698

Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Grabowski, S?awomir J

2015-02-01

432

Ph.D.s awarded (1997-98 thru 2006-07) 54 Computational Bio & Bioinformatics  

E-print Network

Ph.D.s awarded (1997-98 thru 2006-07) 54 Computational Bio & Bioinformatics Ph.D. Admissions Data - Fall 2012 Entering Class Admissions data for Biological and Biomedical Sciences can be found here. Ph Median years to Ph.D. 5.7 Percent of students awarded Ph.D. 100% Notes: Median years to Ph.D. for degrees

433

Field measurement of alkalinity and pH  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

Barnes, Ivan

1964-01-01

434

Measurement of pH. Definition, Standards, and Procedures  

E-print Network

. TARGET UNCERTAINTIES FOR MEASUREMENT OF SECONDARY BUFFER SOLUTIONS 11. CALIBRATION OF pH METER-ELECTRODE ASSEMBLIES AND TARGET UNCERTAINTIES FOR UNKNOWNS 12. GLOSSARY 13. ANNEX: MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY 14. SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS 15. REFERENCES R. P... INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE 1.1 pH, a single ion quantity The concept of pH is unique among the commonly encountered physicochemical quantities listed in the IUPAC Green Book [3] in that, in terms of its definition [4], pH = ?lg aH it involves a single ion quantity...

Wilson, George S.; Buck, R. P.; Rondinini, S.; Covington, A. K.; Baucke, F. G. K.; Brett, C. M. A.; Camõ es, M. F.; Milton, M. J. T.; Mussini, T.; Naumann, R.; Pratt, K. W.; Spitzer, P.

2002-01-01

435

PhD Student Handbook Department of Computing  

E-print Network

Deadlines for RAs registered for a PhD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Graduate School Professional Skills Development Programme . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 English Language Proficiency Test

Cadar, Cristian

436

Marine teleost locates live prey through pH sensing.  

PubMed

We report that the Japanese sea catfish Plotosus japonicus senses local pH-associated increases in H(+)/CO2 equating to a decrease of ?0.1 pH unit in ambient seawater. We demonstrated that these sensors, located on the external body of the fish, detect undamaged cryptic respiring prey, such as polychaete worms. Sensitivity is maximal at the natural pH of seawater (pH 8.1 to 8.2) and decreases dramatically in seawater with a pH <8.0. PMID:24904164

Caprio, John; Shimohara, Mami; Marui, Takayuki; Harada, Shuitsu; Kiyohara, Sadao

2014-06-01

437

Liposomal vincristine for relapsed or refractory Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a review of literature  

PubMed Central

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies that arise from clonal proliferation of immature lymphoid cells in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and other organs. There are approximately 3000 new adult cases diagnosed every year in the United States with a 5-year overall survival ranging from 22% to 50%. Most adult patients with ALL who achieve a complete response will ultimately relapse and for this subset of patients the only hope of curative therapy is successful re-induction to achieve a complete response followed by allogeneic transplant. Conventional vincristine has been used in all phases of ALL therapy but its efficacy is limited by cumulative toxicity, typically neuropathic in nature. Historically, the dose of conventional vincristine has been capped at 2 mg to avoid severe neurotoxicity. Liposomal vincristine [as vincristine sulfate liposomal injection (VSLI)] constitutes encapsulating vincristine in a sphingomyelin/cholesterol envelope. This process is thought to enhance drug delivery to the target tissues, decrease neurotoxicity by reducing the percentage of free drug in the plasma and therefore results in increased efficacy with acceptable toxicity. Results from recent trials using VSLI in the setting of relapsed/refractory Ph-negative ALL have been encouraging. VSLI as salvage monotherapy has been successful in inducing complete responses in a minority of adults with relapsed/refractory ALL so that they can be bridged to stem-cell transplantation. Rigorous post-approval testing needs to be conducted to clarify its utility in the clinic. PMID:24490021

Pathak, Priyanka; Hess, Rosemary

2014-01-01

438

Liposomal vincristine for relapsed or refractory Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a review of literature.  

PubMed

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies that arise from clonal proliferation of immature lymphoid cells in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and other organs. There are approximately 3000 new adult cases diagnosed every year in the United States with a 5-year overall survival ranging from 22% to 50%. Most adult patients with ALL who achieve a complete response will ultimately relapse and for this subset of patients the only hope of curative therapy is successful re-induction to achieve a complete response followed by allogeneic transplant. Conventional vincristine has been used in all phases of ALL therapy but its efficacy is limited by cumulative toxicity, typically neuropathic in nature. Historically, the dose of conventional vincristine has been capped at 2 mg to avoid severe neurotoxicity. Liposomal vincristine [as vincristine sulfate liposomal injection (VSLI)] constitutes encapsulating vincristine in a sphingomyelin/cholesterol envelope. This process is thought to enhance drug delivery to the target tissues, decrease neurotoxicity by reducing the percentage of free drug in the plasma and therefore results in increased efficacy with acceptable toxicity. Results from recent trials using VSLI in the setting of relapsed/refractory Ph-negative ALL have been encouraging. VSLI as salvage monotherapy has been successful in inducing complete responses in a minority of adults with relapsed/refractory ALL so that they can be bridged to stem-cell transplantation. Rigorous post-approval testing needs to be conducted to clarify its utility in the clinic. PMID:24490021

Pathak, Priyanka; Hess, Rosemary; Weiss, Mark A

2014-02-01

439

Italia-Netherland PhD Program: the I.O. PhD Research Program.  

PubMed

In the framework of long-term scientific collaboration among the founder members coming from Holland and Italy there was a growing consensus to activate a philosophical doctorate (PhD) program, involving young Italian researchers in the field of perinatal medicine, neonatology and pediatrics. The aims were to promote excellence in research, offering to young Italian physicians the opportunity to maturate an International research experience leading to PhD degree, and to promote human and technological improvement energies in perinatal, neonatal and pediatrics research. Thus, an official collaboration among the Dutch Universities from Maastricht and Utrecht and the Italian Children's Hospital from Alessandria, has been activated on March 1st 2010, finalized to the PhD program. The experimental phase included the selection of projects and relative candidates after an interview-selection focusing on their scientific attitudes and the availability on their research projects. Candidates' selection started on May 2010 and on September 29th ten projects and candidates have been approved by the scientific commission. Research topics included: perinatal asphyxia, aging and the origin of adulthood neurodegenerative disease, neuroprotective strategies, biochemical pulmonology, intrauterine growth retardation and perinatal teratology. To date, all projects have been approved by local Ethics Committee from the University/Hospital of origin of the candidates. Five manuscripts have been published and/or submitted to international Journals regarding pneumology, perinatal asphyxia and teratology, whilst about 60-70% of data regarding clinical studies have already been collected. PMID:21878061

Bellissima, Valentina; Borghesi, Alessandro; Bozzetti, Valentina; Dessì, Angelica; Fabiano, Adele; Risso, Francesco M; Salvo, Vincenzo; Satriano, Angela; Silvagni, Davide; Varrica, Alessandro; van Bel, Frank; Visser, Gerard H A; Vles, Hans Js; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Gavilanes, Antonio D W; Gazzolo, Diego

2011-10-01

440

High Mg effective incorporation in Al-rich Al x Ga1 - x N by periodic repetition of ultimate V/III ratio conditions  

PubMed Central

According to first-principles calculations, the solubility of Mg as a substitute for Ga or Al in Al x Ga1 – x N bulk is limited by large, positive formation enthalpies. In contrast to the bulk case, the formation enthalpies become negative on Al x Ga1 – x N surface. In addition, the N-rich growth atmosphere can also be favorable to Mg incorporation on the surface by changing the chemical potentials. On the basis of these special features, we proposed a modified surface engineering technique that applies periodical interruptions under an ultimate V/III ratio condition (extremely N-rich), to enhance Mg effective incorporation. By optimizing the interruption conditions (2 nm interruption interval with 2 s interruption time), the enhancement ratio can be up to about 5 in the Al0.99Ga0.01N epilayer. PMID:24444104

2014-01-01

441

Infinite resources: the ultimate strategy  

SciTech Connect

If the author's projections of world demand for nonrenewable materials prove to be reasonably correct, then it seems highly likely that currently economic resources of many important elements will be in inadequate supply by 2100. At the same time, the prospects appear good that resources of more than 30 elements can be made virtually unlimited if sufficient R and D is invested. Eventually a number of elements will undoubtedly become too scarce and expensive to use except for a few vital purposes. However, there is plenty of time before resources of any limited material become completely economically depleted in which to develop adequate substitutes by using more plentiful materials. The ability to tailor new materials to set specifications is advancing rapidly, and our capabilities in this direction should grow with time if R and D in this area is adequately supported. Although a strategy of infinite resources may be difficult to pursue in the face of global political uncertainties, success would mean that future shortages will be at most only transient events and that a stable population of 8.5 billion people will not be imperiled or impoverished by the lack of materials required for civilized life. 20 references, 3 tables.

Goeller, H.E.; Zucker, A.

1984-02-03

442

Black Holes: The Ultimate Abyss  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on the mystery of black holes, discussing the three basic sizes and how the characteristics of each type make them different from other black holes. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, performing extensions, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, audio vocabulary, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

Lee Ann Hennig

443

Ultimate open pit stochastic optimization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Classical open pit optimization (maximum closure problem) is made on block estimates, without directly considering the block grades uncertainty. We propose an alternative approach of stochastic optimization. The stochastic optimization is taken as the optimal pit computed on the block expected profits, rather than expected grades, computed from a series of conditional simulations. The stochastic optimization generates, by construction, larger ore and waste tonnages than the classical optimization. Contrary to the classical approach, the stochastic optimization is conditionally unbiased for the realized profit given the predicted profit. A series of simulated deposits with different variograms are used to compare the stochastic approach, the classical approach and the simulated approach that maximizes expected profit among simulated designs. Profits obtained with the stochastic optimization are generally larger than the classical or simulated pit. The main factor controlling the relative gain of stochastic optimization compared to classical approach and simulated pit is shown to be the information level as measured by the boreholes spacing/range ratio. The relative gains of the stochastic approach over the classical approach increase with the treatment costs but decrease with mining costs. The relative gains of the stochastic approach over the simulated pit approach increase both with the treatment and mining costs. At early stages of an open pit project, when uncertainty is large, the stochastic optimization approach appears preferable to the classical approach or the simulated pit approach for fair comparison of the values of alternative projects and for the initial design and planning of the open pit.

Marcotte, Denis; Caron, Josiane

2013-02-01

444

SUPER ESP: Ultimate electrostatic precipitation  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses SUPER ESP, a new electrostatic precipitator (ESP) concept, enabling high collection efficiencies with considerably smaller collection areas than has previously been possible. The new concept allows a major reduction in ESP size by using an alternating sequence of prechargers and short collector sections. The length of the collection section in each precharger/collector pair (module) dominates the optimization. The size reduction is greater for ESPs operating with high resistivity particulate matter than with low resistivity particulate matter. The relationship in number of modules, collector section size, and overall ESP collection is presented and discussed. Comparisons are given of ESP size for both conventional and SUPER ESP technology operating with either high or low resistivity particulate matter. Because of the size reduction, the cost of the SUPER ESP is projected to be lower than that of a conventional ESP of comparable efficiencY. The paper is based on an ESP model, ESPVI 4.0.

Plaks, N.

1991-01-01

445

MITEsâ??The Ultimate Parasites  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Transposable elements (TEs) are fragments of DNA that can jump from one genome position to another, often producing extra copies of themselves in the process. Yang et al. show how a special type of TEs, called miniature inverted repeat transposable elements or MITEs, transpose and accumulate in the genome.

Josefa González (Stanford University; Department of Biology)

2009-09-11

446

Multiple Theoretical Perspectives in the Thesis PhD: A foundation problem in PhD education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research has exposed weaknesses in many of the conceptual foundations of PhD education processes as currently implemented. This paper focuses on the use of multiple theoretical perspectives in PhD research projects using the long thesis model of PhD study. The paper describes the epistemological factors impacting on the coherent inclusion of multiple theoretical perspectives necessary for undertaking multi, cross

Terence Love

2002-01-01

447

Wireless pH Recording Immediately Above the Squamocolumnar Junction Improves the Diagnostic Performance of Esophageal pH Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:The optimal position for pH electrode placement in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminatory power of targeted pH recording immediately above the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) and to compare the results with those obtained by simultaneous recording at the conventional level for pH monitoring.SUBJECTS AND METHODS:Sixty-two

Jörgen Wenner; Mats Hall; Peter Höglund; Jan Johansson; Folke Johnsson; Stefan Öberg

2008-01-01

448

Effects of low environmental pH on blood pH and sodium balance of brook trout. [Brook  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinales) exposed to a low environmental pH (3.0-3.3) showed a drop in mean blood pH from 7.39 to 6.97. Trout at an environmental pH of 3.5 lost 50% of their total body sodium. Control sodium influx (72.5 micromols\\/100 g hours) decreased to zero between pH 3.0 and 4.9 as Na efflux increased markedly over control levels. There

Randall K. Packer; William A. Dunson

1970-01-01

449

Mapping Soil pH Buffering Capacity of Selected Fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Soil pH buffering capacity, since it varies spatially within crop production fields, may be used to define sampling zones to assess lime requirement, or for modeling changes in soil pH when acid forming fertilizers or manures are added to a field. Our objective was to develop a procedure to map this soil property. One hundred thirty six soil samples (0 to 15 cm depth) from three Georgia Coastal Plain fields were titrated with calcium hydroxide to characterize differences in pH buffering capacity of the soils. Since the relationship between soil pH and added calcium hydroxide was approximately linear for all samples up to pH 6.5, the slope values of these linear relationships for all soils were regressed on the organic C and clay contents of the 136 soil samples using multiple linear regression. The equation that fit the data best was b (slope of pH vs. lime added) = 0.00029 - 0.00003 * % clay + 0.00135 * % O/C, r(exp 2) = 0.68. This equation was applied within geographic information system (GIS) software to create maps of soil pH buffering capacity for the three fields. When the mapped values of the pH buffering capacity were compared with measured values for a total of 18 locations in the three fields, there was good general agreement. A regression of directly measured pH buffering capacities on mapped pH buffering capacities at the field locations for these samples gave an r(exp 2) of 0.88 with a slope of 1.04 for a group of soils that varied approximately tenfold in their pH buffering capacities.

Weaver, A. R.; Kissel, D. E.; Chen, F.; West, L. T.; Adkins, W.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J. C.

2003-01-01

450

PhET Simulation: Forces and Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive simulation provides four components for exploring balanced and unbalanced forces. In the introductory activity, users choose from among 5 objects of different masses, set the surface with or without friction, then "push" the object along a straight line. The simulation displays force vectors and free body diagrams to match the motion. Record your "push" and replay to see the sum of forces. The second activity focuses on the role of friction when objects are pushed on a wood surface. Set your own gravitational constant and watch the effects on static and kinetic friction. The third activity lets users display simultaneous graphs of applied force, acceleration, velocity, and position. The final activity, "Robot Moving Company", is a game where users apply a force to deliver objects of different mass from one point to another. This resource is part of PhET, the Physics Education Technology Project, a collection of simulation-based learning objects developed for learners of physics, chemistry, math, earth science, and biology.

2011-09-27

451

PhET Simulation: Alpha Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource simulates the process of alpha decay, a type of radioactive decay in which an atomic nucleus emits an alpha particle. A number of different radioisotopes will undergo this type of decay; this web page simulates the Polonium-211 atom. Users can watch a single atom decay or work with a "Bucket O' Polonium" to view a pattern of decay. Editor's Note: Radioactive decay happens when an atomic nucleus of an unstable atom loses energy by emitting ionizing radiation. If you take a sample of a particular radionuclide, the half-life is the time it takes for half the atoms to decay. The Bucket O' Polomium" activity could be invaluable to help students understand the concept of half-life. They can observe 100 virtual polonium-211 atoms in the process of decay. Pause the action every 1/2 second to get a feel for the math associated with radioactive decay. Simple enough for grades 7-8, but can be adapted for AP Physics as well. See Related Materials for a link to a student guide specifically developed by the PhET team for use with this simulation.

2011-07-21

452

K.W. Gavin Cheng, Ph.D Associate Professor  

E-print Network

: developed a rapid assay for regeneration of nerve cell which is now in use by many research groups around work on development of neural stem cells for transplantation (with R. Brownstone, S. Hochman, and L of Manitoba for ultimate commercialization. Proceed with genetic modification of neural stem cells to optimize

Manitoba, University of

453

Rethinking PhD Learning Incorporating Communities of Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper grows from research which focuses on the learning characteristics of PhD students, incorporating communities of practice both during their studies and beyond completion of their PhD, and drawing on theories of adult learning and lifelong learning. It shows how professional discourse enhances academic discourse through student engagement…

Shacham, Miri; Od-Cohen, Yehudit

2009-01-01

454

What if We Made Fewer Ph.D.'s?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whenever a discussion opens about nonacademic employment for Ph.D.s, it is not long before someone suggests reducing graduate-school admissions. "The market for full-time scholars has fallen off a cliff lately," this argument goes, "so why not just train fewer of them?" The strategy to reduce the number of Ph.D. students recurs in those…

Cassuto, Leonard

2012-01-01

455

PhDs in Australia, from the Beginning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Australian PhD is a relatively recent phenomenon, the first three being awarded in 1948. Before that, most Australian scholars typically went to Britain (predominantly) or the USA to undertake their doctoral studies. The aim of this research note is to provide a brief statistical history of the Australian PhD, noting changes over time between…

Dobson, Ian R.

2012-01-01

456

DOHERTY PhD SCHOLARSHIP (687/2012) Student ID....................................  

E-print Network

DOHERTY PhD SCHOLARSHIP (687/2012) Student ID.................................... AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY DOHERTY PhD SCHOLARSHIP CONDITIONS OF AWARD The awarded scholarship and the living allowance (stipend) value are stated in your scholarship letter of offer. Other benefits are listed

Botea, Adi

457

Variation in soil pH under tussock grassland species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three tussock grassland sites were sampled along a climatic-soil gradient in the Mackenzie Basin, South Canterbury. There was a range within sites of 0.5 pH units in the 1-5 cm soil layer beneath different species. The pH was highest beneath composite flatweeds and Rumex acetosella and lowest below Festuca novae-zelandiae.

D. Scott

1975-01-01

458

CURRICULUM VITAE KATHERINE J. AUCOIN, PH.D.  

E-print Network

.D., Eliot Goldman, Ph.D. · Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy - Depression Intervention training o Kevin Stark, Ph for children ages 6-17, including individual, family, and group therapies and crisis management Providing Orleans, LA · Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Preschoolers o Michael

Li, X. Rong

459

The Early Development of Electronic pH Meters  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 19-year-old undergraduate at the University of Chicago, Kenneth Goode, in 1921 came up with the idea of an electronic pH meter, worked out some of its initial problems, and set in motion an international scientific effort that culminated in the current, wide availability of electronic pH meters. Except for the replacement of vacuum tubes by…

Hines, Wallis G.; de Levie, Robert

2010-01-01

460

CRAIG E. MALONEY, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University  

E-print Network

CRAIG E. MALONEY, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Phone: 412-268-1468; Fax, Physics, Ph.D. 2005 · University of Toledo, Physics and Mathematics, B.S. 1998 Publications Research

Nagle, John F.

461

Ris-PhD-Report Department of Civil Engineering  

E-print Network

Risø-PhD-Report Department of Civil Engineering Wind Turbine Wake in Atmospheric Turbulence Pierre ­ Department of Civil Engineering Risø-PhD-53(EN) AAU-DCE Thesis No. 22 October 2009 This thesis is submitted

462

PhD-student position in Limnology/Aquatic Biogeochemistry  

E-print Network

PhD-student position in Limnology/Aquatic Biogeochemistry: Published: 2014-09-30 Uppsala University and a turnover of SEK 5,900 million. PhD-student position in Limnology/Aquatic Biogeochemistry: role of inland, with a focus on aquatic biogeochemistry/aquatic ecology/limnology/water and environmental engineering or other

Uppsala Universitet

463

Neuroscience Ph.D. Program Spring 2015 Courses  

E-print Network

Neuroscience Ph.D. Program Spring 2015 Courses For up to date course information please check ISIS For more information on Neuroscience Ph.D. Program requirements, please check the Graduate Student Manual Required Core Courses for all Neuroscience Students: ACB:6252:0001 Functional Neuroanatomy 4 SH 060

464

SOCIOLOGY (Ph.D.) Executive Officer: Professor John Torpey  

E-print Network

233 SOCIOLOGY (Ph.D.) Executive Officer: Professor John Torpey The Graduate Center 365 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10016 Email: Sociology@gc.cuny.edu http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Sociology/ facultY Richard D n Betty Yorburg n Jock Young n Sharon Zukin the PrOgram The Ph.D. Program in Sociology develops

Dennehy, John

465

A Renaissance in Engineering PhD Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper addresses the role of engineering PhD education and its relationship to innovation and technology, and the need to reconsider how we educate PhD engineers. Much of the effort on engineering education in the last two decades focused on undergraduate education with a few exceptions that relate to master degree programs. Doctoral education…

Akay, Adnan

2008-01-01

466

CV Marianne Espeland Marianne Espeland, PhD  

E-print Network

CV Marianne Espeland Marianne Espeland, PhD Museum of Comparative Zoology, Room 401c, Harvard@fas.harvard.edu Current position Harvard University. Museum of Comparative Zoology and Department of Organismic and Evolutionary biology. Postdoctoral fellow Education Oct. 2010 Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in systematic zoology

Espeland, Marianne

467

Microscale pH Titrations Using an Automatic Pipet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a microscale pH titration technique that utilizes an automatic pipet. A small aliquot (1-5 mL) of the analyte solution is titrated with repeated additions of titrant, and the pH is determined after each delivery. The equivalence point is determined graphically by either the second derivative method or a Gran plot. The pipet can be…

Flint, Edward B.; Kortz, Carrie L.; Taylor, Max A.

2002-01-01

468

The Importance of Having a Ph.D., Career Advice  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A presentation on the importance of having a PhD to motivate Initiative to Maximize Student Diversity Program (IMSD) undergrads towards conducting research, pursuing careers in the biomedical field, applying to grad school, and getting a Ph.D., based upon ARS scientist's experiences as a student, a ...

469

CHLORIDE, IN CALCIUM, IN pH ARSENIC, IN  

E-print Network

CHLORIDE, IN CALCIUM, IN pH ARSENIC, IN MILLIGRAMS PER LITER MILLIGRAMS PER LITER MICROGRAMS PER concentrations, calcium concentrations, arsenic concentrations and pH after 100,000 years of simulated ground-water flow and reaction. View is from the northwest looking to the southeast. CHLORIDE, IN CALCIUM, IN p

470

M.S. and Ph.D. in Biochemistry and  

E-print Network

The curriculum is designed to ensure a common foundation of core concepts and skills, but also to allow considerable flexibility for customization to provide the optimal educational experience for each student. Core, microbiology, and medicine. Ph.D. Degree The Ph.D. in BMB prepares students for careers in academic research

Chapman, Michael S.

471

Predicting Computer Science Ph.D. Completion: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the results of an analysis of indicators that can be used to predict whether a student will succeed in a Computer Science Ph.D. program. The analysis was conducted by studying the records of 75 students who have been in the Computer Science Ph.D. program of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Seventy-seven variables were…

Cox, G. W.; Hughes, W. E., Jr.; Etzkorn, L. H.; Weisskopf, M. E.

2009-01-01

472

PH 412 Syllabus 2014 Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Prevention  

E-print Network

PH 412 Syllabus 2014 PH 412 Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Prevention Spring Quarter 2014 Thursdays 6-9pm McGaw 2-322 Chad Achenbach, MD, MPH Assistant Professor in Medicine ­ Infectious Diseases hours: By Appointment Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Prevention will focus on major concepts

Contractor, Anis

473

Infectious Diseases and Immunity Ph.D. Program UC Berkeley  

E-print Network

Infectious Diseases and Immunity Ph.D. Program UC Berkeley Ph.D. Degree Program The Graduate Group in Infectious Diseases and Immunity provides the opportunity for the study of the biology of infectious agents of infectious diseases. The degree program is unique in emphasizing integrated, multidisciplinary training

Sjölander, Kimmen

474

Effect of pH on biological phosphorus uptake.  

PubMed

An anaerobic aerobic laboratory scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to study the effect of pH on enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Seven steady states were achieved under different operating conditions. In all of them, a slight variation in the pH value was observed during anaerobic phase. However, pH rose significantly during aerobic phase. The increase observed was due to phosphorus uptake and carbon dioxide stripping. When pH was higher than 8.2-8.25 the phosphorus uptake rate clearly decreased. The capability of Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) and Biological Nutrient Removal Model No. 1 (BNRM1) to simulate experimental results was evaluated. Both models successfully characterized the enhanced biological phosphorus removal performance of the SBR. Furthermore, BNRM1 also reproduced the pH variations observed and the decrease in the phosphorus uptake rate. This model includes a switch function in the kinetic expressions to represent the pH inhibition in biological processes. The pH inhibition constants related to polyphosphate storage process were obtained by adjusting model predictions to measured phosphorus concentrations. On the other hand, pH inhibition should be included in ASM2d to accurately simulate experimental phosphorus evolution observed in an A/O SBR. PMID:16958137

Serralta, J; Ferrer, J; Borrás, L; Seco, A

2006-12-01

475

Chanelle Case Borden, Ph.D. - Spotlight on Scientists  

Cancer.gov

Chanelle Case Borden, Ph.D. - Spotlight on Scientists You will need Adobe Flash Player 8 or later and JavaScript enabled to view this video. You can view the movie here Chanelle Case Borden, Ph.D., a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral fellow,

476

PARTICIPANT LIST Susan G. Amara, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

Blumenstein, LL.B., M.B.A. President CHDI Management/CHDI Foundation 350 Seventh Avenue, Suite 601 New York. Darnell, M.D., Ph.D. Investigator Howard Hughes Medical Institute The Rockefeller University 1230 York Avenue New York, NY 10065 Phone: 212-327-7474 E-mail: darnelr@mail.rockefeller.edu Ed Dudek, Ph

477

160 /Physics Matthew B. Koss, Ph.D., Professor  

E-print Network

160 /Physics Physics Matthew B. Koss, Ph.D., Professor Janine Shertzer, Ph.D., Distinguished Assistant Professor Physics is the study of the behavior of the universe,especially the fundamental laws underlying natural phenomena. The Department of Physics has offerings to meet a range of interests, from

Oxley, Paul

478

Mary Beth Leigh, PhD Associate Professor of Microbiology  

E-print Network

Mary Beth Leigh, PhD Associate Professor of Microbiology Institute of Arctic Biology, University mbleigh@alaska.edu Education · Ph.D. Microbiology (2003) University of Oklahoma, Co-advisors: John S · Associate Professor of Microbiology, Institute of Arctic Biology, Department of Biology and Wildlife

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

479

OFFICE OF GRADUATE STUDIES Ph. D. PROPOSAL DEFENSE  

E-print Network

OFFICE OF GRADUATE STUDIES Ph. D. PROPOSAL DEFENSE REPORT Banner SPACMNT Ph.D. Proposal Defense Chair or the Doctoral Program Director immediately after the proposal defense and submitted Preliminary Title of Dissertation Date of Proposal Defense DISSERTATION PROPOSAL COMMITTEE INFORMATION

Bieber, Michael

480

EFFECTS OF LOW PH ON REPRODUCTION OF RAINBOW TROUT  

EPA Science Inventory

Reproduction of rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri in acidic water was studied. Adults were exposed to waters of pH 4.5, 5.0, or 5.5 during the final 6 weeks of reproductive maturation; control acidities were pH 6.5-7.1. Progeny of acid-exposed females and control males had reduced s...

481

Optical fibre PH sensor based on immobilized indicator  

Microsoft Academic Search

An optical fiber pH sensor which has the immobilized pH sensitive indicator dye reagents on the tip of the optical fiber has been studied. The probe is made by covalently immobilizing the phenol red, bromine phenol blue, or bromothymol blue on the polyacrylamide microsphere fixed by polyterafluoroethylene (PTFE) film. A gap between the dye and optical fiber was used to

Defu Cai; Qiang Cao; Jinghong Han; Jine Cai; Yating Li; Zemin Zhu; Jie Fan; Ning Gao

1991-01-01

482

Ris-PhD-29(EN) Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell  

E-print Network

Risø-PhD-29(EN) Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell Risø National Laboratory Roskilde Denmark December 2006 #12;Introduction 2 Author: Søren Højgaard Jensen Title: Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell Department: Department of Solid State Chemistry and Fuel Cells Risø-PhD-29(EN) December 2006 This thesis is submitted

483

Illinois Institute of Technology Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program  

E-print Network

Training (Ph.D., Adelphi University, 1974) Cognitive models of depression, seasonal affective disorder, 2012). Eating and weight disorders and associated psychopathology. Joyce Hopkins, Associate Professor for disorders in infants and preschool children. Eric Houston, Assistant Professor (Ph.D., University

Heller, Barbara

484

P.H. Diamond CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, USA  

E-print Network

P.H. Diamond CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, USA WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Korea 2014 US-TTF Theory of Cross-Phase Evolution and its Impact on ELM Dynamics #12;P.H. Diamond CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, USA WCI

Diamond, Patrick H.

485

Tulsa Program Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Instructional  

E-print Network

a Ph.D. focused on ECE will assist you in meeting your career goals. One academic writing sampleTulsa Program Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Instructional Leadership and Academic Curriculum. Writing samples should show evidence of effective writing skills. Academic writing samples may range from

Oklahoma, University of

486

MA and Ph.D. in Applied Anthropology GRADUATE INTERNSHIP  

E-print Network

MA and Ph.D. in Applied Anthropology GRADUATE INTERNSHIP Description Students enrolled in the MA or Ph.D. in Applied Anthropology programs must complete a graduate internship with approved professional-supervision. The purpose of this internship is to give students practical training with the guidance of an internship

Escher, Christine

487

pH Meter (ChemPages Lab)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

pH Meter: this is a resource in the collection "ChemPages Laboratory Resources". A pH meter represents the hydrogen ion concentration in pH units. A pH meter consists of a glass electrode and a read out screen. The glass electrode is made of very thin glass that establishes and measures the electrical potential difference between the analyte solution (the solution to be measured) and an internal reference. The electrical potential is then converted into a pH reading for the sample. The ChemPages Laboratory Resources are a set of web pages that include text, images, video, and self check questions. The topics included are those that are commonly encountered in the first-year chemistry laboratory. They have been put together for use as both a pre-laboratory preparation tool and an in-laboratory reference source.

488

Luminescence sensor of pH aqueous solutions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a luminescence sensor for real-time pH measurements. The emission spectra of mixture consisted of tested and base solution of fluorescein is used for analysis of the pH of aqueous solutions. The proposed microfluidic mixing system with integrated optical fibers allows pH measurement in the range 7.6 - 2.8. The developed sensor can be used in automatic pH control systems that work with aqueous solutions. The optimization of fluorescein concentration in base solution allowed to obtain linear characteristic of sensor response. The practical realization of the sensor with continuous monitoring of the pH of liquids and its potential applications are presented.

Wyrwas, Marek; Miluski, Piotr

2014-05-01

489

Sol gel-based fiber optic pH sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report here on the development of a sol-gel based fiber optic sensor to monitor local blood pH. These sensors are being developed for invasive medical applications; that is, they will be coaxially threaded through a catheter beyond an occlusion in the vascular system. The fiber optic pH sensor design was based on the immobilization of a pH sensitive dye, seminaphthorhodamine-1 carboxylate, onto the tip or surface of an optical fiber using the sol-gel method. The fiber optic pH sensor was tested in phosphate buffer saline and human whole blood using a miniature fluorimeter system. Linear responses were obtained in blood in the pH range 6.7 to 8.0, which demonstrates potential for use for in vivo sensing.

Grant, Sheila A.; Glass, Robert S.

1997-06-01

490

Contact lenses affect corneal stromal pH.  

PubMed

Recent studies suggest that corneal acidosis may alter corneal structure and function. We determined whether the range of oxygen transmissibility (Dk/L) provided by a hydrogel lens could affect corneal stromal pH. Stromal pH was measured using a noninvasive fluorometric technique under both open- and closed-eye conditions on subjects who wore hydrogel lenses made of the same material but with different lens powers. Under closed-eye lens wearing conditions, central stromal pH was reduced substantially and there was no relation between degree of acidosis and lens Dk/L. Under open-eye lens wearing conditions, central stromal pH was also reduced but the degree of acidosis was dependent on lens Dk/L. These results suggest extended wear of hydrogel lenses can produce marked decreases in stromal pH which could remain reduced even after the eyes are opened. PMID:8115135

Rivera, R; Gan, C; Polse, K; Bonanno, J; Fatt, I

1993-12-01

491

Comparative reactivity of TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph (L = CO or PMe3): impact of ancillary ligand l on activation of carbon-hydrogen bonds including catalytic hydroarylation and hydrovinylation/oligomerization of ethylene.  

PubMed

Complexes of the type TpRu(L)(NCMe)R [L = CO or PMe3; R = Ph or Me; Tp = hydridotris(pyrazolyl)borate] initiate C-H activation of benzene. Kinetic studies, isotopic labeling, and other experimental evidence suggest that the mechanism of benzene C-H activation involves reversible dissociation of acetonitrile, reversible benzene coordination, and rate-determining C-H activation of coordinated benzene. TpRu(PMe3)(NCMe)Ph initiates C-D activation of C6D6 at rates that are approximately 2-3 times more rapid than that for TpRu(CO)(NCMe)Ph (depending on substrate concentration); however, the catalytic hydrophenylation of ethylene using TpRu(PMe3)(NCMe)Ph is substantially less efficient than catalysis with TpRu(CO)(NCMe)Ph. For TpRu(PMe3)(NCMe)Ph, C-H activation of ethylene, to ultimately produce TpRu(PMe3)(eta3-C4H7), is found to kinetically compete with catalytic ethylene hydrophenylation. In THF solutions containing ethylene, TpRu(PMe3)(NCMe)Ph and TpRu(CO)(NCMe)Ph separately convert to TpRu(L)(eta3-C4H7) (L = PMe3 or CO, respectively) via initial Ru-mediated ethylene C-H activation. Heating mesitylene solutions of TpRu(L)(eta3-C4H7) under ethylene pressure results in the catalytic production of butenes (i.e., ethylene hydrovinylation) and hexenes. PMID:17488072

Foley, Nicholas A; Lail, Marty; Lee, John P; Gunnoe, T Brent; Cundari, Thomas R; Petersen, Jeffrey L

2007-05-30

492

Prism: a New Approach to Radiotherapy Planning Software Ira J. Kalet, Ph.D., Jonathan P. Jacky, Ph.D.,  

E-print Network

Prism: a New Approach to Radiotherapy Planning Software Ira J. Kalet, Ph.D., Jonathan P. Jacky, Ph, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2442 z current address: RSA, Inc., 22 Terry Ave., Burlington, MA 01803 1 #12;Prism: New Approach to RTP Software/Kalet 2 Abstract Purpose: We describe the capabilities and performance of Prism

Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

493

2004 Michigan Technological University Alicia A. Thorsen, Ph.D. CandidateAlicia A. Thorsen, Ph.D. Candidate  

E-print Network

© 2004 Michigan Technological University Alicia A. Thorsen, Ph.D. CandidateAlicia A. Thorsen, Ph.D. Candidate Department of Computer Science Michigan Technological University athorsen@mtu.edu Graphs, Parallel Michigan Technological University Combinatorial Scientific Computing (CSC)Combinatorial Scientific

494

Saccadic Intrusions in Strabismus Kenneth J. Ciuffreda, OD, PhD; Robert V. Kenyon, PhD; Lawrence Stark, MD  

E-print Network

Saccadic Intrusions in Strabismus Kenneth J. Ciuffreda, OD, PhD; Robert V. Kenyon, PhD; Lawrence strabismus, amblyopia without strabismus, or con- stant strabismus amblyopia. Saccadic intrusions were present under most test conditions in intermittent strabismus, were rarely observed in amblyopia without

Kenyon, Robert V.

495

SON 68 nuclear glass alteration kinetics between pH 7 and pH 11.5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of the pH was investigated on the mechanisms of SON 68 (R7T7-type) glass alteration under `saturation' conditions in order to delimit the pH range within which a stable, protective gel is formed. Static experiments were conducted at 90°C with an S/ V ratio of 50 cm-1 at various imposed pH values: 7, 8, 9.5, 10, 10.5, 11 and 11.5. An additional experiment was conducted with no restriction on the pH. The kinetic study showed that a protective gel formed in all the test media, although its stability was pH-dependent: at pH 11 or higher, the precipitation of a potassium and sodium aluminosilicate led to the degradation of the gel and the lose of its protective properties. This phenomenon resulted in renewed glass alteration, leading to complete and rapid degradation of the glass into alteration products. The aluminosilicate precipitation was found to be limited by the solubility of aluminum. Below pH 10, this type of secondary phase is unlikely to precipitate and the gel should remain stable. This study, based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, suggests that aqueous alteration of the French SON 68 nuclear glass results in the formation of a protective gel with long-term stability between pH 7 and pH 10.

Gin, S.; Mestre, J. P.

2001-05-01

496

Pathways of the Heart Rahul C. Deo, MD, PhD; Frederick P. Roth, PhD  

E-print Network

Editorial Pathways of the Heart Rahul C. Deo, MD, PhD; Frederick P. Roth, PhD Disease heterogeneity that are solely based on anatomic or hemodynamic considerations. The article by Barth et al4 in this issue. Armed with `omic data sets and bioinformatics tools, Barth et al tackle the hypothesis that CRT reduces

Roth, Frederick

497

Continuous pH monitoring in a perfused bioreactor system using an optical pH sensor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Monitoring and regulating the pH of the solution in a bioprocess is one of the key steps in the success of bioreactor operation. An in-line optical pH sensor, based on the optical absorption properties of phenol red present in the medium, was developed and tested in this work for use in NASA space bioreactors based on a rotating wall-perfused vessel system supporting a baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. The sensor was tested over three 30-day and one 124-day cell runs. The pH sensor initially was calibrated and then used during the entire cell culture interval. The pH reported by the sensor was compared to that measured by a fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer and a blood gas analyzer. The maximum standard error of prediction for all the four cell runs for development pH sensor against BGA was +/-0.06 pH unit and for the fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer against the blood gas analyzer was +/-0.05 pH unit. The pH sensor system performed well without need of recalibration for 124 days. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Vani, Sundeep; Taylor, Thomas D.; Anderson, Melody M.

2002-01-01

498

Economics Ph.D Assessment Plan 1 May 1, 2012 Assessment Plan Field of Economics Ph.D.  

E-print Network

by the ability to design and execute a long-term research program that addresses a sequence of well after the Ph.D. is completed, most students will enter the international Economics Ph.D. job market expect to search for a university-based teaching position should develop their teaching skills

499

Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap at the time of admission into the program to an academic advisor in the College of Public Health Semester One

Sheridan, Scott

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Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health-Allied Health-Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-AHLT] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap at the time of admission into the program to academic advisor in the College of Public Health Semester One

Sheridan, Scott