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Sample records for ultra-shallow junction formation

  1. Effect of additional low temperature RTA on ultra-shallow p{sup +}-n junction formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kil-Ho; Oh, Jae-Geun; Cho, Byung-Jin; Kim, Jong-Choul

    1996-12-31

    The effect of Additional Low Temperature RTA process (ALTRTA) prior to furnace annealing (FA) on shallow junction formation has been investigated. In p{sup +}-n junction implanted by BF{sub 2} at 20 keV with a dose of 3 {times} 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, it was found that ALTRTA at 950{degrees} C for 5 sec before FA at 850{degrees} C for 60 min decreased the junction depth, sheet resistance and junction leakage current by 10 %, 2 %, and 83.7 %, respectively compared to conventional FA process. As FA time increased, the retardation of boron diffusion by ALTRTA was more prominent. Cross-sectional TEM study showed that the density and size of dislocation in ALTRTA sample were reduced. Therefore, it is speculated that the density reduction of Si-interstitial due to point defect recombination (Interstitial + Vacancy = 0) during ALTRTA retards the boron diffusion, and reduces junction leakage current. The effective ALTRTA condition was found to depend on ion implantation energy and/or dose, and the lower ion implantation energy and/or dose required the lower RTA temperature. From the results, the ALTRTA process prior to FA for BPSG flow is very effective for the formation of ultra-shallow junction with the improvement of junction characteristics.

  2. Formation of Co-implanted Silicon Ultra-Shallow Junctions for Low Thermal Budget Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehana, Mustafa; S., Ahmed; U. Khan, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present a systematic study to create ultra-shallow junctions in n-type silicon substrates and investigate both pre- and post-annealing processes to create a processing strategy for potential applications in nano-devices. Starting wafers were co-implanted with indium and C atoms at energies of 70 keV and 10 keV, respectively. A carefully chosen implantation schedule provides an abrupt ultra-shallow junction between 17 and 43 nm with suppressed sheet resistance and appropriate retained sheet carrier concentration at low thermal budget. A defect doping matrix, primarily the behavior and movement of co-implant generated interstitials at different annealing temperatures, may be engineered to form sufficiently activated ultra-shallow devices.

  3. Carbon and fluorine co-implantation for boron diffusion suppression in extremely ultra shallow junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miakonkikh, Andrey V.; Rogozhin, Aleksander E.; Rudakov, Valeriy I.; Rudenko, Konstantin V.; Lukichev, Vladimir F.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of ultra shallow p+-junctions in silicon by plasma immersion ion implantation were investigated. The effect of carbon and fluorine coimplantation were studied experimentally. Dependence of this effect from carbon concentration was studied, as well as positive role of multistep annealing for pure boron implanted samples.

  4. Ultra-Shallow P{sup +}/N Junction Formation in Si Using Low Temperature Solid Phase Epitaxy Assisted with Laser Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Shuhei; Tanaka, Yuki; Fukaya, Takumi; Matsumoto, Satoru; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Fuse, Genshu; Kudo, Toshio; Sakuragi, Susumu

    2008-11-03

    A combination of Ge pre-amorphization implantation (Ge-PAI), low-energy B implantation and laser annealing is a promising method to form highly-activated, abrupt and ultra-shallow junctions (USJ). In our previous report of IIT 2006, we succeeded in forming pn junctions less than 10 nm using non-melt double-pulsed green laser. However, a large leakage current under reverse bias was observed consequently due to residual defects in the implanted layer. In this study, a method to form USJ is proposed: a combination of low-temperature solid phase epitaxy and non-melt laser irradiation for B activation. Ge pre-amorphization implantation was performed at energy of 6 keV with a dose of 3x10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. Then B implantation was performed at energy of 0.2 keV with a dose of 1.2x10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}. Samples were annealed at 400 deg. C for 10 h in nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, non-melt laser irradiation was performed at energy of 690 mJ/cm{sup 2} and pulse duration of 100 ns with intervals of 300 ns. As a result, USJ around 10 nm with better crystallinity was successfully formed. And the leakage current of pn diodes was reduced significantly. Moreover, it is proven from secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis that transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of B is specifically suppressed.

  5. C-V profiling of ultra-shallow junctions using step-like background profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popadić, Miloš; Milovanović, Vladimir; Xu, Cuiqin; Sarubbi, Francesco; Nanver, Lis K.

    2010-09-01

    A novel C-V profiling method that enables profiling of ultra-shallow and ultra-abrupt junctions is described. The method takes advantage of a peculiar shape of the C-V characteristic that is obtained with a step-like or some other abruptly changing background profile. The method is theoretically described and confirmed by MEDICI simulations. Experimental use of the method requires the fabrication of both a p-n and a Schottky diode with identical background profiles. Here, a step-like background As profile and an ultra-shallow and ultra-abrupt p + junction were achieved by Si epitaxy and pure boron RPCVD, respectively. Using these techniques, junctions with a doping depth of around 7 nm and with a slope of about 2.5 nm/dec were fabricated and measured. The way to create an optimal experimental situation in terms of measurement range and accuracy is discussed.

  6. Down to 2 nm Ultra Shallow Junctions : Fabrication by IBS Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation Prototype PULSION registered

    SciTech Connect

    Torregrosa, Frank; Etienne, Hasnaa; Mathieu, Gilles; Roux, Laurent

    2006-11-13

    Classical beam line implantation is limited in low energies and cannot achieve P+/N junctions requirements for <45nm node. Compared to conventional beam line ion implantation, limited to a minimum of about 200 eV, the efficiency of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is no more to prove for the realization of Ultra Shallow Junctions (USJ) in semiconductor applications: this technique allows to get ultimate shallow profiles (as implanted) thanks to no lower limitation of energy and offers high dose rate. In the field of the European consortium NANOCMOS, Ultra Shallow Junctions implanted on a semi-industrial PIII prototype (PULSION registered ) designed by the French company IBS, have been studied. Ultra shallow junctions implanted with BF3 at acceleration voltages down to 20V were realized. Contamination level, homogeneity and depth profile are studied. The SIMS profiles obtained show the capability to make ultra shallow profiles (as implanted) down to 2nm.

  7. Dopant Activation and Defect Analysis of Ultra-Shallow Junctions Made by Gas Cluster Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Yan; Hautala, John; Larson, Larry; Jain, Amitabh

    2008-11-03

    A long-standing problem in the fabrication of junctions by ion implantation is the enhanced diffusion caused by interstitial agglomeration and dissolution on annealing. Another side effect is residual damage that leads to junction leakage. The gas cluster ion beam technique (GCIB) offers a means of introducing dopant atoms without the creation of interstitials due to the low energy non-ballistic nature of the individual atoms and the localized thermal spike associated with the collision event between the large cluster and the silicon surface. We have employed cluster ion beams to infuse B into Si substrates to fabricate ultra-shallow junctions. Various annealing techniques were used to investigate GCIB B activation. We find that annealing at temperatures around 950 deg. C results in profiles that do not exhibit the extended tail characteristic of enhanced diffusion. This is in contrast to profiles in ion implanted samples, which inevitably result in enhanced diffusion. For laser and flash anneal, because the time scale of process is short, multiple anneal passes are needed in order to achieve low sheet resistance with little diffusion. We have shown that control of interfacial and surface smoothness is critical in improving junction characteristics.

  8. Investigation on boron transient enhanced diffusion induced by the advanced P +/N ultra-shallow junction fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, F.; Lenoble, D.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we propose to characterize boron transient enhanced diffusion (TED) for processes currently used for P+/N ultra-shallow junctions (USJ) fabrication. Indeed, the fundamental understanding of boron diffusion for low energy boron implantation is mandatory to evaluate the scalability of such processes for the coming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistor generations. In these experiments, we characterize the boron anomalous diffusion, thanks to boron buried marker-layers obtained by epitaxial growth. B+ and BF2+ ultra-low energy (ULE) implantations and plasma doping (PLAD) using BF3 as precursor gas are carried out to compare the two techniques used for advanced USJ fabrication. Boron diffusion behaviors are analyzed via secondary ion mass spectrometry for annealing at 700 °C for 5 min and 15 min. Finally this paper brings some physical insights explaining the technological benefit coming from PLAD technique over standard ion implantation that have been demonstrated in recent publications [F. Lallement et al., Proceedings of VLSI, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, in press [1

  9. Laser activation of Ultra Shallow Junctions (USJ) doped by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervisch, Vanessa; Larmande, Yannick; Delaporte, Philippe; Sarnet, Thierry; Sentis, Marc; Etienne, Hasnaa; Torregrosa, Frank; Cristiano, Fuccio; Fazzini, Pier Francesco

    2009-03-01

    Today, the main challenges for the realization of the source/drain extensions concern the ultra-low energy implantation and the activation of the maximum amount of dopants with a minimized diffusion. Among the different annealing processes, one solution is the laser thermal annealing. Many studies [F. Torregrosa, C. Laviron, F. Milesi, M. Hernandez, H. Faik, J. Venturini, Proc. 14th International Conference on Ion Implant Technology, 2004; M. Hernandez, J. Venturini, D. Zahorski, J. Boulmer, D. Débarre, G. Kerrien, T. Sarnet, C. Laviron, M.N Semeria, D. Camel, J.L Santailler, Appl. Surf. Sci. 208-209 (2003) 345-351] have shown that the association of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) and Laser Thermal Process (LTP) allows to obtain junctions of a few nanometers with a high electrical activation. All the wafers studied have been implanted by PULSION ® (PIII implanter developed by Ion Beam Services) with an acceleration voltage of 1 kV and a dose of 6 × 10 15 at./cm 2. In this paper, we compare the annealing process achieved with three excimer lasers: ArF, KrF and XeCl with a wavelength of respectively 193, 248 and 308 nm. We analyse the results in terms of boron activation and junction depth. To complete this study, we have observed the effect of pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) before PIII process on boron implantation and boron activation. We show that Ge PAI implanted by classical beam line allows a decrease of the junction depth from 20 down to 12 nm in the as-implanted condition. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analyses were performed in order to study the structure of pre-amorphized silicon and to estimate the thickness of the amorphous layer. In order to determine the sheet resistance ( Rs) and the junction depth ( Xj), we have used the four-point probe technique (4PP) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis. To complete the electrical characterizations some samples have been analyzed by non-contact optical measurements. All the results are presented as a function of the laser fluence and the laser wavelength.

  10. Fabrication and Structural Characterization of Co-implanted Ultra Shallow Junctions for Integration in Piezoresistive Silicon Sensors Compatible with CMOS Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Mustafa, R.

    2013-12-01

    Fabrication and structural characterization of Indium and Carbon implanted n-type Silicon layers forming ultra-shallow junction for integration in piezoresistive sensors compatible with CMOS processing is studied in detail. The co-implantation technology together with medium range annealing temperature regimes seem to play an important role at atomistic level and provide a process control to engineer the strain and maintain the quality of surface/layer/active device region for further manufacturing process cycle. This is likely to impact the yield and reliability for the fabrication of these devices for diverse applications.

  11. Fabrication of Ultra-Shallow Junctions on 300 mm Wafers Using the Plasma Immersion Implanter PULSION registered Followed by Spike Annealing Using LEVITOR Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Torregrosa, Frank; Etienne, Hasnaa; Sempere, Guillaume; Mathieu, Gilles; Roux, Laurent; Milesi, Frederic; Gonzatti, Frederic

    2008-11-03

    Thanks to the European Project SEA-NET, an industrial version of the IBS Plasma Ion Implantation tool has been installed in LETI for the fabrication of Ultra-Shallow Junction for 45 and 32 nm CMOS on 200 and 300 mm wafers. In this study, we present first doping results on 300 mm wafers using BF{sub 3} plasma. Annealing after PULSION implantation is performed by the ASM furnace LEVITOR. This tool, which works on conduction heating is emissivity independent for temperature control and allows reaching high ramp up and ramp down speeds (up to 900 deg. C/s). Main characteristics of as implanted wafers are presented (metal contamination 2E10/cm{sup 2}, SIMS depth profiles down to 5 nm). Then the effect of convection gas in the annealing process on sheet resistance, junction depth and uniformity is presented.

  12. Enabling Solutions for 28 nm CMOS Advanced Junction Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. I.; Kuo, P.; Lai, H. H.; Ma, K.; Liu, R.; Wu, H. H.; Chan, M.; Yang, C. L.; Wu, J. Y.; Guo, B. N.; Colombeau, B.; Thirumal, T.; Arevalo, E.; Toh, T.; Shim, K. H.; Sun, H. L.; Wu, T.; Lu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Controlling short channel effects for further scaled CMOS is required to take full advantage of the introduction of high K/metal gate or stress induced carrier mobility enhancement. Ultra-Shallow junction formation is necessary to minimize the short channel effects. In this paper, we will discuss the challenges for 28 nm Ultra-Shallow Junction formations in terms of figure of merits of Rs/Xj and junction leakage. We will demonstrate that by adopting and integrating Carborane (CBH, C2B10H12) molecular implant and Phosphorus along with co-implantation and PTC II (VSEA Process Temperature Control) technology, sub-32 nm pLDD and nLDD junction targets can be timely achieved using traditional anneals. Those damage engineering solutions can be readily implemented on state-of-the-art 28 nm device manufacturing.

  13. Excimer laser activation of ultra-shallow junctions in doped Si: Modeling, experiments and real time process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmar, Nadjib; Darif, Mohamed; Millon, Eric; Petit, Agnès; Etienne, Hasnaa; Delaporte, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    This work concerns the ALDIP (Laser Activation of Doping agents Implanted by Plasma immersion) project that was a successful collaboration with Ion Beam Services (IBS) corporation, the "Lasers, Plasmas and Photonic Processes" (LP3) laboratory and the GREMI laboratory. The aim of this work is to control the melted thickness (i.e. junction thickness in the range 10-100 nm) by the Real Time Reflectivity (TRR) monitoring during the Laser Thermal Processing (LTP). The LTP is achieved by using a KrF laser beam (248 nm, 27 ns) with a homogeneous 'Top-Hat' space distribution to induce a selective melting and the resolidification of the doped Si:B samples on few nanometers. This recrystallization is conducted here after the pre-amorphisation process resulting from the ionic implantation of Si (PIII IBS implanter). Thus, all the studied samples are partially amorphized and boron doped. TRR method allows the accurate evaluation of the melting threshold, the duration of the melting phase, and the maximum melted thickness. Obtained results versus laser fluence are shown in the new case of under vacuum treatment. In order to calibrate the TRR method (to determine the intensity and the profile of the TRR signal versus the melting depth), we have used the secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) analysis. This technique gives the doping agents profile versus the depth before and after LTP and confirms also the melting kinetics from TRR results.

  14. Junction formation during desiccation cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toga, K. B.; Alaca, B. Erdem

    2006-08-01

    In order to provide a sound physical basis for the understanding of the formation of desiccation crack networks, an experimental study is presented addressing junction formation. Focusing on junctions, basic features of the network determining the final pattern, provides an elemental approach and imparts conceptual clarity to the rather complicated problem of the evolution of crack patterns. Using coffee-water mixtures a clear distinction between junction formation during nucleation and propagation is achieved. It is shown that for the same drying suspension, one can switch from the well-known symmetric triple junctions that are unique to the nucleation phase to propagation junctions that are purely dictated by the variations of the stress state. In the latter case, one can even manipulate the path of a propagating crack in a deterministic fashion by changing the stress state within the suspension. Clear microscopic evidence is provided for the formation of propagation junctions, and material inhomogeneity is observed to be reflected by a broad distribution of angles, in stark contrast to shrinkage cracks in homogeneous solid films.

  15. Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +}-implants in Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S.; Petersen, D. H.; Hansen, O.; Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F.; Doyle, B. L.; Kontos, A.

    2012-12-15

    The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 Degree-Sign C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H{sup +} beam by utilizing the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha})2{alpha} nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C.

  16. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  17. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  18. Nickel silicide formation on shallow junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu-Long; Agarwal, Aditya; Ru, Guo-Ping; Cai, Gary; Li, Bing-Zong

    2005-08-01

    Nickel silicide formation on shallow junctions is investigated in this paper by X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, cross-sectional and plan-view transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. A mixture of Ni2Si and NiSi with a grain size of 12 nm is confirmed for silicidation on boron (B) doped junctions after annealing at 300 °C, while a pure Ni2Si layer with a grain size of 19 nm forms on arsenic (As) doped junctions. After annealing at 450 °C NiSi formation is verified for both As and B doped junctions. Two significant dopant peaks are revealed after silicidation regardless of the As or the B case. One is located near silicide/Si interface and the other is found to be several nanometers below the silicide film surface. Dopant segregation and Kirkendall voiding effect are employed to explain these results. Comparing with the B case, for silicidation on the As doped junctions a rougher silicide/Si interface is revealed regardless of the anneal temperature of 300 °C or 450 °C. At 450 °C a more ordered grain texture is demonstrated for silicidation on the B doped junctions.

  19. Study of shallow junction formation by boron-containing cluster ion implantation of silicon and two-stage annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin-Ming

    Shallow junction formation made by low energy ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing is facing a major challenge for ULSI (ultra large scale integration) as the line width decreases down to the sub micrometer region. The issues include low beam current, the channeling effect in low energy ion implantation and TED (transient enhanced diffusion) during annealing after ion implantation. In this work, boron containing small cluster ions, such as GeB, SiB and SiB2, was generated by using the SNICS (source of negative ion by cesium sputtering) ion source to implant into Si substrates to form shallow junctions. The use of boron containing cluster ions effectively reduces the boron energy while keeping the energy of the cluster ion beam at a high level. At the same time, it reduces the channeling effect due to amorphization by co-implanted heavy atoms like Ge and Si. Cluster ions have been used to produce 0.65--2keV boron for low energy ion implantation. Two stage annealing, which is a combination of low temperature (550°C) preannealing and high temperature annealing (1000°C), was carried out to anneal the Si sample implanted by GeB, SiBn clusters. The key concept of two-step annealing, that is, the separation of crystal regrowth, point defects removal with dopant activation from dopant diffusion, is discussed in detail. The advantages of the two stage annealing include better lattice structure, better dopant activation and retarded boron diffusion. The junction depth of the two stage annealed GeB sample was only half that of the one-step annealed sample, indicating that TED was suppressed by two stage annealing. Junction depths as small as 30 nm have been achieved by two stage annealing of sample implanted with 5 x 10-4/cm2 of 5 keV GeB at 1000°C for 1 second. The samples were evaluated by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) profiling, TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry)/channeling. Cluster ion implantation in combination with two-step annealing is effective in fabricating ultra-shallow junctions.

  20. PULSION registered: A Versatile 200 to 300 mm Bridge Tool Plasma Immersion Ion Implanter for Ultra-Shallow Doping and Nanotechology Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Torregrosa, Frank; Etienne, Hasnaa; Sempere, Guillaume; Mathieu, Gilles; Roux, Laurent; Milesi, Frederic; Gonzatti, Frederic

    2008-11-03

    Thanks to the European Projects SEA-NET and PULLNANO, an industrial version of the IBS Plasma Ion Implantation tool has been installed in LETI for the fabrication of Ultra-Shallow Junctions for 45 and 32 nm CMOS on 200 and 300 mm wafers. In this paper, we present the main machine characteristics (layout, contamination, homogeneity, reproducibility, uptime) and we show that implanted wafers are compatible with the 32 nm nodes requirements. Then doping results (sheet resistance vs junction depth and leakage current) using several annealing technics are presented (laser, flash and spike anneals). In the second part of the paper, versatility of the tool is demonstrated with its use for other applications (3D doping, hydrogenation, solar cells...)

  1. Ultra-shallow seismic imaging of the top of the saturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, Steven D.; Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Steeples, Don W.

    2010-04-01

    We collected ultra-shallow seismic-reflection data to image the near-surface stratigraphy of a Kansas River point bar. We were successful in identifying a discontinuous clay layer and the top of the saturated zone at depths of 0.95 and 1.4 m. Seismic walkaway data collected using various .22-caliber ammunition show that decreased source energy is necessary to generate higher frequencies and prevent clipping of critical near-offset traces needed to identify ultra-shallow reflections. The seismic reflections exhibited average normal moveout velocities of 180-195 m/s with dominant frequencies of 200-450 Hz. Coincident subsurface features were also imaged using 200-MHz ground-penetrating radar. This study presents the shallowest seismic reflection from the top of the saturated zone reported in the literature to date and further demonstrates the potential of using seismic-reflection methods for ultra-shallow imaging of the subsurface as a stand-alone tool or in conjunction with other high-resolution geophysical techniques.

  2. Semiconductor junction formation by directed heat

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Robert B.

    1988-03-24

    The process of the invention includes applying precursors 6 with N- and P-type dopants therein to a silicon web 2, with the web 2 then being baked in an oven 10 to drive off excessive solvents, and the web 2 is then heated using a pulsed high intensity light in a mechanism 12 at 1100.degree.-1150.degree. C. for about 10 seconds to simultaneously form semiconductor junctions in both faces of the web.

  3. Ultra-shallow junction measurements: A review of SIMS approaches for annealed and processed wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Gary R.; Smith, Stephen P.; Hitzman, Charles J.; Chia, Victor K. F.; Magee, Charles W.

    1998-11-01

    As device sizes continue to shrink, ion implant energies and implant depths have also decreased requiring improved characterization methods. SIMS continues to be an effective choice for characterizing both unannealed and annealed dopant distributions. New methodologies have been required, and are still under development in order to accurately and reproducibly measure very shallow dopant profiles. In this paper, we outline some of the fundamental issues, the methods in use today and show where more work is needed.

  4. Ultra-shallow junction measurements: A review of SIMS approaches for annealed and processed wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, Gary R.; Smith, Stephen P.; Hitzman, Charles J.; Chia, Victor K. F.; Magee, Charles W.

    1998-11-24

    As device sizes continue to shrink, ion implant energies and implant depths have also decreased requiring improved characterization methods. SIMS continues to be an effective choice for characterizing both unannealed and annealed dopant distributions. New methodologies have been required, and are still under development in order to accurately and reproducibly measure very shallow dopant profiles. In this paper, we outline some of the fundamental issues, the methods in use today and show where more work is needed.

  5. Photocarrier Radiometry Characterization of Ultra-shallow Junctions (USJ) in Silicon with Excimer Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Bincheng; Ren, Shengdong; Wang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The activation and recrystallization in arsenic ion-implanted silicon under excimer laser (193 nm) irradiation is investigated using photocarrier radiometry (PCR). Arsenic ion-implanted silicon wafers with a dose of and an energy of 1 keV were irradiated at different laser parameters, such as the laser fluence, shot number, and repetition rate. The excimer laser irradiation-induced enhancement of PCR signals of implanted silicon samples showed that the implantation-induced crystalline structural damage was reduced and the implanted ions were effectively activated.

  6. Medium energy ion scattering analysis of the evolution and annealing of damage and associated dopant redistribution of ultra shallow implants in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. A.; Reading, M. A.; Armour, D. G.; Carter, G.; Zalm, P. C.; Bailey, P.; Noakes, T. C. Q.

    As junction depths in advanced semiconductor devices move to below 20 nm, the process of disorder evolution during ion implantation at ultra low energies becomes increasingly influenced by the surface. This may also hold for shallow regrowth and dopant redistribution processes during subsequent thermal annealing of the substrate. The investigation of these near-surface processes requires analytical techniques with a depth resolution of≤1 nm. Medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) has the unique capability of simultaneously providing quantitative, high-resolution depth distributions of implant disorder (displaced Si lattice atoms) and of implanted atoms, albeit not of light species. We report here a comparative MEIS investigation into the growth mode of shallow disordered/amorphised layers during≤1 keV B+ and 2.5 keV As+ ion implantation into Si. In both cases the growth of the damage depth profiles differs significantly from the energy deposition function, as it is strongly determined on the one hand by the proximity of the surface acting as a nucleation site for migrating point defects formed during implantation, which results in planar growth of the amorphous layer, and on the other by the dynamic annealing processes operating at room temperature. When such defect recombination processes are inhibited, e.g. for low dose, ultra shallow 200 eV B+ implants, MEIS shows that defect production yields exceeding the Kinchin-Pease model predictions are achieved. For As implants, a correlation is observed between the movement of the As and the depth of the growing, planar amorphous layer. Thermal annealing of As implanted samples at different temperatures and durations leads to solid phase epitaxial regrowth. During regrowth, MEIS shows that there is a close correlation between damage dissolution, the movement of nearly half of the As dopant into substitutional sites and the snowploughing of a fraction of the As in front of the advancing amorphous/crystalline interface leading to the formation of a less than 1 nm wide As pile-up layer trapped under the oxide.

  7. Low temperature selective silicon-germanium-boron alloy technology for nanoscale CMOS junctions and contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannavaram, Shyam Akshay

    As device dimensions continue to scale down into the sub-100 nm CMOS (Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor) regime, enormous challenges with respect to formation of advanced junctions and contacts are encountered. These challenges come in the form of the need for ultra-shallow extension junctions (<20 nm) with very low sheet resistances (<400 O/sq.), with near-perfect, laterally abrupt profiles (<2 nm/decade) and process compatibility with respect to ultra-low resistivity metal (silicide) contact formation. In this work, a novel junction formation method was developed to address the above-mentioned problems simultaneously. In order to achieve above-equilibrium activation at low temperatures, a diffusion-free junction process based on in-situ activated Silicon-Germanium-Boron ternary alloy as-deposited junctions was proposed as potential solutions for end-of-the-roadmap ultra-shallow p +/n junctions. These films were grown at 500°C by Ultra-High Vacuum Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (UHV-RTCVD). In order to achieve above-equilibrium stable dopant activation, a novel idea that allowed for the substitutional incorporation of very high levels of boron in a strained SiGe lattice was employed. The reverse junction leakage of the as-deposited and annealed junctions satisfied a stringent budget of 1% of the device off-state leakage for both, the high performance and low power designs. Temperature dependent leakage current measurements indicated a generation-dominated current for temperatures in the range of device operation ( VR = -1 V, 25--100°C) and band-to-band tunneling only at high biases (>4 V). The nominal slope of the junction doping profile decay from SIMS was estimated to be less than 4 nm/decade. Subsequent improvements in determining the actual junction abruptness by reducing the SIMS primary beam energy were incremental owing to nonelimination of other artifacts. To overcome these limitations, the junction abruptness was quantified using the reverse-bias C-V extraction method. Considering the junction alternatives for the sub-70 nm technology nodes and the thermal compatibility requirements with advanced gate stacks that employ high-k dielectrics and/or metal gates, the as-deposited SiGeB junction and contact technology finds great promise with respect to its potential applicability. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  8. Shallow junction formation by polyatomic cluster ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Daisuke; Shimada, Norihiro; Matsuo, Jiro; Yamada, Isao

    1996-12-31

    Recent integrated circuits require shallow junctions which are less than 0.1 {mu}m depth. This creates a strong demand for low energy ion beam techniques. Equivalent low-energy and high-current ion beams can be realized quite easily with clusters, because the kinetic energy of the cluster is shared between the constituent atoms. Additionally, cluster-ion beams avoid damage due to excessive charge. We have used polyatomic clusters, decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}), as a kind of B cluster, in order to form a very shallow p{sup +} junction. A B SIMS profile of B{sub 10}H{sub 14} implanted into Si (100) at 20keV was quite similar to that of B implanted at 2keV. These SIMS measurements revealed that the cluster ion beam can realize equivalent low-energy implantation quite easily. The implantation efficiency achieved was about 90%. The damage induced by B{sub 10}H{sub 14} implantation was completely removed by a 600{degrees}C furnace anneal for 30 min, and implanted B atoms were electrically activated. After rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 900{degrees}C of a sample prepared with a close of 5{times}10{sup 13} ion/cm{sup 2}, the sheet resistance decreased to about 600W/sq. and the activation efficiency was about 50%. These results show that a polyatomic cluster ion beam is useful for shallow junction formation.

  9. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Lavoie, Christian; Alptekin, Emre; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Zhu, Frank; Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M.

    2016-04-01

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  10. The Onecut Transcription Factor HNF-6 Regulates in Motor Neurons the Formation of the Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Audouard, Emilie; Schakman, Olivier; René, Frédérique; Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Huber, Andrea B.; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Gailly, Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The neuromuscular junctions are the specialized synapses whereby spinal motor neurons control the contraction of skeletal muscles. The formation of the neuromuscular junctions is controlled by a complex interplay of multiple mechanisms coordinately activated in motor nerve terminals and in their target myotubes. However, the transcriptional regulators that control in motor neurons the genetic programs involved in neuromuscular junction development remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the Onecut transcription factor HNF-6 regulates in motor neurons the formation of the neuromuscular junctions. Indeed, adult Hnf6 mutant mice exhibit hindlimb muscle weakness and abnormal locomotion. This results from defects of hindlimb neuromuscular junctions characterized by an abnormal morphology and defective localization of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin at the motor nerve terminals. These defects are consequences of altered and delayed formation of the neuromuscular junctions in newborn mutant animals. Furthermore, we show that the expression level of numerous regulators of neuromuscular junction formation, namely agrin, neuregulin-2 and TGF-ß receptor II, is downregulated in the spinal motor neurons of Hnf6 mutant newborn animals. Finally, altered formation of neuromuscular junction-like structures in a co-culture model of wildtype myotubes with mutant embryonic spinal cord slices is rescued by recombinant agrin and neuregulin, indicating that depletion in these factors contributes to defective neuromuscular junction development in the absence of HNF-6. Thus, HNF-6 controls in spinal motor neurons a genetic program that coordinates the formation of hindlimb neuromuscular junctions. PMID:23227180

  11. Fabrication of sub-40-nm p-n junctions for 0.18 {mu}m MOS device applications using a cluster-tool-compatible, nanosecond thermal doping technique

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, K.H.; McCarthy, A.M.

    1993-09-20

    In this paper, we introduced an alternative deep-submicrometer doping technology, Projection Gas Immersion Laser Doping (P-GILD). Representing the marriage of lithography and diffusion, P-GILD is a resistless, step-and-repeat doping process that utilizes excimer laser light patterned by a dielectric reticle to selectively heat and, thereby, dope regions of an integrated circuit. Results of physical and electrical characterization are presented for ultra-shallow p{sup +} {minus}n and n{sup +} {minus}p junctions produced by gas immersion laser doping (GILD), a phenomenologically identical technique that utilizes an aluminum contact mask rather than a dielectric reticle to pattern the beam. Junctions produced using GILD exhibit uniformly-doped, abrupt impurity profiles with no apparent defect formation in the silicon. Electrically, sheet and contact resistivities of the ultra-shallow junctions are less than 100{Omega}/sheet and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} {Omega}{sm_bullet}cm{sup 2}, respectively, while n{sup +} {minus}p and p{sup +} {minus}n diodes exhibit nearly ideal forward bias behavior and reverse leakage current densities less than 5 nA/cm{sup 2} at {minus}5V. Uniformity of both diode characteristics and sheet resistance for junctions produced by the step-and-repeat process is also shown to be better than {plus_minus}5% across a 4-inch wafer.

  12. Adherens Junction Formation Inhibits Lentivirus Entry and Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Padmashali, Roshan; You, Hui; Karnik, Nikhila; Lei, Pedro; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    Although cellular signaling pathways that affect lentivirus infection have been investigated, the role of cell-cell interactions in lentiviral gene delivery remains elusive. In the course of our studies we observed that lentiviral gene transfer was a strong function of the position of epithelial cells within colonies. While peripheral cells were transduced efficiently, cells in the center of colonies were resistant to gene transfer. In addition, gene delivery was enhanced significantly under culture conditions that disrupted adherens junctions (AJ) but decreased upon AJ formation. In agreement, gene knockdown and gain-of-function approaches showed that α-catenin, a key component of the AJ complex prevented lentivirus gene transfer. Using a doxycycline regulatable system we showed that expression of dominant negative E-cadherin enhanced gene transfer in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, dissolution of AJ by doxycycline increased entry of lentiviral particles into the cell cytoplasm in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together our results demonstrate that AJ formation renders cells non-permissive to lentiviral gene transfer and may facilitate development of simple means to enhance gene delivery or combat virus infection. PMID:24236116

  13. Molecular mechanisms regulating formation, trafficking and processing of annular gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Falk, Matthias M; Bell, Cheryl L; Kells Andrews, Rachael M; Murray, Sandra A

    2016-01-01

    Internalization of gap junction plaques results in the formation of annular gap junction vesicles. The factors that regulate the coordinated internalization of the gap junction plaques to form annular gap junction vesicles, and the subsequent events involved in annular gap junction processing have only relatively recently been investigated in detail. However it is becoming clear that while annular gap junction vesicles have been demonstrated to be degraded by autophagosomal and endo-lysosomal pathways, they undergo a number of additional processing events. Here, we characterize the morphology of the annular gap junction vesicle and review the current knowledge of the processes involved in their formation, fission, fusion, and degradation. In addition, we address the possibility for connexin protein recycling back to the plasma membrane to contribute to gap junction formation and intercellular communication. Information on gap junction plaque removal from the plasma membrane and the subsequent processing of annular gap junction vesicles is critical to our understanding of cell-cell communication as it relates to events regulating development, cell homeostasis, unstable proliferation of cancer cells, wound healing, changes in the ischemic heart, and many other physiological and pathological cellular phenomena. PMID:27230503

  14. Synergistic effect of ATP for RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Takuma; Han, Yong-Woon; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Yokota, Hiroaki; Nakao, Kimiko; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Ono, Teruo; Harada, Yoshie

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RuvB hexameric ring motor proteins, together with RuvAs, promote branch migration of Holliday junction DNA. Zero mode waveguides (ZMWs) constitute of nanosized holes and enable the visualization of a single fluorescent molecule under micromolar order of the molecules, which is applicable to characterize the formation of RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex. In this study, we used ZMWs and counted the number of RuvBs binding to RuvA–Holliday junction DNA complex. Our data demonstrated that different nucleotide analogs increased the amount of Cy5-RuvBs binding to RuvA–Holliday junction DNA complex in the following order: no nucleotide, ADP, ATPγS, and mixture of ADP and ATPγS. These results suggest that not only ATP binding to RuvB but also ATP hydrolysis by RuvB facilitates a stable RuvA–RuvB–Holliday junction DNA complex formation. PMID:26658024

  15. Benefits of Damage Engineering for PMOS Junction Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd

    2011-01-07

    As CMOS devices continue to shrink, the formation of ultra shallow junction (USJ) in the source/drain extension remains to be a key challenge requiring high dopant activation, shallow dopant profile and abrupt junctions. The next generations of sub nano-CMOS devices impose a new set of challenges such as elimination of residual defects resulting in higher leakage, difficulty to control lateral diffusion, junction stability post anneal and junction formation in new materials. To address these challenges for advanced technological nodes beyond 32 nm, it is imperative to explore novel species and techniques. Molecular species such as Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}), a novel doping species and a promising alternative to monomer Boron is of considerable interest due to the performance boost for 22 nm low power and high performance devices. Also, to reduce residual defects, damage engineering methodologies have generated a lot of attention as it has demonstrated significant benefits in device performance. Varian proprietary techniques to perform implants at cold temperatures (PTC II) have demonstrated lower junction leakage, enhanced activation, reduced dopant diffusion and less dopant deactivation due to the reduction of self-interstitial atoms present at the end-of-range (EOR) with low implant temperatures. In this paper, for the first time, there is a comprehensive study of the effect of implant temperature on defect engineering affecting deactivation/reactivation, and it is well established in this paper that colder the implant temperature the better it is for damage engineering with reduced EOR defects and better amorphization. The effect has been studied over a wide range of implant temperature. To understand any difference in deactivation between molecular and monomer Boron and to provide direct comparison equivalent Boron implants, co-implanted with Carbon were also studied. Implants with wide range of temperatures are implemented using PTC II. This paper will also show how damage reduction correlates with optimum junction formation and stability.

  16. Benefits of Damage Engineering for PMOS Junction Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd

    2011-01-01

    As CMOS devices continue to shrink, the formation of ultra shallow junction (USJ) in the source/drain extension remains to be a key challenge requiring high dopant activation, shallow dopant profile and abrupt junctions. The next generations of sub nano-CMOS devices impose a new set of challenges such as elimination of residual defects resulting in higher leakage, difficulty to control lateral diffusion, junction stability post anneal and junction formation in new materials. To address these challenges for advanced technological nodes beyond 32 nm, it is imperative to explore novel species and techniques. Molecular species such as Carborane (C2B10H12), a novel doping species and a promising alternative to monomer Boron is of considerable interest due to the performance boost for 22 nm low power and high performance devices. Also, to reduce residual defects, damage engineering methodologies have generated a lot of attention as it has demonstrated significant benefits in device performance. Varian proprietary techniques to perform implants at cold temperatures (PTC II) have demonstrated lower junction leakage, enhanced activation, reduced dopant diffusion and less dopant deactivation due to the reduction of self-interstitial atoms present at the end-of-range (EOR) with low implant temperatures. In this paper, for the first time, there is a comprehensive study of the effect of implant temperature on defect engineering affecting deactivation/reactivation, and it is well established in this paper that colder the implant temperature the better it is for damage engineering with reduced EOR defects and better amorphization. The effect has been studied over a wide range of implant temperature. To understand any difference in deactivation between molecular and monomer Boron and to provide direct comparison equivalent Boron implants, co-implanted with Carbon were also studied. Implants with wide range of temperatures are implemented using PTC II. This paper will also show how damage reduction correlates with optimum junction formation and stability.

  17. Excimer laser annealing: A gold process for CZ silicon junction formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, David C.; Bottenberg, William R.; Byron, Stanley; Alexander, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A cold process using an excimer laser for junction formation in silicon has been evaluated as a way to avoid problems associated with thermal diffusion. Conventional thermal diffusion can cause bulk precipitation of SiOx and SiC or fail to completely activate the dopant, leaving a degenerate layer at the surface. Experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of fabricating high quality p-n junctions using a pulsed excimer laser for junction formation at remelt temperature with ion-implanted surfaces. Solar-cell efficiency exceeding 16 percent was obtained using Czochralski single-crystal silicon without benefit of back surface field or surface passivation. Characterization shows that the formation of uniform, shallow junctions (approximately 0.25 micron) by excimer laser scanning preserves the minority carrier lifetime that leads to high current collection. However, the process is sensitive to initial surface conditions and handling parameters that drive the cost up.

  18. SOS1 and Ras regulate epithelial tight junction formation in the human airway through EMP1.

    PubMed

    Durgan, Joanne; Tao, Guangbo; Walters, Matthew S; Florey, Oliver; Schmidt, Anja; Arbelaez, Vanessa; Rosen, Neal; Crystal, Ronald G; Hall, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The human airway is lined with respiratory epithelial cells, which create a critical barrier through the formation of apical tight junctions. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this process, an RNAi screen for guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) was performed in human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). We report that SOS1, acting through the Ras/MEK/ERK pathway, is essential for tight junction formation. Global microarray analysis identifies epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1), an integral tetraspan membrane protein, as a major transcriptional target. EMP1 is indispensable for tight junction formation and function in 16HBE cells and in a human airway basal progenitor-like cell line (BCi-NS1.1). Furthermore, EMP1 is significantly downregulated in human lung cancers. Together, these data identify important roles for SOS1/Ras and EMP1 in tight junction assembly during airway morphogenesis. PMID:25394671

  19. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    Triple junctions are probably the most remarkable features of plate boundaries since their presence constitutes one of the major demonstrations of plate tectonics theory. Divergent (R-R-R) triple junctions (at 120° and T junctions) are particular ones since their stability depends on the exact values of the relative velocities of plate divergence and hence is strongly affected by plate rheology and processes of crustal accretion. The mechanisms of their formation and long-term steadiness are not well understood even though it is commonly accepted, generally based on common sense, that the geometry and stability of triple junctions should be related to the intuitively acceptable geometric considerations that 3-branch configurations should be "stable" over the time on a 3D Earth surface. That said, most plate boundaries are in fact 2D in terms that they involve only two plates, while junctions with 3 and more branches, if even mechanically not excluded, are generally short-lived and hence rarely observed at tectonic scale. Indeed, it has been long-time suggested that triple junctions result from evolution of short-lived quadruple junctions, yet, without providing a consistent mechanical explanation or experimental demonstration of this process, due to the rheological complexity of the lithosphere and that of strain localization and crustal accretion processes. For example, it is supposed that R-R-R junctions form as result of axisymmetric mantle upwellings. However, impingement of buoyant fluid on a non-pre-stressed lithosphere should result in multiple radial cracks, as is well known from previous analog and numerical experiments. In case of uni-directionally pre-stressed lithosphere, it has also shown that linear 2D rift structures should be formed. Therefore, a complete 3D thermos-mechanically consistent approach is needed to understand the processes of formation of multi-branch junctions. With this goal we here reproduce and study the processes of multi-branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  20. Ultra-Shallow Depth Profiling of Arsenic Implants in Silicon by Hydride Generation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Atsuko; Kojima, Hisao; Itoga, Toshihiko; Kanehori, Keiichi

    1995-08-01

    High resolution depth profiling of arsenic (As) implanted into silicon wafers by a chemical technique is described. Silicon wafers are precisely etched through repeated oxidation by hydrogen peroxide solution and dissolution of the oxide by hydrofluoric acid solution. The etched silicon thickness is determined by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Arsenic concentration is determined by hydride generation ICP-AES (HG-ICP-AES) with prereduction using potassium iodide. The detection limit of As in a 4-inch silicon wafer is 2.4×1018 atoms/cm3. The etched silicon thickness is controlled to less than 4±2 atomic layers. Depth profiling of an ultra-shallow As diffusion layer with the proposed method shows good agreement with profiling using the four-probe method or secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  1. V(D)J recombination coding junction formation without DNA homology: processing of coding termini.

    PubMed Central

    Boubnov, N V; Wills, Z P; Weaver, D T

    1993-01-01

    Coding junction formation in V(D)J recombination generates diversity in the antigen recognition structures of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor molecules by combining processes of deletion of terminal coding sequences and addition of nucleotides prior to joining. We have examined the role of coding end DNA composition in junction formation with plasmid substrates containing defined homopolymers flanking the recombination signal sequence elements. We found that coding junctions formed efficiently with or without terminal DNA homology. The extent of junctional deletion was conserved independent of coding ends with increased, partial, or no DNA homology. Interestingly, G/C homopolymer coding ends showed reduced deletion regardless of DNA homology. Therefore, DNA homology cannot be the primary determinant that stabilizes coding end structures for processing and joining. PMID:8413286

  2. Formation of carbon nanotube semiconductor-metal intramolecular junctions by self-assembly of vacancy defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Do; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Yu, Jaejun; Yoon, Euijoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2007-10-01

    Atomistic processes of carbon nanotube semiconductor-metal intramolecular junction formation are investigated by tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles total energy calculations. We show that the junctions can be formed by reconstruction of vacancy clusters through a series of generalized Stone-Wales transformations [Chem. Phys. Lett. 128, 501 (1986)]. Our simulations suggest a mechanism for synthesis of carbon nanotube semiconductor-metal intramolecular junctions with specific locations and controlled sizes and show the possibility of application to nanoelectronic devices. Our simulations study also provides a microscopic explanation to the superplastic deformation in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  3. Functional formation of heterotypic gap junction channels by connexins-40 and -43

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xianming; Xu, Qin; Veenstra, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Connexin40 (Cx40) and connexin43 (Cx43) are co-expressed in the cardiovascular system, yet their ability to form functional heterotypic Cx43/Cx40 gap junctions remains controversial. We paired Cx43 or Cx40 stably-transfected N2a cells to examine the formation and biophysical properties of heterotypic Cx43/Cx40 gap junction channels. Dual whole cell patch clamp recordings demonstrated that Cx43 and Cx40 form functional heterotypic gap junctions with asymmetric transjunctional voltage (Vj) dependent gating properties. The heterotypic Cx43/Cx40 gap junctions exhibited less Vj gating when the Cx40 cell was positive and pronounced gating when negative. Endogenous N2a cell connexin expression levels were 1,000-fold lower than exogenously expressed Cx40 and Cx43 levels, measured by real-time PCR and Western blotting methods, suggestive of heterotypic gap junction formation by exogenous Cx40 and Cx43. Imposing a [KCl] gradient across the heterotypic gap junction modestly diminished the asymmetry of the macroscopic normalized junctional conductance – voltage (Gj-Vj) curve when [KCl] was reduced by 50% on the Cx43 side and greatly exacerbated the Vj gating asymmetries when lowered on the Cx40 side. Pairing wild-type (wt) Cx43 with the Cx40 E9,13K mutant protein produced a nearly symmetrical heterotypic Gj-Vj curve. These studies conclusively demonstrate the ability of Cx40 and Cx43 to form rectifying heterotypic gap junctions, owing primarily to alternate amino-terminal (NT) domain acidic and basic amino acid differences that may play a significant role in the physiology and/or pathology of the cardiovascular tissues including cardiac conduction properties and myoendothelial intercellular communication. PMID:25483586

  4. Assessment of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Activity in Biological Samples by Receptor Internalization and Adherens Junction Formation

    PubMed Central

    Obinata, Hideru; Hla, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid mediator involved in many biological actions, including vascular homeostasis and immune cell trafficking. S1P activity is mediated by specific G protein-coupled receptors, leading to multiple physiological responses including adherens junction formation in endothelial cells. Here, we describe bioassays for rapidly assessing S1P activity in biological fluids based on ligand-induced receptor internalization in transfected HEK293 cells and consequent adherens junction formation of vascular endothelial cells. PMID:22528440

  5. Y-junction carbon nanocoils: synthesis by chemical vapor deposition and formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Er-Xiong; Wang, Jing; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Wen-Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ze-Chen; Luo, Zhi-Jia; Yang, Hai-Jie; Zou, Cheng-Xiong; Kang, Jianli; Pan, Lujun

    2015-01-01

    Y-junction carbon nanocoils (Y-CNCs) were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition using Ni catalyst prepared by spray-coating method. According to the emerging morphologies of Y-CNCs, several growth models were advanced to elucidate their formation mechanisms. Regarding the Y-CNCs without metal catalyst in the Y-junctions, fusing of contiguous CNCs and a tip-growth mechanism are considered to be responsible for their formation. However, as for the Y-CNCs with catalyst presence in the Y-junctions, the formation can be ascribed to nanoscale soldering/welding and bottom-growth mechanism. It is found that increasing spray-coating time for catalyst preparation generates agglomerated larger nanoparticles strongly adhering to the substrate, resulting in bottom-growth of CNCs and appearance of the metal catalyst in the Y-junctions. In the contrary case, CNCs catalyzed by isolated smaller nanoparticles develop Y-junctions with an absence of metal catalyst by virtue of weaker adhesion of catalyst with the substrate and tip-growth of CNCs. PMID:26063127

  6. Y-junction carbon nanocoils: synthesis by chemical vapor deposition and formation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Er-Xiong; Wang, Jing; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Wang, Wen-Yi; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ze-Chen; Luo, Zhi-Jia; Yang, Hai-Jie; Zou, Cheng-Xiong; Kang, Jianli; Pan, Lujun

    2015-01-01

    Y-junction carbon nanocoils (Y-CNCs) were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition using Ni catalyst prepared by spray-coating method. According to the emerging morphologies of Y-CNCs, several growth models were advanced to elucidate their formation mechanisms. Regarding the Y-CNCs without metal catalyst in the Y-junctions, fusing of contiguous CNCs and a tip-growth mechanism are considered to be responsible for their formation. However, as for the Y-CNCs with catalyst presence in the Y-junctions, the formation can be ascribed to nanoscale soldering/welding and bottom-growth mechanism. It is found that increasing spray-coating time for catalyst preparation generates agglomerated larger nanoparticles strongly adhering to the substrate, resulting in bottom-growth of CNCs and appearance of the metal catalyst in the Y-junctions. In the contrary case, CNCs catalyzed by isolated smaller nanoparticles develop Y-junctions with an absence of metal catalyst by virtue of weaker adhesion of catalyst with the substrate and tip-growth of CNCs. PMID:26063127

  7. The TRPV4 Channel Contributes to Intercellular Junction Formation in Keratinocytes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sokabe, Takaaki; Fukumi-Tominaga, Tomoko; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Mizuno, Atsuko; Tominaga, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel is a physiological sensor for hypo-osmolarity, mechanical deformation, and warm temperature. The channel activation leads to various cellular effects involving Ca2+ dynamics. We found that TRPV4 interacts with β-catenin, a crucial component linking adherens junctions and the actin cytoskeleton, thereby enhancing cell-cell junction development and formation of the tight barrier between skin keratinocytes. TRPV4-deficient mice displayed impairment of the intercellular junction-dependent barrier function in the skin. In TRPV4-deficient keratinocytes, extracellular Ca2+-induced actin rearrangement and stratification were delayed following significant reduction in cytosolic Ca2+ increase and small GTPase Rho activation. TRPV4 protein located where the cell-cell junctions are formed, and the channel deficiency caused abnormal cell-cell junction structures, resulting in higher intercellular permeability in vitro. Our results suggest a novel role for TRPV4 in the development and maturation of cell-cell junctions in epithelia of the skin. PMID:20413591

  8. The extracellular matrix component laminin promotes gap junction formation in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Kouki, Tom; Fujiwara, Ken; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Folliculo-stellate (FS) cells in the anterior pituitary gland are believed to have multifunctional properties. FS cells connect to each other not only by mechanical means, but also by gap junctional cell-to-cell communication. Using transgenic rats that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) specifically in FS cells in the anterior pituitary gland (S100b-GFP rats), we recently revealed that FS cells in primary culture markedly change their shape, and form numerous interconnections with neighboring FS cells in the presence of laminin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) component of the basement membrane. Morphological and functional changes in cells are believed to be partly modified by matricrine signaling, by which ECM components function as cellular signals. In the present study, we examined whether gap junction formation between FS cells is affected by matricrine cues. A cell sorter was used to isolate FS cells from male S100b-GFP rat anterior pituitary for primary culture. We observed that mRNA and protein levels of connexin 43 in gap junction channels were clearly higher in the presence of laminin. In addition, we confirmed the formation of gap junctions between FS cells in primary culture by electron microscopy. Interestingly, we also observed that FS cells in the presence of laminin displayed well-developed rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Our findings suggest that, in anterior pituitary gland, FS cells may facilitate functional roles such as gap junctional cell-to-cell communication by matricrine signaling. PMID:21177835

  9. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  10. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; et al

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  11. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell−cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  12. Basic Aspects of the Formation and Activation of Boron Junctions Using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zschaetzsch, G.; Vandervorst, W.; Hoffmann, T.; Goossens, J.; Everaert, J.-L.; Agua Borniquel, J. I. del; Poon, T.

    2008-11-03

    This study investigates the basic aspects of junction formation using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation using BF{sub 3} and addresses the role of (pre)amorphization, C(F)-co-implantation, plasma parameters (bias, dose) and the thermal anneal cycle (spike versus msec laser anneal). The basic physics are studied using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, sheet resistance and using four point probe and RsL. Profiles with junction depths ranging from 10-12 nm and sheet resistance values below 800 Ohm/sq are readily achievable.

  13. Physical understanding of cryogenic implant benefits for electrical junction stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeni Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the effect of cryogenic temperature implants on electrical junction stability for ultra shallow junction applications for sub-32 nm technology nodes and beyond. A comprehensive study was conducted to gain physical understanding of the impact of cryogenic temperature implants on dopant-defect interactions. Carborane (C2B10H12) molecule, a potential alternative to monomer boron was implanted in carbon preamorphized silicon substrates at cryogenic implant temperatures. Results indicate implants at cryogenic temperatures increase dopant activation with reduced diffusion, resulting in lower sheet resistance for a lower junction depth. Further, this study emphasizes the benefits of co-implants performed at cryogenic temperatures as alternative to traditional preamorphizing implants.

  14. IQGAP1 controls tight junction formation through differential regulation of claudin recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Tanos, Barbara E.; Perez Bay, Andres E.; Salvarezza, Susana; Vivanco, Igor; Mellinghoff, Ingo; Osman, Mahasin; Sacks, David B.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein previously implicated in adherens junction formation. However, its role in the establishment or maintenance of tight junctions (TJs) has not been explored. We hypothesized that IQGAP1 could regulate TJ formation by modulating the expression and/or localization of junctional proteins, and we systematically tested this hypothesis in the model Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. We find that IQGAP1 silencing enhances a transient increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) observed during the early stages of TJ formation (Cereijido et al., 1978). Quantitative microscopy and biochemical experiments suggest that this effect of IQGAP1 on TJ assembly is accounted for by reduced expression and TJ recruitment of claudin 2, and increased TJ recruitment of claudin 4. Furthermore, we show that IQGAP1 also regulates TJ formation through its interactor CDC42, because IQGAP1 knockdown increases the activity of the CDC42 effector JNK and dominant-negative CDC42 prevents the increase in TER caused by IQGAP1 silencing. Hence, we provide evidence that IQGAP1 modulates TJ formation by a twofold mechanism: (1) controlling the expression and recruitment of claudin 2 and recruitment of claudin 4 to the TJ, and (2) transient inhibition of the CDC42–JNK pathway. PMID:25588839

  15. The formation of excess free volume in triple junctions of <111> and <100> tilt boundaries in Ni at crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletaev, Gennady; Novoselova, Darya; Kaygorodova, Valentina; Starostenkov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The formation of excess free volume in triple junctions of <111> and <100> tilt boundaries in Ni at crystallization was studied by the method of molecular dynamics. It is shown that the triple junctions, containing excess free volume, mainly forms during crystallization process in the result of "locking" of the liquid phase density at a meeting of the three crystallization fronts and, as a consequence, of the concentration of excess free volume in the triple junction after solidification. The calculation of excess free volume formed in the triple junctions during crystallization was carried out. The peculiarities of formation of the free volume in the triple junctions of low and large-angle <111> and <100> tilt boundaries were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that the main part of the free volume is accumulated during crystallization in the area of the grain boundaries and the triple junctions.

  16. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  17. The spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Aragonès, Albert C.; Ciampi, Simone; Sanz, Fausto; Darwish, Nadim; Diez-Perez, Ismael

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we report the spontaneous formation of single-molecule junctions via terminal alkyne contact groups. Self-assembled monolayers that form spontaneously from diluted solutions of 1, 4-diethynylbenzene (DEB) were used to build single-molecule contacts and assessed using the scanning tunneling microscopy-break junction technique (STM-BJ). The STM-BJ technique in both its dynamic and static approaches was used to characterize the lifetime (stability) and the conductivity of a single-DEB wire. It is demonstrated that single-molecule junctions form spontaneously with terminal alkynes and require no electrochemical control or chemical deprotonation. The alkyne anchoring group was compared against typical contact groups exploited in single-molecule studies, i.e. amine (benzenediamine) and thiol (benzendithiol) contact groups. The alkyne contact showed a conductance magnitude comparable to that observed with amine and thiol groups. The lifetime of the junctions formed from alkynes were only slightly less than that of thiols and greater than that observed for amines. These findings are important as (a) they extend the repertoire of chemical contacts used in single-molecule measurements to 1-alkynes, which are synthetically accessible and stable and (b) alkynes have a remarkable affinity toward silicon surfaces, hence opening the door for the study of single-molecule transport on a semiconducting electronic platform.

  18. Gating of single molecule junction conductance by charge transfer complex formation.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain; Brooke, Carly; Wang, Kun; Lambert, Colin J; Xu, Bingqian; Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-12-01

    The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference. PMID:26510687

  19. Fluid displacement during droplet formation at microfluidic flow-focusing junction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haishui; He, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Microdroplets and microcapsules have been widely produced using microfluidic flow-focusing junction for biomedical and chemical applications. However, the multiphase microfluidic flow at the flow-focusing junction has not been well investigated. In this study, the displacement of two (core and shell) aqueous fluids that disperse into droplets altogether in a carrier oil emulsion was investigated both numerically and experimentally. It was found that extensive displacement of the two aqueous fluids within the droplet during its formation could occur as a result of the shear effect of the carrier fluid and the capillary effect of interfacial tension. We further identified that the two mechanisms of fluid displacement can be evaluated by two dimensionless parameters. The quantitative relationship between the degree of fluid displacement and these two dimensionless parameters was determined experimentally. Finally, we demonstrated that the degree of fluid displacement could be controlled to generate hydrogel microparticles of different morphologies using planar or nonplanar flow-focusing junctions. These findings should provide useful guidance to the microfluidic production of microscale droplets or capsules for various biomedical and chemical applications. PMID:26381220

  20. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Stanga, Serena; Zanou, Nadège; Audouard, Emilie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Contino, Sabrina; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; René, Frédérique; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric; Gailly, Philippe; Dewachter, Ilse; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Besides its crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the knowledge of amyloid precursor protein (APP) physiologic functions remains surprisingly scarce. Here, we show that APP regulates the transcription of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). APP-dependent regulation of GDNF expression affects muscle strength, muscular trophy, and both neuronal and muscular differentiation fundamental for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) maturation in vivo In a nerve-muscle coculture model set up to modelize NMJ formation in vitro, silencing of muscular APP induces a 30% decrease in secreted GDNF levels and a 40% decrease in the total number of NMJs together with a significant reduction in the density of acetylcholine vesicles at the presynaptic site and in neuronal maturation. These defects are rescued by GDNF expression in muscle cells in the conditions where muscular APP has been previously silenced. Expression of GDNF in muscles of amyloid precursor protein null mice corrected the aberrant synaptic morphology of NMJs. Our findings highlight for the first time that APP-dependent GDNF expression drives the process of NMJ formation, providing new insights into the link between APP gene regulatory network and physiologic functions.-Stanga, S., Zanou, N., Audouard, E., Tasiaux, B., Contino, S., Vandermeulen, G., René, F., Loeffler, J.-P., Clotman, F., Gailly, P., Dewachter, I., Octave, J.-N., Kienlen-Campard, P. APP-dependent glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression drives neuromuscular junction formation. PMID:26718890

  1. Gating of single molecule junction conductance by charge transfer complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain; Brooke, Carly; Wang, Kun; Lambert, Colin J.; Xu, Bingqian; Nichols, Richard J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2015-11-01

    The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference.The solid-state structures of organic charge transfer (CT) salts are critical in determining their mode of charge transport, and hence their unusual electrical properties, which range from semiconducting through metallic to superconducting. In contrast, using both theory and experiment, we show here that the conductance of metal |single molecule| metal junctions involving aromatic donor moieties (dialkylterthiophene, dialkylbenzene) increase by over an order of magnitude upon formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). This enhancement occurs because CT complex formation creates a new resonance in the transmission function, close to the metal contact Fermi energy, that is a signal of room-temperature quantum interference. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis of 1c; experimental details of conductance measurements, formation of charge transfer complexes of 1c and 2 in solution; further details of theoretical methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04420k

  2. Formation of adherens junctions leads to the emergence of a tissue-level tension in epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew R; Daeden, Alicia; Charras, Guillaume T

    2014-06-01

    Adherens junctions and desmosomes integrate the cytoskeletons of adjacent cells into a mechanical syncitium. In doing so, intercellular junctions endow tissues with the strength needed to withstand the mechanical stresses encountered in normal physiology and to coordinate tension during morphogenesis. Though much is known about the biological mechanisms underlying junction formation, little is known about how tissue-scale mechanical properties are established. Here, we use deep atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation to measure the apparent stiffness of epithelial monolayers reforming from dissociated cells and examine which cellular processes give rise to tissue-scale mechanics. We show that the formation of intercellular junctions coincided with an increase in the apparent stiffness of reforming monolayers that reflected the generation of a tissue-level tension. Tension rapidly increased, reaching a maximum after 150 min, before settling to a lower level over the next 3 h as monolayers established homeostasis. The emergence of tissue tension correlated with the formation of adherens junctions but not desmosomes. As a consequence, inhibition of any of the molecular mechanisms participating in adherens junction initiation, remodelling and maturation significantly impeded the emergence of tissue-level tension in monolayers. PMID:24659804

  3. Formation of adherens junctions leads to the emergence of a tissue-level tension in epithelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew R.; Daeden, Alicia; Charras, Guillaume T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adherens junctions and desmosomes integrate the cytoskeletons of adjacent cells into a mechanical syncitium. In doing so, intercellular junctions endow tissues with the strength needed to withstand the mechanical stresses encountered in normal physiology and to coordinate tension during morphogenesis. Though much is known about the biological mechanisms underlying junction formation, little is known about how tissue-scale mechanical properties are established. Here, we use deep atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation to measure the apparent stiffness of epithelial monolayers reforming from dissociated cells and examine which cellular processes give rise to tissue-scale mechanics. We show that the formation of intercellular junctions coincided with an increase in the apparent stiffness of reforming monolayers that reflected the generation of a tissue-level tension. Tension rapidly increased, reaching a maximum after 150 min, before settling to a lower level over the next 3 h as monolayers established homeostasis. The emergence of tissue tension correlated with the formation of adherens junctions but not desmosomes. As a consequence, inhibition of any of the molecular mechanisms participating in adherens junction initiation, remodelling and maturation significantly impeded the emergence of tissue-level tension in monolayers. PMID:24659804

  4. ATP requirement for induced tight junction formation in HT 29 adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mückter, H; Ben-Shaul, Y; Bacher, A

    1987-10-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) of the fascia occludens type can be rapidly assembled in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT 29 under the influence of trypsin or ammonium sulfate. We have studied the influence of the metabolic inhibitors, dinitrophenol (DNP) and deoxyglucose (DG), on the induced formation of TJ in this cell line. A reduction of the ATP level by DG treatment to 20% of control values did not affect the amount and complexity of induced TJ fibrils. However, under conditions of severe ATP depletion obtained by DNP, the velocity of TJ formation was substantially reduced, and the arrangement of the TJ fibrils as observed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy showed characteristic changes. PMID:3691550

  5. Trpm7 Protein Contributes to Intercellular Junction Formation in Mouse Urothelium.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaki; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Matsumoto, Seiji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-12-11

    Trpm7 is a divalent cation-permeable channel that has been reported to be involved in magnesium homeostasis as well as cellular adhesion and migration. We generated urothelium-specific Trpm7 knock-out (KO) mice to reveal the function of Trpm7 in vivo. A Trpm7 KO was induced by tamoxifen and was confirmed by genomic PCR and immunohistochemistry. By using patch clamp recordings in primary urothelial cells, we observed that Mg(2+)-inhibitable cation currents as well as acid-inducible currents were significantly smaller in Trpm7 KO urothelial cells than in cells from control mice. Assessment of voiding behavior indicated a significantly smaller voided volume in Trpm7 KO mice (mean voided volume 0.28 ± 0.08 g in KO mice and 0.36 ± 0.04 g in control mice, p < 0.05, n = 6-8). Histological analysis showed partial but substantial edema in the submucosal layer of Trpm7 KO mice, most likely due to inflammation. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly higher in Trpm7 KO bladders than in controls. In transmission electron microscopic analysis, immature intercellular junctions were observed in Trpm7 KO urothelium but not in control mice. These results suggest that Trpm7 is involved in the formation of intercellular junctions in mouse urothelium. Immature intercellular junctions in Trpm7 knock-out mice might lead to a disruption of barrier function resulting in inflammation and hypersensitive bladder afferent nerves that may affect voiding behavior in vivo. PMID:26504086

  6. PAR6B is required for tight junction formation and activated PKCζ localization in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, Heather E; Jiang, Yuan; Fornace, Kimberly M; Yang, Fan; Meltzer, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of mechanisms that govern the control of epithelial cell polarity, morphology and plasticity are emerging as key processes in tumor progression. In this study we report amplification and overexpression of PAR6B, an essential component in epithelial cell tight junction (TJ) formation and maintenance of apico-basal polarity, in breast cancer cell lines. Analysis of chromosome 20q13.13 in 11 breast cancer cell lines by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identified a novel small amplicon centered at PARD6B in 5 cell lines, with copy number ranging from 7 to 27. The presence of the PARD6B amplicon correlated with PARD6B transcript and PAR6B protein abundance. Expression of related isoforms PARD6A and PARD6G were detectable at significantly lower levels. PARD6B overexpression correlated with TJ network formation in cultured cell monolayers. SiRNA-mediated inhibition of PAR6B in MCF7 resulted in loss of TJ assembly and membrane localization of atypical PKCζ (aPKC), but did not affect adherens junction formation. SiRNA-mediated inhibition of CDC42 in MCF7 also resulted in loss of TJ networks, confirming the requirement of a complete PAR6-aPKC-CDC42-PAR3 complex to activate and stabilize TJs. Immunohistochemical analysis of PAR6B expression on breast tumor microarrays indicated exquisite epithelial cell-specificity. Few quantitative differences in staining were observed between normal epithelium and adjacent tumor margins. However staining appeared reduced and cytoplasmic in more poorly differentiated tumors. We propose that quantitative imbalances in the components of pathways governing normal epithelial cell polarity arising from gain or loss of function may radically alter epithelial cell architecture and contribute to tumor progression. PMID:22957302

  7. MuSK frizzled-like domain is critical for mammalian neuromuscular junction formation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Messéant, Julien; Dobbertin, Alexandre; Girard, Emmanuelle; Delers, Perrine; Manuel, Marin; Mangione, Francesca; Schmitt, Alain; Le Denmat, Dominique; Molgó, Jordi; Zytnicki, Daniel; Schaeffer, Laurent; Legay, Claire; Strochlic, Laure

    2015-03-25

    The muscle-specific kinase MuSK is one of the key molecules orchestrating neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation. MuSK interacts with the Wnt morphogens, through its Frizzled-like domain (cysteine-rich domain [CRD]). Dysfunction of MuSK CRD in patients has been recently associated with the onset of myasthenia, common neuromuscular disorders mainly characterized by fatigable muscle weakness. However, the physiological role of Wnt-MuSK interaction in NMJ formation and function remains to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that the CRD deletion of MuSK in mice caused profound defects of both muscle prepatterning, the first step of NMJ formation, and synapse differentiation associated with a drastic deficit in AChR clusters and excessive growth of motor axons that bypass AChR clusters. Moreover, adult MuSKΔCRD mice developed signs of congenital myasthenia, including severe NMJs dismantlement, muscle weakness, and fatigability. We also report, for the first time, the beneficial effects of lithium chloride, a reversible inhibitor of the glycogen synthase kinase-3, that rescued NMJ defects in MuSKΔCRD mice and therefore constitutes a novel therapeutic reagent for the treatment of neuromuscular disorders linked to Wnt-MuSK signaling pathway deficiency. Together, our data reveal that MuSK CRD is critical for NMJ formation and plays an unsuspected role in NMJ maintenance in adulthood. PMID:25810523

  8. A numerical study on the dynamics of droplet formation in a microfluidic double T-junction

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Trung-Dung; Byon, Chan; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, droplet formations in microfluidic double T-junctions (MFDTD) are investigated based on a two-dimensional numerical model with volume of fluid method. Parametric ranges for generating alternating droplet formation (ADF) are identified. A physical background responsible for the ADF is suggested by analyzing the dynamical stability of flow system. Since the phase discrepancy between dispersed flows is mainly caused by non-symmetrical breaking of merging droplet, merging regime becomes the alternating regime at appropriate conditions. In addition, the effects of channel geometries on droplet formation are studied in terms of relative channel width. The predicted results show that the ADF region is shifted toward lower capillary numbers when channel width ratio is less than unity. The alternating droplet size increases with the increase of channel width ratio. When this ratio reaches unity, alternating droplets can be formed at very high water fraction (wf = 0.8). The droplet formation in MFDTD depends significantly on the viscosity ratio, and the droplet size in ADF decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratio. The understanding of underlying physics of the ADF phenomenon is useful for many applications, including nanoparticle synthesis with different concentrations, hydrogel bead generation, and cell transplantation in biomedical therapy. PMID:25825622

  9. Bimetallic junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcella, F. G.; Lessmann, G. G.; Lindberg, R. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The formation of voids through interdiffusion in bimetallic welded structures exposed to high operating temperatures is inhibited by utilizing an alloy of the parent materials in the junction of the parent materials or by preannealing the junction at an ultrahigh temperature. These methods are also used to reduce the concentration gradient of a hardening agent.

  10. Laser annealing of ion implanted CZ silicon for solar cell junction formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzeff, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The merits of large spot size pulsed laser annealing of phosphorus implanted, Czochralski grown silicon for function formation of solar cells are evaluated. The feasibility and requirements are also determined to scale-up a laser system to anneal 7.62 cm diameter wafers at a rate of one wafer/second. Results show that laser annealing yields active, defect-free, shallow junction devices. Functional cells with AM 1 conversion efficiencies up to 15.4% for 2 x 2 cm and 2 x 4 cm sizes were attained. For larger cells, 7.62 cm dia., conversion efficiencies ranged up to 14.5%. Experiments showed that texture etched surfaces are not compatible with pulsed laser annealing due to the surface melting caused by the laser energy. When compared with furnace annealed cells, the laser annealed cells generally exhibited conversion efficiencies which were equal to or better than those furnace annealed. In addition, laser annealing has greater throughput potential.

  11. Neuromuscular Junction Formation in Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Augments Contractile Function and Improves Cytoskeletal Organization

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Neil R.W.; Passey, Samantha L.; Player, Darren J.; Mudera, Vivek; Baar, Keith; Greensmith, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases are conditions that affect both motor neurons and the underlying skeletal muscle tissue. At present, the majority of neuromuscular research utilizes animal models and there is a growing need to develop novel methodologies that can be used to help understand and develop treatments for these diseases. Skeletal muscle tissue-engineered constructs exhibit many of the characteristics of the native tissue such as accurate fascicular structure and generation of active contractions. However, to date, there has been little consideration toward the integration of engineered skeletal muscle with motor neurons with the aim of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, which would provide a model to investigate neuromuscular diseases and basic biology. In the present work we isolated primary embryonic motor neurons and neonatal myoblasts from Sprague-Dawley rats, and cocultured the two cell types in three-dimensional tissue-engineered fibrin hydrogels with the aim of NMJ formation. Immunohistochemistry revealed myotube formation in a fascicular arrangement and neurite outgrowth from motor neuron cell bodies toward the aligned myotubes. Furthermore, colocalization of pre- and postsynaptic proteins and chemical inhibition of spontaneous myotube twitch indicated the presence of NMJs in the innervated constructs. When electrical field stimulation was employed to evoke isometric contractions, maximal twitch and tetanic force were higher in the constructs cocultured with motor neurons, which may, in part, be explained by improved myotube cytoskeletal organization in these constructs. The fabrication of such constructs may be useful tools for investigating neuromuscular pharmaceuticals and improving the understanding of neuromuscular pathologies. PMID:26166548

  12. Neuromuscular Junction Formation in Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Augments Contractile Function and Improves Cytoskeletal Organization.

    PubMed

    Martin, Neil R W; Passey, Samantha L; Player, Darren J; Mudera, Vivek; Baar, Keith; Greensmith, Linda; Lewis, Mark P

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases are conditions that affect both motor neurons and the underlying skeletal muscle tissue. At present, the majority of neuromuscular research utilizes animal models and there is a growing need to develop novel methodologies that can be used to help understand and develop treatments for these diseases. Skeletal muscle tissue-engineered constructs exhibit many of the characteristics of the native tissue such as accurate fascicular structure and generation of active contractions. However, to date, there has been little consideration toward the integration of engineered skeletal muscle with motor neurons with the aim of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, which would provide a model to investigate neuromuscular diseases and basic biology. In the present work we isolated primary embryonic motor neurons and neonatal myoblasts from Sprague-Dawley rats, and cocultured the two cell types in three-dimensional tissue-engineered fibrin hydrogels with the aim of NMJ formation. Immunohistochemistry revealed myotube formation in a fascicular arrangement and neurite outgrowth from motor neuron cell bodies toward the aligned myotubes. Furthermore, colocalization of pre- and postsynaptic proteins and chemical inhibition of spontaneous myotube twitch indicated the presence of NMJs in the innervated constructs. When electrical field stimulation was employed to evoke isometric contractions, maximal twitch and tetanic force were higher in the constructs cocultured with motor neurons, which may, in part, be explained by improved myotube cytoskeletal organization in these constructs. The fabrication of such constructs may be useful tools for investigating neuromuscular pharmaceuticals and improving the understanding of neuromuscular pathologies. PMID:26166548

  13. Porous silicon formation by hole injection from a back side p+/n junction for electrical insulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fvre, A.; Menard, S.; Defforge, T.; Gautier, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to study the formation of porous silicon (PS) in low doped (1 1014 cm-3) n-type silicon through hole injection from a back side p+/n junction in the dark. This technique is investigated within the framework of electrical insulation. Three different types of junctions are investigated. The first one is an epitaxial n-type layer grown on p+ doped silicon wafer. The two other junctions are carried out by boron diffusion leading to p+ regions with junction depths of 20 and 115 ?m. The resulting PS morphology is a double layer with a nucleation layer (NL) and macropores fully filled with mesoporous material. This result is unusual for low doped n-type silicon. Morphology variations are described depending on the junction formation process, the electrolyte composition, the anodization current density and duration. In order to validate the more interesting industrial potentialities of the p+/n injection technique, a comparison is achieved with back side illumination in terms of resulting morphology and experiments confirm comparable results. Electrical characterizations of the double layer, including NL and fully filled macropores, are then performed. To our knowledge, this is the first electrical investigation in low doped n type silicon with this morphology. Compared to the bulk silicon, the measured electrical resistivities are 6-7 orders of magnitude higher at 373 K.

  14. Quantitative prediction of junction leakage in bulk-technology CMOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, R.; Heringa, A.; Venezia, V. C.; Loo, J.; Verheijen, M. A.; Hopstaken, M. J. P.; van der Tak, K.; de Potter, M.; Hooker, J. C.; Meunier-Beillard, P.; Delhougne, R.

    2010-03-01

    Junction leakage becomes more significant as metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) technologies scale down in bulk-silicon. In this work we quantify the four key elements to junction leakage generation through a combination of experiment and device simulation. These elements are: (i) ultra-shallow junction steepness, (ii) channel and pocket concentrations, (iii) junction curvature, and (iv) the presence of residual defects. We first characterize n +/p and p +/n diodes to quantify how changes in doping profiles affect reverse bias leakage. Diodes with end-of-range (EOR) silicon defects intentionally located in the junction depletion region are also characterized to quantify their contribution. This feeds into a device simulation study to gain insight in the experimental results and in the capabilities of available physical models. Thereafter simulation is used to predict leakage in future generation bulk-silicon MOS devices. In summary, band-to-band tunneling (BBT) due to aggressively scaled doping profiles and trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) due to the increased presence of defects make off-state low-standby-power leakage targets difficult to meet. With the increase of junction leakage from aggressively scaled ultra-shallow junctions, the assumption that the subthreshold leakage component dominates off-state current is no longer valid.

  15. ROCK activity regulates functional tight junction assembly during blastocyst formation in porcine parthenogenetic embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeongwoo

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein serine/threonine kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2) are Rho subfamily GTPase downstream effectors that regulate cell migration, intercellular adhesion, cell polarity, and cell proliferation by stimulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Inhibition of ROCK proteins affects specification of the trophectoderm (TE) and inner cell mass (ICM) lineages, compaction, and blastocyst cavitation. However, the molecules involved in blastocyst formation are not known. Here, we examined developmental competence and levels of adherens/tight junction (AJ/TJ) constituent proteins, such as CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1, as well as expression of their respective mRNAs, after treating porcine parthenogenetic four-cell embryos with Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 100 µM for 24 h. Following this treatment, the blastocyst development rates were 39.1, 20.7, 10.0, and 0% respectively. In embryos treated with 20 µM treatment, expression levels of CXADR, OCLN, TJP1, and CDH1 mRNA and protein molecules were significantly reduced (P < 0.05). FITC-dextran uptake assay revealed that the treatment caused an increase in TE TJ permeability. Interestingly, the majority of the four-cell and morula embryos treated with 20 µM Y-27643 for 24 h showed defective compaction and cavitation. Taken together, our results indicate that ROCK activity may differentially affect assembly of AJ/TJs as well as regulate expression of genes encoding junctional proteins. PMID:27077008

  16. Na,K-ATPase activity is required for formation of tight junctions, desmosomes, and induction of polarity in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, S A; Palmer, L G; Moon, S Y; Peralta Soler, A; Apodaca, G L; Harper, J F; Zheng, Y; Rajasekaran, A K

    2001-12-01

    Na,K-ATPase is a key enzyme that regulates a variety of transport functions in epithelial cells. In this study, we demonstrate a role for Na,K-ATPase in the formation of tight junctions, desmosomes, and epithelial polarity with the use of the calcium switch model in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Inhibition of Na,K-ATPase either by ouabain or potassium depletion prevented the formation of tight junctions and desmosomes and the cells remained nonpolarized. The formation of bundled stress fibers that appeared transiently in control cells was largely inhibited in ouabain-treated or potassium-depleted cells. Failure to form stress fibers correlated with a large reduction of RhoA GTPase activity in Na,K-ATPase-inhibited cells. In cells overexpressing wild-type RhoA GTPase, Na,K-ATPase inhibition did not affect the formation of stress fibers, tight junctions, or desmosomes, and epithelial polarity developed normally, suggesting that RhoA GTPase is an essential component downstream of Na,K-ATPase-mediated regulation of these junctions. The effects of Na,K-ATPase inhibition were mimicked by treatment with the sodium ionophore gramicidin and were correlated with the increased intracellular sodium levels. Furthermore, ouabain treatment under sodium-free condition did not affect the formation of junctions and epithelial polarity, suggesting that the intracellular Na(+) homeostasis plays a crucial role in generation of the polarized phenotype of epithelial cells. These results thus demonstrate that the Na,K-ATPase activity plays an important role in regulating both the structure and function of polarized epithelial cells. PMID:11739775

  17. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26426912

  18. Rho1 regulates adherens junction remodeling by promoting recycling endosome formation through activation of myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Hanako; Loza, Andrew J.; Skeath, James B.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Once adherens junctions (AJs) are formed between polarized epithelial cells they must be maintained because AJs are constantly remodeled in dynamic epithelia. AJ maintenance involves endocytosis and subsequent recycling of E-cadherin to a precise location along the basolateral membrane. In the Drosophila pupal eye epithelium, Rho1 GTPase regulates AJ remodeling through Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin) endocytosis by limiting Cdc42/Par6/aPKC complex activity. We demonstrate that Rho1 also influences AJ remodeling by regulating the formation of DE-cadherin–containing, Rab11-positive recycling endosomes in Drosophila postmitotic pupal eye epithelia. This effect of Rho1 is mediated through Rok-dependent, but not MLCK-dependent, stimulation of myosin II activity yet independent of its effects upon actin remodeling. Both Rho1 and pMLC localize on endosomal vesicles, suggesting that Rho1 might regulate the formation of recycling endosomes through localized myosin II activation. This work identifies spatially distinct functions for Rho1 in the regulation of DE-cadherin–containing vesicular trafficking during AJ remodeling in live epithelia. PMID:25079692

  19. Experimental investigation of liquid-liquid plug formation in a T-junction microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Panagiota; Chinaud, Maxime; Roumpea, Eynagelia-Panagiota; Weheliye, Weheliye; Omar. K. Matar Collaboration; Lyes Kahouadji Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Plug formation mechanism of two immiscible liquids was studied experimentally in a 200 μm microchannel using two innovative micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μ PIV) techniques i.e. two-colour μ PIV and high speed bright field μ PIV. The aqueous phase was a water/glycerol solution whereas the organic phase was silicon oil with a range of viscosities from 5 to 155 cSt. Experiments were conducted for different fluid flow rate combinations in the T-junction inlet and it was observed that velocity profiles within the forming plugs depend on the flow rate ratios. The velocity field studies provided insight into the plug mechanism revealing that the interface curvature at the rear of the forming plug changes sign at the later stages of plug formation and accelerates the thinning of the meniscus leading to plug breakage. Results from the two-colour PIV show that the continuous phase resists the flow of the dispersed phase into the main channel at the rear of the plug meniscus and causes the change in the interface curvature. Department of Chemical Engineering South Kensington Campus Imperial College London SW7 2AZ.

  20. Behavior of tricellulin during destruction and formation of tight junctions under various extracellular calcium conditions.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Akira; Kojima, Takashi; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2013-01-01

    Tricellulin is an important component of tricellular tight junctions (TJs) and is involved in the formation of tricellular contacts. However, little is known about its regulation during the assembly and disassembly of tricellular TJs. By using the well-differentiated pancreatic cancer cell line HPAC, which highly expresses tricellulin at tricellular contacts, we have investigated changes in the localization, expression and phosphorylation of tricellulin and in its TJ functions as a barrier and fence during the destruction and formation of TJs induced by changes in the extracellular calcium concentration. During both extracellular Ca(2+) depletion caused by EGTA treatment and Ca(2+) repletion after Ca(2+) starvation, the expression of tricellulin increased in whole lysates and in Triton-X-100-insoluble fractions without any change in its mRNA. The increases in immunoreactivity revealed by Western blotting were prevented by alkaline phosphatase treatment. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that tricellulin was phosphorylated on threonine residues when it increased after Ca(2+) depletion and repletion. In the early stage after Ca(2+) repletion, tricellulin was expressed not only at tricellular contacts but also in the cytoplasm and at bicellular borders. In confocal laser microscopy, tricellulin was observed at the apical-most regions and basolateral membranes of tricellular contacts after Ca(2+) repletion. Knockdown of tricellulin delayed the recovery of the barrier and fence functions after Ca(2+) repletion. Thus, the dynamic behavior of tricellulin during the destruction and formation of TJs under various extracellular calcium conditions seems to be closely associated with the barrier and fence functions of TJs. PMID:23073616

  1. Nano-welding and junction formation in hydrogen titanate nanowires by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dhal, Satyanarayan; Chatterjee, Shyamal; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Tribedi, Lokesh C; Bapat, Rudheer; Ayyub, Pushan

    2015-06-12

    Crystalline hydrogen titanate (H2Ti3O7) nanowires were irradiated with N(+) ions of different energies and fluences. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that at relatively lower fluence the nanowires are bent and start to adhere strongly to one another as well as to the silicon substrate. At higher fluence, the nanowires show large-scale welding and form a network of mainly 'X' and 'Y' junctions. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering studies confirm a high degree of amorphization of the nanowire surface after irradiation. We suggest that while ion-irradiation induced defect formation and dangling bonds may lead to chemical bonding between nanowires, the large scale nano-welding and junction network formation can be ascribed to localized surface melting due to heat spike. Our results demonstrate that low energy ion irradiation with suitable choice of fluence may provide an attractive route to the formation and manipulation of large-area nanowire-based devices. PMID:25990259

  2. A lattice Boltzmann study of the effects of viscoelasticity on droplet formation in microfluidic cross-junctions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anupam; Sbragaglia, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Based on mesoscale lattice Boltzmann (LB) numerical simulations, we investigate the effects of viscoelasticity on the break-up of liquid threads in microfluidic cross-junctions, where droplets are formed by focusing a liquid thread of a dispersed (d) phase into another co-flowing continuous (c) immiscible phase. Working at small Capillary numbers, we investigate the effects of non-Newtonian phases in the transition from droplet formation at the cross-junction (DCJ) to droplet formation downstream of the cross-junction (DC) (Liu and Zhang, Phys. Fluids. 23, 082101 (2011)). We will analyze cases with Droplet Viscoelasticity (DV), where viscoelastic properties are confined in the dispersed phase, as well as cases with Matrix Viscoelasticity (MV), where viscoelastic properties are confined in the continuous phase. Moderate flow-rate ratios [Formula: see text] of the two phases are considered in the present study. Overall, we find that the effects are more pronounced with MV, where viscoelasticity is found to influence the break-up point of the threads, which moves closer to the cross-junction and stabilizes. This is attributed to an increase of the polymer feedback stress forming in the corner flows, where the side channels of the device meet the main channel. Quantitative predictions on the break-up point of the threads are provided as a function of the Deborah number, i.e., the dimensionless number measuring the importance of viscoelasticity with respect to Capillary forces. PMID:26794502

  3. Tight junction protein ZO-2 expression and relative function of ZO-1 and ZO-2 during mouse blastocyst formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, Bhavwanti; Nowak, Rachael L.; Anderson, Rebecca; Kwong, Wing Yee; Papenbrock, Thomas; Fleming, Tom P.

    2008-11-01

    Apicolateral tight junctions (TJs) between epithelial cells are multiprotein complexes regulating membrane polarity and paracellular transport and also contribute to signalling pathways affecting cell proliferation and gene expression. ZO-2 and other ZO family members form a sub-membranous scaffold for binding TJ constituents. We investigated ZO-2 contribution to TJ biogenesis and function during trophectoderm epithelium differentiation in mouse preimplantation embryos. Our data indicate that ZO-2 is expressed from maternal and embryonic genomes with maternal ZO-2 protein associated with nuclei in zygotes and particularly early cleavage stages. Embryonic ZO-2 assembled at outer blastomere apicolateral junctional sites from the late 16-cell stage. Junctional ZO-2 first co-localised with E-cadherin in a transient complex comprising adherens junction and TJ constituents before segregating to TJs after their separation from the blastocyst stage (32-cell onwards). ZO-2 siRNA microinjection into zygotes or 2-cell embryos resulted in specific knockdown of ZO-2 mRNA and protein within blastocysts. Embryos lacking ZO-2 protein at trophectoderm TJs exhibited delayed blastocoel cavity formation but underwent normal cell proliferation and outgrowth morphogenesis. Quantitative analysis of trophectoderm TJs in ZO-2-deficient embryos revealed increased assembly of ZO-1 but not occludin, indicating ZO protein redundancy as a compensatory mechanism contributing to the mild phenotype observed. In contrast, ZO-1 knockdown, or combined ZO-1 and ZO-2 knockdown, generated a more severe inhibition of blastocoel formation indicating distinct roles for ZO proteins in blastocyst morphogenesis.

  4. Laser annealing of ion implanted CZ silicon for solar cell junction formation. Quarterly report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Katzeff, J. S.

    1980-07-01

    A project to evaluate the merits of large spot size pulsed laser annealing of ion implanted silicon wafers for junction formation on solar cells is described. A Q-switched Nd:Glass laser system is used operating in the 1064 (regular) and 532 (with frequency doubler) nm wavelengths. The laser output is in excess of 30 joules with a 20 to 50 ns pulse duration. Material used in this investigation is 3-inch diameter CZ silicon, P-type 0.014 inches thick, 10..cap omega..-cm resistivity, <100> orientation. Three wafer surface conditions are being evaluated in this pulse annealing investigation: chem-polished, texture etched, and flash etched. Annealing was performed with and without beam homogenization. Both modes showed excellent lattice recovery from the implant-induced damage as analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques. Homogenization of the beam was performed using a fused silica rod configured with a 90/sup 0/ bend. The unhomogenized annealing was performed using a plano-concave lens. Fabrication of laser annealed cells using both modes is forthcoming.

  5. Formation of Satellite and subsatellite droplets in a flow-focusing junction for viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funfschilling, Denis; Carrier, Odile; Li, Huai-Zhi

    2011-11-01

    The formation of a cascade of satellite and subsatellite oil droplets is observed in a flow-focusing microfluidic junction (250 micrometer of characteristic length) in the presence of surfactant (Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate), and polymer (100 to 1000 ppm of PAAm of high molecular mass). The size and distribution of the satellite and subsatellite droplets is quite reproducible. One and only one satellite droplet is formed in the dripping regime in case of Newtonian fluids. When PAAm is added to the solution, the viscosity becomes viscoelastic and satellite droplets are many. The mechanism of breakup leading to multiple satellite droplets is self-repeating, as observed in previous work,. At low frequency, the number of satellite droplet can go up to 7 or more. The distribution is generally very structured: a unique mother satellite droplet is surrounded by two daughter droplets, each of these daughter droplet is surrounded again by two grand-daughter droplets so that there are 4 daughter droplets in total. The ratio in volume between each generation is about 30.

  6. Ultra-shallow fluorine and nitrogen implantation from r.f. plasma and its effect on electro-physical parameters of Al/HfO2/Si MOS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisz, M.; Mroczyński, R.; Szymańska, M.

    2013-07-01

    This study described a novel and original method of ultra-shallow fluorine and nitrogen implantation from radio frequency (RF = 13,56MHz) CF4 and NH3 plasmas, performed in classical RIE / PECVD reactors. The performed experiments indicate that ultra-shallow implantation of high concentration of fluorine and nitrogen ions by using r.f. plasma reactors (PECVD ad RIE) is feasible. It is also possible to control the implantation process parameters, ie implantation depth and maximum concentration, by controlling the parameters of the plasma processes. Electrical characterization of MOS structures with HfO2 layer as a gate dielectric, shows that samples implanted with nitrogen, have the best insulating properties, better even the reference sample. Samples prepared by fluorine implantation, exhibit much worse I-V behavior for low, medium and high electric fields, than all samples studied in this article. This samples exhibit the highest leakage currents, too.

  7. Physical understanding of cryogenic implant benefits for electrical junction stability

    SciTech Connect

    Adeni Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd

    2012-03-12

    We investigate the effect of cryogenic temperature implants on electrical junction stability for ultra shallow junction applications for sub-32 nm technology nodes and beyond. A comprehensive study was conducted to gain physical understanding of the impact of cryogenic temperature implants on dopant-defect interactions. Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) molecule, a potential alternative to monomer boron was implanted in carbon preamorphized silicon substrates at cryogenic implant temperatures. Results indicate implants at cryogenic temperatures increase dopant activation with reduced diffusion, resulting in lower sheet resistance for a lower junction depth. Further, this study emphasizes the benefits of co-implants performed at cryogenic temperatures as alternative to traditional preamorphizing implants.

  8. Combination of agrin and laminin increase acetylcholine receptor clustering and enhance functional neuromuscular junction formation In vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bill G X; Quigley, Anita F; Bourke, Justin L; Nowell, Cameron J; Myers, Damian E; Choong, Peter F M; Kapsa, Robert M I

    2016-05-01

    Clustering of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) at the postsynaptic membrane is a crucial step in the development of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ). During development and after denervation, aneural AChR clusters form on the sarcolemma. Recent studies suggest that these receptors are critical for guiding and initiating synaptogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of agrin and laminin-1; agents with known AChR clustering activity; on NMJ formation and muscle maturation. Primary myoblasts were differentiated in vitro on collagen, laminin or collagen and laminin-coated surfaces in the presence or absence of agrin and laminin. The pretreated cells were then subject to innervation by PC12 cells. The number of neuromuscular junctions was assessed by immunocytochemical co-localization of AChR clusters and the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. Functional neuromuscular junctions were quantitated by analysis of the level of spontaneous as well as neuromuscular blocker responsive contractile activity and muscle maturation was assessed by the degree of myotube striation. Agrin alone did not prime muscle for innervation while a combination of agrin and laminin pretreatment increased the number of neuromuscular junctions formed and enhanced acetylcholine based neurotransmission and myotube striation. This study has direct clinical relevance for treatment of denervation injuries and creating functional neuromuscular constructs for muscle tissue repair. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 551-565, 2016. PMID:26251299

  9. Arc/Forearc Lengthening at Plate Triple Junctions and the Formation of Ophiolitic Soles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, John; Dewey, John

    2013-04-01

    The principal enigma of large obducted ophiolite slabs is that they clearly must have been generated by some form of organized sea-floor spreading/plate-accretion, such as may be envisioned for the oceanic ridges, yet the volcanics commonly have arc affinity (Miyashiro) with boninites (high-temperature/low-pressure, high Mg and Si andesites), which are suggestive of a forearc origin. PT conditions under which boninites and metamorphic soles form and observations of modern forearc systems lead us to the conclusion that ophiolite formation is associated with overidding plate spreading centers that intersect the trench to form ridge-trench-trench of ridge-trench-tranform triple junctions. The spreading centers extend and lengthen the forearc parallel to the trench and by definition are in supra-subduction zone (SSZ) settings. Many ophiolites likewise have complexly-deformed associated mafic-ultramafic assemblages that suggest fracture zone/transform t along their frontal edges, which in turn has led to models involving the nucleation of subduction zones on fracture zones or transpressional transforms. Hitherto, arc-related sea-floor-spreading has been considered to be either pre-arc (fore-arc boninites) or post-arc (classic Karig-style back arc basins that trench-parallell split arcs). Syn-arc boninites and forearc oceanic spreading centers that involve a stable ridge/trench/trench triple or a ridge-trench-transform triple junction, the ridge being between the two upper plates, are consistent with large slab ophiolite formation in a readied obduction settting. The direction of subduction must be oblique with a different sense in the two subduction zones and the oblique subduction cannot be partitioned into trench orthogonal and parallel strike-slip components. As the ridge spreads, new oceanic lithosphere is created within the forearc, the arc and fore-arc lengthen significantly, and a syn-arc ophiolite forearc complex is generated by this mechanism. The ophiolite ages along arc-strike; a distinctive diachronous MORB-like to boninitic to arc volcanic stratigraphy develops vertically in the forearc and eruption centers progressively migrate from the forearc back to the main arc massif with time. Dikes in the ophiolite are highly oblique to the trench (as are back-arc magnetic anomalies. Boninites and high-mg andesites are generated in the fore-arc under the aqueous, low pressure/high temperature, regime at the ridge above the instantaneously developed subducting and dehydrating slab. Subducted slab refrigeration of the hanging wall ensues and accretion of MORB metabasites to the hanging wall of the subduction channel initiates. Mafic protolith garnet/two pyroxene granulites to greenschists accrete and form the inverted P and T metamorphic sole prior to obduction. Sole accretion of lithosphere begins at about 1000°C and the full retrogressive sole may be fully formed within ten to fifteen million years of accretion, at which time low grade subduction melanges accrete. Obduction of the SSZ forearc ophiolite with its subjacent metamorphic sole occurs whenever the oceanic arc attempts subduction of a stable buoyant continental or back arc margin.

  10. Formation of p-n-p junction with ionic liquid gate in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xin; Tang, Ning E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn Duan, Junxi; Zhang, Yuewei; Lu, Fangchao; Xu, Fujun; Yang, Xuelin; Gao, Li; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Ge, Weikun E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-04-07

    Ionic liquid gating is a technique which is much more efficient than solid gating to tune carrier density. To observe the electronic properties of such a highly doped graphene device, a top gate made of ionic liquid has been used. By sweeping both the top and back gate voltage, a p-n-p junction has been created. The mechanism of forming the p-n-p junction has been discussed. Tuning the carrier density by ionic liquid gate can be an efficient method to be used in flexible electronics.

  11. Low-energy BF2, BCl2, and BBr2 implants for ultrashallow P+-N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, S. R.; Agarwal, Vikas; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    1997-08-01

    We have examined low energy BCl2 and BBr2 implants as a means of fabricating ultra-shallow P+-N junctions. Five keV and 9 keV BCl2 implants and 18 keV BBr2 implants have been compared to 5 keV BF2 implants to study the benefits of using these species. BCl2 and BBr2, being heavier species, have a lower projected range and produce more damage. The greater damage restricts channeling, resulting in shallower as-implanted profiles. The increased damage amorphizes the substrate at low implant doses which results in reduced transient enhanced diffusion (TED) during the post-implant anneal. Post-anneal SIMS profiles indicate a junction depth reduction of over 10 nm (at 5 X 1017 cm-3 background doping) for 5 keV BCl2 implants as compared to 5 keV BF2 implants. Annealed junctions as shallow as 10 nm have been obtained from the 18 keV BBr2 implants. The increased damage degrades the electrical properties of these junctions by enhancing the leakage current densities. BCl2 implanted junctions have leakage current densities of approximately 1 (mu) A/cm2 as compared to 10 nA/cm2 for the BF2 implants. BBr2 implants have a lower leakage density of approximately 50 nA/cm2. Low energy BBr2 implants offer an exciting alternative for fabricating low leakage, ultra-shallow P+-N junctions.

  12. Reliable Formation of Single Molecule Junctions with Air-Stable Diphenylphosphine Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Parameswaran, R.; Hybertsen, M.; Widawsky, J.R.; Vázquez H.; Park, Y.S.; Boardman, B.M.; Nuckolls, C.; Steigerwald, M.L.; Venkataraman, L.

    2010-07-15

    We measure the conductance of single Au-molecule-Au junctions with a series of air-stable diphenylphosphine-terminated molecules using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction technique. Thousands of conductance versus displacement traces collected for each molecule are used to statistically analyze junction conductance and evolution upon elongation. Measured conductances for a series of alkane-based molecules exhibit an exponential decrease with increasing length, as expected for saturated molecules, with a tunneling decay constant of 0.98 {+-} 0.04. Measurements of junction elongation indicate strong metal-molecule binding, with a length that increases with the number of methylene groups in the backbone. Measured conductance histograms for four molecules with short, unsaturated backbones (e.g., benzene) are much broader with less well-defined peaks. These measurements are supported by density function theory calculations. The phosphine binds selectively to under-coordinated gold atoms through a donor-acceptor bond with a binding energy of about 1 eV. The calculated tunnel coupling correlates very well with experiment.

  13. Junction formation and current transport mechanisms in hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Jäckle, Sara; Mattiza, Matthias; Liebhaber, Martin; Brönstrup, Gerald; Rommel, Mathias; Lips, Klaus; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-01-01

    We investigated hybrid inorganic-organic solar cells combining monocrystalline n-type silicon (n-Si) and a highly conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The build-in potential, photo- and dark saturation current at this hybrid interface are monitored for varying n-Si doping concentrations. We corroborate that a high build-in potential forms at the hybrid junction leading to strong inversion of the n-Si surface. By extracting work function and valence band edge of the polymer from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, a band diagram of the hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS heterojunction is presented. The current-voltage characteristics were analyzed using Schottky and abrupt pn-junction models. The magnitude as well as the dependence of dark saturation current on n-Si doping concentration proves that the transport is governed by diffusion of minority charge carriers in the n-Si and not by thermionic emission of majorities over a Schottky barrier. This leads to a comprehensive explanation of the high observed open-circuit voltages of up to 634 mV connected to high conversion efficiency of almost 14%, even for simple planar device structures without antireflection coating or optimized contacts. The presented work clearly shows that PEDOT:PSS forms a hybrid heterojunction with n-Si behaving similar to a conventional pn-junction and not, like commonly assumed, a Schottky junction. PMID:26278010

  14. Junction formation and current transport mechanisms in hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckle, Sara; Mattiza, Matthias; Liebhaber, Martin; Brönstrup, Gerald; Rommel, Mathias; Lips, Klaus; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-08-01

    We investigated hybrid inorganic-organic solar cells combining monocrystalline n-type silicon (n-Si) and a highly conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The build-in potential, photo- and dark saturation current at this hybrid interface are monitored for varying n-Si doping concentrations. We corroborate that a high build-in potential forms at the hybrid junction leading to strong inversion of the n-Si surface. By extracting work function and valence band edge of the polymer from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, a band diagram of the hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS heterojunction is presented. The current-voltage characteristics were analyzed using Schottky and abrupt pn-junction models. The magnitude as well as the dependence of dark saturation current on n-Si doping concentration proves that the transport is governed by diffusion of minority charge carriers in the n-Si and not by thermionic emission of majorities over a Schottky barrier. This leads to a comprehensive explanation of the high observed open-circuit voltages of up to 634 mV connected to high conversion efficiency of almost 14%, even for simple planar device structures without antireflection coating or optimized contacts. The presented work clearly shows that PEDOT:PSS forms a hybrid heterojunction with n-Si behaving similar to a conventional pn-junction and not, like commonly assumed, a Schottky junction.

  15. Gap junctions composed of connexins 41.8 and 39.4 are essential for colour pattern formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Irion, Uwe; Frohnhöfer, Hans Georg; Krauss, Jana; Çolak Champollion, Tuǧba; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Geiger-Rudolph, Silke; Weiler, Christian; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between all three pigment cell types are required to form the stripe pattern of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio), but their molecular nature is poorly understood. Mutations in leopard (leo), encoding Connexin 41.8 (Cx41.8), a gap junction subunit, cause a phenotypic series of spotted patterns. A new dominant allele, leo(tK3), leads to a complete loss of the pattern, suggesting a dominant negative impact on another component of gap junctions. In a genetic screen, we identified this component as Cx39.4 (luchs). Loss-of-function alleles demonstrate that luchs is required for stripe formation in zebrafish; however, the fins are almost not affected. Double mutants and chimeras, which show that leo and luchs are only required in xanthophores and melanophores, but not in iridophores, suggest that both connexins form heteromeric gap junctions. The phenotypes indicate that these promote homotypic interactions between melanophores and xanthophores, respectively, and those cells instruct the patterning of the iridophores. PMID:25535837

  16. Prediction of low-energy boron doping profile for ultrashallow junction formation by hybrid molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuhara, Hidehiko; Miyamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Our original hybrid method combining tight-binding quantum chemical and classical molecular dynamics was first applied to the low-energy doping process of boron into a silicon substrate, which has a depth of more than 10 nm that is needed to evaluate an ultrashallow junction position. Tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics calculation was used for an injected boron atom and surrounding silicon atoms within a sphere with a radius of 0.5 nm centered at the boron atom. This method is advantageous in treating the many-body collision effect and electron-electron interaction, which are more important in low-energy doping, compared with the Monte Carlo method with binary collision approximation. A comparison with a plasma doping experiment was also carried out. The junction positions were 6.2 nm for boron doping at an initial kinetic energy of 200 eV in the simulation results and 6.4 nm for 200 eV in the experimental results. Good agreement between simulation and experimental results indicates that our hybrid molecular dynamics method is applicable to doping profile prediction in a silicon structure with a depth of more than 10 nm that is needed to evaluate ultrashallow junction formation.

  17. Evidence of a shallow junction formation from plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride and silicon boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tue; Van Nguyen, Son; Dobuzinsky, David M.

    1993-10-01

    Dielectric constant characterization of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of boron nitride (BN) and silicon boron nitride (SiBN) films is studied using metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures. Using the measurement technique of calculating the dielectric constant value from the capacitance, the average dielectric constant value for the BN and SiBN films deposited under similar conditions can vary as much as 40% (from 2.8 to 4.4). Low dielectric constant values are normally observed on MIS structures where the silicon substrate is n-type. Detailed C-V analysis at various test frequencies (100 Hz-1 MHz) shows that the flatband and the threshold voltages shift more than 30 V in n-type and p-type substrate wafers, respectively. These C-V characteristics suggest the formation of a junction at the insulator-substrate interface. This interface junction is probably formed by the boron-rich nitride deposition during the transient period and subsequent boron diffusion to the silicon substrate. Accounting for this p-n junction on n-type substrate wafers, the adjusted dielectric constant for MIS structures on n-type substrate is between 4 and 5, which is the same for MIS structures on p-type substrate and MIM structures.

  18. Time-resolved mixing and flow-field measurements during droplet formation in a flow-focusing junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Odile; Gökhan Ergin, F.; Li, Huai-Zhi; Watz, Bo B.; Funfschilling, Denis

    2015-08-01

    Highly monodispersed emulsions can be produced in microfluidic flow-focusing junctions (Anna et al 2003 Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 364-6, Baroud et al 2010 Lab Chip 10 2032-45). This is the reason why many industrial processes in the medical industry among others are based on droplet manipulation and involve at some point a step of dripping within a junction. However, only a few studies have focused on the flow field inside and outside the droplet, even though it is a necessary step for understanding the physical mechanism involved and for modeling the droplet formation process. Water-in-oil emulsions are produced in flow-focusing junctions of square cross sections. The fluids constituting the emulsion are (i) a 5.0 mPa·s silicon oil for the oil phase and (ii) distilled water containing 2.0 wt% of sodium dodecyl sulfate surfactant for the aqueous phase. Time-resolved shadow particle images are acquired using a microscale particle image velocimetry (µPIV) system and flow fields are calculated using an adaptive PIV algorithm in combination with dynamic masking. Inside the microchannel and in the permanent regime, the droplet has an internal circulation that has been well established by Sarrazin et al (AICHE J. 52 4061-70). But during the formation of a droplet in a flow-focusing junction, the flow field is not so well known, and the circulation in the finger flows forward along the sides and returns along the center. The mechanism can be described in terms of four distinct steps: droplet growth, necking, rupture, and recoil. The liquid expelled from the neck just before rupture is also well observed. The flow field and mixing are measured in detail during a complete cycle of formation of a main droplet and satellite droplets using high-speed imaging. This allows us to develop a better understanding of the different forces that are present and of the physical mechanism of droplet formation.

  19. Formation of adherens and communicating junctions coordinate the differentiation of the shedding-layer and beta-epidermal generation in regenerating lizard epidermis.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    In the lizard epidermis, the formation of a stratified alpha- and beta-layer, separated by a shedding complex for molting, suggests that keratinocytes communicate in a coordinated manner after they leave the basal layers during the shedding cycle. I have therefore studied the localization of cell junctional proteins such as beta-catenin and connexins 43 and 26 during scale regeneration in lizard using immunocytochemistry. Beta-catenin is also detected in nuclei of basal cells destined to give rise to the Oberhäutchen and beta-cells suggesting activation of the Wnt-pathway during beta-cell differentiation. The observations show that cells of the entire shedding layer (clear and Oberhäutchen) and beta-layer are connected by beta-catenin (adherens junctions) and connexins (communicating junctions) during their differentiation. This likely cell coupling determines the formation of a distinct shedding and beta-layer within the regenerating epidermis. The observed pattern of cell junctional stratification suggests that after departing from the basal layer Oberhäutchen and beta-cells form a continuous communicating compartment that coordinates the contemporaneous differentiation along the entire scale. While the beta-layer matures the junctions are lost while other cell junctions are formed in the following mesos- and alpha-cell layers. This process determines the formation of layers with different texture (harder or softer) and the precise localization of the shedding layer within lizard epidermis. PMID:24860869

  20. Junction formation of Cu3BiS3 investigated by Kelvin probe force microscopy and surface photovoltage measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Fredy; Chamorro, William; Vallejo, William; Baier, Robert; Dittrich, Thomas; Grimm, Alexander; Lux-Steiner, Martha C

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recently, the compound semiconductor Cu3BiS3 has been demonstrated to have a band gap of ~1.4 eV, well suited for photovoltaic energy harvesting. The preparation of polycrystalline thin films was successfully realized and now the junction formation to the n-type window needs to be developed. We present an investigation of the Cu3BiS3 absorber layer and the junction formation with CdS, ZnS and In2S3 buffer layers. Kelvin probe force microscopy shows the granular structure of the buffer layers with small grains of 20–100 nm, and a considerably smaller work-function distribution for In2S3 compared to that of CdS and ZnS. For In2S3 and CdS buffer layers the KPFM experiments indicate negatively charged Cu3BiS3 grain boundaries resulting from the deposition of the buffer layer. Macroscopic measurements of the surface photovoltage at variable excitation wavelength indicate the influence of defect states below the band gap on charge separation and a surface-defect passivation by the In2S3 buffer layer. Our findings indicate that Cu3BiS3 may become an interesting absorber material for thin-film solar cells; however, for photovoltaic application the band bending at the charge-selective contact has to be increased. PMID:22497001

  1. Defect-related luminescence in silicon p{sup +}–n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, R. V. Bagraev, N. T.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Malyarenko, A. M.

    2015-09-15

    Ultra-shallow p{sup +}–n junctions fabricated by the silicon planar technology based on the short-time nonequilibrium diffusion of boron from the gas phase into n-Si (100) substrates upon their preliminary oxidation and the opening of windows in SiO{sub 2} by electron lithography and reactive ion etching are examined. The electroand photoluminescence spectra measured in the study demonstrate emission in the range 1–1.6 µm, which is indicative of the presence of a high concentration of defects that probably appear as a result of the amorphizing effect of ions in the etching stage.

  2. Planar Be-implanted GaAs junction formation using swept-line electron beam annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.K.; De Jule, R.Y.; Soda, K.J.

    1983-12-01

    Comparative studies of swept-line electron beam annealing and furnace annealing of Be implanted in n-GaAs doped with Si are presented. Electron beam annealing causes less Be redistribution and results in fewer traps than furnace annealing, but causes site mixing of amphoteric Si. Planar Be-implanted junctions result in a p(+)-nu-n structure for the electron beam annealed samples, similar to thermally quenched samples. It is believed that this is caused by the incorporation of amphoteric Si on Ga and As sites during transient annealing, which produces results similar to thermal quenching. 14 references.

  3. Dynamic formation of ER-PM junctions presents a lipid phosphatase to regulate phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Jensen, Jill B; Vivas, Oscar; Kruse, Martin; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis E; Hille, Bertil

    2016-04-11

    Endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) contact sites play an integral role in cellular processes such as excitation-contraction coupling and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). Another ER-PM assembly is one tethered by the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syt). We have discovered that at steady state, E-Syt2 positions the ER and Sac1, an integral ER membrane lipid phosphatase, in discrete ER-PM junctions. Here, Sac1 participates in phosphoinositide homeostasis by limiting PM phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P), the precursor of PI(4,5)P2 Activation of G protein-coupled receptors that deplete PM PI(4,5)P2disrupts E-Syt2-mediated ER-PM junctions, reducing Sac1's access to the PM and permitting PM PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2to recover. Conversely, depletion of ER luminal calcium and subsequent activation of SOCE increases the amount of Sac1 in contact with the PM, depleting PM PI(4)P. Thus, the dynamic presence of Sac1 at ER-PM contact sites allows it to act as a cellular sensor and controller of PM phosphoinositides, thereby influencing many PM processes. PMID:27044890

  4. The Peptidoglycan-Binding Protein SjcF1 Influences Septal Junction Function and Channel Formation in the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Mareike; Tetik, Nalan; Ramos-León, Félix; Flinner, Nadine; Ngo, Giang; Stevanovic, Mara; Burnat, Mireia; Pernil, Rafael; Flores, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria exchange nutrients and regulators between cells for diazotrophic growth. Two alternative modes of exchange have been discussed involving transport either through the periplasm or through septal junctions linking adjacent cells. Septal junctions and channels in the septal peptidoglycan are likely filled with septal junction complexes. While possible proteinaceous factors involved in septal junction formation, SepJ (FraG), FraC, and FraD, have been identified, little is known about peptidoglycan channel formation and septal junction complex anchoring to the peptidoglycan. We describe a factor, SjcF1, involved in regulation of septal junction channel formation in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. SjcF1 interacts with the peptidoglycan layer through two peptidoglycan-binding domains and is localized throughout the cell periphery but at higher levels in the intercellular septa. A strain with an insertion in sjcF1 was not affected in peptidoglycan synthesis but showed an altered morphology of the septal peptidoglycan channels, which were significantly wider in the mutant than in the wild type. The mutant was impaired in intercellular exchange of a fluorescent probe to a similar extent as a sepJ deletion mutant. SjcF1 additionally bears an SH3 domain for protein-protein interactions. SH3 binding domains were identified in SepJ and FraC, and evidence for interaction of SjcF1 with both SepJ and FraC was obtained. SjcF1 represents a novel protein involved in structuring the peptidoglycan layer, which links peptidoglycan channel formation to septal junction complex function in multicellular cyanobacteria. Nonetheless, based on its subcellular distribution, this might not be the only function of SjcF1. PMID:26126850

  5. Investigation of Factors that Control Droplet Formation in Microfluidic Cross-Junctions Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, Jason

    Microfluidics could potentially provide a cheaper and more effective alternative to current industrial and laboratory fluid management techniques due to the large surface area-to-volume ratios; however, optimization of the flow conditions necessary for precise droplet generation is required for any segmented flow application. The Shan-Chen multicomponent multiphase Lattice Boltzmann method was used to simulate droplet formation conditions and provide insight about the conditions for different flow regimes like streaming, threading, and stable droplet generation. For the range of numerically stable flow conditions tested, the combined effects of the Capillary number and velocity ratio were demonstrated to be the process drivers for the cross-junction droplet size while the other dimensionless numbers had a less significant effect. Future studies include the analysis of other multiphase models to improve the numerical stability and reduce spurious velocities. In addition, there has already been some success in incorporating tracer particles into cross-junction droplets to quantify mixing during droplet coalescence. Further improvements will incorporate suspended magnetic particles to simulate the afforded mixing and separation capabilities.

  6. Formation of cristae and crista junctions in mitochondria depends on antagonism between Fcj1 and Su e/g

    PubMed Central

    Rabl, Regina; Soubannier, Vincent; Scholz, Roland; Vogel, Frank; Mendl, Nadine; Vasiljev-Neumeyer, Andreja; Körner, Christian; Jagasia, Ravi; Keil, Thomas; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Cyrklaff, Marek; Neupert, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Crista junctions (CJs) are important for mitochondrial organization and function, but the molecular basis of their formation and architecture is obscure. We have identified and characterized a mitochondrial membrane protein in yeast, Fcj1 (formation of CJ protein 1), which is specifically enriched in CJs. Cells lacking Fcj1 lack CJs, exhibit concentric stacks of inner membrane in the mitochondrial matrix, and show increased levels of F1FO–ATP synthase (F1FO) supercomplexes. Overexpression of Fcj1 leads to increased CJ formation, branching of cristae, enlargement of CJ diameter, and reduced levels of F1FO supercomplexes. Impairment of F1FO oligomer formation by deletion of its subunits e/g (Su e/g) causes CJ diameter enlargement and reduction of cristae tip numbers and promotes cristae branching. Fcj1 and Su e/g genetically interact. We propose a model in which the antagonism between Fcj1 and Su e/g locally modulates the F1FO oligomeric state, thereby controlling membrane curvature of cristae to generate CJs and cristae tips. PMID:19528297

  7. JNK signaling regulates E-cadherin junctions in germline cysts and determines primordial follicle formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wanbao; Wang, Ye; Wang, Zhengpin; Xin, Qiliang; Wang, Yijing; Feng, Lizhao; Zhao, Lihua; Wen, Jia; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Chao; Xia, Guoliang

    2016-05-15

    Physiologically, the size of the primordial follicle pool determines the reproductive lifespan of female mammals, while its establishment largely depends on a process of germline cyst breakdown during the perinatal period. The mechanisms regulating this process are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is crucial for germline cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation. JNK was specifically localized in oocytes and its activity increased as germline cyst breakdown progressed. Importantly, disruption of JNK signaling with a specific inhibitor (SP600125) or knockdown technology (Lenti-JNK-shRNAs) resulted in significantly suppressed cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation in cultured mouse ovaries. Our results show that E-cadherin is intensely expressed in germline cysts, and that its decline is necessary for oocyte release from the cyst. However, inhibition of JNK signaling leads to aberrantly enhanced localization of E-cadherin at oocyte-oocyte contact sites. WNT4 expression is upregulated after SP600125 treatment. Additionally, similar to the effect of SP600125 treatment, WNT4 overexpression delays cyst breakdown and is accompanied by abnormal E-cadherin expression patterns. In conclusion, our results suggest that JNK signaling, which is inversely correlated with WNT4, plays an important role in perinatal germline cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation by regulating E-cadherin junctions between oocytes in mouse ovaries. PMID:27013242

  8. Doping Evolution and Junction Formation in Stacked Cyanine Dye Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Jenatsch, Sandra; Wang, Lei; Bulloni, Matia; Véron, Anna C; Ruhstaller, Beat; Altazin, Stéphane; Nüesch, Frank; Hany, Roland

    2016-03-16

    Cyanine dyes are fluorescent organic salts with intrinsic conductivity for ionic and electronic charges. Recently ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013 , 135 , 18008 - 18011 ), these features have been exploited in cyanine light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs). Here, we demonstrate that stacked, constant-voltage driven trimethine cyanine LECs with various counteranions develop a p-i-n junction that is composed of p- and n-doped zones and an intrinsic region where light-emission occurs. We introduce a method that combines spectral photocurrent response measurements with optical modeling and find that at maximum current the intrinsic region is centered at ∼37% away from the anode. Transient capacitance, photoluminescence and attenuance experiments indicate a device situation with a narrow p-doped region, an undoped region that occupies ∼72% of the dye layer thickness and an n-doped region with a maximum doping concentration of 0.08 dopant/cyanine molecule. Finally, we observe that during device relaxation the parent cyanines are not reformed. We ascribe this to irreversible reactions between doped cyanine radicals. For sterically conservative cyanine dyes, this suggests that undesired radical decomposition pathways limit the LEC long-term stability in general. PMID:26914281

  9. Formation of antiwaves in gap-junction-coupled chains of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Alexander; Ermentrout, Bard

    2012-07-01

    Using network models consisting of gap-junction-coupled Wang-Buszaki neurons, we demonstrate that it is possible to obtain not only synchronous activity between neurons but also a variety of constant phase shifts between 0 and π. We call these phase shifts intermediate stable phase-locked states. These phase shifts can produce a large variety of wavelike activity patterns in one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays of neurons, which can be studied by reducing the system of equations to a phase model. The 2π periodic coupling functions of these models are characterized by prominent higher order terms in their Fourier expansion, which can be varied by changing model parameters. We study how the relative contribution of the odd and even terms affects what solutions are possible, the basin of attraction of those solutions, and their stability. These models may be applicable to the spinal central pattern generators of the dogfish and also to the developing neocortex of the neonatal rat.

  10. Involvement of YAP, TAZ and HSP90 in Contact Guidance and Intercellular Junction Formation in Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joshua T.; Tuyen, Binh C.; Rose, Brad W.; Reilly, Christopher M.; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular environment possesses a rich milieu of biophysical and biochemical signaling cues that are simultaneously integrated by cells and influence cellular phenotype. Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (WWTR1; TAZ), two important signaling molecules of the Hippo pathway, have been recently implicated as nuclear relays of cytoskeletal changes mediated by substratum rigidity and topography. These proteins intersect with other important intracellular signaling pathways (e.g. Wnt and TGFβ). In the cornea, epithelial cells adhere to the stroma through a 3-dimensional topography-rich basement membrane, with features in the nano-submicron size-scale that are capable of profoundly modulating a wide range of fundamental cell behaviors. The influences of substratum-topography, YAP/TAZ knockdown, and HSP90 inhibition on cell morphology, YAP/TAZ localization, and the expression of TGFβ2 and CTGF, were investigated. The results demonstrate (a) that knockdown of TAZ enhances contact guidance in a YAP dependent manner, (b) that CTGF is predominantly regulated by YAP and not TAZ, and (c) that TGFβ2 is regulated by both YAP and TAZ in these cells. Additionally, inhibition of HSP90 resulted in nuclear localization and subsequent transcriptional-activation of YAP, formation of cell-cell junctions and co-localization of E-cadherin and β-catenin at adherens junctions. Results presented in this study reflect the complexities underlying the molecular relationships between the cytoskeleton, growth factors, heat shock proteins, and co-activators of transcription that impact mechanotransduction. The data reveal the importance of YAP/TAZ on the cell behaviors, and gene and protein expression. PMID:25290150

  11. Formation of functional gap junctions in amniotic fluid-derived stem cells induced by transmembrane co-culture with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jennifer Petsche; Augustini, Emily; Moise, Kenneth J; Johnson, Anthony; Jacot, Jeffrey G

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSC) have been reported to differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells and form gap junctions when directly mixed and cultured with neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). This study investigated whether or not culture of AFSC on the opposite side of a Transwell membrane from NRVM, allowing for contact and communication without confounding factors such as cell fusion, could direct cardiac differentiation and enhance gap junction formation. Results were compared to shared media (Transwell), conditioned media and monoculture media controls. After a 2-week culture period, AFSC did not express cardiac myosin heavy chain or troponin T in any co-culture group. Protein expression of cardiac calsequestrin 2 was up-regulated in direct transmembrane co-cultures and media control cultures compared to the other experimental groups, but all groups were up-regulated compared with undifferentiated AFSC cultures. Gap junction communication, assessed with a scrape-loading dye transfer assay, was significantly increased in direct transmembrane co-cultures compared to all other conditions. Gap junction communication corresponded with increased connexin 43 gene expression and decreased phosphorylation of connexin 43. Our results suggest that direct transmembrane co-culture does not induce cardiomyocyte differentiation of AFSC, though calsequestrin expression is increased. However, direct transmembrane co-culture does enhance connexin-43-mediated gap junction communication between AFSC. PMID:23634988

  12. Local stoichiometry and atomic interdiffusion during reactive metal/mercury-cadmium-telluride junction formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, A.; Raisanen, A.; Chang, S.; Philip, P.; Troullier, N.

    1987-10-01

    We summarize synchrotron radiation photoemission studies of Ag, Ge and Sm overlayers on Hg1-xCdxTe (110) surfaces. These metals exhibit widely different interface reactivity with Hg1-xCdxTe and yield a range of different interface morphologies. To assess the relative importance of the microscopic driving forces that determine the local composition at the interface and in the semiconductor near surface region we present a systematic comparison of our data with calculated thermodynamic parameters such as the cation-metal heat of solution, the heat of alloying from Miedema's semiempirical model, and the metal telluride formation enthalpy.

  13. [Influence of limk1 Gene Polymorphism on Learning Acquisition and Memory Formation with pCREB Distribution and Aggregate Formation in Neuromuscular Junctions in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Kaminskaya, A N; Nikitina, E A; Medvedeva, A V; Gerasimenko, M S; Chernikova, D A; Savateeva-Popova, E V

    2015-06-01

    We have shown previously that the polymorphic structure of the limk1 gene in drosophila leads to changes in LIMK1 content and to defects in courtship behavior, sound production, and learning/memory. The results of the present study of three wild-type strains and mutant agn(ts3) with altered limk1 structure demonstrate that long-term memory is normal in Canton-S and Oregon-R but is impaired in Berlin and drastically suppressed in agn(ts3). This temperature-sensitive mutant carries the S-element from the Tc1/mariner family insertion near the dlimk1 3'-UTR and, compared to Canton-S, has a reverse pCREB distribution in adult neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) of the second dorsal imago nerve before and after learning. Moreover, only agn(ts3) demonstrates amyloid-like aggregate formation in NMJ. This suggests that this impedes pCREb transport and thereby impairs the formation of short- and long-term memory. PMID:26310031

  14. Neuromuscular Junction Formation between Human Stem cell-derived Motoneurons and Human Skeletal Muscle in a Defined System

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiufang; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Vandenburgh, Herman; Hickman, James

    2011-01-01

    Functional in vitro models composed of human cells will constitute an important platform in the next generation of system biology and drug discovery. This study reports a novel human-based in vitro Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ) system developed in a defined serum-free medium and on a patternable non-biological surface. The motoneurons and skeletal muscles were derived from fetal spinal stem cells and skeletal muscle stem cells. The motoneurons and skeletal myotubes were completely differentiated in the co-culture based on morphological analysis and electrophysiology. NMJ formation was demonstrated by phase contrast microscopy, immunocytochemistry and the observation of motoneuron-induced muscle contractions utilizing time lapse recordings and their subsequent quenching by D-Tubocurarine. Generally, functional human based systems would eliminate the issue of species variability during the drug development process and its derivation from stem cells bypasses the restrictions inherent with utilization of primary human tissue. This defined human-based NMJ system is one of the first steps in creating functional in vitro systems and will play an important role in understanding NMJ development, in developing high information content drug screens and as test beds in preclinical studies for spinal or muscular diseases/injuries such as muscular dystrophy, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord repair. PMID:21944471

  15. Rab3Gap1 mediates exocytosis of Claudin-1 and tight junction formation during epidermal barrier acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, G.; Gerner, L.; Naeem, A.S.; Ralph, O.; Ono, M.; O’Neill, C.A.; O’Shaughnessy, R.F.L.

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal barrier acquisition during late murine gestation is accompanied by an increase in Akt kinase activity and cJun dephosphorlyation. The latter is directed by the Ppp2r2a regulatory subunit of the Pp2a phosphatase. This was accompanied by a change of Claudin-1 localisation to the cell surface and interaction between Occludin and Claudin-1 which are thought to be required for tight junction formation. The aim of this study was to determine the nature of the barrier defect caused by the loss of AKT/Ppp2r2a function. There was a paracellular barrier defect in rat epidermal keratinocytes expressing a Ppp2r2a siRNA. In Ppp2r2a knockdown cells, Claudin-1 was located to the cytoplasm and its expression was increased. Inhibiting cJun phosphorylation restored barrier function and plasma membrane localisation of Claudin-1. Expression of the Rab3 GTPase activating protein, Rab3Gap1, was restored in Ppp2r2a siRNA cells when cJun phosphorylation was inhibited. During normal mouse epidermal development, Claudin-1 plasma membrane localisation and Rab3Gap1 cell surface expression were co-incident with Akt activation in mouse epidermis, strongly suggesting a role of Rab3Gap1 in epidermal barrier acquisition. Supporting this hypothesis, siRNA knockdown of Rab3Gap1 prevented plasma membrane Claudin-1 expression and the formation of a barrier competent epithelium. Replacing Rab3Gap1 in Ppp2r2a knockdown cells was sufficient to rescue Claudin-1 transport to the cell surface. Therefore these data suggest Rab3Gap1 mediated exocytosis of Claudin-1 is an important component of epidermal barrier acquisition during epidermal development. PMID:23685254

  16. Dynamics of plume-triple junction interaction: Results from a series of three-dimensional numerical models and implications for the formation of oceanic plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dordevic, Mladen; Georgen, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Mantle plumes rising in the vicinity of mid-ocean ridges often generate anomalies in melt production and seafloor depth. This study investigates the dynamical interactions between a mantle plume and a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, using a parameter space approach and a suite of steady state, three-dimensional finite element numerical models. The top domain boundary is composed of three diverging plates, with each assigned half-spreading rates with respect to a fixed triple junction point. The bottom boundary is kept at a constant temperature of 1350°C except where a two-dimensional, Gaussian-shaped thermal anomaly simulating a plume is imposed. Models vary plume diameter, plume location, the viscosity contrast between plume and ambient mantle material, and the use of dehydration rheology in calculating viscosity. Importantly, the model results quantify how plume-related anomalies in mantle temperature pattern, seafloor depth, and crustal thickness depend on the specific set of parameters. To provide an example, one way of assessing the effect of conduit position is to calculate normalized area, defined to be the spatial dispersion of a given plume at specific depth (here selected to be 50 km) divided by the area occupied by the same plume when it is located under the triple junction. For one particular case modeled where the plume is centered in an intraplate position 100 km from the triple junction, normalized area is just 55%. Overall, these models provide a framework for better understanding plateau formation at triple junctions in the natural setting and a tool for constraining subsurface geodynamical processes and plume properties.

  17. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions.

    PubMed

    Ingerle, D; Meirer, F; Pepponi, G; Demenev, E; Giubertoni, D; Wobrauschek, P; Streli, C

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted elements with drastically increased confidence level. Silicon wafers implanted with Arsenic at different implantation energies were measured by XRR and GIXRF using a combined, simultaneous measurement and data evaluation procedure. The data were processed using a self-developed software package (JGIXA), designed for simultaneous fitting of GIXRF and XRR data. The results were compared with depth profiles obtained by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). PMID:25202165

  18. High-T(sub c) Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Junctions with Polyimide-Passivated Ambient Temperature Edge Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barner, J. B.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Hunt, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to controllably fabricate High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) S-Normal-S (SNS) Josephson Juntions (JJ's) enhances the possibilities fro many applications, including digital circuits, SQUID's, and mixers. A wide variety of approaches to fabricating SNS-like junctions has been tried and analyzed in terms of proximity effect behavior.

  19. In situ formation of p-n junction: a novel principle for photoelectrochemical sensor and its application for mercury(II) ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Liu, Kang-Li; Dong, Yu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun; Zhang, Chi

    2014-05-27

    The discovery and development of photoelectrochemical sensors with novel principles are of great significance to realize sensitive and low-cost detection. In this paper, a new photoelectrochemial sensor based on the in situ formation of p-n junction was designed and used for the accurate determination of mercury(II) ions. Cysteine-capped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) was assembled on the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode based on the electrostatic interaction between Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and Cys-capped ZnS QDs. The in situ formation of HgS, a p-type semiconductor, on the surface of ZnS facilitated the charge carrier transport and promoted electron-hole separation, triggered an obviously enhanced anodic photocurrent of Cys-capped ZnS QDs. The formation of p-n junction was confirmed by P-N conductive type discriminator measurements and current-voltage (I-V) curves. The photoelectrochemical method was used for the sensing of trace mercuric (II) ions with a linear concentration of 0.01 to 10.0 µM and a detection limit of 4.6×10(-9)mol/L. It is expected that the present study can serve as a foundation to the application of p-n heterojunction to photoelectrochemical sensors and it might be easily extended to more exciting sensing systems by photoelectrochemistry. PMID:24832992

  20. p120-Catenin is essential for N-cadherin-mediated formation of proper junctional structure, thereby establishing cell polarity in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Chisa; Yoshioka, Masato; Tominaga, Sachiko; Osaka, Yoshinori; Obata, Shuichi; Suzuki, Shintaro T

    2010-01-01

    The role of p120-catenin in the function of classical cadherins is still enigmatic despite various studies. To elucidate its role, we examined the effect of p120-catenin on the N-cadherin-mediated localization of junctional proteins in epithelial cells in this study. Cadherin-deficient MIA PaCa-2 epithelial cells did not show linear localization of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. When N-cadherin was expressed in these cells, however, the resultant transfectant cells revealed strong cell adhesion activity and linear localization of ZO-1, occludin, and N-cadherin in the lateral membrane. When the p120-catenin-binding site of N-cadherin was disrupted, the linear localization of ZO-1 and occludin disappeared, and the mutant N-cadherin became localized more diffusely in the transfectant, although the cell adhesion activity did not change much. Knockdown of p120-catenin also resulted in the very weak localization of ZO-1 and occludin. A similar effect of p120-catenin on the localization of junctional proteins was obtained under more dynamic conditions in a wound healing assay. Moreover, p120-catenin was essential for the regulation of centrosome orientation in this healing assay. Taken together, the present data indicate that p120-catenin is essential for N-cadherin-mediated formation of proper junctional structures and thereby the establishment of the cell polarity. Similar results were obtained when E-cadherin mutants comparable to those of N-cadherin were used, suggesting that p120-catenin plays the same role in the function of other classical cadherins. PMID:20859058

  1. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  2. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  3. Fibrillin and elastin expression in skin regenerating from cultured keratinocyte autografts: morphogenesis of microfibrils begins at the dermo-epidermal junction and precedes elastic fiber formation.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, M; Bächi, T; Meuli, M; Altermatt, S; Gobet, R; Bruckner-Tuderman, L; Steinmann, B

    1996-05-01

    The temporo-spatial expression of fibrillin and elastin in skin regenerating from autologous keratinocyte grafts was studied in three burned children. Skin biopsies taken between 5 days and 17 months after grafting were investigated by conventional immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning, and electron microscopy. Fibrillin, the major component of 10-12nm microfibrils, appeared 5 days after grafting in a band-like fashion similar to collagen VII at the prospective basement membrane, and the formed the characteristic microfibrillar candelabra at the dermo-epidermal junction by fusion of several fine microfibrils to communicating microfibrils projecting downward into the reticular layer of the neodermis. Four to five months after grafting, several communicating microfibrils were connected to a web of horizontally undulating microfibrils of the neodermis which had developed independently. Elastin was first identified in the deeper neodermis 1 month after grafting as granular aggregates and 4 months after grafting on fibrillar structures and surrounding capillaries of the upper neodermis. Association of elastin with microfibrils in the papillary dermis was not detectable before month 17. Our findings suggest that the cutaneous microfibrillar apparatus develops simultaneously at both the dermo-epidermal junction and the reticular dermis and is a prerequisite for elastic fiber formation. In addition, it might be a driving force for the formation of the papilla-rete ridge pattern. PMID:8618045

  4. Generating triple junction distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Graden Bryant

    Substantial studies indicate polycrystalline triple junctions are independent microstructural defects with distinct properties and effects from their constituent grain boundaries. Triple junctions are also descriptive of grain boundary networks and can provide relative grain boundary energies. Despite their undeniable influence within microstructures, there is a lack of techniques for characterizing triple junctions on a large scale. This is the result of the difficulty of measuring their many parameters and three-dimensional features. In a first step towards triple junction characterization, this work has developed a method of characterizing twin-dependent triple junction distributions. All necessary parameters and conventions are established for generating twin-dependent distributions within a discrete space. A novel method of weighting distribution values to remove inherent sampling biases is developed. As a result of the distribution weighting, a novel technique for generating twin-dependent triple junctions with unequal volume cells is created. Grain boundary plane stereological methods are adopted to enable forming twin-dependent distributions from electron back-scatter diffraction data on a single section plane. This method has been prepared in a software format for the automated generation of distributions. The method has been optimized by empirical techniques and through the implementation of simulated microstructures it has been qualitatively and quantitatively validated. Quantitative measures of distribution quality are developed and implemented to approximate the relative reliability of results with respect to data quantity. The implications of this method to general triple junctions are discussed and the parameters and conventions of a general triple junction distribution are presented as a foundation for future development. This work prepares the fundamentals to general triple junction characterization and makes progress towards integrated materials engineering.

  5. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  6. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  7. The zinc sensing receptor, ZnR/GPR39, controls proliferation and differentiation of colonocytes and thereby tight junction formation in the colon

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, L; Sekler, I; Hershfinkel, M

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a renewable tissue that requires precise balance between proliferation and differentiation, an essential process for the formation of a tightly sealed barrier. Zinc deficiency impairs the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier and is associated with ulcerative and diarrheal pathologies, but the mechanisms underlying the role of Zn2+ are not well understood. Here, we determined a role of the colonocytic Zn2+ sensing receptor, ZnR/GPR39, in mediating Zn2+-dependent signaling and regulating the proliferation and differentiation of colonocytes. Silencing of ZnR/GPR39 expression attenuated Zn2+-dependent activation of ERK1/2 and AKT as well as downstream activation of mTOR/p70S6K, pathways that are linked with proliferation. Consistently, ZnR/GPR39 silencing inhibited HT29 and Caco-2 colonocyte proliferation, while not inducing caspase-3 cleavage. Remarkably, in differentiating HT29 colonocytes, silencing of ZnR/GPR39 expression inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation. Furthermore, Caco-2 colonocytes showed elevated expression of ZnR/GPR39 during differentiation, whereas silencing of ZnR/GPR39 decreased monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance, suggesting compromised barrier formation. Indeed, silencing of ZnR/GPR39 or chelation of Zn2+ by the cell impermeable chelator CaEDTA was followed by impaired expression of the junctional proteins, that is, occludin, zonula-1 (ZO-1) and E-cadherin. Importantly, colon tissues of GPR39 knockout mice also showed a decrease in expression levels of ZO-1 and occludin compared with wildtype mice. Altogether, our results indicate that ZnR/GPR39 has a dual role in promoting proliferation of colonocytes and in controlling their differentiation. The latter is followed by ZnR/GPR39-dependent expression of tight junctional proteins, thereby leading to formation of a sealed intestinal epithelial barrier. Thus, ZnR/GPR39 may be a therapeutic target for promoting epithelial function and tight junction barrier integrity during ulcerative colon diseases. PMID:24967969

  8. Time-dependent effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure argon plasma on epithelial cell attachment, viability and tight junction formation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoentsch, Maxi; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Nebe, J. Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The application of physical plasma to living tissues is expected to promote wound healing by plasma disinfection and stimulation of tissue regeneration. However, the effects of plasma on healthy cells must be studied and understood. In our experiments we used an argon plasma jet (kINPen®09) to gain insights into time-dependent plasma effects on cell attachment, viability and tight junction formation in vitro. Murine epithelial cells mHepR1 were suspended in complete cell culture medium and were irradiated with argon plasma (direct approach) for 30, 60 and 120 s. Suspecting that physical plasma may exert its effect via the medium, cell culture medium alone was first treated with argon plasma (indirect approach) and immediately afterwards, cells were added and also cultured for 24 h. Cell morphology and vitality were verified using light microscopy and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Already after 30 s of treatment the mHepR1 cells lost their capability to adhere and the cell vitality decreased with increasing treatment time. Interestingly, the same inhibitory effect was observed in the indirect approach. Furthermore, the argon plasma-treated culture medium-induced large openings of the cell's tight junctions, were verified by the zonula occludens protein ZO-1, which we observed for the first time in confluently grown epithelial cells.

  9. Formation of single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon pn junctions by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiyuan, Wang; Yongguang, Huang; Dewei, Liu; Xiaoning, Zhu; Xiao, Cui; Hongliang, Zhu

    2013-06-01

    Pn junctions based on single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon were formed by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (PLM). P type silicon wafers were implanted with 245 keV 126Te+ to a dose of 2 × 1015 ions/cm2, after a PLM process (248 nm, laser fluence of 0.30 and 0.35 J/cm2, 1-5 pulses, duration 30 ns), an n+ type single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon layer with high carrier density (highest concentration 4.10 × 1019 cm-3, three orders of magnitude larger than the solid solution limit) was formed, it shows high broadband optical absorption from 400 to 2500 nm. Current—voltage measurements were performed on these diodes under dark and one standard sun (AM 1.5), and good rectification characteristics were observed. For present results, the samples with 4-5 pulses PLM are best.

  10. Ohmic contact formation of metal/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge junctions with an anomalous modulation of Schottky barrier height

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hanhui; Wang, Peng; Qi, Dongfeng; Li, Xin; Han, Xiang; Wang, Chen; Chen, Songyan Li, Cheng; Huang, Wei

    2014-11-10

    The modulation of Schottky barrier height of metal/Ge inserting an amorphous Ge layer has been demonstrated. It is interested that the Schottky barrier height of Al/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge junctions is oscillated with increase of the a-Ge thickness from 0 to 10 nm, and when the thickness reaches above 10 nm, the Al/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge shows ohmic characteristics. Electron hopping through localized states of a-Ge layer, the alleviation of metal induced gap states, as well as the termination of dangling bonds at the amorphous-Ge/n-Ge interface are proposed to explain the anomalous modulation of Schottky barrier height.

  11. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  12. Charged species transport and the formation of ionic depletion/enrichment zone in the junction between micro- and nano-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuan-Da; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2007-11-01

    Charged species transport exhibits ionic exclusion and enrichment effect when the channel scale down to the magnitude of the electric double layer thickness. The effect as a semipermeable interface results in a wide range ionic depletion zone and enrichment zone in the adjacent microchannel when an electrical field passes through the nanochannel. We utilize an alternating depletion and enrichment effect to achieve the goal of the species concentration in microchannels. Besides, the bulk charge layer originates from the theory of the electroosmosis second kind is used to explain the formation of high speed recirculation within the ionic depletion zone in this study. We also used latex particle to visualize these recirculation structures to evidence the specific flow field in the junction between micro- and nano-channel.

  13. Electro-Optical Characteristics of P+n In0.53Ga0.47As Hetero-Junction Photodiodes in Large Format Dense Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWames, R.; Littleton, R.; Witte, K.; Wichman, A.; Bellotti, E.; Pellegrino, J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper is concerned with focal plane array (FPA) data and use of analytical and three-dimensional numerical simulation methods to determine the physical effects and processes limiting performance. For shallow homojunction P+n designs the temperature dependence of dark current for T < 300 K depends on the intrinsic carrier concentration of the In0.53Ga0.47As material, implying that the dominant dark currents are generation and recombination (G-R) currents originating in the depletion regions of the double layer planar heterostructure (DLPH) photodiode. In the analytical model differences from bulk G-R behavior are modeled with a G-R like perimeter-dependent shunt current conjectured to originate at the InP/InGaAs interface. In this description the fitting property is the effective conductivity, σ eff( T), in mho cm-1. Variation in the data suggests σ eff (300 K) values of 1.2 × 10-11-4.6 × 10-11 mho cm-1). Substrate removal extends the quantum efficiency (QE) spectral band into the visible region. However, dead-layer effects limit the QE to 10% at a wavelength of 0.5 μm. For starlight-no moon illumination conditions, the signal-to-noise ratio is estimated to be 50 at an operating temperature of 300 K. A major result of the 3D numerical simulation of the device is the prediction of a perimeter G-R current not associated with the properties of the metallurgical interface. Another is the prediction that for a junction positioned in the larger band gap InP cap layer the QE is bias-dependent and that a relatively large reverse bias ≥0.9 V is needed for the QE to saturate to the shallow homojunction value. At this higher bias the dark current is larger than the shallow homojunction value. The 3D numerical model and the analytical model agree in predicting and explaining the measured radiatively limited diffusion current originating at the n-side of the junction. The calculations of the area-dependent G-R current for the condition studied are also in agreement. Unique advantages of the 3D numerical simulation are the ability to mimic real device structures, achieve deeper understanding of the real physical effects associated with the various methods of junction formation, and predict how device designs will function.

  14. The Role of Gap Junctions and Mechanical Loading on Mineral Formation in a Collagen-I Scaffold Seeded with Osteoprogenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damaraju, Swathi; Matyas, John R.; Rancourt, Derrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Fracture nonunions represent one of many large bone defects where current treatment strategies fall short in restoring both form and function of the injured tissue. In this case, the use of a tissue-engineered scaffold for promoting bone healing offers an accessible and easy-to-manipulate environment for studying bone formation processes in vitro. We have previously shown that mechanical prestimulation using confined compression of differentiating osteoblasts results in an increase in mineralization formed in a 3D collagen-I scaffold. This study builds on this knowledge by evaluating the short and long-term effects of blocking gap junction-mediated intercellular communication among osteogenic cells on their effectiveness to mineralize collagen-I scaffolds in vitro, and in the presence and absence of mechanical stimulation. In this study, confined compression was applied in conjunction with octanol (a general communication blocker) or 18-α-glycerrhetinic acid (AGA, a specific gap junction blocker) using a modified FlexCell plate to collagen-I scaffolds seeded with murine embryonic stem cells stimulated toward osteoblast differentiation using beta-glycerol phosphate. The activity, presence, and expression of osteoblast cadherin, connexin-43, as well as various pluripotent and osteogenic markers were examined at 5–30 days of differentiation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, immunofluorescence, viability, histology assessments, and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assessments revealed that inhibiting communication in this scaffold altered the lineage and function of differentiating osteoblasts. In particular, treatment with communication inhibitors caused reduced mineralization in the matrix, and dissociation between connexin-43 and integrin α5β1. This dissociation was not restored even after long-term recovery. Thus, in order for this scaffold to be considered as an alternative strategy for the repair of large bone defects, cell–cell contacts and cell–matrix interactions must remain intact for osteoblast differentiation and function to be preserved. This study shows that within this 3D scaffold, gap junctions are essential in osteoblast response to mechanical loading, and are essential structures in producing a significant amount and organization of mineralization in the matrix. PMID:25752490

  15. The role of gap junctions and mechanical loading on mineral formation in a collagen-I scaffold seeded with osteoprogenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Damaraju, Swathi; Matyas, John R; Rancourt, Derrick E; Duncan, Neil A

    2015-05-01

    Fracture nonunions represent one of many large bone defects where current treatment strategies fall short in restoring both form and function of the injured tissue. In this case, the use of a tissue-engineered scaffold for promoting bone healing offers an accessible and easy-to-manipulate environment for studying bone formation processes in vitro. We have previously shown that mechanical prestimulation using confined compression of differentiating osteoblasts results in an increase in mineralization formed in a 3D collagen-I scaffold. This study builds on this knowledge by evaluating the short and long-term effects of blocking gap junction-mediated intercellular communication among osteogenic cells on their effectiveness to mineralize collagen-I scaffolds in vitro, and in the presence and absence of mechanical stimulation. In this study, confined compression was applied in conjunction with octanol (a general communication blocker) or 18-α-glycerrhetinic acid (AGA, a specific gap junction blocker) using a modified FlexCell plate to collagen-I scaffolds seeded with murine embryonic stem cells stimulated toward osteoblast differentiation using beta-glycerol phosphate. The activity, presence, and expression of osteoblast cadherin, connexin-43, as well as various pluripotent and osteogenic markers were examined at 5-30 days of differentiation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, immunofluorescence, viability, histology assessments, and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assessments revealed that inhibiting communication in this scaffold altered the lineage and function of differentiating osteoblasts. In particular, treatment with communication inhibitors caused reduced mineralization in the matrix, and dissociation between connexin-43 and integrin α5β1. This dissociation was not restored even after long-term recovery. Thus, in order for this scaffold to be considered as an alternative strategy for the repair of large bone defects, cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions must remain intact for osteoblast differentiation and function to be preserved. This study shows that within this 3D scaffold, gap junctions are essential in osteoblast response to mechanical loading, and are essential structures in producing a significant amount and organization of mineralization in the matrix. PMID:25752490

  16. Hemicentin 2 and Fibulin 1 are required for epidermal-dermal junction formation and fin mesenchymal cell migration during zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Natália Martins; Zhang, Jinli; Carney, Thomas J; Metzger, Manuel; Korzh, Vladimir; Bloch, Wilhelm; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2012-09-15

    Hemicentin 1 (Hmcn1) and Hemicentin 2 (Hmcn2) belong to the fibulin family of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that play pivotal roles during development and homeostasis of a variety of vertebrate tissues. Recently, we have shown that mutations in zebrafish Hmcn1, also called Fibulin 6, lead to massive fin blistering, similar to the defects caused by the Fraser syndrome gene Fras1. In contrast, the role of Hmcn2 during vertebrate development has thus far been uncharacterized. In zebrafish, hmcn2, like fibulin 1 (fbln1), another member of the fibulin family, is predominantly expressed in fin mesenchymal cells and developing somites, contrasting the strict epithelial expression of hmcn1. While antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO)-based knockdown of hmcn2 did not yield any discernable defects, hmcn2/fbln1 double knockdown fish displayed blistering in the trunk, pointing to an essential contribution of these proteins from mesodermal sources for proper epidermal-dermal junction formation. In contrast, and unlike hmcn1 mutants, epidermal-dermal junctions in the fin folds of hmcn2/fbln1 double knockdown fish were only moderately affected. Instead, they displayed impaired migration of fin mesenchymal cells into the fin folds, pointing to a crucial role of Hmcn2 and Fbln1 to remodel the ECM of the fin fold interepidermal space, which is a prerequisite for fibroblast ingrowth. TEM analyses suggest that this ECM remodeling occurs at the level of actinotrichia, the collageneous migration substrate of mesenchymal cells, and at the level of cross fibers, which resemble mammalian microfibers. This work provides first insights into the role of Hmcn2 during vertebrate development, identifying it as an evolutionary conserved protein that acts in functional redundancy with Fbln1C and/or Fbln1D isoforms to regulate tissue adhesion and cell migration, while extending the current knowledge of the functions of vertebrate Fbln1. PMID:22771579

  17. Delayed Short Course Treatment with Teriparatide (PTH1–34) Improves Femoral Allograft Healing by Enhancing Intramembranous Bone Formation at the Graft-Host Junction

    PubMed Central

    Takahata, Masahiko; Schwarz, Edward M.; Chen, Tony; O’Keefe, Regis J; Awad, Hani A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical management of critical bone defects remains a major challenge. Despite pre-clinical work demonstrating teriparatide (PTH1–34) effectiveness in small animals, inconclusive data from clinical trials have raised questions of dose and regimen. To address this, we completed a comprehensive study in the murine femoral allograft model, to assess the effects of dose (0.4, 4, and 40 μg/kg/day) and various treatment regimens on radiographic, histologic and biomechanical healing at 2, 4, and 9 weeks. Only the high dose (40 μg/kg) of PTH1–34 demonstrated significant effects when given daily over 9 weeks. Remarkably, equivalent biomechanical results were obtained with delayed, short treatment from 2 to 6 weeks that did not induce a significant increase in endochondral bone formation and callus volume. In contrast, PTH1–34 treatment from 1 to 5 weeks post-op demonstrated similar osteogenic effects as immediate-daily treatment for 9 weeks, but failed to achieve a significant increase in biomechanics at 9 weeks. Micro-CT and histologic analyses demonstrated that the 2-week delay in treatment allowed for timely completion of the endochondral phase, such that the prominent effects of PTH1–34 were enhanced intramembranous bone formation and remodeling at the graft-host junction. These findings support the potential use of PTH1–34 as an adjuvant therapy for massive allograft healing, and suggest that there may be an ideal treatment window in which a short course is administered following the endochondral phase to promote osteoblastic bone formation and remodeling to achieve superior union with modest callus formation. PMID:21956542

  18. The Relationships of Plate Triple-junction Evolution, Trench-Arc Lengthening, Boninite Generation, and SSZ Spreading Centers to Ophiolite Formation, High-Temperature Soles, and Obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, J.; Dewey, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    A review of modern-day island arcs, the locations of boninite eruptions, the conditions necessary for hot upper plate spreading, potential regions of shallow SSZ flux melting, and formation of high-temperature metamorphic soles along the subduction channels indicates that many future, recent and ancient large slab ophiolite obduction events can be related to triple junctions that link SSZ spreading centers with trenches. These subduction systems leading to large slab ophiolite obduction events typically face stable continental margins. Boninitic melt generation requires hydrous melting of refractory mantle peridotite under an extremely high-temperature and low-pressure condition. This condition is generally explained by the addition of slab-derived fluids into a hot young oceanic mantle asthenosphere and lithosphere, which previously likely experienced melt extraction. Metamorphic conditions associated with metamorphic soles formation likewise require a hot upper plate lithosphere that, based on sole protolith, geochronologic and thermochronologic data, rapidly heats and then refrigerates and decompresses MORB-OIB type subcreted lithosphere. Numerous examples of present-day and recent SSZ spreading centers that link with two trenches or a trench and transform are considered ideal sites for ophiolite and boninite generation. The SZZ fore-arc spreading centers that link to the trench lines and triple junctions at the front of the arc may also continue towards the arc and back arc, creating no distinction between fore-arc and back-arc spreading episodes or to the transform-linked spreading centers from fore-arc to back arc. These SSZ spreading centers, which may be transiently produced during arc evolution over short or protracted time periods, act to open gaps in the arc massif and lengthen the trench, fore-arc and the arc crustal massif. They lead to an evolving arc magmatic front that begins in the infant fore-arc where ophiolite generation occurs at, near or in the trench, followed then by migration to sites distal from the trench line where a new arc massif is established on newly created oceanic lithosphere. Modern and ancient analogues of these setting are reviewed.

  19. Opto-electronic modeling of light emission from avalanche-mode silicon p+n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Satadal; Hueting, Raymond J. E.; Annema, Anne-Johan; Qi, Lin; Nanver, Lis K.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2015-09-01

    This work presents the modeling of light emission from silicon based p+n junctions operating in avalanche breakdown. We revisit the photon emission process under the influence of relatively high electric fields in a reverse biased junction ( > 10 5 V/cm). The photon emission rate is described as a function of the electron temperature T e , which is computed from the spatial distribution of the electric field. The light emission spectra lie around the visible spectral range ( λ ˜ 300-850 nm), where the peak wavelength and the optical intensity are both doping level dependent. It is theoretically derived that a specific minimum geometrical width ( ˜ 170 nm) of the active region of avalanche is required, corresponding to a breakdown voltage of ˜5 V, below which the rate of photon emission in the desired spectrum drops. The derived model is validated using experimental data obtained from ultra-shallow p+n junctions with low absorption through a nm-thin p+ region and surface coverage of solely 3 nm of pure boron. We observe a peak in the emission spectra near 580 nm and 650 nm for diodes with breakdown voltages 7 V and 14 V, respectively, consistent with our model.

  20. Obstacle strength of binary junction due to dislocation dipole formation: An in-situ transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez Haghighat, S. M.; Schublin, R.

    2015-10-01

    We report the experimental observation of the <111> edge dislocation dipole formation and annihilation in ultra-high purity Fe using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in-situ straining. The observation is confirmed by TEM image simulations. The edge dipole is formed by the interaction of a moving screw dislocation with an obstacle of dislocation character. It results from the glide of the two arms of the dislocation on two different glide planes, which stabilizes the dipole that is closed by a jog. The dipole is later released from the obstacle and disappears, presumably by gliding of the dipole's edge segments along their Burgers vector and freeing the mobile screw dislocation from the jog. This mechanism leads to enhanced obstacle strength of the immobile dislocation well above Orowan critical stress, promoting forest strength.

  1. Crustal structure in the junction of Qinling Orogen, Yangtze Craton and Tibetan Plateau: implications for the formation of the Dabashan Orocline and the growth of Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chengxin; Yang, Yingjie; Zheng, Yong

    2016-03-01

    The crust at the junction of Qinling Orogen, Yangtze Craton and NE Tibetan Plateau bears imprints of the Triassic collision and later intra-continental orogeny between the Qinling Orogen and the Yangtze Craton, and the Cenozoic growth of Tibetan Plateau. Investigating detailed crustal structures in this region helps to better understand these tectonic processes. In this study, we construct a 3-D crustal Vs model using seismic ambient noise data recorded at 321 seismic stations. Ambient noise tomography is performed to generate Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps at 8-50 s periods, which are then inverted for a 3D isotropic Vs model using a Bayesian Monte-Carlo method. Our 3D model reveals deep-rooted high velocities beneath the Hannan-Micang and Shennong-Huangling Domes, which are located on the west and east sides of the Dabashan Orocline. Similar high velocities are observed in the upper/mid crust of the western Qinling Orogen. We suggest the crustal-scale bodies with high velocity beneath the two domes and the western Qinling Orogen may represent mechanically strong rocks, which not only assisted the formation of the major Dabashan Orocline during late Mesozoic intra-continental orogeny, but also have impeded the northeastward expansion of the Tibetan Plateau during the Cenozoic era.

  2. The intracellular domain of cadherin-11 is not required for the induction of cell aggregation, adhesion or gap-junction formation.

    PubMed

    Braungart, E; Hartman, E; Bechler, K; Höfler, H; Atkinson, M J

    2001-01-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules demonstrates calcium-dependent homophilic binding, leading to cellular recognition and adhesion. The adhesion mediated by the classical type I cadherins is strengthened through catenin-mediated coupling of the cytoplasmic domain to the cytoskeleton. This cytoskeletal interaction may not be essential for the adhesion promoted by all cadherins, several of which lack cytosolic catenin-binding sequences. Cadherin-11, a classical cadherin, possesses a cytoplasmic domain that interacts with catenins, but may also occur as a variant form expressing a truncated cytoplasmic domain. To study the role of the cytoplasmic sequence in cadherin-11 mediated adhesion we have constructed and expressed a truncated cadherin-11 protein lacking the cytoplasmic domain and unable to bind beta-catenin. Expression of the truncated cadherin-11 in MDA-MB-435S human mammary carcinoma cells reduced their motility and promoted calcium-dependent cell aggregation, frequent cell contacts, and functional gap-junctions. We conclude that the intracellular catenin-binding domain of cadherin-11, and by inference cytoskeletal interaction, is not required for the initiation and formation of cell adhesion. PMID:11775026

  3. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T.; Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  4. Junction formation at the interface of CdS/CuInxGa(1 - x)Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soon Mi; Kim, Tae Gun; Duck Chung, Yong; Cho, Dae-Hyung; Kim, Jeha; Kim, Kyung Joong; Yi, Yeonjin; Kim, Jeong Won

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial band alignment and chemical composition at the cadmium sulfide (CdS)/copper indium gallium diselenide (CuInx Ga1-x Se2 : CIGS) heterojunction was investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy. Over the two different interfaces made by either thermal deposition of CdS on a CIGS film or step-by-step etching of a chemical-bath deposited (CBD)-CdS/CIGS film by Ar+ ions, the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum were determined using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy, respectively. Concurrently, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to trace chemical changes across the interface. Both interfaces showed a In-rich and Cu-deficient profile. The thermal deposition of CdS on CIGS induces Cd-Cu intermixing and nonstoichiometric CdS formation associated with a strong band bending and high electron injection barrier. However, the CBD-CdS layer shows a rather sharp interface and negligible electron injection barrier in the conduction band, which will show better solar cell characteristics.

  5. Schwertmannite formation at cell junctions by a new filament-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing isolate affiliated with the novel genus Acidithrix.

    PubMed

    Mori, Jiro F; Lu, Shipeng; Händel, Matthias; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R; Iancu, Vasile Vlad; Tarcea, Nicolae; Popp, Jürgen; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    A new acidophilic iron-oxidizing strain (C25) belonging to the novel genus Acidithrix was isolated from pelagic iron-rich aggregates ('iron snow') collected below the redoxcline of an acidic lignite mine lake. Strain C25 catalysed the oxidation of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] under oxic conditions at 25 °C at a rate of 3.8 mM Fe(II) day(-1) in synthetic medium and 3.0 mM Fe(II) day(-1) in sterilized lake water in the presence of yeast extract, producing the rust-coloured, poorly crystalline mineral schwertmannite [Fe(III) oxyhydroxylsulfate]. During growth, rod-shaped cells of strain C25 formed long filaments, and then aggregated and degraded into shorter fragments, building large cell-mineral aggregates in the late stationary phase. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of cells during the early growth phase revealed that Fe(III)-minerals were formed as single needles on the cell surface, whereas the typical pincushion-like schwertmannite was observed during later growth phases at junctions between the cells, leaving major parts of the cell not encrusted. This directed mechanism of biomineralization at specific locations on the cell surface has not been reported from other acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria. Strain C25 was also capable of reducing Fe(III) under micro-oxic conditions which led to a dissolution of the Fe(III)-minerals. Thus, strain C25 appeared to have ecological relevance for both the formation and transformation of the pelagic iron-rich aggregates at oxic/anoxic transition zones in the acidic lignite mine lake. PMID:26506965

  6. Formation of neuromuscular junctions in transplanted peroneus longus muscles in the rat. A quantitative comparison with reinnervation of the muscle in situ.

    PubMed

    Vedung, S; Olsson, Y

    1983-01-01

    The formation of neuromuscular junctions in free heterotopic muscle transplants in the rat has been studied quantitatively and compared with the reinnervation of the muscle in situ. The AChE-containing area and the nerve terminal were stained in the same longitudinal section and the length of end-plate, the average number of nerve terminal branch points within the end-plate and the terminal innervation ratio (TIR) were determined. In denervated muscles we noticed early disappearance of nerves whereas the AChE-stained end-plates were visible after eight weeks. The reinnervation of the muscle in situ and after transplantation showed considerable similarities. Early during reinnervation the number of AChE positive areas increased and many of them were innervated by more than one axon. Terminal axons were also seen innervating more than one end-plate situated on the same or on different muscle fibres. Later the number of end-plates decreased and they were innervated by only one axon. The end-plate length reached normal value in the reinnervated muscle in situ but remained smaller in the transplanted muscle. In all reinnervated muscles ultraterminal sprouting was found as indicated by an increased number of nerve terminal branch points within the end-plate area. The TIR was increased in all reinnervated muscles due to terminal and ultraterminal sprouting of the axon. No significant difference in reinnervation was noted between normal and predenervated transplants. The reinnervation of transplanted muscles obviously has similarities not only with the reinnervation of normal muscles but also with the development of muscular innervation during early postnatal growth. In spite of the plasticity of the peripheral nerve the transplanted muscles underwent considerable atrophy which may have been enhanced by the unphysiological placement of the muscles in the abdomen. However, this experimental model made it possible to study reinnervation of muscle fibres only originating from the graft. PMID:6622987

  7. Adherens junctions in C. elegans embryonic morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Armenti, Stephen T.; Nance, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    C. elegans provides a simplified, in vivo model system in which to study adherens junctions and their role in morphogenesis. The core adherens junction components – HMR-1/E-cadherin, HMP-2/β-catenin and HMP-1/α-catenin – were initially identified through genetic screens for mutants with body axis elongation defects. In early embryos, adherens junction proteins are found at sites of contact between blastomeres, and in epithelial cells adherens junction proteins localize to the multifaceted apical junction (CeAJ) – a single structure that combines the adhesive and barrier functions of vertebrate adherens and tight junctions. The apically localized polarity proteins PAR-3 and PAR-6 mediate formation and maturation of junctions, while the basolaterally localized regulator LET-413/Scribble ensures that junctions remain apically positioned. Adherens junctions promote robust adhesion between epithelial cells and provide mechanical resistance for the physical strains of morphogenesis. However, in contrast to vertebrates, C. elegans adherens junction proteins are not essential for general cell adhesion or for epithelial cell polarization. A combination of conserved and novel proteins localizes to the CeAJ and works together with adherens junctions proteins to mediate adhesion. PMID:22674076

  8. Connexin43 gap junctions in normal, regenerating, and cultured mouse bone marrow and in human leukemias: their possible involvement in blood formation.

    PubMed Central

    Krenacs, T.; Rosendaal, M.

    1998-01-01

    Communicating channels called gap junctions are thought to play a ubiquitous part in cell growth and development. Based on earlier work, we have recently found functional evidence of their presence in human and mouse bone marrow. In this study we studied the cell-type association of the gap junction channel-forming protein, connexin, in mouse and human bone marrow under different physiological and pathological conditions and tested the pathway of communication in bone marrow cultures. For high-resolution antigen demonstration we took advantage of semi-thin resin sections, antigen retrieval methods, immunofluorescence, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Connexin43 (Cx43) and its mRNA were consistently expressed in human and rodent marrow. Cx37 was found only in the arteriolar endothelium, but neither Cx32 nor -26 were expressed. In tissue sections, the immunostained junctions appeared as dots, which were digitally measured and counted. Their average size was 0.40 mm in human and 0.49 mm in mice marrow. There were at least twice as many gap junctions in the femoral midshaft of 6-week-old mice (1.75 x 10(5)/mm3) as in those older than 12 weeks (0.89 x 10(5)/mm3). Most Cx43 was associated with collagen III+ endosteal and adventitial stromal cells and with megakaryocytes. Elsewhere, they were few and randomly distributed between all kinds of hematopoietic cells. In the femoral epiphysis of juvenile mice, stromal cell processes full of Cx43 enmeshed three to six layers of hematopoietic cells near the endosteum. The same pattern was seen in the midshaft of regenerating mouse marrow 3 to 5 days after cytotoxic treatment with 5-fluorouracil. Functional tests in cultures showed the transfer of small fluorescent dyes, Lucifer Yellow and 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5, 6-carboxyfluorescein, between stromal cells and in rare cases between stromal and hematopoietic cells too. The stromal cells were densely packed with Cx43 and we found aggregates of connexon particles in their membrane replicas. In normocellular human bone marrow, gap junctions were as rare as in adult mouse and similarly distributed, except that they were also on adipocytic membranes. In a few leukemic samples, characterized by an increased stromal/hematopoietic cell ratio, there were two- to fourfold more Cx43 (2.8 x 10(5) to 3.9 x 10(5)/mm3) than in the normal (1.0 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(5)/mm3). The cases included a hypoplastic acute lymphoblastic leukemia, an acute myeloid leukemia (French-American-British classification M4-5), a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with elevated number of megakaryocytes, and a CD34+ acute hemoblastosis, probably acute myeloid leukemia (French-American-British classification M7). Taken together, our results indicate that direct cell-cell communication may be involved in hematopoiesis, ie, in developmentally active epiphyseal bone marrow and when there is a demand for progenitors in regeneration. However, gap junctions may not play as important a role in resting adult hematopoiesis and in leukemias. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:9546360

  9. Connexin43 gap junctions in normal, regenerating, and cultured mouse bone marrow and in human leukemias: their possible involvement in blood formation.

    PubMed

    Krenacs, T; Rosendaal, M

    1998-04-01

    Communicating channels called gap junctions are thought to play a ubiquitous part in cell growth and development. Based on earlier work, we have recently found functional evidence of their presence in human and mouse bone marrow. In this study we studied the cell-type association of the gap junction channel-forming protein, connexin, in mouse and human bone marrow under different physiological and pathological conditions and tested the pathway of communication in bone marrow cultures. For high-resolution antigen demonstration we took advantage of semi-thin resin sections, antigen retrieval methods, immunofluorescence, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Connexin43 (Cx43) and its mRNA were consistently expressed in human and rodent marrow. Cx37 was found only in the arteriolar endothelium, but neither Cx32 nor -26 were expressed. In tissue sections, the immunostained junctions appeared as dots, which were digitally measured and counted. Their average size was 0.40 mm in human and 0.49 mm in mice marrow. There were at least twice as many gap junctions in the femoral midshaft of 6-week-old mice (1.75 x 10(5)/mm3) as in those older than 12 weeks (0.89 x 10(5)/mm3). Most Cx43 was associated with collagen III+ endosteal and adventitial stromal cells and with megakaryocytes. Elsewhere, they were few and randomly distributed between all kinds of hematopoietic cells. In the femoral epiphysis of juvenile mice, stromal cell processes full of Cx43 enmeshed three to six layers of hematopoietic cells near the endosteum. The same pattern was seen in the midshaft of regenerating mouse marrow 3 to 5 days after cytotoxic treatment with 5-fluorouracil. Functional tests in cultures showed the transfer of small fluorescent dyes, Lucifer Yellow and 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5, 6-carboxyfluorescein, between stromal cells and in rare cases between stromal and hematopoietic cells too. The stromal cells were densely packed with Cx43 and we found aggregates of connexon particles in their membrane replicas. In normocellular human bone marrow, gap junctions were as rare as in adult mouse and similarly distributed, except that they were also on adipocytic membranes. In a few leukemic samples, characterized by an increased stromal/hematopoietic cell ratio, there were two- to fourfold more Cx43 (2.8 x 10(5) to 3.9 x 10(5)/mm3) than in the normal (1.0 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(5)/mm3). The cases included a hypoplastic acute lymphoblastic leukemia, an acute myeloid leukemia (French-American-British classification M4-5), a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with elevated number of megakaryocytes, and a CD34+ acute hemoblastosis, probably acute myeloid leukemia (French-American-British classification M7). Taken together, our results indicate that direct cell-cell communication may be involved in hematopoiesis, ie, in developmentally active epiphyseal bone marrow and when there is a demand for progenitors in regeneration. However, gap junctions may not play as important a role in resting adult hematopoiesis and in leukemias. PMID:9546360

  10. Altered α-defensin 5 expression in cervical squamocolumnar junction: implication in the formation of a viral/tumour-permissive microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Pascale; Herman, Ludivine; Roncarati, Patrick; Maillard, Catherine; Renoux, Virginie; Demoulin, Stéphanie; Erpicum, Charlotte; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Boniver, Jacques; Noël, Agnès; Delvenne, Philippe; Herfs, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly type 16, is causally associated with cancer of the uterine cervix, which mainly develops at the squamocolumnar (SC) junction. The progression of cervical HPV infections into (pre)neoplastic lesions suggests that viral antigens are not adequately recognized by innate immunity or presented to the adaptive immune system. Members of the defensin family have recently been found to inhibit viral and bacterial pathogens, to stimulate the migration of immune cells and to play a role in anticancer responses. In the present study, we focused on the poorly characterized human α-defensin 5 (HD-5) and its possible role in these processes. We showed that HD-5 was able to prevent HPV virion entry into cervical keratinocytes and to influence adaptive immunity. Indeed, this peptide specifically induced the chemoattraction and proliferation of both activated T lymphocytes and immature dendritic cells in a CCR2/CCR6-dependent manner and stimulated the infiltration of these professional antigen-presenting cells in a (pre)neoplastic epithelium transplanted in vivo in immunodeficient mice. No chemotactic effect was observed with plasmacytoid dendritic cells, macrophages or natural killer cells. Proliferative and angiogenic effects of HD-5 were also assessed in vitro and in vivo. However there was a striking regional disparity in expression of HD-5, being prominent in ectocervical, vaginal and vulvar neoplasia, while absent, or nearly so, in the cervical SC junction. Taken together, these results suggest one possible explanation for why the SC junction is uniquely vulnerable to both high-risk HPV infection (via reduced HD-5 expression and viral entry) and progression of neoplasia (via altered cell-mediated immune responses and altered microenvironment). PMID:25196670

  11. JGIXA - A software package for the calculation and fitting of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for the characterization of nanometer-layers and ultra-shallow-implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingerle, D.; Pepponi, G.; Meirer, F.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2016-04-01

    Grazing incidence XRF (GIXRF) is a very surface sensitive, nondestructive analytical tool making use of the phenomenon of total external reflection of X-rays on smooth polished surfaces. In recent years the method experienced a revival, being a powerful tool for process analysis and control in the fabrication of semiconductor based devices. Due to the downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices, junction depths as well as layer thicknesses are reduced to a few nanometers, i.e. the length scale where GIXRF is highly sensitive. GIXRF measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under varying grazing angles and results in angle dependent intensity curves. These curves are correlated to the layer thickness, depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. But the evaluation of these measurements is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function for the implants as well as for the thickness and density of nanometer-thin layers. In order to overcome this ambiguity, GIXRF can be combined with X-ray reflectometry (XRR). This is straightforward, as both techniques use similar measurement procedures and the same fundamental physical principles can be used for a combined data evaluation strategy. Such a combined analysis removes ambiguities in the determined physical properties of the studied sample and, being a correlative spectroscopic method, also significantly reduces experimental uncertainties of the individual techniques. In this paper we report our approach to a correlative data analysis, based on a concurrent calculation and fitting of simultaneously recorded GIXRF and XRR data. Based on this approach we developed JGIXA (Java Grazing Incidence X-ray Analysis), a multi-platform software package equipped with a user-friendly graphic user interface (GUI) and offering various optimization algorithms. Software and data evaluation approach were benchmarked by characterizing metal and metal oxide layers on Silicon as well as Arsenic implants in Silicon. The results of the different optimization algorithms have been compared to test the convergence of the algorithms. Finally, simulations for Iron nanoparticles on bulk Silicon and on a W/C multilayer are presented, using the assumption of an unaltered X-ray Standing Wave above the surface.

  12. comK Prophage Junction Fragments as Markers for Listeria monocytogenes Genotypes Unique to Individual Meat and Poultry Processing Plants and a Model for Rapid Niche-Specific Adaptation, Biofilm Formation, and Persistence ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Bindhu; Lok, Mei; Wen, Jia; Alessandria, Valentina; Chen, Yi; Kathariou, Sophia; Knabel, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Different strains of Listeria monocytogenes are well known to persist in individual food processing plants and to contaminate foods for many years; however, the specific genotypic and phenotypic mechanisms responsible for persistence of these unique strains remain largely unknown. Based on sequences in comK prophage junction fragments, different strains of epidemic clones (ECs), which included ECII, ECIII, and ECV, were identified and shown to be specific to individual meat and poultry processing plants. The comK prophage-containing strains showed significantly higher cell densities after incubation at 30°C for 48 h on meat and poultry food-conditioning films than did strains lacking the comK prophage (P < 0.05). Overall, the type of strain, the type of conditioning film, and the interaction between the two were all highly significant (P < 0.001). Recombination analysis indicated that the comK prophage junction fragments in these strains had evolved due to extensive recombination. Based on the results of the present study, we propose a novel model in which the concept of defective comK prophage was replaced with the rapid adaptation island (RAI). Genes within the RAI were recharacterized as “adaptons,” as these genes may allow L. monocytogenes to rapidly adapt to different food processing facilities and foods. If confirmed, the model presented would help explain Listeria's rapid niche adaptation, biofilm formation, persistence, and subsequent transmission to foods. Also, comK prophage junction fragment sequences may permit accurate tracking of persistent strains back to and within individual food processing operations and thus allow the design of more effective intervention strategies to reduce contamination and enhance food safety. PMID:21441318

  13. Solitons in Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. V.

    1998-11-01

    Magnetic flux quanta in Josephson junctions, often called fluxons, in many cases behave as solitons. A review of recent experiments and modelling of fluxon dynamics in Josephson circuits is presented. Classic quasi-one-dimensional junctions, stacked junctions (Josephson superlattices), and discrete Josephson transmission lines (JTLs) are discussed. Applications of fluxon devices as high-frequency oscillators and digital circuits are also addressed.

  14. Tight junctions: molecular architecture and function.

    PubMed

    Aijaz, Saima; Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Tight junctions are the most apical component of the epithelial junctional complex and are crucial for the formation and functioning of epithelial and endothelial barriers. They regulate selective diffusion of ions and solutes along the paracellular pathway and restrict apical/basolateral intramembrane diffusion of lipids. Research over the past years provided much insight into the molecular composition of tight junctions, and we are starting to understand the mechanisms that permit selective paracellular diffusion. Moreover, a complex network of proteins has been identified at tight junctions that is based on cytoskeleton-linked adaptors that recruit and thereby often regulate different types of signaling components that regulate epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and polarization. PMID:16487793

  15. Junctional adhesion molecule A promotes epithelial tight junction assembly to augment lung barrier function.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Leslie A; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O; Quintero, David A; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A; Koval, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A(-/-) mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A(-/-) mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  16. Junctional Adhesion Molecule A Promotes Epithelial Tight Junction Assembly to Augment Lung Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Ward, Christina; Kwon, Mike; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Quintero, David A.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.; Koval, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial barrier function is maintained by tight junction proteins that control paracellular fluid flux. Among these proteins is junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), an Ig fold transmembrane protein. To assess JAM-A function in the lung, we depleted JAM-A in primary alveolar epithelial cells using shRNA. In cultured cells, loss of JAM-A caused an approximately 30% decrease in transepithelial resistance, decreased expression of the tight junction scaffold protein zonula occludens 1, and disrupted junctional localization of the structural transmembrane protein claudin-18. Consistent with findings in other organs, loss of JAM-A decreased β1 integrin expression and impaired filamentous actin formation. Using a model of mild systemic endoxotemia induced by i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide, we report that JAM-A−/− mice showed increased susceptibility to pulmonary edema. On injury, the enhanced susceptibility of JAM-A−/− mice to edema correlated with increased, transient disruption of claudin-18, zonula occludens 1, and zonula occludens 2 localization to lung tight junctions in situ along with a delay in up-regulation of claudin-4. In contrast, wild-type mice showed no change in lung tight junction morphologic features in response to mild systemic endotoxemia. These findings support a key role of JAM-A in promoting tight junction homeostasis and lung barrier function by coordinating interactions among claudins, the tight junction scaffold, and the cytoskeleton. PMID:25438062

  17. Septal Junctions in Filamentous Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Forchhammer, Karl; Maldener, Iris

    2016-02-01

    In the filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, septal junctions that traverse the septal peptidoglycan join adjacent cells, allowing intercellular communication. Perforations in the septal peptidoglycan have been observed, and proteins involved in the formation of such perforations and putative protein components of the septal junctions have been identified, but their relationships are debated. PMID:26748968

  18. Electron tunneling in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelkes, Vincent Bernard

    2005-07-01

    This thesis describes approximately four years of fundamental research in the field of molecular electronics. Data are obtained on nanoscopic metal---molecule---metal junctions using conducting-probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). The CP-AFM method involves a conductive AFM probe that is brought into contact with a molecular monolayer that has been self-assembled on a conductive substrate. Tunneling currents are measured to describe charge transport through a small number of molecules. While there are many architectures for creating such molecular tunnel junctions, CP-AFM offers a quick and simple route to formation of nanoscale junctions void of pinholes, with the ability to change contact metals, and measure and control junction compression. Four experiments are highlighted in this manuscript as contributions to the field. The first deals with effects of the type of connection between electrode and molecule (i.e., either a chemical bond or a physical contact), electrode work function, and applied bias. The breadth of this experiment focuses on a series of alkanethiol and alkanedithiol monolayers of varying length in order to characterize both the length dependence and the extrapolated contact resistance. These parameters are then used in the context of conventional theory to extract transmission coefficients relating to tunneling transport through different contacts and as the result of different metals. The second experiment focuses on issues of reproducibility in CP-AFM measurements by performing measurements on Au/decanethiol/Au junctions under a variety of experimental conditions. The third experiment focuses on current rectification (asymmetry with applied voltage) of decanethiol junctions in comparison to a perfluorinated analogue (SHC2H4C 8F17). Alkanethiol monolayers are known to create surface dipoles that decrease the work function of the substrate that they are deposited upon. The opposite shift and rectification direction occurs for the perfluorinated analogue, indicating a correlation of the surface dipole and observed asymmetry. Finally, applied load is varied in the fourth experiment similar to nanoindentation. Measurements are performed on alkanethiols other than decanethiol, with various loading rates and maximum applied loads. The data are modeled using conventional contact mechanics to estimate film modulus and plastic deformation.

  19. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.

  20. Behavior of tight-junction, adherens-junction and cell polarity proteins during HNF-4{alpha}-induced epithelial polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Satohisa, Seiro; Chiba, Hideki . E-mail: hidchiba@sapmed.ac.jp; Osanai, Makoto; Ohno, Shigeo; Kojima, Takashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2005-10-15

    We previously reported that expression of tight-junction molecules occludin, claudin-6 and claudin-7, as well as establishment of epithelial polarity, was triggered in mouse F9 cells expressing hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} [H. Chiba, T. Gotoh, T. Kojima, S. Satohisa, K. Kikuchi, M. Osanai, N. Sawada. Hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4{alpha} triggers formation of functional tight junctions and establishment of polarized epithelial morphology in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, Exp. Cell Res. 286 (2003) 288-297]. Using these cells, we examined in the present study behavior of tight-junction, adherens-junction and cell polarity proteins and elucidated the molecular mechanism behind HNF-4{alpha}-initiated junction formation and epithelial polarization. We herein show that not only ZO-1 and ZO-2, but also ZO-3, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-B, JAM-C and cell polarity proteins PAR-3, PAR-6 and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) accumulate at primordial adherens junctions in undifferentiated F9 cells. In contrast, CRB3, Pals1 and PATJ appeared to exhibit distinct subcellular localization in immature cells. Induced expression of HNF-4{alpha} led to translocation of these tight-junction and cell polarity proteins to beltlike tight junctions, where occludin, claudin-6 and claudin-7 were assembled, in differentiated cells. Interestingly, PAR-6, aPKC, CRB3 and Pals1, but not PAR-3 or PATJ, were also concentrated on the apical membranes in differentiated cells. These findings indicate that HNF-4{alpha} provokes not only expression of tight-junction adhesion molecules, but also modulation of subcellular distribution of junction and cell polarity proteins, resulting in junction formation and epithelial polarization.

  1. A Kinetic Monte Carlo model for material aging: Simulations of second phase formation at Au/Bi2Te3 junction in oxygen environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. W.; Yang, N. Y. C.

    2014-03-01

    Electronic properties of semiconductor devices are sensitive to defects such as second phase precipitates, grain sizes, and voids. These defects can evolve over time especially under oxidation environments and it is therefore important to understand the resulting aging behavior in order for the reliable applications of devices. In this paper, we propose a kinetic Monte Carlo framework capable of simultaneous simulation of the evolution of second phases, precipitates, grain sizes, and voids in complicated systems involving many species including oxygen. This kinetic Monte Carlo model calculates the energy barriers of various events based directly on the experimental data. As a first step of our model implementation, we incorporate the second phase formation module in the parallel kinetic Monte Carlo codes SPPARKS. Selected aging simulations are performed to examine the formation of second phase precipitates at the eletroplated Au/Bi2Te3 interface under oxygen and oxygen-free environments, and the results are compared with the corresponding experiments.

  2. A Kinetic Monte Carlo model for material aging: Simulations of second phase formation at Au/Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} junction in oxygen environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. W.; Yang, N. Y. C.

    2014-03-14

    Electronic properties of semiconductor devices are sensitive to defects such as second phase precipitates, grain sizes, and voids. These defects can evolve over time especially under oxidation environments and it is therefore important to understand the resulting aging behavior in order for the reliable applications of devices. In this paper, we propose a kinetic Monte Carlo framework capable of simultaneous simulation of the evolution of second phases, precipitates, grain sizes, and voids in complicated systems involving many species including oxygen. This kinetic Monte Carlo model calculates the energy barriers of various events based directly on the experimental data. As a first step of our model implementation, we incorporate the second phase formation module in the parallel kinetic Monte Carlo codes SPPARKS. Selected aging simulations are performed to examine the formation of second phase precipitates at the eletroplated Au/Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} interface under oxygen and oxygen-free environments, and the results are compared with the corresponding experiments.

  3. Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Stimulates Expression of Blood-Testis-Barrier Proteins Claudin-3 and -5 and Tight Junction Formation via a Gnα11-Coupled Receptor in Sertoli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Dietze, Raimund; Shihan, Mazen; Kirch, Ulrike; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is a circulating sulfated steroid considered to be a pro-androgen in mammalian physiology. Here we show that at a physiological concentration (1 μM), DHEAS induces the phosphorylation of the kinase Erk1/2 and of the transcription factors CREB and ATF-1 in the murine Sertoli cell line TM4. This signaling cascade stimulates the expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-3 and claudin-5. As a consequence of the increased expression, tight junction connections between neighboring Sertoli cells are augmented, as demonstrated by measurements of transepithelial resistance. Phosphorylation of Erk1/2, CREB, or ATF-1 is not affected by the presence of the steroid sulfatase inhibitor STX64. Erk1/2 phosphorylation was not observed when dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) was used instead of DHEAS. Abrogation of androgen receptor (AR) expression by siRNA did not affect DHEAS-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation, nor did it change DHEAS-induced stimulation of claudin-3 and claudin-5 expression. All of the above indicate that desulfation and conversion of DHEAS into a different steroid hormone is not required to trigger the DHEAS-induced signaling cascade. All activating effects of DHEAS, however, are abolished when the expression of the G-protein Gnα11 is suppressed by siRNA, including claudin-3 and -5 expression and TJ formation between neighboring Sertoli cells as indicated by reduced transepithelial resistance. Taken together, these results are consistent with the effects of DHEAS being mediated through a membrane-bound G-protein-coupled receptor interacting with Gnα11 in a signaling pathway that resembles the non-classical signaling pathways of steroid hormones. Considering the fact that DHEAS is produced in reproductive organs, these findings also suggest that DHEAS, by acting as an autonomous steroid hormone and influencing the formation and dynamics of the TJ at the blood-testis barrier, might play a crucial role for the regulation and maintenance of male fertility. PMID:26938869

  4. Assay of Rab13 in regulating epithelial tight junction assembly.

    PubMed

    Marzesco, Anne-Marie; Zahraoui, Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Rab13 is recruited to tight junctions from a cytosolic pool after cell-cell contact formation. Tight junctions are intercellular junctions that separate apical from basolateral domains and are required for the establishment/maintenance of polarized transport in epithelial cells. They form selective barriers regulating the diffusion of ions and solutes between cells. They also maintain the cell surface asymmetry by forming a "fence" that prevents apical/basolateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. We generate stable MDCK cell lines expressing inactive (T22N mutant) and constitutively active (Q67L mutant) Rab13 as GFP-Rab13 chimeras. Expression of GFP-Rab13Q67L delays the formation of electrically tight epithelial monolayers, induces the leakage of small nonionic tracers from the apical domain, and disrupts the tight junction fence diffusion barrier. It also alters the tight junction strand structure and delays the localization of the tight junction transmembrane protein, claudin1. In contrast, the inactive Rab13T22N mutant does not disrupt tight junction functions, tight junction strand architecture, or claudin1 localization. Here we describe a set of assays that allows us to investigate the role of Rab13 in modulating tight junction structure and function. PMID:16473586

  5. Metal Silicides: Active elements of ULSI contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, C. M.; Tsai, J. Y.; Sun, J.

    1996-11-01

    As device dimensions scale to the 0.1 urn regime, the self-aligned suicide (SALICIDE) contact technology increasingly becomes an integral part of both the ultra-shallow junction and the metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor device itself. This paper will discuss the effect of suicide materials and formation processes on suicide stability, junction consumption, the ability to accurately profile shallow junctions, and contact resistance in series with the channel. The use of suicides as diffusion sources (SADS) provides an important pathway toward optimization of suicide technology. Diffusion of boron and arsenic from nearly epitaxial layers of CoSi2, formed from bilayers of Ti and Co, offer good suicide stability, ultra-shallow, low-leakage junctions, and low contact resistance.

  6. Proximal Junctional Kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Jo; Iyer, Sravisht

    2016-05-01

    Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a common complication following adult spinal deformity surgery. It is defined by two criteria: a proximal junctional sagittal Cobb angle (1) ≥10° and (2) at least 10° greater than the preoperative measurement. PJK is multifactorial in origin and likely stems from surgical, radiographic, and patient-related risk factors. The diagnosis of PJK represents a broad spectrum of disease ranging from asymptomatic patients with recurrence of deformity to those presenting with increased pain, functional deficit, and, in the most severe cases, neurologic deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated increased pain levels in select patients with PJK. In keeping with the broad spectrum of the disease, classification schemes are needed to better describe and stratify the severity of PJK. The most severe form is proximal junctional failure. A consensus on a uniform definition of proximal junctional failure is needed to allow for more systematic study of this phenomenon. PMID:26982965

  7. Epithelial junctions and attachments.

    PubMed Central

    Labouesse, Michel

    2006-01-01

    A distinctive feature of polarized epithelial cells is their specialized junctions, which contribute to cell integrity and provide platforms to orchestrate cell shape changes. The chapter discusses the composition and assembly of C. elegans cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix junctions, proteins that anchor the cytoskeleton and mechanisms involved in establishing epithelial polarity. The focus remains cellular and does not properly deal with epithelial cells in the context of the developing embryo. PMID:18050482

  8. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. PMID:22881834

  9. Oxidative Stress, Lens Gap Junctions, and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The eye lens is constantly subjected to oxidative stress from radiation and other sources. The lens has several mechanisms to protect its components from oxidative stress and to maintain its redox state, including enzymatic pathways and high concentrations of ascorbate and reduced glutathione. With aging, accumulation of oxidized lens components and decreased efficiency of repair mechanisms can contribute to the development of lens opacities or cataracts. Maintenance of transparency and homeostasis of the avascular lens depend on an extensive network of gap junctions. Communication through gap junction channels allows intercellular passage of molecules (up to 1 kDa) including antioxidants. Lens gap junctions and their constituent proteins, connexins (Cx43, Cx46, and Cx50), are also subject to the effects of oxidative stress. These observations suggest that oxidative stress-induced damage to connexins (and consequent altered intercellular communication) may contribute to cataract formation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 339–353. PMID:18831679

  10. Tight junctions in skin: new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sapra, Bharti; Jindal, Manish; Tiwary, Ashok K

    2012-11-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are intercellular contacts that seal the space between the individual cells of an epithelial sheet or stratifying epithelia, such as the epidermis, so that they can collectively separate tissue compartments. Intercellular junctions, such as adherens and TJs, play a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of epithelial and endothelial barriers. A variety of components including claudins, occludin, tricellulin, zonula occluden proteins and junctional adhesion molecules have been identified in complex localization patterns in mammalian epidermis. In several skin diseases that are characterized by impaired skin barrier function, altered proliferation/differentiation of the epidermis and/or infiltration of inflammatory cells, altered expression patterns of TJ proteins have been observed. This review is aimed at providing an insight into the molecular composition, tools for identification and understanding the role of TJs in skin diseases and barrier function regulation. PMID:23259250

  11. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  12. RhoA-JNK Regulates the E-Cadherin Junctions of Human Gingival Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Kim, H J; Kim, H-M

    2016-03-01

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is unique with regard to its wide intercellular spaces and sparsely developed intercellular junctions. Thus, knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation of the intercellular junctions of the junctional epithelium may be essential to understand the pathophysiology of the JE. HOK-16B cells, a normal human gingival epithelial cell line, were used to identify the molecules involved in the regulation of the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions between human gingival epithelial cells. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) disrupted the intercellular junctions through the dissociation of E-cadherin. The role of JNK in the formation of these E-cadherin junctions was further confirmed by demonstrating that JNK inhibition induced the formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions. The upstream signaling of JNK was also examined. Activation of the small GTPase RhoA disrupted the formation of E-cadherin junctions between HOK-16B cells, which was accompanied by JNK activation. Disruption of these intercellular junctions upon RhoA activation was prevented when JNK activity was inhibited. In contrast, RhoA inactivation led to HOK-16B cell aggregation and the formation of intercellular junctions, even under conditions in which the cellular junctions were naturally disrupted by growth on a strongly adhesive surface. Furthermore, the JE of mouse molars had high JNK activity associated with low E-cadherin expression, which was reversed in the other gingival epithelia, including the sulcular epithelium. Interestingly, JNK activity was increased in cells grown on a solid surface, where cells showed higher RhoA activity than those grown on soft surfaces. Together, these results indicate that the decreased formation of intercellular E-cadherin junctions within the JE may be coupled to high JNK activity, which is activated by the upregulation of RhoA on solid tooth surfaces. PMID:26635280

  13. Single naphthalene and anthracene molecular junctions using Ag and Cu electrodes in ultra high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Shintaro; Kaneko, Satoshi; Chenyang, Liu; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2015-11-01

    We present a charge transport study on single naphthalene and anthracene molecular junctions wired into Ag and Cu electrodes using mechanically controllable break junction technique at 100 K under ultra-high vacuum condition. In particular we focus on effect of metal-π interaction on the formation probability of the molecular junctions. We found that the single molecular junctions of the acene molecules (e.g. naphthalene and anthracene) exhibit highly conductive character below 0.2 G0 (G0 = 2e2/h). The acene molecular junctions displayed formation probability of ca. 20% for Ag system and >40% for Cu system. The high formation probability of the molecular junctions with respect to benzene/Au junctions can be qualitatively explained by size effect, in which larger molecules of the naphthalene and anthracene can effectively bridge the gap between metal electrodes compared with small molecule such as benzene. The acene/Cu junctions displayed higher formation probability than the acene/Ag junctions. This result demonstrated that not only the size effect but the degree of the metal-π interaction have to be taken into account to quantitatively evaluate the formation probability of the molecular junctions for Ag and Cu system.

  14. Dot junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G.T.

    1986-04-01

    A design of solar cells with reduced junction area on the cell surface is investigated for reduction of saturation current and increase in open-circuit voltage. Equidiameter dot junctions distributed across the surface of the cell offer an efficient alternative, with variations in dot diameter and in the spacing between dots giving the required variations in the ratio of junction area to total surface area. A simplified analysis for short-circuit current and other cell parameters, which enables cell design optimization, is presented. Experimental solar-cell performance results, as functions of different area ratios, are presented and compared with the model. It is shown that saturation current reduction is possible for achieving efficiencies as high as 18% in flat-plate terrestrial applications.

  15. Formins at the Junction.

    PubMed

    Grikscheit, Katharina; Grosse, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The actin cytoskeleton and adhesion junctions are physically and functionally coupled at the cell-cell interface between epithelial cells. The actin regulatory complex Arp2/3 has an established role in the turnover of junctional actin; however, the role of formins, the largest group of actin regulators, is less clear. Formins dynamically shape the actin cytoskeleton and have various functions within cells. In this review we describe recent progress on how formins regulate actin dynamics at cell-cell contacts and highlight formin functions during polarized protein traffic necessary for epithelialization. PMID:26732401

  16. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to occur naturally. We will present some preliminary results of our calculations of the modification of CNT electronic properties as a result of deformations.

  17. Cytokine regulation of tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Nusrat, Asma

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial and endothelial tight junctions act as a rate-limiting barrier between an organism and its environment. Continuing studies have highlighted the regulation of the tight junction barrier by cytokines. Elucidation of this interplay is vital for both the understanding of physiological tight junction regulation and the etiology of pathological conditions. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of tight junctions modulation by cytokines. PMID:18952050

  18. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. PMID:26008742

  19. Intercellular junctions in myriapods.

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Bigliardi, E; Lane, N J

    1990-01-01

    Tissue from the intestinal tract of myriapods, including millipedes, centipedes and pauropods were examined in tracer-impregnated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The foregut and hindgut of all three classes exhibit pleated septate junctions; these display undulating intercellular ribbons in thin sections. In replicas they show discrete intramembranous particle (IMP) arrays aligned in rows in parallel; with one another. The tissues of the hindgut also possess scalariform junctions, characterized by cross-striated intercellular clefts in sections and IMP-enriched membranes in replicas. Gap junctions occur in all groups, but they are atypical in replicas in that their component IMPs do not always fracture onto the E face, as is characteristic of other arthropods; some IMPs cleave to the P face and others to the E face. The midgut of these organisms exhibits smooth septate junctions with conventional straight septal ribbons and occasional interseptal columns. However the intramembranous appearance in replicas is variable, particularly in centipedes, in that the rows of IMPs in chemically-unfixed propanecryofixed tissues, are prominent and adhere preferentially to the E face, with complementary P face grooves, while in fixed tissues the IMPs are much less distinct and fracture to either P face or E face. They tend not to protrude far beyond the mid-plane of the membrane bilayer and lie in rows which commonly take on the form of a network. Individual rows of the network sometimes curve to run beside a second row, over a short distance, before bending away into another part of the network. The aligned particle rows, which are much more prominent in millipedes, where they frequently lie in close parallel appositions, do not fuse into ridges as often occurs in insect tissues. The myriapod junctions, therefore, are of the same general kind as are found in the gut tract of other arthropod groups, but differ with respect to the subtleties of their intramembranous organization and disposition. PMID:18620307

  20. Phosphatase regulation of intercellular junctions

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Declan F

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular junctions represent the key contact points and sites of communication between neighboring cells. Assembly of these junctions is absolutely essential for the structural integrity of cell monolayers, tissues and organs. Disruption of junctions can have severe consequences such as diarrhea, edema and sepsis, and contribute to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases. Cell junctions are not static structures, but rather they represent highly dynamic micro-domains that respond to signals from the intracellular and extracellular environments to modify their composition and function. This review article will focus on the regulation of tight junctions and adherens junctions by phosphatase enzymes that play an essential role in preserving and modulating the properties of intercellular junction proteins. PMID:24868494

  1. Wireless Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Laura

    2015-03-01

    We report low temperature, microwave transmission measurements on a wireless two- dimensional network of Josephson junction arrays composed of superconductor-insulator -superconductor tunnel junctions. Unlike their biased counterparts, by removing all electrical contacts to the arrays and superfluous microwave components and interconnects in the transmission line, we observe new collective behavior in the transmission spectra. In particular we will show emergent behavior that systematically responds to changes in microwave power at fixed temperature. Likewise we will show the dynamic and collective response of the arrays while tuning the temperature at fixed microwave power. We discuss these spectra in terms of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition and Shapiro steps. We gratefully acknowledge the support Prof. Steven Anlage at the University of Maryland and Prof. Allen Goldman at the University of Minnesota. Physics and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  2. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  3. Crystal Phase Transformation in Self-Assembled InAs Nanowire Junctions on Patterned Si Substrates.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Torsten; Rosenbach, Daniel; Vakulov, Daniil; Heedt, Sebastian; Schäpers, Thomas; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lepsa, Mihail Ion

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the growth and structural characteristics of InAs nanowire junctions evidencing a transformation of the crystalline structure. The junctions are obtained without the use of catalyst particles. Morphological investigations of the junctions reveal three structures having an L-, T-, and X-shape. The formation mechanisms of these structures have been identified. The NW junctions reveal large sections of zinc blende crystal structure free of extended defects, despite the high stacking fault density obtained in individual InAs nanowires. This segment of zinc blende crystal structure in the junction is associated with a crystal phase transformation involving sets of Shockley partial dislocations; the transformation takes place solely in the crystal phase. A model is developed to demonstrate that only the zinc blende phase with the same orientation as the substrate can result in monocrystalline junctions. The suitability of the junctions to be used in nanoelectronic devices is confirmed by room-temperature electrical experiments. PMID:26881450

  4. Parity effect in Josephson junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Jared H.; Heimes, Andreas; Duty, Timothy; Marthaler, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We study the parity effect and transport due to quasiparticles in circuits comprised of many superconducting islands. We develop a general approach and show that it is equivalent to previous methods for describing the parity effect in their more limited regimes of validity. As an example we study transport through linear arrays of Josephson junctions in the limit of negligible Josephson energy and observe the emergence of the parity effect with decreasing number of nonequilibrium quasiparticles. Due to the exponential increase in the number of relevant charge states with increasing length, in multijunction arrays the parity effect manifests in qualitatively different ways to the two-junction case. The role of charge disorder is also studied as this hides much of the parity physics that would otherwise be observed. Nonetheless, we see that the current through a multijunction array at low bias is limited by the formation of metastable even-parity states.

  5. Physiology and Function of the Tight Junction

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James M.; Van Itallie, Christina M.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of tight junctions has evolved from their historical perception as inert solute barriers to recognition of their physiological and biochemical complexity. Many proteins are specifically localized to tight junctions, including cytoplasmic actin-binding proteins and adhesive transmembrane proteins. Among the latter are claudins, which are critical barrier proteins. Current information suggests that the paracellular barrier is most usefully modeled as having two physiologic components: a system of charge-selective small pores, 4 Å in radius, and a second pathway created by larger discontinuities in the barrier, lacking charge or size discrimination. The first pathway is influenced by claudin expression patterns and the second is likely controlled by different proteins and signals. Recent information on claudin function and disease-causing mutations have led to a more complete understanding of their role in barrier formation, but progress is impeded by lack of high resolution structural information. PMID:20066090

  6. The length change of a dislocation junction in FCC-single crystals under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurinnaya, Raisa; Zgolich, Marina; Starenchenko, Vladimir; Sadritdinova, Gulnora

    2016-01-01

    The product of dislocation reactions among dislocations of non-coplanar slip systems are dislocation junctions. The paper presents the study on the length change of dislocation junctions under stress. It is revealed that dislocation junctions can be destructed by merging of triple dislocation nodes at certain inclination angles of the glide dislocation and the forest dislocation to the junction line and the corresponding lengths of free segments of intersecting dislocations. Dislocation junctions formed at an arbitrary intersection of segments of the reacting dislocation are investigated. The geometry of the intersection of segments of reacting dislocations, at which dislocation junctions are not completely destructed under stress but cease to be an obstacle for further motion of the glide dislocation, is determined. Such junctions remain in the shear zone, presenting an obstacle to other glide dislocations. Conditions under which the length of the dislocation junction increases with an increase in the stress exceeding the original length are found. The formed extended barrier becomes too strong for the acting stress. Higher stresses are required in order to destruct it. The probability of completely destructible junctions under stress, the probability of non-destructible junctions that remain in the shear zone and replenish the density of dislocation debris, as well as the probability of formation of long strong junctions, which are barriers capable of limiting the shear zone, are determined.

  7. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  8. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells. PMID:26404354

  9. Tight junctions and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kunyoo; Fogg, Vanessa C; Margolis, Ben

    2006-01-01

    The tight junction is an intracellular junctional structure that mediates adhesion between epithelial cells and is required for epithelial cell function. Tight junctions control paracellular permeability across epithelial cell sheets and also serve as a barrier to intramembrane diffusion of components between a cell's apical and basolateral membrane domains. Recent genetic and biochemical studies in invertebrates and vertebrates indicate that tight junction proteins play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of apico-basal polarity. Proteins involved in epithelial cell polarization form evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complexes at the tight junction, and these protein complexes regulate the architecture of epithelia throughout the polarization process. Accumulating information regarding the regulation of these polarity proteins will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby cell polarity is established. PMID:16771626

  10. Very large thermophase in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Giazotto, F; Heikkilä, T T; Bergeret, F S

    2015-02-13

    The concept of thermophase refers to the appearance of a phase gradient inside a superconductor originating from the presence of an applied temperature bias across it. The resulting supercurrent flow may, in suitable conditions, fully counterbalance the temperature-bias-induced quasiparticle current therefore preventing the formation of any voltage drop, i.e., a thermovoltage, across the superconductor. Yet, the appearance of a thermophase is expected to occur in Josephson-coupled superconductors as well. Here, we theoretically investigate the thermoelectric response of a thermally biased Josephson junction based on a ferromagnetic insulator. In particular, we predict the occurrence of a very large thermophase that can reach π/2 across the contact for suitable temperatures and structure parameters; i.e., the quasiparticle thermal current can reach the critical current. Such a thermophase can be several orders of magnitude larger than that predicted to occur in conventional Josephson tunnel junctions. In order to assess experimentally the predicted very large thermophase, we propose a realistic setup realizable with state-of-the-art nanofabrication techniques and well-established materials, based on a superconducting quantum interference device. This effect could be of strong relevance in several low-temperature applications, for example, for revealing tiny temperature differences generated by coupling the electromagnetic radiation to one of the superconductors forming the junction. PMID:25723238

  11. Molecular architecture of tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Mitic, L L; Anderson, J M

    1998-01-01

    The tight junction creates a regulated barrier in the paracellular pathway and, together with the actin-rich adherens junction, forms a functional unit called the apical junction complex. A growing number of tight junction-associated proteins have been identified, but functions are defined for only a few. The intercellular barrier is formed by rows of the transmembrane protein occludin, which is bound on the cytoplasmic surface to ZO-1 and ZO-2. These proteins are members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) protein family and are likely to have both structural and signaling roles. Junctional plaque proteins without known functions include cingulin, p130, and 7H6; single reports describe ZA-1TJ and symplekin. Many cellular signaling pathways affect assembly and sealing of junctions. Transducing proteins, which localize within the junction, include both heterotrimeric and rho-related GTP-binding proteins, PKC-zeta and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Control of perijunctional actin may be the unifying mechanism for regulating paracellular permeability. PMID:9558457

  12. Bile duct epithelial tight junctions and barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R.K.; Samak, G.

    2013-01-01

    Bile ducts play a crucial role in the formation and secretion of bile as well as excretion of circulating xenobiotic substances. In addition to its secretory and excretory functions, bile duct epithelium plays an important role in the formation of a barrier to the diffusion of toxic substances from bile into the hepatic interstitial tissue. Disruption of barrier function and toxic injury to liver cells appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver diseases such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cholangiocarcinoma. Although the investigations into understanding the structure and regulation of tight junctions in gut, renal and endothelial tissues have expanded rapidly, very little is known about the structure and regulation of tight junctions in the bile duct epithelium. In this article we summarize the current understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of bile duct epithelium, the structure and regulation of tight junctions in canaliculi and bile duct epithelia and different mechanisms involved in the regulation of disruption and protection of bile duct epithelial tight junctions. This article will make a case for the need of future investigations toward our understanding of molecular organization and regulation of canalicular and bile duct epithelial tight junctions. PMID:24665411

  13. Probing Electronic and Thermoelectric Properties of Single Molecule Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widawsky, Jonathan R.

    In an effort to further understand electronic and thermoelectric phenomenon at the nanometer scale, we have studied the transport properties of single molecule junctions. To carry out these transport measurements, we use the scanning tunneling microscope-break junction (STM-BJ) technique, which involves the repeated formation and breakage of a metal point contact in an environment of the target molecule. Using this technique, we are able to create gaps that can trap the molecules, allowing us to sequentially and reproducibly create a large number of junctions. By applying a small bias across the junction, we can measure its conductance and learn about the transport mechanisms at the nanoscale. The experimental work presented here directly probes the transmission properties of single molecules through the systematic measurement of junction conductance (at low and high bias) and thermopower. We present measurements on a variety of molecular families and study how conductance depends on the character of the linkage (metal-molecule bond) and the nature of the molecular backbone. We start by describing a novel way to construct single molecule junctions by covalently connecting the molecular backbone to the electrodes. This eliminates the use of linking substituents, and as a result, the junction conductance increases substantially. Then, we compare transport across silicon chains (silanes) and saturated carbon chains (alkanes) while keeping the linkers the same and find a stark difference in their electronic transport properties. We extend our studies of molecular junctions by looking at two additional aspects of quantum transport -- molecular thermopower and molecular current-voltage characteristics. Each of these additional parameters gives us further insight into transport properties at the nanoscale. Evaluating the junction thermopower allows us to determine the nature of charge carriers in the system and we demonstrate this by contrasting the measurement of amine-terminated and pyridine-terminated molecules (which exhibit hole transport and electron transport, respectively). We also report the thermopower of the highly conducting, covalently bound molecular junctions that we have recently been able to form, and learn that, because of their unique transport properties, the junction power factors, GS2, are extremely high. Finally, we discuss the measurement of molecular current-voltage curves and consider the electronic and physical effects of applying a large bias to the system. We conclude with a summary of the work discussed and an outlook on related scientific studies.

  14. Topological p-n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bang-Fen; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    We propose to form a junction between p- and n-type on the surface of an ideal topological insulator (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3, in which carrier type and density are locally controlled by composition graded doping or electrical gating. Such topological p-n junction are promising for possible device application. A single gapless chiral edge state localized along the junction interface appears in the presence of an external magnetic field, and it can be probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and transport measurements.

  15. "V-junction": a novel structure for high-speed generation of bespoke droplet flows.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; Casadevall i Solvas, Xavier; deMello, Andrew

    2015-01-21

    We present the use of microfluidic "V-junctions" as a droplet generation strategy that incorporates enhanced performance characteristics when compared to more traditional "T-junction" formats. This includes the ability to generate target-sized droplets from the very first one, efficient switching between multiple input samples, the production of a wide range of droplet sizes (and size gradients) and the facile generation of droplets with residence time gradients. Additionally, the use of V-junction droplet generators enables the suspension and subsequent resumption of droplet flows at times defined by the user. The high degree of operational flexibility allows a wide range of droplet sizes, payloads, spacings and generation frequencies to be obtained, which in turn provides for an enhanced design space for droplet-based experimentation. We show that the V-junction retains the simplicity of operation associated with T-junction formats, whilst offering functionalities normally associated with droplet-on-demand technologies. PMID:25379571

  16. Novel tunnelling barriers for spin tunnelling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish

    A tunnel junction consists of two metal electrodes separated by an insulating barrier thin enough for electrons to tunnel across. With ferromagnetic electrodes, a spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) effect, electrons of one spin tunnelling preferentially over those of the other, is observed. When the electrodes are switched from a parallel to an anti-parallel alignment, the tunnelling current changes and gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR). Since 1995, interest in SDT junctions has increased as TMR in excess of 15% has been achieved, making viable their use in non-volatile memory and magnetic sensors applications. In this work, two key issues of SDT junctions are addressed: spin polarization of the electrode and the tunnel barrier. Spin polarization, a measure of electron states of up and down spins, is widely believed to be an intrinsic property of the electrode. In junctions with barriers formed by plasma oxidation of composite Ta/Al films, the surprising effect of the resistance being lower with the electrodes aligned antiparallel was observed. Junctions with Ta/Al barriers and those with Al/Ta barriers behave opposite to each other and exhibit an inversion only when the Ta side of the barrier is biased positive. This demonstrates the spin polarization is also influenced by the barrier material. Half-metallic materials such as magnetite (Fe3O4) have a gap in one of the spins' states at the fermi level, thus having a theoretical spin polarization of 100%. In this work, an ultrathin Fe3O 4 layer was added between the Al2O3 barrier and the NiFe electrode. The TMR increased sharply from 4% to 16% for thicknesses less than 0.5nm. As the tunnel barrier must be thinner than 2nm, choice of the barrier material becomes critical. Presently, Al2O3 is the best known barrier. In looking for alternative materials, AlN and AlON were formed by plasma nitridation and oxy-nitridation of deposited Al films. TMR results of up to 18% and resistance-area products down to 3.5kO · mum 2 were achieved. AlN and AlON thus work as well as Al2O 3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine relative proportions of different oxidation states of the insulating barrier, understand the effect of plasma formation of the barrier on the underlying electrode, and the oxidation state of ion-beam deposited magnetite films. With a nanometer-scale oxide between two ferromagnetic electrodes, an SDT junction is a tiny capacitor. Presence of static charge in the ambient makes it susceptible to electrostatic discharge (ESD). Results from ESD testing on SDT junctions are presented and a useful model is discussed. Results obtained clearly show that the effects of the electrode/barrier interface are prominent in influencing the observed values of spin polarization and hence the TMR. The materials investigated show promise for use as alternate barrier materials in SDT junctions.

  17. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  18. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  19. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  20. How coherent are Josephson junctions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Hanhee

    2012-02-01

    Superconducting quantum circuits based on Josephson junctions are a promising technology to realize a electronically controlled, solid-state based large-scale quantum information processor but their future prospects rely on the intrinsic coherence of Josephson junctions and the engineering of the isolated environment for the quantum circuits. We introduce a new architecture for superconducting quantum circuits employing a single-Josephson junction in a three dimensional waveguide cavity where we carefully engineer the environment of the qubit to effectively reduce the coupling of the qubit to the environment while maintaining sufficient coupling to the control signal. With this architecture we demonstrate that Josephson junction qubits are at least an order of magnitude more coherent with T^Ramsey2 10 to 20 ?s without the use of spin echo than previously reported and highly stable, enabling us to observe the physics in a Josephson junction with a unprecedented level of precision. These results suggest that the overall quality of Josephson junctions will allow error rates of a few 10-4, approaching the error correction threshold. We will also discuss how to scale this architecture and perform two-qubit gates.

  1. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  2. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  3. Wnt Signaling in Neuromuscular Junction Development

    PubMed Central

    Koles, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Wnt proteins are best known for their profound roles in cell patterning, because they are required for the embryonic development of all animal species studied to date. Besides regulating cell fate, Wnt proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their roles in nervous system development and function. New studies indicate that multiple positive and negative Wnt signaling pathways take place simultaneously during the formation of vertebrate and invertebrate neuromuscular junctions. Although some Wnts are essential for the formation of NMJs, others appear to play a more modulatory role as part of multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the most recent findings regarding the function of Wnts at the NMJ from both vertebrate and invertebrate model systems. PMID:22510459

  4. Single Molecule Junctions: Probing Contact Chemistry and Fundamental Circuit Laws

    SciTech Connect

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-04-11

    By exploiting selective link chemistry, formation of single molecule junctions with reproducible conductance has become established. Systematic studies reveal the structure-conductance relationships for diverse molecules. I will draw on experiments from my collaborators at Columbia University, atomic-scale calculations and theory to describe progress in two areas. First, I will describe a novel route to form single molecule junctions, based on SnMe3 terminated molecules, in which gold directly bonds to carbon in the molecule backbone resulting in near ideal contact resistance [1]. Second, comparison of the conductance of junctions formed with molecular species containing either one backbone or two backbones in parallel allows demonstration of the role of quantum interference in the conductance superposition law at the molecular scale [2].

  5. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orellana, Juan A.; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Saez, Juan C. . E-mail: jsaez@bio.puc.cl

    2006-06-15

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels.

  6. MgcRacGAP interacts with cingulin and paracingulin to regulate Rac1 activation and development of the tight junction barrier during epithelial junction assembly

    PubMed Central

    Guillemot, Laurent; Guerrera, Diego; Spadaro, Domenica; Tapia, Rocio; Jond, Lionel; Citi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of Rho-family GTPases is crucial to direct the formation of cell–cell junctions and tissue barriers. Cingulin (CGN) and paracingulin (CGNL1) control RhoA activation in epithelial cells by interacting with RhoA guanidine exchange factors. CGNL1 depletion also inhibits Rac1 activation during junction assembly. Here we show that, unexpectedly, Madin–Darby canine kidney epithelial cells depleted of both CGN and CGNL1 (double-KD cells) display normal Rac1 activation and tight junction (TJ) formation, despite decreased junctional recruitment of the Rac1 activator Tiam1. The expression of the Rac1 inhibitor MgcRacGAP is decreased in double-KD cells, and the barrier development and Rac1 activation phenotypes are rescued by exogenous expression of MgcRacGAP. MgcRacGAP colocalizes with CGN and CGNL1 at TJs and forms a complex and interacts directly in vitro with CGN and CGNL1. Depletion of either CGN or CGNL1 in epithelial cells results in decreased junctional localization of MgcRacGAP but not of ECT2, a centralspindlin-interacting Rho GEF. These results provide new insight into coordination of Rho-family GTPase activities at junctions, since apical accumulation of CGN and CGNL1 at TJs during junction maturation provides a mechanism to spatially restrict down-regulation of Rac1 activation through the recruitment of MgcRacGAP. PMID:24807907

  7. Oxygen adsorption at noble metal/TiO2 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein-Babaei, F.; Alaei-Sheini, Navid; Lajvardi, Mehdi M.

    2016-03-01

    Electric conduction in titanium dioxide is known to be oxygen sensitive and the conductivity of a TiO2 ceramic body is determined mainly by the concentration of its naturally occurring oxygen vacancy. Recently, fabrications and electronic features of a number of noble metal/TiO2-based electronic devices, such as solar cells, UV detectors, gas sensors and memristive devices have been demonstrated. Here, we investigate the effect of oxygen adsorption at the noble metal/TiO2 junction in such devices, and show the potentials of these junctions in chemical sensor fabrication. The polycrystalline, poly-phase TiO2 layers are grown by the selective and controlled oxidation of titanium thin films vacuum deposited on silica substrates. Noble metal thin films are deposited on the oxide layers by physical vapor deposition. Current-voltage (I-V) diagrams of the fabricated devices are studied for Ag/, Au/, and Pt/TiO2 samples. The raw samples show no junction energy barrier. After a thermal annealing in air at 250° C, I-V diagrams change drastically. The annealed samples demonstrate highly non-linear I-V indicating the formation of high Schottky energy barriers at the noble metal/TiO2 junctions. The phenomenon is described based on the effect of the oxygen atoms adsorbed at the junction.

  8. Investigation of Junction Properties of CdS/CdTe Solar Cells and their Correlation to Device Properties (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Dhere, R. G.; Zhang, Y.; Romero, M. J.; Asher, S. E.; Young, M.; To, B.; Noufi, R.; Gessert, T. A.

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the Junction Studies are: (1) understand the nature of the junction in the CdTe/CdS device; (2) correlate the device fabrication parameters to the junction formation; and (3) develop a self consistent device model to explain the device properties. Detailed analysis of CdS/CdTe and SnO{sub 2}/CdTe devices prepared using CSS CdTe is discussed.

  9. Topological Josephson ϕ0 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolcini, Fabrizio; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia S.

    2015-07-01

    We study the effect of a magnetic field on the current-phase relation of a topological Josephson junction formed by connecting two superconductors through the helical edge states of a quantum spin-Hall insulator. We predict that the Zeeman effect along the spin quantization axis of the helical edges results in an anomalous Josephson relation that allows for a supercurrent to flow in the absence of superconducting phase bias. We relate the associated field-tunable phase shift ϕ0 in the Josephson relation of such a ϕ0 junction to the existence of a so-called helical superconductivity, which may result from the interplay of the Zeeman effect and spin-orbit coupling. We analyze the dependence of the magneto-supercurrent on the junction length and discuss its observability in suitably designed hybrid structures subject to an in-plane magnetic field.

  10. Josephson junctions in SPICE3

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on SPICE3 which is the most recent version of the venerable circuit simulator SPICE from the University of California, Berkeley. Unlike its predecessors, SPICE3 is written in the C programming language, and is designed for interactive use under a modern multitasking operating system. SPICE3, being an interactive program, offers the user great control and flexibility in performing simulations, and provides a powerful graphics capability for viewing simulation results. A C-shell like control syntax is supported, as well as such features as plotting while simulating, parameter alteration during simulation, and simulation data controlled breakpoints. Unfortunately, the Berkeley distribution of SPICE3 lacks support for Josephson junctions. As a consequence, the author has developed a customize version of SPICE3b.1 which incorporates a Josephson junction model. The model supports control current modulation, as well as a fifth order polynomial description of the quasiparticle current suitable for NbN junctions.

  11. The kidney tight junction (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HOU, JIANGHUI

    2014-01-01

    The tight junction is an important subcellular organelle which plays a vital role in epithelial barrier function. Claudin, as the integral membrane component of tight junctions, creates a paracellular transport pathway for various ions to be reabsorbed by the kidneys. This review summarizes advances in claudin structure, function and pathophysiology in kidney diseases. Different claudin species confer selective paracellular permeability to each of three major renal tubular segments: the proximal tubule, the thick ascending limb of Henle’s loop and the distal nephron. Defects in claudin function can cause a wide spectrum of kidney diseases, such as hypomagnesemia, hypercalciuria, kidney stones and hypertension. Studies using transgenic mouse models with claudin mutations have recapitulated several of these renal disease phenotypes and have elucidated the underlying biological mechanisms. Modern recording approaches based upon scanning ion conductance microscopy may resolve the biophysical nature of claudin transport function and provide novel insight into tight junction architecture. PMID:25319473

  12. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1988-03-22

    This patent describes a detection system for detecting the gyroprecessional resonance of a specimen having a particle system with magnetic or electric dipole moments: The detection system comprises: means for irradiating the specimen with a pulse of high frequency radiation, detector means for detecting signals produced by magnetic resonance of the specimen, a dc SQUID having a superconducting ring and two shunted Josephson tunnel junctions interrupting the ring, the ring having a bias current input at one side thereof between the junctions and bias current output at the other side thereof between the junctions, means for establishing a constant magnetic flux threading the SQUID ring, means for supplying a bias current to the bias current input of the SQUID an input coil inductively coupled to the SQUID ring, and a resonant circuit coupling the detector means to the input coil.

  13. Josephson junction q-spoiler

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1988-03-22

    This patent describes a detection system for detecting the gyroprecessional resonance of a specimen having a particle system with magnetic or electric dipole moments comprising: means for irradiating the specimen with a pulse of high frequency radiation, detector means for detecting signals produced by magnetic resonance of the specimen, a dc SQUID having a superconducting ring and two shunted Josephson tunnel junctions interrupting the ring, the ring having a bias current input at one side thereof between the junctions and a bias current output at the other side thereof between the junctions, means for establishing a constant magnetic flux threading the SQUID ring, means for supplying a bias current to the bias current input of the SQUID, an input coil inductively coupled to the SQUID ring, and a resonant circuit coupling the detector means to the input coil.

  14. The Extracellular Architecture of Adherens Junctions Revealed by Crystal Structures of Type I Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    O Harrison; X Jin; S Hong; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; J Brasch; Y Wu; J Vendome; K Felsovalyi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Adherens junctions, which play a central role in intercellular adhesion, comprise clusters of type I classical cadherins that bind via extracellular domains extended from opposing cell surfaces. We show that a molecular layer seen in crystal structures of E- and N-cadherin ectodomains reported here and in a previous C-cadherin structure corresponds to the extracellular architecture of adherens junctions. In all three ectodomain crystals, cadherins dimerize through a trans adhesive interface and are connected by a second, cis, interface. Assemblies formed by E-cadherin ectodomains coated on liposomes also appear to adopt this structure. Fluorescent imaging of junctions formed from wild-type and mutant E-cadherins in cultured cells confirm conclusions derived from structural evidence. Mutations that interfere with the trans interface ablate adhesion, whereas cis interface mutations disrupt stable junction formation. Our observations are consistent with a model for junction assembly involving strong trans and weak cis interactions localized in the ectodomain.

  15. Dislocation Dynamics Simulations of Junctions in Hexagonal Close-Packed Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C; Aubry, S; Chung, P; Arsenlis, A

    2011-12-05

    The formation and strength of dislocations in the hexagonal closed packed material beryllium are studied through dislocation junctions and the critical stress required to break them. Dislocation dynamics calculations (using the code ParaDiS) of junction maps are compared to an analytical line tension approximation in order to validate our model. Results show that the two models agree very well. Also the critical shear stress necessary to break 30{sup o} - 30{sup o} and 30{sup o} - 90{sup o} dislocation junctions is computed numerically. Yield surfaces are mapped out for these junctions to describe their stability regions as function of resolved shear stresses on the glide planes. The example of two non-coplanar binary dislocation junctions with slip planes [2-1-10] (01-10) and [-12-10] (0001) corresponding to a prismatic and basal slip respectively is chosen to verify and validate our implementation.

  16. Multifunctional strands in tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Tsukita, S; Furuse, M; Itoh, M

    2001-04-01

    Tight junctions are one mode of cell-cell adhesion in epithelial and endothelial cellular sheets. They act as a primary barrier to the diffusion of solutes through the intercellular space, create a boundary between the apical and the basolateral plasma membrane domains, and recruit various cytoskeletal as well as signalling molecules at their cytoplasmic surface. New insights into the molecular architecture of tight junctions allow us to now discuss the structure and functions of this unique cell-cell adhesion apparatus in molecular terms. PMID:11283726

  17. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  18. GLIAL ANKYRINS FACILITATE PARANODAL AXOGLIAL JUNCTION ASSEMBLY

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Susuki, Keiichiro; Sherman, Diane L.; Makara, Michael A.; Brophy, Peter J.; Cooper, Edward C.; Bennett, Vann; Mohler, Peter J.; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-glia interactions establish functional membrane domains along myelinated axons. These include nodes of Ranvier, paranodal axoglial junctions, and juxtaparanodes. Paranodal junctions are the largest vertebrate junctional adhesion complex, are essential for rapid saltatory conduction, and contribute to assembly and maintenance of nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying paranodal junction assembly are poorly understood. Ankyrins are cytoskeletal scaffolds traditionally associated with Na+ channel clustering in neurons and important for membrane domain establishment and maintenance in many cell types. Here, we show that ankyrinB, expressed by Schwann cells, and ankyrinG, expressed by oligodendrocytes, are highly enriched at the glial side of paranodal junctions where they interact with the essential glial junctional component neurofascin 155. Conditional knockout of ankyrins in oligodendrocytes disrupts paranodal junction assembly and delays nerve conduction during early development in mice. Thus, glial ankyrins function as major scaffolds that facilitate early and efficient paranodal junction assembly in the developing central nervous system. PMID:25362471

  19. Molecular architecture of tight junctions of periderm differs from that of the maculae occludentes of epidermis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kazumasa; Furuse, Mikio; Yoshida, Yoko; Itoh, Masahiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Tsukita, Shoichiro; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2002-06-01

    Occludin and claudins are tetraspan-transmembrane proteins in tight junctions. Maculae occludentes, which are less-developed tight junctions, occur in the granular cell layer of the epidermis. The periderm, which overlies the developing epidermis and functions as a protective layer for the embryo, carries developed tight junctions as observed in simple epithelia. In both periderm and epidermis, occludin is expressed at the cell-cell border. To determine the difference between tight junctions of periderm and epidermis, claudin-6 expression was examined in periderm and epidermis. Immunofluorescence staining showed claudin-6 expression at the cell-cell border of the periderm, but not in the epidermis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction confirmed that claudin-6 was not expressed in mouse adult skin, whereas immunoelectron microscopy revealed that claudin-6 was localized at tight junctions of the periderm. Furthermore, L fibroblasts with stable expression of exogenous claudin-6 formed developed tight junctions at cell-cell borders. These findings indicate that molecular architecture of tight junctions of the periderm is different from that of the maculae occludentes of the epidermis, and that claudin-6 is important in the formation of tight junctions of the periderm. PMID:12060405

  20. GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION AND CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gap Junctions (GJs) provide cell-to-cell communication (GJIC) of essential metabolites and ions. Js allow tissues to average responses, clear waste products, and minimize the effects of xenobiotics by dilution and allowing steady-state catabolism. any chemicals can adversely affe...

  1. The Yolla Bolly junction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, M.C.; Jayko, A.S. ); Jones, D.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Engebretson, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    West of Red Bluff, California, rocks of the northern Coast Ranges, Klamath-Sierra Nevada, and Great Valley provinces come together at what has been called the Yolla Bolly junction. Mapping of the Red Bluff and Willows 1:100,000 quadrangles has greatly clarified the enigmatic features of this complex area. Terranes of the Klamath Mountains and their Cretaceous sedimentary cover have been thrust northwestward over the Elder Creek terrane and Franciscan rocks, north of the left-lateral Cold Fork fault zone. The Condrey Mountain window (Franciscan Pickett Peak terrane) provides a measure of the magnitude of this thrusting (ca 90 km). South of the Cold Fork fault zone, the Franciscan and Elder Creek terranes were driven southeastward as tectonic wedges onto Sierran-Klamath basement. Timing of this scissor-tectonics is not constrained near the junction, but further north in southwest Oregon, Lower Eocene strata were deformed by overthrusting of the Klamath block whereas Upper Eocene strata overlap the thrust, indicating that thrusting occurred between about 52 and 60 Ma. Plate reconstructions for this time interval indicate the close proximity of the Kula-Farallon-North America triple junction and that old (ca 100 m.y.) Farallon lithosphere was being subducted north of the junction whereas to the south, very young (ca 10 m.y.) Kula plate was presumably obducted onto North America.

  2. Cholera toxin notches epithelial junctions.

    PubMed

    Lemichez, Emmanuel; Stefani, Caroline

    2013-09-11

    Cholera toxin (CT) is the factor responsible for watery diarrhea associated with Vibrio cholerae infection. In this issue, Guichard et al. (2013) report that CT compromises intestinal epithelium barrier function via cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced disruption of Rab11- and exocyst-dependent delivery of endocytic recycling cargo to cell-cell junctions. PMID:24034608

  3. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  4. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  5. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  6. Characterization of buried metal-molecule-metal junctions using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayco, Christopher B.; Land, Donald P.; Parikh, Atul N.; Kiehl, Richard A.

    2014-09-01

    We have devised an infrared spectromicroscopy based experimental configuration to enable structural characterization of buried molecular junctions. Our design utilizes a small mercury drop at the focal point of an infrared microscope to act as a mirror in studying metal-molecule-metal (MmM) junctions. An organic molecular monolayer is formed either directly on the mercury drop or on a thin, infrared (IR) semi-transparent layer of Au deposited onto an IR transparent, undoped silicon substrate. Following the formation of the monolayer, films on either metal can be examined independently using specular reflection spectroscopy. Furthermore, by bringing together the two monolayers, a buried molecular bilayer within the MmM junction can be characterized. Independent examination of each half of the junction prior to junction formation also allows probing any structural and/or conformational changes that occur as a result of forming the bilayer. Because our approach allows assembling and disassembling microscopic junctions by forming and withdrawing Hg drops onto the monolayer covered metal, spatial mapping of junctions can be performed simply by translating the location of the derivatized silicon wafer. Finally, the applicability of this technique for the longer-term studies of changes in molecular structure in the presence of electrical bias is discussed.

  7. Vinculin associates with endothelial VE-cadherin junctions to control force-dependent remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Joppe; Spanjaard, Emma; van der Krogt, Gerard; Grigoriev, Ilya; Akhmanova, Anna; Rehmann, Holger

    2012-01-01

    To remodel endothelial cell–cell adhesion, inflammatory cytokine- and angiogenic growth factor–induced signals impinge on the vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) complex, the central component of endothelial adherens junctions. This study demonstrates that junction remodeling takes place at a molecularly and phenotypically distinct subset of VE-cadherin adhesions, defined here as focal adherens junctions (FAJs). FAJs are attached to radial F-actin bundles and marked by the mechanosensory protein Vinculin. We show that endothelial hormones vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor α, and most prominently thrombin induced the transformation of stable junctions into FAJs. The actin cytoskeleton generated pulling forces specifically on FAJs, and inhibition of Rho-Rock-actomyosin contractility prevented the formation of FAJs and junction remodeling. FAJs formed normally in cells expressing a Vinculin binding-deficient mutant of α-catenin, showing that Vinculin recruitment is not required for adherens junction formation. Comparing Vinculin-devoid FAJs to wild-type FAJs revealed that Vinculin protects VE-cadherin junctions from opening during their force-dependent remodeling. These findings implicate Vinculin-dependent cadherin mechanosensing in endothelial processes such as leukocyte extravasation and angiogenesis. PMID:22391038

  8. Shear-induced reorganization of renal proximal tubule cell actin cytoskeleton and apical junctional complexes.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yi; Gotoh, Nanami; Yan, Qingshang; Du, Zhaopeng; Weinstein, Alan M; Wang, Tong; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2008-08-12

    In this study, we demonstrate that fluid shear stress (FSS)-induced actin cytoskeletal reorganization and junctional formation in renal epithelial cells are nearly completely opposite the corresponding changes in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) [Thi MM et al. (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:16483-16488]. Mouse proximal tubule cells (PTCs) were subjected to 5 h of FSS (1 dyn/cm(2)) to investigate the dynamic responses of the cytoskeletal distribution of filamentous actin (F-actin), ZO-1, E-cadherin, vinculin, and paxillin to FSS. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that FSS caused basal stress fiber disruption, more densely distributed peripheral actin bands (DPABs), and the formation of both tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). A dramatic reinforcement of vinculin staining was found at the cell borders as well as the cell interior. These responses were abrogated by the actin-disrupting drug, cytochalasin D. To interpret these results, we propose a "junctional buttressing" model for PTCs in which FSS enables the DPABs, TJs, and AJs to become more tightly connected. In contrast, in the "bumper-car" model for ECs, all junctional connections were severely disrupted by FSS. This "junctional buttressing" model explains why a FSS of only 1/10 of that used in the EC study can cause a similarly dramatic, cytoskeletal response in these tall, cuboidal epithelial cells; and why junctional buttressing between adjacent cells may benefit renal epithelium in maximizing flow-activated, brush border-dependent, transcellular salt and water reabsorption. PMID:18685100

  9. The development of the myotendinous junction. A review

    PubMed Central

    Charvet, Benjamin; Ruggiero, Florence; Le Guellec, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Summary The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a complex specialized region located at the muscle-tendon interface that represents the primary site of force transmission. Despite their different embryologic origins, muscle and tendon morphogenesis occurs in close spatial and temporal association. After muscle attachment, muscle and tendon constitute a dynamic and functional integrated unit that transduces muscle contraction force to the skeletal system. We review here the current understanding of MTJ formation describing changes during morphogenesis and focusing on the crosstalk between muscle and tendon cells that leads to the development of a functional MTJ. Molecules involved in the formation of the linkage, both at the tendon side and at the muscle side of the junction are described. Much of this knowledge comes from studies using different animal models such as mice, zebrafish and Drosophila where powerful methods for in vivo imaging and genetic manipulations can be used to enlighten this developmental process. PMID:23738275

  10. Tunnel junction with the thin-film electrodes in a resistive phase-slip state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikovsky, Andrey V.; Erganokov, Khassanby Kh.

    1996-02-01

    Resistive current state of wide superconducting tin films with the phase-slip lines has been studied experimentally. We measured the current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) of the junction with the electrodes-wide films in the resistive phase-slip state. Features related to the formation and evolution of the phase-slip lines in wide films have been discovered on the CVCs of the tunnel junction.

  11. Tight Junction Proteins: From Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, E. Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-01-01

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis. PMID:23743355

  12. Autonomic neuromuscular junctions: current developments and future directions.

    PubMed Central

    Burnstock, G

    1986-01-01

    (1) The autonomic neuromuscular junction has been defined, with emphasis on the role of muscle effector bundles and en passage release of transmitter from extensive terminal nerve varicosities to diffuse to muscle across variable and often wide junctional clefts. (2) A multiplicity of neurotransmitters is described in the autonomic nervous system, including purines, peptides, amino acids and monoamines. The ultrastructural identification, projections, roles and interactions of the different nerve types have been discussed. (3) It has been suggested that the part played by peripheral neuroeffector control mechanisms has been underestimated and includes cotransmission, pre- and post-junctional neuromodulation, and the participation of locally released agents. (4) A time-lapse film was shown of the formation of autonomic neuromuscular junctions in culture, introducing questions relating to long-term 'trophic' influences in the autonomic nervous system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 PMID:3319994

  13. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β. PMID:25871745

  14. Structure of intercellular junctions in the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Telò, P; Lostaglio, S; Dejana, E

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cell junctions are complex structures formed by transmembrane adhesive molecules linked to a network of cytoplasmic/cytoskeletal proteins. At least three different types of endothelial junctions have been described: tight junctions, gap junctions and adherens junctions. These structures have some features and components in common with epithelium but also some which are specific for endothelium. We still know very little about the pathologic consequences of alterations in the functional behaviour or synthesis of endothelial cell junction proteins. It is possible that pathologies linked to altered endothelial permeability and vascular organization (e.g. hemangiomas, scleroderma, and other types of vasculitis) are associated with structural alterations in endothelial junction organization. In addition, changes in endothelial permeability properties are associated with the early stages of atherosclerosis and many inflammatory diseases. PMID:9501564

  15. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  16. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. PMID:27073108

  17. Thermocouple, multiple junction reference oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved oven for maintaining the junctions of a plurality of reference thermocouples at a common and constant temperature is described. The oven is characterized by a cylindrical body defining a heat sink with axially extended-cylindrical cavity a singularized heating element which comprises a unitary cylindrical heating element consisting of a resistance heating coil wound about the surface of metallic spool with an axial bore defined and seated in the cavity. Other features of the oven include an annular array of radially extended bores defined in the cylindrical body and a plurality of reference thermocouple junctions seated in the bores in uniformly spaced relation with the heating element, and a temperature sensing device seated in the axial bore for detecting temperature changes as they occur in the spool and circuit to apply a voltage across the coil in response to detected drops in temperatures of the spool.

  18. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements.

  19. Occluding junctions of invertebrate epithelia.

    PubMed

    Jonusaite, Sima; Donini, Andrew; Kelly, Scott P

    2016-01-01

    Invertebrate diversity and architecture is immense. This is achieved by the organization and function of four tissue types found in most metazoan phyla-epithelial, connective, muscle and nervous tissue. Epithelial tissue is found in all extant animals (parazoan and metazoan alike). Epithelial cells form cellular sheets that cover internal or external surfaces and regulate the passage of material between separated compartments. The transepithelial movement of biological material between compartments can occur across the transcellular pathway (i.e. across cells) or the paracellular pathway (i.e. between cells) and the latter is regulated by occluding junctions that typically link cells in a subapical domain. In this review, information on occluding junctions of invertebrate epithelia is consolidated and discussed in the context of morphology, ultrastructure and physiology. In addition, an overview of what is currently known about invertebrate occluding junction proteins and their role in maintaining the integrity of invertebrate epithelia and regulating the barrier properties of these tissues is presented. PMID:26510419

  20. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, S. T. M.; Trees, B. R.

    2001-10-01

    There is considerable scientific and technological interest in the time-dependent behavior of arrays of non-identical Josephson junctions, whose voltages oscillate with individual bare frequencies that can be made, through interactions, to renormalize their frequencies to a common value. We have studied the degree of synchronization of a subset of overdamped junctions in a ladder geometry, in which the voltages across the ``rung'' junctions of the ladder oscillate with the same, renormalized frequency and a fixed phase difference. We measure the degree of synchronization of the junctions with an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of the nearest-neighbor junction coupling strength. We also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction (RSJ) equations could be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of the junction coupling strength and also demonstrated that the relationship between the array size N and the critical coupling strength for all junctions to oscillate with the same frequency scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  1. Adherens and Tight Junctions: Structure, Function and Connections to the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Hartsock, Andrea; Nelson, W. James

    2009-01-01

    Summary Adherens juctions and Tight junctions comprise two modes of cell-cell adhesion that provide different functions. Both junctional complexes are proposed to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, and formation and maturation of cell-cell contacts involves reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Adherens junctions initiate cell-cell contacts, and mediate the maturation and maintenance of the contact. Adherens junctions consist of the transmembrane protein E-cadherin, and intracellular components, p120-catenin, β-catenin and α-catenin. Tight junctions regulate the paracellular pathway for the movement of ions and solutes in-between cells. Tight junctions consist of the transmembrane proteins occludin and claudin, and the cytoplasmic scaffolding proteins ZO-1,-2, and -3. This review discusses the binding interactions of the most studied proteins that occur within each of these two junctional complexes and possible modes of regulation of these interactions, and the different mechanisms that connect and regulate interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:17854762

  2. Fixed Junction Photovoltaic Devices Based On Polymerizable Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limanek, Austin; Leger, Janelle, , Dr.

    Recently, polymer-based photovoltaic devices (PPVs) have received significant attention as a possible affordable, large area and flexible solar energy technology. In particular, research on chemically fixed p-i-n junctions in polymer photovoltaic devices has shown promising results. These devices are composed of ionic monomers in a polymer matrix sandwiched between two electrodes. When a potential is applied, the ionic monomers migrate towards their corresponding electrodes, enabling electrochemical doping of the polymer. This leads to the formation of bonds between the polymer and ionic monomers, resulting in the formation of a chemically fixed p-i-n junction. However, early devices suffered from long charging times and low overall response. This has been attributed to the low phase compatibility between the ionic monomers and the polymer. It has been shown for light-emitting electrochemical cells, replacing the ionic monomers with polymerizable ionic liquids (PILs) mitigates these challenges. We will present the use of PILs as the dopant in fixed junction PPV devices. Preliminary devices demonstrate significantly improved performance, decreased charging times, and high open circuit voltages. This research supported by the National Science Foundation DMR-1057209.

  3. Giant tunnel magneto-resistance in graphene based molecular tunneling junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Li, Jianwei; Yu, Yunjin; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a class of stable zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) based molecular magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs). For those junctions having pentagon-connecting formations, huge tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) is found. Different from most of the other proposed molecular junctions, the huge TMR in our structures is generic, and is not significantly affected by external parameters such as bias voltage, gate voltage, length of the molecule and width of the ZGNRs. The double pentagon-connecting formation between the molecule and ZGNRs is critical for the remarkable TMR ratio, which is as large as ~2 × 105. These molecular MTJs behave as almost perfect spin filters and spin valve devices. Other connecting formations of the ZGNR based MTJs lead to much smaller TMR. By first principles analysis, we reveal the microscopic physics responsible for this phenomenon.

  4. Structure–property relationships in atomic-scale junctions: Histograms and beyond

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mark S. Hybertsen; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-03

    Over the past 10 years, there has been tremendous progress in the measurement, modeling and understanding of structure–function relationships in single molecule junctions. Numerous research groups have addressed significant scientific questions, directed both to conductance phenomena at the single molecule level and to the fundamental chemistry that controls junction functionality. Many different functionalities have been demonstrated, including single-molecule diodes, optically and mechanically activated switches, and, significantly, physical phenomena with no classical analogues, such as those based on quantum interference effects. Experimental techniques for reliable and reproducible single molecule junction formation and characterization have led to this progress. In particular, themore » scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction (STM-BJ) technique has enabled rapid, sequential measurement of large numbers of nanoscale junctions allowing a statistical analysis to readily distinguish reproducible characteristics. Furthermore, harnessing fundamental link chemistry has provided the necessary chemical control over junction formation, enabling measurements that revealed clear relationships between molecular structure and conductance characteristics.« less

  5. Structural organization of the tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Paris, Luca; Tonutti, Laura; Vannini, Cristina; Bazzoni, Gianfranco

    2008-03-01

    Tight junctions are the most apical organelle of the apical junctional complex and are primarily involved in the regulation of paracellular permeability and membrane polarity. Extensive research in the past two decades has identified not only the individual molecules of the tight junctions but also their mutual interactions, which are the focus of the present review article. While a complete map of the interactions among the tight junction molecules is probably far from being complete, the available evidence already allows outlining the general molecular architecture of the tight junctions. Here, with the aim of gaining deeper mechanistic understanding of tight junction assembly, regulation and function, we have subdivided the known molecular interactions into four major clusters that are centered on cell surface, polarity, cytoskeletal and signaling molecules. PMID:17945185

  6. Low-high junction theory applied to solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P.; Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Recent use of alloying techniques for rear contact formation has yielded a new kind of silicon solar cell, the back surface field (BSF) cell, with abnormally high open circuit voltage and improved radiation resistance. Several analytical models for open circuit voltage based on the reverse saturation current are formulated to explain these observations. The zero SRV case of the conventional cell model, the drift field model, and the low-high junction (LHJ) model can predict the experimental trends. The LHJ model applies the theory of the low-high junction and is considered to reflect a more realistic view of cell fabrication. This model can predict the experimental trends observed for BSF cells. Detailed descriptions and derivations for the models are included. The correspondences between them are discussed. This modeling suggests that the meaning of minority carrier diffusion length measured in BSF cells be reexamined.

  7. Low-high junction theory applied to solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P.; Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Recent use of alloying techniques for rear contact formation has yielded a new kind of silicon solar cell, the back surface field (BSF) cell, with abnormally high open-circuit voltage and improved radiation resistance. Several analytical models for open-circuit voltage based on the reverse saturation current are formulated to explain these observations. The zero surface recombination velocity (SRV) case of the conventional cell model, the drift field model, and the low-high junction (LHJ) model can predict the experimental trends. The LHJ model applies the theory of the low-high junction and is considered to reflect a more realistic view of cell fabrication. This model can predict the experimental trends observed for BSF cells.

  8. Organization of cellular receptors into a nanoscale junction during HIV-1 adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Daniels, Brian R; Siliciano, Robert F; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with its host cell is the target for new antiretroviral therapies. Viral particles interact with the flexible plasma membrane via viral surface protein gp120 which binds its primary cellular receptor CD4 and subsequently the coreceptor CCR5. However, whether and how these receptors become organized at the adhesive junction between cell and virion are unknown. Here, stochastic modeling predicts that, regarding binding to gp120, cellular receptors CD4 and CCR5 form an organized, ring-like, nanoscale structure beneath the virion, which locally deforms the plasma membrane. This organized adhesive junction between cell and virion, which we name the viral junction, is reminiscent of the well-characterized immunological synapse, albeit at much smaller length scales. The formation of an organized viral junction under multiple physiopathologically relevant conditions may represent a novel intermediate step in productive infection. PMID:20657663

  9. Optimizing boron junctions through point defect and stress engineering using carbon and germanium co-implants

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, Victor; Oh, Yong-Seog; Pramanik, Dipu; Graoui, Houda; Foad, Majeed A.

    2005-08-01

    We report the fabrication of p{sup +}/n junctions using Ge{sup +}, C{sup +}, and B{sup +} co-implantation and a spike anneal. The best junction exhibits a depth of 26 nm, vertical abruptness of 3 nm/decade, and sheet resistance of 520 Ohm/square. The junction location is defined by where the boron concentration drops to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. These junctions are close to the International Technology Roadmap specifications for the 65 nm technology node and are achieved by careful engineering of amorphization, stresses, and point defects. Advanced simulation of boron diffusion is used to understand and optimize the process window. The simulations show that the optimum process completely suppresses the transient-enhanced diffusion of boron and the formation of boron-interstitial clusters. This increases the boron solubility to 20% above the equilibrium solid-state solubility.

  10. Organization of Cellular Receptors into a Nanoscale Junction during HIV-1 Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Daniels, Brian R.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Sun, Sean X.; Wirtz, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with its host cell is the target for new antiretroviral therapies. Viral particles interact with the flexible plasma membrane via viral surface protein gp120 which binds its primary cellular receptor CD4 and subsequently the coreceptor CCR5. However, whether and how these receptors become organized at the adhesive junction between cell and virion are unknown. Here, stochastic modeling predicts that, regarding binding to gp120, cellular receptors CD4 and CCR5 form an organized, ring-like, nanoscale structure beneath the virion, which locally deforms the plasma membrane. This organized adhesive junction between cell and virion, which we name the viral junction, is reminiscent of the well-characterized immunological synapse, albeit at much smaller length scales. The formation of an organized viral junction under multiple physiopathologically relevant conditions may represent a novel intermediate step in productive infection. PMID:20657663

  11. Occluding junctions in cultured epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Cereijido, M; Meza, I; Martínez-Palomo, A

    1981-03-01

    When MDCK cells are cultured in monolayers, they synthesize, assemble, and seal occluding junctions that limit the paracellular route. These processes may be impaired by inhibitors of the protein synthesis but not by inhibitors of the synthesis of RNA. Once established, the occluding junctions confer to the monolayer an overall electrical resistance of 80-600 omega . cm2. At the microscopical level, the resistance of individual junctions have large variations along the perimeter of a given cell. This agrees with the images of freeze-fracture electron microscopy where the network of the junction varies abruptly from 1 to 10 strands. The junctions are impermeable to macromolecular tracers, have a 9 to 1 Na+/Cl- discrimination, and a cation selectivity following the order: K+ greater than Na+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+ greater than Li+. Sealing requires extracellular Ca2+, but the junctions open when the concentration of Ca2+ in the cytoplasm increases. The structural components of the cytoskeleton (microtubules and microfilaments) seem to be involved in the junctional events as revealed by staining with immunofluorescent specific antibodies. If the cells are treated with cytochalasin B, actin microfilaments disorganize, the junctions open, and the electrical resistance across the monolayers falls. The resealing of the tight junction is inhibited by this drug. PMID:7212057

  12. String junctions and holographic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chiodaroli, Marco; Gutperle, Michael; Hung, Ling-Yan; Krym, Darya

    2011-01-15

    In this paper we study half-BPS type IIB supergravity solutions with multiple AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xM{sub 4} asymptotic regions, where M{sub 4} is either T{sup 4} or K{sub 3}. These solutions were first constructed in [M. Chiodaroli, M. Gutperle, and D. Krym, J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2010) 066.] and have geometries given by the warped product of AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 2}xM{sub 4} over {Sigma}, where {Sigma} is a Riemann surface. We show that the holographic boundary has the structure of a star graph, i.e. n half-lines joined at a point. The attractor mechanism and the relation of the solutions to junctions of self-dual strings in six-dimensional supergravity are discussed. The solutions of [M. Chiodaroli, M. Gutperle, and D. Krym, J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2010) 066.] are constructed introducing two meromorphic and two harmonic functions defined on {Sigma}. We focus our analysis on solutions corresponding to junctions of three different conformal field theories and show that the conditions for having a solution charged only under Ramond-Ramond three-form fields reduce to relations involving the positions of the poles and the residues of the relevant harmonic and meromorphic functions. The degeneration limit in which some of the poles collide is analyzed in detail. Finally, we calculate the holographic boundary entropy for a junction of three CFTs and obtain a simple expression in terms of poles and residues.

  13. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. An electronic copy of the documentation is included on the distribution medium in LaTEX format. RWGSCAT is also offered as a bundle with a related program, CWGSCAT (Scattering Matrix Program for Circular WaveGuide Junctions). Please see the abstract for RWGSCAT/CWGSCAT (COS-10045) for information about the bundled package. RWGSCAT was developed in 1993 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA.

  14. Fabrication of Tunnel Junctions For Direct Detector Arrays With Single-Electron Transistor Readout Using Electron-Beam Lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Rhee, K. W.; Teufel, J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will describe the fabrication of small aluminum tunnel junctions for applications in astronomy. Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junctions with integrated single-electron transistor readout have the potential for photon-counting sensitivity at sub-millimeter wavelengths. The junctions for the detector and single-electron transistor can be made with electron-beam lithography and a standard self-aligned double-angle deposition process. However, high yield and uniformity of the junctions is required for large-format detector arrays. This paper will describe how measurement and modification of the sensitivity ratio in the resist bilayer was used to greatly improve the reliability of forming devices with uniform, sub-micron size, low-leakage junctions.

  15. Gap Junction Regulation by Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Juan; Salarian, Mani; Chen, Yanyi; Veenstra, Richard; Louis, Charles F.; Yang, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ activated calmodulin (CaM) inhibits gap junction channels in the low nM to high ?M range of [Ca2+]i. This regulation plays an essential role in numerous cellular processes that include hearing, lens transparency, and synchronized contractions of the heart. Previous studies have indicated that gap junction mediated cell-to-cell communication was inhibited by CaM antagonists. More recent evidence indicates a direct role of CaM in regulating several members of the connexin family. Since the intracellular loop and carboxyl termini of connexins are largely invisible in electron microscopy and X-ray crystallographic structures due to disorder in these domains, peptide models encompassing the putative CaM binding sites of several intracellular domains of connexins have been used to identify the Ca2+-dependent CaM binding sites of these proteins. This approach has been used to determine the CaM binding affinities of peptides derived from a number of different connexin-subfamilies. PMID:24440348

  16. The tight junction: a multifunctional complex.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Eveline E; Lynch, Robert D

    2004-06-01

    Multicellular organisms are separated from the external environment by a layer of epithelial cells whose integrity is maintained by intercellular junctional complexes composed of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, whereas gap junctions provide for intercellular communication. The aim of this review is to present an updated overview of recent developments in the area of tight junction biology. In a relatively short time, our knowledge of the tight junction has evolved from a relatively simple view of it being a permeability barrier in the paracellular space and a fence in the plane of the plasma membrane to one of it acting as a multicomponent, multifunctional complex that is involved in regulating numerous and diverse cell functions. A group of integral membrane proteins-occludin, claudins, and junction adhesion molecules-interact with an increasingly complex array of tight junction plaque proteins not only to regulate paracellular solute and water flux but also to integrate such diverse processes as gene transcription, tumor suppression, cell proliferation, and cell polarity. PMID:15151915

  17. Assembly of gap junctions during amphibian neurulation.

    PubMed

    Decker, R S; Friend, D S

    1974-07-01

    Sequential thin-section, tracer (K-pyroantimonate, lanthanum, ruthenium red, and horseradish peroxidase), and freeze-fracture studies were conducted on embryos and larvae of Rana pipiens to determine the steps involved in gap junction assembly during neurulation. The zonulae occludentes, which join contiguous neuroepithelial cells, fragment into solitary domains as the neural groove deepens. These plaque-like contacts also become permeable to a variety of tracers at this juncture. Where the ridges of these domains intersect, numerous 85-A participles apparently pile up against tight junctional remnants, creating arrays recognizable as gap junctions. With neural fold closure, the remaining tight junctional elements disappear and are replaced by macular gap junctions. Well below the junctional complex, gap junctions form independent of any visible, preexisting structure. Small, variegated clusters, containing 4-30 particles located in flat, particle-free regions, characterize this area. The number of particles within these arrays increases and they subsequently blend together into a polygonally packed aggregate resembling a gap junction. The assembly process in both apical and basal regions conforms with the concept of translational movement of particles within a fluid plasma membrane. PMID:4135001

  18. Plasma Implantation Technology for Upcoming Ultra Shallow and Highly Doped Fully Depleted Silicon On Insulator Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzatti, Frederic; Milsi, Frederic; Delaye, Vincent; Duchaine, Julian; Torregrosa, Frank; Etienne, Hasnaa; Yckache, Karim

    2011-01-01

    To face the continuous dimensions downscaling for upcoming semiconductor devices, we have investigated a plasma immersion ion implantation way and have compared the results to a conventional one. This new implantation method allows, in particular, high and thin doping concentration to field source and drain requirements for 32 nm node and below. In addition to this key step, a silicon selective epitaxy growth has been performed. Thus, n-type and p-type ion implantations have been carried out on thin blanket SOI substrates in Pulsion plasma ion implantation tool manufactured by Ion Beam Services, with AsH3, BF3 or B2H6 precursors. Then a recrystallization annealing followed by silicon selective epitaxial growth has been performed in a reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition tool. Regarding n-type implantation we observed a poly-silicon growth in areas where the top silicon has been amorphous down to the buried oxide and a mono-silicon growth for areas where the top silicon has not been completely amorphous. Indeed, in this case recrystallization annealing was not sufficient to allow lengthwise solid phase epitaxy growth whereas there were no difficulties for axial one. Regarding p-type implantations no epitaxial growths have been observed at all. This lack of growth cannot be explained by a complete silicon amorphization which would have led to a growth of poly-silicon like for n-type implantation. According to our first results this growth vacancy could be explained by the very high boron atoms concentration on the substrate surface. The latter being resistant to HF-last cleaning could thus block silicon nucleation. However some rinsing processes, more or less aggressive, have been tested to remove this boron silicon alloy layer. Among these different tests, hydrochloric or plasma etching have provided, in some specific cases, promising results allowing an epitaxial silicon growth.

  19. Distinct subdomain organization and molecular composition of a tight junction with adherens junction features.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Fabio D; Lopez, Lanier N; Lin, Harrison W; Davies, Caroline; Azevedo, Ricardo B; Gow, Alexander; Kachar, Bechara

    2006-12-01

    Most polarized epithelia constrain solute diffusion between luminal and interstitial compartments using tight junctions and generate mechanical strength using adherens junctions. These intercellular junctions are typically portrayed as incongruent macromolecular complexes with distinct protein components. Herein, we delineate the molecular composition and subdomain architecture of an intercellular junction between sensory and non-sensory cells of the inner ear. In this junction, claudins partition into claudin-14 and claudin-9/6 subdomains that are distinguishable by strand morphology, which contrasts with in vitro data that most claudins co-assemble into heteromeric strands. Surprisingly, canonical adherens junction proteins (p120ctn, alpha- and beta-catenins) colocalize with the claudin-9/6 subdomain and recruit a dense cytoskeletal network. We also find that catenins colocalize with claudin-9 and claudin-6, but not claudin-14, in a heterologous system. Together, our data demonstrate that canonical tight junction and adherens junction proteins can be recruited to a single junction in which claudins partition into subdomains and form a novel hybrid tight junction with adherens junction organization. PMID:17130295

  20. Computer models of DNA four-way junctions.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, A R; Olson, W K

    1994-08-16

    A modeling scheme that combines a constrained backbone generating algorithm with simple hard-sphere packing calculations is offered to build the four-stranded structures of DNA found in Holliday junctions. Two standard B-DNA duplexes are oriented side by side with helix axes at different relative inclinations and then systematically rotated and translated to identify closely spaced contact-free states. Attempts are subsequently made to introduce a low-energy sugar-phosphate linkage that serves as the site of strand exchange between the two duplexes. The chemical connection is sought using an algorithm which identifies the possible arrangements of the intervening backbone torsions between arbitrarily positioned bases. The goal is to identify the multiple conformational solutions associated with a particular arrangement of neighboring DNA helices in the four-way junction rather than a single optimum structure. The methodology is general, in terms of accommodating four-way junctions with arms of variable conformation and chain length and of dimensions much greater than treated heretofore. The only deformation in the four-way structures relative to B-DNA occurs at the site of backbone exchange, with base stacking and Watson-Crick pairing completely preserved in all models. The arrangements of neighboring bases at these sites resemble the unusual conformational steps found in a number of small molecule nucleic acid crystal structures. An interesting outcome of the calculations is the formation of sterically acceptable four-arm Holliday junctions over a wide range of angles at the cross. The potential mobility of the Holliday junctions is inferred from visualization and energetic analysis of the various models. Long-range electrostatic energies based on different currently available treatments of the dielectric constant are used to estimate the conformational preferences and flexibility of the four-stranded structures. The various dielectric schemes, however, are not in complete agreement on the likely conformational variability of the four-way junctions. The structures suggest a possible mechanism for branch migration and detail a pathway linking the antiparallel uncrossed Holliday structure inferred from solution measurements and the parallel cross-packed helical arrangements observed in single-crystal X-ray studies. PMID:8068615

  1. Molecular structure and assembly of the tight junction.

    PubMed

    Denker, B M; Nigam, S K

    1998-01-01

    Polarized epithelial cells separate two extremely different cellular milieus. The tight junction (TJ) is the most apical component of the junctional complex and serves as the permeability barrier between these environments. The tight junctional complex appears to be a dynamic and regulated structure. Some of its protein components have been identified and include the transmembrane protein occludin. Nontransmembrane proteins on the cytosolic leaflet including ZO-1, ZO-2, cingulin, 7H6, and several unidentified phosphoproteins are also believed to be part of the TJ. Interactions of some of these proteins with the actin cytoskeleton are a major determinant of TJ structure and may also play a role in the regulation of TJ assembly. Recent progress using the "calcium switch" and the "ATP depletion-repletion" model of TJ formation offers new insight regarding how these structures form. TJ biogenesis appears to be regulated, in part, by classic signal transduction pathways involving heterotrimeric G proteins, release of intracellular Ca2+, and activation of protein kinase C. Although many of the details of the signaling pathways have yet to be defined, these observations may provide insight into how TJs form during tubular development. Furthermore, it may be possible to suggest potential therapeutic targets for intervention in a variety of diseases (e.g., ischemia, toxic injury to the kidney and other epithelial tissue) where TJ integrity has been compromised and reassembly is required. PMID:9458817

  2. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  3. Vertical junction silicon microdisk modulators and switches.

    PubMed

    Watts, Michael R; Zortman, William A; Trotter, Douglas C; Young, Ralph W; Lentine, Anthony L

    2011-10-24

    Vertical junction resonant microdisk modulators and switches have been demonstrated with exceptionally low power consumption, low-voltage operation, high-speed, and compact size. This paper reviews the progress of vertical junction microdisk modulators, provides detailed design data, and compares vertical junction performance to lateral junction performance. The use of a vertical junction maximizes the overlap of the depletion region with the optical mode thereby minimizing both the drive voltage and power consumption of a depletion-mode modulator. Further, the vertical junction enables contact to be made from the interior of the resonator and therein a hard outer wall to be formed that minimizes radiation in small diameter resonators, further reducing the capacitance and drive power of the modulator. Initial simple vertical junction modulators using depletion-mode operation demonstrated the first sub-100 fJ/bit silicon modulators. With more intricate doping schemes and through the use of AC-coupled drive signals, 3.5 μm diameter vertical junction microdisk modulators have recently achieved a communications efficiency of 3 fJ/bit, making these modulators the smallest and lowest power modulators demonstrated to date, in any material system. Additionally, the demonstration was performed at 12.5 Gb/s, required a peak-to-peak signal level of only 1 V, and achieved bit-error-rates below 10(-12) without requiring signal pre-emphasis. As an additional benefit to the use of interior contacts, higher-order active filters can be constructed from multiple vertical-junction modulators without interference of the electrodes. Doing so, we demonstrated second-order active high-speed bandpass switches with ~2.5 ns switching speeds, and power penalties of only 0.4 dB. Through the use of vertical junctions in resonant modulators, we have achieved the lowest power consumption, lowest voltage, and smallest silicon modulators demonstrated to date. PMID:22109050

  4. Effect of Front-Side Silver Metallization on Underlying n+-p Junction in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the effect of front-side Ag metallization on the underlying n+-p junction of multicrystalline Si solar cells. The junction quality beneath the contacts was investigated by characterizing the uniformities of the electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction, using scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We investigated cells with a commercial Ag paste (DuPont PV159) and fired at furnace setting temperatures of 800 degrees, 840 degrees, and 930 degrees C, which results in actual cell temperatures ~100 degrees C lower than the setting temperature and the three cells being under-, optimal-, and over-fired. We found that the uniformity of the junction beneath the Ag contact was significantly degraded by the over-firing, whereas the junction retained good uniformity with the optimal- and under-fire temperatures. Further, Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes from <100 nm to several μm were found at the Ag/Si interface of the over-fired cell. Large crystallites were imaged as protrusions into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of the junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent recrystallization with incorporation of impurities in the Ag paste and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching.

  5. The Ly6 Protein Coiled Is Required for Septate Junction and Blood Brain Barrier Organisation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Assia; Haenlin, Marc; Waltzer, Lucas; Roch, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic analysis of the Drosophila septate junctions has greatly contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the assembly of these adhesion structures, which bear strong similarities with the vertebrate tight junctions and the paranodal septate junctions. These adhesion complexes share conserved molecular components and have a common function: the formation of paracellular barriers restraining the diffusion of solutes through epithelial and glial envelopes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we characterise the function of the Drosophila cold gene, that codes for a protein belonging to the Ly6 superfamily of extracellular ligands. Analysis of cold mutants shows that this gene is specifically required for the organisation of the septate junctions in epithelial tissues and in the nervous system, where its contribution is essential for the maintenance of the blood-brain barrier. We show that cold acts in a cell autonomous way, and we present evidence indicating that this protein could act as a septate junction component. Conclusion/Significance We discuss the specific roles of cold and three other Drosophila members of the Ly6 superfamily that have been shown to participate in a non-redundant way in the process of septate junction assembly. We propose that vertebrate Ly6 proteins could fulfill analogous roles in tight junctions and/or paranodal septate junctions. PMID:21423573

  6. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2015-05-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25792565

  7. Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Delahoy, Alan E.

    2010-01-26

    Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

  8. Method of junction formation for CIGS photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Delahoy, Alan E.

    2006-03-28

    Sulfur is used to improve the performance of CIGS devices prepared by the evaporation of a single source ZIS type compound to form a buffer layer on the CIGS. The sulfur may be evaporated, or contained in the ZIS type material, or both. Vacuum evaporation apparatus of many types useful in the practice of the invention are known in the art. Other methods of delivery, such as sputtering, or application of a thiourea solution, may be substituted for evaporation.

  9. The beneficial effects of cumulus cells and oocyte-cumulus cell gap junctions depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Wu, Sha-Na; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Wang, Dong-Hui; Kong, Xiang-Wei; Lu, Angeleem; Li, Yan-Jiao; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Yue-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Cumulus cells are a group of closely associated granulosa cells that surround and nourish oocytes. Previous studies have shown that cumulus cells contribute to oocyte maturation and fertilization through gap junction communication. However, it is not known how this gap junction signaling affects in vivo versus in vitro maturation of oocytes, and their subsequent fertilization and embryonic development following insemination. Therefore, in our study, we performed mouse oocyte maturation and insemination using in vivo- or in vitro-matured oocyte-cumulus complexes (OCCs, which retain gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes co-cultured with cumulus cells (DCs, which lack gap junctions between the cumulus cells and the oocytes), and in vitro-matured, denuded oocytes without cumulus cells (DOs). Using these models, we were able to analyze the effects of gap junction signaling on oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. We found that gap junctions were necessary for both in vivo and in vitro oocyte maturation. In addition, for oocytes matured in vivo, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization and blastocyst formation, and this improvement was strengthened by gap junctions. Moreover, for oocytes matured in vitro, the presence of cumulus cells during insemination improved fertilization, but not blastocyst formation, and this improvement was independent of gap junctions. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the beneficial effect of gap junction signaling from cumulus cells depends on oocyte maturation and fertilization methods. PMID:26966678

  10. Sertoli-germ cell junctions in the testis: a review of recent data.

    PubMed

    Kopera, Ilona A; Bilinska, Barbara; Cheng, C Yan; Mruk, Dolores D

    2010-05-27

    Spermatogenesis is a process that involves an array of cellular and biochemical events, collectively culminating in the formation of haploid spermatids from diploid precursor cells known as spermatogonia. As germ cells differentiate from spermatogonia into elongated spermatids, they also progressively migrate across the entire length of the seminiferous epithelium until they reach the luminal edge in anticipation of spermiation at late stage VIII of spermatogenesis. At the same time, these germ cells must maintain stable attachment with Sertoli cells via testis-unique intermediate filament- (i.e. desmosome-like junctions) and actin- (i.e. ectoplasmic specializations, ESs) based cell junctions to prevent sloughing of immature germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium, which may result in infertility. In essence, both desmosome-like junctions and basal ESs are known to coexist between Sertoli cells at the level of the blood-testis barrier where they cofunction with the well-studied tight junction in maintaining the immunological barrier. However, the type of anchoring device that is present between Sertoli and germ cells depends on the developmental stage of the germ cell, i.e. desmosome-like junctions are present between Sertoli and germ cells up to, but not including, step 8 spermatids after which this junction type is replaced by the apical ES. While little is known about the biology of the desmosome-like junction in the testis, we have a relatively good understanding of the molecular architecture and the regulation of the ES. Here, we discuss recent findings relating to these two junction types in the testis, highlighting prospective areas that should be investigated in future studies. PMID:20403872

  11. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions. PMID:25282046

  12. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 109 K m-1) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4‧-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions.

  13. Tight junction-related human diseases.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Norimasa

    2013-01-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions adjacent to the apical ends of paracellular spaces. They have two classical functions, the barrier function and the fence function. The former regulates the passage of ions, water and various molecules through paracellular spaces, and is thus related to edema, jaundice, diarrhea and blood-borne metastasis. The latter function maintains cell polarity by forming a fence to prevent intermixing of molecules in the apical membrane with those in the lateral membrane. This function is deeply involved in cancer cell properties in terms of loss of cell polarity. Recently, two novel aspects of tight junctions have been reported. One is their involvement in signal transduction. The other is that fact that tight junctions are considered to be a crucial component of innate immunity. In addition, since some proteins comprising tight junctions work as receptors for viruses and extracellular stimuli, pathogenic bacteria and viruses target and affect the tight junction functions, leading to diseases. In this review, the relationship between tight junctions and human diseases will be described. PMID:23356220

  14. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  15. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies. PMID:14997440

  16. New Phenomena in Josephson SINIS Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    We analyze the dc and ac Josephson effects in SaINISb junctions in which an additional bias current flows in the N layer. The case of low temperatures and voltages \\(eV, T<<Δ\\) is considered in the dirty limit. We show that the critical Josephson current may change sign, and the considered SINIS junction may become a π junction if the voltage drop across the N/Sa interface exceeds a certain value \\(eVN>Δ/2\\). The ac Josephson effect may arise even if the current flows only through the N/Sa interface, whereas the current through the Sb/N interface is absent.

  17. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  18. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  19. Grand Junction Resource Area, Resource Management Plan, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    Implementation of a resource management plan is proposed for the 2.0-million-acre Grand Junction Planning Area, located in west-central Colorado. Under the preferred alternative, existing withdrawals from mineral location on 124,442 acres would continue and an additional 154,067 acres would be withdrawn. Approximately 14,100 acres would be identified as unsuitable for further coal leasing. Approximately 624,701 acres would be open to oil and gas leasing without stipulations; 685,603 acres would be open to oil and gas leasing with stipulations; and 149,087 acres would be closed to oil and gas leasing. Air quality enhancement, soil stabilization, and watershed protection would be emphasized. Habitats of major wildlife species and of threatened and endangered plants and animals would be actively managed, but no new livestock management actions would be implemented. The wild horse herd would be allowed to expand from 65 to 120 animals. Paleontological sites and 11,685 archaeological sites would be protected. Approximately 1319 acres of commercial forest land would be identified as suitable for management, and 2800 cords of fuel wood would be offered for sale annually. The three existing developed recreation sites would be maintained, and the Mud Springs site would be expanded to accommodate more group use.

  20. Bioavailability and Efficacy of a Gap Junction Enhancer (PQ7) in a Mouse Mammary Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Stephanie N.; Prasain, Keshar; Beck, Amanda; Nguyen, Thi D. T.; Hua, Duy H.; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2013-01-01

    The loss of gap junctional intercellular communication is characteristic of neoplastic cells, suggesting that the restoration with a gap junction enhancer may be a new therapeutic treatment option with less detrimental effects than traditional antineoplastic drugs. A gap junction enhancer, 6-methoxy-8-[(2-furanylmethyl) amino]-4-methyl-5-(3-trifluoromethylphenyloxy) quinoline (PQ7), on the normal tissue was evaluated in healthy C57BL/6J mice in a systemic drug distribution study. Immunoblot analysis of the vital organs indicates a reduction in Cx43 expression in PQ7-treated animals with no observable change in morphology. Next the transgenic strain FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyVT) 634Mul/J (also known as PyVT) was used as a spontaneous mammary tumor mouse model to determine the biological and histological effects of PQ7 on tumorigenesis and metastasis at three stages of development: Pre tumor, Early tumor, and Late tumor formation. PQ7 was assessed to have a low toxicity through intraperitoneal administration, with the majority of the compound being detected in the heart, liver, and lungs six hours post injection. The treatment of tumor bearing animals with PQ7 had a 98% reduction in tumor growth, while also decreasing the total tumor burden compared to control mice during the Pre stage of development. PQ7 treatment increased Cx43 expression in the neoplastic tissue during Pre-tumor formation; however, this effect was not observed in Late stage tumor formation. This study shows that the gap junction enhancer, PQ7, has low toxicity to normal tissue in healthy C57BL/6J mice, while having clinical efficacy in the treatment of spontaneous mammary tumors of PyVT mice. Additionally, gap junctional intercellular communication and neoplastic cellular growth are shown to be inversely related, while treatment with PQ7 inhibits tumor growth through targeting gap junction expression. PMID:23776708

  1. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  2. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  3. Ferromagnetic planar Josephson junction with transparent interfaces: a φ junction proposal.

    PubMed

    Heim, D M; Pugach, N G; Kupriyanov, M Yu; Goldobin, E; Koelle, D; Kleiner, R

    2013-05-29

    We calculate the current-phase relation of a planar Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic weak link located on top of a thin normal metal film. Following experimental observations we assume transparent superconductor-ferromagnet interfaces. This provides the best interlayer coupling and a low suppression of the superconducting correlations penetrating from the superconducting electrodes into the ferromagnetic layer. We show that this Josephson junction is a promising candidate for experimental φ junction realization. PMID:23636963

  4. Local Frame Junction Trees in SLAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, Frank O.

    2005-11-01

    Junction trees (JT) is a general purpose tool for exact inference on graphical models. Many of the existing algorithms for building junction trees require a fixed static graphical model. The construction process is not unique, finding the one with the best computational structure (smallest clique size) is also a hard problem. For large scale inference problems, such as Geo-referencing using triangular geodetic networks or equivalent, the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem in robotics pose some challenges to junction tree applications. Incremental junction tree techniques for dynamic graphical models prescribe heuristic methods for growing the tree structure, and are applicable to large scale graphical models. Of concern are the proliferative widening of the tree, which makes message passing expensive. In the context of SLAM we present a new apporach that exploits the local frame dependence of novel observation variables.

  5. Splice junctions are constrained by protein disorder

    PubMed Central

    Smithers, Ben; Oates, Matt E.; Gough, Julian

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered that positions of splice junctions in genes are constrained by the tolerance for disorder-promoting amino acids in the translated protein region. It is known that efficient splicing requires nucleotide bias at the splice junction; the preferred usage produces a distribution of amino acids that is disorder-promoting. We observe that efficiency of splicing, as seen in the amino-acid distribution, is not compromised to accommodate globular structure. Thus we infer that it is the positions of splice junctions in the gene that must be under constraint by the local protein environment. Examining exonic splicing enhancers found near the splice junction in the gene, reveals that these (short DNA motifs) are more prevalent in exons that encode disordered protein regions than exons encoding structured regions. Thus we also conclude that local protein features constrain efficient splicing more in structure than in disorder. PMID:25934802

  6. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  7. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-01

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a ?-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  8. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  9. Degradation of connexins and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Matthias M.; Kells, Rachael M.; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin proteins are short-lived within the cell, whether present in the secretory pathway or in gap junction plaques. Their levels can be modulated by their rate of degradation. Connexins, at different stages of assembly, are degraded through the proteasomal, endo-/lysosomal, and phago-/lysosomal pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about connexin and gap junction degradation including the signals and protein-protein interactions that participate in their targeting for degradation. PMID:24486527

  10. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  11. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  12. Junctional complexes in the preimplantation rabbit embryo.

    PubMed

    Hastings, R A; Enders, A C

    1975-01-01

    The morphology and development of junctional complexes between blastomeres of the preimplantation rabbit embryo were investigated using several approaches. Electron microscopic examination of embryos stained en bloc with uranyl acetate, and the study of junction permeability using horseradish peroxidase and lanthanum nitrate provided information on structure, intermembrane spacing and permeability of the junctional complexes. In addition, the freeze fracture technique was used with day 5 and day 6 blastocysts, since the large size of these embryos facilitated use of this method. These experiments showed that although rudimentary junctions were present between blastomeres of the early cleavage stages, effective tight junctions were not present until the blastocyst stage. Electron microscopic examination of thin sections revealed apical foci of membrane approximation or "fusion" between trophoblast cells by day 4. Freeze fracturing revealed a lattice of interconnecting ridges (on the A face) and grooves (on the B face) in the apical region between trophoblast cells of the day 5 blastocyst. This lattice formed a continuous band along the apical margin of each cell, and therefore constituted a zonula occludens. The zonula occludens of the day 5 blastocyst averages 2-3 ridges per lattice, while day 6 blastocysts had lattices that averaged 5-6 ridges. Also seen in the freeze fracture replicas from the day 5 and day 6 blastocysts were local accumulations of intramembranous particles on the A face. These particles were often observed in aggregates similar to those of previously described gap junctions. It could not be determined whether these small regions of particles were true gap junctions or a possible primitive form of gap junction because the complementary pitted surfaces (B face pits) were not demonstrated. PMID:45878

  13. Photovoltaic device having an extended PN junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Aiello, Robert Vincent (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A photovoltaic device having essentially only a body of semiconductor material having a first region of one conductivity type in contact with a second region of the opposite conductivity type, forming a portion of the device PN junction therebetween. A plurality of pocket regions of the same conductivity type as the first region extend into the second region thereby further defining a portion of the PN junction in the second region.

  14. Tunnel junctions with multiferroic barriers.

    PubMed

    Gajek, Martin; Bibes, Manuel; Fusil, Stéphane; Bouzehouane, Karim; Fontcuberta, Josep; Barthélémy, Agnès; Fert, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Multiferroics are singular materials that can exhibit simultaneously electric and magnetic orders. Some are ferroelectric and ferromagnetic and provide the opportunity to encode information in electric polarization and magnetization to obtain four logic states. However, such materials are rare and schemes allowing a simple electrical readout of these states have not been demonstrated in the same device. Here, we show that films of La(0.1)Bi(0.9)MnO(3) (LBMO) are ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, and retain both ferroic properties down to a thickness of 2 nm. We have integrated such ultrathin multiferroic films as barriers in spin-filter-type tunnel junctions that exploit the magnetic and ferroelectric degrees of freedom of LBMO. Whereas ferromagnetism permits read operations reminiscent of magnetic random access memories (MRAM), the electrical switching evokes a ferroelectric RAM write operation. Significantly, our device does not require the destructive ferroelectric readout, and therefore represents an advance over the original four-state memory concept based on multiferroics. PMID:17351615

  15. Tight Junctions in Salivary Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial cell tight junctions (TJs) consist of a narrow belt-like structure in the apical region of the lateral plasma membrane that circumferentially binds each cell to its neighbor. TJs are found in tissues that are involved in polarized secretions, absorption functions, and maintaining barriers between blood and interstitial fluids. The morphology, permeability, and ion selectivity of TJ vary among different types of tissues and species. TJs are very dynamic structures that assemble, grow, reorganize, and disassemble during physiological or pathological events. Several studies have indicated the active role of TJ in intestinal, renal, and airway epithelial function; however, the functional significance of TJ in salivary gland epithelium is poorly understood. Interactions between different combinations of the TJ family (each with their own unique regulatory proteins) define tissue specificity and functions during physiopathological processes; however, these interaction patterns have not been studied in salivary glands. The purpose of this review is to analyze some of the current data regarding the regulatory components of the TJ that could potentially affect cellular functions of the salivary epithelium. PMID:20182541

  16. Josephson-junction qubits: entanglement and coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. R.; Berkley, A. J.; Dragt, A. J.; Gubrud, M. A.; Johnson, P. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Ramos, R. C.; Strauch, F. W.; Wellstood, F. C.; Xu, H.

    2002-12-01

    We review briefly the problems that are driving the search for a quantum computer. These include, primarily, methods for encryption and decryption based on Shor's algorithm for factoring large integers and the use of Pell's equation for encryption. We also outline some of the approaches that have been suggested for implementing a quantum computer and then focus on Josephson-junction systems as qubits. We have been investigating the current-biased Josephson junction for this application, a suggestion we made about 2 years ago. We have studied macroscopic quantum tunneling and energy level spectroscopy, using microwaves, in single junctions and recently we have begun measurements of the two-quantum bit (qubit) system, i.e. two capacitively coupled junctions. Theoretical studies of energy levels and their dynamic evolution are also in progress. In the present report we discuss the basics of single Josephson junctions and compare their potential as qubits with the potentials of other systems. We also discuss our future plans to obtain greater isolation of the junctions from sources of decoherence and to develop realistic qubits. An important first step must be to exhibit quantum entanglement and measure coherence times. Then it must be shown that the states of the qubits can be initialized, that gate operations can be performed, and that the results can be read out.

  17. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  18. Epidermal tight junctions in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandner, JM; Zorn-Kruppa, M; Yoshida, T; Moll, I; Beck, LA; De Benedetto, A

    2014-01-01

    The skin, the largest organ of the body, is an essential barrier that under homeostatic conditions efficiently protects and/or minimizes damage from both environmental (e.g. microorganisms, physical trauma, ultraviolet radiation) and endogenous (e.g., cancers, inflammation) factors. This formidable barrier function resides mainly in the epidermis, a dynamic, highly-stratified epithelium. The epidermis has 2 major barrier structures: stratum corneum, the outmost layer and tight junctions, intercellular junctions that seal adjacent keratinocytes in the stratum granulosum, found below the stratum corneum. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of tight junction function, composition and regulation. Herein we review what is known about tight junctions in healthy skin and keratinocyte culture systems and highlight the dynamic crosstalk observed between tight junctions and the cutaneous immune system. Finally we discuss the preliminary observations suggesting that tight junction function or protein expression may be relevant for the pathogenesis of a number of common cutaneous inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. PMID:25838981

  19. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise. PMID:23134759

  20. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trees, B. R.; Dissanayake, S. T. M.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of a ladder array of overdamped Josephson junctions with periodic boundary conditions. The junctions have critical current and resistive disorder, are current biased above the critical current, and their voltages oscillate with nonidentical bare frequencies. We have been interested in the onset of synchronization in the rung junctions of the ladder, in which nearest neighbor interactions of strength α renormalize the bare frequencies to a common value. The degree of synchronization of the array is measured by an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of α and the spread of bare frequencies. For a given frequency spread, a synchronization phase transition is clearly visible with an increase in α. We have also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction equations can be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of values of α and also demonstrate that the relationship between the array size, N, and the critical coupling strength for the onset of synchronization scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  1. Structure-Property Relationships in Atomic-Scale Junctions: Histograms and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Hybertsen, Mark S; Venkataraman, Latha

    2016-03-15

    Over the past 10 years, there has been tremendous progress in the measurement, modeling and understanding of structure-function relationships in single molecule junctions. Numerous research groups have addressed significant scientific questions, directed both to conductance phenomena at the single molecule level and to the fundamental chemistry that controls junction functionality. Many different functionalities have been demonstrated, including single-molecule diodes, optically and mechanically activated switches, and, significantly, physical phenomena with no classical analogues, such as those based on quantum interference effects. Experimental techniques for reliable and reproducible single molecule junction formation and characterization have led to this progress. In particular, the scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction (STM-BJ) technique has enabled rapid, sequential measurement of large numbers of nanoscale junctions allowing a statistical analysis to readily distinguish reproducible characteristics. Harnessing fundamental link chemistry has provided the necessary chemical control over junction formation, enabling measurements that revealed clear relationships between molecular structure and conductance characteristics. Such link groups (amines, methylsuflides, pyridines, etc.) maintain a stable lone pair configuration that selectively bonds to specific, undercoordinated transition metal atoms available following rupture of a metal point contact in the STM-BJ experiments. This basic chemical principle rationalizes the observation of highly reproducible conductance signatures. Subsequently, the method has been extended to probe a variety of physical phenomena ranging from basic I-V characteristics to more complex properties such as thermopower and electrochemical response. By adapting the technique to a conducting cantilever atomic force microscope (AFM-BJ), simultaneous measurement of the mechanical characteristics of nanoscale junctions as they are pulled apart has given complementary information such as the stiffness and rupture force of the molecule-metal link bond. Overall, while the BJ technique does not produce a single molecule circuit for practical applications, it has proved remarkably versatile for fundamental studies. Measured data and analysis have been combined with atomic-scale theory and calculations, typically performed for representative junction structures, to provide fundamental physical understanding of structure-function relationships. This Account integrates across an extensive series of our specific nanoscale junction studies which were carried out with the STM- and AFM-BJ techniques and supported by theoretical analysis and density functional theory based calculations, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of the measurement process and the rich data sets that emerge. Several examples illustrate the impact of measured trends based on the most probable values for key characteristics (obtained from ensembles of order 1000-10 000 individual junctions) to build a solid picture of conductance phenomena as well as attributes of the link bond chemistry. The key forward-looking question posed here is the extent to which the full data sets represented by the individual trajectories can be analyzed to address structure-function questions at the level of individual junctions. Initial progress toward physical modeling of conductance of individual junctions indicates trends consistent with physical junction structures. Analysis of junction mechanics reveals a scaling procedure that collapses existing data onto a universal force-extension curve. This research directed to understanding the distribution of structures and physical characteristics addresses fundamental questions concerning the interplay between chemical control and stochastically driven diversity. PMID:26938931

  2. E-cadherin is essential for in vivo epidermal barrier function by regulating tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Tunggal, Judith A; Helfrich, Iris; Schmitz, Annika; Schwarz, Heinz; Günzel, Dorothee; Fromm, Michael; Kemler, Rolf; Krieg, Thomas; Niessen, Carien M

    2005-03-23

    Cadherin adhesion molecules are key determinants of morphogenesis and tissue architecture. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the morphogenetic contributions of cadherins remain poorly understood in vivo. Besides supporting cell-cell adhesion, cadherins can affect a wide range of cellular functions that include activation of cell signalling pathways, regulation of the cytoskeleton and control of cell polarity. To determine the role of E-cadherin in stratified epithelium of the epidermis, we have conditionally inactivated its gene in mice. Here we show that loss of E-cadherin in the epidermis in vivo results in perinatal death of mice due to the inability to retain a functional epidermal water barrier. Absence of E-cadherin leads to improper localization of key tight junctional proteins, resulting in permeable tight junctions and thus altered epidermal resistance. In addition, both Rac and activated atypical PKC, crucial for tight junction formation, are mislocalized. Surprisingly, our results indicate that E-cadherin is specifically required for tight junction, but not desmosome, formation and this appears to involve signalling rather than cell contact formation. PMID:15775979

  3. Cosmic string Y-junctions: A comparison between field theoretic and Nambu-Goto dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bevis, Neil; Saffin, Paul M.

    2008-07-15

    We explore the formation of cosmic string Y-junctions when strings of two different types collide, which has recently become important since string theory can yield cosmic strings of distinct types. Using a model containing two types of local U(1) string and stable composites, we simulate the collision of two straight strings and investigate whether the dynamics matches that previously obtained using the Nambu-Goto action, which is not strictly valid close to the junction. We find that the Nambu-Goto action performs only moderately well at predicting when the collision results in the formation of a pair of Y-junctions (with a composite string connecting them). However, we find that when they do form, the late-time dynamics matches those of the Nambu-Goto approximation very closely. We also see little radiative emission from the Y-junction system, which suggests that radiative decay due to bridge formation does not appear to be a means via which a cosmological network of such string would rapidly lose energy.

  4. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    PubMed

    Géraud, Cyrill; Evdokimov, Konstantin; Straub, Beate K; Peitsch, Wiebke K; Demory, Alexandra; Dörflinger, Yvette; Schledzewski, Kai; Schmieder, Astrid; Schemmer, Peter; Augustin, Hellmut G; Schirmacher, Peter; Goerdt, Sergij

    2012-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ), i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ) transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis. PMID:22509281

  5. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the “red complex” species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the “red complex.” In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection. PMID:26305580

  6. MODULATION OF N-CADHERIN JUNCTIONS AND THEIR ROLE AS EPICENTERS OF DIFFERENTIATION-SPECIFIC ACTIN REGULATION IN THE DEVELOPING LENS

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michelle; Zhang, Liping; Zhai, Ni; Cader, Ahmad; Chan, Yim; Nowak, Roberta B.; Fowler, Velia M.; Menko, A. Sue

    2010-01-01

    Extensive elongation of lens fiber cells is a central feature of lens morphogenesis. Our study investigates the role of N-cadherin junctions in this process in vivo. We investigate both the molecular players involved in N-cadherin junctional maturation and the subsequent function of these junctions as epicenters for the assembly of an actin cytoskeleton that drives morphogenesis. We present the first evidence of nascent cadherin junctions in vivo, and show they are a prominent feature along lateral interfaces of undifferentiated lens epithelial cells. Maturation of these N-cadherin junctions, required for lens cell differentiation, preceded organization of a cortical actin cytoskeleton along the cells’ lateral borders, but was linked to recruitment of α-catenin and dephosphorylation of N-cadherin-linked β-catenin. Biochemical analysis revealed differentiation-specific recruitment of actin regulators cortactin and Arp3 to maturing N-cadherin junctions of differentiating cells, linking N-cadherin junctional maturation with actin cytoskeletal assembly during fiber cell elongation. Blocking formation of mature N-cadherin junctions led to reduced association of α-catenin with N-cadherin, prevented organization of actin along lateral borders of differentiating lens fiber cells and blocked their elongation. These studies provide a molecular link between N-cadherin junctions and the organization of an actin cytoskeleton that governs lens fiber cell morphogenesis in vivo. PMID:20969840

  7. Upregulation and maintenance of gap junctional communication in lens cells.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Bruce A; Le, Anh-Chi N; Musil, Linda S

    2009-05-01

    The cells of the lens are joined by an extensive network of gap junction intercellular channels consisting of connexins 43, 46, and 50. We have proposed, and experimentally supported, the hypothesis that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is required for upregulation of gap junction-mediated intercellular coupling (GJIC) at the lens equator. The ability of FGF to increase GJIC in cultured lens cells requires sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In other cell types, activation of ERK has been shown to block GJIC mediated by connexin43 (Cx43). Why ERK signaling does not block lens cell coupling is not known. Another unresolved issue in lens gap junction regulation is how connexins, synthesized before the loss of biosynthetic organelles in mature lens fiber cells, avoid degradation during formation of the organelle-free zone. We have addressed these questions using serum-free cultures (termed DCDMLs) of primary embryonic chick lens epithelial cells. We show that FGF stimulates ERK in DCDMLs via the canonical Ras/Raf1 pathway, and that the reason that neither basal nor growth factor-stimulated GJIC is blocked by activation of ERK is because it is not mediated by Cx43. In fibroblastic cells, the normally rapid rate of degradation of Cx43 after its transport to the plasma membrane is reduced by treatments that either directly (ALLN; epoxomicin) or indirectly (generation of oxidatively un/mis-folded proteins by arsenic compounds) prevent the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) from acting on its normal substrates. We show here that Cx45.6 and Cx56, the chick orthologs of mammalian Cx50 and Cx46, behave similarly in DCDMLs. When organelles lyse during the maturation of fiber cells, they release into the cytosol a large amount of new proteins that have the potential to saturate the capacity, and/or compromise the function, of the UPS. This would serve to spare gap junctions from degradation during formation of the organelle-free zone, thereby preserving GJIC between mature fiber cells despite the lack of de novo connexin synthesis. PMID:19103198

  8. A study on NiGe-contacted Ge n+/p Ge shallow junction prepared by dopant segregation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Bing-Yue; Shih, Jhe-Ju; Lin, Han-Chi; Lin, Chiung-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the effect of dopant segregation on the NiGe/n-Ge contact is studied by experiments and first-principles calculations. Both Al-contacted and NiGe-contacted n+/p junctions were fabricated. Phosphorus and arsenic ions were Implanted Before Germanide (IBG) formation or Implanted After Germanide (IAG) formation. The NiGe-contacted junction always exhibit higher forward current than the Al-contacted junction due to dopant segregation. First principles calculations predict that phosphorus atoms tend to segregate on both NiGe side and Ge side while arsenic atoms tend to segregate at Ge side. Since phosphorus has higher activation level and lower diffusion coefficient than arsenic, we propose a phosphorus IBG + arsenic IAG process. Shallow n+/p junction with junction depth 90 nm below the NiGe/Ge interface is achieved. The lowest and average contact resistivity is 2 × 10-6 Ω cm2 and 6.7 × 10-6 Ω cm2, respectively. Methods which can further reduce the junction depth and contact resistivity are suggested.

  9. MicroRNA-205 Targets Tight Junction-related Proteins during Urothelial Cellular Differentiation *

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Pei-Jung Katy; Chi, Lang-Ming; Chen, Chien-Lun; Liang, Chih-Lung; Lin, Chung-Tzu; Chang, Yu-Xun; Chen, Chun-Hsien; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian bladder urothelium classified as basal, intermediate, and terminally differentiated umbrella cells offers one of the most effective permeability barrier functions known to exist in nature because of the formation of apical uroplakin plaques and tight junctions. To improve our understanding of urothelial differentiation, we analyzed the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of mouse urinary tissues and by TaqMan miRNA analysis of microdissected urothelial layers and in situ miRNA-specific hybridization to determine the dependence of these miRNAs on the differentiation stage. Our in situ hybridization studies revealed that miR-205 was enriched in the undifferentiated basal and intermediate cell layers. We then used a quantitative proteomics approach to identify miR-205 target genes in primary cultured urothelial cells subjected to antagomir-mediated knockdown of specific miRNAs. Twenty-four genes were reproducibly regulated by miR-205; eleven of them were annotated as cell junction- and tight junction-related molecules. Western blot analysis demonstrated that antagomir-induced silencing of miR-205 in primary cultured urothelial cells elevated the expression levels of Tjp1, Cgnl1, and Cdc42. Ectopic expression of miR-205 in MDCK cells inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins and the formation of tight junctions. miR-205- knockdown urothelial cells showed alterations in keratin synthesis and increases of uroplakin Ia and Ib, which are the urothelial differentiation products. These results suggest that miR-205 may contribute a role in regulation of urothelial differentiation by modulating the expression of tight junction-related molecules. PMID:24912853

  10. Cell-junctional and cytoskeletal organization in mouse blastocysts lacking E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Ohsugi, M; Larue, L; Schwarz, H; Kemler, R

    1997-05-15

    Trophectoderm epithelium formation, the first visible differentiation process during mouse embryonic development, is affected in embryos lacking the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Here we analyze the developmental potential of such E-cadherin-negative embryos, focusing on the organization of cell junctions and the cytoskeleton. To do this we used antibodies directed against alpha-, beta-, or gamma-(plakoglobin)-catenin and junctional and cytoskeletal proteins including ZO-1 and occludin (tight junctions), desmoglein1 (desmosomes), connexin43 (gap junctions), and EndoA (cytokeratin intermediate filaments). Membrane localization of alpha- and beta-catenin, and ZO-1, as well as cortical actin filament organization were abnormal in E-cadherin-negative embryos, and the expression levels of alpha- and beta-catenin were dramatically reduced, all suggesting a regulatory role for E-cadherin in forming the cadherin-catenin complex. In contrast, the membrane localization of plakoglobin, occludin, desmoglein1, connexin43, and cytokeratin filaments appeared unaltered. The unusual morphogenesis in E-cadherin-negative embryos apparently reflects defects in the molecular architecture of a supermolecular assembly involving zonulae adherens, tight junctions, and cortical actin filament organization, although the individual structures still appeared normal in electron microscopical analysis. PMID:9187087

  11. Quantum decay of the supercurrent and intrinsic capacitance of Josephson junctions beyond the tunnel limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, Daniil S.; Skvortsov, Mikhail A.

    2015-12-01

    A nondissipative supercurrent state of a Josephson junction is metastable with respect to the formation of a finite-resistance state. This transition is driven by fluctuations, thermal at high temperatures and quantum at low temperatures. We evaluate the lifetime of such a state due to quantum fluctuations in the limit when the supercurrent is approaching the critical current. The decay probability is determined by the instanton action for the superconducting phase difference across the junction. At low temperatures, the dynamics of the phase is massive and is determined by the effective capacitance, which is a sum of the geometric and intrinsic capacitance of the junction. We model the central part of the Josephson junction either by an arbitrary short mesoscopic conductor described by the set of its transmission coefficients, or by a diffusive wire of an arbitrary length. The intrinsic capacitance can generally be estimated as C*˜G /Eg , where G is the normal-state conductance of the junction and Eg is the proximity minigap in its normal part. The obtained capacitance is sufficiently large to qualitatively explain the hysteretic behavior of the current-voltage characteristic even in the absence of overheating.

  12. Precursor configurations and post-rupture evolution of Ag-CO-Ag single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Zoltán; Visontai, Dávid; Makk, Péter; Gillemot, Katalin; Oroszlány, László; Pósa, László; Lambert, Colin; Halbritter, András

    2014-11-01

    Experimental correlation analysis and first-principles theory are used to probe the structure and evolution of Ag-CO-Ag single-molecule junctions both before the formation and after the rupture of the junctions. Two dimensional correlation histograms and conditional histograms demonstrate that prior to the single-molecule bridge configuration the CO molecule is already bound parallel to the Ag single-atom contact. This molecular precursor configuration is accompanied by the opening of additional conductance channels compared to the single-channel transport in pure Ag monoatomic junctions. To investigate the post-rupture evolution of the junction we introduce a cross-correlation analysis between the opening and the subsequent closing conductance traces. This analysis implies that the molecule is bound rigidly to the apex of one electrode, and so the same single-molecule configuration is re-established as the junction is closed. The experimental results are confirmed by ab initio simulations of the evolution of contact geometries, transmission eigenvalues and scattering wavefunctions.

  13. Musical molecules: the molecular junction as an active component in audio distortion circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergren, Adam Johan; Zeer-Wanklyn, Lucas; Semple, Mitchell; Pekas, Nikola; Szeto, Bryan; McCreery, Richard L.

    2016-03-01

    Molecular junctions that have a non-linear current-voltage characteristic consistent with quantum mechanical tunneling are demonstrated as analog audio clipping elements in overdrive circuits widely used in electronic music, particularly with electric guitars. The performance of large-area molecular junctions fabricated at the wafer level is compared to currently standard semiconductor diode clippers, showing a difference in the sound character. The harmonic distributions resulting from the use of traditional and molecular clipping elements are reported and discussed, and differences in performance are noted that result from the underlying physics that controls the electronic properties of each clipping component. In addition, the ability to tune the sound using the molecular junction is demonstrated. Finally, the hybrid circuit is compared to an overdriven tube amplifier, which has been the standard reference electric guitar clipped tone for over 60 years. In order to investigate the feasibility of manufacturing molecular junctions for use in commercial applications, devices are fabricated using a low-density format at the wafer level, where 38 dies per wafer, each containing two molecular junctions, are made with exceptional non-shorted yield (99.4%, representing 718 out of 722 tested devices) without requiring clean room facilities.

  14. Quadruple-junction lattice coherency and phase separation in a binary-phase system

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sung-Yoon; Choi, Si-Young; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    If each phase has an identical crystal structure and small misfit in the lattice parameters in a binary-phase crystalline system, coherent phase boundaries usually form during separation. Although there have been numerous studies on the effect of coherency elastic energy, no attempt has been made to demonstrate how the phase-separation behaviour varies when multiple interfaces meet at a junction. Here we show that a comprehensively different phase-separation morphology is induced, to release the high coherency strain confined to quadruple junctions. High-temperature in-situ transmission electron microscopy reveals that phase boundaries with a new crystallographic orientation emerge over twinned crystals to provide strain relaxation at quadruple junctions. The high coherency strain and the formation of different phase boundaries can be understood in terms of the force equilibrium between interface tensions at a junction point. Visualizing the quadruple points at atomic resolution, our observations emphasize the impact of multiple junctions on the morphology evolution during phase separation. PMID:26346223

  15. Proteomic mapping of ER-PM junctions identifies STIMATE as a regulator of Ca? influx.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ji; He, Lian; Sun, Aomin; Quintana, Ariel; Ding, Yuehe; Ma, Guolin; Tan, Peng; Liang, Xiaowen; Zheng, Xiaolu; Chen, Liangyi; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Shenyuan L; Zhong, Ling; Huang, Yun; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Walker, Cheryl L; Hogan, Patrick G; Wang, Youjun; Zhou, Yubin

    2015-10-01

    Specialized junctional sites that connect the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) play critical roles in controlling lipid metabolism and Ca(2+) signalling. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry mediated by dynamic STIM1-ORAI1 coupling represents a classical molecular event occurring at ER-PM junctions, but the protein composition and how previously unrecognized protein regulators facilitate this process remain ill-defined. Using a combination of spatially restricted biotin labelling in situ coupled with mass spectrometry and a secondary screen based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we mapped the proteome of intact ER-PM junctions in living cells without disrupting their architectural integrity. Our approaches led to the discovery of an ER-resident multi-transmembrane protein that we call STIMATE (STIM-activating enhancer, encoded by TMEM110) as a positive regulator of Ca(2+) influx in vertebrates. STIMATE physically interacts with STIM1 to promote STIM1 conformational switch. Genetic depletion of STIMATE substantially reduces STIM1 puncta formation at ER-PM junctions and suppresses the Ca(2+)-NFAT signalling. Our findings enable further genetic studies to elucidate the function of STIMATE in normal physiology and disease, and set the stage to uncover more uncharted functions of hitherto underexplored ER-PM junctions. PMID:26322679

  16. Si Radial p-i-n Junction Photovoltaic Arrays with Built-In Light Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Campbell, Ian H; Dayeh, Shadi A; Schuele, Paul; Evans, David; Picraux, S Tom

    2015-05-26

    High-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices require strong light absorption, low reflection and efficient photogenerated carrier collection for high quantum efficiency. Previous optical studies of vertical wires arrays have revealed that extremely efficient light absorption in the visible wavelengths is achievable. Photovoltaic studies have further advanced the wire approach by employing radial p-n junction architectures to achieve more efficient carrier collection. While radial p-n junction formation and optimized light absorption have independently been considered, PV efficiencies have further opportunities for enhancement by exploiting the radial p-n junction fabrication procedures to form arrays that simultaneously enhance both light absorption and carrier collection efficiency. Here we report a concept of morphology control to improve PV performance, light absorption and quantum efficiency of silicon radial p-i-n junction arrays. Surface energy minimization during vapor phase epitaxy is exploited to form match-head structures at the tips of the wires. The match-head structure acts as a built-in light concentrator and enhances optical absorptance and external quantum efficiencies by 30 to 40%, and PV efficiency under AM 1.5G illumination by 20% compared to cylindrical structures without match-heads. The design rules for these improvements with match-head arrays are systematically studied. This approach of process-enhanced control of three-dimensional Si morphologies provides a fab-compatible way to enhance the PV performance of Si radial p-n junction wire arrays. PMID:25961330

  17. Precursor configurations and post-rupture evolution of Ag-CO-Ag single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Zoltán; Visontai, Dávid; Makk, Péter; Gillemot, Katalin; Oroszlány, László; Pósa, László; Lambert, Colin; Halbritter, András

    2014-12-21

    Experimental correlation analysis and first-principles theory are used to probe the structure and evolution of Ag-CO-Ag single-molecule junctions both before the formation and after the rupture of the junctions. Two dimensional correlation histograms and conditional histograms demonstrate that prior to the single-molecule bridge configuration the CO molecule is already bound parallel to the Ag single-atom contact. This molecular precursor configuration is accompanied by the opening of additional conductance channels compared to the single-channel transport in pure Ag monoatomic junctions. To investigate the post-rupture evolution of the junction we introduce a cross-correlation analysis between the opening and the subsequent closing conductance traces. This analysis implies that the molecule is bound rigidly to the apex of one electrode, and so the same single-molecule configuration is re-established as the junction is closed. The experimental results are confirmed by ab initio simulations of the evolution of contact geometries, transmission eigenvalues and scattering wavefunctions. PMID:25358380

  18. Highly Conducting pi-Conjugated Molecular Junctions Covalently Bonded to Gold Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Hybertsen, M.; Widawsky, J.R.; Vazquez, H.; Schneebeli, S.T.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-11-02

    We measure electronic conductance through single conjugated molecules bonded to Au metal electrodes with direct Au-C covalent bonds using the scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction technique. We start with molecules terminated with trimethyltin end groups that cleave off in situ, resulting in formation of a direct covalent {sigma} bond between the carbon backbone and the gold metal electrodes. The molecular carbon backbone used in this study consist of a conjugated {pi} system that has one terminal methylene group on each end, which bonds to the electrodes, achieving large electronic coupling of the electrodes to the {pi} system. The junctions formed with the prototypical example of 1,4-dimethylenebenzene show a conductance approaching one conductance quantum (G{sub 0} = 2e{sup 2}/h). Junctions formed with methylene-terminated oligophenyls with two to four phenyl units show a 100-fold increase in conductance compared with junctions formed with amine-linked oligophenyls. The conduction mechanism for these longer oligophenyls is tunneling, as they exhibit an exponential dependence of conductance on oligomer length. In addition, density functional theory based calculations for the Au-xylylene-Au junction show near-resonant transmission, with a crossover to tunneling for the longer oligomers.

  19. Photocurrent generation in lateral graphene p-n junction created by electron-beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuechao; Shen, Youde; Liu, Tao; Wu, Tao (Tom); Jie Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has been considered as an attractive material for optoelectronic applications such as photodetectors owing to its extraordinary properties, e.g. broadband absorption and ultrahigh mobility. However, challenges still remain in fundamental and practical aspects of the conventional graphene photodetectors which normally rely on the photoconductive mode of operation which has the drawback of e.g. high dark current. Here, we demonstrated the photovoltaic mode operation in graphene p-n junctions fabricated by a simple but effective electron irradiation method that induces n-type doping in intrinsic p-type graphene. The physical mechanism of the junction formation is owing to the substrate gating effect caused by electron irradiation. Photoresponse was obtained for this type of photodetector because the photoexcited electron-hole pairs can be separated in the graphene p-n junction by the built-in potential. The fabricated graphene p-n junction photodetectors exhibit a high detectivity up to ~3 × 1010 Jones (cm Hz1/2 W−1) at room temperature, which is on a par with that of the traditional III–V photodetectors. The demonstrated novel and simple scheme for obtaining graphene p-n junctions can be used for other optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and be applied to other two dimensional materials based devices. PMID:26152225

  20. Proteomic mapping of ER-PM junctions identifies STIMATE as regulator of Ca2+ influx

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ji; He, Lian; Sun, Aomin; Quintana, Ariel; Ding, Yuehe; Ma, Guolin; Tan, Peng; Liang, Xiaowen; Zheng, Xiaolu; Chen, Liangyi; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Shenyuan L.; Zhong, Ling; Huang, Yun; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Walker, Cheryl L.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Wang, Youjun; Zhou, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    Specialized junctional sites that connect the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) play critical roles in controlling lipid metabolism and Ca2+ signaling1–4. Store operated Ca2+ entry mediated by dynamic STIM1-ORAI1 coupling represents a classical molecular event occurring at ER-PM junctions, but the protein composition and how previously-unrecognized protein regulators facilitate this process remain ill-defined. Using a combination of spatially-restricted biotin-labelling in situ coupled with mass spectrometry5, 6 and a secondary screen based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation7, we mapped the proteome of intact ER-PM junctions in living cells without disrupting their architectural integrity. Our approaches lead to the discovery of an ER-resident multi-transmembrane protein that we call STIMATE (STIM-activating enhancer, encoded by TMEM110) as a positive regulator of Ca2+ influx in vertebrates. STIMATE physically interacts with STIM1 to promote STIM1 conformational switch. Genetic depletion of STIMATE substantially reduces STIM1 puncta formation at ER-PM junctions and suppresses the Ca2+-NFAT signaling. Our findings enable further genetic studies to elucidate the function of STIMATE in normal physiology and disease, and set the stage to uncover more uncharted functions of hitherto underexplored ER-PM junctions. PMID:26322679

  1. Musical molecules: the molecular junction as an active component in audio distortion circuits.

    PubMed

    Bergren, Adam Johan; Zeer-Wanklyn, Lucas; Semple, Mitchell; Pekas, Nikola; Szeto, Bryan; McCreery, Richard L

    2016-03-01

    Molecular junctions that have a non-linear current-voltage characteristic consistent with quantum mechanical tunneling are demonstrated as analog audio clipping elements in overdrive circuits widely used in electronic music, particularly with electric guitars. The performance of large-area molecular junctions fabricated at the wafer level is compared to currently standard semiconductor diode clippers, showing a difference in the sound character. The harmonic distributions resulting from the use of traditional and molecular clipping elements are reported and discussed, and differences in performance are noted that result from the underlying physics that controls the electronic properties of each clipping component. In addition, the ability to tune the sound using the molecular junction is demonstrated. Finally, the hybrid circuit is compared to an overdriven tube amplifier, which has been the standard reference electric guitar clipped tone for over 60 years. In order to investigate the feasibility of manufacturing molecular junctions for use in commercial applications, devices are fabricated using a low-density format at the wafer level, where 38 dies per wafer, each containing two molecular junctions, are made with exceptional non-shorted yield (99.4%, representing 718 out of 722 tested devices) without requiring clean room facilities. PMID:26871885

  2. Optimization of a tunneling barrier in magnetic tunneling junction by tilted-plasma oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, C.H.; Shim, Heejae; Kim, K.S.; Cho, B.K.

    2004-10-01

    Oxidation of an AlO{sub x} insulating barrier in a magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) was carried out by a tilted-plasma oxidation method. It was found that the tilted-plasma oxidation induced a gradual change in the extent of oxidation of an insulating layer, which consequently led to a gradual change in the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and specific junction resistance (RA) of the MTJ. We found a linear relation in the TMR versus RA curve with positive and negative slopes for less- and overoxidized junctions, respectively, and a parabolic relation for optimally oxidized junctions. The crossover in the TMR versus RA curves provides an effective and useful way to optimize (and monitor) the oxidation condition of a tunneling barrier in MTJs especially of a tunneling barrier less than 10 A thick. The tunneling junctions were also investigated after thermal annealing at various temperatures. The observations after thermal annealing were found to be consistent with transmission electrons microscopy images and a scenario of the partial formation of an additional ultrathin tunneling barrier at the top surface of the bottom magnetic layer.

  3. Correlation of interfacial bonding mechanism and equilibrium conductance of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhan-Yu; Qiao, Jing-Si; Ji, Wei; Guo, Hong

    2014-12-01

    We report theoretical investigations on the role of interfacial bonding mechanism and its resulting structures to quantum transport in molecular wires. Two bonding mechanisms for the Au-S bond in an Au(111)/1,4-benzenedithiol(BDT)/Au(111) junction were identified by ab initio calculation, confirmed by a recent experiment, which, we showed, critically control charge conduction. It was found, for Au/BDT/Aujunctions, the hydrogen atom, bound by a dative bond to the Sulfur, is energetically non-dissociativeafter the interface formation. The calculated conductance and junction breakdown forces of H-non-dissociative Au/BDT/Au devices are consistent with the experimental values, while the H-dissociated devices, with the interface governed by typical covalent bonding, give conductance more than an order of magnitude larger. By examining the scattering states that traverse the junctions, we have revealed that mechanical and electric properties of a junction have strong correlation with the bonding configuration. This work clearly demonstrates that the interfacial details, rather than previously believed many-body effects, is of vital importance for correctly predicting equilibrium conductance of molecular junctions; and manifests that the interfacial contact must be carefully understood for investigating quantum transport properties of molecular nanoelectronics.

  4. A Unique Role for Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain IIA in Regulation of Epithelial Apical Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I.; Bachar, Moshe; Babbin, Brian A.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    The integrity and function of the epithelial barrier is dependent on the apical junctional complex (AJC) composed of tight and adherens junctions and regulated by the underlying actin filaments. A major F-actin motor, myosin II, was previously implicated in regulation of the AJC, however direct evidence of the involvement of myosin II in AJC dynamics are lacking and the molecular identity of the myosin II motor that regulates formation and disassembly of apical junctions in mammalian epithelia is unknown. We investigated the role of nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) heavy chain isoforms, A, B, and C in regulation of epithelial AJC dynamics and function. Expression of the three NMMII isoforms was observed in model intestinal epithelial cell lines, where all isoforms accumulated within the perijunctional F-actin belt. siRNA-mediated downregulation of NMMIIA, but not NMMIIB or NMMIIC expression in SK-CO15 colonic epithelial cells resulted in profound changes of cell morphology and cell-cell adhesions. These changes included acquisition of a fibroblast-like cell shape, defective paracellular barrier, and substantial attenuation of the assembly and disassembly of both adherens and tight junctions. Impaired assembly of the AJC observed after NMMIIA knock-down involved dramatic disorganization of perijunctional actin filaments. These findings provide the first direct non-pharmacological evidence of myosin II-dependent regulation of AJC dynamics in mammalian epithelia and highlight a unique role of NMMIIA in junctional biogenesis. PMID:17668046

  5. Photocurrent generation in lateral graphene p-n junction created by electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xuechao; Shen, Youde; Liu, Tao; Wu, Tao (Tom); Jie Wang, Qi

    2015-07-01

    Graphene has been considered as an attractive material for optoelectronic applications such as photodetectors owing to its extraordinary properties, e.g. broadband absorption and ultrahigh mobility. However, challenges still remain in fundamental and practical aspects of the conventional graphene photodetectors which normally rely on the photoconductive mode of operation which has the drawback of e.g. high dark current. Here, we demonstrated the photovoltaic mode operation in graphene p-n junctions fabricated by a simple but effective electron irradiation method that induces n-type doping in intrinsic p-type graphene. The physical mechanism of the junction formation is owing to the substrate gating effect caused by electron irradiation. Photoresponse was obtained for this type of photodetector because the photoexcited electron-hole pairs can be separated in the graphene p-n junction by the built-in potential. The fabricated graphene p-n junction photodetectors exhibit a high detectivity up to ~3 × 1010 Jones (cm Hz1/2 W-1) at room temperature, which is on a par with that of the traditional III-V photodetectors. The demonstrated novel and simple scheme for obtaining graphene p-n junctions can be used for other optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and be applied to other two dimensional materials based devices.

  6. Tailoring the vapor-liquid-solid growth toward the self-assembly of GaAs nanowire junctions.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xing; Dayeh, Shadi A; Veeramuthu, Vaithianathan; Larrue, Alexandre; Wang, Jian; Su, Haibin; Soci, Cesare

    2011-11-01

    New insights into understanding and controlling the intriguing phenomena of spontaneous merging (kissing) and the self-assembly of monolithic Y- and T-junctions is demonstrated in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth of GaAs nanowires. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy for determining polar facets was coupled to electrostatic-mechanical modeling and position-controlled synthesis to identify nanowire diameter, length, and pitch, leading to junction formation. When nanowire patterns are designed so that the electrostatic energy resulting from the interaction of polar surfaces exceeds the mechanical energy required to bend the nanowires to the point of contact, their fusion can lead to the self-assembly of monolithic junctions. Understanding and controlling this phenomenon is a great asset for the realization of dense arrays of vertical nanowire devices and opens up new ways toward the large scale integration of nanowire quantum junctions or nanowire intracellular probes. PMID:21967168

  7. Tailoring the vapor-liquid-solid growth toward the self-assembly of GaAs nanowire junctions.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Dai X; Dayeh SA; Veeramuthu V; Larrue A; Wang J; Su H; Soci C

    2011-11-09

    New insights into understanding and controlling the intriguing phenomena of spontaneous merging (kissing) and the self-assembly of monolithic Y- and T-junctions is demonstrated in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth of GaAs nanowires. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy for determining polar facets was coupled to electrostatic-mechanical modeling and position-controlled synthesis to identify nanowire diameter, length, and pitch, leading to junction formation. When nanowire patterns are designed so that the electrostatic energy resulting from the interaction of polar surfaces exceeds the mechanical energy required to bend the nanowires to the point of contact, their fusion can lead to the self-assembly of monolithic junctions. Understanding and controlling this phenomenon is a great asset for the realization of dense arrays of vertical nanowire devices and opens up new ways toward the large scale integration of nanowire quantum junctions or nanowire intracellular probes.

  8. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  9. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup error–induced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of ± 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans.

  10. Two classes of gap junction channels mediate soma-germline interactions essential for germline proliferation and gametogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Starich, Todd A; Hall, David H; Greenstein, David

    2014-11-01

    In all animals examined, somatic cells of the gonad control multiple biological processes essential for germline development. Gap junction channels, composed of connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates, permit direct intercellular communication between cells and frequently form between somatic gonadal cells and germ cells. Gap junctions comprise hexameric hemichannels in apposing cells that dock to form channels for the exchange of small molecules. Here we report essential roles for two classes of gap junction channels, composed of five innexin proteins, in supporting the proliferation of germline stem cells and gametogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Transmission electron microscopy of freeze-fracture replicas and fluorescence microscopy show that gap junctions between somatic cells and germ cells are more extensive than previously appreciated and are found throughout the gonad. One class of gap junctions, composed of INX-8 and INX-9 in the soma and INX-14 and INX-21 in the germ line, is required for the proliferation and differentiation of germline stem cells. Genetic epistasis experiments establish a role for these gap junction channels in germline proliferation independent of the glp-1/Notch pathway. A second class of gap junctions, composed of somatic INX-8 and INX-9 and germline INX-14 and INX-22, is required for the negative regulation of oocyte meiotic maturation. Rescue of gap junction channel formation in the stem cell niche rescues germline proliferation and uncovers a later channel requirement for embryonic viability. This analysis reveals gap junctions as a central organizing feature of many soma-germline interactions in C. elegans. PMID:25195067

  11. Two Classes of Gap Junction Channels Mediate Soma-Germline Interactions Essential for Germline Proliferation and Gametogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Starich, Todd A.; Hall, David H.; Greenstein, David

    2014-01-01

    In all animals examined, somatic cells of the gonad control multiple biological processes essential for germline development. Gap junction channels, composed of connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates, permit direct intercellular communication between cells and frequently form between somatic gonadal cells and germ cells. Gap junctions comprise hexameric hemichannels in apposing cells that dock to form channels for the exchange of small molecules. Here we report essential roles for two classes of gap junction channels, composed of five innexin proteins, in supporting the proliferation of germline stem cells and gametogenesis in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Transmission electron microscopy of freeze-fracture replicas and fluorescence microscopy show that gap junctions between somatic cells and germ cells are more extensive than previously appreciated and are found throughout the gonad. One class of gap junctions, composed of INX-8 and INX-9 in the soma and INX-14 and INX-21 in the germ line, is required for the proliferation and differentiation of germline stem cells. Genetic epistasis experiments establish a role for these gap junction channels in germline proliferation independent of the glp-1/Notch pathway. A second class of gap junctions, composed of somatic INX-8 and INX-9 and germline INX-14 and INX-22, is required for the negative regulation of oocyte meiotic maturation. Rescue of gap junction channel formation in the stem cell niche rescues germline proliferation and uncovers a later channel requirement for embryonic viability. This analysis reveals gap junctions as a central organizing feature of many soma–germline interactions in C. elegans. PMID:25195067

  12. Role of tight junction proteins in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is associated with impaired epithelial barrier function that is regulated by cell-cell contacts. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression pattern of selected components involved in the formation of tight junctions in relation to GERD. Methods Eighty-four patients with GERD-related symptoms with endoscopic signs (erosive: n = 47) or without them (non-erosive: n = 37) as well as 26 patients lacking GERD-specific symptoms as controls were included. Endoscopic and histological characterization of esophagitis was performed according to the Los Angeles and adapted Ismeil-Beigi criteria, respectively. Mucosal biopsies from distal esophagus were taken for analysis by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of five genes encoding tight junction components [Occludin, Claudin-1, -2, Zona occludens (ZO-1, -2)]. Results Histopathology confirmed GERD-specific alterations as dilated intercellular spaces in the esophageal mucosa of patients with GERD compared to controls (P < 0.05). Claudin-1 and −2 were 2- to 6-fold upregulation on transcript (P < 0.01) and in part on protein level (P < 0.015) in GERD, while subgroup analysis of revealed this upregulation for ERD only. In both erosive and non-erosive reflux disease, expression levels of Occludin and ZO-1,-2 were not significantly affected. Notably, the induced expression of both claudins did not correlate with histopathological parameters (basal cell hyperplasia, dilated intercellular spaces) in patients with GERD. Conclusions Taken together, the missing correlation between the expression of tight junction-related components and histomorphological GERD-specific alterations does not support a major role of the five proteins studied in the pathogenesis of GERD. PMID:22994974

  13. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 stimulates the assembly of adherens junctions in keratinocytes: involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Gniadecki, R; Gajkowska, B; Hansen, M

    1997-06-01

    Signaling via intercellular junctions plays an important role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Loss of cell-cell contacts has been implicated in carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. Here, we investigated whether 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] was able to stimulate the assembly of adherens junctions and/or desmosomes in cultured human keratinocytes. After 4-day incubation, 1,25-(OH)2D3 caused assembly of adherens junctions, but not desmosomes. The adherens junctions were identified upon known ultrastructural criteria and evidence of the translocation of specific junctional proteins (E-cadherin, P-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and vinculin) to the cell-cell borders. The presence of alpha-catenin and vinculin at cell-cell borders indicated that the adherens junctions were functional. This was further supported by showing that anti E-cadherin antibody inhibited the 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced keratinocyte stratification. A relation between protein kinase C and adherens junction regulation was noticed. 1,25-(OH)2D3-dependent formation of junctions was blocked by the inhibitors of protein kinase C, bisindolylmaleimide and 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine (H-7), and treatment of keratinocytes with 1,25-(OH)2D3 caused a rapid activation of protein kinase C and its translocation to the membranes. Formation of intercellular contacts may be an important mechanism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 action in hyperproliferative and neoplastic diseases. PMID:9165007

  14. The discovery of epidermal tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Sugawara, Koji; Tsuruta, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    It was previously thought that the skin barrier is composed singly by the stratum corneum. However, this concept was overturned by the report of Tsukita's group in 2002. They convinced us that tight junctions exist in the stratum granulosum of the epidermis, with the constituent proteins being occludin, claudin-1 and claudin-4. However, more than 30 years before this, Hashimoto et al. described the possible existence of tight junctions in the epidermis in 'Intercellular spaces of the human epidermis as demonstrated with lanthanum' in 1971. Dr. Hashimoto observed lanthanum nitrate-injected human skin by electron microscopy. He discovered that the injected lanthanum penetrated the intercellular spaces of the basal and spinous layers of the epidermis and then moved towards the skin surface until penetration was halted in the granular cell layer near the stratum corneum. He described the cell-to-cell adhesion structures that blocked the movement of lanthanum as 'truly tight junctions'. Thus, this was the first description of the existence of tight junctions in the epidermis. However, the presence of these structures was denied by others and was forgotten. Thanks to the discovery of claudin, the existence of tight junctions between epidermal keratinocytes was finally confirmed. It is interesting that Hashimoto's finding was eventually proved to be correct three decades later as a result of progress in molecular biology. This article encourages us to recognize the importance of careful observation in the molecular biology era. PMID:24673182

  15. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  16. Gap junctions in the chicken pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, V M; Hall, D H; Strahsburger, E; Beyer, E C; Sáez, J C

    2000-04-10

    The chicken pineal gland, which contains a heterogeneous cell population, sustains a circadian rhythm of activity. Synchronization of cellular activity of heterogeneous cells might be facilitated by gap junctional intercellular channels which are permeable to ions and second messengers. To test this possibility, we looked for morphologically identifiable gap junctions between the different pineal cells, used antibodies and cDNA probes to screen for the presence of connexins, and tested for functional intercellular coupling. By transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry, gap junctions and connexins were observed between pinealocyte cell bodies, stromal cells, astrocytes, and astrocyte and pinealocyte processes. Two gap junctional proteins, connexin43 and connexin45, were detected by immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting and RNA blot analysis. Functional intercellular coupling was observed in the gland by transfer of low molecular weight dyes. Dye transferred between homologous and heterologous cells. These data suggest that homologous and heterologous gap junctions may provide a mechanism for coordination of the cellular responses of the elements of the biological clock which are induced by lighting cues to produce the circadian rhythm of pineal activity. PMID:10760487

  17. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two silver layers separated by a layer of aluminum oxide. By applying a voltage and measuring how the resonant frequency changes, the shape of the potential can be deduced. Ideally, the structure would produce a double potential well with well separation determined by geometry. The effect on the gate potentials on the resonant frequency was measured and compared to simple models.

  18. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  19. Modulation of tight junction structure and function by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Walsh, S V; Hopkins, A M; Nusrat, A

    2000-06-30

    Dynamic regulation of tight junction function is fundamental to many physiologic processes. Disruption of tight junction function drastically alters paracellular permeability and is a hallmark of many pathologic states. Recently, an increasing number of cytokines have been shown to influence tight junction function both in vitro and in vivo. Cytokine-induced effects on tight junction barrier function have also been correlated with effects on intrinsic tight junction proteins and the associated actin cytoskeleton. The aim of this article is to review studies relating to the effects of cytokines on tight junction function and structure. PMID:10854688

  20. Articular Cartilage Increases Transition Zone Regeneration in Bone-tendon Junction Healing

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ling; Lee, Kwong Man; Leung, Kwok Sui

    2008-01-01

    The fibrocartilage transition zone in the direct bone-tendon junction reduces stress concentration and protects the junction from failure. Unfortunately, bone-tendon junctions often heal without fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration. We hypothesized articular cartilage grafts could increase fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration. Using a goat partial patellectomy repair model, autologous articular cartilage was harvested from the excised distal third patella and interposed between the residual proximal two-thirds bone fragment and tendon during repair in 36 knees. We evaluated fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration, bone formation, and mechanical strength after repair at 6, 12, and 24 weeks and compared them with direct repair. Autologous articular cartilage interposition resulted in more fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration (69.10% ± 14.11% [mean ± standard deviation] versus 8.67% ± 7.01% at 24 weeks) than direct repair at all times. There was no difference in the amount of bone formation and mechanical strength achieved. Autologous articular cartilage interposition increases fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration in bone-tendon junction healing, but additional research is required to ascertain the mechanism of stimulation and to establish the clinical applicability. PMID:18987921

  1. Gap Junctions and Hemichannels in Signal Transmission, Function and Development of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Nidhi; Kar, Rekha; Jiang, Jean X.

    2012-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) mediated by connexins, in particular connexin 43 (Cx43), plays important roles in regulating signal transmission among different bone cells and thereby regulates development, differentiation, modeling and remodeling of the bone. GJIC regulates osteoblast formation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis. Osteoclast formation and resorptive ability are also reported to be modulated by GJIC. Furthermore, osteocytes utilize GJIC to coordinate bone remodeling in response to anabolic factors and mechanical loading. Apart from gap junctions, connexins also form hemichannels, which are localized on the cell surface and function independently of the gap junction channels. Both these channels mediate the transfer of molecules smaller than 1.2 kDa including small ions, metabolites, ATP, prostaglandin and IP3. The biological importance of the communication mediated by connexin-forming channels in bone development is revealed by the low bone mass and osteoblast dysfunction in the Cx43-null mice and the skeletal malformations observed in occulodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) caused by mutations in the Cx43 gene. The current review summarizes the role of gap junctions and hemichannels in regulating signaling, function and development of bone cells. PMID:21963408

  2. Lateral assembly of N-cadherin drives tissue integrity by stabilizing adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S.; Fischer, S. C.; Schuman, E. M.; Stelzer, E. H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin interactions ensure the correct registry and anchorage of cells during tissue formation. Along the plasma membrane, cadherins form inter-junctional lattices via cis- and trans-dimerization. While structural studies have provided models for cadherin interactions, the molecular nature of cadherin binding in vivo remains unexplored. We undertook a multi-disciplinary approach combining live cell imaging of three-dimensional cell assemblies (spheroids) with a computational model to study the dynamics of N-cadherin interactions. Using a loss-of-function strategy, we demonstrate that each N-cadherin interface plays a distinct role in spheroid formation. We found that cis-dimerization is not a prerequisite for trans-interactions, but rather modulates trans-interfaces to ensure tissue stability. Using a model of N-cadherin junction dynamics, we show that the absence of cis-interactions results in low junction stability and loss of tissue integrity. By quantifying the binding and unbinding dynamics of the N-cadherin binding interfaces, we determined that mutating either interface results in a 10-fold increase in the dissociation constant. These findings provide new quantitative information on the steps driving cadherin intercellular adhesion and demonstrate the role of cis-interactions in junction stability. PMID:25589573

  3. Plasticity of Button-Like Junctions in the Endothelium of Airway Lymphatics in Development and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Li-Chin; Baluk, Peter; Srinivasan, R. Sathish; Oliver, Guillermo; McDonald, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells of initial lymphatics have discontinuous button-like junctions (buttons), unlike continuous zipper-like junctions (zippers) of collecting lymphatics and blood vessels. Buttons are thought to act as primary valves for fluid and cell entry into lymphatics. To learn when and how buttons form during development and whether they change in disease, we examined the appearance of buttons in mouse embryos and their plasticity in sustained inflammation. We found that endothelial cells of lymph sacs at embryonic day (E)12.5 and tracheal lymphatics at E16.5 were joined by zippers, not buttons. However, zippers in initial lymphatics decreased rapidly just before birth, as buttons appeared. The proportion of buttons increased from only 6% at E17.5 and 12% at E18.5 to 35% at birth, 50% at postnatal day (P)7, 90% at P28, and 100% at P70. In inflammation, zippers replaced buttons in airway lymphatics at 14 and 28 days after Mycoplasma pulmonis infection of the respiratory tract. The change in lymphatic junctions was reversed by dexamethasone but not by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 signaling by antibody mF4-31C1. Dexamethasone also promoted button formation during early postnatal development through a direct effect involving glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation in lymphatic endothelial cells. These findings demonstrate the plasticity of intercellular junctions in lymphatics during development and inflammation and show that button formation can be promoted by glucocorticoid receptor signaling in lymphatic endothelial cells. PMID:22538088

  4. Molecular aspects of tight junction barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guo Hua; Weber, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular organisms, epithelia lining body cavities regulate absorption and secretion of ions, organic molecules, and water. Proper function of epithelia depends on apically and basolaterally situated ion channels as well as tight junctions which seal the apical intercellular space. Without tight junctions, transepithelial concentration gradients of ions and nutrients would be dissipated through the paracellular space. Elevated tight junction permeability is a feature of many diseases of multiple organs, including the gastrointestinal tract [1,2,3*,4*], kidney [5,6], and lungs [7,8]. In the intestines, epithelial barrier dysfunction is a major contributor to diarrhea and malnutrition and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. PMID:25128899

  5. Phonon Josephson junction with nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Shabir; Vitali, David

    2016-03-01

    We study coherent phonon oscillations and tunneling between two coupled nonlinear nanomechanical resonators. We show that the coupling between two nanomechanical resonators creates an effective phonon Josephson junction, which exhibits two different dynamical behaviors: Josephson oscillation (phonon-Rabi oscillation) and macroscopic self-trapping (phonon blockade). Self-trapping originates from mechanical nonlinearities, meaning that when the nonlinearity exceeds its critical value, the energy exchange between the two resonators is suppressed, and phonon Josephson oscillations between them are completely blocked. An effective classical Hamiltonian for the phonon Josephson junction is derived and its mean-field dynamics is studied in phase space. Finally, we study the phonon-phonon coherence quantified by the mean fringe visibility, and show that the interaction between the two resonators may lead to the loss of coherence in the phononic junction.

  6. Synchronized switching in a josephson junction crystal.

    PubMed

    Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    We consider a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator where the central conductor is interrupted by a series of uniformly spaced Josephson junctions. The device forms an extended medium that is optically nonlinear on the single photon level with normal modes that inherit the full nonlinearity of the junctions but are nonetheless accessible via the resonator ports. For specific plasma frequencies of the junctions, a set of normal modes clusters in a narrow band and eventually becomes entirely degenerate. Upon increasing the intensity of a red detuned drive on these modes, we observe a sharp and synchronized switching from low-occupation quantum states to high-occupation classical fields, accompanied by a pronounced jump from low to high output intensity. PMID:24949766

  7. Holographic Josephson junction from massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Li, Huai-Fan; Zeng, Hua-Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2016-05-01

    We study the holographic superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity. If the boundary theory is independent of spatial directions, i.e., if the chemical potential is homogeneous in spatial directions, we find that the graviton mass parameter will make it more difficult for the normal metal-superconductor phase transition to take place. In the holographic model of the Josephson junction, it is found that the maximal tunneling current will decrease according to the graviton mass parameter. Besides, the coherence length of the junction decreases as well with respect to the graviton mass parameter. If one interprets the graviton mass parameter as the effect of momentum dissipation in the boundary field theory, this indicates that the stronger the momentum dissipation is, the smaller the coherence length is.

  8. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  9. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  10. The Seven Junction Cooper Pair Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumentado, Jose; Keller, Mark W.; Martinis, John M.; Urbina, Cristian

    2002-03-01

    The precision of single-electron charge transfer has already been established at the 10-8 level in a gated array of Al/Al_xO_y/Al junctions (M. W. Keller et al.), Science 285, 1706 (1999), while previous efforts at transferring Cooper pairs have met with some disappointment (L.G. Geerligs et al.), Z. Phys. B 85, 349 (1991). We revisit this problem using a novel approach in the present seven junction system in the superconducting state. This approach involves an engineering of the Josephson coupling energy, E_J, at the single and multiple junction level using closely placed ``environmental'' resistors and carefully choosing the charging energy E_C. We will present recent results addressing the performance of this new design in both the superconducting and normal states.

  11. Magnetic tunnel junctions with yttrium oxide barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimopoulos, T.; Gieres, G.; Colis, S.; Wecker, J.; Luo, Y.; Samwer, K.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions have been studied, with YOx barriers prepared by plasma oxidation of a 1.5 nm Y film. We report their junction area resistance, tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) and barrier parameters (height and thickness) as a function of the oxidation time. For the optimum oxidation time, TMR values of ˜25% are obtained at room temperature and ˜44% at low temperature (5 K). The barrier height extracted from the current-voltage curves, is close to 1 eV, which is less than half of what is usually reported for AlOx-based junctions. Structural and topographical characterization of the multilayes revealed that the YOx layer is amorphous with well-defined, smooth, and correlated interfaces with the ferromagnetic electrodes.

  12. Intercellular Junction Assembly, Dynamics, and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kathleen J.; Getsios, Spiro; Troyanovsky, Sergey; Godsel, L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Intercellular anchoring junctions are highly specialized regions of the plasma membrane where members of the cadherin family of transmembrane adhesion molecules on opposing cells interact through their extracellular domains, and through their cytoplasmic domains serve as a platform for organizing cytoskeletal anchors and remodelers. Here we focus on assembly of so-called “anchoring” or “adhering” junctions—adherens junctions (AJs) and desmosomes (DSMs), which associate with actin and intermediate filaments, respectively. We will examine how the assembly and function of AJs and DSMs are intimately connected during embryogenesis and in adult cells and tissues, and in some cases even form specialized “mixed” junctions. We will explore signaling and trafficking machineries that drive assembly and remodeling and how these mechanisms are co-opted in human disease. PMID:20182611

  13. Molecular organization of tricellular tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Furuse, Mikio; Izumi, Yasushi; Oda, Yukako; Higashi, Tomohito; Iwamoto, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    When the apicolateral border of epithelial cells is compared with a polygon, its sides correspond to the apical junctional complex, where cell adhesion molecules assemble from the plasma membranes of two adjacent cells. On the other hand, its vertices correspond to tricellular contacts, where the corners of three cells meet. Vertebrate tricellular contacts have specialized structures of tight junctions, termed tricellular tight junctions (tTJs). tTJs were identified by electron microscopic observations more than 40 years ago, but have been largely forgotten in epithelial cell biology since then. The identification of tricellulin and angulin family proteins as tTJ-associated membrane proteins has enabled us to study tTJs in terms of not only the paracellular barrier function but also unknown characteristics of epithelial cell corners via molecular biological approaches. PMID:25097825

  14. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  15. Exploring Hot Gas at Junctions of Galaxy Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Yamasaki, Noriko; Kawahara, Hajime; Sekiya, Norio; Sasaki, Shin; Sousbie, Thierry

    Because galaxies are forced to follow the strong gravitational potential created by the underlying cosmic web of the dark matter, their distribution reflects its filamentary structures. By identifying the filamentary structures, one can therefore recover a map of the network that drives structure formation. Filamentary junctions are regions of particular interest as they identify places where mergers and other interesting astrophysical phenomena have high chances to occur. We identified the galaxy filaments by our original method (Sousbie (2011) & Sousbie et al. (2011)) and X-ray pointing observations were conducted for the six fields locating in the junctions of the galaxy filaments where no specific diffuse X-ray emissions had previously been detected so far. We discovered significant X-ray signals in their images and spectra of the all regions. Spectral analysis demonstrated that six sources originate from diffuse emissions associated with optically bright galaxies, group-scale, or cluster-scale X-ray halos with kT˜1-4 keV, while the others are compact object origin. Interestingly, all of the newly discovered three intracluster media show peculiar features such as complex or elongated morphologies in X-ray and/or optical and hot spot involved in ongoing merger events (Kawahara et al. (2011) & Mitsuishi et al. (2014)). In this conference, results of follow-up radio observations for the merging groups as well as the details of the X-ray observations will be reported.

  16. Ballistic Josephson junctions in edge-contacted graphene.

    PubMed

    Calado, V E; Goswami, S; Nanda, G; Diez, M; Akhmerov, A R; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Klapwijk, T M; Vandersypen, L M K

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid graphene-superconductor devices have attracted much attention since the early days of graphene research. So far, these studies have been limited to the case of diffusive transport through graphene with poorly defined and modest-quality graphene/superconductor interfaces, usually combined with small critical magnetic fields of the superconducting electrodes. Here, we report graphene-based Josephson junctions with one-dimensional edge contacts of molybdenum rhenium. The contacts exhibit a well-defined, transparent interface to the graphene, have a critical magnetic field of 8 T at 4 K, and the graphene has a high quality due to its encapsulation in hexagonal boron nitride. This allows us to study and exploit graphene Josephson junctions in a new regime, characterized by ballistic transport. We find that the critical current oscillates with the carrier density due to phase-coherent interference of the electrons and holes that carry the supercurrent caused by the formation of a Fabry-Pérot cavity. Furthermore, relatively large supercurrents are observed over unprecedented long distances of up to 1.5 μm. Finally, in the quantum Hall regime we observe broken symmetry states while the contacts remain superconducting. These achievements open up new avenues to exploit the Dirac nature of graphene in interaction with the superconducting state. PMID:26214253

  17. Ballistic Josephson junctions in edge-contacted graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calado, V. E.; Goswami, S.; Nanda, G.; Diez, M.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid graphene-superconductor devices have attracted much attention since the early days of graphene research. So far, these studies have been limited to the case of diffusive transport through graphene with poorly defined and modest-quality graphene/superconductor interfaces, usually combined with small critical magnetic fields of the superconducting electrodes. Here, we report graphene-based Josephson junctions with one-dimensional edge contacts of molybdenum rhenium. The contacts exhibit a well-defined, transparent interface to the graphene, have a critical magnetic field of 8 T at 4 K, and the graphene has a high quality due to its encapsulation in hexagonal boron nitride. This allows us to study and exploit graphene Josephson junctions in a new regime, characterized by ballistic transport. We find that the critical current oscillates with the carrier density due to phase-coherent interference of the electrons and holes that carry the supercurrent caused by the formation of a Fabry-Pérot cavity. Furthermore, relatively large supercurrents are observed over unprecedented long distances of up to 1.5 μm. Finally, in the quantum Hall regime we observe broken symmetry states while the contacts remain superconducting. These achievements open up new avenues to exploit the Dirac nature of graphene in interaction with the superconducting state.

  18. Exploring Hot Gas at Junctions of Galaxy Filaments with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, I.; Kawahara, H.; Sekiya, N.; Sasaki, S.; Sousbie, T.; Y. Yamasaki, N.

    2014-07-01

    Galaxies are forced to form filamentary structure reflecting the underlying cosmic web of the dark matter. In particular, at junctions of galaxy filaments, one can naturally expect that intense structure formation has high chances to occur. We identified the galaxy filaments by making use of our original method (Sousbie (2011) & Sousbie et al. (2011)) in conjunction with SDSS spectroscopic galaxies. We performed X-ray pointing observations for six fields locating in the junctions of the galaxy filaments where no specific diffuse X-ray emissions had previously been detected so far. We discovered significant X-ray signals in their images and spectra of the all regions compared to a background region. Spectral analysis revealed that six sources originate from diffuse emissions associated with optically bright galaxies, group-scale, or cluster-scale X-ray halos with temperautres of 1-4 keV, while the others are compact object origin. Interestingly, the observed three intracluster media possess peculiar signatures such as complex or elongated morphologies in X-ray and/or optical and hot spot, suggesting that all of the systems are experiencing an ongoing merger (Kawahara et al. (2011) & Mitsuishi et al. (2014)). In this conference, results of follow-up radio observations to search for merger-induced diffuse radio emissions will be reported.

  19. Pasiflora proteins are novel core components of the septate junction

    PubMed Central

    Deligiannaki, Myrto; Casper, Abbie L.; Jung, Christophe; Gaul, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial sheets play essential roles as selective barriers insulating the body from the environment and establishing distinct chemical compartments within it. In invertebrate epithelia, septate junctions (SJs) consist of large multi-protein complexes that localize at the apicolateral membrane and mediate barrier function. Here, we report the identification of two novel SJ components, Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2, through a genome-wide glial RNAi screen in Drosophila. Pasiflora mutants show permeable blood-brain and tracheal barriers, overelongated tracheal tubes and mislocalization of SJ proteins. Consistent with the observed phenotypes, the genes are co-expressed in embryonic epithelia and glia and are required cell-autonomously to exert their function. Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 belong to a previously uncharacterized family of tetraspan membrane proteins conserved across the protostome-deuterostome divide. Both proteins localize at SJs and their apicolateral membrane accumulation depends on other complex components. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments we demonstrate that pasiflora proteins are core SJ components as they are required for complex formation and exhibit restricted mobility within the membrane of wild-type epithelial cells, but rapid diffusion in cells with disrupted SJs. Taken together, our results show that Pasiflora1 and Pasiflora2 are novel integral components of the SJ and implicate a new family of tetraspan proteins in the function of these ancient and crucial cell junctions. PMID:26329602

  20. P-cresol induces disruption of cardiomyocyte adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu-Sen; Lin, Yen-Tung; Wang, Sheng-De; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Seu-Mei

    2013-04-01

    Higher serum levels of p-cresol in chronic kidney disease populations have been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. However, studies on how p-cresol affects intercellular junctions between cardiomyocytes were limited. This study investigated the effect of p-cresol on adherens junction (AJ) of neonatal cultured cardiomyocytes and its underlying mechanism. A loss of N-cadherin and p120-catenin (p120ctn) immunostaining from cell-cell contact sites was noted by p-cresol treatment. In addition, p-cresol disrupted AJs by inducing formation of intercellular gaps. Our previous study has revealed that p-cresol increased intracellular calcium levels and activated protein kinase Cα (PKCα) by phosphorylation. The PKCα activation was involved in the p-cresol-mediated AJ disassembly, since pharmacological inhibition of PKCα abolished the above-mentioned p-cresol effect. This PKCα activation also led to the serine dephosphorylation of p120ctn and caused the dissociation of p120ctn from N-cadherin. This hypothesis was further confirmed in H9c2 cells by siRNA approach. SiRNA knockdown of PKCα prevented p-cresol-induced serine dephosphorylation of p120ctn and splitting of AJ. In conclusion, p-cresol caused PKCα-dependent AJ disassembly of cardiomyocytes, which might be related to asychronized contraction. PMID:23466501

  1. Generation of terahertz waves by a current in magnetic junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, Yu. V.; Zilberman, P. E.; Mikhailov, G. M.; Chigarev, S. G.

    2014-02-01

    The terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum (approximately 0.3-30 THz) is still insufficiently mastered primarily because of the absence of compact and controllable emitters (oscillators) and receivers (detectors) reliably operating in this range in a wide temperature range, including room temperature. The corresponding recent studies in this field, which were supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, have been reviewed. New physical effects have been proposed and principles of the operation of terahertz devices based on these effects have been implemented. These effects refer to the physics of ferromagnetic and/or antiferromagnetic conducting layers assembled in micro- and nanostructures, which are called magnetic junctions. These effects are as follows: the formation of a quasiequilibrium distribution of current-injected electrons over the energy levels and the possibility of inverted population of levels, induction of the macroscopic magnetization by a spin-polarized current in an antiferromagnetic layer in the absence of external magnetic field, the appearance of current-induced contribution to antiferromagnetic resonance, and the experimental observation and study of the properties of terahertz radiation in ferromagnet-ferromagnet and ferromagnet-antiferromagnet junctions.

  2. Electrospun Composite Nanofibers of Semiconductive Polymers for Coaxial PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, William; Thomas, Sylvia

    The objective of this research is to investigate the conditions under P3HT and Activink, semiconducting polymers, form 1 dimension (1D) coaxial p-n junctions and to characterize their behavior in the presence of UV radiation and organic gases. For the first time, fabrication and characterization of semiconductor polymeric single fiber coaxial arrangements will be studied. Electrospinning, a low cost, fast and reliable method, with a coaxial syringe arrangement will be used to fabricate these fibers. With the formation of fiber coaxial arrangements, there will be investigations of dimensionality crossovers e.g., from one-dimensional (1D) to two-dimensional (2D). Coaxial core/shell fibers have been realized as seen in a recent publication on an electrospun nanofiber p-n heterojunction of oxides (BiFeO3 and TiO2, respectively) using the electrospinning technique with hydrothermal method. In regards to organic semiconducting coaxial p-n junction nanofibers, no reported studies have been conducted, making this study fundamental and essential for organic semiconducting nano devices for flexible electronics and multi-dimensional integrated circuits.

  3. Currents Induced by Injected Charge in Junction Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Gaubas, Eugenijus; Ceponis, Tomas; Kalesinskas, Vidas

    2013-01-01

    The problem of drifting charge-induced currents is considered in order to predict the pulsed operational characteristics in photo- and particle-detectors with a junction controlled active area. The direct analysis of the field changes induced by drifting charge in the abrupt junction devices with a plane-parallel geometry of finite area electrodes is presented. The problem is solved using the one-dimensional approach. The models of the formation of the induced pulsed currents have been analyzed for the regimes of partial and full depletion. The obtained solutions for the current density contain expressions of a velocity field dependence on the applied voltage, location of the injected surface charge domain and carrier capture parameters. The drift component of this current coincides with Ramo's expression. It has been illustrated, that the synchronous action of carrier drift, trapping, generation and diffusion can lead to a vast variety of possible current pulse waveforms. Experimental illustrations of the current pulse variations determined by either the rather small or large carrier density within the photo-injected charge domain are presented, based on a study of Si detectors. PMID:24036586

  4. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions.

  5. Electronic properties of electrodeposited semiconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatman, Shawn Michael Edward

    This thesis describes the synthesis, structural properties, optical properties, and electronic properties of semiconductor junctions based on electrochemically deposited ZnO and CU2O thin films. The first focus is characterizing the effect of deposition conditions (including applied potential and electrolyte composition) on the fundamental properties of these materials (including carrier concentration, band gap, and microstructure). Subsequent discussion addresses electrical conduction to and through ZnO/substrate junctions as a function of these deposition conditions. Finally, three device applications for these ZnO-based junction are explored: Schottky rectifiers, humidity sensors, and photovoltaic cells. Since electrical conduction to and through heterojunction interfaces is very important for maximizing the functionality of semiconductor devices, this thesis work is an essential step towards increasing the functionality of multi-layer ZnO-based heterojunction devices prepared by electrodeposition. Capacitive Mott-Schottky analyses showed that the carrier concentrations of our ZnO electrodeposits are dependent upon deposition potential, with higher net carrier concentration at more positive potentials. UV/Visible diffuse reflectance data indicates that band gap increases with more positive deposition potentials. Together, these results suggest that hydrogen is the dominant, yet unintentional, Moss-Burstein like dopant in our n-type ZnO. Furthermore, the range of carrier concentrations we can achieve (10 18 -- 1021 cm-3) is comparable to that obtained with intentional doping. This is significant because using deposition potential to change growth rate or morphology will simultaneously change electronic properties. The deposition potential studies evolved into a procedure for selective, one-step production of either ohmic or rectifying (Schottky) ZnO/metal junctions (Chatman et al., Appi.Phys.Lett., 2008, 92, 012103/1-3). Rectifying ratio and soft-breakdown characteristics can be influenced by tuning either deposition potential and pH (Chatman et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2009, 1, 552-558). (In contrast, our CU2O/metal junctions were always ohmic.) Rectifying ZnO/metal junctions are very susceptible to relative humidity compared with ohmic samples because of protonic conduction at the ZnO/air interface. Hydrophobic coatings applied to ZnO deposits greatly reduce the erratic sensitivity of ZnO at high humidities while retaining humidity sensitivity (Chatman et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2009, 1, 552-558). ZnO/CU2O pn junctions were prepared with different permutations of a two-step electrodeposition process. ZnO/CU 2O/metal junctions were determined to be light sensitive when the CU 2O layer was deposited using lactate-based electrolytes. Unfortunately, solar conversion efficiencies was too low to determine device efficiencies.

  6. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  7. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. The multiple junction edge illuminated solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. I.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Riley, T. J.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The multiple junction edge illuminated solar cell was devised for high voltage low current applications. Devices to be flight tested in early 1974 with 96 series connected PNN+ junctions in a 2 cm X 2.3 cm size deliver 36 volts at 1 milliampere. Test data of M-J cells fabricated with resistivities of 10, 50, 100, 200, 450, and 1000 ohm cm silicon are presented and problem areas are discussed. An additional potential application of the M-J cell lies in ultilization of its high intensity performance that has been demonstrated at levels in excess of 100 AMO suns.

  9. More aromatic molecular junction has lower conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhen; Ji, Xiao-Li; Song, Yang; Wei, Ming-Zhi; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2015-10-01

    The conductance of molecular junctions containing one of five-atom cyclic unit cyclopentadiene, furan, and thiophene sandwiched between two gold electrodes is theoretically investigated. It shows that when the molecules are adsorbed on pyramidal protruding or single atom protruding electrode surfaces, the conductance of these junctions show a negative relationship with their aromaticity, which is consistent with the experimental finding [34]. The analysis of the transmission coefficients and the molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian attributes this to the aromaticity dependent alignment of frontier molecular orbitals with the Fermi energy of electrodes.

  10. Electroluminescence in Molecular Junctions: A Diagrammatic Approach.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Hua, Weijie; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-09-01

    We compute electroluminescent signal in a current carrying single molecule junction using a superoperator formalism. Liouville space loop diagrams are used to identify all density matrix pathways that emit photons via the electroluminescence process. A frequency resolved spectrum is expressed in terms of the various Fock space states of the isolated molecule that participate in the creation and subsequent recombination of exciton. Application is made to a multilevel Coulomb blockade model system and to a gold-benzene-1,4-dithiol-gold molecular junction. PMID:26575925

  11. Endoscopic Approaches to the Craniovertebral Junction.

    PubMed

    Kshettry, Varun R; Thorp, Brian D; Shriver, Michael F; Zanation, Adam M; Woodard, Troy D; Sindwani, Raj; Recinos, Pablo F

    2016-02-01

    The endoscopic endonasal approach provides a direct surgical trajectory to anteriorly located lesions at the craniovertebral junction. The inferior limit of surgical exposure is predicted by the nasopalatine line, and the lateral limit is demarcated by the lower cranial nerves. Endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy allows preservation of the soft palate, and patients can restart an oral diet on the first postoperative day. Treating the condition at the craniovertebral junction using this approach requires careful preoperative planning and endoscopic endonasal surgical experience with a 2-surgeon 4-handed approach combining expertise in otolaryngology and neurosurgery. PMID:26614839

  12. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  13. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  14. Atomic-scaled characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Wang, Dennis; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    Graphene p-n junctions are essential devices for studying relativistic Klein tunneling and the Veselago lensing effect in graphene. We have successfully fabricated graphene p-n junctions using both lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. We then use our 4-probe STM system to characterize the junctions. The ability to carry out scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in our STM instrument is essential for us to locate and measure the junction interface. We obtain both the topography and dI/dV spectra at the junction area, from which we track the shift of the graphene chemical potential with position across the junction interface. This allows us to directly measure the spatial width and roughness of the junction and its potential barrier height. We will compare the junction properties of devices fabricated by the aforementioned two methods and discuss their effects on the performance as a Veselago lens.

  15. 6. View northeast, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View northeast, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, western estate wall and tree lines to right - A. I. Du Pont Estate, Junction of State Route 141 & Rockland Road, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  16. 8. Vidw southwest, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Vidw southwest, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, northern estate wall and tree lines to left - A. I. Du Pont Estate, Junction of State Route 141 & Rockland Road, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  17. Ballistic bipolar junctions in chemically gated graphene ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Baringhaus, Jens; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The realization of ballistic graphene pn-junctions is an essential task in order to study Klein tunneling phenomena. Here we show that intercalation of Ge under the buffer layer of pre-structured SiC-samples succeeds to make truly nano-scaled pn-junctions. By means of local tunneling spectroscopy the junction width is found to be as narrow as 5 nm which is a hundred times smaller compared to electrically gated structures. The ballistic transmission across the junction is directly proven by systematic transport measurements with a 4-tip STM. Various npn- and pnp-junctions are studied with respect to the barrier length. The pn-junctions are shown to act as polarizer and analyzer with the second junction becoming transparent in case of a fully ballistic barrier. This can be attributed to the almost full suppression of electron transmission through the junction away from normal incidence. PMID:25898259

  18. Continuous endocytic recycling of tight junction proteins: how and why?

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Andrew D; Whitley, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Tight junctions consist of many proteins, including transmembrane and associated cytoplasmic proteins, which act to provide a barrier regulating transport across epithelial and endothelial tissues. These junctions are dynamic structures that are able to maintain barrier function during tissue remodelling and rapidly alter it in response to extracellular signals. Individual components of tight junctions also show dynamic behaviour, including migration within the junction and exchange in and out of the junctions. In addition, it is becoming clear that some tight junction proteins undergo continuous endocytosis and recycling back to the plasma membrane. Regulation of endocytic trafficking of junctional proteins may provide a way of rapidly remodelling junctions and will be the focus of this chapter. PMID:22928507

  19. Alternative types of molecule-decorated atomic chains in Au–CO–Au single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Zoltán; Makk, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Summary We investigate the formation and evolution of Au–CO single-molecule break junctions. The conductance histogram exhibits two distinct molecular configurations, which are further investigated by a combined statistical analysis. According to conditional histogram and correlation analysis these molecular configurations show strong anticorrelations with each other and with pure Au monoatomic junctions and atomic chains. We identify molecular precursor configurations with somewhat higher conductance, which are formed prior to single-molecule junctions. According to detailed length analysis two distinct types of molecule-affected chain-formation processes are observed, and we compare these results to former theoretical calculations considering bridge- and atop-type molecular configurations where the latter has reduced conductance due to destructive Fano interference. PMID:26199840

  20. Albumin impairs renal tubular tight junctions via targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yibo; Hu, Caiyu; Ding, Guixia; Zhang, Yue; Huang, Songming; Jia, Zhanjun; Zhang, Aihua

    2015-05-01

    Proteinuria is, not only a hallmark of glomerular disease, but also a contributor to kidney injury. However, its pathogenic mechanism is still elusive. In the present study, the effects of albumin on renal tubular tight junctions and the potential molecular mechanisms of those effects were investigated. In mouse proximal tubular cells (mPTCs), albumin treatment resulted in a significant loss of the cellular tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-1 in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating a severe impairment of the tight junctions. On the basis of our previous study showing that albumin stimulated NLRP3 [neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein, major histocompatibility complex class 2 transcription activator, incompatibility locus protein from Podospora anserina, and telomerase-associated protein (NACHT); leucine-rich repeat (LRR); and pyrin domain (PYD) domains-containing protein 3] inflammasome activation in mPTCs, we pretreated mPTCs with NLRP3 siRNA (siNLRP3) and found that NLRP3 knockdown significantly blocked the downregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-1 induced by albumin. Similarly, in albumin-overloaded wild-type mice, both ZO-1 and claudin-1 were downregulated at the protein and mRNA levels in parallel with the impaired formation of the tight junctions on transmission electron microscopy and the abnormal renal tubular morphology on periodic acid-Schiff staining, which contrasted with the stimulation of NLRP3 in the renal tubules. In contrast, NLRP3 knockout (NLRP3(-/-)) mice preserved normal ZO-1 and claudin-1 expression as well as largely normal tight junctions and tubular morphology. More importantly, deletion of the NLRP3 pathway downstream component caspase-1 similarly blocked the albumin overload-induced downregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-1. Taken together, these findings demonstrated an important role of the albumin-NLRP3 inflammasome axis in mediating the impairment of renal tubular tight junctions and integrity. PMID:25715986

  1. Connexin26 regulates assembly and maintenance of cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex for normal hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary deafness affects about 1 in 2000 children and GJB2 gene mutation is most frequent cause for this disease in the world. GJB2 encodes connexin26 (Cx26), a component in cochlear gap junction. Recently, we found macromolecular change of gap junction plaques with two different types of Cx26 mutation as major classification of clinical case, one is a model of dominant negative type, Cx26R75W+ and the other is conditional gene deficient mouse, Cx26f/fP0Cre as a model for insufficiency of gap junction protein [6]. Gap junction composed mainly of Cx26 and Cx30 in wild type mice formed large planar gap junction plaques (GJP). In contrast, Cx26R75W+ and Cx26f/fP0Cre showed fragmented small round GJPs around the cell border. In Cx26f/fP0Cre, some of the cells with Cx26 expression due to their cellular mosaicism showed normal large GJP with Cx26 and Cx30 only at the cell junction site between two Cx26 positive cells. These indicate that bilateral Cx26 expressions from both adjacent cells are essential for the formation of the cochlear linear GJP, and it is not compensated by other cochlear Connexins such as Connexin30. In the present study, we demonstrated a new molecular pathology in most common hereditary deafness with different types of Connexin26 mutations, and this machinery can be a new target for drag design of hereditary deafness.

  2. Irsogladine maleate regulates gap junctional intercellular communication-dependent epithelial barrier in human nasal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Ryo; Nomura, Kazuaki; Kakuki, Takuya; Takano, Ken-Ichi; Kohno, Takayuki; Konno, Takumi; Sawada, Norimasa; Himi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    The airway epithelium of the human nasal mucosa acts as the first physical barrier that protects against inhaled substances and pathogens. Irsogladine maleate (IM) is an enhancer of gastric mucosal protective factors via upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). GJIC is thought to participate in the formation of functional tight junctions. However, the effects of IM on GJIC and the epithelial barrier in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) remain unknown. To investigate the effects of IM on GJIC and the tight junctional barrier in HNECs, primary cultures of HNECs transfected with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-HNECs) were treated with IM and the GJIC inhibitors oleamide and 18β-GA. Some cells were pretreated with IM before treatment with TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) to examine whether IM prevented the changes via TLR3-mediated signal pathways. In hTERT-HNECs, GJIC blockers reduced the expression of tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7, occludin, tricellulin, and JAM-A. IM induced GJIC activity and enhanced the expression of claudin-1, -4, and JAM-A at the protein and mRNA levels with an increase of barrier function. GJIC blockers prevented the increase of the tight junction proteins induced by IM. Furthermore, IM prevented the reduction of JAM-A but not induction of IL-8 and TNF-α induced by poly(I:C). In conclusion, IM can maintain the GJIC-dependent tight junctional barrier via regulation of GJIC in upper airway nasal epithelium. Therefore, it is possible that IM may be useful as a nasal spray to prevent the disruption of the epithelial barrier by viral infections and exposure to allergens in human nasal mucosa. PMID:25652184

  3. Ballistic transport in InSb Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasco, John Jeffrey; Gill, Stephen; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    We present transport measurements on Josephson junctions consisting of InSb nanowires contacted by Al at various junction lengths. Junction behavior as a function of gate voltage, electric field, and magnetic field is discussed. We show that short junctions behave as 1D quantum wires, exhibiting quantized conductance steps. In addition, we show how Josephson behavior changes as transport evolves from ballistic to diffusive as a function of contact spacing.

  4. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  5. The Na+/K+ ATPase is required for septate junction function and epithelial tube-size control in the Drosophila tracheal system.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sarah M; Ternet, Melissa; Salvaterra, Paul M; Beitel, Greg J

    2003-10-01

    Although the correct architecture of epithelial tubes is crucial for the function of organs such as the lung, kidney and vascular system, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control tube size. We show that mutations in the ATPalpha alpha and nrv2 beta subunits of the Na+/K+ ATPase cause Drosophila tracheal tubes to have increased lengths and expanded diameters. ATPalpha and nrv2 mutations also disrupt stable formation of septate junctions, structures with some functional and molecular similarities to vertebrate tight junctions. The Nrv2 beta subunit isoforms have unique tube size and junctional functions because Nrv2, but not other Drosophila Na+/K+ ATPase beta subunits, can rescue nrv2 mutant phenotypes. Mutations in known septate junctions genes cause the same tracheal tube-size defects as ATPalpha and nrv2 mutations, indicating that septate junctions have a previously unidentified role in epithelial tube-size control. Double mutant analyses suggest that tube-size control by septate junctions is mediated by at least two discernable pathways, although the paracellular diffusion barrier function does not appear to involved because tube-size control and diffusion barrier function are genetically separable. Together, our results demonstrate that specific isoforms of the Na+/K+ ATPase play a crucial role in septate junction function and that septate junctions have multiple distinct functions that regulate paracellular transport and epithelial tube size. PMID:12930776

  6. Real-Space Microscopic Electrical Imaging of n+-p Junction Beneath Front-Side Ag Contact of Multicrystalline Si Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2012-04-15

    We investigated the quality of the n+-p diffused junction beneath the front-side Ag contact of multicrystalline Si solar cells by characterizing the uniformities of electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction using the atomic force microscopy-based electrical imaging techniques of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We found that Ag screen-printing metallization fired at the over-fire temperature significantly degrades the junction uniformity beneath the Ag contact grid, whereas metallization at the optimal- and under-fire temperatures does not cause degradation. Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes were found at the Ag-grid/emitter-Si interface of the over-fired cell, which is associated with the junction damage beneath the Ag grid. Large crystallites protrude into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent re-crystallization with incorporation of Ag and other impurities and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching. The effect of this junction damage on solar cell performance is discussed.

  7. Lipid Polarity Is Maintained in Absence of Tight Junctions*

    PubMed Central

    Ikenouchi, Junichi; Suzuki, Mayu; Umeda, Kazuaki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Sato, Satoshi B.; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Stolz, Donna B.; Umeda, Masato

    2012-01-01

    The role of tight junctions (TJs) in the establishment and maintenance of lipid polarity in epithelial cells has long been a subject of controversy. We have addressed this issue using lysenin, a toxin derived from earthworms, and an influenza virus labeled with a fluorescent lipid, octadecylrhodamine B (R18). When epithelial cells are stained with lysenin, lysenin selectively binds to their apical membranes. Using an artificial liposome, we demonstrated that lysenin recognizes the membrane domains where sphingomyelins are clustered. Interestingly, lysenin selectively stained the apical membranes of epithelial cells depleted of zonula occludens proteins (ZO-deficient cells), which completely lack TJs. Furthermore, the fluorescent lipid inserted into the apical membrane by fusion with the influenza virus did not diffuse to the lateral membrane in ZO-deficient epithelial cells. This study revealed that sphingomyelin-cluster formation occurs only in the apical membrane and that lipid polarity is maintained even in the absence of TJs. PMID:22294698

  8. Effect of disorder on longitudinal resistance of a graphene p-n junction in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiang-Chai; Yeung, T. C. Au; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2010-06-01

    The longitudinal resistances of a six-terminal graphene p-n junction under a perpendicular magnetic field are investigated. Because of the chirality of the Hall edge states, the longitudinal resistances on top and bottom edges of the graphene ribbon are not equal. In the presence of suitable disorder, the top-edge and bottom-edge resistances well show the plateau structures in the both unipolar and bipolar regimes, and the plateau values are determined by the Landau filling factors only. These plateau structures are in excellent agreement with the recent experiment. For the unipolar junction, the resistance plateaus emerge in the absence of impurity and they are destroyed by strong disorder. But for the bipolar junction, the resistances are very large without the plateau structures in the clean junction. The disorder can strongly reduce the resistances and leads the formation of the resistance plateaus due to the mixture of the Hall edge states in virtue of the disorder. In addition, the size effect of the junction on the resistances is studied and some extra resistance plateaus are found in the long graphene junction case. This is explained by the fact that only part of the edge states participate in the full mixing.

  9. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164 Section 9.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  10. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164 Section 9.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  11. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164 Section 9.164 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  12. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency.

  13. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  14. Supercurrent in van der Waals Josephson junction

    PubMed Central

    Yabuki, Naoto; Moriya, Rai; Arai, Miho; Sata, Yohta; Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satoru; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Supercurrent flow between two superconductors with different order parameters, a phenomenon known as the Josephson effect, can be achieved by inserting a non-superconducting material between two superconductors to decouple their wavefunctions. These Josephson junctions have been employed in fields ranging from digital to quantum electronics, yet their functionality is limited by the interface quality and use of non-superconducting material. Here we show that by exfoliating a layered dichalcogenide (NbSe2) superconductor, the van der Waals (vdW) contact between the cleaved surfaces can instead be used to construct a Josephson junction. This is made possible by recent advances in vdW heterostructure technology, with an atomically flat vdW interface free of oxidation and inter-diffusion achieved by eliminating all heat treatment during junction preparation. Here we demonstrate that this artificially created vdW interface provides sufficient decoupling of the wavefunctions of the two NbSe2 crystals, with the vdW Josephson junction exhibiting a high supercurrent transparency. PMID:26830754

  15. Overdamped Josephson junctions for digital applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febvre, P.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.; Belogolovskii, M.; Collot, R.; Lacquaniti, V.

    2013-01-01

    An interesting feature of Superconductor-Normal metal-Superconductor Josephson junctions for digital applications is due to their non-hysteretic current-voltage characteristics in a broad temperature range below Tc. This allows to design Single-Flux-Quantum (SFQ) cells without the need of external shunts. Two advantages can be drawn from this property: first the SFQ cells can be more compact which leads to a more integrated solution towards nano-devices and more complex circuits; second the absence of electrical parasitic elements associated with the wiring of resistors external to the Josephson junctions increases the performance of SFQ circuits, in particular regarding the ultimate speed of operation. For this purpose Superconductor-Normal metal-Insulator-Superconductor Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions have been recently developed at INRiM with aluminum layer thicknesses between 30 and 100 nm. They exhibit non-hysteretic current-voltage characteristics with IcRn values higher than 0.5 mV in a broad temperature range and optimal Stewart McCumber parameters at 4.2 K for RSFQ applications. The main features of obtained SNIS junctions regarding digital applications are presented.

  16. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; dAnjou, Marc-Andr; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  17. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass (Beck, 2013). Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electrical current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of (110±2) μeV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  18. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  19. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  20. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  1. Miniaturized symmetrization optics for junction laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Jacob M. (Inventor); Kaiser, Charlie J. (Inventor); Neil, Clyde C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Miniaturized optics comprising transverse and lateral cylindrical lenses composed of millimeter-sized rods with diameters, indices-of-refraction and spacing such that substantially all the light emitted as an asymmetrical beam from the emitting junction of the laser is collected and translated to a symmetrical beam.

  2. In-situ preparation of a single molecular junction with mechanically controllable break junctions in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, M.; Sekiguchi, N.; Murakoshi, K.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed the mechanically controllable break junction system (in-situ MCBJ) to investigate the conductance of a single molecular junction in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Gas or liquid sample of bridging molecules was introduced to metal electrodes with a gas doser. For the introduction of solid sample, a Knudsen cell was used. In the present system, molecular junctions can be prepared without breaking vacuum. Thus, the atomic structure and chemical property of single molecular junction could be well defined. The electrical conductance of a single ethanedithiol molecule bridging between two Au electrodes was investigated with this in-situ MCBJ system. The conductance was determined to be 0.2 G0 (G0 = 2e2/h).

  3. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  4. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  5. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  6. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided...

  7. A Holliday junction resolvase from Pyrococcus furiosus: functional similarity to Escherichia coli RuvC provides evidence for conserved mechanism of homologous recombination in Bacteria, Eukarya, and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Komori, K; Sakae, S; Shinagawa, H; Morikawa, K; Ishino, Y

    1999-08-01

    The Holliday junction is an essential intermediate of homologous recombination. RecA of Bacteria, Rad51 of Eukarya, and RadA of Archaea are structural and functional homologs. These proteins play a pivotal role in the formation of Holliday junctions from two homologous DNA duplexes. RuvC is a specific endonuclease that resolves Holliday junctions in Bacteria. A Holliday junction-resolving activity has been found in both yeast and mammalian cells. To examine whether the paradigm of homologous recombination apply to Archaea, we assayed and found the activity to resolve a synthetic Holliday junction in crude extract of Pyrococcus furiosus cells. The gene, hjc (Holliday junction cleavage), encodes a protein composed of 123 amino acids, whose sequence is not similar to that of any proteins with known function. However, all four archaea, whose total genome sequences have been published, have the homologous genes. The purified Hjc protein cleaved the recombination intermediates formed by RecA in vitro. These results support the notion that the formation and resolution of Holliday junction is the common mechanism of homologous recombination in the three domains of life. PMID:10430863

  8. Mapping of Single-Base Differences between Two DNA Strands in a Single Molecule Using Holliday Junction Nanomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Brème, Camille; Heslot, François

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work is to demonstrate a novel single-molecule DNA sequence comparison assay that is purely based on DNA mechanics. Methods A molecular construct that contained the two homologous but non-identical DNA sequences that were to be compared was prepared such that a four-way (Holliday) junction could be formed by the formation of heteroduplexes through the inter-recombination of the strands. Magnetic tweezers were used to manipulate the force and the winding applied to this construct for inducing both the formation and the migration of a Holliday junction. The end-to-end distance of the construct was measured as a function of the winding and was used to monitor the behavior of the Holliday junction in different regions of the intra-molecular recombination. Main Results In the appropriate buffer, the magnet rotation induces the migration of the Holliday junction in the regions where there is no sequence difference between the recombining sequences. In contrast, even a single-base difference between the recombining sequences leads to a long-lasting blockage of the migration in the same buffer; this effect was obtained when the junction was positioned near this locus (the site of the single-base difference) and forced toward the formation of heteroduplexes that comprise the locus. The migration blockages were detected through the identification of the formation of plectonemes. The detection of the presence of sequence differences and their respective mappings were obtained from the series of blockages that were detected. Significance This work presents a novel single-molecule sequence comparison assay that is based on the use of a Holliday junction as an ultra-sensitive nanomechanism; the mismatches act as blocking grains of sand in the Holliday “DNA gearbox”. This approach will potentially have future applications in biotechnology. PMID:23393565

  9. Generation of small mono-disperse bubbles in axisymmetric T-junction: The role of swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel A.; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.; López-Herrera, José M.

    2011-07-01

    The dynamics of micro-bubble formation in an axisymmetric T-junction for a gas-liquid system is analyzed. The approach adopted involves the creation of a tapering gas-liquid meniscus from which a steady gas ligament issues by the introduction of a coaxial swirl in the liquid stream. A simple and easy geometry (an axisymmetric T-junction) suffices to introduce the swirl and to stabilize the meniscus, leading to the formation of small monodisperse bubbles. Full three-dimensional simulations (3D) have also been conducted to show that, even when the liquid injection is not perfectly axisymmetric, the bubbles generated under conditions of some focusing swirl are distinctively smaller than bubbles created in the absence of swirl. In such cases, the bubbles, produced at the trail of the vortex axis, become a serendipitous tool to visualize the non-axisymmetrical behavior of the vortex core, as shown by the simulations.

  10. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  11. Protected quantum bits and Josephson junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, Ruslan

    In this thesis we consider a Josephson junction device whose symmetry is described by the point group Td. It can be visualized as a tetrahedron that contains two Josephson junctions on each edge. We find the conditions under which the ground state of the system is degenerate or almost degenerate. In this case, the low-energy degrees of freedom can be mapped to the Hilbert space of a quantum spin 1/2. We evaluate effects of different physical perturbations on the degenerate ground state and find that they are small for most perturbations. We argue that this system can be considered as a very promising candidate for a protected quantum bit with built-in error correction. We propose and discuss an experimental method that allows to test validity of some of the theoretical results obtained for the tetrahedral Josephson junction array and other similar symmetric circuits. We have chosen a simpler pyramidal array to demonstrate the main ideas of our method. Even though the noise resistance and theoretical decoherence time of the pyramidal array are worse than those of the more complex tetrahedral systems, it is much easier to realize the pyramid experimentally. The proposed design can be used with any symmetric Josephson junction circuit. We explore a natural generalization of the tetrahedral quantum bit and consider devices whose symmetry can be described by one of the higher-order permutation groups Sn. We study the level structure and the associated built-in protection of some conceptually simple circuits and show that these circuits have many interesting properties. In particular, their ground state can be highly degenerate and stable with respect to perturbations violating the symmetry. Unfortunately, these highly symmetric systems consist of a large number of identical Josephson junctions. This makes them too complicated for experimental realization.

  12. Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An InGaAs-based three-junction (3J) tandem thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell has been investigated to utilize more of the blackbody spectrum (from a 1,100 C general purpose heat source GPHS) efficiently. The tandem consists of three vertically stacked subcells, a 0.74-eV InGaAs cell, a 0.6- eV InGaAs cell, and a 0.55-eV InGaAs cell, as well as two interconnecting tunnel junctions. A greater than 20% TPV system efficiency was achieved by another group with a 1,040 C blackbody using a single-bandgap 0.6- eV InGaAs cell MIM (monolithic interconnected module) (30 lateral junctions) that delivered about 12 V/30 or 0.4 V/junction. It is expected that a three-bandgap tandem MIM will eventually have about 3 this voltage (1.15 V) and about half the current. A 4 A/cm2 would be generated by a single-bandgap 0.6-V InGaAs MIM, as opposed to the 2 A/cm2 available from the same spectrum when split among the three series-connected junctions in the tandem stack. This would then be about a 50% increase (3xVoc, 0.5xIsc) in output power if the proposed tandem replaced the single- bandgap MIM. The advantage of the innovation, if successful, would be a 50% increase in power conversion efficiency from radioisotope heat sources using existing thermophotovoltaics. Up to 50% more power would be generated for radioisotope GPHS deep space missions. This type of InGaAs multijunction stack could be used with terrestrial concentrator solar cells to increase efficiency from 41 to 45% or more.

  13. Thermopower measurements of atomic and molecular junctions using microheater-embedded mechanically-controllable break junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-03-01

    There has been growing interest in developing high-performance thermoelectric materials for realizing thermoelectric power generation. Quantum confinement effects in low-dimensional structures are expected to provide high electronic density of states for enhanced thermopower, and thus considered as a promising approach for achieving a high figure of merit (M. S. Dresselhaus et al., Adv. Mat. 19 (2007) 1043-1053). From this respect, it is interesting to study thermoelectric properties of atomic and molecular junctions and evaluate their potential as a thermoelectric material. Recently, we have developed a heater-embedded micro-fabricated mechanically-controllable break junction (MCBJ) for investigating the thermoelectric transport in single-atom and -molecule junctions. Using the MCBJ devices, we could repeatedly form stable junctions at room temperatures via a self-breaking mechanism with one side being heated by the adjacent microheater. In my presentation, I will show the results of simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and the electrical conductance of atom-sized Au junctions and Au-benzenedithiol-Au junctions and discuss on the geometrical dependence of thermoelectric transport.

  14. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly.

    PubMed

    Weng, Mo; Wieschaus, Eric

    2016-01-18

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin-rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell-cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  15. Evolution of the northern Main Ethiopian rift: birth of a triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenden, Ellen; Ebinger, Cynthia; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Deino, Alan; Ayalew, Dereje

    2004-07-01

    Models for the formation of the archetypal rift-rift-rift triple junction in the Afar depression have assumed the synchronous development of the Red Sea-Aden-East African rift systems soon after flood basaltic magmatism at 31 Ma, but the timing of intial rifting in the northern sector of the East African rift system had been poorly constrained. The aims of our field, geochronology, and remote sensing studies were to determine the timing and kinematics of rifting in the 3rd arm, the Main Ethiopian rift (MER), near its intersection with the southern Red Sea rift. New structural data and 10 new SCLF 40Ar/ 39Ar dates show that extension in the northern Main Ethiopian rift commenced after 11 Ma, more than 17 My after initial rifting in the southern Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. The triple junction, therefore, could have developed only during the past 11 My, or 20 My after the flood basaltic magmatism. Thus, the flood basaltic magmatism and separation of Arabia from Africa are widely separated in time from the opening of the Main Ethiopian rift, which marks the incipient Nubia-Somalia plate boundary; triple junction formation is not a primary feature of breakup above the Afar mantle plume. The East African rift system appears to have propagated northward from the Mesozoic Anza rift system into the Afar depression to cut across Oligo-Miocene rift structures of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, in response to global plate reorganisations. Structural patterns reveal a change from 130°E-directed extension to 105°E-directed extension sometime in the interval 6.6 to 3 Ma, consistent with predictions from global plate kinematic studies. The along-axis propagation of rifting in each of the three arms of the triple junction has led to a NE-migration of the triple junction since 11 Ma.

  16. Photoelectric properties of GaAs p-n-junction under illumination of intense laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ašmontas, S.; Gradauskas, J.; Sužiedėlis, A.; Šilėnas, A.; Vaičikauskas, V.; Žalys, O.; Steikūnas, G.; Steikūnienė, A.

    2014-10-01

    Results of experimental investigation of photoelectric properties of GaAs p-n-junction illuminated by short laser pulses of 1.06 μm wavelength are presented. The influence of laser radiation intensity and external bias voltage on the formation of photoresponse voltage has been studied. Free carrier heating was recognized to influence significantly the magnitude of the measured photovoltage. Possibility to improve the conversion efficiency of solar cells is discussed.

  17. A tiny bleb at Junctional Dilatation of the Posterior Communicating Artery as a Predisposing Factor for Development of a De Novo Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kuhyun; Park, Wonhyoung; Koo, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Formation of de novo aneurysm from a junctional dilatation at the origin site of the posterior communicating artery (PcomA) has been rarely reported. In this case report, three females in sixth decades of age developed a de novo aneurysm from the junctional dilatation of the PComA with a tiny bleb-like lesion over 5 years after initial presentation. PMID:26958416

  18. Regulation of tight junction permeability and occludin phosphorylation by Rhoa-p160ROCK-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hirase, T; Kawashima, S; Wong, E Y; Ueyama, T; Rikitake, Y; Tsukita, S; Yokoyama, M; Staddon, J M

    2001-03-30

    In epithelial and endothelial cells, tight junctions regulate the paracellular permeability of ions and proteins. Disruption of tight junctions by inflammation is often associated with tissue edema, but regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Using ECV304 cells as a model system, lysophosphatidic acid and histamine were found to increase the paracellular permeability of the tracer horseradish peroxidase. Cytoskeletal changes induced by these agents included stimulation of stress fiber formation and myosin light chain phosphorylation. Additionally, occludin, a tight junction protein, was a target for signaling events triggered by lysophosphatidic acid and histamine, events that resulted in its phosphorylation. A dominant-negative mutant of RhoA, RhoA T19N, or a specific inhibitor of Rho-activated kinases, Y-27632, prevented stress fiber formation, myosin light chain phosphorylation, occludin phosphorylation, and the increase in tracer flux in response to lysophosphatidic acid. In contrast, although RhoA T19N and Y-27632 blocked the cytoskeletal events induced by histamine, they had no effect on the stimulation of occludin phosphorylation or increased tracer flux, indicating that occludin phosphorylation may regulate tight junction permeability independently of cytoskeletal events. Thus, occludin is a target for receptor-initiated signaling events regulating its phosphorylation, and this phosphorylation may be a key regulator of tight junction permeability. PMID:11139571

  19. The mysterious droplet birth in a microfluidic cross junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loo, Stephanie; Gilet, Tristan

    2015-11-01

    In microfluidics flow focusing is widely used to produce water-in-oil droplets in microchannels at high frequency. Nevertheless, the scaling laws associated to droplet length, speed and frequency could not be identified yet, owing to the large number of parameters involved (incl. complex geometry). We here present an experimental study of droplet formation in a microfluidic cross-junction with a minimum number of geometrical parameters. We mostly focus on the dripping regime. The formation sequence is decomposed in two steps, inflation and squeezing, that vary differently according to both water and oil flow rates. These variations reveal several insights about the fluid flows in both phases. From there we infer the scaling law that relates droplet volume and frequency to the Capillary number associated to each inlet flow rate. This law involves a minimum of fitting parameters. We finally discuss the influence of inlet control (flow rate vs. pressure) and surfactants on the formation dynamics. Supported by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  20. Highly reliable ag nanowire flexible transparent electrode with mechanically welded junctions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byungil; Shin, Hae-A-Seul; Kim, Taegeon; Joo, Young-Chang; Han, Seung Min

    2014-08-27

    Deformation behavior of the Ag nanowire flexible transparent electrode under bending strain is studied and results in a novel approach for highly reliable Ag nanowire network with mechanically welded junctions. Bending fatigue tests up to 500,000 cycles are used to evaluate the in situ resistance change while imposing fixed, uniform bending strain. In the initial stages of bending cycles, the thermally annealed Ag nanowire networks show a reduction in fractional resistance followed by a transient and steady-state increase at later stages of cycling. SEM analysis reveals that the initial reduction in resistance is caused by mechanical welding as a result of applied bending strain, and the increase in resistance at later stages of cycling is determined to be due to the failure at the thermally locked-in junctions. Based on the observations from this study, a new methodology for highly reliable Ag nanowire network is proposed: formation of Ag nanowire networks with no prior thermal annealing but localized junction formation through simple application of mechanical bending strain. The non-annealed, mechanically welded Ag nanowire network shows significantly enhanced cyclic reliability with essentially 0% increase in resistance due to effective formation of localized wire-to-wire contact. PMID:24789010

  1. Indentation Tests Reveal Geometry-Regulated Stiffening of Nanotube Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Yang, Yang; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Asif, Syed; Penev, Evgeni S; Yakobson, Boris I; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-01-13

    Here we report a unique method to locally determine the mechanical response of individual covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in various configurations such as "X", "Y", and "Λ"-like. The setup is based on in situ indentation using a picoindenter integrated within a scanning electron microscope. This allows for precise mapping between junction geometry and mechanical behavior and uncovers geometry-regulated junction stiffening. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the dominant contribution to the nanoindentation response is due to the CNT walls stretching at the junction. Targeted synthesis of desired junction geometries can therefore provide a "structural alphabet" for construction of macroscopic CNT networks with tunable mechanical response. PMID:26618517

  2. β2-syntrophin and Par-3 promote an apicobasal Rac activity gradient at cell-cell junctions by differentially regulating Tiam1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Natalie A.; Porter, Andrew P.; Whalley, Helen J.; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Jones, Richard C.; Syed, Azharuddin Sajid; Bjartell, Anders; Anderson, Kurt I.; Malliri, Angeliki

    2012-01-01

    Although Rac and its activator Tiam1 are known to stimulate cell-cell adhesion, the mechanisms regulating their activity in cell-cell junction formation are poorly understood. Here, we identify β2-syntrophin as a Tiam1 interactor required for optimal cell-cell adhesion. We show that during tight junction (TJ) assembly β2-syntrophin promotes Tiam1-Rac activity, in contrast to the function of the apical determinant Par-3 whose inhibition of Tiam1-Rac activity is necessary for TJ assembly. We further demonstrate that β2-syntrophin localises more basally than Par-3 at cell-cell junctions, thus generating an apicobasal Rac activity gradient at developing cell-cell junctions. Targeting active Rac to TJs shows that this gradient is required for optimal TJ assembly and apical lumen formation. Consistently, β2-syntrophin depletion perturbs Tiam1 and Rac localisation at cell-cell junctions and causes defects in apical lumen formation. We conclude that β2-syntrophin and Par-3 finetune Rac activity along cell-cell junctions controlling TJ assembly and the establishment of apicobasal polarity. PMID:23103911

  3. De novo-generated small palindromes are characteristic of amplicon boundary junction of double minutes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Yu, Yang; Meng, Xiangning; Fan, Yihui; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Chunshui; Yue, Zhichao; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Chunyu; Yu, Lisa; Ji, Wei; Jia, Xueyuan; Guan, Rongwei; Wu, Jie; Yu, Jingcui; Bai, Jing; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Mingrong; Lee, Ki-Young; Sun, Wenjing; Fu, Songbin

    2013-01-01

    Double minutes (DMs) are hallmarks of gene amplification. However, their molecular structure and the mechanisms of formation are largely unknown. To elucidate the structure and underlying molecular mechanism of DMs, we obtained and cloned DMs using microdissection; and degenerated oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) from the ovarian cancer cell line UACC-1598. Two large amplicons, the 284 kb AmpMYCN, originating from locus 2p24.3 and the 391 kb AmpEIF5A2, from locus 3q26.2, were found co-amplified on the same DMs. The two amplicons are joined through a complex 7 kb junction DNA sequence. Analysis of the junction has revealed three de novo created small palindromes surrounding the six breakpoints. Consistent with these observations, we further found that 70% of the 57 reported DM junction sequences have de novo creation of small palindromic sequences surrounding the breakpoints. Together, our findings indicate that de novo-generated small palindromic sequences are characteristic of amplicon boundary junctions on DMs. It is possible that the de novo-generated small palindromic sequences, which may be generated through non-homologous end joining in concert with a novel DNA repair machinery, play a common role in amplicon rejoining and gene amplification. PMID:23382041

  4. The adherens junctions control susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Lauren M.; Marceau, Caleb D.; Starkl, Philipp M.; Lumb, Jennifer H.; Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Cooper, Rachel L.; Merakou, Christina; Bouley, Donna M.; Meng, Wenxiang; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Galli, Stephen J.; Bagnoli, Fabio; Citi, Sandra; Carette, Jan E.; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a transient skin colonizer and a formidable human pathogen, ranking among the leading causes of skin and soft tissue infections as well as severe pneumonia. The secreted bacterial α-toxin is essential for S. aureus virulence in these epithelial diseases. To discover host cellular factors required for α-toxin cytotoxicity, we conducted a genetic screen using mutagenized haploid human cells. Our screen identified a cytoplasmic member of the adherens junctions, plekstrin-homology domain containing protein 7 (PLEKHA7), as the second most significantly enriched gene after the known α-toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). Here we report a new, unexpected role for PLEKHA7 and several components of cellular adherens junctions in controlling susceptibility to S. aureus α-toxin. We find that despite being injured by α-toxin pore formation, PLEKHA7 knockout cells recover after intoxication. By infecting PLEKHA7−/− mice with methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain, we demonstrate that this junctional protein controls disease severity in both skin infection and lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Our results suggest that adherens junctions actively control cellular responses to a potent pore-forming bacterial toxin and identify PLEKHA7 as a potential nonessential host target to reduce S. aureus virulence during epithelial infections. PMID:26489655

  5. Coherent transmission of nodal Dirac fermions through a graphene-based superconducting double barrier junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chunxu; Wei, Ke-Wei; Yang, Gui; Yang, Yanling

    2013-05-01

    Transport characteristics of relativistic electrons through graphene-based d-wave superconducting double barrier junction and ferromagnet/ d-wave superconductor/normal metal double junction have been investigated based on the Dirac-Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation. We have first presented the results of superconducting double barrier junction. In the subgap regime, both the crossed Andreev and nonlocal tunneling conductance all oscillate with the bias voltage due to the formation of Andreev bound states in the normal metal region. Moreover, the critical voltage beyond which the crossed Andreev conductance becomes to zero decreases with increasing value of superconducting pair potential α. In the presence of the ferromagnetism, the MR through graphene-based ferromagnet/ d-wave superconductor/normal metal double junction has been investigated. It is shown that the MR increases from exchange splitting h 0=0 to h 0= E F (Fermi energy), and then it goes down. At h 0= E F, MR reaches its maximum 100. In contrast to the case of a single superconducting barrier, Andreev bound states also manifest itself in the zero bias MR, which result in a series of peaks except the maximum one at h 0= E F. Besides, the resonance peak of the MR can appear at certain bias voltage and structure parameter. Those phenomena mean that the coherent transmission can be tuned by superconducting pair potential, structure parameter, and external bias voltage, which benefits the spin-polarized electron device based on the graphene materials.

  6. Nonredundant roles of cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin isoforms in regulation of epithelial apical junctions.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Somesh; Naydenov, Nayden G; Harris, Gianni; Dugina, Vera; Morgan, Kathleen G; Chaponnier, Christine; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2012-09-01

    Association with the actin cytoskeleton is critical for normal architecture and dynamics of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs). Epithelial cells express β-cytoplasmic (β-CYA) and γ-cytoplasmic (γ-CYA) actins, which have different cellular localization and functions. This study elucidates the roles of cytoplasmic actins in regulating structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in model intestinal epithelia. Immunofluorescence labeling and latrunculin B treatment reveal affiliation of dynamic β-CYA filaments with newly assembled and mature AJs, whereas an apical γ-CYA pool is composed of stable perijunctional bundles and rapidly turning-over nonjunctional filaments. The functional effects of cytoplasmic actins on epithelial junctions are examined by using isoform-specific small interfering RNAs and cell-permeable inhibitory peptides. These experiments demonstrate unique roles of β-CYA and γ-CYA in regulating the steady-state integrity of AJs and TJs, respectively. Furthermore, β-CYA is selectively involved in establishment of apicobasal cell polarity. Both actin isoforms are essential for normal barrier function of epithelial monolayers, rapid AJ/TJ reassembly, and formation of three-dimensional cysts. Cytoplasmic actin isoforms play unique roles in regulating structure and permeability of epithelial junctions. PMID:22855531

  7. The adherens junctions control susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    PubMed

    Popov, Lauren M; Marceau, Caleb D; Starkl, Philipp M; Lumb, Jennifer H; Shah, Jimit; Guerrera, Diego; Cooper, Rachel L; Merakou, Christina; Bouley, Donna M; Meng, Wenxiang; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Galli, Stephen J; Bagnoli, Fabio; Citi, Sandra; Carette, Jan E; Amieva, Manuel R

    2015-11-17

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a transient skin colonizer and a formidable human pathogen, ranking among the leading causes of skin and soft tissue infections as well as severe pneumonia. The secreted bacterial α-toxin is essential for S. aureus virulence in these epithelial diseases. To discover host cellular factors required for α-toxin cytotoxicity, we conducted a genetic screen using mutagenized haploid human cells. Our screen identified a cytoplasmic member of the adherens junctions, plekstrin-homology domain containing protein 7 (PLEKHA7), as the second most significantly enriched gene after the known α-toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). Here we report a new, unexpected role for PLEKHA7 and several components of cellular adherens junctions in controlling susceptibility to S. aureus α-toxin. We find that despite being injured by α-toxin pore formation, PLEKHA7 knockout cells recover after intoxication. By infecting PLEKHA7(-/-) mice with methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain, we demonstrate that this junctional protein controls disease severity in both skin infection and lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Our results suggest that adherens junctions actively control cellular responses to a potent pore-forming bacterial toxin and identify PLEKHA7 as a potential nonessential host target to reduce S. aureus virulence during epithelial infections. PMID:26489655

  8. Indium oxide thin-film homo-junctions: Morphology and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Jolanta; Villuendas, Francisco; Pilar Lozano, María; Díez, Isabel

    2013-08-01

    Indium oxide shows an unusual combination of electrical and optical properties that give rise to a broad range of applications in optoelectronic devices. Here, we report results of structural, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical transport studies of transparent homo-junctions, obtained by sequential growth of polycrystalline thin layers of indium oxide under O2-rich and O2-poor conditions. We find that the growth temperature, which affects significantly film morphology, is critical for the rectifying behavior of the junctions. Only junctions grown at about 350 °C are rectifying. We also find that p-type-like layers have higher concentration of inter-grain oxygen than n-type layers, presumably coming from oxygen-rich deposition conditions and from much larger number of grain boundaries than in n-type layers. We conjecture that the segregation of oxygen ions at grain boundaries is responsible for the formation of inversion layers in O2-rich films and their apparent p-type dc conduction. This mechanism significantly modifies the capacitance-voltage characteristics of the junctions. However, the rectifying mechanism can be accounted for by a space-charge layer at the p-n interface. Such behavior might be important in other polycrystalline thin films with a large number of interface defects at grain boundaries.

  9. Oligodendrocyte gap junction loss and disconnection from reactive astrocytes in multiple sclerosis gray matter.

    PubMed

    Markoullis, Kyriaki; Sargiannidou, Irene; Schiza, Natasa; Roncaroli, Federico; Reynolds, Richard; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2014-09-01

    Gap junctions are essential for glial cell function and have been increasingly implicated in multiple sclerosis (MS). Because increasing cortical abnormalities correlate with disease progression and cognitive dysfunction, we examined the expression of oligodendrocytic connexin32 (Cx32) and Cx47 and their astrocytic partners Cx30 and Cx43 in cortical lesions and normal-appearing gray matter (NAGM) in MS patients. Postmortem brain tissue samples from 9 MS cases were compared with 10 controls using real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, and immunohistochemical analyses. Connexin32 and Cx47 gap junction formation in oligodendrocytes was reduced within lesions, whereas Cx32 loss also extended to NAGM. In contrast, astrocytic Cx30 expression was increased within cortical lesions, whereas Cx43 was elevated in both lesions and NAGM. Diffuse microglial activation and marked astrogliotic changes accompanied these connexin abnormalities. Increased expression of Cx43 correlated with inflammatory load (r = 0.828, p = 0.042), whereas Cx32 expression correlated with longer disease duration and, therefore, milder course (r = 0.825, p = 0.043). Thus, there is a loss of intramyelin and intercellular oligodendrocyte gap junctions in MS gray matter lesions and NAGM, whereas interastrocytic gap junctions are increased, reflecting astrogliosis. These changes correlate with inflammation and disease duration and suggest that disconnection of oligodendrocytes from reactive astrocytes may play a role in failed remyelination and disease progression. PMID:25101702

  10. Dynamics of atomic scale metallic junctions and adsorbed Lewis base adsorbates studied by fluctuation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tai-Wei

    Atomic-scale junctions (ASJs) are the ultimate thin nanowires that exhibit great potential as chemical (Lewis bases) sensors through adsorbate-induced conductance changes. The goal of this work was to fabricate robust ASJs for sensing applications that fully utilize this potential and detect chemical noise. Au-Ag-Au bimetallic ASJs were formed with high yield using a novel fabrication scheme that creates initially overgrown junctions followed by controllable thinning processes. Ag deposition was galvanically triggered to initiate junction formation across specially prepared Au electrodes in the presence of aqueous Ag(I). The process was then self-terminated through the agency of an external resistor. Junction thinning could be performed via three different approaches: self-dissolution at low Ag(I) concentration, current-induced electromigration, or potential-induced oxidation. The fabricated ASJs showed robustness, enabling pyridine sensing studies. The fluctuation of surface population at equilibrium was reflected in the noise in steady-state electrical signals which cannot be observed directly. Fluctuation spectroscopy was used to isolate and study this chemical noise. The combination of ASJs with fluctuation spectroscopy constitutes a powerful method of studying adsorption- desorption kinetics at high sensitivity and may lead to quantification of single molecules on atomic surfaces by purely electrical measurements.

  11. The energy barrier at noble metal/TiO{sub 2} junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein-Babaei, F. E-mail: fhbabaei@yahoo.com; Lajvardi, Mehdi M. Alaei-Sheini, Navid

    2015-02-23

    Nobel metal/TiO{sub 2} structures are used as catalysts in chemical reactors, active components in TiO{sub 2}-based electronic devices, and connections between such devices and the outside circuitry. Here, we investigate the energy barrier at the junctions between vacuum-deposited Ag, Au, and Pt thin films and TiO{sub 2} layers by recording their electrical current vs. voltage diagrams and spectra of optical responses. Deposited Au/, Pt/, and Ag/TiO{sub 2} behave like contacts with zero junction energy barriers, but the thermal annealing of the reverse-biased devices for an hour at 523 K in air converts them to Schottky diodes with high junction energy barriers, decreasing their reverse electric currents up to 10{sup 6} times. Similar thermal processing in vacuum or pure argon proved ineffective. The highest energy barrier and the lowest reverse current among the devices examined belong to the annealed Ag/TiO{sub 2} contacts. The observed electronic features are described based on the physicochemical parameters of the constituting materials. The formation of higher junction barriers with rutile than with anatase is demonstrated.

  12. Claudins in occluding junctions of humans and flies.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mikio; Tsukita, Shoichiro

    2006-04-01

    The epithelial barrier is fundamental to the physiology of most metazoan organ systems. Occluding junctions, including vertebrate tight junctions and invertebrate septate junctions, contribute to the epithelial barrier function by restricting free diffusion of solutes through the paracellular route. The recent identification and characterization of claudins, which are tight junction-associated adhesion molecules, gives insight into the molecular architecture of tight junctions and their barrier-forming mechanism in vertebrates. Mice lacking the expression of various claudins, and human hereditary diseases with claudin mutations, have revealed that the claudin-based barrier function of tight junctions is indispensable in vivo. Interestingly, claudin-like molecules have recently been identified in septate junctions of Drosophila. Here, we present an overview of recent progress in claudin studies conducted in mammals and flies. PMID:16537104

  13. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-27

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules. PMID:27215814

  14. Fabrication and characterization of graphene PN junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dennis; Zhou, Xiaodong; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark; Ross, Frances; Pasupathy, Abhay

    Theoretical predictions of relativistic Klein tunneling and Veselago lensing in graphene have inspired efforts to fabricate graphene p-n junctions where such phenomena could be realized and studied via electronic transport or scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Here we will discuss the interplay between device geometry and our measurements in a 4-probe STM, which allows for simultaneous back gating, biasing, and scanning of a micromechanically exfoliated graphene sample. A sharp p-n junction is essential to the manifestation of these aforementioned effects, and we examine the benefits and drawbacks of several routes toward this goal from a fabrication standpoint. These methods include lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. Finally, we will describe our subsequent characterization results for each, including information about topography and spatial mapping of the density of states. This work is supported by NSF IGERT (DGE-1069240).

  15. Tight junction physiology of pleural mesothelium.

    PubMed

    Markov, Alexander G; Amasheh, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Pleura consists of visceral and parietal cell layers, producing a fluid, which is necessary for lubrication of the pleural space. Function of both mesothelial cell layers is necessary for the regulation of a constant pleural fluid volume and composition to facilitate lung movement during breathing. Recent studies have demonstrated that pleural mesothelial cells show a distinct expression pattern of tight junction proteins which are known to ubiquitously determine paracellular permeability. Most tight junction proteins provide a sealing function to epithelia, but some have been shown to have a paracellular channel function or ambiguous properties. Here we provide an in-depth review of the current knowledge concerning specific functional contribution of these proteins determining transport and barrier function of pleural mesothelium. PMID:25009499

  16. Tight junction physiology of pleural mesothelium

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Alexander G.; Amasheh, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Pleura consists of visceral and parietal cell layers, producing a fluid, which is necessary for lubrication of the pleural space. Function of both mesothelial cell layers is necessary for the regulation of a constant pleural fluid volume and composition to facilitate lung movement during breathing. Recent studies have demonstrated that pleural mesothelial cells show a distinct expression pattern of tight junction proteins which are known to ubiquitously determine paracellular permeability. Most tight junction proteins provide a sealing function to epithelia, but some have been shown to have a paracellular channel function or ambiguous properties. Here we provide an in-depth review of the current knowledge concerning specific functional contribution of these proteins determining transport and barrier function of pleural mesothelium. PMID:25009499

  17. Nonlinear dynamics in a magnetic Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Silas; Blanter, Ya. M.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2012-08-01

    We theoretically consider a Josephson junction formed by a ferromagnetic spacer with a strong spin-orbit interaction or a magnetic spin valve, i.e., a bilayer with one static and one free layer. Electron spin transport facilitates a nonlinear dynamical coupling between the magnetic moment and charge current, which consists of normal and superfluid components. By phenomenologically adding reactive and dissipative interactions (guided by structural and Onsager symmetries), we construct magnetic torques and charge pumping, whose microscopic origins are also discussed. A stability analysis of our coupled nonlinear systems generates a rich phase diagram with fixed points, limit cycles, and quasiperiodic states. Our findings reduce to the known phase diagrams for current-biased nonmagnetic Josephson junctions, on the one hand, and spin-torque driven magnetic films, on the other, in the absence of coupling between the magnetic and superconducting order parameters.

  18. Laminin 332 in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Kiritsi, Dimitra; Has, Cristina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Laminin 332 is an essential component of the dermal-epidermal junction, a highly specialized basement membrane zone that attaches the epidermis to the dermis and thereby provides skin integrity and resistance to external mechanical forces. Mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes that encode the three constituent polypeptide chains, α3, β3 and γ2, abrogate or perturb the functions of laminin 332. The phenotypic consequences are diminished dermal-epidermal adhesion and, as clinical symptoms, skin fragility and mechanically induced blistering. The disorder is designated as junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). This article delineates the signs and symptoms of the different forms of JEB, the mutational spectrum, genotype-phenotype correlations as well as perspectives for future molecular therapies. PMID:23076207

  19. Exercise modulates synaptic acetylcholinesterase at neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Blotnick, E; Anglister, L

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase plays a major role in neuromuscular transmission and is regulated by neuromuscular activity. Since fast-twitch motor units are recruited with increased motor demand, we examined acetylcholinesterase regulation in rat leg muscles following treadmill training. Total acetylcholinesterase and specifically the membrane-bound tetramer increased in exercised fast-, but not slow-twitch muscles, while other isoforms remained unchanged. Synaptic acetylcholinesterase increased markedly in neuromuscular junctions of trained fibers, without concomitant changes in synaptic acetylcholine receptor, thus elevating synaptic acetylcholinesterase/receptor ratios. Electron microscopy showed that acetylcholinesterase increased in postjunctional folds and primary cleft, where it was added adjacent to the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Thus, although the primary acetylcholinesterase at the neuromuscular junction is the collagen-tailed asymmetric isoform associated with synaptic basal lamina, physiological demands such as strenuous exercise, or potentially pathological conditions, can selectively recruit the membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase tetramer to the synapse for optimal synaptic transmission. PMID:26820598

  20. Dissipation and traversal time in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Ranfagni, Anedio; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    The various ways of evaluating dissipative effects in macroscopic quantum tunneling are re-examined. The results obtained by using functional integration, while confirming those of previously given treatments, enable a comparison with available experimental results relative to Josephson junctions. A criterion based on the shortening of the semiclassical traversal time tau of the barrier with regard to dissipation can be established, according to which DELTAtau/tau > or approx. N/Q, where Q is the quality factor of the junction and N is a numerical constant of order unity. The best agreement with the experiments is obtained for N=1.11, as it results from a semiempirical analysis based on an increase in the potential barrier caused by dissipative effects.

  1. Excess junction current of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, E. Y.; Legge, R. N.; Christidis, N.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of n(plus)-p silicon solar cells with 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 10 ohm-cm p-type base materials have been examined in detail. In addition to the usual I-V measurements, we have studied the temperature dependence of the slope of the I-V curve at the origin by the lock-in technique. The excess junction current coefficient (Iq) deduced from the slope at the origin depends on the square root of the intrinsic carrier concentration. The Iq obtained from the I-V curve fitting over the entire forward bias region at various temperatures shows the same temperature dependence. This result, in addition to the presence of an aging effect, suggest that the surface channel effect is the dominant cause of the excess junction current.

  2. Nonreciprocity in Active Josephson Junction Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Archana

    This thesis work explores different ideas for realizing nonreciprocal photon dynamics using active parametric circuits based on Josephson junctions. The motivation stems from developing non-magnetic alternatives to existing nonreciprocal devices, invariably employing magnetic materials and fields and hence limited in their application potential for use with on-chip microwave superconducting circuits. The main idea rests on the fact the "pump" wave (or the carrier) in an active nonlinear system changes the phase of a small modulation signal just as the magnetic field rotates the polarization of the wave propagating in a Faraday medium. All the implementations discussed in this thesis draw from the basic idea of chaining together discrete parametric processes with an optimal phase difference between the respective pumps to realize nonreciprocity. Though discussed specifically for microwave applications using Josephson junctions as a platform, the ideas presented here are generic enough to be adopted for any nonlinear system implementing frequency mixing.

  3. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  4. Generalized junction conditions for collapsing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, G.; Maharaj, S. D.; Govender, M.

    2014-03-01

    We have constructed the general junction conditions on the surface of a dissipating relativistic star. The stellar exterior is a spacetime described by the generalised Vaidya metric and a two-fluid energy-momentum tensor, and therefore, defines the local atmosphere, which must be a super-position of standard null radiation and a general null fluid. We have highlighted briefly that our result will effect the physics of the dissipation at the stellar boundary.

  5. Double- and triple-barrier Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, R.; Giordano, A.

    2014-11-01

    A generalization of the semi-classical model describing the Josephson dynamics of tri-layer superconducting systems is given by assuming a constant non-null arbitrary superconducting phase for the inner electrode and the presence of inhomogeneities in the superconducting coupling between electrodes. Extension of the model to triple-barrier Josephson junctions is proposed. Integer and fractional Shapiro steps are predicted and their amplitudes are calculated.

  6. Quantum dynamics in the bosonic Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Chuchem, Maya; Cohen, Doron; Smith-Mannschott, Katrina; Hiller, Moritz; Kottos, Tsampikos; Vardi, Amichay

    2010-11-15

    We employ a semiclassical picture to study dynamics in a bosonic Josephson junction with various initial conditions. Phase diffusion of coherent preparations in the Josephson regime is shown to depend on the initial relative phase between the two condensates. For initially incoherent condensates, we find a universal value for the buildup of coherence in the Josephson regime. In addition, we contrast two seemingly similar on-separatrix coherent preparations, finding striking differences in their convergence to classicality as the number of particles increases.

  7. Josephson Effect in SFNS Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karminskaya, T. Yu.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Sidorenko, A. S.

    The critical current, I C, of Josephson junctions both in ramp-type (S-FN-S) and in overlap (SNF-FN-FNS, SN-FN-NS, SNF-N-FNS) geometries has been calculated in the frame of linearized Usadel equations (S-superconductor, F-ferromagnetic, N-normal metal). For the ramp-type structures, in which S electrodes contact directly the end walls of FN bilayer, it is shown that I C may exhibit damping oscillations as a function of both the distance L between superconductors and thicknesses d F,N of ferromagnetic and normal layers. The conditions have been determined under which the decay length and period of oscillation of I C(L) at fixed d F are of the order of decay length of superconducting correlations in the N metal, ξN, that is much larger than in F film. In overlap configurations, in which S films are placed on the top of NF bilayer, the studied junctions have complex SNF or SN electrodes (N or NF bilayer are situated under a superconductor). We demonstrate that in these geometries the critical current can exceed that in ramp-type junctions. Based on these results, the choice of the most practically applicable geometry is discussed.

  8. Single-molecule junctions beyond electronic transport.

    PubMed

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Venkataraman, Latha

    2013-06-01

    The idea of using individual molecules as active electronic components provided the impetus to develop a variety of experimental platforms to probe their electronic transport properties. Among these, single-molecule junctions in a metal-molecule-metal motif have contributed significantly to our fundamental understanding of the principles required to realize molecular-scale electronic components from resistive wires to reversible switches. The success of these techniques and the growing interest of other disciplines in single-molecule-level characterization are prompting new approaches to investigate metal-molecule-metal junctions with multiple probes. Going beyond electronic transport characterization, these new studies are highlighting both the fundamental and applied aspects of mechanical, optical and thermoelectric properties at the atomic and molecular scales. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of quantum interference and manipulation of electronic and nuclear spins in single-molecule circuits are heralding new device concepts with no classical analogues. In this Review, we present the emerging methods being used to interrogate multiple properties in single molecule-based devices, detail how these measurements have advanced our understanding of the structure-function relationships in molecular junctions, and discuss the potential for future research and applications. PMID:23736215

  9. Regulation of the MDCK cell tight junction.

    PubMed

    Kovbasnjuk, O N; Szmulowicz, U; Spring, K R

    1998-01-01

    The sodium flux across individual tight junctions (TJ) of low-resistance MDCK cell monolayers grown on glass coverslips was determined as a measure of paracellular permeability. Increases in perfusate glucose concentration from 5 to 25 mM decreased tight junction Na permeability. This permeability decrease was not specific as nonmetabolizable analogues of glucose caused similar diminutions in TJ Na permeability. Stimulation of protein kinase A increased TJ Na permeability, and inhibition of protein kinase A decreased TJ Na permeability. Transepithelial electrical resistance of monolayers grown on permeable supports did not change as predicted from the observed alterations in TJ Na permeability of monolayers grown on glass coverslips. Fluorescent labeling of cell F-actin showed that increased F-actin in the perijunctional ring correlated with higher TJ Na permeability. Although a low dose of cytochalasin D did not change TJ Na permeability, it disrupted the cytoskeleton and blocked the decrease in TJ Na permeability caused by glucose. Cytochalasin D failed to block the effects of protein kinase A stimulation or inhibition on TJ Na permeability. We conclude that tight junction sodium permeability is regulated both by protein kinase A activity and by other processes involving the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9430624

  10. Josephson junction in a thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.; Dobrovitski, V. V.; Clem, J. R.; Mawatari, Yasunori; Mints, R. G.

    2001-04-01

    The phase difference {phi}(y) for a vortex at a line Josephson junction in a thin film attenuates at large distances as a power law, unlike the case of a bulk junction where it approaches exponentially the constant values at infinities. The field of a Josephson vortex is a superposition of fields of standard Pearl vortices distributed along the junction with the line density {phi}'(y)/2{pi}. We study the integral equation for {phi}(y) and show that the phase is sensitive to the ratio l/{Lambda}, where l={lambda}{sub J}{sup 2}/{lambda}{sub L}, {Lambda}=2{lambda}{sub L}{sup 2}/d, {lambda}{sub L}, and {lambda}{sub J} are the London and Josephson penetration depths, and d is the film thickness. For l<<{Lambda}, the vortex ''core'' of the size l is nearly temperature independent, while the phase ''tail'' scales as l{Lambda}/y{sup 2}={lambda}{sub J}2{lambda}{sub L}/d/y{sup 2}; i.e., it diverges as T{yields}T{sub c}. For l>>{Lambda}, both the core and the tail have nearly the same characteristic length l{Lambda}.

  11. Primary thermometry with nanoscale tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvi, K.P.; Kauppinen, J.P.; Paalanen, M.A.; Pekola, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    We have found current-voltage (I-V) and conductance (dI/dV) characteristics of arrays of nanoscale tunnel junctions between normal metal electrodes to exhibit suitable features for primary thermometry. The current through a uniform array depends on the ratio of the thermal energy k{sub B}T and the electrostatic charging energy E{sub c} of the islands between the junctions and is completely blocked by Coulomb repulsion at T=0 and at small voltages eV/2 {<=} Ec. In the opposite limit, k{sub B}T {much_gt} E{sub c}, the width of the conductance minimum scales linearly and universally with T and N, the number of tunnel junctions, and qualifies as a primary thermometer. The zero bias drop in the conductance is proportional to T{sup -1} and can be used as a secondary thermometer. We will show with Monte Carlo simulations how background charge and nonuniformities of the array will affect the thermometer.

  12. Gap junctions in several tissues share antigenic determinants with liver gap junctions.

    PubMed Central

    Dermietzel, R; Leibstein, A; Frixen, U; Janssen-Timmen, U; Traub, O; Willecke, K

    1984-01-01

    Using affinity-purified antibodies against mouse liver gap junction protein (26 K), discrete fluorescent spots were seen by indirect immunofluorescence labelling on apposed membranes of contiguous cells in several mouse and rat tissues: pancreas (exocrine part), kidney, small intestine (epithelium and circular smooth muscle), Fallopian tube, endometrium, and myometrium of delivering rats. No reaction was seen on sections of myocardium, ovaries and lens. Specific labelling of gap junction plaques was demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy on ultrathin frozen sections through liver and the exocrine part of pancreas after treatment with gold protein A. Weak immunoreactivity was found on the endocrine part of the pancreas (i.e., Langerhans islets) after glibenclamide treatment of mice and rats, which causes an increase of insulin secretion and of the size as well as the number of gap junction plaques in cells of Langerhans islets. Furthermore, the affinity purified anti-liver 26 K antibodies were shown by immunoblot to react with proteins of similar mol. wt. in pancreas and kidney membranes. Taken together these results suggest that gap junctions from several, morphogenetically different tissues have specific antigenic sites in common. The different extent of specific immunoreactivity of anti-liver 26 K antibodies with different tissues is likely due to differences in size and number of gap junctions although structural differences cannot be excluded. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6209130

  13. Crooked, Coiled and Crimpled are three Ly6-like proteins required for proper localization of septate junction components

    PubMed Central

    Nilton, Anna; Oshima, Kenzi; Zare, Fariba; Byri, Sunitha; Nannmark, Ulf; Nyberg, Kevin G.; Fehon, Richard G.; Uv, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular junction formation is an elaborate process that is dependent on the regulated synthesis, assembly and membrane targeting of constituting components. Here, we report on three Drosophila Ly6-like proteins essential for septate junction (SJ) formation. SJs provide a paracellular diffusion barrier and appear molecularly and structurally similar to vertebrate paranodal septate junctions. We show that Crooked (Crok), a small GPI-anchored Ly6-like protein, is required for septa formation and barrier functions. In embryos that lack Crok, SJ components are produced but fail to accumulate at the plasma membrane. Crok is detected in intracellular puncta and acts tissue-autonomously, which suggests that it resides in intracellular vesicles to assist the cell surface localization of SJ components. In addition, we demonstrate that two related Ly6 proteins, Coiled (Cold) and Crimpled (Crim), are required for SJ formation and function in a tissue-autonomous manner, and that Cold also localizes to intracellular vesicles. Specifically, Crok and Cold are required for correct membrane trafficking of Neurexin IV, a central SJ component. The non-redundant requirement for Crok, Cold, Crim and Boudin (Bou; another Ly6 protein that was recently shown to be involved in SJ formation) suggests that members of this conserved family of proteins cooperate in the assembly of SJ components, possibly by promoting core SJ complex formation in intracellular compartments associated with membrane trafficking. PMID:20570942

  14. Propofol depresses cisplatin cytotoxicity via the inhibition of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xiyan; Wang, Qin; Ge, Hui; Tao, Liang

    2016-06-01

    The general anesthetic, propofol, affects chemotherapeutic activity, however, the mechanism underlying its effects remains to be fully elucidated. Our previous study showed that tramadol and flurbiprofen depressed the cytotoxicity of cisplatin via the inhibition of gap junction (GJ) intercellular communication (GJIC) in connexin (Cx)32 HeLa cells. The present study investigated whether the effects of propofol on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin were mediated by GJ in U87 glioma cells and Cx26‑transfected HeLa cells. Standard colony formation assay was used to determine the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Parachute dye coupling assay was used to measure GJ function, and western blot analysis was used to determine the expression levels of Cx32. The results revealed that exposure of the U87 glioma cells and the Cx26-transfected HeLa cells to cisplatin for 1 h reduced clonogenic survival in low density cultures (without GJs) and high density cultures (with GJs). However, the toxic effect was higher in the high density culture. In addition, pretreatment of the cells with propofol significantly reduced cisplatin‑induced cytotoxicity, but only in the presence of functional GJs. Furthermore, propofol significantly inhibited dye coupling through junctional channels, and a long duration of exposure of the cells to propofol downregulated the expression levels of Cx43 and Cx26. These results demonstrated that the inhibition of GJIC by propofol affected the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. The present study provides evidence of a novel mechanism underlying the effects of analgesics in counteracting chemotherapeutic efficiency. PMID:27082707

  15. LRP4 Is Critical for Neuromuscular Junction Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Arnab; Lu, Yisheng; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Bowman, Andrew; Shen, Chengyong; Li, Lei; Xiong, Wen-cheng

    2014-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a synapse between motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibers, and is critical for control of muscle contraction. Its formation requires neuronal agrin that acts by binding to LRP4 to stimulate MuSK. Mutations have been identified in agrin, MuSK, and LRP4 in patients with congenital myasthenic syndrome, and patients with myasthenia gravis develop antibodies against agrin, LRP4, and MuSK. However, it remains unclear whether the agrin signaling pathway is critical for NMJ maintenance because null mutation of any of the three genes is perinatal lethal. In this study, we generated imKO mice, a mutant strain whose LRP4 gene can be deleted in muscles by doxycycline (Dox) treatment. Ablation of the LRP4 gene in adult muscle enabled studies of its role in NMJ maintenance. We demonstrate that Dox treatment of P30 mice reduced muscle strength and compound muscle action potentials. AChR clusters became fragmented with diminished junctional folds and synaptic vesicles. The amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials were reduced, indicating impaired neuromuscular transmission and providing cellular mechanisms of adult LRP4 deficiency. We showed that LRP4 ablation led to the loss of synaptic agrin and the 90 kDa fragments, which occurred ahead of other prejunctional and postjunctional components, suggesting that LRP4 may regulate the stability of synaptic agrin. These observations demonstrate that LRP4 is essential for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the NMJ and that loss of muscle LRP4 in adulthood alone is sufficient to cause myasthenic symptoms. PMID:25319686

  16. Analysis of astronomical data from optical superconducting tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, J. H.; Reynolds, A. P.; Perryman, Michael A.; Favata, Fabio; Peacock, Anthony J.

    2002-06-01

    Currently operating optical superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors, developed at the European Space Agency (ESA), can simultaneously measure the wavelength ((Delta) (gamma) equals 50 nm at 500 nm) and arrival time (to within approximately 5 microsecond(s) ) of individual photons in the range 310 to 720 nm with an efficiency of approximately 70%, and with count rates of the order of 5000 photons s-1 per junction. A number of STJs placed in an array format generates 4-D data: photon arrival time, energy, and array element (X,Y). Such STJ cameras are ideally suited for, e.g., high-time-resolution spectrally resolved monitoring of variable sources or low- resolution spectroscopy of faint extragalactic objects. The reduction of STJ data involves detector efficiency correction, atmospheric extinction correction, sky background subtraction, and, unlike that of data from CCD-based systems, a more complex energy calibration, barycentric arrival time correction, energy range selection, and time binning; these steps are, in many respects, analogous to procedures followed in high-energy astrophysics. We discuss these calibration steps in detail using a representative observation of the cataclysmic variable UZ Fornacis; these data were obtained with ESA's S-Cam2 6 X 6-pixel device. We furthermore discuss issues related to telescope pointing and guiding, differential atmospheric refraction, and atmosphere-induced image motion and image smearing (`seeing') in the focal plane. We also present a simple and effective recipe for extracting the evolution of atmospheric seeing with time from any science exposure and discuss a number of caveats in the interpretation of STJ-based time-binned data, such as light curves and hardness ratio plots.

  17. Construction of α-β Phase Junction on Bi4V2O11 via Electrospinning Retardation Effect and Its Promoted Photocatalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chade; Chen, Gang; Sun, Jingxue; Zhou, Yansong

    2016-05-16

    The creation of a phase junction structure in photocatalysts is a wise approach to promote photocatalytic performance, as phase junctions possess the potential to inhibit the recombination of photoinduced charge carriers. Here, Bi4V2O11 nanofibers with an α-β phase junction are fabricated via electrospinning with subsequent calcination. Electrospinning offers the opportunity to keep α-Bi4V2O11 from transforming into β-Bi4V2O11 completely due to an electrospinning retardation effect, leading to the formation of an α-β Bi4V2O11 phase junction. Furthermore, the α-β Bi4V2O11 phase junction realizes a well-established type-II band alignment. Photoelectrochemical measurements and photoluminescence spectroscopic investigations demonstrate that the phase junction structure has a significant impact on the separation and transfer of photogenerated electrons and holes. Thus, the α-β phase junction on Bi4V2O11 holds the key to achieving promoted efficiency in the photocatalysis process. PMID:27135691

  18. The Drosophila tricellular junction protein Gliotactin regulates its own mRNA levels through BMP-mediated induction of miR-184.

    PubMed

    Sharifkhodaei, Zohreh; Padash-Barmchi, Mojgan; Gilbert, Mary M; Samarasekera, Gayathri; Fulga, Tudor A; Van Vactor, David; Auld, Vanessa J

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial bicellular and tricellular junctions are essential for establishing and maintaining permeability barriers. Tricellular junctions are formed by the convergence of three bicellular junctions at the corners of neighbouring epithelia. Gliotactin, a member of the Neuroligin family, is located at theDrosophilatricellular junction, and is crucial for the formation of tricellular and septate junctions, as well as permeability barrier function. Gliotactin protein levels are tightly controlled by phosphorylation at tyrosine residues and endocytosis. Blocking endocytosis or overexpressing Gliotactin results in the spread of Gliotactin from the tricellular junction, resulting in apoptosis, delamination and migration of epithelial cells. We show that Gliotactin levels are also regulated at the mRNA level by micro (mi)RNA-mediated degradation and that miRNAs are targeted to a short region in the 3'UTR that includes a conserved miR-184 target site. miR-184 also targets a suite of septate junction proteins, including NrxIV, coracle and Mcr. miR-184 expression is triggered when Gliotactin is overexpressed, leading to activation of the BMP signalling pathway. Gliotactin specifically interferes with Dad, an inhibitory SMAD, leading to activation of the Tkv type-I receptor and activation of Mad to elevate the biogenesis and expression of miR-184. PMID:26906422

  19. Regulation of gap junctional intercellular communication by TCDD in HMEC and MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gakhar, Gunjan Schrempp, Diane Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that many neoplastic tissues exhibit a decrease in gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Many hydrocarbons and organochlorine compounds are environmental pollutants known to be carcinogenic. The effect of an organochlorine compound, TCDD, on GJIC in human breast cell lines has not been established. In the present study, we showed that TCDD causes an inhibition in the gap junctional activity in MCF-7 (breast cancer cells). In MCF-7 cells, an increase in the phosphorylated form of gap junctional protein, connexin 43 (Cx43), and PKC {alpha} was seen in the presence of TCDD. Gap junctional plaque formation was significantly decreased in MCF-7 cells in the presence of TCDD. Immunoprecipitation studies of PKC {alpha} showed that TCDD caused a significant 40% increase in the phosphorylated Cx43 in MCF-7 cells. TCDD also modulated the translocation of PKC {alpha} from the cytosol to the membrane and caused a 2-fold increase in the PKC {alpha} activity at 50 nM TCDD in MCF-7 cells. Calphostin C, an inhibitor of PKC {alpha}, showed a significant inhibition of PKC {alpha} activity in the presence of TCDD. Furthermore, TCDD also caused a decrease in the gap junctional activity and Cx43 protein in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). However, we observed a shift in the Cx43 plaques towards the perinuclear membrane in the presence of TCDD by confocal microscopy and Western blot. Overall, these results conclude that TCDD decreases GJIC by phosphorylating Cx43 via PKC {alpha} signaling pathway in MCF-7 cells; however, TCDD decreases the GJIC by affecting the localization of Cx43 in HMEC. These new findings elucidate the differential mode of effect of TCDD in the downregulation of GJIC in HMEC and MCF-7 cells.

  20. Lens placode planar cell polarity is dependent on Cdc42-mediated junctional contraction inhibition.

    PubMed

    Muccioli, Maria; Qaisi, Dalya; Herman, Ken; Plageman, Timothy F

    2016-04-01

    Development of the ocular lens commences with the formation of the lens placode, an epithelial structure that thickens and subsequently bends inward in a process called invagination. Invagination is observed during the development of many embryonic structures, but the spectrum of morphogenetic events driving this process are, in most cases, not fully understood. A characteristic commonly found in embryonic tissues undergoing epithelial reorganization is planar polarity, a property where cells are geometrically and/or molecularly orientated in a specific direction along the plane of an epithelium. Planar polarity is known to drive the morphogenesis of several epithelial structures, however its role during invagination events is less clear. We have found that at the onset of invagination, cells of the lens placode become geometrically planar polarized such that they are orientated toward a central point in the lens placode. Further investigation revealed that this is due to contraction of radially orientated junctions and the elongation of those circumferentially orientated. Radial junctions have an elevated localization of actomyosin and their contraction is dependent on the F-actin and Rho-kinase binding protein, Shroom3. Elongation of circumferential junctions is dependent upon Cdc42, a Rho-GTPase known to regulate polarity via the Par-complex. We determined that Cdc42 and members of the Par-complex inhibit Shroom3-induced contractility and promote anisotropic placode cell geometry through inhibition of junctional contraction. We postulate that invagination of the lens placode requires careful orchestration of these opposing processes which are mediated by the planar polarization of junctional proteins. PMID:26902112

  1. General anesthetics have differential inhibitory effects on gap junction channels and hemichannels in astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhe; Gangoso, Ester; Yi, Chenju; Jeanson, Tiffany; Kandelman, Stanislas; Mantz, Jean; Giaume, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes represent a major non-neuronal cell population actively involved in brain functions and pathologies. They express a large amount of gap junction proteins that allow communication between adjacent glial cells and the formation of glial networks. In addition, these membrane proteins can also operate as hemichannels, through which "gliotransmitters" are released, and thus contribute to neuroglial interaction. There are now reports demonstrating that alterations of astroglial gap junction communication and/or hemichannel activity impact neuronal and synaptic activity. Two decades ago we reported that several general anesthetics inhibited gap junctions in primary cultures of astrocytes (Mantz et al., (1993) Anesthesiology 78(5):892-901). As there are increasing studies investigating neuroglial interactions in anesthetized mice, we here updated this previous study by employing acute cortical slices and by characterizing the effects of general anesthetics on both astroglial gap junctions and hemichannels. As hemichannel activity is not detected in cortical astrocytes under basal conditions, we treated acute slices with the endotoxin LPS or proinflammatory cytokines to induce hemichannel activity in astrocytes, which in turn activated neuronal hemichannels. We studied two extensively used anesthetics, propofol and ketamine, and the more recently developed dexmedetomidine. We report that these drugs have differential inhibitory effects on gap junctional communication and hemichannel activity in astrocytes when used in their respective, clinically relevant concentrations, and that dexmedetomidine appears to be the least effective on both channel functions. In addition, the three anesthetics have similar effects on neuronal hemichannels. Altogether, our observations may contribute to optimizing the selection of anesthetics for in vivo animal studies. GLIA 2016;64:524-536. PMID:26666873

  2. Local dynamics of gap-junction-coupled interneuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Troy; Gage, Gregory J.; Berke, Joshua D.; Zochowski, Michal

    2010-03-01

    Interneurons coupled by both electrical gap-junctions (GJs) and chemical GABAergic synapses are major components of forebrain networks. However, their contributions to the generation of specific activity patterns, and their overall contributions to network function, remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate, using computational methods, that the topological properties of interneuron networks can elicit a wide range of activity dynamics, and either prevent or permit local pattern formation. We systematically varied the topology of GJ and inhibitory chemical synapses within simulated networks, by changing connection types from local to random, and changing the total number of connections. As previously observed we found that randomly coupled GJs lead to globally synchronous activity. In contrast, we found that local GJ connectivity may govern the formation of highly spatially heterogeneous activity states. These states are inherently temporally unstable when the input is uniformly random, but can rapidly stabilize when the network detects correlations or asymmetries in the inputs. We show a correspondence between this feature of network activity and experimental observations of transient stabilization of striatal fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), in electrophysiological recordings from rats performing a simple decision-making task. We suggest that local GJ coupling enables an active search-and-select function of striatal FSIs, which contributes to the overall role of cortical-basal ganglia circuits in decision-making.

  3. Androgen-Dependent Sertoli Cell Tight Junction Remodeling Is Mediated by Multiple Tight Junction Components

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Papia; William Buaas, F.; Sharma, Manju; Smith, Benjamin E.; Greenlee, Anne R.; Eacker, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (SCTJs) of the seminiferous epithelium create a specialized microenvironment in the testis to aid differentiation of spermatocytes and spermatids from spermatogonial stem cells. SCTJs must be chronically broken and rebuilt with high fidelity to allow the transmigration of preleptotene spermatocytes from the basal to adluminal epithelial compartment. Impairment of androgen signaling in Sertoli cells perturbs SCTJ remodeling. Claudin (CLDN) 3, a tight junction component under androgen regulation, localizes to newly forming SCTJs and is absent in Sertoli cell androgen receptor knockout (SCARKO) mice. We show here that Cldn3-null mice do not phenocopy SCARKO mice: Cldn3−/− mice are fertile, show uninterrupted spermatogenesis, and exhibit fully functional SCTJs based on imaging and small molecule tracer analyses, suggesting that other androgen-regulated genes must contribute to the SCARKO phenotype. To further investigate the SCTJ phenotype observed in SCARKO mutants, we generated a new SCARKO model and extensively analyzed the expression of other tight junction components. In addition to Cldn3, we identified altered expression of several other SCTJ molecules, including down-regulation of Cldn13 and a noncanonical tight junction protein 2 isoform (Tjp2iso3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to demonstrate direct androgen receptor binding to regions of these target genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CLDN13 is a constituent of SCTJs and that TJP2iso3 colocalizes with tricellulin, a constituent of tricellular junctions, underscoring the importance of androgen signaling in the regulation of both bicellular and tricellular Sertoli cell tight junctions. PMID:24825397

  4. Direct evidences of filamentary resistive switching in Pt/Nb-doped SrTiO3 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Ren, L. Z.; Wang, Y. J.; Yu, F. M.; Meng, M.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wu, S. X.; Li, S. W.

    2014-04-01

    The first concerned question on the fundamental physics of the resistive switching (RS) effect in metal/Nb-doped SrTiO3 junctions is whether the RS does take place at the whole interface or at some local regions of the interface. Even though several investigations provide the clues of the filamentary nature of the RS, direct evidences are still required. Moreover, there is obvious inconsistency between the possible filamentary feature and the observed capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis loops. Here, we report direct evidences of a filamentary RS effect in Pt/Nb-doped SrTiO3 junctions. The virgin Pt/NSTO junctions show an initial RS effect. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of the initial RS and the C-V characteristic in the virgin junctions are interpreted by using the theory of metal/semiconductor contacts. The correspondence between the initial RS and the C-V hysteresis loops is also discussed. The most important is that an electroforming process is observed at a large forward voltage, which is a direct indication of the formation of conductive filaments across the Pt/NSTO interface. Following the electroforming, the Pt/NSTO junctions exhibit a filamentary RS effect. The I-V characteristic of the filamentary RS deviates from the theoretical prediction of metal/semiconductor interfaces. However, the C-V characteristic is almost the same as that of the virgin junctions. This demonstrates that the conductive filaments are formed at local regions of the Pt/NSTO interface and a majority of the interface remains invariant. The results clearly show that a filamentary RS effect occurs in the Pt/NSTO junctions and that the observed C-V hysteresis loops are not correlated to the filamentary RS.

  5. Electron Holography Characterization of Shallow Junction Fabricated By Diffusion-less Process for Sub-30 nm Gate-Length MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Toda, Akio; Uejima, Kazuya; Fukai, Toshinori; Hane, Masami; Ikezawa, Takeo

    2008-11-03

    Cross-sectional electron holography was used for two-dimensional potential mapping of source/drain extensions (SDEs) in scaled MOSFETs fabricated using state-of-the-art junction formation technology. First, we show that specimen-preparation artifacts, which have prevented detailed examinations of scaled SDEs, are significantly reduced by using low-energy backside Ar{sup +} milling. Next, we demonstrate that electron holography clearly reveals very shallow (10-nm-deep) SDE junction profiles. We also show that the experimental examinations, in conjunction with doping-process simulations, allow examinations of how dopant distribution, such as junction depth and abruptness, affect the potential distribution in planar-bulk MOSFETs approaching the scaling limit.

  6. New advances in on-line sample preconcentration by capillary electrophoresis using dynamic pH junction.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, Adam S; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2008-12-01

    The small injection volumes and narrow dimensions characteristic of microseparation techniques place constraints on concentration sensitivity that is required for trace chemical analyses. On-line sample preconcentration techniques using dynamic pH junction and its variants have emerged as simple yet effective strategies for enhancing concentration sensitivity of weakly ionic species by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Dynamic pH junction offers a convenient format for electrokinetic focusing of dilute sample plugs directly in-capillary for improved detection without off-line sample pretreatment. In this report, we highlight new advances in dynamic pH junction which have been reported to enhance method performance while discussing challenges for future research. PMID:19082065

  7. ROCK2 primes the endothelium for vascular hyperpermeability responses by raising baseline junctional tension

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Cora M.L.; Knezevic, Nebojsa; Valent, Erik T.; Tauseef, Mohammad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Rajendran, Kavitha; Hardin, C. Corey; Aman, Jurjan; van Bezu, Jan; Sweetnam, Paul; van Hinsbergh, Victor W.M.; Mehta, Dolly; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.

    2015-01-01

    Rho kinase mediates the effects of inflammatory permeability factors by increasing actomyosin-generated traction forces on endothelial adherens junctions, resulting in disassembly of intercellular junctions and increased vascular leakage. In vitro, this is accompanied by the Rho kinase-driven formation of prominent radial F-actin fibers, but the in vivo relevance of those F-actin fibers has been debated, suggesting other Rho kinase-mediated events to occur in vascular leak. Here, we delineated the contributions of the highly homologous isoforms of Rho kinase (ROCK1 and ROCK2) to vascular hyperpermeability responses. We show that ROCK2, rather than ROCK1 is the critical Rho kinase for regulation of thrombin receptor-mediated vascular permeability. Novel traction force mapping in endothelial monolayers, however, shows that ROCK2 is not required for the thrombin-induced force enhancements. Rather, ROCK2 is pivotal to baseline junctional tension as a novel mechanism by which Rho kinase primes the endothelium for hyperpermeability responses, independent from subsequent ROCK1-mediated contractile stress-fiber formation during the late phase of the permeability response. PMID:25869521

  8. Effects of adenine nucleotide and sterol depletion on tight junction structure and function in MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ladino, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The antitumor agent Hadacidin (H), N-formyl-hydroxyamino-acetic acid, reversibly inhibited the multiplication of clone 4 Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells at a 4 mM concentration within 24-48 hours. Treated cells were arrested in the S phase of the cell cycle. Accompanying this action was a 16-fold increase in the area occupied b the cells and a refractoriness to trypsin treatment. To test whether this effect was due to an increase in tight junction integrity, electrical resistance (TER) was measured across H-treated monolayers. Addition of H at the onset of junction formation reversibly prevented the development of TER. ATP and cAMP levels were decreased by H, as well as the rate of ({sup 3}H)-leucine incorporation into protein. When 1 mM dibutyryl-cAMP (d.cAMP) and theophylline were added, H had no effect on cell division or protein synthesis, and TER was partially restored. The addition of 1 mM d.cAMP and 1 mM theophylline to control cultures decreased TER, indicating a biphasic effect on TER development/maintenance. In a separate study, the effect of sterol depletion on tight junctions formation/maintenance in wild-type MDCK cells was investigated.

  9. Complementary GaAs junction-gated heterostructure field effect transistor fabrication for integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Sherwin, M.E.; Robertson, P.J.; Shul, R.J.; Howard, A.J.; Rieger, D.J.; Klem, J.F.

    1994-10-01

    A new GaAs junction-gated complementary logic technology that integrates a modulation doped p-channel heterostructure field effect transistor (pHFET) and a fully ion implanted n-channel JFET has recently been fabricated. High-speed, low-power operation has been demonstrated with loaded ring oscillators that show gate delays of 179 ps/stage for a power-delay product of 28 fJ at 1.2 V operation and 320 ps/stage and 8.9 fJ at 0.8 V operation. The principal advantages of this technology include the ability to independently set the threshold voltage of n- and p-channel devices and to independently design the pHFET for high performance. A self-aligned refractory gate process based on tungsten and tungsten silicide gate metal has been used to fabricate the FETs. Novel aspects of the fabrication include the simultaneous formation of non-alloyed, refractory ohmic contacts for the junction gates and the formation of shallow p-n junctions by ion implantation.

  10. ROCK2 primes the endothelium for vascular hyperpermeability responses by raising baseline junctional tension.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Cora M L; Knezevic, Nebojsa; Valent, Erik T; Tauseef, Mohammad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Rajendran, Kavitha; Hardin, C Corey; Aman, Jurjan; van Bezu, Jan; Sweetnam, Paul; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Mehta, Dolly; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P

    2015-07-01

    Rho kinase mediates the effects of inflammatory permeability factors by increasing actomyosin-generated traction forces on endothelial adherens junctions, resulting in disassembly of intercellular junctions and increased vascular leakage. In vitro, this is accompanied by the Rho kinase-driven formation of prominent radial F-actin fibers, but the in vivo relevance of those F-actin fibers has been debated, suggesting other Rho kinase-mediated events to occur in vascular leak. Here, we delineated the contributions of the highly homologous isoforms of Rho kinase (ROCK1 and ROCK2) to vascular hyperpermeability responses. We show that ROCK2, rather than ROCK1 is the critical Rho kinase for regulation of thrombin receptor-mediated vascular permeability. Novel traction force mapping in endothelial monolayers, however, shows that ROCK2 is not required for the thrombin-induced force enhancements. Rather, ROCK2 is pivotal to baseline junctional tension as a novel mechanism by which Rho kinase primes the endothelium for hyperpermeability responses, independent from subsequent ROCK1-mediated contractile stress-fiber formation during the late phase of the permeability response. PMID:25869521

  11. Vascular Lumen Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Eckhard; Axnick, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system developed early in evolution. It is required in large multicellular organisms for the transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products to and from tissues. The vascular system is composed of hollow tubes, which have a high level of complexity in vertebrates. Vasculogenesis describes the de novo formation of blood vessels, e.g., aorta formation in vertebrate embryogenesis. In contrast, angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels from preexisting ones, e.g., sprouting of intersomitic blood vessels from the aorta. Importantly, the lumen of all blood vessels in vertebrates is lined and formed by endothelial cells. In both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, lumen formation takes place in a cord of endothelial cells. It involves a complex molecular mechanism composed of endothelial cell repulsion at the cell–cell contacts within the endothelial cell cords, junctional rearrangement, and endothelial cell shape change. As the vascular system also participates in the course of many diseases, such as cancer, stroke, and myocardial infarction, it is important to understand and make use of the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel formation to better understand and manipulate the pathomechanisms involved. PMID:22474612

  12. Fabrication of BiOBr nanosheets@TiO2 nanobelts p-n junction photocatalysts for enhanced visible-light activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Huang, Xiang; Tan, Xin; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiangli; Yang, Libin; Wang, Shucong

    2016-03-01

    The construction of p-n junction structure is a smart strategy for improving the photocatalytic activity, since p-n junctions can inhibit the recombination of photo-induced charges. Herein, BiOBr nanosheets@TiO2 nanobelts p-n junction photocatalysts were prepared by assembling BiOBr nanosheets on the surface of TiO2 nanobelts via a hydrothermal route followed by a co-precipitation process. BiOBr@TiO2 p-n junction photocatalysts exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity in photocatalytic H2 production over water splitting and photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. Mott-Schottky plots confirmed the formation of p-n junctions in the interface of BiOBr and TiO2. The enhanced photocatalytic performance can be ascribed to the 1D nanostructure and the formation of p-n junctions. This work shows a potential application of low cost BiOBr as a substitute for noble metals in photocatalytic H2 production under visible light irradiation.

  13. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  14. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2012-03-06

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  15. Scanning SQUID microscopy of SFS π-Josephson junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Oboznov, V. A.

    2005-03-01

    We use a Scanning SQUID Microscope to image the magnetic flux distribution in arrays of SFS (superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor) Josephson junctions. The junctions are fabricated with barrier thickness such that they undergo a transition to a π-junction state at a temperature Tπ 2-4 K. In arrays with cells that have an odd number of π-junctions, we observe spontaneously generated magnetic flux in zero applied magnetic field. We image both fully-frustrated arrays and arrays with non-uniform frustration created by varying the number of π-junctions in the cells. By monitoring the onset of spontaneous flux as a function of temperature near Tπ,^ we estimate the uniformity of the junction critical currents.

  16. Actin filaments are associated with the septate junctions of invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lane, N J; Flores, V

    1988-01-01

    Septate junctions are almost ubiquitous in the tissues of invertebrates but are never found in those of vertebrates. In spite of their widespread occurrence and hence obvious importance to the invertebrates, their precise function has remained elusive although they have been variously considered to be regions of cell-cell coupling, permeability barriers or adhesion sites. This report demonstrates that elements of the cytoskeletal system insert into the cytoplasmic face of septate junctions. Actin filaments, identified by virtue of their capacity to bind the S1 subfragment of rabbit myosin, are associated with the membranes of septate junctions. Cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizer, leads to disorganization of the intramembrane components of these junctions. These data suggest that a primary role of septate junctions could be to maintain intercellular cohesion and hence tissue integrity. The assembly and localization of these junctions may be mediated, directly or indirectly, by the cytoplasmic actin filaments associated with their lateral membranes. PMID:2457261

  17. Design and Implementation of a Josephson Junction Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girit, Caglar; Goffman, Marcelo; Pothier, Hugues; Urbina, Cristián; Esteve, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    A Josephson tunnel junction can be used as an on-chip absorption spectrometer at frequencies up to several hundred gigahertz. As a result of the AC Josephson effect, a voltage biased junction acts as a microwave source. When emitted photons are absorbed in the junction's electromagnetic environment, a dc Cooper pair current flows (inelastic Cooper pair tunneling). By measuring this dc current as a function of applied voltage--the junction's current-voltage characteristic--one obtains a spectrum of the electromagnetic environment. We describe the design of a Josephson junction spectrometer which seeks to optimize bandwidth, sensitivity, coupling and linewidth. We present measurements of the spectra of miniature on-chip LC circuits with resonant frequencies in the 25-100 GHz range. Our Josephson junction spectrometer will be used to study level transitions in mesoscopic systems. Supported by Grant ANR-10-IDEX-0001-02 PSL.

  18. Regulation of Adherens Junction Dynamics by Phosphorylation Switches

    PubMed Central

    Bertocchi, Cristina; Vaman Rao, Megha; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    Adherens junctions connect the actin cytoskeleton of neighboring cells through transmembrane cadherin receptors and a network of adaptor proteins. The interactions between these adaptors and cadherin as well as the activity of actin regulators localized to adherens junctions are tightly controlled to facilitate cell junction assembly or disassembly in response to changes in external or internal forces and/or signaling. Phosphorylation of tyrosine, serine, or threonine residues acts as a switch on the majority of adherens junction proteins, turning on or off their interactions with other proteins and/or their enzymatic activity. Here, we provide an overview of the kinases and phosphatases regulating phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins and bring examples of phosphorylation events leading to the assembly or disassembly of adherens junctions, highlighting the important role of phosphorylation switches in regulating their dynamics. PMID:22848810

  19. Innexin7a forms junctions that stabilize the basal membrane during cellularization of the blastoderm in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Maurijn; Benton, Matthew A; Vazquez-Faci, Tania; Lamers, Gerda E M; Jacobs, Chris G C; Rabouille, Catherine

    2015-06-15

    In insects, the fertilized egg undergoes a series of rapid nuclear divisions before the syncytial blastoderm starts to cellularize. Cellularization has been extensively studied in Drosophila melanogaster, but its thick columnar blastoderm is unusual among insects. We therefore set out to describe cellularization in the beetle Tribolium castaneum, the embryos of which exhibit a thin blastoderm of cuboidal cells, like most insects. Using immunohistochemistry, live imaging and transmission electron microscopy, we describe several striking differences to cellularization in Drosophila, including the formation of junctions between the forming basal membrane and the yolk plasmalemma. To identify the nature of this novel junction, we used the parental RNAi technique for a small-scale screen of junction proteins. We find that maternal knockdown of Tribolium innexin7a (Tc-inx7a), an ortholog of the Drosophila gap junction gene Innexin 7, leads to failure of cellularization. In Inx7a-depleted eggs, the invaginated plasma membrane retracts when basal cell closure normally begins. Furthermore, transiently expressed tagged Inx7a localizes to the nascent basal membrane of the forming cells in wild-type eggs. We propose that Inx7a forms the newly identified junctions that stabilize the forming basal membrane and enable basal cell closure. We put forward Tribolium as a model for studying a more ancestral mode of cellularization in insects. PMID:26015545

  20. Vezatin, an integral membrane protein of adherens junctions, is required for the sound resilience of cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Bahloul, Amel; Simmler, Marie-Christine; Michel, Vincent; Leibovici, Michel; Perfettini, Isabelle; Roux, Isabelle; Weil, Dominique; Nouaille, Sylvie; Zuo, Jian; Zadro, Cristina; Licastro, Danilo; Gasparini, Paolo; Avan, Paul; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Petit, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Loud sound exposure is a significant cause of hearing loss worldwide. We asked whether a lack of vezatin, an ubiquitous adherens junction protein, could result in noise-induced hearing loss. Conditional mutant mice bearing non-functional vezatin alleles only in the sensory cells of the inner ear (hair cells) indeed exhibited irreversible hearing loss after only one minute exposure to a 105 dB broadband sound. In addition, mutant mice spontaneously underwent late onset progressive hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction related to substantial hair cell death. We establish that vezatin is an integral membrane protein with two adjacent transmembrane domains, and cytoplasmic N- and C-terminal regions. Late recruitment of vezatin at junctions between MDCKII cells indicates that the protein does not play a role in the formation of junctions, but rather participates in their stability. Moreover, we show that vezatin directly interacts with radixin in its actin-binding conformation. Accordingly, we provide evidence that vezatin associates with actin filaments at cell–cell junctions. Our results emphasize the overlooked role of the junctions between hair cells and their supporting cells in the auditory epithelium resilience to sound trauma. PMID:20049712

  1. Realization of radial p-n junction silicon nanowire solar cell based on low-temperature and shallow phosphorus doping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A radial p-n junction solar cell based on vertically free-standing silicon nanowire (SiNW) array is realized using a novel low-temperature and shallow phosphorus doping technique. The SiNW arrays with excellent light trapping property were fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching technique. The shallow phosphorus doping process was carried out in a hot wire chemical vapor disposition chamber with a low substrate temperature of 250C and H2-diluted PH3 as the doping gas. Auger electron spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements prove the formation of a shallow p-n junction with P atom surface concentration of above 1020cm?3 and a junction depth of less than 10nm. A short circuit current density of 37.13mA/cm2 is achieved for the radial p-n junction SiNW solar cell, which is enhanced by 7.75% compared with the axial p-n junction SiNW solar cell. The quantum efficiency spectra show that radial transport based on the shallow phosphorus doping of SiNW array improves the carrier collection property and then enhances the blue wavelength region response. The novel shallow doping technique provides great potential in the fabrication of high-efficiency SiNW solar cells. PMID:24369781

  2. Electron microscopic single particle analysis of a tetrameric RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mayanagi, Kouta Fujiwara, Yoshie; Miyata, Tomoko; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2008-01-11

    During the late stage of homologous recombination in prokaryotes, RuvA binds to the Holliday junction intermediate and executes branch migration in association with RuvB. The RuvA subunits form two distinct complexes with the Holliday junction: complex I with the single RuvA tetramer on one side of the four way junction DNA, and complex II with two tetramers on both sides. To investigate the functional roles of complexes I and II, we mutated two residues of RuvA (L125D and E126K) to prevent octamer formation. An electron microscopic analysis indicated that the mutant RuvA/RuvB/Holliday junction DNA complex formed the characteristic tripartite structure, with only one RuvA tetramer bound to one side of the Holliday junction, demonstrating the unexpected stability of this complex. The novel bent images of the complex revealed an intriguing morphological similarity to the structure of SV40 large T antigen, which belongs to the same AAA+ family as RuvB.

  3. Realization of radial p-n junction silicon nanowire solar cell based on low-temperature and shallow phosphorus doping.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gangqiang; Liu, Fengzhen; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Hailong; Zhu, Meifang

    2013-01-01

    A radial p-n junction solar cell based on vertically free-standing silicon nanowire (SiNW) array is realized using a novel low-temperature and shallow phosphorus doping technique. The SiNW arrays with excellent light trapping property were fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching technique. The shallow phosphorus doping process was carried out in a hot wire chemical vapor disposition chamber with a low substrate temperature of 250C and H2-diluted PH3 as the doping gas. Auger electron spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements prove the formation of a shallow p-n junction with P atom surface concentration of above 1020cm-3 and a junction depth of less than 10nm. A short circuit current density of 37.13mA/cm2 is achieved for the radial p-n junction SiNW solar cell, which is enhanced by 7.75% compared with the axial p-n junction SiNW solar cell. The quantum efficiency spectra show that radial transport based on the shallow phosphorus doping of SiNW array improves the carrier collection property and then enhances the blue wavelength region response. The novel shallow doping technique provides great potential in the fabrication of high-efficiency SiNW solar cells. PMID:24369781

  4. Morphology, properties, and performance of electrodeposited n-CdSe in liquid junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, M.; Ling, I.; Parsons, W.S.

    1982-09-01

    The authors describe the mechanisms for galvanostatic electrodeposition of CdSe in terms of competition between chemical reactions that lead to Se formation and electrochemical reduction of Se as polyselenide, at the interfaces between selenium and selenide. This mechanism leads to a cauliflower morphology for the resulting film. This morphology is ideal for a photoanode in the liquid junction solar cell configuration, and the authors describe the performance of such an electrode. In spite of the unique morphology, solid-state properties of the film can be evaluated and the methodology for these evaluations is presented. The performance of the liquid junction solar cells is limited by the dark current and the dielectric properties of the material. The authors also describe the effects of metal ions such as Zn/sup +2/, Ru/sup +3/, and Ga/sup +3/ on the various electrode properties.

  5. Specificity of Interaction between Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin and Claudin-Family Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Koval, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), a major cause of food poisoning, forms physical pores in the plasma membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. The ability of CPE to recognize the epithelium is due to the C-terminal binding domain, which binds to a specific motif on the second extracellular loop of tight junction proteins known as claudins. The interaction between claudins and CPE plays a key role in mediating CPE toxicity by facilitating pore formation and by promoting tight junction disassembly. Recently, the ability of CPE to distinguish between specific claudins has been used to develop tools for studying roles for claudins in epithelial barrier function. Moreover, the high affinity of CPE to selected claudins makes CPE a useful platform for targeted drug delivery to tumors expressing these claudins. PMID:22069652

  6. An intercellular polyamine transfer via gap junctions regulates proliferation and response to stress in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Desforges, Bénédicte; Curmi, Patrick A.; Bounedjah, Ouissame; Nakib, Samir; Hamon, Loic; De Bandt, Jean-Pascal; Pastré, David

    2013-01-01

    In the organism, quiescent epithelial cells have the potential to resume cycling as a result of various stimuli, including wound healing or oxidative stress. Because quiescent cells have a low polyamine level, resuming their growth requires an increase of their intracellular polyamine levels via de novo polyamine synthesis or their uptake from plasma. Another alternative, explored here, is an intercellular exchange with polyamine-rich cycling cells via gap junctions. We show that polyamines promote gap junction communication between proliferating cells by promoting dynamical microtubule plus ends at the cell periphery and thus allow polyamine exchange between cells. In this way, cycling cells favor regrowth in adjacent cells deprived of polyamines. In addition, intercellular interactions mediated by polyamines can coordinate the translational response to oxidative stress through the formation of stress granules. Some putative in vivo consequences of polyamine-mediated intercellular interactions are also discussed regarding cancer invasiveness and tissue regeneration. PMID:23515223

  7. Topological phase transition of a Josephson junction and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutasoit, Jimmy; Marciani, Marco; Tarasinski, Brian; Beenakker, Carlo

    A Josephson junction formed by a superconducting ring interrupted by a semiconductor nanowire can realize a zero-dimensional class D topological superconductor. By coupling the Josephson junction to a ballistic wire and altering the strength of the coupling, one can drive this topological superconductor through a topological phase transition. We study the compressibility of the junction as a probe of the topological phase transition. We also study the dynamics of the phase transition by studying the current pulse injected into the wire.

  8. Definitive evidence for the existence of tight junctions in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Lane, N J; Chandler, H J

    1980-09-01

    Extensive and unequivocal tight junctions are here reported between the lateral borders of the cellular layer that circumscribes the arachnid (spider) central nervous system. This account details the features of these structures, which form a beltlike reticulum that is more complex than the simple linear tight junctions hitherto found in invertebrate tissues and which bear many of the characteristics of vertebrate zonulae occludentes. We also provide evidence that these junctions form the basis of a permeability barrier to exogenous compounds. In thin sections, the tight junctions are identifiable as punctate points of membrane apposition; they are seen to exclude the stain and appear as election- lucent moniliform strands along the lines of membrane fusion in en face views of uranyl-calcium-treated tissues. In freeze-fracture replicas, the regions of close membrane apposition exhibit P-face (PF) ridges and complementary E-face (EF) furrows that are coincident across face transitions, although slightly offset with respect to one another. The free inward diffusion of both ionic and colloidal lanthanum is inhibited by these punctate tight junctions so that they appear to form the basis of a circumferential blood-brain barrier. These results support the contention that tight junctions exist in the tissues of the invertebrata in spite of earlier suggestions that (a) they are unique to vertebrates and (b) septate junctions are the equivalent invertebrate occluding structure. The component tight junctional 8- to 10-nm-particulate PF ridges are intimately intercalated with, but clearly distinct from, inverted gap junctions possessing the 13-nm EF particles typical of arthropods. Hence, no confusion can occur as to which particles belong to each of the two junctional types, as commonly happens with vertebrate tissues, especially in the analysis of developing junctions. Indeed, their coexistance in this way supports the idea, over which there has been some controversy, that the intramembrane particles making up these two junctional types must be quite distinct entities rather than products of a common precursor. PMID:7410478

  9. Na,K-ATPase and epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sigrid A; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions are unique organelles in polarized epithelial and endothelial cells that regulate the flow of solutes and ions across the epithelial barrier. The structure and functions of tight junctions are regulated by a wide variety of signaling and molecular mechanisms. Several recent studies in mammals, drosophila, and zebrafish reported a new role for Na,K-ATPase, a well-studied ion transporter, in the modulation of tight junction development, permeability, and polarity. In this review, we have attempted to compile these new reports and suggest a model for a conserved role of Na,K-ATPase in the regulation of tight junction structure and functions. PMID:19273189

  10. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  11. Craniovertebral Junction Instability: A Review of Facts about Facets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction surgery involves an appropriate philosophical, biomechanical and anatomical understanding apart from high degree of technical skill and ability of controlling venous and arterial bleeding. The author presents his 30-year experience with treating complex craniovertebral junction instability related surgical issues. The facets of atlas and axis form the primary site of movements at the craniovertebral junction. All craniovertebral junction instability is essentially localized to the atlantoaxial facet joint. Direct manipulation and fixation of the facets forms the basis of treatment for instability. PMID:26240728

  12. Gap junctions between human T-colony cells.

    PubMed

    Neumark, T; Huynh, D C

    1989-01-01

    T-cell colonies formed in liquid or semisolid cultures of stimulated human blood mononuclear cells were investigated under electron microscope. Typical gap junctions with five-layered structure were demonstrated between colony cells embedded in water miscible resin. The overall thickness of the junctional zones was less than 25 nm. The intercellular gap was demonstrated by lanthanum nitrate staining. Close membrane associations were observed after normal embedding with a junctional width of 20-35 nm corresponding to gap junctions. The functional importance of free communication between colony cells is discussed. PMID:2486458

  13. Direct experimental determination of voltage across high-low junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    High-low (HL) junctions form a part of many semiconductor devices, including back surface field solar cells. A first experimental determination and interpretation of the voltage across the HL junction under low- and high-injection conditions is presented as a function of the voltage across a nearby p/n junction. Theoretical analysis from first principles is shown to bear well on the experimental results. In addition, a test structure is proposed for measurement of the effective surface recombination velocity at the HL junctions.

  14. Direct experimental determination of voltage across high-low junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Daud, T.; Lindholm, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    High-low (HL) junctions form part of many semiconductor devices, including back surface field solar cells. A first experimental determination and interpretation of the voltage across the HL junction under low- and high-injection conditions is presented as a function of the voltage across a nearby p/n junction. Theoretical analysis from first principles is shown to bear well on the experimental results. In addition, a test structure is proposed for measurement of the effective surface recombination velocity at the HL junctions.

  15. Systematic optimization of quantum junction colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Tang, Jiang; Kramer, Illan J.; Ning, Zhijun; Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-10-01

    The recently reported quantum junction architecture represents a promising approach to building a rectifying photovoltaic device that employs colloidal quantum dot layers on each side of the p-n junction. Here, we report an optimized quantum junction solar cell that leverages an improved aluminum zinc oxide electrode for a stable contact to the n-side of the quantum junction and silver doping of the p-layer that greatly enhances the photocurrent by expanding the depletion region in the n-side of the device. These improvements result in greater stability and a power conversion efficiency of 6.1% under AM1.5 simulated solar illumination.

  16. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua Joshua

    2008-11-11

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  17. Magic-T Junction using Microstrip/Slotline Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Doiron, Terence

    2008-01-01

    An improved broadband planar magic-T junction that incorporates microstrip/slotline transitions has been developed. In comparison with a prior broadband magic-T junction incorporating microstrip/slotline transitions, this junction offers superior broadband performance. In addition, because this junction is geometrically simpler and its performance is less affected by fabrication tolerances, the benefits of the improved design can be realized at lower fabrication cost. There are potential uses for junctions like this one in commercial microwave communication receivers, radar and polarimeter systems, and industrial microwave instrumentation. A magic-T junction is a four-port waveguide junction consisting of a combination of an H-type and an E-type junction. An E-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm that extends from a main waveguide in the same direction as that of the electric (E) field in the waveguide. An H-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm parallel to the magnetic (H) field in a main waveguide. A magic-T junction includes two input ports (here labeled 1 and 2, respectively) and two output ports (here labeled E and H, respectively). In an ideal case, (1) a magic-T junction is lossless, (2) the input signals add (that is, they combine in phase with each other) at port H, and (3) the input signals subtract (that is, they combine in opposite phase) at port E. The prior junction over which the present junction is an improvement affords in-phase-combining characterized by a broadband frequency response, and features a small slotline area to minimize in-band loss. However, with respect to isolation between ports 1 and 2 and return loss at port E, it exhibits narrowband frequency responses. In addition, its performance is sensitive to misalignment of microstrip and slotline components: this sensitivity is attributable to a limited number of quarter-wavelength (lambda/4) transmission-line sections for matching impedances among all four ports, and to strong parasitic couplings at the microstrip/slotline T junction, where four microstrip lines and a slotline are combined. The present improved broadband magic-T junction (see figure) includes a microstrip ring structure and two microstrip- to-slotline transitions. One of the microstrip/slotline transitions is a small T junction between the ring and a slotline; the other microstrip/slotline transition effects coupling between the slotline and port E. The smallness of the T junction and the use of minimum-size slotline terminations help to minimize radiation loss. An impedance-transformation network that includes multiple quarter-wavelength sections is used to increase the operating bandwidth and minimize the parasitic coupling around the microstrip/slotline T junction. As a result, the improved junction has greater bandwidth and lower phase imbalance at the sum and difference ports than did the prior junction.

  18. Reciprocal myocardial-endocardial interactions pattern the delay in atrioventricular junction conduction

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Michael; Yang, PoAn Brian; Louie, Jonathan D.; Navetta, Alicia M.; Garriock, Robert J.; Mikawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Efficient blood flow depends on two developmental processes that occur within the atrioventricular junction (AVJ) of the heart: conduction delay, which entrains sequential chamber contraction; and valve formation, which prevents retrograde fluid movement. Defects in either result in severe congenital heart disease; however, little is known about the interplay between these two crucial developmental processes. Here, we show that AVJ conduction delay is locally assigned by the morphogenetic events that initiate valve formation. Our data demonstrate that physical separation from endocardial-derived factors prevents AVJ myocardium from becoming fast conducting. Mechanistically, this physical separation is induced by myocardial-derived factors that support cardiac jelly deposition at the onset of valve formation. These data offer a novel paradigm for conduction patterning, whereby reciprocal myocardial-endocardial interactions coordinate the processes of valve formation with establishment of conduction delay. This, in turn, synchronizes the electrophysiological and structural events necessary for the optimization of blood flow through the developing heart. PMID:25273084

  19. Tectonic framework of the Azores Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, J. M.; Luis, J. Freire; Abreu, I.; Victor, L. A. Mendes; Galdeano, A.; Rossignol, J. C.

    The lack of accurate and detailed magnetic information has, in the past, limited the development of well constrained models for the plate tectonic evolution of the Azores Triple Junction. An aeromagnetic survey, made possible by the existing airport facilities, has long been desired as it can provide high quality magnetic data, whose homogeneity and coherency is far better than those provided by classic marine surveys. The results presented in this paper concern only a part of the Aeromagnetic Survey conducted by the Portuguese Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia e Geofisica and already allow an improved definition of the basic tectonic boundaries at the central part of the Azores plateau.

  20. On-chip Josephson junction microwave switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaman, O.; Abutaleb, M. O.; Kirby, C.; Rennie, M.

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the design and measurement of a reflective single-pole single-throw microwave switch with no internal power dissipation, based on a superconducting circuit containing a single Josephson junction. The data demonstrate the switch operation with 2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth centered at 10 GHz, low insertion loss, and better than 20 dB on/off ratio. The switch's measured performance agrees well with simulations for input powers up to -100 dBm. An extension of the demonstrated circuit to implement a single-pole double-throw switch is shown in simulation.