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Sample records for ultrafine particles development

  1. Ultrafine particles in cities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia; Birmili, Wolfram; Paasonen, Pauli; Hu, Min; Kulmala, Markku; Harrison, Roy M; Norford, Leslie; Britter, Rex

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter less than 100 nm) are ubiquitous in urban air, and an acknowledged risk to human health. Globally, the major source for urban outdoor UFP concentrations is motor traffic. Ongoing trends towards urbanisation and expansion of road traffic are anticipated to further increase population exposure to UFPs. Numerous experimental studies have characterised UFPs in individual cities, but an integrated evaluation of emissions and population exposure is still lacking. Our analysis suggests that the average exposure to outdoor UFPs in Asian cities is about four-times larger than that in European cities but impacts on human health are largely unknown. This article reviews some fundamental drivers of UFP emissions and dispersion, and highlights unresolved challenges, as well as recommendations to ensure sustainable urban development whilst minimising any possible adverse health impacts. PMID:24503484

  2. Ultrafine particle emissions from waterpipes

    PubMed Central

    Monn, Ch; Kindler, Ph; Meile, A; Brndli, O

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Ultrafine particle emissions from waterpipes and their impact on human health have not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to characterise the inhalation pattern of waterpipe smokers, and (a) construct apparatus to simulate waterpipe smoking in the laboratory, and (b) characterise mainstream emissions from waterpipes under different smoking conditions. Methods Real life waterpipe smoking patterns were first measured with a spirometer. The average smoking pattern was then mechanically simulated in apparatus. Total particle number concentrations were determined with a condensation particle counter (CPC) for particles between 0.02??m and 1??m (P?Trak UPC, Model 8525, TSI) and the particle size fraction was determined with a differential mobility analyser (DMA) for particles from 0.01??m to 0.5??m. This instrument was coupled with a laser particle spectrometer for particles between 0.35??m and 10??m (Wide Range Particle Spectrometer, Model 1000XP, MSC Corp). Carbon monoxide levels were determined with an electrochemical sensor (Q?Trak monitor, Model 8554, TSI). Results The tidal volume of an average waterpipe breath of 5?seconds was found to be 1 (SD 0.47) litre. The intervals between breaths on average were 25.5 (SD 10.2) seconds. Particle number concentrations of ultrafine particles in mainstream smoke during waterpipe smoking ranged up to 70109 particles per litre. The median diameter of the particles in a full smoking set with charcoal, tobacco and water was 0.04??m. Smoke from the heated tobacco contributed to particles in the size range between 0.01??m and 0.2??m. The glowing piece of charcoal only contributed to particles smaller than 0.05??m. Conclusions Waterpipe smoking emits large amounts of ultrafine particles. With regard to particle emissions, smoking waterpipes may carry similar health risks to smoking cigarettes. PMID:18048615

  3. Surgical smoke and ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    Brske-Hohlfeld, Irene; Preissler, Gerhard; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Pitz, Mike; Nowak, Dennis; Peters, Annette; Wichmann, H-Erich

    2008-01-01

    Background Electrocautery, laser tissue ablation, and ultrasonic scalpel tissue dissection all generate a 'surgical smoke' containing ultrafine (<100 nm) and accumulation mode particles (< 1 ?m). Epidemiological and toxicological studies have shown that exposure to particulate air pollution is associated with adverse cardiovascular and respiratory health effects. Methods To measure the amount of generated particulates in 'surgical smoke' during different surgical procedures and to quantify the particle number concentration for operation room personnel a condensation particle counter (CPC, model 3007, TSI Inc.) was applied. Results Electro-cauterization and argon plasma tissue coagulation induced the production of very high number concentration (> 100000 cm-3) of particles in the diameter range of 10 nm to 1 ?m. The peak concentration was confined to the immediate local surrounding of the production side. In the presence of a very efficient air conditioning system the increment and decrement of ultrafine particle occurrence was a matter of seconds, with accumulation of lower particle number concentrations in the operation room for only a few minutes. Conclusion Our investigation showed a short term very high exposure to ultrafine particles for surgeons and close assisting operating personnel alternating with longer periods of low exposure. PMID:19055750

  4. Combustion derived ultrafine particles induce cytochrome P-450 expression in specific lung compartments in the developing neonatal and adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jackie K. W.; Vogel, Christoph F.; Baek, Jaeeun; Kodani, Sean D.; Uppal, Ravi S.; Bein, Keith J.; Anderson, Donald S.

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle exhaust is rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and can be a dominant contributor to ultrafine urban particulate matter (PM). Exposure to ultrafine PM is correlated with respiratory infections and asthmatic symptoms in young children. The lung undergoes substantial growth, alveolarization, and cellular maturation within the first years of life, which may be impacted by environmental pollutants such as PM. PAHs in PM can serve as ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that induces expression of certain isozymes in the cytochrome P-450 superfamily, such as CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, localized in specific lung cell types. Although AhR activation and induction has been widely studied, its context within PM exposure and impact on the developing lung is poorly understood. In response, we have developed a replicable ultrafine premixed flame particle (PFP) generating system and used in vitro and in vivo models to define PM effects on AhR activation in the developing lung. We exposed 7-day neonatal and adult rats to a single 6-h PFP exposure and determined that PFPs cause significant parenchymal toxicity in neonates. PFPs contain weak AhR agonists that upregulate AhR-xenobiotic response element activity and expression and are capable inducers of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in both ages with different spatial and temporal patterns. Neonatal CYP1A1 expression was muted and delayed compared with adults, possibly because of differences in the enzyme maturation. We conclude that the inability of neonates to sufficiently adapt in response to PFP exposure may, in part, explain their susceptibility to PFP and urban ultrafine PM. PMID:23502512

  5. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Ott, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Personal exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) can occur while people are cooking, driving, smoking, operating small appliances such as hair dryers, or eating out in restaurants. These exposures can often be higher than outdoor concentrations. For 3 years, portable monitors were employed in homes, cars, and restaurants. More than 300 measurement periods in several homes were documented, along with 25?h of driving two cars, and 22 visits to restaurants. Cooking on gas or electric stoves and electric toaster ovens was a major source of UFP, with peak personal exposures often exceeding 100,000 particles/cm and estimated emission rates in the neighborhood of 10 particles/min. Other common sources of high UFP exposures were cigarettes, a vented gas clothes dryer, an air popcorn popper, candles, an electric mixer, a toaster, a hair dryer, a curling iron, and a steam iron. Relatively low indoor UFP emissions were noted for a fireplace, several space heaters, and a laser printer. Driving resulted in moderate exposures averaging about 30,000 particles/cm in each of two cars driven on 17 trips on major highways on the East and West Coasts. Most of the restaurants visited maintained consistently high levels of 50,000-200,000 particles/cm for the entire length of the meal. The indoor/outdoor ratios of size-resolved UFP were much lower than for PM?.? or PM??, suggesting that outdoor UFP have difficulty in penetrating a home. This in turn implies that outdoor concentrations of UFP have only a moderate effect on personal exposures if indoor sources are present. A time-weighted scenario suggests that for typical suburban nonsmoker lifestyles, indoor sources provide about 47% and outdoor sources about 36% of total daily UFP exposure and in-vehicle exposures add the remainder (17%). However, the effect of one smoker in the home results in an overwhelming increase in the importance of indoor sources (77% of the total). PMID:20087407

  6. Development of a land-use regression model for ultrafine particles in Toronto, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaliauskas, Kelly; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Yao, Xiaohong; Reali, Christopher; Sun, Tim; Evans, Greg J.

    2015-06-01

    This study applies land-use regression (LUR) to characterize the spatial distribution of ultrafine particles (UFP) in a large city. Particle number (PN) concentrations were measured in residential areas around Toronto, Canada, between June and August 2008. A combination of fixed and mobile monitoring was used to assess spatial gradients between and within communities. The fixed monitoring locations included a central site, two downtown sites, and four residential sites located 6-15 km from the downtown core. The mobile data included average PN concentrations collected on 112 road segments from 10 study routes that were repeated on three separate days. The mobile data was used to create the land-use regression model while the fixed sites were used for validation purposes. The predictor variables that best described the spatial variation of PN concentration (R2 = 0.72, validated R2 = 0.68) included population density within 300 m, total resource and industrial area within 1000 m, total residential area within 3000 m, and major roadway and highway length within 3000 m. The LUR model successfully predicted the afternoon peak PN concentration (slope = 0.96, R2 = 0.86) but over-predicted the 24-h average PN concentration (slope = 1.28, R2 = 0.72) measured at seven fixed monitoring sites.

  7. Increased inflammation and altered macrophage chemotactic responses caused by two ultrafine particle types

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, L; Brown, D; Clouter, A; Donaldson, K

    2004-01-01

    Background: Ultrafine particles have been hypothesised to be an important contributing factor in the toxicity and adverse health effects of particulate air pollution (PM10) and nanoparticles are used increasingly in industrial processes. Aims: To compare the ability of ultrafine and fine particles of titanium dioxide and carbon black to induce inflammation, cause epithelial injury, and affect the alveolar macrophage clearance functions of phagocytosis and chemotaxis in vivo. Methods: Rats were instilled with fine and ultrafine carbon black and titanium dioxide. Inflammation was quantified by bronchoalveolar lavage; the ability of the macrophages to phagoytose indictor fluorescent beads and to migrate towards aC5a were determined. Results: Ultrafine particles induced more PMN recruitment, epithelial damage, and cytotoxicity than their fine counterparts, exposed at equal mass. Both ultrafine and fine particles significantly impaired the phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages. Only ultrafine particle treatment significantly enhanced the sensitivity of alveolar macrophages to chemotact towards C5a. Conclusions: Ultrafine particles of two very different materials induced inflammation and epithelial damage to a greater extent than their fine counterparts. In general, the effect of ultrafine carbon black was greater than ultrafine titanium dioxide, suggesting that there are differences in the likely harmfulness of different types of ultrafine particle. Epithelial injury and toxicity were associated with the development of inflammation after exposure to ultrafines. Increased sensitivity to a C5a chemotactic gradient could make the ultrafine exposed macrophages more likely to be retained in the lungs, so allowing dose to accumulate. PMID:15090666

  8. Traffic and nucleation events as main sources of ultrafine particles in high-insolation developed world cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brines, M.; Dall'Osto, M.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Gómez-Moreno, F.; Núñez, L.; Artíñano, B.; Costabile, F.; Gobbi, G. P.; Salimi, F.; Morawska, L.; Sioutas, C.; Querol, X.

    2015-05-01

    Road traffic emissions are often considered the main source of ultrafine particles (UFP, diameter smaller than 100 nm) in urban environments. However, recent studies worldwide have shown that - in high-insolation urban regions at least - new particle formation events can also contribute to UFP. In order to quantify such events we systematically studied three cities located in predominantly sunny environments: Barcelona (Spain), Madrid (Spain) and Brisbane (Australia). Three long-term data sets (1-2 years) of fine and ultrafine particle number size distributions (measured by SMPS, Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) were analysed. Compared to total particle number concentrations, aerosol size distributions offer far more information on the type, origin and atmospheric evolution of the particles. By applying k-means clustering analysis, we categorized the collected aerosol size distributions into three main categories: "Traffic" (prevailing 44-63% of the time), "Nucleation" (14-19%) and "Background pollution and Specific cases" (7-22%). Measurements from Rome (Italy) and Los Angeles (USA) were also included to complement the study. The daily variation of the average UFP concentrations for a typical nucleation day at each site revealed a similar pattern for all cities, with three distinct particle bursts. A morning and an evening spike reflected traffic rush hours, whereas a third one at midday showed nucleation events. The photochemically nucleated particles' burst lasted 1-4 h, reaching sizes of 30-40 nm. On average, the occurrence of particle size spectra dominated by nucleation events was 16% of the time, showing the importance of this process as a source of UFP in urban environments exposed to high solar radiation. Nucleation events lasting for 2 h or more occurred on 55% of the days, this extending to > 4 h in 28% of the days, demonstrating that atmospheric conditions in urban environments are not favourable to the growth of photochemically nucleated particles. In summary, although traffic remains the main source of UFP in urban areas, in developed countries with high insolation urban nucleation events are also a main source of UFP. If traffic-related particle concentrations are reduced in the future, nucleation events will likely increase in urban areas, due to the reduced urban condensation sinks.

  9. Ultrafine particle characteristics in seven industrial plants.

    PubMed

    Elihn, Karine; Berg, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Ultrafine particles are considered as a possible cause of some of the adverse health effects caused by airborne particles. In this study, the particle characteristics were measured in seven Swedish industrial plants, with a special focus on the ultrafine particle fraction. Number concentration, size distribution, surface area concentration, and mass concentration were measured at 10 different job activities, including fettling, laser cutting, welding, smelting, core making, moulding, concreting, grinding, sieving powders, and washing machine goods. A thorough particle characterization is necessary in workplaces since it is not clear yet which choice of ultrafine particle metric is the best to measure in relation to health effects. Job activities were given a different order of rank depending on what particle metric was measured. An especially high number concentration (130 x 10(3) cm(-3)) and percentage of ultrafine particles (96%) were found at fettling of aluminium, whereas the highest surface area concentration (up to 3800 mum(2) cm(-3)) as well as high PM10 (up to 1 mg m(-3)) and PM1 (up to 0.8 mg m(-3)) were found at welding and laser cutting of steel. The smallest geometric mean diameter (22 nm) was found at core making (geometric standard deviation: 1.9). PMID:19447849

  10. Ultrafine particle deposition in subjects with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chalupa, David C; Morrow, Paul E; Oberdrster, Gnter; Utell, Mark J; Frampton, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    Ambient air particles in the ultrafine size range (diameter < 100 nm) may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter. However, there are few data on ultrafine particle deposition during spontaneous breathing, and none in people with asthma. Sixteen subjects with mild to moderate asthma were exposed for 2 hr, by mouthpiece, to ultrafine carbon particles with a count median diameter (CMD) of 23 nm and a geometric standard deviation of 1.6. Deposition was measured during spontaneous breathing at rest (minute ventilation, 13.3 +/- 2.0 L/min) and exercise (minute ventilation, 41.9 +/- 9.0 L/min). The mean +/- SD fractional deposition was 0.76 +/- 0.05 by particle number and 0.69 +/- 0.07 by particle mass concentration. The number deposition fraction increased as particle size decreased, reaching 0.84 +/- 0.03 for the smallest particles (midpoint CMD = 8.7 nm). No differences between sexes were observed. The deposition fraction increased during exercise to 0.86 +/- 0.04 and 0.79 +/- 0.05 by particle number and mass concentration, respectively, and reached 0.93 +/- 0.02 for the smallest particles. Experimental deposition data exceeded model predictions during exercise. The deposition at rest was greater in these subjects with asthma than in previously studied healthy subjects (0.76 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.10, p < 0.001). The efficient respiratory deposition of ultrafine particles increases further in subjects with asthma. Key words: air pollution, asthma, deposition, dosimetry, inhalation, ultrafine particles. PMID:15175176

  11. Ultrafine particle and fiber production in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, George W. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In a system and method for producing ultrafine particles and ultrafine fibers of a given source material by evaporating and condensing the material in a gas atmosphere that includes inert gas. A smaller, more narrow size distribution is accomplished by producing the particles and fibers in a microgravity environment in order to reduce particle coalescence caused by convection currents. Particle coalescence also is reduced in an Earth gravity environment by controlling the convection currents. Condensed particles are collected either by providing an electrostatic field or a spatially varying magnetic field or by causing the gas to move through a filter which collects the particles. Nonferromagnetic material fibers are produced and collected by electrodes which produce an electro- static field. Ferromagnetic particles are collected by spatially varying magnetic fields.

  12. Filtration of ultrafine metallic particles in industry.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Morele, Y; Régnier, R

    2015-09-01

    Thermal metal spraying, metal cutting and arc welding processes generate large quantities of ultrafine particles that cause the irreversible clogging of industrial filters. The aim of the study performed was to identify the causes of the clogging of cartridge filters and investigate other paths for cleaning them. This study required the development of a test bench capable of reproducing a thermal spraying process to test the performances of different filtration techniques. This test instrument first, permitted the precise characterization of the aerosol generated by the process and, second, defined the clogging and cleaning conditions for filters. Several parameters were tested: the type of filter, online and off-line cleaning, pre-coating, cleaning by jets of high-speed compressed air via a probe. PMID:25759204

  13. ULTRAFINE PARTICLES ON AND NEAR FREEWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We plan to use the concentrator to obtain concentrated samples of fine and ultrafine particles for chemical or biological assays. We plan to conduct a study of I/O ratios for vehicles under different ventilation conditions. We plan to collect large samples of particulate a...

  14. [Ultrafine particle emissions from laser printers].

    PubMed

    Grana, Mario; Vicentini, Laura; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Magrini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been growing attention to the importance of indoor air quality on which scientist and experts have no doubts since in modern society we tend to spend most of the time in various types of indoor environments (office, private homes, etc.). Laser printers, in particular, release an aerosol into the environment including solid and liquid particles and gaseous compounds. The measurement of all these components is not practically feasible. Therefore, it is necessary to identify a marker which, when measured, shows accurately the frequency, duration and magnitude of the exposure. The measure with an optical particle counter (OPC) and a condensation particle counter (CPC) is an indicator with high sensitivity and representativeness. The major advantage of using these tools is the ability to detect the presence of ultrafine particles and also detect the particles in the liquid phase. The continuous recording of submicron particulate matter emitted during the printing activity allows to measure the exposure of personnel, while the ratio between the peak values and the values without printing activity can be used to classify the printers according to their emissivity. The particulate generated during the processes of printing has size less than 0.3 micron and therefore extends in the size range of nanoparticles (ultrafine particles less than 100 nm). These activities lead to high concentrations of ultrafine particles with a variability related to factors such as type of printer, toner, paper type, frequency of maintenance and air exchange. The concentrations of ultrafine particles in office environments can be reduced by proper choice of the printers, with the use of appropriate filtration techniques and placing the equipment away from workstations. PMID:26749975

  15. Polymer degradation and ultrafine particles: potential inhalation hazards for astronauts.

    PubMed

    Ferin, J; Oberdörster, G

    1992-01-01

    When Teflon is heated the developing fumes produce in exposed human an influenza-like syndrome (polymer fume fever) or also severe toxic effects like pulmonary edema, pneumonitis and death. The decomposition products and the resulting health effects are temperature-dependent. The toxic effects seem to be related to the ultrafine particulate fraction of the fume. To test the hypothesis that exposure to ultrafine particles results in an increased interstitialization of the particles which is accompanied by an acute pathological inflammation, rats were exposed to titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles by intratracheal instillation and by inhalation. Both acute intratracheal instillation and subchronic inhalation studies on rats show that ultrafine TiO2 particles (approximately 20 nm diameter) access the pulmonary interstitium to a larger extent than fine particles (approximately 250 nm diameter) and that they elicit an inflammatory response as indicated by PMN increase in lavaged cells. The release of ultrafine particles into the air of an enclosed environment from a thermodegradation event or from other sources is a potential hazard for astronauts. Knowing the mechanisms of action is a prerequisite for technical or medical countermeasures. PMID:11537570

  16. Polymer degradation and ultrafine particles: Potential inhalation hazards for astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferin, J.; Oberdörster, G.

    When Teflon is heated the developing fumes produce in exposed humans an influenza-like syndrome (polymer fume fever) or also severe toxic effects like pulmonary edema, pneumonitis and death. The decomposition products and the resulting health effects are temperature-dependent. The toxic effects seem to be related to the ultrafine particulate fraction of the fume. To test the hypothesis that exposure to ultrafine particles results in an increased interstitialization of the particles which is accompanied by an acute pathological inflammation, rats were exposed to titanium dioxide (TiO 2) particles by intratracheal instillation and by inhalation. Both acute intratracheal instillation and subchronic inhalation studies on rats show that ultrafine TiO 2 particles (˜20 nm diameter) access the pulmonary interstitium to a larger extent than fine particles (˜250 nm diameter) and that they elicit an inflammatory response as indicated by PMN increase in lavaged cells. The release of ultrafine particles into the air of an enclosed environment from a thermodegradation event or from other sources is a potential hazard for astronauts. Knowing the mechanisms of action is a prerequisite for technical or medical countermeasures.

  17. Focusing particle concentrator with application to ultrafine particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne; Lewis, Gregory; Spielman, Steven R.

    2013-06-11

    Technology is presented for the high efficiency concentration of fine and ultrafine airborne particles into a small fraction of the sampled airflow by condensational enlargement, aerodynamic focusing and flow separation. A nozzle concentrator structure including an acceleration nozzle with a flow extraction structure may be coupled to a containment vessel. The containment vessel may include a water condensation growth tube to facilitate the concentration of ultrafine particles. The containment vessel may further include a separate carrier flow introduced at the center of the sampled flow, upstream of the acceleration nozzle of the nozzle concentrator to facilitate the separation of particle and vapor constituents.

  18. Sources of ultrafine particles in the Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, Laura N.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2015-06-01

    Source contributions to ultrafine particle number concentrations for a summertime period in the Eastern U.S. are investigated using the chemical transport model PMCAMx-UF. New source-resolved number emissions inventories are developed for biomass burning, dust, gasoline automobiles, industrial sources, non-road and on-road diesel. According to the inventory for this summertime period in the Eastern U.S., gasoline automobiles are responsible for 40% of the ultrafine particle number emissions, followed by industrial sources (33%), non-road diesel (16%), on-road diesel (10%), and 1% from biomass burning and dust. With these emissions as input, the chemical transport model PMCAMx-UF reproduces observed ultrafine particle number concentrations (N3-100) in Pittsburgh with an error of 12%. For this summertime period in the Eastern U.S., nucleation is predicted to be the source of more than 90% of the total particle number concentrations. The source contributions to primary particle number concentrations are on average similar to those of their source emissions contributions: gasoline is predicted to contribute 36% of the total particle number concentrations, followed by industrial sources (31%), non-road diesel (18%), on-road diesel (10%), biomass burning (1%), and long-range transport (4%). For this summertime period in Pittsburgh, number source apportionment predictions for particles larger than 3 nm in diameter (traffic 65%, other combustion sources 35%) are consistent with measurement-based source apportionment (traffic 60%, combustion sources 40%).

  19. Measurements of ultrafine bubbles using different types of particle size measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Maeda, Shigeo; Kashiwa, Masakazu; Fujita, Toshihiro

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, we succeeded in measuring the sizes of bubbles generated by our GALF (GAs Liquid Foam) bubble generating system, using particle tracking analysis for the first time, and quantitatively confirmed the generation and presence of ultrafine bubbles measuring around 100 to 200 nm in diameter. After that, we also developed a new technology to generate a high density of ultrafine bubbles and launched our ultrafine bubble generating system (ultrafineGALF) in 2011. This report details several independent measurements of bubbles generated in water by ultrafineGALF, using dynamic light scattering, laser diffraction scattering, particle tracking analysis, and the electrical sensing zone method. It was found that the presence of ultrafine bubbles with a diameter of about 100 to 200 nm could be determined quantitatively using any of these methods.

  20. Concentrated ambient ultrafine particle exposure induces cardiac change in young healthy volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient ultrafine particles has been associated with cardiopulmonary toxicity and mortality. Adverse effects specifically linked to ultrafine particles include loss of sympathovagal balance and altered hemostasis. To characterize the effects of ultrafine particles in ...

  1. Characterizing and predicting ultrafine particle counts in Canadian classrooms during the winter months: model development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, Scott; Dufresne, Andr; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Joseph, Lawrence

    2008-03-01

    School classrooms are potentially important micro-environments for childhood exposures owing to the large amount of time children spend in these locations. While a number of airborne contaminants may be present in schools, to date few studies have examined ultrafine particle (0.02-1 microm) (UFP) levels in classrooms. In this study, our objective was to characterize UFP counts (cm(-3)) in classrooms during the winter months and to develop a model to predict such exposures based on ambient weather conditions and outdoor UFPs, as well as classroom characteristics such as size, temperature, relative humidity, and carbon dioxide levels. In total, UFP count data were collected on 60 occasions in 37 occupied classrooms at one elementary school and one secondary school in Pembroke, Ontario. On average, outdoor UFP levels exceeded indoor measures by 8989 cm(-3) (95% confidence interval (CI): 6382, 11596), and classroom UFP counts were similar at both schools with a combined average of 5017 cm(-3) (95% CI: 4300, 5734). Of the variables examined only wind speed and outdoor UFPs were important determinants of classrooms UFP levels. Specifically, each 10 km/h increase in wind speed corresponded to an 1873 cm(-3) (95% CI: 825, 2920) decrease in classroom UFP counts, and each 10000 cm(-3) increase in outdoor UFPs corresponded to a 1550 cm(-3) (95% CI: 930, 2171) increase in classroom UFP levels. However, high correlations between these two predictors meant that the independent effects of wind speed and outdoor UFPs could not be separated in multivariable models, and only outdoor UFP counts were included in the final predictive model. To evaluate model performance, classroom UFP counts were collected for 8 days at two new schools and compared to predicted values based on outdoor UFP measures. A moderate correlation was observed between measured and predicted classroom UFP counts (r=0.63) for both schools combined, but this relationship was not valid on days in which a strong indoor UFP source (electric kitchen stove) was active in schools. In general, our findings suggest that reasonable estimates of classroom UFP counts may be obtained from outdoor UFP data but that the accuracy of such estimates are limited in the presence of indoor UFP sources. PMID:17919560

  2. Characterizing and predicting ultrafine particle counts in Canadian classrooms during the winter months: Model development and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Weichenthal, Scott Dufresne, Andre; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Joseph, Lawrence

    2008-03-15

    School classrooms are potentially important micro-environments for childhood exposures owing to the large amount of time children spend in these locations. While a number of airborne contaminants may be present in schools, to date few studies have examined ultrafine particle (0.02-1 {mu}m) (UFP) levels in classrooms. In this study, our objective was to characterize UFP counts (cm{sup -3}) in classrooms during the winter months and to develop a model to predict such exposures based on ambient weather conditions and outdoor UFPs, as well as classroom characteristics such as size, temperature, relative humidity, and carbon dioxide levels. In total, UFP count data were collected on 60 occasions in 37 occupied classrooms at one elementary school and one secondary school in Pembroke, Ontario. On average, outdoor UFP levels exceeded indoor measures by 8989 cm{sup -3} (95% confidence interval (CI): 6382, 11 596), and classroom UFP counts were similar at both schools with a combined average of 5017 cm{sup -3} (95% CI: 4300, 5734). Of the variables examined only wind speed and outdoor UFPs were important determinants of classrooms UFP levels. Specifically, each 10 km/h increase in wind speed corresponded to an 1873 cm{sup -3} (95% CI: 825, 2920) decrease in classroom UFP counts, and each 10 000 cm{sup -3} increase in outdoor UFPs corresponded to a 1550 cm{sup -3} (95% CI: 930, 2171) increase in classroom UFP levels. However, high correlations between these two predictors meant that the independent effects of wind speed and outdoor UFPs could not be separated in multivariable models, and only outdoor UFP counts were included in the final predictive model. To evaluate model performance, classroom UFP counts were collected for 8 days at two new schools and compared to predicted values based on outdoor UFP measures. A moderate correlation was observed between measured and predicted classroom UFP counts (r=0.63) for both schools combined, but this relationship was not valid on days in which a strong indoor UFP source (electric kitchen stove) was active in schools. In general, our findings suggest that reasonable estimates of classroom UFP counts may be obtained from outdoor UFP data but that the accuracy of such estimates are limited in the presence of indoor UFP sources.

  3. The development and field testing of a system for determination of ultrafine activity particle size distribution and working levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1990-10-31

    Recent investigations of radon decay products in indoor air have shown that what has been called the unattached'' fraction is in fact an ultrafine size aerosol with diameters in the range of 0.5 to 10 nm. There are a number of difficulties in characterizing particles in this size range. Classical diffusion batteries using screens with high mesh numbers do not have the resolution to give detailed information for the ultra fine range. The use of single screens of differing mesh numbers (Graded Screen Arrays) either in parallel or in a stack configuration can be used to provide these results. However, accurately measuring the activity directly attached to the screens is difficult because of the attachment of some activity to the back side of the screen and the distribution of activity around the individual screen wires. A continuous monitoring system that provides information on both the size and charge distributions on these important size range particles has been constructed and its behavior characterized in the laboratory. It has now been field tested and employed in several field studies to determine the exposure of individuals to radon progeny in the indoor environment. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Study of fine and ultrafine particles for coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Birlingmair, D.; Buttermore, W.; Chmielewski, T.; Pollard, J.

    1990-04-01

    During the second quarter of work on this new project, critical review of the literature continued. Several new references related to gravity separation were identified and evaluated. A synopsis was assembled to summarize techniques developed by various researchers for the float/sink separation of ultrafine coal. In the reviewed literature, it was commonly concluded that substantial improvements in washability results for ultrafine coals can be obtained only through the application of dynamic (centrifugal) procedures, and through the use of dispersing aids such as ultrasound and surfactants. These results suggest the presence of physicochemical phenomena, typical of colloidal systems. In theoretical studies this quarter, the effects of Brownian motion on fine particle sedimentation have been identified and theoretically quantitated. The interaction between Brownian and gravitational forces was calculated, and a model was prepared to permit estimation of critical particle size in float/sink separations. In laboratory studies this quarter, aliquots of Upper Freeport coal were prepared and subjected to laboratory float/sink separations to investigate the relative effectiveness of static and centrifugal techniques for fine and ultrafine coal. This series will verify results of earlier work and provide a basis for comparing the effects which may result from further modifications to the separation techniques resulting from insights gained in the basic phenomena governing float/sink processes. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. In-cabin ultrafine particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin

    To assess the total human health risks associated with human exposure to ultrafine particle (UFP), the concentrations and fates of UFPs in the in-cabin atmospheres must be understood. In order to assess human exposure more accurately and further prevent adverse health effects from UFP exposure in the in-cabins, it is essential to gain insight into UFP transport dynamics between in-cabin and outside atmospheres and the factors that are able to affect them. In this dissertation, mathematical model are developed and formulated as tools to improve the understanding of UFP dynamics in the in-cabin atmosphere. Under three different ventilation conditions, (i) Fan off-recirculation (RC) off, (ii) Fan on-RC off, and (iii) Fan on-RC on, the average modeled UFP I/O ratios were found to be 0.40, 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, and agree with the experimental data very well. Then, analysis focused on how the factors, such as ventilation settings, vehicle speed, filtration, penetration, and deposition, affect I/O ratios in broader categories of vehicle cabin microenvironments. Ventilation is the only mechanical process of exchanging air between the in-cabin and the outside. Under condition (ii), I/O ratio that varies from 0.2 to 0.7 was proportional to the airflow rate in the range of 0-360 m3/h. Under condition (iii), the modeled I/O ratio was inversely proportional to the airflow rate from mechanical ventilation within the range of 0.15-0.45 depending on the particle size. Significant variability of the penetration factor (520%) was found due to the pressure difference. A coefficient "B" was successfully introduced to account for the electric charge effect on penetration factors. The effect of penetration on the I/O ratio was then evaluated by substituting penetration factor into the model. Under condition (i), the modeled I/O ratios increased linearly, up to 20%, within the penetration factor range. Under condition (iii), the effect of penetration factor is less but still significant (10%). The most penetrating particle size was observed at 300 nm, where the filtration efficiency was 20% in this study. As the filter face velocity (0.1 m s-1 0.5 m s-1) increased, filtration efficiency reductions were 10%-20%. As filter usage is increased, filtration efficiency enhancements were 5%-15% but mechanical airflow rate decreased 10%. Due to the discrepancy of filtration efficiencies, the UFP I/O ratios changes 5%-15% under condition (ii), and 5% under condition (iii). Vehicle speed directly affects the differential pressure between the ambient and the in-cabin environments, which determines the leakage flow rate. When there is no mechanical air supply from outside, in the vehicle (conditions (i) and (iii)), driving speed plays an important role for the air exchange resulting in a greater effect (8%). Under condition (ii), vehicle speed has a little effect on the I/O ratios (<5%).

  6. CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS (SHR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Epidemiological evidence suggests that ultrafine particles are associated with adverse cardiovascular effects, specifically in elderly individuals with preexisting cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was (i) to assess cardiopulmonary responses in adult ...

  7. HUMAN CLINICAL STUDIES OF CONCENTRATED AMBIENT ULTRAFINE AND FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confirmation of our hypothesis that exposure to ambient ultrafine and fine particles promotes coagulation and alters cardiac function will have important implications for air pollution regulatory efforts, and will provide new approaches for the prevention of cardiovascular hea...

  8. Ultrafine particle measurement and related EPA research studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Webinar slides to present information on measuring ultrafine particles at the request of the 2013 MARAMA Monitoring Committee. The talk covers near-road monitoring, instrument intercomparison, and general overview of UFP monitoring technology.

  9. VERSATILE AEROSOL CONCENTRATION ENRICHMENT SYSTEM (VACES) FOR SIMULTANEOUS IN VIVO AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE AND COARSE AMBIENT PARTICLES. PART I: DEVELOPMENT AND LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION. (R827352C001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the development and bench-testing of a versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES) capable of simultaneously concentrating ambient particles of the coarse, fine and ultrafine size fractions for conducting in vivo and in vitro studies. The VACE...

  10. Polymer degradation and ultrafine particles - Potential inhalation hazards for astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferin, J.; Oberdoerster, G.

    1992-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that exposure to ultrafine particles results in an increased interstiatilization of the particles which is accompanied by an acute pathological inflammation, rats were exposed to titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles by intratracheal instillation and by inhalation. Both acute intratracheal instillation and subchronic inhalation studies on rats show that ultrafine TiO2 particles access the pulmonary interstitium to a larger extent than fine particles and that they elicit an inflammatory response as indicated by PMN increase in lavaged cells. The release of ultrafine particles into the air of an enclosed environment from a thermodegradation event or from other sources is a potential hazard for astronauts. Knowing the mechanisms of action is a prerequisite for technical or medical countermeasures.

  11. Measurements of hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles during ultrafine particle formation events at urban, industrial, and coastal sites.

    PubMed

    Park, Kihong; Kim, Jae-Seok; Park, Seung Ho

    2009-09-01

    The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique was applied to determine the hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles in three sites of urban Gwangju, industrial Yeosu, and coastal Taean in South Korea. A database for the hygroscopicity and volatility of the known compositions and sizes of the laboratory-generated particles wasfirst constructed for comparison with the measured properties of atmospheric ultrafine particles. Distinct differences in hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles werefound between a "photochemical event" and a "combustion event" as well as among different sites. At the Gwangju site, ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" were determined to be more hygroscopic (growth factor (GF) = 1.05-1.33) than those in the "combustion event" (GF = 1.02-1.12), but their hygroscopicity was not as high as pure ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the laboratory-generated database, suggesting they were internally mixed with less soluble species. Ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" at the Yeosu site, having a variety of SO2, CO, and VOC emission sources, were more hygroscopic (GF = 1.34-1.60) and had a higher amount of volatile species (47-75%)than those observed at the Gwangju site. Ultrafine particle concentration at the Taean site increased during daylight hours with low tide, having a higher GF (1.34-1.80) than the Gwangju site and a lower amount of volatile species (17-34%) than the Yeosu site. Occasionally ultrafine particles were externally mixed according to their hygroscopicity and volatility, and TEM/EDS data showed that each type of particle had a distinct morphology and elemental composition. PMID:19764239

  12. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration. PMID:25518646

  13. Selective separation of ultra-fine particles by magnetophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, T.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Wingo, R. M.; Worl, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    The selective and-specific extraction of species of interest fiom local environmental and other sample sources are importaut fbr scientific research, industrial processes, and environmental applications. A novel process for selective separation of ultrafine particles using 'magnetophoresis' is investigated. The principle of this process is that the direction and velocity of particle movement in a magnetic field are determined by magnetic, gravitational, and drag fbrces. By controlling these fbrces, one is able to control the migration rates of different species and then magnetically fiactionate mixtures of species into discrete groups. This study demonstrated for the fist time the selective separation of various species, such as iron (111) oxide, cupric (11) oxide, samarium (In) oxide, and cerium (III) oxide, by magnetophoresis. To better understand this phenomenon, a fbrce-balance model was developed that provides a good interpretation of the experimental results.

  14. The persistence, transport and health effects of regional ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, Nicholas James

    Due to the multitude of health studies that have shown the ability of ultrafine particles (UFPs, DP < 100 nm) to penetrate deep into lung tissue, diffuse into the bloodstream, and eventually cause heart and lung disease, my thesis will focus on these effectively unmonitored airborne pollutants. UFPs are commonly detected near busy roadways and other high-temperature combustion sources in the form of heavy metals (copper, lead, zinc, iron) and toxic organics (benzo{a}pyrene, coronene). Studies of UFPs during the 1970s expressed a nucleic propensity for coagulation and growth. Because many of the UFPs studied were generated from heavy-duty diesel engines operating with ≥0.3 wt % sulfur, the resulting sulfur-containing UFPs were hydrophilic and water vapor readily condensed on the generated nuclei. Due to their increased size, UFPs tend to settle out of air streams quickly; thus, limiting their impact regime to near-roadway influence and labeling them as local pollutants. By using highly size- and time-resolved impactors with TeflonRTM ultrafine after-filters (targeting DP < 90 nm), new evidence suggests the persistence of UFPs for greater periods of time and transport than previously predicted. Techniques developed during the Roseville rail yard study, refined during the Watt Ave/Arden Way study and applied across California's central valley have shown low levels of UFPs in a regional background. For cities in constrictive topography and meteorology (such as Bakersfield, Fresno and Los Angeles), winter inversions and stagnant weather can saturate the region with ultrafine heavy metals and carcinogenic organics, similar to the disasters during the middle of the last century.

  15. EFFECTS OF CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES ON HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the leading theories concerning the toxicology of ambient particulate matter (PM) attributes health effects associated with PM inhalation to ultrafine particles (UF). UF numbers dwarf those of fine and coarse particles present in the ambient air as a result of fossil fuel ...

  16. LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION OF ULTRAFINE AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-line analysis of ultrafine aerosol particle in the 12 to 150 nm size range is performed by
    laser desorption/ionization. Particles are size selected with a differential mobility analyzer and then
    sent into a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer where they are ablated w...

  17. Ultrafine particle emissions from desktop 3D printers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Brent; Azimi, Parham; El Orch, Zeineb; Ramos, Tiffanie

    2013-11-01

    The development of low-cost desktop versions of three-dimensional (3D) printers has made these devices widely accessible for rapid prototyping and small-scale manufacturing in home and office settings. Many desktop 3D printers rely on heated thermoplastic extrusion and deposition, which is a process that has been shown to have significant aerosol emissions in industrial environments. However, we are not aware of any data on particle emissions from commercially available desktop 3D printers. Therefore, we report on measurements of size-resolved and total ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations resulting from the operation of two types of commercially available desktop 3D printers inside a commercial office space. We also estimate size-resolved (11.5 nm-116 nm) and total UFP (<100 nm) emission rates and compare them to emission rates from other desktop devices and indoor activities known to emit fine and ultrafine particles. Estimates of emission rates of total UFPs were large, ranging from ˜2.0 × 1010 # min-1 for a 3D printer utilizing a polylactic acid (PLA) feedstock to ˜1.9 × 1011 # min-1 for the same type of 3D printer utilizing a higher temperature acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic feedstock. Because most of these devices are currently sold as standalone devices without any exhaust ventilation or filtration accessories, results herein suggest caution should be used when operating in inadequately ventilated or unfiltered indoor environments. Additionally, these results suggest that more controlled experiments should be conducted to more fundamentally evaluate particle emissions from a wider arrange of desktop 3D printers.

  18. Study of fine and ultrafine particles for coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Birlingmair, D.; Buttermore, W.; Enustun, V.; Pollard, J.

    1990-07-01

    The primary objective of this research is to identify improved means for predicting the cleanability of fine and ultrafine coal by investigating the phenomena which govern laboratory techniques used to separate coal ground to find and ultrafine sizes for the determination of washability characteristics. This study seeks to identify and quantify factors other than gravity which affect separation, to establish limitations of density-based separation, and to develop techniques which will provide more accurate and consistent prediction of cleanability.

  19. Traffic emission factors of ultrafine particles: effects from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Janhll, Sara; Molnar, Peter; Hallquist, Mattias

    2012-09-01

    Ultrafine particles have a significant detrimental effect on both human health and climate. In order to abate this problem, it is necessary to identify the sources of ultrafine particles. A parameterisation method is presented for estimating the levels of traffic-emitted ultrafine particles in terms of variables describing the ambient conditions. The method is versatile and could easily be applied to similar datasets in other environments. The data used were collected during a four-week period in February 2005, in Gothenburg, as part of the Gte-2005 campaign. The specific variables tested were temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), carbon monoxide concentration (CO), and the concentration of particles up to 10 ?m diameter (PM(10)); all indicators are of importance for aerosol processes such as coagulation and gas-particle partitioning. These variables were selected because of their direct effect on aerosol processes (T and RH) or as proxies for aerosol surface area (CO and PM(10)) and because of their availability in local monitoring programmes, increasing the usability of the parameterization. Emission factors are presented for 10-100 nm particles (ultrafine particles; EF(ufp)), for 10-40 nm particles (EF(10-40)), and for 40-100 nm particles (EF(40-100)). For EF(40-100) no effect of ambient conditions was found. The emission factor equations are calculated based on an emission factor for NO(x) of 1 g km(-1), thus the particle emission factors are easily expressed in units of particles per gram of NO(x) emitted. For 10-100 nm particles the emission factor is EF(ufp) = 1.8 10(15) (1 - 0.095 CO - 3.2 10(-3) T) particles km(-1). Alternative equations for the EFs in terms of T and PM(10) concentration are also presented. PMID:22858604

  20. DAILY MORTALITY AND FINE AND ULTRAFINE PARTICLES IN ERFURT, GERMANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr H-Erich Wichmann and colleagues at the National Research Center for Environment and Health (GSF) in Neuherberg, Germany, prospec-tively studied the association of daily mortality data with the number and mass concentrations of ultra-fine and fine particles in Erfurt, Ger...

  1. CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES TO ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE EXPOSURES IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TD-02-042 (U. KODAVANTI) GPRA # 10108

    Cardiovascular Responses to Ultrafine Carbon Particle Exposures in Rats.
    V. Harder1, B. Lentner1, A. Ziesenis1, E. Karg1, L. Ruprecht1, U. Kodavanti2, A. Stampfl3, J. Heyder1, H. Schulz1
    GSF- Institute for Inhalation Biology1, I...

  2. Land use regression model for ultrafine particles in Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Gerard; Beelen, Rob; Kos, Gerard; Dijkema, Marieke; van der Zee, Saskia C; Fischer, Paul H; Brunekreef, Bert

    2011-01-15

    There are currently no epidemiological studies on health effects of long-term exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP), largely because data on spatial exposure contrasts for UFP is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop a land use regression (LUR) model for UFP in the city of Amsterdam. Total particle number concentrations (PNC), PM10, PM2.5, and its soot content were measured directly outside 50 homes spread over the city of Amsterdam. Each home was measured during one week. Continuous measurements at a central urban background site were used to adjust the average concentration for temporal variation. Predictor variables (traffic, address density, land use) were obtained using geographic information systems. A model including the product of traffic intensity and the inverse distance to the nearest road squared, address density, and location near the port explained 67% of the variability in measured PNC. LUR models for PM2.5, soot, and coarse particles (PM10, PM2.5) explained 57%, 76%, and 37% of the variability in measured concentrations. Predictions from the PNC model correlated highly with predictions from LUR models for PM2.5, soot, and coarse particles. A LUR model for PNC has been developed, with similar validity as previous models for more commonly measured pollutants. PMID:21158386

  3. Physicochemical characterization of Baizhi particles by ultrafine pulverization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lian-Wei; Sun, Peng; Gai, Guo-Sheng; Yang, Yu-Fen; Wang, Yu-Rong

    2011-04-01

    Baizhi, as a medicinal plant, has been demonstrated to be useful for the treatment of aches and pains in China. The physicochemical characterization of Baizhi particles is greatly influenced by ultrafine pulverization. To study the physicochemical characterization of Baizhi, the raw plant material of Baizhi was ground to 6 ?m particles by a high speed centrifugal sheering (HSCS) pulverizer. The micron particles were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Imperatorin is one of the active ingredients of Baizhi, and its extraction yield is determined to evaluate the chemical characterization of Baizhi powder. Imperatorin was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that after ultrafine pulverization, the plant cell walls are broken into pieces and the extraction yield of imperatorin is increased by 11.93% compared with the normal particles.

  4. Modeling the Burning Rate Enhancement of a Propellant Containing Ultrafine Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton

    2009-06-01

    Burning laws for ultrafine particles have been used in previous work to develop models for the burning of single and agglomerated particles. These ultrafine particles are usually reactive metal particles. In a rocket propellant, aluminum particles are often added to other energetic materials to enhance the burning rate and increase the energy released. In this effort, the laws describing the burning of metal particles and those describing the burning of energetic materials will both be coupled into a model for deriving the surface regression rate of the burning rocket propellant. Also from this model, an enhancement factor will be derived for the increase in the burning rate of a propellant when the size of the metal particles is decreased. Examples are shown that illustrate how this concept conforms to experimental results.

  5. Modeling the Burning Rate Enhancement of a Propellant Containing Ultrafine Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton T.

    2009-12-01

    Burning laws for ultrafine particles have been used in previous work to develop models for the burning of single and agglomerated particles. These ultrafine particles are usually reactive metal particles. In a rocket propellant, aluminum particles are often added to other energetic materials to enhance the burning rate and increase the energy released. In this effort, the laws describing the burning of metal particles and those describing the burning of energetic materials will both be coupled into a model for deriving the surface regression rate of the burning rocket propellant. Also from this model, an enhancement factor will be derived for the increase in the burning rate of a propellant when the size of the metal particles is decreased. Examples are shown that illustrate how this concept conforms to experimental results.

  6. Understanding the sources, scales and fate of ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Paola

    The biggest source of uncertainty in understanding anthropogenic forcing of the climate system derives from the role of atmospheric particles. The ability of particles to influence climate both through direct effects (i.e. increasing albedo) and indirect effects (i.e. changing cloud properties) are non-linear functions of the number concentration, size distribution and chemical composition of in situ particles. These are, in turn, determined by particle dynamics processes ¡V nucleation (new particle formation (NPF)), direct emission of particles, condensation, coagulation, and deposition. Each of these processes is incompletely understood. My research has focused on understanding controls on NPF and initial particle growth from initial detectable sizes of 3 nm diameter to climate relevant sizes (˜100 nm). NPF events have been observed in numerous locations, but questions remain as to the scale of these events and their importance to regional/global particle number concentrations, size distributions and climate forcing. In my research I improved the understanding of mechanisms responsible for NPF and growth, the spatial scales of, and vertical and horizontal variability in, NPF and growth over eastern North America. Results from my analyses show that NPF events and high concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFP) extend for several hundreds of kilometers as a result of the major role played by the regional background in providing chemical precursors for particle nucleation. Further, the appearance of freshly nucleated particles appears to be strongly linked to boundary layer dynamics and that the nucleation mechanism may be initiated by an increase in turbulence from aloft. Thus, events observed near the surface often result from the entrainment of either freshly nucleated particles or nucleation precursors formed aloft. Given the difficulty of directly measuring continuous particle size distributions (PSDs) at many locations, the use of observations from space would represent a unique tool for predicting NPF occurrence. In this regard I developed and evaluated an innovative algorithm to estimate UFP number concentrations based on satellite retrieved variables which shows good skill for predicting UFP concentrations and relative to global model output.

  7. Model simulation of ultrafine particles inside a road tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidhagen, L.; Johansson, C.; Strm, J.; Kristensson, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Pirjola, L.; Hansson, H.-C.

    A monodispersive aerosol dynamic model, coupled to a 3D hydrodynamical grid model, has been used to study the dynamics of ultrafine particles inside a road tunnel in Stockholm, Sweden. The model results were compared to measured data of particle number concentrations, traffic intensity and tunnel ventilation rate. Coagulation and depositional losses to the tunnel walls were shown to be important processes during traffic peak hours, together contributing to losses of 77% of the particles smaller than 10 nm and 41% of the particles of size 10-29 nm. Particle growth due to water uptake or the presence of a micron-sized, resuspended particle fraction did not have any significant effect on the number of particles lost due to coagulation. Model simulation of particle number concentration response to temporal variations in traffic flow showed that constant emission factors could be used to reproduce the concentration variations of the particles larger than 29 nm, while vehicle-speed-dependent factors are suggested to reproduce the variation of the smallest fractions. The emission factors for particle number concentrations estimated from the model simulation are in general higher and show a larger contribution from light-duty vehicles than what has been reported from a tunnel in California. The model study shows that combined measurements and model simulations in road tunnels can be used to improve the determinations of vehicle emission factors for ultrafine particles under realistic driving conditions.

  8. Fine and ultrafine particle decay rates in multiple homes.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Kindzierski, Warren; Kearney, Jill; MacNeill, Morgan; Hroux, Marie-ve; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2013-11-19

    Human exposure to particles depends on particle loss mechanisms such as deposition and filtration. Fine and ultrafine particles (FP and UFP) were measured continuously over seven consecutive days during summer and winter inside 74 homes in Edmonton, Canada. Daily average air exchange rates were also measured. FP were also measured outside each home and both FP and UFP were measured at a central monitoring station. A censoring algorithm was developed to identify indoor-generated concentrations, with the remainder representing particles infiltrating from outdoors. The resulting infiltration factors were employed to determine the continuously changing background of outdoor particles infiltrating the homes. Background-corrected indoor concentrations were then used to determine rates of removal of FP and UFP following peaks due to indoor sources. About 300 FP peaks and 400 UFP peaks had high-quality (median R(2) value >98%) exponential decay rates lasting from 30 min to 10 h. Median (interquartile range (IQR)) decay rates for UFP were 1.26 (0.82-1.83) h(-1); for FP 1.08 (0.62-1.75) h(-1). These total decay rates included, on average, about a 25% contribution from air exchange, suggesting that deposition and filtration accounted for the major portion of particle loss mechanisms in these homes. Models presented here identify and quantify effects of several factors on total decay rates, such as window opening behavior, home age, use of central furnace fans and kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans, use of air cleaners, use of air conditioners, and indoor-outdoor temperature differences. These findings will help identify ways to reduce exposure and risk. PMID:24143863

  9. Miniaturized ultrafine particle sizer and monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Da-Ren (Inventor); Qi, Chaolong (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring particle size distribution includes a charging device and a precipitator. The charging device includes a corona that generates charged ions in response to a first applied voltage, and a charger body that generates a low energy electrical field in response to a second applied voltage in order to channel the charged ions out of the charging device. The corona tip and the charger body are arranged relative to each other to direct a flow of particles through the low energy electrical field in a direction parallel to a direction in which the charged ions are channeled out of the charging device. The precipitator receives the plurality of particles from the charging device, and includes a disk having a top surface and an opposite bottom surface, wherein a predetermined voltage is applied to the top surface and the bottom surface to precipitate the plurality of particles.

  10. Fine and ultrafine particle emissions from microwave popcorn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Avalos, J; Zhu, Y

    2014-04-01

    This study characterized fine (PM2.5 ) and ultrafine particle (UFP, diameter < 100nm) emissions from microwave popcorn and analyzed influential factors. Each pre-packed popcorn bag was cooked in a microwave oven enclosed in a stainless steel chamber for 3min. The number concentration and size distribution of UFPs and PM2.5 mass concentration were measured inside the chamber repeatedly for five different flavors under four increasing power settings using either the foil-lined original package or a brown paper bag. UFPs and PM2.5 generated by microwaving popcorn were 150-560 and 350-800 times higher than the emissions from microwaving water, respectively. About 90% of the total particles emitted were in the ultrafine size range. The emitted PM concentrations varied significantly with flavor. Replacing the foil-lined original package with a brown paper bag significantly reduced the peak concentration by 24-87% for total particle number and 36-70% for PM2.5 . A positive relationship was observed between both UFP number and PM2.5 mass and power setting. The emission rates of microwave popcorn ranged from 1.9נ10(10) to 8.0נ10(10) No./min for total particle number and from 134 to 249?g/min for PM2.5 . PMID:24106981

  11. Process and apparatus for producing ultrafine explosive particles

    DOEpatents

    McGowan, Michael J. (Martinsburg, WV)

    1992-10-20

    A method and an improved eductor apparatus for producing ultrafine explosive particles is disclosed. The explosive particles, which when incorporated into a binder system, have the ability to propagate in thin sheets, and have very low impact sensitivity and very high propagation sensitivity. A stream of a solution of the explosive dissolved in a solvent is thoroughly mixed with a stream of an inert nonsolvent by obtaining nonlaminar flow of the streams by applying pressure against the flow of the nonsolvent stream, to thereby diverge the stream as it contacts the explosive solution, and violently agitating the combined stream to rapidly precipitate the explosive particles from the solution in the form of generally spheroidal, ultrafine particles. The two streams are injected coaxially through continuous, concentric orifices of a nozzle into a mixing chamber. Preferably, the nonsolvent stream is injected centrally of the explosive solution stream. The explosive solution stream is injected downstream of and surrounds the nonsolvent solution stream for a substantial distance prior to being ejected into the mixing chamber.

  12. SOURCE STRENGTHS OF ULTRAFINE AND FINE PARTICLES DUE TO COOKING WITH A GAS STOVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cooking, particularly frying, is an important source of particles indoors. Few studies have measured a full range of particle sizes, including ultrafine particles, produced during cooking. In this study, semicontinuous instruments with fine size discriminating ability were us...

  13. Process for making ultra-fine ceramic particles

    DOEpatents

    Stangle, Gregory C. (Alfred, NY); Venkatachari, Koththavasal R. (Hornell, NY); Ostrander, Steven P. (Scotia, NY); Schulze, Walter A. (Alfred Station, NY)

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing ultra-fine ceramic particles in which droplets are formed from a ceramic precursor mixture containing a metal cation, a nitrogen-containing fuel, a solvent, and an anion capable of participating in an anionic oxidation-reduction reaction with the nitrogen containing fuel. The nitrogen-containing fuel contains at least three nitrogen atoms, at least one oxygen atom, and at least one carbon atom. The ceramic precursor mixture is dried to remove at least 85 weight percent of the solvent, and the dried mixture is then ignited to form a combusted powder.

  14. Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Hamamoto, Shiro; Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Yasuda, Hajime

    1995-04-01

    Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer fine particles were produced by reducing the copolymer particles-metal ion complexes or refluxing an ethanol solution of metal ions in the presence of copolymer particles. The size of metal particles formed by reduction of the complex is smaller than that by reflux of the metal ion solution and depends on the amount of metal ions immobilized.

  15. TOTAL AND REGIONAL LUNG DOSE OF INHALED ULTRAFINE PARTICLES IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This record is closed and superseded by record 72390 - Ultrafine particles are ubiquitous in polluted urban air. Although mass fraction of ultrafine particles in ambient particulate matter (PM) may be small, its presence in a great number has been a source of concern for potentia...

  16. Spatio-temporal variation of urban ultrafine particle number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Ducret-Stich, Regina E.; Foraster, Maria; Morelli, Xavier; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Basagaa, Xavier; Corradi, Elisabetta; Ineichen, Alex; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Rivera, Marcela; Slama, Rmy; Knzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C.

    2014-10-01

    Methods are needed to characterize short-term exposure to ultrafine particle number concentrations (UFP) for epidemiological studies on the health effects of traffic-related UFP. Our aims were to assess season-specific spatial variation of short-term (20-min) UFP within the city of Basel, Switzerland, and to develop hybrid models for predicting short-term median and mean UFP levels on sidewalks. We collected measurements of UFP for periods of 20 min (MiniDiSC particle counter) and determined traffic volume along sidewalks at 60 locations across the city, during non-rush hours in three seasons. For each monitoring location, detailed spatial characteristics were locally recorded and potential predictor variables were derived from geographic information systems (GIS). We built multivariate regression models to predict local UFP, using concurrent UFP levels measured at a suburban background station, and combinations of meteorological, temporal, GIS and observed site characteristic variables. For a subset of sites, we assessed the relationship between UFP measured on the sidewalk and at the nearby residence (i.e., home outdoor exposure on e.g. balconies). The average median 20-min UFP levels at street and urban background sites were 14,700 9100 particles cm-3 and 9900 8600 particles cm-3, respectively, with the highest levels occurring in winter and the lowest in summer. The most important predictor for all models was the suburban background UFP concentration, explaining 50% and 38% of the variability of the median and mean, respectively. While the models with GIS-derived variables (R2 = 0.61) or observed site characteristics (R2 = 0.63) predicted median UFP levels equally well, mean UFP predictions using only site characteristic variables (R2 = 0.62) showed a better fit than models using only GIS variables (R2 = 0.55). The best model performance was obtained by using a combination of GIS-derived variables and locally observed site characteristics (median: R2 = 0.66; mean: R2 = 0.65). The 20-min UFP concentrations measured at the sidewalk were strongly related (R2 = 0.8) to the concurrent 20-min residential UFP levels nearby. Our results indicate that median UFP can be moderately predicted by means of a suburban background site and GIS-derived traffic and land use variables. In areas and regions where large-scale GIS data are not available, the spatial distribution of traffic-related UFP may be assessed reasonably well by collecting on-site short-term traffic and land-use data.

  17. Flotation classification of ultrafine particles -- A novel classification approach

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Guanzhou; Luo Lin; Hu Yuehua; Xu Jin; Wang Dianzuo

    1995-12-31

    This paper introduces a novel classification approach named the flotation classification approach which works by controlling interactions between particles. It differs considerably from the conventional classification processes operating on mechanical forces. In the present test, the micro-bubble flotation technology is grafted onto hydro-classification. Selective aggregation and dispersion of ultrafine particles are achieved through governing the interactions in the classification process. A series of laboratory classification tests for {minus}44 gm kaolin have been conducted on a classification column. As a result, about 92% recovery for minus 2 {micro}m size fraction Kaolin in the final product is obtained. In addition, two criteria for the classification are set up. Finally, a principle of classifying and controlling the interactions between particles is discussed in terms of surface thermodynamics and hydrodynamics.

  18. Exposure to Inhalable, Respirable, and Ultrafine Particles in Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m−3 for inhalable and 1.29 mg m−3 for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m−3). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  19. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Mhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  20. Dynamics of ultrafine particles inside a roadway tunnel.

    PubMed

    Mishra, V K; Aggarwal, M L; Berghmans, P; Frijns, E; Int Panis, L; Chacko, K M

    2015-12-01

    Size-segregated ultrafine particles from motor vehicles were investigated in the Craeybeckx tunnel (E19 motorway, Antwerp, Belgium) at two measurement sites, at 100 and 300m inside the tunnel, respectively, during March 2008. It was observed that out of the three size modes, nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation, Aitken mode was the most dominant size fraction inside the tunnel. The diurnal variation in ultrafine particle (UFP) levels closely follows the vehicular traffic inside the tunnel, which was maximum during office rush hours, both in the morning and evening and minimum during night-time around 3am. The tunnel data showed very high growth rates in comparison with free atmosphere. The average condensation sink during the growth period was 14.1-17.3נ10(-2)s(-1). The average growth rate (GR) of geometric mean diameter was found to be 18.62.45nmh(-1). It was observed that increase in Aitken mode was related to the numbers of heavy-duty vehicles (HDV), as they emit mainly in the Aitken mode. The higher Aitken mode during traffic jams correlated well with HDV numbers. At the end of the tunnel, sudden dilution leading to fast coagulation was responsible for the sudden drop in the UFP number concentration. PMID:26577216

  1. Exposure visualisation of ultrafine particle counts in a transport microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, S.; Clark, R. D. R.; Walsh, P. T.; Arnold, S. J.; Colvile, R. N.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M. J.

    An increasing number of studies indicate that short-term peak exposures, such as those seen in the transport microenvironment, pose particular health threats. Short-term exposure can only be sufficiently characterised using portable, fast-response monitoring instrumentation with detailed summaries of individual activity. In this paper, we present an exposure visualisation system that addresses this issueit allows the simultaneous presentation of mobile video imagery synchronised with measured real-time ultrafine particle count exposure of an individual. The combined data can be examined in detail for the contribution of the surrounding environment and the individual's activities to their peak and overall exposure. The exposure visualisation system is demonstrated and evaluated around the DAPPLE study site in Central London using different modes of transport (walking, cycling, bus, car and taxi). The video images, synchronised with the exposure profile, highlight the extent to which ultrafine particle exposure is associated with traffic density and proximity to pollutant source. The extremely rapid decline in concentration with increasing distance away from the pollutant source, such as from the main street to the backstreets, is clearly evident. The visualisation technique allows these data to be presented to both technical audiences and laypersons thus making it an effective environmental risk communication tool. Some exposure peaks however are not obviously associated with any event recorded on videoin these cases it will be necessary to use advanced dispersion modelling techniques to investigate meteorological conditions and other variables influencing in-street conditions to identify their possible causes.

  2. Surface area of particle administered versus mass in determining the pulmonary toxicity of ultrafine and fine carbon black: comparison to ultrafine titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Tina M; Castranova, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles are characterized by having a high surface area per mass. Particulate surface area has been reported to play an important role in determining the biological activity of nanoparticles. However, recent reports have questioned this relationship. This study was conducted to determine whether mass of particles or surface area of particles is the more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In this study, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to various doses of ultrafine and fine carbon black. At 1, 7, or 42 days post-exposure, inflammatory and cytotoxic potential of each particle type was compared on both a mass dosage (mg/rat) as well as an equal surface area dosage (cm2 of particles per cm2 of alveolar epithelium). In an additional study, the pulmonary responses to instillation of ultrafine carbon black were compared to equivalent particle surface area doses of ultrafine titanium dioxide. Results Ultrafine carbon black particles caused a dose dependent but transient inflammatory and cytotoxic response. On a mass basis, these responses were significantly (65 fold) greater than those for fine sized carbon black. However, when doses were equalized based on surface area of particles given, the ultrafine carbon black particles were only slightly (non-significantly) more inflammogenic and cytotoxic compared to the fine sized carbon black. At one day post-exposure, inflammatory potencies of the ultrafine carbon black and ultrafine titanium dioxide particles were similar. However, while the pulmonary reaction to ultrafine carbon black resolved with time, the inflammatory effects of ultrafine titanium dioxide were more persistent over a 42 day post-exposure period. Conclusion These results indicate that for low toxicity low solubility materials, surface area of particles administered rather than mass burden of particles may be a more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In addition, ultrafine titanium dioxide appears to be more bioactive than ultrafine carbon black on an equivalent surface area of particles delivered basis. PMID:19413904

  3. Nanotoxicology: An Emerging Discipline Evolving from Studies of Ultrafine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Oberdörster, Günter; Oberdörster, Eva; Oberdörster, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Although humans have been exposed to airborne nanosized particles (NSPs; < 100 nm) throughout their evolutionary stages, such exposure has increased dramatically over the last century due to anthropogenic sources. The rapidly developing field of nanotechnology is likely to become yet another source through inhalation, ingestion, skin uptake, and injection of engineered nanomaterials. Information about safety and potential hazards is urgently needed. Results of older bio-kinetic studies with NSPs and newer epidemiologic and toxicologic studies with airborne ultrafine particles can be viewed as the basis for the expanding field of nanotoxicology, which can be defined as safety evaluation of engineered nanostructures and nanodevices. Collectively, some emerging concepts of nanotoxicology can be identified from the results of these studies. When inhaled, specific sizes of NSPs are efficiently deposited by diffusional mechanisms in all regions of the respiratory tract. The small size facilitates uptake into cells and transcytosis across epithelial and endothelial cells into the blood and lymph circulation to reach potentially sensitive target sites such as bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, and heart. Access to the central nervous system and ganglia via translocation along axons and dendrites of neurons has also been observed. NSPs penetrating the skin distribute via uptake into lymphatic channels. Endocytosis and biokinetics are largely dependent on NSP surface chemistry (coating) and in vivo surface modifications. The greater surface area per mass compared with larger-sized particles of the same chemistry renders NSPs more active biologically. This activity includes a potential for inflammatory and pro-oxidant, but also antioxidant, activity, which can explain early findings showing mixed results in terms of toxicity of NSPs to environmentally relevant species. Evidence of mitochondrial distribution and oxidative stress response after NSP endocytosis points to a need for basic research on their interactions with subcellular structures. Additional considerations for assessing safety of engineered NSPs include careful selections of appropriate and relevant doses/concentrations, the likelihood of increased effects in a compromised organism, and also the benefits of possible desirable effects. An interdisciplinary team approach (e.g., toxicology, materials science, medicine, molecular biology, and bioinformatics, to name a few) is mandatory for nanotoxicology research to arrive at an appropriate risk assessment. PMID:16002369

  4. Nanotoxicology: an emerging discipline evolving from studies of ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Oberdrster, Gnter; Oberdrster, Eva; Oberdrster, Jan

    2005-07-01

    Although humans have been exposed to airborne nanosized particles (NSPs; < 100 nm) throughout their evolutionary stages, such exposure has increased dramatically over the last century due to anthropogenic sources. The rapidly developing field of nanotechnology is likely to become yet another source through inhalation, ingestion, skin uptake, and injection of engineered nanomaterials. Information about safety and potential hazards is urgently needed. Results of older biokinetic studies with NSPs and newer epidemiologic and toxicologic studies with airborne ultrafine particles can be viewed as the basis for the expanding field of nanotoxicology, which can be defined as safety evaluation of engineered nanostructures and nanodevices. Collectively, some emerging concepts of nanotoxicology can be identified from the results of these studies. When inhaled, specific sizes of NSPs are efficiently deposited by diffusional mechanisms in all regions of the respiratory tract. The small size facilitates uptake into cells and transcytosis across epithelial and endothelial cells into the blood and lymph circulation to reach potentially sensitive target sites such as bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, and heart. Access to the central nervous system and ganglia via translocation along axons and dendrites of neurons has also been observed. NSPs penetrating the skin distribute via uptake into lymphatic channels. Endocytosis and biokinetics are largely dependent on NSP surface chemistry (coating) and in vivo surface modifications. The greater surface area per mass compared with larger-sized particles of the same chemistry renders NSPs more active biologically. This activity includes a potential for inflammatory and pro-oxidant, but also antioxidant, activity, which can explain early findings showing mixed results in terms of toxicity of NSPs to environmentally relevant species. Evidence of mitochondrial distribution and oxidative stress response after NSP endocytosis points to a need for basic research on their interactions with subcellular structures. Additional considerations for assessing safety of engineered NSPs include careful selections of appropriate and relevant doses/concentrations, the likelihood of increased effects in a compromised organism, and also the benefits of possible desirable effects. An interdisciplinary team approach (e.g., toxicology, materials science, medicine, molecular biology, and bioinformatics, to name a few) is mandatory for nanotoxicology research to arrive at an appropriate risk assessment. PMID:16002369

  5. Method for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles, device for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jie; Liu, Yung Y

    2015-01-20

    The invention provides a method for dispersing particles within a reaction field, the method comprising confining the particles to the reaction field using a standing wave. The invention also provides a system for coating particles, the system comprising a reaction zone; a means for producing fluidized particles within the reaction zone; a fluid to produce a standing wave within the reaction zone; and a means for introducing coating moieties to the reaction zone. The invention also provides a method for coating particles, the method comprising fluidizing the particles, subjecting the particles to a standing wave; and contacting the subjected particles with a coating moiety.

  6. Vascular effects of ultrafine particles in persons with type 2 diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes confers an increased risk for cardiovascular effects of airborne particles. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that inhalation of elemental carbon ultrafine particles (UFP) would activate blood platelets and vascular endothelium in people with type 2 diabetes. ...

  7. UPREGULATION OF TISSUE FACTOR IN HUMAN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS FOLLOWING ULTRAFINE PARTICLE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiology studies have linked the exposure to air pollutant particles with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In our laboratory we have tested the hypothesis that the ultrafine fraction of ambient pollutant particles would cau...

  8. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

    2005-09-30

    In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

  9. Monodispersed Ultrafine Zeolite Crystal Particles by Microwave Hydrothermal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.; Harris, Michael Tyrone; Khatri, Lubna

    2008-01-01

    Microwave hydrothermal synthesis of zeolites is reviewed. Monodispersed ultrafine crystal particles of zeolite (Silicalite-1) have been synthesized in batch reactor vessels by microwave irradiation heating of aqueous basic silicate precursor solutions with tetra propyl ammonium hydroxide as the templating molecule. The effects of major process parameters (such as synthesis temperature, microwave heating rate, volume ratio (i.e., the volume of the initial synthesis solution over the total volume of the reactor vessel), and synthesis time on the zeolite particle characteristics are studied using a computer-controlled microwave reactor system that allows real-time monitoring and control of reaction medium temperature. The changes in the morphology, size and crystal structure of the particles are investigated using scanning electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and BET surface analysis. We have found that the synthesis temperature, volume ratio, and heating rate play a significant role in controlling the particle size, uniformity, and morphology. Microwave processing has generated new morphologies of zeolite particles (i.e., uniform block-shaped particles that contain mixed gel-nanocrystallites and agglomerated crystal particles) that could not be made by a conventional hydrothermal process. At higher synthesis temperature and lower volume ratio, irregular block-shaped particles were produced, whereas increasing the volume ratio promoted the formation of monodispersed single-crystal particles with uniform shape. Our results clearly demonstrate that faster microwave heating is advantageous to enhance the zeolite crystallization kinetics and produces larger-size crystal particles in shorter time. In addition, zeolite crystallization mechanisms, depending on the microwave heating rate, were also discussed.

  10. Roadside measurements of ultrafine particles at a busy urban intersection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yungang; Zhu, Yifang; Salinas, Robert; Ramirez, David; Karnae, Saritha; John, Kuruvilla

    2008-11-01

    A field sampling campaign on ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter <100 nm) was conducted at a busy traffic intersection from December 2006 to June 2007 in Corpus Christi, TX. This traffic intersection consisted of South Padre Island Drive (SPID, Highway 358) and Staples Street. Traffic densities on SPID were 9102/hr and 7880/hr for weekdays and weekends, respectively. Staples Street traffic densities were 2795/hr and 2572/hr, respectively. There were approximately 3.7% heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) on both roadways. Peak traffic flows occurred early in the morning and late in the evening during weekdays and around noon on weekends. The average UFP total number concentration collected by a condensation particle counter (CPC 3785; TSI) was 66 x 10(3) cm(-3). A direct relationship between the UFP number concentration and traffic density was observed, but the HDDV traffic density was found to be a better estimator of the UFP number concentration than total traffic density. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS 3936 with DMA 3081 and CPC 3785, TSI) measuring the particle size distribution from 7 to 290 nm was rotated among four corners of the intersection. The upwind and downwind size distributions were both bimodal in shape, exhibiting a nucleation mode at 10-30 nm and a secondary mode at 50-70 nm. The highest and lowest particle concentrations were observed on the downwind and upwind sides of both roadways, respectively, indicating the importance of wind direction. Wind speed also played an important role in overall particle concentrations; UFP concentrations were inversely proportional to wind speed. A negative correlation was observed between particle number concentrations and ambient temperature. The particle number concentration was 3.5 times greater when traffic was idling at a red light than moving at a green light. PMID:19044160

  11. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression

    PubMed Central

    Fent, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters’ potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator’s shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 107 particles per cm3, 170 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 4700 μm2 cm−3 active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 104 particles per cm3, 0.36 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 92 μm2 cm−3 active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 105 particles per cm3, 2.7 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 320 μm2 cm−3 active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The wind direction and the relative position of the fire crew to the stationary burning vehicle played a primary role in fire crews’ potential for exposure. We recommend that firefighters wear self-contained breathing apparatus during all phases of the vehicle fire response to significantly reduce their potential for particulate, vapor, and gaseous exposures. PMID:26308547

  12. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Fent, Kenneth W

    2015-10-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters' potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator's shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 10(7) particles per cm(3), 170 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 4700 μm(2) cm(-3) active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 10(4) particles per cm(3), 0.36 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 92 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 10(5) particles per cm(3), 2.7 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 320 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The wind direction and the relative position of the fire crew to the stationary burning vehicle played a primary role in fire crews' potential for exposure. We recommend that firefighters wear self-contained breathing apparatus during all phases of the vehicle fire response to significantly reduce their potential for particulate, vapor, and gaseous exposures. PMID:26308547

  13. Measurements of ultrafine particle concentrations and size distribution in an iron foundry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Chao, Yen-Chi; Wu, Cheng-Han; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Uang, Shi-Nian; Shih, Tung-Sheng

    2008-10-01

    The number and surface area concentration of ultrafine particles in an iron foundry is of interest as freshly generated ultrafine particles are produced by metal melting, pouring and molding processes. This study measured the number and surface area concentrations of ultrafine particles and their size distributions in an iron foundry using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The 10-100 nm ultrafine particle number concentrations (NC(0.01-0.1)) and surface area concentrations (SC(0.01-0.1)) measured at the iron foundry were 2.07 x 10(4) to 2.82 x 10(5)particles cm(-3) and 67.56 to 2.13 x 10(3)microm(2)cm(-3), respectively. The concentrations changed dramatically depending on on-site manufacturing conditions. The NC(0.01-0.1) levels in the iron foundry were approximately 4.5 times higher on average compared with those in the outdoor ambient environment. These measurement results indicate that the presence of extra particles in the workplace air is within the ultrafine range. Additionally, the analytical results suggest that the number mode diameter can be used to estimate the SC(0.01-0.1) levels using the NC(0.01-0.1) levels. Moreover, the ultrafine particle number mode diameter was found to be about 46.1 nm in the iron foundry. PMID:18313211

  14. Comparison of deposited surface area of airborne ultrafine particles generated from two welding processes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J F; Albuquerque, P C; Miranda, Rosa M; Santos, Telmo G; Vieira, M T

    2012-09-01

    This article describes work performed on the assessment of the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in two welding processes metal-active gas (MAG) of carbon steel and friction-stir welding (FSW) of aluminium in terms of deposited area in alveolar tract of the lung using a nanoparticle surface area monitor analyser. The obtained results showed the dependence from process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and clearly demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles, when compared with background levels. The obtained results showed that the process that results on the lower levels of alveolar-deposited surface area is FSW, unlike MAG. Nevertheless, all the tested processes resulted in important doses of ultrafine particles that are to be deposited in the human lung of exposed workers. PMID:22954401

  15. Cardiovascular Effects in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome Exposed to Concentrated Ultrafine Air Pollution Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: Epidemiologic studies report associations between ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) and various indices of cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. A leading hypothesis contends that smaller ultrafine (UF) particles induce a greater physiologic response bec...

  16. Ultrafine particle concentrations in and around idling school buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qunfang; Fischer, Heidi J.; Weiss, Robert E.; Zhu, Yifang

    2013-04-01

    Unnecessary school bus idling increases children's exposure to diesel exhaust, but to what extent children are exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter < 100 nm) in and around idling school buses remains unclear. This study employed nine school buses and simulated five scenarios by varying emissions source, wind direction, and window position. The purpose was to investigate the impact of idling on UFP number concentration and PM2.5 mass concentration inside and near school buses. Near the school buses, total particle number concentration increased sharply from engine off to engine on under all scenarios, by a factor of up to 26. The impact of idling on UFP number concentration inside the school buses depended on wind direction and window position: wind direction was important and statistically significant while the effect of window positions depended on wind direction. Under certain scenarios, idling increased in-cabin total particle number concentrations by a factor of up to 5.8, with the significant increase occurring in the size range of 10-30 nm. No significant change of in-cabin PM2.5 mass concentration was observed due to idling, regardless of wind direction and window position, indicating that PM2.5 is not a good indicator for primary diesel exhaust particle exposure. The deposition rates based on total particle number concentration inside school bus cabins varied between 1.5 and 5.0 h-1 across nine tested buses under natural convection conditions, lower than those of passenger cars but higher than those of indoor environments.

  17. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    PubMed

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant. PMID:26531805

  18. [Effect of particle size on the enzymatic hydrolysis of polysaccharides from ultrafine lignocellulose particles].

    PubMed

    Shutova, V V; Iusipovich, E Iu; Zakharkin, D O; Revin, V V

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of wood polysaccharides ground into ultrafine particles (UFPs) has been investigated. The content of reducing sugars (RS's) in powdered raw materials and the yield of sugars during enzymatic hydrolysis have been shown to depend on the particle size. Laser interference microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies have shown that increasing the grinding time from 20 to 40 min resulted in the formation of particles ranging from 2 to 200 nm in size. Enzymatic hydrolyzates of UFPs mostly contained glucose and galactose. The grinding intensity (mill rotation rate) and time had a significant effect on the extent of the enzymatic hydrolysis of wood. PMID:22834308

  19. The effect of ventilation, age, and asthmatic condition on ultrafine particle deposition in children.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Hector A; Perez, Daniel; Clague, Juan W; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Li, Wen-Whai; Amaya, Maria A; Burchiel, Scott W; Berwick, Marianne; Pingitore, Nicholas E

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) contribute to health risks associated with air pollution, especially respiratory disease in children. Nonetheless, experimental data on UFP deposition in asthmatic children has been minimal. In this study, the effect of ventilation, developing respiratory physiology, and asthmatic condition on the deposition efficiency of ultrafine particles in children was explored. Deposited fractions of UFP (10-200?nm) were determined in 9 asthmatic children, 8 nonasthmatic children, and 5 nonasthmatic adults. Deposition efficiencies in adults served as reference of fully developed respiratory physiologies. A validated deposition model was employed as an auxiliary tool to assess the independent effect of varying ventilation on deposition. Asthmatic conditions were confirmed via pre-and post-bronchodilator spirometry. Subjects were exposed to a hygroscopic aerosol with number geometric mean diameter of 27-31?nm, geometric standard deviation of 1.8-2.0, and concentration of 1.2 10(6) particles cm(-3). Exposure was through a silicone mouthpiece. Total deposited fraction (TDF) and normalized deposition rate were 50% and 32% higher in children than in adults. Accounting for tidal volume and age variation, TDF was 21% higher in asthmatic than in non-asthmatic children. The higher health risks of air pollution exposure observed in children and asthmatics might be augmented by their susceptibility to higher dosages of UFP. PMID:22848818

  20. The Effect of Ventilation, Age, and Asthmatic Condition on Ultrafine Particle Deposition in Children

    PubMed Central

    Olvera, Hector A.; Perez, Daniel; Clague, Juan W.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Li, Wen-Whai; Amaya, Maria A.; Burchiel, Scott W.; Berwick, Marianne; Pingitore, Nicholas E.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) contribute to health risks associated with air pollution, especially respiratory disease in children. Nonetheless, experimental data on UFP deposition in asthmatic children has been minimal. In this study, the effect of ventilation, developing respiratory physiology, and asthmatic condition on the deposition efficiency of ultrafine particles in children was explored. Deposited fractions of UFP (10200?nm) were determined in 9 asthmatic children, 8 nonasthmatic children, and 5 nonasthmatic adults. Deposition efficiencies in adults served as reference of fully developed respiratory physiologies. A validated deposition model was employed as an auxiliary tool to assess the independent effect of varying ventilation on deposition. Asthmatic conditions were confirmed via pre-and post-bronchodilator spirometry. Subjects were exposed to a hygroscopic aerosol with number geometric mean diameter of 2731?nm, geometric standard deviation of 1.82.0, and concentration of 1.2 106 particles cm?3. Exposure was through a silicone mouthpiece. Total deposited fraction (TDF) and normalized deposition rate were 50% and 32% higher in children than in adults. Accounting for tidal volume and age variation, TDF was 21% higher in asthmatic than in non-asthmatic children. The higher health risks of air pollution exposure observed in children and asthmatics might be augmented by their susceptibility to higher dosages of UFP. PMID:22848818

  1. ULTRAFINE PARTICLE DEPOSITION IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS VS. PATIENTS WTH COPD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Individuals affected with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have increased susceptibility to adverse health effects from exposure to particulate air pollution. The dosimetry of ultrafine aerosols (diameter # 0.1 :m) is not well characterized in the healthy or diseas...

  2. [Determination of average particle diameter and size distribution of ultra-fine beta zeolite by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Xue, Yan; Yang, Haiying; Yang, Yongtan

    2004-09-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of average particle diameter and size distribution of ultra-fine beta zeolite by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The dispersion and stabilization conditions of ultra-fine beta zeolite powder in suspensions were investigated by measuring the isoelectric point (IEP) of the powder suspension. Stable dispersion condition of beta zeolite ultrafine particles in aqueous solution was obtained by adding beta zeolite into the buffer (1.25 mmol/L NaHCO3-5 mmol/L Na2CO3, pH 10.82). The calibration equation between migration time and particle size was established to obtain the data of particle diameter by relating the beta zeolite diameters determined by laser particle sizer with the migration time from electropherogram of beta zeolite through the cumulative percentage of particle distribution. The calibration equation between particle size and amount was also established to correct the deviation of the response caused by particle size as the special relating principle suggested in the paper. The method is advantageous in small sample quantity required, low cost and short measurement period for each individual analysis. PMID:15706938

  3. ENHANCED TOXICITY OF CHARGED CARBON NANOTUBES AND ULTRAFINE CARBON BLACK PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Man-made carbonaceous nano-particles such as single and multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (CNT) and ultra-fine carbon black (UFCB) particles are finding increasing applications in industry, but their potential toxic effects is of concern. In aqueous media, these particles cluster in...

  4. ULTRAFINE PARTICLE CONCENTRATIONS NEAR FREEWAYS AT NIGHT OR EARLY MORNING UNDER CALM WEATHER CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that ultrafine (UF) particles dominate the number concentrations in close proximity to the roadway. The UF particles are also known to be more toxic than larger sizes of PM on an equal mass basis. In this work, UF particle number concentrations were measured u...

  5. What does respirator certification tell us about filtration of ultrafine particles?

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Honda, Takeshi; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2008-05-01

    Recent interest in exposures to ultrafine particles (less than 100 nm) in both environmental and occupational settings led the authors to question whether the protocols used to certify respirator filters provide adequate attention to ultrafine aerosols. The authors reviewed the particle size distribution of challenge aerosols and evaluated the aerosol measurement method currently employed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) particulate respirator certification protocol for its ability to measure the contribution of ultrafine particles to filter penetration. Also considered were the differences between mechanical and electrically charged (electret) filters in light of the most penetrating particle size. It was found that the sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctylphthalate (DOP) aerosols currently used in respirator certification tests contain a significant fraction of particles in the ultrafine region. However, the photometric method deployed in the certification test is not capable of adequately measuring light scatter of particles below approximately 100 nm in diameter. Specifically, 68% (by count) and 8% (by mass) of the challenge NaCl aerosol particles and 10% (by count) and 0.3% (by mass) of the DOP particles below 100 nm do not significantly contribute to the filter penetration measurement. In addition, the most penetrating particle size for electret filters likely occurs at 100 nm or less under test conditions similar to those used in filter certification. The authors conclude, therefore, that the existing NIOSH certification protocol may not represent a worst-case assessment for electret filters because it has limited ability to determine the contribution of ultrafine aerosols, which include the most penetrating particle size for electret filters. Possible strategies to assess ultrafine particle penetration in the certification protocol are discussed. PMID:18322869

  6. Research on ultrafine particle size measurement using small amounts of data.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenmei; Shen, Jin; Liu, Wei; Wang, Yajing

    2011-08-20

    The paper puts forward a new method of ultrafine particle size measurement using small amounts of data of a dynamic light-scattering signal, and establishes an arithmetic model of the measurement by wavelet package transform. First, through the wavelet package transform, the ultrafine particle dynamic light-scattering signals were decomposed into multifrequency bands. Then, the noise of signals of different frequency bands were removed and the power spectrum of the wavelet packet coefficients of each frequency band was calculated. Finally, the ultrafine particle size distribution information could be deduced from inversing the power spectrum. The standard polystyrene particles of 100, 300, and 400 nm were measured using this method, and the inversion results indicated that this method can effectively remove noise and improve the accuracy of particle size measurement using small amounts of data. PMID:21857710

  7. Ultrafine particle generation by high-velocity impact of metal projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, L.; Iannitti, G.; Vigo, P.; Ruggiero, A.; Russi, A.; Buonanno, G.

    2014-05-01

    Ultrafine particle generation through mechanical processes was not carefully deepened so far, even if it could be related to the human health-based researches. In particular, the evaluation of ultrafine particles produced in battlefield scenarios can be useful to quantify the exposure of soldiers to particles carrying toxic heavy metals. In the present work ultrafine particle generation during high-velocity impact of metal projectiles was deepened performing symmetrical high velocity Taylor impacts of copper cylinder tests (Rod-on-Rod tests) by means of a gas-gun facility. Particle number distributions and total concentrations were measured through one-second-time resolution instruments in a chamber where impact events at different velocities were performed. Particle number generation per impact was also evaluated. Particle concentrations in the 106 part. cm-3 range were measured corresponding to particle generations higher than 1012 particles per impact, then comparable to those typical of combustion sources. Particle number distribution showed a unimodal distribution with a 10 nm mode. Summarizing, the performed experimental campaign revealed an extremely high generation of ultrafine particles from mechanical processes.

  8. Metrological assessment of a portable analyzer for monitoring the particle size distribution of ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Stabile, Luca; Cauda, Emanuele; Marini, Sara; Buonanno, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Adverse health effects caused by worker exposure to ultrafine particles have been detected in recent years. The scientific community focuses on the assessment of ultrafine aerosols in different microenvironments in order to determine the related worker exposure/dose levels. To this end, particle size distribution measurements have to be taken along with total particle number concentrations. The latter are obtainable through hand-held monitors. A portable particle size distribution analyzer (Nanoscan SMPS 3910, TSI Inc.) was recently commercialized, but so far no metrological assessment has been performed to characterize its performance with respect to well-established laboratory-based instruments such as the scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) spectrometer. The present paper compares the aerosol monitoring capability of the Nanoscan SMPS to the laboratory SMPS in order to evaluate whether the Nanoscan SMPS is suitable for field experiments designed to characterize particle exposure in different microenvironments. Tests were performed both in a Marple calm air chamber, where fresh diesel particulate matter and atomized dioctyl phthalate particles were monitored, and in microenvironments, where outdoor, urban, indoor aged, and indoor fresh aerosols were measured. Results show that the Nanoscan SMPS is able to properly measure the particle size distribution for each type of aerosol investigated, but it overestimates the total particle number concentration in the case of fresh aerosols. In particular, the test performed in the Marple chamber showed total concentrations up to twice those measured by the laboratory SMPS-likely because of the inability of the Nanoscan SMPS unipolar charger to properly charge aerosols made up of aggregated particles. Based on these findings, when field test exposure studies are conducted, the Nanoscan SMPS should be used in tandem with a condensation particle counter in order to verify and correct the particle size distribution data. PMID:24817159

  9. PAHs, PAH-induced carcinogenic potency, and particle-extract-Induced cytotoxicity of traffic-related nano/ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lin, Wen-Yinn; Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chaung, Hso-Chi

    2008-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) bound in nano/ ultrafine particles from vehicle emissions may cause adverse health effects. However, little is known about the characteristics of the nanoparticle-bound PAHs and the PAH-associated carcinogenic potency/cytotoxicity; therefore, traffic-related nano/ultrafine particles were collected in this study using a microorifice uniform deposition impactor(MOUDI) and a nano-MOUDI. For PM0.056--18, the difference in size-distribution of particulate total-PAHs between non-after-rain and after-rain samples was statistically significant at alpha = 0.05; however, this difference was not significant for PM0.01--0.056. The PAH correlation between PM0.01--0.1 and PM0.1--1.8 was lower for the after-rain samples than forthe non-after-rain samples. The average particulate total-PAHs in five samplings displayed a trimodal distribution with a major peak in the Aitken mode (0.032--0.056 microm). About half of the particulate total-PAHs were in the ultrafine size range. The BaPeq sums of BaP, IND, and DBA (with toxic equivalence factors > or = 0.1) accounted for approximately 90% of the total-BaPeq in the nano/ultrafine particles, although these three compounds contributed little to the mass of the sampled particles. The mean content of the particle-bound total-PAHs/-BaPeqs and the PAH/BaPeq-derived carcinogenic potency followed the order nano > ultrafine > fine > coarse. For a sunny day sample, the cytotoxicity of particle extracts (using 1:1 (v/v) n-hexane/dichloromethane) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) for the nano (particularly the 10-18 nm)/ultrafine particles than for the coarser particles and bleomycin. Therefore, traffic-related nano and ultrafine particles are possibly cytotoxic. PMID:18589992

  10. A new approach for on-line measurements of the chemistry of individual ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauscher, M. D.; Lewis, G. S.; Hering, S. V.; Prather, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Ultrafine aerosol particles, those with diameters less than 100nm, are abundant in the atmosphere and play a crucial role in climate through cloud formation and have a greater effect on human health than larger particles. The chemistry of ultrafine particles helps determine whether they will act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) as well as how they will affect human health. However, it is difficult to study the chemistry of ultrafine particles due to their low mass and small size for optical detection. Typically, long collection times are required to collect ultrafine particles onto substrates, leading to loss of temporal information and individual particle chemistry and source information. Single particle mass spectrometers that rely on optical detection of particles for subsequent chemical analysis cannot effectively analyze ultrafine particles. Growth of particles through condensation has been used in various sizing (i.e. condensation particle counter (CPC), cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNc)), as well as chemical (i.e. particle into liquid system (PILS) and condensation growth and impaction system (C-GIS)) instruments. In order to study ultrafine particles, we couple a laminar flow, water condensation growth tube (GT) with an aerodynamic focusing lens aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS). The GT used here is similar in principle to the water-based CPC. The particles are exposed to a region of high supersaturation where they grow in size by water vapor condensation. We have coupled this GT to a single particle mass spectrometry ATOFMS system. Using this combined approach, we are able to detect polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) as small as 38nm compared to the lower size limit of 90 nm of the ATOFMS without the GT. A series of inorganic and organic chemical standards representative of ambient particles show that by evaporating the particles between the GT and ATOFMS, there is little change in the chemistry of the particles that have undergone this growth and evaporation process. We have successfully characterized ambient particles down to 50nm with this GT-ATOFMS system. This technique has great potential to expand our limited knowledge of the chemistry of ultrafine particles and their effect on both climate and human health.

  11. Pulmonary response to intratracheal instillation of ultrafine versus fine titanium dioxide: role of particle surface area

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Tina M; Kommineni, C; Castranova, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Background The production and use of nanoparticles is growing rapidly due to the unique physical and chemical properties associated with their nano size and large surface area. Since nanoparticles have unique physicochemical properties, their bioactivity upon exposure to workers or consumers is of interest. In this study, the issue of what dose metric (mass dose versus surface area dose) is appropriate for toxicological studies has been addressed. Rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to various doses of ultrafine or fine TiO2. At 1, 7, or 42 days post-exposure, inflammatory and cytotoxic potential of each particle type was compared on both a mass dosage (mg/rat) as well as an equal surface area dosage (cm2 of particles per cm2 of alveolar epithelium) basis. Results The findings of the study show that on a mass basis the ultrafine particles caused significantly more inflammation and were significantly more cytotoxic than the fine sized particles. However, when doses were equalized based on surface area of particles delivered, the ultrafine particles were only slightly more inflammogenic and cytotoxic when compared to the fine sized particles. Lung burden data indicate that ultrafine TiO2 appears to migrate to the interstitium to a much greater extent than fine TiO2. Conclusion This study suggests that surface area of particles may be a more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies than mass of particles. PMID:19046442

  12. The role of organic condensation on ultrafine particle growth during nucleation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patoulias, D.; Fountoukis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    A new aerosol dynamics model (DMANx) has been developed that simulates aerosol size/composition distribution and includes the condensation of organic vapors on nanoparticles through the implementation of the recently developed volatility basis set framework. Simulations were performed for Hyytiälä (Finland) and Finokalia (Greece), two locations with different organic sources where detailed measurements were available to constrain the new model. We investigate the effect of condensation of organics and chemical aging reactions of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors on ultrafine particle growth and particle number concentration during a typical springtime nucleation event in both locations. This work highlights the importance of the pathways of oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds and the production of extremely low volatility organics. At Hyytiälä, organic condensation dominates the growth process of new particles. The low-volatility SOA contributes to particle growth during the early growth stage, but after a few hours most of the growth is due to semi-volatile SOA. At Finokalia, simulations show that organics have a complementary role in new particle growth, contributing 45% to the total mass of new particles. Condensation of organics increases the number concentration of particles that can act as CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) (N100) by 13% at Finokalia and 25% at Hyytiälä during a typical spring day with nucleation. The sensitivity of our results to the surface tension used is discussed.

  13. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND LIPID MEDIATORS INDUCED IN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGES BY ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In ambient aerosols, ultrafine particles (UFP) and their agglomerates are considered to be major factors contributing to adverse health effects. Reactivity of agglomerated UFP of elemental carbon (EC), Printex 90, Printex G, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) was evaluated by the...

  14. The exposure to coarse, fine and ultrafine particle emissions from concrete mixing, drilling and cutting activities.

    PubMed

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant; Mulheron, Mike

    2014-08-30

    Building activities generate coarse (PM10?10?m), fine (PM2.5?2.5?m) and ultrafine particles (<100nm) making it necessary to understand both the exposure levels of operatives on site and the dispersion of ultrafine particles into the surrounding environment. This study investigates the release of particulate matter, including ultrafine particles, during the mixing of fresh concrete (incorporating Portland cement with Ground Granulated Blastfurnace Slag, GGBS or Pulverised Fuel Ash, PFA) and the subsequent drilling and cutting of hardened concrete. Particles were measured in the 5-10,000nm size range using a GRIMM particle spectrometer and a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS50). The mass concentrations of PM2.5-10 fraction contributed ?52-64% of total mass released. The ultrafine particles dominated the total particle number concentrations (PNCs); being 74, 82, 95 and 97% for mixing with GGBS, mixing with PFA, drilling and cutting, respectively. Peak values measured during the drilling and cutting activities were 4 and 14 times the background. Equivalent emission factors were calculated and the total respiratory deposition dose rates for PNCs for drilling and cutting were 32.979.4110(8)min(-1) and 88.2558.8210(8)min(-1). These are a step towards establishing number and mass emission inventories for particle exposure during construction activities. PMID:25068443

  15. DEPOSITION DISTRIBUTION OF NANO AND ULTRAFINE PARTICLES IN HUMAN LUNGS DURING CONTROLLED MOUTH BREATHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nano and ultrafine particles are abundant in the atmosphere and the level of human exposure to these tiny particles is expected to increase markedly as industrial activities increase manufacturing nano-sized materials. Exposure-dose relationships and site-specific internal dose a...

  16. ANALYSIS OF TOTAL RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED ULTRAFINE PARTICLES IN ADULT SUBJECTS AT VARIOUS BREATHING PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine particles are ubiquitous in the ambient air and their unique physicochemical characteristics may pose a potential health hazard. Accurate lung dose information is essential to assess a potential health risk to exposure to these particles. In the present study, we measur...

  17. UP-REGULATION OF TISSUE FACTOR IN HUMAN PULMONARY ARTERY ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AFTER ULTRAFINE PARTICLE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Epidemiology studies have linked exposure to pollutant particles to

    increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, but the mechanisms remain unknown.

    Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the ultrafine fraction of ambient pollutant

    particle...

  18. MECHANISMS BY WHICH ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICLES CAUSE ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small number of recent studies suggest that different size particles may cause different health effects. There are clearly differences in the chemical makeup of coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles, and this different chemistry may well drive different health responses. The ...

  19. Association of particulate air pollution and acute mortality: involvement of ultrafine particles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberdorster, G.; Gelein, R. M.; Ferin, J.; Weiss, B.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies show an association between particulate air pollution and acute mortality and morbidity down to ambient particle concentrations below 100 micrograms/m3. Whether this association also implies a causality between acute health effects and particle exposure at these low levels is unclear at this time; no mechanism is known that would explain such dramatic effects of low ambient particle concentrations. Based on results of our past and most recent inhalation studies with ultrafine particles in rats, we propose that such particles, that is, particles below approximately 50 nm in diameter, may contribute to the observed increased mortality and morbidity In the past we demonstrated that inhalation of highly insoluble particles of low intrinsic toxicity, such as TiO2, results in significantly increased pulmonary inflammatory responses when their size is in the ultrafine particle range, approximately 20 nm in diameter. However, these effects were not of an acute nature and occurred only after prolonged inhalation exposure of the aggregated ultrafine particles at concentrations in the milligrams per cubic meter range. In contrast, in the course of our most recent studies with thermodegradation products of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) we found that freshly generated PTFE fumes containing singlet ultrafine particles (median diameter 26 nm) were highly toxic to rats at inhaled concentrations of 0.7-1.0 x 10(6) particles/cm3, resulting in acute hemorrhagic pulmonary inflammation and death after 10-30 min of exposure. We also found that work performance of the rats in a running wheel was severely affected by PTFE fume exposure. These results confirm reports from other laboratories of the highly toxic nature of PTFE fumes, which cannot be attributed to gas-phase components of these fumes such as HF, carbonylfluoride, or perfluoroisobutylene, or to reactive radicals. The calculated mass concentration of the inhaled ultrafine PTFE particles in our studies was less than 60 micrograms/m3, a very low value to cause mortality in healthy rats. Aging of the fumes with concomitant aggregation of the ultrafine particles significantly decreases their toxicity. Since ultrafine particles are always present in the urban atmosphere, we suggest that they play a role in causing acute lung injury in sensitive parts of the population.

  20. Human pulmonary responses to experimental inhalation of high concentration fine and ultrafine magnesium oxide particles.

    PubMed Central

    Kuschner, W G; Wong, H; D'Alessandro, A; Quinlan, P; Blanc, P D

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to air polluted with particles less than 2.5 micron in size is associated epidemiologically with adverse cardiopulmonary health consequences in humans. The goal of this study was to characterize human pulmonary responses to controlled experimental high-dose exposure to fine and ultrafine magnesium oxide particles. We quantified bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and cytokine concentrations, pulmonary function, and peripheral blood neutrophil concentrations in six healthy volunteers 18 to 20 hr after inhalation of fine and ultrafine magnesium oxide particles produced from a furnace system model. We compared postexposure studies with control studies from the same six subjects. Mean +/- standard deviation (SD) cumulative magnesium dose was 4,138 +/- 2,163 min x mg/m3. By weight, 28% of fume particles were ultrafine (<0.1 micron in diameter) and over 98% of fume particles were fine (<2.5 micron in diameter). There were no significant differences in BAL inflammatory cell concentrations, BAL interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor, pulmonary function, or peripheral blood neutrophil concentrations postexposure compared with control. Our findings suggest that high-dose fine and ultrafine magnesium oxide particle exposure does not produce a measurable pulmonary inflammatory response. These findings are in marked contrast with the well-described pulmonary inflammatory response following zinc oxide particle inhalation. We conclude that fine and ultrafine particle inhalation does not result in toxicity in a generic manner independent of particle composition. Our findings support the concept that particle chemical composition, in addition to particle size, is an important determinant of respiratory effects. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B PMID:9370520

  1. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS THROUGH A POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine carbon particles induce IL-8 expression in human airway
    epithelial cells through a post-transcritpional mechanism
    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to
    particulate matter (PM) - induced adverse health effects. IL-8 is an
    i...

  2. Size-dependent proinflammatory effects of ultrafine polystyrene particles: a role for surface area and oxidative stress in the enhanced activity of ultrafines.

    PubMed

    Brown, D M; Wilson, M R; MacNee, W; Stone, V; Donaldson, K

    2001-09-15

    Studies into the effects of ultrafine particles in the lung have shown adverse effects considered to be due in part to the particle size. Air pollution particles (PM(10)) are associated with exacerbations of respiratory disease and deaths from cardiovascular causes in epidemiological studies and the ultrafine fraction of PM(10) has been hypothesized to play an important role. The aim of the present study was to investigate proinflammatory responses to various sizes of polystyrene particles as a simple model of particles of varying size including ultrafine. In the animal model, we demonstrated that there was a significantly greater neutrophil influx into the rat lung after instillation of 64-nm polystyrene particles compared with 202- and 535-nm particles and this was mirrored in other parameters of lung inflammation, such as increased protein and lactate dehydrogenase in bronchoalveolar lavage. When surface area instilled was plotted against inflammation, these two variables were directly proportional and the line passed through zero. This suggests that surface area drives inflammation in the short term and that ultrafine particles cause a greater inflammatory response because of the greater surface area they possess. In vitro, we measured the changes in intracellular calcium concentration in mono mac 6 cells in view of the potential role of calcium as a signaling molecule. Calcium changes after particle exposure may be important in leading to proinflammatory gene expression such as chemokines. We demonstrated that only ultrafine polystyrene particles induced a significant increase in cytosolic calcium ion concentration. Experiments using dichlorofluorescin diacetate demonstrated greater oxidant activity of the ultrafine particles, which may explain their activity in these assays. There were significant increases in IL-8 gene expression in A549 epithelial cells after treatment with the ultrafine particles but not particles of other sizes. These findings suggest that ultrafine particles composed of low-toxicity material such as polystyrene have proinflammatory activity as a consequence of their large surface area. This supports a role for such particles in the adverse health effects of PM(10). PMID:11559017

  3. Purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes by using ultrafine gold particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihey, Fumiyuki; Mizoguti, Eiji; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Nakamura, Kazuo

    2000-03-01

    The purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is needed to enable detailed characterization and some application of this material. We report a purification method utilizing ultrafine gold particles as catalysts to selectively oxidize carbonaceous impurities in SWNT soot. The ultrafine gold particles with a diameter of 20 nm were dispersed in the soot in combination with benzalkonium chloride as surfactant. Thermogravimetric analyses and electron microscopy observations revealed that oxidation occured at about 330^circC for carbonaceous impurities and at about 410^circC for SWNTs. This selective oxidation enabled us to purify SWNTs and make the quantitative analyses of SWNTs.

  4. Spatial distributions of ultrafine particles and their behavior and chemical composition in relation to roadside sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Shinji; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-11-01

    Vertical and horizontal distributions of the chemical components of ultrafine particles (UFP; <0.1 ?m) in relation to roadside sources were investigated by using a newly developed PM 0.1 collection system with a UFP impactor filter (50% cut-off, 0.1 ?m; air flow rate, 40.0 L min -1). UFP were measured at a suburban roadside, at two background sites in Saitama (summer 2007 and winter 2008), and at two levels on a high-rise building in Tokyo (summer and winter 2005). The results from the high-rise building showed that ultrafine elemental carbon from vehicle exhaust can reach the upper atmosphere regardless of season because of the high diffusivity of UFP. The total concentrations of the carbonaceous and ionic components at all sites except the roadside site in summer were mostly within the same range. Therefore, UFP diffuse both vertically and horizontally, and its chemical components are distributed uniformly. The UFP composition in summer reflected not only the vehicle exhaust contribution but also photochemical formation, especially at the low-elevation sites, where the samplers were installed several meters above ground level. The results also showed that ionic components contributed to increases in the UFP levels.

  5. Formation and Growth of Ultrafine Particles from Secondary Anthropogenic Sources in Bakersfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlm, L.; Russell, L. M.; Liu, S.; Day, D. A.; Weber, R.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Keutsch, F. N.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Markovic, M. Z.; Murphy, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    There is extensive evidence that ultrafine particles (Dp<100 nm) have adverse effects on human health. In this study, physical and chemical properties of ultrafine aerosol particles are investigated at a polluted urban site in Bakersfield, California. The analysis is based on measurements during the CalNex campaign 15 May to 29 June in 2010. Aerosol measurements in this study include mainly particle number size distributions provided by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and size resolved aerosol chemical composition determined with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Growth events of ultrafine particles were observed on most days during the campaign and the events had a very regular pattern. A nucleation mode centered at 10-20 nm appeared in early morning and was observed to grow up to 40-100 nm throughout the day. Most of the growth events were regional, representing horizontal scales of at least 100 km. Microphysical modeling and size-resolved HR-ToF-AMS concentrations show that organic components dominated the particle growth in the ultrafine mode, and sulfate provided only a minor contribution to the growth. The ultrafine mass was largely dominated by organics (83%) and was in general at maximum during the afternoon, indicating the importance of photochemistry. Whereas elemental carbon and the AMS tracer m/z 57 for hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) peaked in early morning during rush hour, indicative of primary emissions, particle number concentration peaked in the afternoon. This is interpreted as a result of new particle formation. Potentially important parameters for both growth and new particle formation, as concentrations of oxidizers and different organic and inorganic vapors, have been investigated.

  6. A Micro Aerosol Sensor for the Measurement of Airborne Ultrafine Particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Particle number concentration and particle size are the two key parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne nanoparticles or ultrafine particles that have attracted the most attention. This paper proposes a simple micro aerosol sensor for detecting the number concentration and particle size of ultrafine particles with diameters from 50 to 253 nm based on electrical diffusion charging. The sensor is composed of a micro channel and a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, which thus integrate charging, precipitating and measurement elements into one chip, the overall size of which is 98 × 38 × 25 mm³. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor is useful for measuring monodisperse aerosol particles with number concentrations from 300 to 2.5 × 10⁴ /cm³ and particle sizes from 50 to 253 nm. The aerosol sensor has a simple structure and small size, which is favorable for use in handheld devices. PMID:26999156

  7. Variability in exposure to ambient ultrafine particles in urban schools: Comparative assessment between Australia and Spain.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Mandana; Reche, Cristina; Rivas, Ioar; Crilley, Leigh R; Álvarez-Pedrerol, Mar; Viana, Mar; Tobias, Aurelio; Alastuey, Andrés; Sunyer, Jordi; Querol, Xavier; Morawska, Lidia

    2016-03-01

    Ambient ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNC) have inhomogeneous spatio-temporal distributions and depend on a number of different urban factors, including background conditions and distant sources. This paper quantitatively compares exposure to ambient ultrafine particles at urban schools in two cities in developed countries, with high insolation climatic conditions, namely Brisbane (Australia) and Barcelona (Spain). The analysis used comprehensive indoor and outdoor air quality measurements at 25 schools in Brisbane and 39 schools in Barcelona. PNC modes were analysed with respect to ambient temperature, land use and urban characteristics, combined with the measured elemental carbon concentrations, NOx (Brisbane) and NO2 (Barcelona). The trends and modes of the quantified weekday average daily cycles of ambient PNC exhibited significant differences between the two cities. PNC increases were observed during traffic rush hours in both cases. However, the mid-day peak was dominant in Brisbane schools and had the highest contribution to total PNC for both indoors and outdoors. In Barcelona, the contribution from traffic was highest for ambient PNC, while the mid-day peak had a slightly higher contribution for indoor concentrations. Analysis of the relationships between PNC and land use characteristics in Barcelona schools showed a moderate correlation with the percentage of road network area and an anti-correlation with the percentage of green area. No statistically significant correlations were found for Brisbane. Overall, despite many similarities between the two cities, school-based exposure patterns were different. The main source of ambient PNC at schools was shown to be traffic in Barcelona and mid-day new particle formation in Brisbane. The mid-day PNC peak in Brisbane could have been driven by the combined effect of background and meteorological conditions, as well as other local/distant sources. The results have implications for urban development, especially in terms of air quality mitigation and management at schools. PMID:26760710

  8. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-03-31

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of production since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase FTS. The separation problem is further compounded by catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. Existing pilot-scale equipment was modified to include a filtration test apparatus. After undergoing an extensive plant shakedown period, filtration tests with cross-flow filter modules using simulant FTS wax slurry were conducted. The focus of these early tests was to find adequate mixtures of polyethylene wax to simulate FTS wax. Catalyst particle size analysis techniques were also developed. Initial analyses of the slurry and filter permeate particles will be used by the research team to design improved filter media and cleaning strategies.

  9. Size resolved ultrafine particles emission model--a continues size distribution approach.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Irina; Janssen, Stijn; Vrancken, Karl; Vos, Peter; Mishra, Vinit; Berghmans, Patrick

    2011-08-15

    A new parameterization for size resolved ultrafine particles (UFP) traffic emissions is proposed based on the results of PARTICULATES project (Samaras et al., 2005). It includes the emission factors from the Emission Inventory Guidebook (2006) (total number of particles, #/km/veh), the shape of the corresponding particle size distribution given in PARTICULATES and data for the traffic activity. The output of the model UFPEM (UltraFine Particle Emission Model) is a sum of continuous distributions of ultrafine particles emissions per vehicle type (passenger cars and heavy duty vehicles), fuel (petrol and diesel) and average speed representative for urban, rural and highway driving. The results from the parameterization are compared with measured total number of ultrafine particles and size distributions in a tunnel in Antwerp (Belgium). The measured UFP concentration over the entire campaign shows a close relation to the traffic activity. The modelled concentration is found to be lower than the measured in the campaign. The average emission factor from the measurement is 4.29E+14 #/km/veh whereas the calculated is around 30% lower. A comparison of emission factors with literature is done as well and in overall a good agreement is found. For the size distributions it is found that the measured distributions consist of three modes--Nucleation, Aitken and accumulation and most of the ultrafine particles belong to the Nucleation and the Aitken modes. The modelled Aitken mode (peak around 0.04-0.05 μm) is found in a good agreement both as amplitude of the peak and the number of particles whereas the modelled Nucleation mode is shifted to smaller diameters and the peak is much lower that the observed. Time scale analysis shows that at 300 m in the tunnel coagulation and deposition are slow and therefore neglected. The UFPEM emission model can be used as a source term in dispersion models. PMID:21641631

  10. Ultrafine particle emission characteristics of diesel engine by on-board and test bench measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Lou, Diming; Hu, Zhiyuan; Tan, Piqiang; Yao, Di; Hu, Wei; Li, Peng; Ren, Jin; Chen, Changhong

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the emission characteristics of ultrafine particles based on test bench and on-board measurements. The bench test results showed the ultrafine particle number concentration of the diesel engine to be in the range of (0.56-8.35) x 10(8) cm(-3). The on-board measurement results illustrated that the ultrafine particles were strongly correlated with changes in real-world driving cycles. The particle number concentration was down to 2.0 x 10(6) cm(-3) and 2.7 x 10(7) cm(-3) under decelerating and idling operations and as high as 5.0 x 10(8) cm(-3) under accelerating operation. It was also indicated that the particle number measured by the two methods increased with the growth of engine load at each engine speed in both cases. The particle number presented a "U" shaped distribution with changing speed at high engine load conditions, which implies that the particle number will reach its lowest level at medium engine speeds. The particle sizes of both measurements showed single mode distributions. The peak of particle size was located at about 50-80 nm in the accumulation mode particle range. Nucleation mode particles will significantly increase at low engine load operations like idling and decelerating caused by the high concentration of unburned organic compounds. PMID:23534231

  11. [Research on NEDC ultrafine particle emission characters of a port fuel injection gasoline car].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Jin; Tan, Pi-Qiang; Lou, Di-Ming

    2012-12-01

    A Santana gasoline car with multi-port fuel injection (PFI) system was used as the research prototype and an engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) was employed to investigate the exhaust ultrafine particle number and size distribution characters of the tested vehicle in new European driving cycle (NEDC). The tested results showed that the vehicle's nuclear particle number, accumulation particle number, as well as the total particle number emission increased when the car drove in accelerated passage, and the vehicle's particle number emission was high during the first 40 seconds after test started and when the speed was over 90 km x h(-1) in extra urban driving cycle (EUDC) in NEDC. The ultrafine particle distribution of the whole NEDC showed a single peak logarithmic distribution, with diameters of the peak particle number emission ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm, and the geometric mean diameter was 24 nm. The ultrafine particle distribution of the urban driving cycle named by the economic commission for Europe (ECE) e. g. ECE I, ECE II - IV, the extra urban driving cycle e. g. EUDC, and the idling, constant speed, acceleration, deceleration operation conditions of NEDC all showed a single peak logarithmic distribution, also with particle diameters of the peak particle number emission ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm, and the geometric mean diameters of different driving cycle and different driving mode were from 14 nm to 42 nm. Therefore, the ultrafine particle emissions of the tested PFI gasoline car were mainly consisted of nuclear mode particles with a diameter of less than 50 nm. PMID:23379140

  12. Estimation of the contribution of ultrafine particles to lung deposition of particle-bound mutagens in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kawanaka, Youhei; Matsumoto, Emiko; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Yun, Sun-Ja

    2011-02-15

    The present study was performed to estimate the contributions of fine and ultrafine particles to the lung deposition of particle-bound mutagens in the atmosphere. This is the first estimation of the respiratory deposition of atmospheric particle-bound mutagens. Direct and S9-mediated mutagenicity of size-fractionated particulate matter (PM) collected at roadside and suburban sites was determined by the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. Regional deposition efficiencies in the human respiratory tract of direct and S9-mediated mutagens in each size fraction were calculated using the LUDEP computer-based model. The model calculations showed that about 95% of the lung deposition of inhaled mutagens is caused by fine particles for both roadside and suburban atmospheres. Importantly, ultrafine particles were shown to contribute to the deposition of mutagens in the alveolar region of the lung by as much as 29% (+S9) and 26% (-S9) for the roadside atmosphere and 11% (+S9) and 13% (-S9) for the suburban atmosphere, although ultrafine particles contribute very little to the PM mass concentration. These results indicated that ultrafine particles play an important role as carriers of mutagens into the lung. PMID:21194730

  13. Characterization of ultrafine and fine particles at a site near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn; Tanner, Roger L.

    Continuous measurements were taken during a 22-day campaign held in the summer of 2000 at a site close to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in eastern Tennessee. The campaign was conducted to investigate the relationships between ultrafine/fine particles and gaseous species observed. A varimax-rotation factor analysis was performed to explore the relationship of the fine and ultrafine particle number concentrations, the gaseous species concentration, the mean wind speed, and the solar radiation. A 6-factor model was found to best resolve 79.7% of the variability embedded in the data. The model suggests that 31.4% of the data variability could be explained by ultrafine particles (the diameters smaller than or equal to 100 nm). It was difficult to label this factor without chemistry information of the ultrafine particles. However, no gas species were loaded on Factor 1 indicating the ultrafine particles observed in this study were not associated with primary source emissions. The decoupling of the ultrafine particles from the fine particles also implies that the former ones might have been produced and transported to the site by separated mechanisms from those of fine particles. The second factor included the PM 2.5 mass concentration and the number concentrations of particles in the diameter range of 101-400 nm. The loading pattern on Factor 2 led to the conclusion that this factor was contributed by regional transport. The third factor includes CO, NO 2, reactive odd nitrogen (NO y), and SO 2 that were contributed by primary source emissions. The mean wind speed and ozone were loaded in Factor 4 that was labeled as ozone transport. Identification of this factor led to an observation that ozone transport to the site was essentially decoupled from the regional transport factor of fine particles (i.e., Factor 2). Solar radiation was singly included in the fifth factor indicating this is a unique factor. The quality of NO data was marginal and the variable was distilled by the model into Factor 6. A multiple regression analysis further indicated that PM 2.5 mass concentration was best explained by CO, O 3, and number concentrations of particles in the diameter range between 0.1 and 0.4 ?m. We also identified two unique events during the campaign in which the number concentrations of 31-51 nm particles dramatically increased by a factor of 10 in 30 min, reaching 40,000 cm -3 and lasting for a couple of hours. Particles in the size range just below and above those in the 31-51 nm diameter range also exhibited increases during these events, but the changes were much less dramatic.

  14. SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES
    Y.M. Kim, A.G. Lenz, R. Silbajoris, I. Jaspers and J.M. Samet. Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, ...

  15. Combustion of PTFE: The effects of gravity on ultrafine particle generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinnon, Thomas; Todd, Paul; Oberdorster, Gunter

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project is to obtain an understanding of the effect of gravity on the toxicity of ultrafine particle and gas phase materials produced when fluorocarbon polymers are thermally degraded or burned. The motivation for the project is to provide a basic technical foundation on which policies for spacecraft health and safety with regard to fire and polymers can be formulated.

  16. PULMONARY AND CARDIAC GENE EXPRESSION FOLLOWING ACUTE ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE INHALATION IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles (ufCP) causes cardiac physiological changes without marked pulmonary injury or inflammation. We hypothesized that acute ufCP exposure of 13 months old Spontaneously Hypertensive (SH) rats will cause differential effects on the lung and hea...

  17. CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES IN UNRESTRAINED WKY-RATS TO INHALED ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    This study provides evidence for adverse cardiac effects of inhaled ultrafine particles (UFPs) in healthy WKY rats. Short term exposure (24 h) with carbon UFPs (180 ?g?m ?) induced a moderate but significant heart rate increase of 18 bpm (4.8 %) in association with a ...

  18. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-03-31

    The morphological and chemical nature of ultrafine iron catalyst particles (3-5 nm diameters) during activation/FTS was studied by HRTEM, EELS, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. With the progress of FTS, the carbide re-oxidized to magnetite and catalyst activity gradually decreased. The growth of oxide phase continued and average particle size also increased simultaneously. The phase transformation occurred in a ''growing oxide core'' manner with different nano-zones. The nano-range carbide particles did not show fragmentation or attrition as generally observed in micrometer range particles. Nevertheless, when the dimension of particles reached the micrometer range, the crystalline carbide phase appeared to be sprouted on the surface of magnetite single crystal. In the previous reporting period, a design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. During the current reporting period, we have started construction of the new filtration system and began modifications to the 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) reactor. The system will utilize a primary wax separation device followed by a Pall Accusep or Membralox ceramic cross-flow membrane. As of this writing, the unit is nearly complete except for the modification of a moyno-type pump; the pump was shipped to the manufacturer to install a special leak-free, high pressure seal.

  19. Multimodal ultrafine particles from pulverized coal combustion in a laboratory scale reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Francesco; Beretta, Federico; D'Anna, Andrea

    2010-07-15

    Particle size distribution functions have been measured in a ethanol fueled flame reactor fed with a low amount of pulverized coal particles. The reactor is operated in low (5.0 vol.%) and high (76.5 vol.%) oxygen concentrations using two high volatile bituminous Colombian and Indonesian coals. A carbon black powder is also oxidized in the same conditions. Generated particles are sampled using rapid-dilution probes and the size distribution functions are measured on-line by a high resolution Differential Mobility Analyzer. Results clearly show that ultrafine particles, those with sizes lower than 100 nm, have a multimodal size distribution function. These particles have huge number concentrations in both investigated conditions whereas their formation is enhanced in the oxygen enriched condition. Ultrafine particles are almost totally dominated in number by the fraction having sizes below 30 nm. Nanoparticles also account for a significant fraction of total particle mass and slowly coagulate in the reactor. The shape of the size distribution functions is not affected by the coal type, at least for the two investigated coals. Results suggest that ultrafine particles form through the vaporization-nucleation-growth pathway involving inorganic ashes. Moreover the contribution of carbonaceous particles seems particularly important for size smaller than 5 nm. (author)

  20. Effect of flow characteristics on ultrafine particle emissions from range hoods.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms of the production of nanometer-sized particulate generated from cooking oils, the ventilation of kitchen hoods was studied by determining the particle concentration, particle size distribution, particle dimensions, and hood's flow characteristics under several cooking scenarios. This research varied the temperature of the frying operation on one cooking operation, with three kinds of commercial cooking oils including soybean oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil. The variations of particle concentration and size distributions with the elevated cooking oil temperatures were presented. The particle concentration increases as a function of temperature. For oil temperatures ranging between 180C and 210C, a 5C increase in temperature increased the number concentration of ultrafine particles by 20-50%. The maximum concentration of ultrafine particles was found to be approximately 6 10(6) particles per cm(3) at 260C. Flow visualization techniques and particle distribution measurement were performed for two types of hood designs, a wall-mounted range hood and an island hood, at a suction flow rate of 15 m(3) min(-1). The flow visualization results showed that different configurations of kitchen hoods induce different aerodynamic characteristics. By comparing the results of flow visualizations and nanoparticle measurements, it was found that the areas with large-scale turbulent vortices are more prone to dispersion of ultrafine particle leakage because of the complex interaction between the shear layers and the suction movement that results from turbulent dispersion. We conclude that the evolution of ultrafine particle concentration fluctuations is strongly affected by the location of the hood, which can alter the aerodynamic features. We suggest that there is a correlation between flow characteristics and amount of contaminant leakage. This provides a comprehensive strategy to evaluate the effectiveness of kitchen hoods in capturing cooking oil fumes, which is based on an assessment of the entire hood face exposure instead of on breathing-zone sampling alone. PMID:23479025

  1. Ultrafine particle emission from incinerators: the role of the fabric filter.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, G; Scungio, M; Stabile, L; Tirler, W

    2012-01-01

    Incinerators are claimed to be responsible of particle and gaseous emissions: to this purpose Best Available Techniques (BAT) are used in the flue-gas treatment sections leading to pollutant emission lower than established threshold limit values. As regard particle emission, only a mass-based threshold limit is required by the regulatory authorities. However; in the last years the attention of medical experts moved from coarse and fine particles towards ultrafine particles (UFPs; diameter less than 0.1 microm), mainly emitted by combustion processes. According to toxicological and epidemiological studies, ultrafine particles could represent a risk for health and environment. Therefore, it is necessary to quantify particle emissions from incinerators also to perform an exposure assessment for the human populations living in their surrounding areas. A further topic to be stressed in the UFP emission from incinerators is the particle filtration efficiency as function of different flue-gas treatment sections. In fact, it could be somehow important to know which particle filtration method is able to assure high abatement efficiency also in terms of UFPs. To this purpose, in the present work experimental results in terms of ultrafine particle emissions from several incineration plants are reported. Experimental campaigns were carried out in the period 2007-2010 by measuring UFP number distributions and total concentrations at the stack of five plants through condensation particle counters and mobility particle sizer spectrometers. Average total particle number concentrations ranging from 0.4 x 10(3) to 6.0 x 10(3) particles cm(-3) were measured at the stack of the analyzed plants. Further experimental campaigns were performed to characterize particle levels before the fabric filters in two of the analyzed plants in order to deepen their particle reduction effect; particle concentrations higher than 1 x 10(7) particles cm(-3) were measured, leading to filtration efficiency greater than 99.99%. PMID:22393815

  2. Comparing Inhaled Ultrafine versus Fine Zinc Oxide Particles in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, William S.; Chalupa, David F.; Pauly-Brown, Andrea; Speers, Donna M.; Stewart, Judith C.; Frampton, Mark W.; Utell, Mark J.; Huang, Li-Shan; Cox, Christopher; Zareba, Wojciech; Oberdörster, Günter

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Zinc oxide is a common, biologically active constituent of particulate air pollution as well as a workplace toxin. Ultrafine particles (< 0.1 μm diameter) are believed to be more potent than an equal mass of inhaled accumulation mode particles (0.1–1.0 μm diameter). Objectives: We compared exposure–response relationships for respiratory, hematologic, and cardiovascular endpoints between ultrafine and accumulation mode zinc oxide particles. Methods: In a human inhalation study, 12 healthy adults inhaled 500 μg/m3 of ultrafine zinc oxide, the same mass of fine zinc oxide, and filtered air while at rest for 2 hours. Measurements and Main Results: Preexposure and follow-up studies of symptoms, leukocyte surface markers, hemostasis, and cardiac electrophysiology were conducted to 24 hours post-exposure. Induced sputum was sampled 24 hours after exposure. No differences were detected between any of the three exposure conditions at this level of exposure. Conclusions: Freshly generated zinc oxide in the fine or ultrafine fractions inhaled by healthy subjects at rest at a concentration of 500 μg/m3 for 2 hours is below the threshold for acute systemic effects as detected by these endpoints. PMID:15735058

  3. Ultrafine particle emission of waste incinerators and comparison to the exposure of urban citizens.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Morawska, Lidia

    2015-03-01

    On the basis of the growing interest on the impact of airborne particles on human exposure as well as the strong debate in Western countries on the emissions of waste incinerators, this work reviewed existing literature to: (i) show the emission factors of ultrafine particles (particles with a diameter less than 100 nm) of waste incinerators; and (ii) assess the contribution of waste incinerators in terms of ultrafine particles to exposure and dose of people living in the surrounding areas of the plants in order to estimate eventual risks. The review identified only a limited number of studies measuring ultrafine particle emissions, and in general they report low particle number concentrations at the stack (the median value was equal to 5.510(3) part cm(-3)), in most cases higher than the outdoor background value. The lowest emissions were achieved by utilization of the bag-house filter which has an overall number-based filtration efficiency higher than 99%. Referring to reference case, the corresponding emission factor is equal to 9.110(12) part min(-1), that is lower than one single high-duty vehicle. Since the higher particle number concentrations found in the most contributing microenvironments to the exposure (indoor home, transportation, urban outdoor), the contribution of the waste incinerators to the daily dose can be considered as negligible. PMID:24726660

  4. Observations of ultra-fine particles above a deciduous forest in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Prip, H.; Srensen, L. L.

    2005-03-01

    We report physical particle size distribution and chemical composition data over a Beech forest in Denmark during May and June of 2004 with a focus on four days characterized by high concentrations of ultra-fine particles. Highest number concentrations of sub-30 nm particles were observed when net radiation >300 W m-2 and ambient particle surface area <100 ?m2 cm-3. The 10-30 nm particles show growth rates of 1.5-4.5 nm hr-1 and are comprised predominantly of ammonium, sulfate and associated water.

  5. INDOOR AND OUTDOOR ULTRA-FINE PARTICLE COUNTS IN A 1999 TWO-SEASON FRESNO, CALIFORNIA, USA ACUTE CARDIAC PANEL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor and Outdoor Ultrafine Particle Counts in a 1999 Two-Season Fresno, California, USA Acute Cardiac Panel Study.

    John Creason, Debra Walsh, Lucas Neas, US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects R...

  6. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    PubMed

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated. PMID:23028013

  7. Determinants of personal exposure to PM2.5, ultrafine particle counts, and CO in a transport microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kaur, S; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J

    2009-07-01

    Short-term human exposure concentrations to PM2.5, ultrafine particle counts (particle range: 0.02-1 microm), and carbon monoxide (CO) were investigated at and around a street canyon intersection in Central London, UK. During a four week field campaign, groups of four volunteers collected samples at three timings (morning, lunch, and afternoon), along two different routes (a heavily trafficked route and a backstreet route) via five modes of transport (walking, cycling, bus, car, and taxi). This was followed by an investigation into the determinants of exposure using a regression technique which incorporated the site-specific traffic counts, meteorological variables (wind speed and temperature) and the mode of transport used. The analyses explained 9, 62, and 43% of the variability observed in the exposure concentrations to PM2.5, ultrafine particle counts, and CO in this study, respectively. The mode of transport was a statistically significant determinant of personal exposure to PM2.5, ultrafine particle counts, and CO, and for PM2.5 and ultrafine particle counts it was the most important determinant. Traffic count explained little of the variability in the PM2.5 concentrations, but it had a greater influence on ultrafine particle count and CO concentrations. The analyses showed that temperature had a statistically significant impact on ultrafine particle count and CO concentrations. Wind speed also had a statistically significant effect but smaller. The small proportion in variability explained in PM2.5 by the model compared to the largest proportion in ultrafine particle counts and CO may be due to the effect of long-range transboundary sources, whereas for ultrafine particle counts and CO, local traffic is the main source. PMID:19673259

  8. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLES INDUCE INTERLEUKIN-8 GENE TRANSCRIPTION AND P38 MAPK ACTIVATION IN NORMAL BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies suggest that ultrafine particles contribute to particulate matter-induced adverse health effects. Interleukin (IL)-8 is an important proinflammatory cytokine in the human lung that is induced in respiratory cells exposed to a variety of environmental insul...

  9. Long-term assessment of ultrafine particles on major roadways in Las Vegas, Nevada and Detroit, Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation at the National Air Monitoring conference, given at the request of OAQPS partners. The presentation will cover ultrafine particle data collected at three locations - Las Vegas, Detroit, and Research Triangle Park.

  10. Exposure for ultrafine carbon particles at levels below detectable pulmonary inflammation affects cardiovascular performance in spontaneously hypertensive rats*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to particulate matter is a risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease but the related molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously we studied cardiovascular responses in healthy WKY rats following inhalation exposure to ultrafine carbon particles (UfCPs...

  11. Effect of ultrafine gold particles and cationic surfactant on burning as-grown single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Yudasaka, M.; Nihey, F.; Iijima, S.

    2000-10-01

    Mizoguti et al. (Chem. Phys. Lett. 321 (2000) 297) reported that amorphous carbon (a-C) contained in as-grown single-wall carbon nanotubes could be burned preferentially by using ultrafine gold particles and cationic surfactant, benzalkonium chloride (BKC). We confirmed this result and found additionally that the optimum concentration of the ultrafine gold particles and BKC were, respectively, 0.6 atom% and 7 g/l. We studied the roles of ultrafine gold particles and BKC in this phenomenon; the ultrafine gold particles catalyzed the oxidation of carbonaceous materials leading to the decrease of the burning temperatures. BKC had the function of homogenizing the a-C aggregation states, which resulted in the burning of a-C in a narrow temperature range.

  12. Mineralogical characterization of ambient fine/ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei C1 coal combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Senlin; Hao, Xiaojie; Liu, Dingyu; Wang, Qiangxiang; Zhang, Wenchao; Liu, Pinwei; Zhang, Rongci; Yu, Shang; Pan, Ruiqi; Wu, Minghong; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2016-03-01

    Nano-quartz in Xuanwei coal, the uppermost Permian (C1) coal deposited in the northwest of Yuanan, China, has been regarded as one of factors which caused high lung cancer incidence in the local residents. However, mineralogical characterization of the fine/ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei coal combustion has not previously been studied. In this study, PM1 and ultrafine particles emitted from Xuanwei coal combustion were sampled. Chemical elements in the ambient particles were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and mineralogical characterization of these ambient particles was investigated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM/EDX) and transmission electronic microscopy, coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM/EDX). Our results showed that the size distribution of mineral particles from the coal combustion emissions ranged from 20 to 200 nm. Si-containing particles and Fe-containing particles accounted for 50.7% of the 150 individual particles measured, suggesting that these two types of particles were major minerals in the ambient particles generally. The nano-mineral particles were identified as quartz (SiO2) and gypsum (CaSO4) based on their crystal parameters and chemical elements. Additionally, there also existed unidentified nano-minerals. Armed with these data, toxicity assessments of the nano-minerals will be carried out in a future study.

  13. Five-year roadside measurements of ultrafine particles in a major Canadian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaliauskas, Kelly; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Yao, Xiaohong; Jun, Yun-Seok; Jadidian, Parnian; Evans, Greg J.

    2012-03-01

    This study reports the diurnal, seasonal and annual variation of ultrafine particles (UFP) in a large city. Particle number (PN) concentrations were measured in Toronto, Canada on a major arterial roadway between March 2006 and May 2011 using a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer. The PN in the size range of 8-300 nm decreased during the measurement period primarily due to changes in the vehicle fleet. PN50 (particles with diameters less than 50 nm) decreased by 21% between 2006 and 2010. Notably, the majority of the reduction occurred during the winter months. PN50 exhibited the strongest seasonality and diurnal trend. PN50-100 (particles between 50 and 100 nm) and PN100-300 (particles between 100 and 300 nm) decreased by 17% and 24%, respectively. Correlation analysis between gas phase criteria pollutants showed good correlation between PN50-100 and NO2, SO2, and PM2.5. In contrast, PN50 exhibited the highest correlation with temperature, NO and NO2. A multiple linear regression model was developed for each size fraction. The model adequately explained the annual, seasonal and day-to-day variability of PN50-100 (R2 = 0.64) and PN100-300 (R2 = 0.83). The model captured the annual and seasonal variability of PN50 but only partially explained the day-to-day variability (R2 = 0.52). The long-term reductions in PN50 indicate that policy interventions are having some success in slowly decreasing UFP concentrations in Toronto.

  14. Increased ultrafine particles and carbon monoxide concentrations are associated with asthma exacerbation among urban children

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kristin A.; Halterman, Jill S.; Hopke, Philip K.; Fagnano, Maria; Rich, David Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Increased air pollutant concentrations have been linked to several asthma-related outcomes in children, including respiratory symptoms, medication use, and hospital visits. However, few studies have examined effects of ultrafine particles in a pediatric population. Our primary objective was to examine the effects of ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles on asthma exacerbation among urban children and determine whether consistent treatment with inhaled corticosteroids could attenuate these effects. We also explored the relationship between asthma exacerbation and ambient concentrations of accumulation mode particles, fine particles (? 2.5 micrograms [?m]; PM2.5), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone. We hypothesized that increased 1 to 7 day concentrations of ultrafine particles and other pollutants would be associated with increases in the relative odds of an asthma exacerbation, but that this increase in risk would be attenuated among children receiving school-based corticosteroid therapy. Methods We conducted a pilot study using data from 310 year-old children participating in the School-Based Asthma Therapy trial. Using a time-stratified case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression, we estimated the relative odds of a pediatric asthma visit treated with prednisone (n=96 visits among 74 children) associated with increased pollutant concentrations in the previous 7 days. We re-ran these analyses separately for children receiving medications through the school-based intervention and children in a usual care control group. Results Interquartile range increases in ultrafine particles and carbon monoxide concentrations in the previous 7 days were associated with increases in the relative odds of a pediatric asthma visit, with the largest increases observed for 4-day mean ultrafine particles (interquartile range=2088 p/cm3; OR=1.27; 95% CI=0.901.79) and 7-day mean carbon monoxide (interquartile range=0.17 ppm; OR=1.63; 95% CI=1.032.59). Relative odds estimates were larger among children receiving school-based inhaled corticosteroid treatment. We observed no such associations with accumulation mode particles, black carbon, fine particles (? 2.5 ?m), or sulfur dioxide. Ozone concentrations were inversely associated with the relative odds of a pediatric asthma visit. Conclusions These findings suggest a response to markers of traffic pollution among urban asthmatic children. Effects were strongest among children receiving preventive medications through school, suggesting that this group of children was particularly sensitive to environmental triggers. Medication adherence alone may be insufficient to protect the most vulnerable from environmental asthma triggers. However, further research is necessary to confirm this finding. PMID:24528997

  15. Ultrafine sanding paper: a simple tool for creating small particles.

    PubMed

    Schfer, Helmut; Hess, Claudia; Tobergte, Heinrich; Volf, Anna; Ichilmann, Sachar; Eickmeier, Henning; Voss, Benjamin; Kashaev, Nikolai; Nordmann, Jrg; Akram, Wajiha; Hartmann-Azanza, Brigitte; Steinhart, Martin

    2015-02-25

    A top-down approach, i.e., creating small particles by mechanical force starting from bulk materials, probably presents the most logical approach to particle size reduction and, therefore, top-down techniques are among the first to achieve small particles. A new solvent-free, amazingly simple approach is reported, suitable to achieve nanoparticles and sub-micro particles. PMID:25303708

  16. Size evolution of ultrafine particles: Differential signatures of normal and episodic events.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manish; Khan, Arshad; Anand, S; Sapra, B K

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fireworks on the aerosol number characteristics of atmosphere was studied for an urban mega city. Measurements were made at 50 m height to assess the local changes around the festival days. Apart from the increase in total number concentration and characteristic accumulation mode, short-term increase of ultrafine particle concentration was noted. Total number concentration varies an order of magnitude during the measurement period in which peak occurs at a frequency of approximately one per day. On integral scale, it seems not possible to distinguish an episodic (e.g. firework bursting induced aerosol emission) and a normal (ambient atmospheric changes) event. However these events could be differentiated on the basis of size evolution analysis around number concentration peaks. The results are discussed relative to past studies and inferences are drawn towards aerosol signatures of firework bursting. The short-term burst in ultrafine particle concentration can pose an inhalation hazard. PMID:26552523

  17. Estimating the contribution of photochemical particle formation to ultrafine particle number averages in an urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ma, N; Birmili, W

    2015-04-15

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter<100 nm) have gained major attention in the environmental health discussion due to a number of suspected health effects. Observations of UFPs in urban air reveal the presence of several, time-dependent particle sources. In order to attribute measured UFP number concentrations to different source type contributions, we analyzed observations collected at a triplet of observation sites (roadside, urban background, rural) in the city of Leipzig, Germany. Photochemical new particle formation (NPF) events can be the overwhelming source of UFP particles on particular days, and were identified on the basis of characteristic patterns in the particle number size distribution data. A subsequent segmentation of the diurnal cycles of UFP concentration yielded a quantitative contribution of NPF events to daily, monthly, and annual mean values. At roadside, we obtained source contributions to the annual mean UFP number concentration (diameter range 5-100 nm) for photochemical NPF events (7%), local traffic (52%), diffuse urban sources (20%), and regional background (21%). The relative contribution of NPF events rises when moving away from roadside to the urban background and rural sites (14 and 30%, respectively). Their contribution also increases when considering only fresh UFPs (5-20 nm) (21% at the urban background site), and conversely decreases when considering UFPs at bigger sizes (20-100 nm) (8%). A seasonal analysis showed that NPF events have their greatest importance on UFP number concentration in the months May-August, accounting for roughly half of the fresh UFPs (5-20 nm) at the urban background location. The simplistic source apportionment presented here might serve to better characterize exposure to ambient UFPs in future epidemiological studies. PMID:25617781

  18. Daily mortality and fine and ultrafine particles in Erfurt, Germany part I: role of particle number and particle mass.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, H E; Spix, C; Tuch, T; Wlke, G; Peters, A; Heinrich, J; Kreyling, W G; Heyder, J

    2000-11-01

    Increases in morbidity and mortality have been observed consistently and coherently in association with ambient air pollution. A number of studies on short-term effects have identified ambient particles as a major pollutant in urban air. This study, conducted in Erfurt, Germany, investigated the association of mortality not only with ambient particles but also with gaseous pollutants and indicators of sources. Part I of this study concentrates on particles. Data were collected prospectively over a 3.5-year period from September 1995 to December 1998. Death certificates were obtained from the local authorities and aggregated to daily time series of total counts and counts for subgroups. In addition to standard data for particle mass with diameters < or = 2.5 microm (PM2.5)* or < or = 10 microm (PM10) from impactors, a mobile aerosol spectrometer (MAS) was used to obtain size-specific number and mass concentration data in six size classes between 0.01 microm and 2.5 microm. Particles smaller than 0.1 microm were labeled ultrafine particles (three size classes), and particles between 0.1 and 2.5 microm were termed fine particles (three size classes). Concentrations of the gases sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) were also measured. The daily average total number concentration was 18,000 particles/cm3 with 88% of particles below 0.1 pm and 58% below 0.03 microm in diameter. The average mass concentration (PM2.5) was 26 microg/m3; of this, 75% of particles were between 0.1 and 0.5 microm in diameter. Other average concentrations were 38 microg/m3 for PM10, 17 microg/m3 for SO2, 36 microg/m3 for NO2, and 600 microg/m3 for CO. Ambient air pollution demonstrated a strong seasonality with maximum concentrations in winter. Across the study period, fine particle mass decreased, whereas ultrafine particle number was unchanged. The proportion of ultrafine particles below 0.03 microm diameter increased compared with the proportion of other particles. During the study, concentrations of SO2 and CO also decreased, whereas the concentration of NO2 remained unchanged. The data were analyzed using Poisson regression techniques with generalized additive modeling (GAM) to allow nonparametric adjustment for the confounders. Both the best single-day lag and the overall association of multiple days fitted by a polynomial distributed lag model were used to assess the lag structure between air pollution and death. Mortality increased in association with level of ambient air pollution after adjustment for season, influenza epidemics, day of week, and weather. In the sensitivity analyses, the results proved stable against changes of the confounder model. We saw comparable associations for ultrafine and fine particles in a distributed lag model where the contribution of the previous 4 to 5 days was considered. Furthermore, the data suggest a somewhat more delayed association of ultrafine particles than of fine particles if single-day lags are considered. The associations tended to be stronger in winter than in summer and at ages below 70 years compared to ages above 70 years. Analysis of the prevalent diseases mentioned on death certificates revealed that the overall association for respiratory diseases was slightly stronger than for cardiovascular diseases. In two-pollutant models, associations of ultrafine and fine particles seemed to be largely independent of each other, and the risk was enhanced if both were considered at the same time. Furthermore, when the associations were summed for the six size classes between 0.01 and 2.5 microm, the overall association was clearly stronger than the associations of the individual size classes alone. Associations were observed for SO2, NO2, and CO with mortality despite low concentrations of these gases. These associations disappeared in two-pollutant models for NO2 and CO, but they remained stable for SO2. The persistence of the SO2 effect was interpreted as artifact, however, because the SO2 concentration was much below levels at which effects are usually expected

  19. Environmental and health impacts of fine and ultrafine metallic particles: Assessment of threat scores

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, Sylvaine; Lévêque, Thibaut; Xiong, Tian-Tian; Schreck, Eva; and others

    2014-08-15

    This study proposes global threat scores to prioritize the harmfulness of anthropogenic fine and ultrafine metallic particles (FMP) emitted into the atmosphere at the global scale. (Eco)toxicity of physicochemically characterized FMP oxides for metals currently observed in the atmosphere (CdO, CuO, PbO, PbSO{sub 4}, Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZnO) was assessed by performing complementary in vitro tests: ecotoxicity, human bioaccessibility, cytotoxicity, and oxidative potential. Using an innovative methodology based on the combination of (eco)toxicity and physicochemical results, the following hazard classification of the particles is proposed: CdCl{sub 2}∼CdO>CuO>PbO>ZnO>PbSO{sub 4}>Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Both cadmium compounds exhibited the highest threat score due to their high cytotoxicity and bioaccessible dose, whatever their solubility and speciation, suggesting that cadmium toxicity is due to its chemical form rather than its physical form. In contrast, the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} threat score was the lowest due to particles with low specific area and solubility, with no effects except a slight oxidative stress. As FMP physicochemical properties reveal differences in specific area, crystallization systems, dissolution process, and speciation, various mechanisms may influence their biological impact. Finally, this newly developed and global approach could be widely used in various contexts of pollution by complex metal particles and may improve risk management. - Highlights: • Seven micro- and nano- monometallic characterized particles were studied as references. • Bioaccessibility, eco and cytotoxicity, and oxidative potential assays were performed. • According to calculated threat scores: CdCl{sub 2}∼CdO>CuO>PbO>ZnO>PbSO{sub 4}>Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  20. Linking In-Vehicle Ultrafine Particle Exposures to On-Road Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Eckel, Sandrah P; Knibbs, Luke D; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J; Fruin, Scott A

    2012-11-01

    For traffic-related pollutants like ultrafine particles (UFP, Dp < 100 nm), a significant fraction of overall exposure occurs within or close to the transit microenvironment. Therefore, understanding exposure to these pollutants in such microenvironments is crucial to accurately assessing overall UFP exposure. The aim of this study was to develop models for predicting in-cabin UFP concentrations if roadway concentrations are known, taking into account vehicle characteristics, ventilation settings, driving conditions and air exchange rates (AER). Particle concentrations and AER were measured in 43 and 73 vehicles, respectively, under various ventilation settings and driving speeds. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to identify and quantify the factors that determine inside-to-outside (I/O) UFP ratios and AERs across a full range of vehicle types and ages. AER was the most significant determinant of UFP I/O ratios, and was strongly influenced by ventilation setting (recirculation or outside air intake). Inclusion of ventilation fan speed, vehicle age or mileage, and driving speed explained greater than 79% of the variability in measured UFP I/O ratios. PMID:23888122

  1. Linking In-Vehicle Ultrafine Particle Exposures to On-Road Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Eckel, Sandrah P.; Knibbs, Luke D.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Fruin, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    For traffic-related pollutants like ultrafine particles (UFP, Dp < 100 nm), a significant fraction of overall exposure occurs within or close to the transit microenvironment. Therefore, understanding exposure to these pollutants in such microenvironments is crucial to accurately assessing overall UFP exposure. The aim of this study was to develop models for predicting in-cabin UFP concentrations if roadway concentrations are known, taking into account vehicle characteristics, ventilation settings, driving conditions and air exchange rates (AER). Particle concentrations and AER were measured in 43 and 73 vehicles, respectively, under various ventilation settings and driving speeds. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to identify and quantify the factors that determine inside-to-outside (I/O) UFP ratios and AERs across a full range of vehicle types and ages. AER was the most significant determinant of UFP I/O ratios, and was strongly influenced by ventilation setting (recirculation or outside air intake). Inclusion of ventilation fan speed, vehicle age or mileage, and driving speed explained greater than 79% of the variability in measured UFP I/O ratios. PMID:23888122

  2. Linking in-vehicle ultrafine particle exposures to on-road concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Eckel, Sandrah P.; Knibbs, Luke D.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Fruin, Scott A.

    2012-11-01

    For traffic-related pollutants like ultrafine particles (UFP), a significant fraction of overall exposure occurs within or close to the transit microenvironment. Therefore, understanding exposure to these pollutants in such microenvironments is crucial to accurately assessing overall UFP exposure. The aim of this study was to develop models for predicting in-cabin UFP concentrations if roadway concentrations are known, quantifying the effect of vehicle characteristics, ventilation settings, driving conditions and air exchange rates (AER). Particle concentrations and AER were measured in 43 and 73 vehicles, respectively, under various ventilation settings and driving speeds. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to identify and quantify the factors that determine inside-to-outside (I/O) UFP ratios and AERs across a full range of vehicle types and ages. AER was the most significant determinant of UFP I/O ratios, and was most strongly influenced by ventilation setting (recirculation or outside air intake). Further inclusion of ventilation fan speed, vehicle age or mileage, and driving speed explained greater than 79% of the variability in measured UFP I/O ratios.

  3. An innovative antisolvent precipitation process as a promising technique to prepare ultrafine rifampicin particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viosa, Alessandra; Letourneau, Jean-Jacques; Espitalier, Fabienne; Ins R, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Many existing and new drugs fail to be fully utilized because of their limited bioavailability due to poor solubility in aqueous media (BCS drug classes II and IV). In this work, for accelerating dissolution of this kind of poorly water-soluble drugs, an antisolvent precipitation method that does not require the use of conventional volatile organic solvents is proposed. To demonstrate this technique, ultrafine particles of rifampicin were prepared using a room temperature ionic liquid (1-ethyl 3- methyl imidazolium methyl-phosphonate) as an alternative solvent and a phosphate buffer as an antisolvent. Rifampicin solubility was measured in various solvents (1-ethyl 3-methyl imidazolium methylphosphonate, water and phosphate buffer), showing the RTIL good solvency for the model drug: rifampicin solubility was found to be higher than 90 mg/g in RTIL at 30 C and lower than 1 mg/g in water at 25 C. Additionally, it was demonstrated that introduction of rifampicin solution in 1-ethyl 3- methyl imidazolium methyl-phosphonate into the aqueous solution antisolvent can produce particles in the submicron range with or without hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as the stabilizer. The ultrafine particles (280-360 nm) are amorphous with enhanced solubility and faster dissolution rate. To our knowledge, this is the first published work examining the suitability of using RTILs for ultrafine drug nanoparticles preparation by an antisolvent precipitation process.

  4. Ultrafine particle size distribution during high velocity impact of high density metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Bonora, Nicola

    2012-03-01

    In the event of high-energy penetrator impact, people involved in battlefield scenarios are exposed to the additional hazard stemming from ultrafine metallic particles, i.e. exposure, inhalation, and respiration of aerolized metals. In order to have reliable quantitative measurement of the aerosol particles generated under controlled impact conditions, an experimental set-up was designed to perform impact tests with light gas-gun in chamber. During the impact events, aerosol particle size distributions and total concentrations were measured with a one-second time resolution. In this study preliminary results relative to high purity copper projectile impact at different velocities are presented.

  5. Potential Role of Ultrafine Particles in Associations between Airborne Particle Mass and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, Ralph J.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Malik, Shaista

    2005-01-01

    Numerous epidemiologic time-series studies have shown generally consistent associations of cardiovascular hospital admissions and mortality with outdoor air pollution, particularly mass concentrations of particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 or ≤10 μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10). Panel studies with repeated measures have supported the time-series results showing associations between PM and risk of cardiac ischemia and arrhythmias, increased blood pressure, decreased heart rate variability, and increased circulating markers of inflammation and thrombosis. The causal components driving the PM associations remain to be identified. Epidemiologic data using pollutant gases and particle characteristics such as particle number concentration and elemental carbon have provided indirect evidence that products of fossil fuel combustion are important. Ultrafine particles < 0.1 μm (UFPs) dominate particle number concentrations and surface area and are therefore capable of carrying large concentrations of adsorbed or condensed toxic air pollutants. It is likely that redox-active components in UFPs from fossil fuel combustion reach cardiovascular target sites. High UFP exposures may lead to systemic inflammation through oxidative stress responses to reactive oxygen species and thereby promote the progression of atherosclerosis and precipitate acute cardiovascular responses ranging from increased blood pressure to myocardial infarction. The next steps in epidemiologic research are to identify more clearly the putative PM casual components and size fractions linked to their sources. To advance this, we discuss in a companion article (Sioutas C, Delfino RJ, Singh M. 2005. Environ Health Perspect 113:947–955) the need for and methods of UFP exposure assessment. PMID:16079061

  6. Number concentrations of fine and ultrafine particles containing metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolocka, Michael P.; Lake, Derek A.; Johnston, Murray V.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    Typical classification schemes for large data sets of single-particle mass spectra involve statistical or neural network analysis. In this work, a new approach is evaluated in which particle spectra are pre-selected on the basis of an above threshold signal intensity at a specified m/ z (mass to charge ratio). This provides a simple way to identify candidate particles that may contain the specific chemical component associated with that m/ z. Once selected, the candidate particle spectra are then classified by the fast adaptive resonance algorithm, ART 2-a, to confirm the presence of the targeted component in the particle and to study the intra-particle associations with other chemical components. This approach is used to characterize metals in a 75,000 particle data set obtained in Baltimore, Maryland. Particles containing a specific metal are identified and then used to determine the size distribution, number concentration, time/wind dependencies and intra-particle correlations with other metals. Four representative elements are considered in this study: vanadium, iron, arsenic and lead. Number concentrations of ambient particles containing these elements can exceed 10,000 particles cm -3 at the measurement site. Vanadium, a primary marker for fuel oil combustion, is observed from all wind directions during this time period. Iron and lead are observed from the east-northeast. Most particles from this direction that contain iron also contain lead and most particles that contain lead also contain iron, suggesting a common emission source for the two. Arsenic and lead are observed from the south-southeast. Particles from this direction contain either arsenic or lead but rarely both, suggesting different sources for each element.

  7. Ultrafine particles, and PM 2.5 generated from cooking in homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Man-Pun; Wu, Chi-Li; Sze To, Gin-Nam; Chan, Tsz-Chun; Chao, Christopher Y. H.

    2011-11-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matters (PM) emitted during cooking can lead to adverse health effects. An understanding of the exposure to PM during cooking at home provides a foundation for the quantification of possible health risks. The concentrations of airborne particles covering the ultrafine (14.6-100 nm) and accumulation mode (100-661.2 nm) size ranges and PM 2.5 (airborne particulate matters smaller than 2.5 ?m in diameter) during and after cooking activities were measured in 12 naturally ventilated, non-smoking homes in Hong Kong, covering a total of 33 cooking episodes. The monitored homes all practiced Chinese-style cooking. Cooking elevated the average number concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and accumulation mode particles (AMPs) by 10 fold from the background level in the living room and by 20-40 fold in the kitchen. PM 2.5 mass concentrations went up to the maximum average of about 160 ?g m -3 in the kitchen and about 60 ?g m -3 in the living room. Cooking emitted particles dispersed quickly from the kitchen to the living room indicating that the health impact is not limited to occupants in the kitchen. Particle number and mass concentrations remained elevated for 90 min in the kitchen and for 60 min in the living room after cooking. Particles in cooking emissions were mainly in the ultrafine size range in terms of the number count while AMPs contributed to at least 60% of the surface area concentrations in the kitchen and 73% in the living room. This suggests that AMPs could still be a major health concern since the particle surface area concentration is suggested to have a more direct relationship with inhalation toxicity than with number concentration. Particle number concentration (14.6-661.2 nm) in the living room was about 2.7 times that in the outdoor environment, suggesting that better ventilation could help reduce exposure.

  8. Deposition of inhaled charged ultrafine particles in a simple tracheal model

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.; Ayres, L.; Xiong, J.

    1992-11-01

    The deposition of ultrafine (d {le} 200 nm) particles on airway surfaces is an important determinant of the radiation dose that results from inhalation of radon progeny. The activity median diameter of particles to which radon daughters attach is small (10--140 nm). In the absence of charge, deposition in the upper airways of the respiratory system occurs by impaction for large particles and diffusion for small particles. Sedimentation is negligible due to the high flow rates in these airways. Experiments conducted in hollow casts and in vivo in humans have all shown an increase in deposition due to the particle charge. In vivo experimental results showed that there exists a threshold value of charge on the particle (q{sub c}) above which the electrostatic charge enhances deposition. These experiments were performed for particles for which deposition by diffusion is small (d {le} 300 nm). Deposition of ultrafine particles in the airways may occur by a combined mechanism of diffusion and electrostatic charge.

  9. Deposition of inhaled charged ultrafine particles in a simple tracheal model

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.; Ayres, L.; Xiong, J.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of ultrafine (d [le] 200 nm) particles on airway surfaces is an important determinant of the radiation dose that results from inhalation of radon progeny. The activity median diameter of particles to which radon daughters attach is small (10--140 nm). In the absence of charge, deposition in the upper airways of the respiratory system occurs by impaction for large particles and diffusion for small particles. Sedimentation is negligible due to the high flow rates in these airways. Experiments conducted in hollow casts and in vivo in humans have all shown an increase in deposition due to the particle charge. In vivo experimental results showed that there exists a threshold value of charge on the particle (q[sub c]) above which the electrostatic charge enhances deposition. These experiments were performed for particles for which deposition by diffusion is small (d [le] 300 nm). Deposition of ultrafine particles in the airways may occur by a combined mechanism of diffusion and electrostatic charge.

  10. Exposure Assessment for Atmospheric Ultrafine Particles (UFPs) and Implications in Epidemiologic Research

    PubMed Central

    Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Singh, Manisha

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiologic research has shown increases in adverse cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes in relation to mass concentrations of particulate matter (PM) ?2.5 or ?10 ?m in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, respectively). In a companion article [Delfino RJ, Sioutas C, Malik S. 2005. Environ Health Perspect 113(8):934946]), we discuss epidemiologic evidence pointing to underlying components linked to fossil fuel combustion. The causal components driving the PM associations remain to be identified, but emerging evidence on particle size and chemistry has led to some clues. There is sufficient reason to believe that ultrafine particles < 0.1 ?m (UFPs) are important because when compared with larger particles, they have order of magnitudes higher particle number concentration and surface area, and larger concentrations of adsorbed or condensed toxic air pollutants (oxidant gases, organic compounds, transition metals) per unit mass. This is supported by evidence of significantly higher in vitro redox activity by UFPs than by larger PM. Although epidemiologic research is needed, exposure assessment issues for UFPs are complex and need to be considered before undertaking investigations of UFP health effects. These issues include high spatial variability, indoor sources, variable infiltration of UFPs from a variety of outside sources, and meteorologic factors leading to high seasonal variability in concentration and composition, including volatility. To address these issues, investigators need to develop as well as validate the analytic technologies required to characterize the physical/chemical nature of UFPs in various environments. In the present review, we provide a detailed discussion of key characteristics of UFPs, their sources and formation mechanisms, and methodologic approaches to assessing population exposures. PMID:16079062

  11. Combustion-Derived Ultrafine Particles Transport Organic Toxicants to Target Respiratory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Arthur; Murphy, Gleeson; Barker, Steven; Henk, William; Penn, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports associations between inhalation of fine and ultrafine ambient particulate matter [aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5)] and increases in cardiovascular/respiratory morbidity and mortality. Less attention has been paid to how the physical and chemical characteristics of these particles may influence their interactions with target cells. Butadiene soot (BDS), produced during combustion of the high-volume petrochemical 1,3-butadiene, is rich in polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including known carcinogens. We conducted experiments to characterize BDS with respect to particle size distribution, assembly, PAH composition, elemental content, and interaction with respiratory epithelial cells. Freshly generated, intact BDS is primarily (> 90%) PAH-rich, metals-poor (nickel, chromium, and vanadium concentrations all < 1 ppm) PM2.5, composed of uniformly sized, solid spheres (30–50 nm) in aggregated form. Cells of a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) exhibit sequential fluorescent responses—a relatively rapid (~ 30 min), bright but diffuse fluorescence followed by the slower (2–4 hr) appearance of punctate cytoplasmic fluorescence—after BDS is added to medium overlying the cells. The fluorescence is associated with PAH localization in the cells. The ultrafine BDS particles move down through the medium to the cell membrane. Fluorescent PAHs are transferred from the particle surface to the cell membrane, cross the membrane into the cytosol, and appear to accumulate in lipid vesicles. There is no evidence that BDS particles pass into the cells. The results demonstrate that uptake of airborne ultrafine particles by target cells is not necessary for transfer of toxicants from the particles to the cells. PMID:16079063

  12. Combustion-derived ultrafine particles transport organic toxicants to target respiratory cells.

    PubMed

    Penn, Arthur; Murphy, Gleeson; Barker, Steven; Henk, William; Penn, Lynn

    2005-08-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports associations between inhalation of fine and ultrafine ambient particulate matter [aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm (PM2.5)] and increases in cardiovascular/respiratory morbidity and mortality. Less attention has been paid to how the physical and chemical characteristics of these particles may influence their interactions with target cells. Butadiene soot (BDS), produced during combustion of the high-volume petrochemical 1,3-butadiene, is rich in polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including known carcinogens. We conducted experiments to characterize BDS with respect to particle size distribution, assembly, PAH composition, elemental content, and interaction with respiratory epithelial cells. Freshly generated, intact BDS is primarily (> 90%) PAH-rich, metals-poor (nickel, chromium, and vanadium concentrations all < 1 ppm) PM2.5, composed of uniformly sized, solid spheres (30-50 nm) in aggregated form. Cells of a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) exhibit sequential fluorescent responses--a relatively rapid (approximately 30 min), bright but diffuse fluorescence followed by the slower (2-4 hr) appearance of punctate cytoplasmic fluorescence--after BDS is added to medium overlying the cells. The fluorescence is associated with PAH localization in the cells. The ultrafine BDS particles move down through the medium to the cell membrane. Fluorescent PAHs are transferred from the particle surface to the cell membrane, cross the membrane into the cytosol, and appear to accumulate in lipid vesicles. There is no evidence that BDS particles pass into the cells. The results demonstrate that uptake of airborne ultrafine particles by target cells is not necessary for transfer of toxicants from the particles to the cells. PMID:16079063

  13. An Overview of Ultrafine Particles in Ambient Air

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid and liquid particles found in the atmospheric aerosol typically cover 4 to 5 orders of magnitude from nanometers (nm) up to 100 micrometers (m). The size range of particles of most interest to human health effects are inhalable and typically fall below 10 m1,2....

  14. [Experimental study on the size spectra and emission factor of ultrafine particle from coal combustion].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-jun; Xie, Xiao-fang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Cai, Zhi-liang

    2014-12-01

    The emission characteristics of ultrafine particles released from pulverized coal combustion were studied, the size spectra of ultrafine particles (5.6-560 nm) were measured with FMPS (fast mobility particle sizer) on a self-built aerosol experiment platform. Meanwhile, a particle dynamic evolution model was established to obtain the particle deposition rate and the emission rate through the optimized algorithm. Finally, the emission factor was calculated. The results showed that at the beginning of particle generation, the size spectra were polydisperse and complex, the initial size spectra was mainly composed of three modes including 10 nm, 30-40 nm and 100-200 nm. Among them, the number concentration of mode around 10 nm was higher than those of other modes, the size spectrum of around 100-200 nm was lognormal distributed, with a CMD (count median diameter) of around 16 nm. Then, as time went on, the total number concentration was decayed by exponential law, the CMD first increased and then tended to be stable gradually. The calculation results showed that the emission factor of particles from coal combustion under laboratory condition was (5.54 x 10(12) 2.18 x 10(12)) unit x g(-1). PMID:25826918

  15. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Huang, W.-R.; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2013-04-01

    An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E) in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM (d ≤ 1 μm), and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D). The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal), accumulation mode (Nacu), Aitken mode (Ntotal), and nucleation mode (Nnuc) particles were 7.6 × 103 cm-3, 1.2 × 103 cm-3, 4.4 × 103 cm-3, and 1.9 × 103 cm-3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) accounted for 83% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm), indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc/NOx ratio of ~60 cm-3 ppbv-1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB·SO2, for new particle formation (NPF) events showed that photo-oxidation of SO2 was responsible for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover, analysis upon the diameter growth rate, GR, and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10-25, found that the values of GR (8.5 ± 6.8 nm h-1) in Taipei were comparable to other urban areas, whereas the values of J10-25 (2.2 ± 1.2 cm-3 s-1) observed in this study were around the low end of the range of new particle formation rate reported by previous investigations. It was revealed that the particle growth rate correlated exponentially with the photolysis of ozone, suggesting the condensable vapors were produced mostly from photo-oxidation reactions. In addition, this study also revealed that both GR and J10-25 exhibited quadratic relationship with the number concentration of particles. The quadratic relationship was inferred as a result of aerosol dynamics and featured NPF process in urban areas.

  16. Measurements of ultrafine particles and other vehicular pollutants inside a mobile exposure system on Los Angeles freeways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yifang; Fung, David C; Kennedy, Nola; Hinds, William C; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu

    2008-03-01

    A mobile exposure and air pollution measurement system was developed and used for on-freeway ultrafine particle health effects studies. A nine-passenger van was modified with a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration system that can deliver filtered or unfiltered air to an exposure chamber inside the van. State-of-the-art instruments were used to measure concentration and size distribution of fine and ultrafine particles and the concentration of carbon monoxide (CO), black carbon (BC), particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass, and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) inside the exposure chamber. This paper presents the construction and technical details of the van and air pollutant concentrations collected in 32 2-hr runs on two major Los Angeles freeways, Interstate 405 (1-405; mostly gasoline traffic) and Interstate 710 (1-710; large proportion of heavy-duty diesel traffic). More than 97% of particles were removed when the flow through the filter box was switched from bypass mode to filter mode while the vehicle was driving on both freeways. The filtration system thus provides a great particulate matter exposure contrast while keeping gas-phase pollutant concentrations the same. Under bypass mode, average total particle number concentration observed inside the exposure chamber was around 8.4 x 10(4) and 1.3 x 10(5) particles cm(-3) on the I-405 and the I-710 freeways, respectively. Bimodal size distributions were consistent and similar for both freeways with the first mode around 16-20 nm and the second mode around 50-55 nm. BC and particle-bound PAH concentrations were more than two times greater on the I-710 than on the I-405 freeway. Very weak correlations were observed between total particle number concentrations and other vehicular pollutants on the freeways. PMID:18376645

  17. Fine and ultrafine particles in small cities. A case study in the south of Europe.

    PubMed

    Aranda, A; Daz-de-Mera, Y; Notario, A; Rodrguez, D; Rodrguez, A

    2015-12-01

    Ultrafine particles, PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentration, NOx, Ozone, SO2, back-trajectories of air masses and meteorological parameters were studied in a small city over the period February, 2013 to June, 2014. The profiles of PM2.5 and PM10 particles are provided, showing averaged values of 16.6 and 21.6?gm(-3), respectively. The average number concentration of particles in the range of diameters 5.6-560nm was 1.2??10(4)#/?cm(3) with contributions of 42, 51 and 7% from the nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation modes, respectively. The average number concentration of ultrafine particles was 1.1??10(4)#/?cm(3). The results obtained are evidence for some differences in the pollution of ambient air by particles in the studied town in comparison to bigger cities. Nucleation events due to emissions from the city were not observed, and traffic emissions amount to a small contribution to PM2.5 and PM10 particles which are mainly due to crustal origin from the arid surroundings and long-range transport from the Sahara Desert. PMID:26278902

  18. Characterizing the spatial distribution of ambient ultrafine particles in Toronto, Canada: A land use regression model.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, Scott; Van Ryswyk, Keith; Goldstein, Alon; Shekarrizfard, Maryam; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Exposure models are needed to evaluate the chronic health effects of ambient ultrafine particles (<0.1 μm) (UFPs). We developed a land use regression model for ambient UFPs in Toronto, Canada using mobile monitoring data collected during summer/winter 2010-2011. In total, 405 road segments were included in the analysis. The final model explained 67% of the spatial variation in mean UFPs and included terms for the logarithm of distances to highways, major roads, the central business district, Pearson airport, and bus routes as well as variables for the number of on-street trees, parks, open space, and the length of bus routes within a 100 m buffer. There was no systematic difference between measured and predicted values when the model was evaluated in an external dataset, although the R(2) value decreased (R(2) = 50%). This model will be used to evaluate the chronic health effects of UFPs using population-based cohorts in the Toronto area. PMID:25935348

  19. Removal of fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments by the unipolar ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Lee, Byung; Yermakov, Mikhail; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2004-09-01

    The continuous emission of unipolar ions was evaluated in order to determine its ability to remove fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments. The evolution of the indoor aerosol concentration and particle size distribution was measured in real time with the ELPI in a room-size (24.3 m3) test chamber where the ion emitter was operating. After the results were compared with the natural decay, the air cleaning factor was determined. The particle aerodynamic size range of ?0.04-2 ?m was targeted because it represents many bioaerosol agents that cause emerging diseases, as well as those that can be used for biological warfare or in the event of bioterrorism. The particle electric charge distribution (also measured in the test chamber with the ELPI) was rapidly affected by the ion emission. It was concluded that the corona discharge ion emitters (either positive or negative), which are capable of creating an ion density of 105-106 e cm-3, can be efficient in controlling fine and ultrafine aerosol pollutants in indoor air environments, such as a typical office or residential room. At a high ion emission rate, the particle mobility becomes sufficient so that the particle migration results in their deposition on the walls and other indoor surfaces. Within the tested ranges of the particle size and ion density, the particles were charged primarily due to the diffusion charging mechanism. The particle removal efficiency was not significantly affected by the particle size, while it increased with increasing ion emission rate and the time of emission. The performance characteristics of three commercially available ionic air purifiers, which produce unipolar ions by corona discharge at relatively high emission rates, were evaluated. A 30-minute operation of the most powerful device among those tested resulted in the removal of about 97% of 0.1 ?m particles and about 95% of 1 ?m particles from the air in addition to the natural decay effect.

  20. Atmospheric Condensational Properties of Ultrafine Chain and Fractal Aerosol Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlow, William H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose for the research sponsored by this grant was to lay the foundations for qualitative understanding and quantitative description of the equilibrium vapor pressure of water vapor over the irregularly shaped, carbonaceous particles that are present in the atmosphere. This work apparently was the first systematic treatment of the subject. Research was conducted in two complementary components: 1. Calculations were performed of the equilibrium vapor pressure of water over particles comprised of aggregates of spheres in the 50-200 nm radius range. The purposes of this work were two-fold. First, since no systematic treatment of this subject had previously been conducted, its availability would be directly useful for quantitative treatment for a limited range of atmospheric aerosols. Second, it would provide qualitative indications of the effects of highly irregular particle shape on equilibrium vapor pressure of aggregates comprised of smaller spheres.

  1. Ultrafine particle removal and ozone generation by in-duct electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Dustin G; Rim, Donghyun; Persily, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (UFP, < 100 nm) has been shown to have adverse health effects and can be elevated in buildings. In-duct electrostatic precipitator filters (ESP) have been shown to be an effective particulate control device for reducing UFP concentrations (20-100 nm) in buildings, although they have the potential to increase indoor ozone concentrations. This study investigated residential ESP filters to reduce ultrafine particles between 4 to 15 nm and quantified the resulting ozone generation. In-duct ESPs were operated in the central air handling unit of a test house. Results for the two tested ESP brands indicate that removal efficiency of 8 to 14 nm particles was near zero and always less than 10% ( 15%), possibly due to particle generation or low charging efficiency. Adding a media filter downstream of the ESP increased the decay rate for particles in the same size range. Continuous operation of one brand of ESP raised indoor ozone concentrations to 77 ppbv and 20 ppbv for a second brand. Using commercial filters containing activated carbon downstream of the installed ESP reduced the indoor steady-state ozone concentrations between 6% and 39%. PMID:24387032

  2. ULTRAFINE PARTICLE DISPOSITION IN THE HEALTHY AND MILDLY OBSTRUCTED LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    We have shown previously that EGF receptor signaling is triggered by metals associated with ambient air particles. Specifically, we demonstrated that As, Zn and V activated the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase and the downstream kinases, MEK1/2 and ERK1/2. In this study, ...

  3. Ultrafine particles cause cytoskeletal dysfunctions in macrophages: role of intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Winfried; Brown, David M; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Stone, Vicki

    2005-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution is reported to cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. Since most of these particles are derived form combustion processes, the primary composition product is carbon with a very small diameter (ultrafine, less than 100 nm in diameter). Besides the induction of reactive oxygen species and inflammation, ultrafine particles (UFP) can cause intracellular calcium transients and suppression of defense mechanisms of alveolar macrophages, such as impaired migration or phagocytosis. Methods In this study the role of intracellular calcium transients caused by UFP was studied on cytoskeleton related functions in J774A.1 macrophages. Different types of fine and ultrafine carbon black particles (CB and ufCB, respectively), such as elemental carbon (EC90), commercial carbon (Printex 90), diesel particulate matter (DEP) and urban dust (UD), were investigated. Phagosome transport mechanisms and mechanical cytoskeletal integrity were studied by cytomagnetometry and cell viability was studied by fluorescence microscopy. Macrophages were exposed in vitro with 100 and 320 μg UFP/ml/million cells for 4 hours in serum free medium. Calcium antagonists Verapamil, BAPTA-AM and W-7 were used to block calcium channels in the membrane, to chelate intracellular calcium or to inhibit the calmodulin signaling pathways, respectively. Results Impaired phagosome transport and increased cytoskeletal stiffness occurred at EC90 and P90 concentrations of 100 μg/ml/million cells and above, but not with DEP or UD. Verapamil and W-7, but not BAPTA-AM inhibited the cytoskeletal dysfunctions caused by EC90 or P90. Additionally the presence of 5% serum or 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA) suppressed the cytoskeletal dysfunctions. Cell viability showed similar results, where co-culture of ufCB together with Verapamil, W-7, FCS or BSA produced less cell dead compared to the particles only. PMID:16202162

  4. Measurement and capture of fine and ultrafine particles from a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor with an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Ying Li; Achariya Suriyawong; Michael Daukoru; Ye Zhuang; Pratim Biswas

    2009-05-15

    Experiments were carried out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used to measure the particle size distributions (PSDs) in the range of 17 nm to 10 m at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). At the ESP inlet, a high number concentration of ultrafine particles was found, with the peak at approximately 75 nm. A trimodal PSD for mass concentration was observed with the modes at approximately 80-100 nm, 1-2 {mu}m, and 10 {mu}m. The penetration of ultrafine particles through the ESP increased dramatically as particle size decreased below 70 nm, attributable to insufficient or partial charging of the ultrafine particles. Injection of nanostructured fine-particle sorbents for capture of toxic metals in the flue gas caused high penetration of the ultrafine particles through the ESP. The conventional ESP was modified to enhance charging using soft X-ray irradiation. A slipstream of flue gas was introduced from the pilot-scale facility and passed through this modified ESP. Enhancement of particle capture was observed with the soft X-ray irradiation when moderate voltages were used in the ESP, indicating more efficient charging of fine particles. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ particle generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The research conducted by Textron Defense Systems (TDS) represents a potential new and innovative concept for dispersed coal liquefaction. The technical approach is generation of ultra-fine catalyst particles from supercritical solutions by rapid expansion of either catalyst only, or mixtures of catalyst and coal material in supersaturated solvents. The process of rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions was developed at Battelle`s Pacific Northwest Laboratories for the intended purpose of providing a new analytical technique for characterizing supercritical fluids. The concept forming the basis of this research is that ultra-fine particles can be generated from supercritical solutions by rapid expansion of either catalyst or catalyst/coal-material mixtures in supersaturated solvents, such as carbon dioxide or water. The focal point of this technique is the rapid transfer of low vapor pressure solute (i.e., catalyst), dissolved in the supercritical fluid solvent, to the gas phase as the solution is expanded through an orifice. The expansion process is characterized by highly nonequilibrium conditions which cause the solute to undergo extremely rapid supersaturation with respect to the solvent, leading to nucleation and particle growth resulting in nanometer size catalyst particles. A supercritical expansion system was designed and built by TDS at their Haverhill facility.

  6. Characteristics of nano-/ultrafine particle-bound PAHs in ambient air at an international airport.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chia-Hsiang; Chuang, Kuen-Yuan; Chang, Jin-Wei

    2013-03-01

    Concentrations of 22 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were estimated for individual particle-size distributions at the airport apron of the Taipei International Airport, Taiwan, on 48 days in July, September, October, and December of 2011. In total, 672 integrated air samples were collected using a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) and a nano-MOUDI. Particle-bound PAHs (P-PAHs) were analyzed by gas chromatography with mass selective detector (GC/MSD). The five most abundant species of P-PAHs on all sampling days were naphthalene (NaP), phenanthrene (PA), fluoranthene (FL), acenaphthene (AcP), and pyrene (Pyr). Total P-PAHs concentrations were 152.21, 184.83, and 188.94 ng/m(3) in summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. On average, the most abundant fractions of benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration (BaPeq) in different molecular weights were high-weight PAHs (79.29 %), followed by medium-weight PAHs (11.57 %) and low-weight PAHs (9.14 %). The mean BaPeq concentrations were 1.25 and 0.94 (ng/m(3)) in ultrafine particles (<0.1 ?m) and nano-particles (<0.032 ?m), respectively. The percentages of total BaPeq in nano- and ultrafine particulate size ranges were 52.4 % and 70.15 %, respectively. PMID:22821344

  7. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Adam Crawford; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-09-30

    In the previous reporting period, modifications were completed for integrating a continuous wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor. During the current reporting period, a shakedown of the system was completed. Several problems were encountered with the progressive cavity pump used to circulate the wax/catalyst slurry though the cross-flow filter element and reactor. During the activation of the catalyst with elevated temperature (> 270 C) the elastomer pump stator released sulfur thereby totally deactivating the iron-based catalyst. Difficulties in maintaining an acceptable leak rate from the pump seal and stator housing were also encountered. Consequently, the system leak rate exceeded the expected production rate of wax; therefore, no online filtration could be accomplished. Work continued regarding the characterization of ultra-fine catalyst structures. The effect of carbidation on the morphology of iron hydroxide oxide particles was the focus of the study during this reporting period. Oxidation of Fe (II) sulfate results in predominantly {gamma}-FeOOH particles which have a rod-shaped (nano-needles) crystalline structure. Carbidation of the prepared {gamma}-FeOOH with CO at atmospheric pressure produced iron carbides with spherical layered structure. HRTEM and EDS analysis revealed that carbidation of {gamma}-FeOOH particles changes the initial nano-needles morphology and generates ultrafine carbide particles with irregular spherical shape.

  8. Cellular responses by stable and uniform ultrafine titanium dioxide particles in culture-medium dispersions when secondary particle size was 100 nm or less.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masanori; Nishio, Keiko; Fujita, Katsuhide; Kato, Haruhisa; Endoh, Shigehisa; Suzuki, Mie; Nakamura, Ayako; Miyauchi, Arisa; Kinugasa, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Murayama, Hideki; Niki, Etsuo; Yoshida, Yasukazu

    2010-09-01

    Even though there have been some investigations into cellular responses induced by ultrafine titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) in vitro, the relationship between cellular responses and secondary particle size is still not clear. In this study, a stable and uniform TiO(2)-cell culture-medium dispersion was prepared, and cellular responses prompted by "ultrafine secondary particles" were examined. The TiO(2)-DMEM-FBS dispersion included secondary particles in which the secondary particle size was 100 nm or less. In the present study, a "secondary particle" was defined as a complex aggregate of TiO(2) primary particles, proteins from FBS and other medium components. Secondary particle size did not influence the cell viability. The TiO(2)-DMEM-FBS dispersion introduced to the human keratinocyte HaCaT cells caused weak intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. The cellular influence of ultrafine TiO(2)in vitro is caused by the following mechanisms: (1) Secondary particles are formed. Ultrafine TiO(2) particles dispersed in medium immediately form secondary particles with proteins and salts. (2) "Ultrafine" secondary particles are taken up by the cells. The secondary particles reach the cells by diffusion and/or sedimentation and are taken up by the cells, through endocytosis. (3) Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level increases. Internalized secondary particles induce an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, although the secondary particles do not break up in the cell. In the case of ultrafine TiO(2), the increase of the intracellular ROS level was minimal. Moreover, the antioxidation system of cells such as glutathione was working. (4) Apoptotic cell death is induced. An accumulation of oxidative stress activates the apoptotic pathway (such as the caspase-3) and subsequently induces apoptotic cell death. After 24h of exposure to TiO(2), the percentage of apoptotic cells was only 6-7%. As a result, although the ultrafine TiO(2) particles induce some cellular responses, these cellular responses to ultrafine TiO(2) are weaker than those of other cytotoxic ultrafine metal oxide particles, such as nickel oxide. PMID:20541599

  9. Impact of two particle measurement techniques on the determination of N95 class respirator filtration performance against ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Reza; Nol, Alexandra; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Lara, Jaime; Cloutier, Yves

    2012-05-30

    The purpose of this experimental study was to compare two different particle measurement devices; an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), to measure the number concentration and the size distribution of NaCl salt aerosols to determine the collection efficiency of filtering respirators against poly disperse aerosols. Tests were performed on NIOSH approved N95 filtering face-piece respirators (FFR), sealed on a manikin head. Ultrafine particles found in the aerosols were also collected and observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the results, there is a systematic difference for the particle size distribution measured by the SMPS and the ELPI. It is largely attributed to the difference in the measurement techniques. However, in spite of these discrepancies, reasonably similar trends were found for the number concentration with both measuring instruments. The particle penetration, calculated based on mobility and aerodynamic diameters, never exceeded 5% for any size range measured at constant flow rate of 85 L/min. Also, the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), with the lowest filtration efficiency, would occur at a similar ultrafine size range <100 nm. With the ELPI, the MPPS was at 70 nm aerodynamic diameter, whereas it occurred at 40 nm mobility diameter with the SMPS. PMID:22464753

  10. Influential parameters on ultrafine particle concentration downwind at waste-to-energy plants.

    PubMed

    Scungio, Mauro; Buonanno, Giorgio; Arpino, Fausto; Ficco, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    A numerical investigation on the parameters influencing the ultrafine particle concentrations downwind an incinerator plant has been carried out on a three-dimensional full scale model. The simulation was based on a modified version of the k-? turbulence model in order to take into account the thermal buoyancy effect of the plume, and reproducing a stable and neutral atmospheric boundary layer by setting appropriate values of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation rate. The ability of the model to reproduce and maintain a stable atmospheric boundary layer was evaluated by analyzing the turbulent characteristics of the flow along the domain. A parametric analysis made on the basis of different plant operational, environmental, and flue gas treatment parameters was carried out in order to evaluate the impact of incinerator plants on the background concentration of ultrafine particles. The evaluation was made at 5 km downwind the chimney in a breathable area, showing that the most significant impact is due to the flue gas treatment section, with a variation on the background concentration up to 370% for a plant hypothetically working without controls on ultrafine particles emission. Operational and environmental parameters determine variations of the concentrations ranging from 1.62% to 4.48% for the lowest and highest chimney, from 1.41% to 4.52% for the lowest and highest wind speed and from 2.48% to 4.5% for the lowest and highest flue gas velocity, respectively. In addition, plume rise evaluation was carried out as a function of wind speed and flue gas velocity from the chimney. PMID:25670165

  11. Size distribution and emission rate measurement of fine and ultrafine particle from indoor human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghin, Evelyne; Ramalho, Olivier; Kirchner, Sverine

    Human indoor activities generate airborne particles which contribute to the increase of aerosol concentration levels in the home. The particle size distribution emission rate was measured for 18 different activities (burning candle or incense, cooking, spray use, computer printing and household cleaning). The particle emission rate was calculated from concentration measurements with a DMS500 (CAMBUSTION) in an experimental chamber (2.36 0.05 m 3). The results showed that ultrafine particles are emitted during these activities and the lowest number distribution mode was 6 nm for one of the burning candles. All the cooking activities had similar emissions with a mode between 20 and 40 nm. The measured size distributions were represented in a database by the sum of 1, 2 or 3 lognormal distributions. The measured total emission rate ranged between 0.06 10 10 and 13.10 10 10 s -1 and the highest emission rate was measured for the self cleaning oven program (pyrolysis).

  12. Bioaccessibility of trace elements in fine and ultrafine atmospheric particles in an industrial environment.

    PubMed

    Mbengue, Saliou; Alleman, Laurent Y; Flament, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    The lung bioaccessibility, i.e., the solubility in alveolar lung fluid of metals in particulate matter, has been recognized as an important parameter for health risk assessment, associated with the inhalation of airborne particles. The purpose of this study is to use an in vitro method to estimate the pulmonary bioaccessibility of toxic metals in different particle sizes, from a multi-influenced industrial emission area. The fine and ultrafine particles collected with cascade impactors in the chimneys and at different distances from a Fe-Mn smelter were extracted with a simulated alveolar fluid (Gamble solution). In addition, a four-step sequential extraction procedure was employed to approach the metal speciation. The bioaccessibility of metals ranged from almost insoluble for Fe (<1%) to extremely soluble for Rb (>80%). In terms of particle size, the trace element bioaccessibility is generally higher for the finer size fractions (submicron and ultrafine particles) than for the coarse one (>1 m). These submicron particles have a very high number concentration and specific surface area, which confer them an important contact surface with the alveolar fluid, i.e., a higher bioaccessibility. Interestingly, the bioaccessibility of most metals clearly increases between the chimney stacks and the close environment of the studied Fe-Mn smelter, over a very short distance (800 m), possibly due to a mix with surrounding steelworks emissions. This increase is not observed over a greater distance from the smelter (2000 m), when industrial particles were mixed with urban aerosols, except for Fe, under more soluble forms in combustion particles. PMID:26254887

  13. [Characterization of ultrafine particle size distribution in the urban atmosphere of Hangzhou in spring].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Continuous measurement and analysis of the atmospheric ultrafine particle number concentration were performed in Hangzhou from March to May, 2012 by using the fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The result showed that daily number concentration of nucleation mode (5.6-20 nm), Aitken mode (20-100 nm), and accumulation mode (100-560 nm) particles, and total particles were 0.84 x 10(4), 1.08 x 10(4), 0.47 x 10(4) and 2.38 x 10(4) cm(-3) respectively. The concentration of Aitken mode particles was higher than that of other mode particles in sunny day. The nucleation mode and Aitken mode particles usually started to increase around 10:00-11:00 and ended up after 3-4 h. This indicated the solar radiation promoted the formation of new particles. Human activities caused the concentration distribution of each mode particles having an obvious difference between workdays and weekends. Combined with the meteorological factors, analysis showed that the wind speed and wind direction also directly influenced particulate concentration. The analysis of particulate concentration and visibility showed that the concentration of accumulation mode particles had a negative relationship with the atmospheric visibility, while those of nucleation mode and Aitken mode particles had a slight influence on it. PMID:24812930

  14. Ultrafine particle removal by residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning filters.

    PubMed

    Stephens, B; Siegel, J A

    2013-12-01

    This work uses an in situ filter test method to measure the size-resolved removal efficiency of indoor-generated ultrafine particles (approximately 7-100 nm) for six new commercially available filters installed in a recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in an unoccupied test house. The fibrous HVAC filters were previously rated by the manufacturers according to ASHRAE Standard 52.2 and ranged from shallow (2.5 cm) fiberglass panel filters (MERV 4) to deep-bed (12.7 cm) electrostatically charged synthetic media filters (MERV 16). Measured removal efficiency ranged from 0 to 10% for most ultrafine particles (UFP) sizes with the lowest rated filters (MERV 4 and 6) to 60-80% for most UFP sizes with the highest rated filter (MERV 16). The deeper bed filters generally achieved higher removal efficiencies than the panel filters, while maintaining a low pressure drop and higher airflow rate in the operating HVAC system. Assuming constant efficiency, a modeling effort using these measured values for new filters and other inputs from real buildings shows that MERV 13-16 filters could reduce the indoor proportion of outdoor UFPs (in the absence of indoor sources) by as much as a factor of 2-3 in a typical single-family residence relative to the lowest efficiency filters, depending in part on particle size. PMID:23590456

  15. Diurnal and seasonal variations of ultrafine particle formation in anthropogenic SO2 plumes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangqun

    2010-03-15

    The cloud condensation nuclei concentrations predicted by global aerosol models are sensitive to how new particle formation in subgrid anthropogenic SO(2) plumes is parameterized. Using a state-of-the-art kinetic nucleation model, we carried out two case studies to investigate the large difference in the number concentrations of ultrafine particles observed in the plumes from the Horne smelter: one in the summer and the other in the winter. Our model predicted that particle number concentrations are in good agreement with observations for both cases, showing that particle formation in the Horne smelter plumes is dominated by binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) in the winter case and by ion-mediated nucleation (IMN) in the summer case. Further sensitivity studies reveal significant diurnal and seasonal variations of sulfate particle formation in the anthropogenic SO(2) plume, mainly associated with corresponding variations of two key parameters: hydroxyl radical concentration ([OH]) and temperature. Nucleation in the plume is negligible at night because of very low [OH]. BHN is significant when [OH] is relatively high or temperature is relatively low, and it is generally limited to the fresh plumes (within approximately 15 km from source), but it can generate very high concentrations of ultrafine particles (peak values as high as 10(5)-10(6) cm(-3)) under favorable conditions. IMN generally dominates nucleation in the plume when [OH] is relatively low or temperature is relatively high, and it extends from fresh plume to more aged plume and produces 2-3 x 10(4) cm(-3) of nucleated particles. The implications of the results are discussed. PMID:20158231

  16. Measurements of Ultra-fine and Fine Aerosol Particles over Siberia: Large-scale Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Stohl, Andreas; Belan, Boris; Ciais, Philippe; Ndlec, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of in-situ measurements of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles carried out in the troposphere from 500 to 7000 m in the framework of several International and Russian State Projects. Number concentrations of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles measured during intensive airborne campaigns are presented. Measurements carried over a great part of Siberia were focused on particles with diameters from 3 to 21 nm to study new particle formation in the free/upper troposphere over middle and high latitudes of Asia, which is the most unexplored region of the Northern Hemisphere. Joint International airborne surveys were performed along the following routes: Novosibirsk-Salekhard-Khatanga-Chokurdakh-Pevek-Yakutsk-Mirny-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB/PLARCAT2008 Project) and Novosibirsk-Mirny-Yakutsk-Lensk-Bratsk-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB Project). The flights over Lake Baikal was conducted under Russian State contract. Concentrations of ultra-fine and fine particles were measured with automated diffusion battery (ADB, designed by ICKC SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia) modified for airborne applications. The airborne ADB coupled with CPC has an additional aspiration unit to compensate ambient pressure and changing flow rate. It enabled to classify nanoparticles in three size ranges: 3-6 nm, 6-21 nm, and 21-200 nm. To identify new particle formation events we used similar specific criteria as Young et al. (2007): (1) N3-6nm >10 cm-3, (2) R1=N3-6/N621 >1 and R2=N321/N21200 >0.5. So when one of the ratios R1 or R2 tends to decrease to the above limits the new particle formation is weakened. It is very important to notice that space scale where new particle formation was observed is rather large. All the events revealed in the FT occurred under clean air conditions (low CO mixing ratios). Measurements carried out in the atmospheric boundary layer over Baikal Lake did not reveal any event of new particle formation. Concentrations of ultra-fine particles were even lower than ones observed in the polar FT. Summarising the data obtained during two intensive measurement campaigns carried out over the vast territory of Siberia we can draw the conclusion that remote Siberian troposphere is a relatively efficient source of recently formed particles. Measurements carried out in the FT (3-7 km) showed that about 44% of them satisfied criteria of new particle formation. At the same time, more favourable conditions are observed between 5 and 7 km (48%). The present work was funded by ANR grant BLAN06-1_137670, CNRS, CEA, the French Ministry of Research, the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (YAK-AEROSIB project) and by RFBR (grants 07-05-00645, 08-05-10033 and 08-05-92499) and by the Norwegian Research Council as part of POLARCAT-Norway. Flights over Baikal Lake were financed by Russian Government (State Contract No 02.515.11.5087). Young, L.H., Benson, D.R., Montanaro, W.M., Lee, S.H., Pan, L.L., Rogers, D.C., Jensen, J., Stith, J.L., Davis, C.A., Campos, T.L., Bowman, K.P., Cooper,W.A., Lait, L.R., 2007. Enhanced new particle formation observed in the northern midlatitude tropopause region. Journal of Geophysical Research 112. doi:10.1029/2006JD008109

  17. Study of fine and ultrafine particles for coal cleaning. Fossil energy quarterly report, April 1, 1990--June 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Birlingmair, D.; Buttermore, W.; Enustun, V.; Pollard, J.

    1990-07-01

    The primary objective of this research is to identify improved means for predicting the cleanability of fine and ultrafine coal by investigating the phenomena which govern laboratory techniques used to separate coal ground to find and ultrafine sizes for the determination of washability characteristics. This study seeks to identify and quantify factors other than gravity which affect separation, to establish limitations of density-based separation, and to develop techniques which will provide more accurate and consistent prediction of cleanability.

  18. Exposure assessment in Beijing, China: biological agents, ultrafine particles, and lead.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuofei; Yao, Maosheng

    2010-11-01

    In this study, air samples were taken using a BioSampler and gelatin filters from six sites in Beijing: office, hospital, student dormitory, train station, subway, and a commercial street. Dust samples were also collected using a surface sampler from the same environments. Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) and Glucatell assays were used to quantify sample endotoxin and (1,3)-β-d-glucan concentration levels, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the dust mite allergens (Der p 1 and Der f 1). Ultrafine particle and lead concentrations in these sampling sites were also measured using P-Trak and atomic absorption spectrometer, respectively. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and linear regression analysis were used to analyze the concentration data. Higher culturable bacteria (12,639 CFU/m3) and fungi (1,806 CFU/m3) concentrations were observed for the train station and the subway system, respectively. For the rest of sampling sites, their concentrations were comparable to those found in western countries, ranging from 990 to 2,276 CFU/m3 for bacteria, and from 119 to 269 CFU/m3 for fungi. ANOVA analysis indicated that there were statistically significant differences between the culturable bacterial and fungal concentration levels obtained for different sites (p value=0.0001 and 0.0047). As for dust allergens, endotoxin, and (1,3)-β-D-glucan, their concentrations also seemed to be comparable to those found in the developed countries. Airborne allergen concentrations ranged from 16 to 68 ng/m3. The dust-borne allergen concentration was observed to range from 0.063 to 0.327 ng/mg. As for endotoxin, the highest airborne concentration of 25.24 ng/m3 was observed for the commercial street, and others ranged from 0.0427 to 0.1259 ng/m3. And dust-borne endotoxin concentration ranged from 58.83 to 6,427.4 ng/mg. For (1,3)-β-D-glucan, the airborne concentration ranged from 0.02 to 1.2 ng/m3. Linear regression analyses showed that there existed poor correlations between those in airborne and dust-borne states (R2=0.002~0.43). In our study, the lowest ultrafine particle concentration about 5,203 pt/cm3 was observed in office and the highest was observed at the train station, up to 32,783 pt/cm3. Lead concentration was shown to range from 80 to 170 ng/mg with the highest also observed at the train station. The information provided in this work can be used to learn the general situation of relevant health risks in Beijing. And the results here suggested that when characterizing exposure both airborne and dust-borne as well as the environments should be considered. PMID:19904623

  19. Multi-metric measurement of personal exposure to ultrafine particles in selected urban microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinazz, Andrea; Cattaneo, Andrea; Scocca, Damiano R.; Bonzini, Matteo; Cavallo, Domenico M.

    2015-06-01

    At the beginning of the study, our hypothesis was that visiting certain microenvironments (MEs) is one of the most important determinants of personal exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) and that moving between microenvironments significantly differentiates exposure. The overall aim of this study is to perform relevant exposure measurements to extend our knowledge on environmental exposure to UFP in urban environments. The UFP concentrations in different urban MEs were measured by personal monitoring in repeated sampling campaigns along a fixed route. The measurement runs were performed on one-week periods and at different times of day (AM: 08.00-10.30; PM: 16.00-18.30) and repeated in different periods of the year (winter, spring, summer, and autumn) for a total of 56 runs (>110 h). Measurements included on-line monitoring of the UFP particle number concentration (PNC), mean diameter (mean-d) and lung-deposited surface-area (LDSA). Additionally, the PNC, particle mass concentration (PMC) profiles for quasi-ultrafine particles (QUFP; PM0.25) were estimated. A significant seasonal difference in the PNC and PMC, mean diameter and surface area was observed as well as between different times of the day and days of the week. In addition, differences in the UFP concentrations were also found in each ME, and there were specific mean-diameter and surface area concentrations. In general, the mean particle diameters showed an inverse relationship with the PNC, while the LDSA had the opposite behaviour. Appreciable differences among all MEs and monitoring periods were observed; the concentration patterns and variations seemed related to the typical sources of urban pollutants (traffic), proximity to sources and time of day. The highest exposures were observed for walking or biking along high-trafficked routes and while using public buses. The UFP exposure levels in modern cars, equipped with high-efficiency filters and in air recirculation mode, were significantly lower.

  20. Measurements of ultrafine particles carrying different number of charges in on- and near-freeway environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eon S.; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Yifang

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents measurements of electrical charges on ultrafine particles (UFPs) of different electrical mobility diameters (30, 50, 80, and 100 nm) in on- and near-freeway environments. Using a tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) system, we first examined the fraction of UFPs carrying different number of charges on two distinctive freeways: a gasoline-vehicle dominated freeway (I-405) and a heavy-duty diesel truck dominated freeway (I-710). The fractions of UFPs of a given size carrying one or more charges were significantly higher on the freeways than in the background. The background UFPs only carried up to two charges but freeway UFPs could have up to three charges. The total fraction of charged particles was higher on the I-710 than I-405 across the studied electrical mobility diameters. Near the I-405 freeway, we observed a strong decay of charged particles on the downwind side of the freeway. We also found fractional decay of the charged particles was faster than total particle number concentrations, but slower than total ion concentrations downwind from the freeway I-405. Among charged particles, the highest decay rate was observed for particles carrying three charges. Near the I-710 freeway, we found strong net positive charges on nucleation mode particles, suggesting that UFPs were not at steady-state charge equilibrium near freeways.

  1. In-cabin commuter exposure to ultrafine particles on Los Angeles freeways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yifang; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Hinds, William C; Miguel, Antonio H

    2007-04-01

    Worldwide people are exposed to toxic ultrafine particles (UFP, with diameters (dp) less than 100 nm) and nanoparticles (NP, dp < 50 nm) under a variety of circumstances. To date, very limited information is available on human exposure to freshly emitted UFP and NP while traveling on major roads and freeways. We report in-cabin and outdoor measurements of particle number concentration and size distributions while driving three vehicles on Los Angeles freeways. Particle number concentrations and size distributions were measured under different vehicle ventilation settings. When the circulation fan was set to on, with substantial external air intake, outside changes in particle counts caused corresponding in-cabin changes approximately 30-60 s later, indicating an maximal air exchange rate of about 120-60 h(-1). Maximum in-cabin protection (approximately 85%) was obtained when both fan and recirculation were on. In-cabin and outdoor particle size distributions in the 7.9-217 nm range were observed to be mostly bimodal, with the primary peak occurring at 10-30 nm and the secondary at 50-70 nm. The vehicle's manufacture-installed particle filter offered an in-cabin protection of about 50% for particles in the 7-40 nm size range and 20-30% for particles in the 40 to approximately 200 nm size range. For an hour daily commute exposure, the in-vehicle microenvironment contributes approximately 10-50% of people's daily exposure to UFP from traffic. PMID:17438754

  2. Ultrafine Particles from Traffic Emissions and Children's Health (UPTECH) in Brisbane, Queensland (Australia): study design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Ezz, Wafaa Nabil; Mazaheri, Mandana; Robinson, Paul; Johnson, Graham R; Clifford, Samuel; He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Marks, Guy B

    2015-02-01

    Ultrafine particles are particles that are less than 0.1 micrometres (m) in diameter. Due to their very small size they can penetrate deep into the lungs, and potentially cause more damage than larger particles. The Ultrafine Particles from Traffic Emissions and Children's Health (UPTECH) study is the first Australian epidemiological study to assess the health effects of ultrafine particles on children's health in general and peripheral airways in particular. The study is being conducted in Brisbane, Australia. Continuous indoor and outdoor air pollution monitoring was conducted within each of the twenty five participating school campuses to measure particulate matter, including in the ultrafine size range, and gases. Respiratory health effects were evaluated by conducting the following tests on participating children at each school: spirometry, forced oscillation technique (FOT) and multiple breath nitrogen washout test (MBNW) (to assess airway function), fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO, to assess airway inflammation), blood cotinine levels (to assess exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (to measure systemic inflammation). A pilot study was conducted prior to commencing the main study to assess the feasibility and reliably of measurement of some of the clinical tests that have been proposed for the main study. Air pollutant exposure measurements were not included in the pilot study. PMID:25648226

  3. Ultrafine Particles from Traffic Emissions and Children’s Health (UPTECH) in Brisbane, Queensland (Australia): Study Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ezz, Wafaa Nabil; Mazaheri, Mandana; Robinson, Paul; Johnson, Graham R.; Clifford, Samuel; He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Marks, Guy B.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafine particles are particles that are less than 0.1 micrometres (µm) in diameter. Due to their very small size they can penetrate deep into the lungs, and potentially cause more damage than larger particles. The Ultrafine Particles from Traffic Emissions and Children’s Health (UPTECH) study is the first Australian epidemiological study to assess the health effects of ultrafine particles on children’s health in general and peripheral airways in particular. The study is being conducted in Brisbane, Australia. Continuous indoor and outdoor air pollution monitoring was conducted within each of the twenty five participating school campuses to measure particulate matter, including in the ultrafine size range, and gases. Respiratory health effects were evaluated by conducting the following tests on participating children at each school: spirometry, forced oscillation technique (FOT) and multiple breath nitrogen washout test (MBNW) (to assess airway function), fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO, to assess airway inflammation), blood cotinine levels (to assess exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (to measure systemic inflammation). A pilot study was conducted prior to commencing the main study to assess the feasibility and reliably of measurement of some of the clinical tests that have been proposed for the main study. Air pollutant exposure measurements were not included in the pilot study. PMID:25648226

  4. Measurement of Ultrafine Particles and Other Air Pollutants Emitted by Cooking Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qunfang; Gangupomu, Roja H.; Ramirez, David; Zhu, Yifang

    2010-01-01

    Cooking emissions show a strong dependence on cooking styles and parameters. Measurements of the average ultrafine particle (UFP) concentration, PM2.5 and black carbon concentrations emitted by cooking activities ranged from 1.34 104 to 6.04 105 particles/cm3, 10.0 to 230.9 ?g/m3 and 0.1 to 0.8 ?g/m3, respectively. Lower UFP concentrations were observed during boiling, while higher levels were emitted during frying. The highest UFP concentrations were observed when using a gas stove at high temperature with the kitchen exhaust fan turned off. The observed UFP profiles were similar in the kitchen and in another room, with a lag of approximately 10 min. PMID:20617057

  5. Exposure to ultrafine particles in hospitality venues with partial smoking bans.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Manfred; Moshammer, Hanns; Schietz, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Fine particles in hospitality venues with insufficient smoking bans indicate health risks from passive smoking. In a random sample of Viennese inns (restaurants, cafes, bars, pubs and discotheques) effects of partial smoking bans on indoor air quality were examined by measurement of count, size and chargeable surface of ultrafine particles (UFPs) sized 10-300 nm, simultaneously with mass of particles sized 300-2500 nm (PM2.5). Air samples were taken in 134 rooms unannounced during busy hours and analyzed by a diffusion size classifier and an optical particle counter. Highest number concentrations of particles were found in smoking venues and smoking rooms (median 66,011 pt/cm(3)). Even non-smoking rooms adjacent to smoking rooms were highly contaminated (median 25,973 pt/cm(3)), compared with non-smoking venues (median 7408 pt/cm(3)). The particle number concentration was significantly correlated with the fine particle mass (P<0.001). We conclude that the existing tobacco law in Austria is ineffective to protect customers in non-smoking rooms of hospitality premises. Health protection of non-smoking guests and employees from risky UFP concentration is insufficient, even in rooms labeled "non-smoking". Partial smoking bans with separation of smoking rooms failed. PMID:23652720

  6. Systemic and cardiovascular effects of airway injury and inflammation: ultrafine particle exposure in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, M W

    2001-01-01

    The concentration of particles in the ambient air is associated with deaths from cardiovascular disease, and determining the biologic mechanisms involved has been identified as a high-priority research need. Hypotheses have focused on the possibility of direct cardiac effects, or indirect effects related to inflammatory responses, including increased blood viscosity or increased blood coagulability. Ultrafine particles (UFPs; those smaller than 100 nm) may be important in cardiovascular effects because of their very high deposition efficiency in the pulmonary region, and their high propensity to penetrate the epithelium and reach interstitial sites. We have initiated human clinical studies of the health effects of UFPs using a mouthpiece exposure system. Healthy, nonsmoking subjects 18-55 years of age are exposed at rest for 2 hr to 10 microg/m3 carbon UFPs and to filtered air as a control. Preliminary findings indicate a relatively high overall deposition fraction (0.66 +/- 0.12 by particle number) consistent with model predictions and an absence of particle-associated symptoms or changes in lung function. Planned studies examine responses in susceptible subject groups, and the effects of particles of varying composition. Human clinical studies using model particles will complement other approaches such as epidemiologic, animal exposure, and in vitro studies in determining the mechanisms for heath effects related to ambient particle exposure. PMID:11544158

  7. Ultrafine particles near a major roadway in Raleigh, North Carolina: downwind attenuation and correlation with traffic-related pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter <100 run) emitted by traffic are a potential direct health threat to nearby populations and may additionally act as a tracer for co-emitted pollutants. During summertime in Raleigh, North Carolina, UFPs were simultaneously measured upwind and d...

  8. INCREASED IL-8 AND IL-6 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    INCREASED IL-6 AND IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES.
    R Silbajoris1, A G Lenz2, I Jaspers3, J M Samet1. 1NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2GSF-Institute for Inhalation Biology, Neuherberg, Germany; 3 CEMLB, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, ...

  9. STUDY OF ULTRAFINE PARTICLES NEAR A MAJOR HIGHWAY WITH HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL TRAFFIC. (R827352C011)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Motor vehicle emissions usually constitute the most significant source of ultrafine particles (diameter <0.1small mu, Greekm) in an urban environment. Zhu et al. (J. Air Waste Manage. As...

  10. CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICLES IN A RESIDENCE FOR 18 MONTHS IN 1999-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous monitors were employed for 18 months in an occupied townhouse to measure ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles; air change rates; wind speed and direction; temperature; and relative humidity (RH). A main objective was to document short-term and long-term variation in...

  11. Chemical, dimensional and morphological ultrafine particle characterization from a waste-to-energy plant

    SciTech Connect

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Avino, Pasquale; Belluso, Elena

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Particle size distributions and total concentrations measurement at the stack and before the fabric filter of an incinerator. > Chemical characterization of UFPs in terms of heavy metal concentration through a nuclear method. > Mineralogical investigation through a Transmission Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer. > Heavy metal concentrations on UFPs as function of the boiling temperature. > Different mineralogical and morphological composition amongst samples collected before the fabric filter and at the stack. - Abstract: Waste combustion processes are responsible of particles and gaseous emissions. Referring to the particle emission, in the last years specific attention was paid to ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter less than 0.1 {mu}m), mainly emitted by combustion processes. In fact, recent findings of toxicological and epidemiological studies indicate that fine and ultrafine particles could represent a risk for health and environment. Therefore, it is necessary to quantify particle emissions from incinerators also to perform an exposure assessment for the human populations living in their surrounding areas. To these purposes, in the present work an experimental campaign aimed to monitor UFPs was carried out at the incineration plant in San Vittore del Lazio (Italy). Particle size distributions and total concentrations were measured both at the stack and before the fabric filter inlet in order to evaluate the removal efficiency of the filter in terms of UFPs. A chemical characterization of UFPs in terms of heavy metal concentration was performed through a nuclear method, i.e. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), as well as a mineralogical investigation was carried out through a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) in order to evaluate shape, crystalline state and mineral compound of sampled particles. Maximum values of 2.7 x 10{sup 7} part. cm{sup -3} and 2.0 x 10{sup 3} part. cm{sup -3} were found, respectively, for number concentration before and after the fabric filter showing a very high efficiency in particle removing by the fabric filter. With regard to heavy metal concentrations, the elements with higher boiling temperature present higher concentrations at lower diameters showing a not complete evaporation in the combustion section and the consequent condensation of semi-volatile compounds on solid nuclei. In terms of mineralogical and morphological analysis, the most abundant compounds found in samples collected before the fabric filter are Na-K-Pb oxides followed by phyllosilicates, otherwise, different oxides of comparable abundance were detected in the samples collected at the stack.

  12. Ultrafine particle size distributions near freeways: Effects of differing wind directions on exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kozawa, Kathleen H.; Winer, Arthur M.; Fruin, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    High ambient ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations may play an important role in the adverse health effects associated with living near busy roadways. However, UFP size distributions change rapidly as vehicle emissions dilute and age. These size changes can influence UFP lung deposition rates and dose because deposition in the respiratory system is a strong function of particle size. Few studies to date have measured and characterized changes in near-road UFP size distributions in real-time, thus missing transient variations in size distribution due to short-term fluctuations in wind speed, direction, or particle dynamics. In this study we measured important wind direction effects on near-freeway UFP size distributions and gradients using a mobile platform with 5-s time resolution. Compared to more commonly measured perpendicular (downwind) conditions, parallel wind conditions appeared to promote formation of broader and larger size distributions of roughly one-half the particle concentration. Particles during more parallel wind conditions also changed less in size with downwind distance and the fraction of lung-deposited particle number was calculated to be 15% lower than for downwind conditions, giving a combined decrease of about 60%. In addition, a multivariate analysis of several variables found meteorology, particularly wind direction and temperature, to be important in predicting UFP concentrations within 150 m of a freeway (R2 = 0.46, p = 0.014). PMID:24415904

  13. Ultrafine particle size distributions near freeways: Effects of differing wind directions on exposure.

    PubMed

    Kozawa, Kathleen H; Winer, Arthur M; Fruin, Scott A

    2012-12-01

    High ambient ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations may play an important role in the adverse health effects associated with living near busy roadways. However, UFP size distributions change rapidly as vehicle emissions dilute and age. These size changes can influence UFP lung deposition rates and dose because deposition in the respiratory system is a strong function of particle size. Few studies to date have measured and characterized changes in near-road UFP size distributions in real-time, thus missing transient variations in size distribution due to short-term fluctuations in wind speed, direction, or particle dynamics. In this study we measured important wind direction effects on near-freeway UFP size distributions and gradients using a mobile platform with 5-s time resolution. Compared to more commonly measured perpendicular (downwind) conditions, parallel wind conditions appeared to promote formation of broader and larger size distributions of roughly one-half the particle concentration. Particles during more parallel wind conditions also changed less in size with downwind distance and the fraction of lung-deposited particle number was calculated to be 15% lower than for downwind conditions, giving a combined decrease of about 60%. In addition, a multivariate analysis of several variables found meteorology, particularly wind direction and temperature, to be important in predicting UFP concentrations within 150 m of a freeway (R (2) = 0.46, p = 0.014). PMID:24415904

  14. Evaluation of ultrafine particle emissions from laser printers using emission test chambers.

    PubMed

    Schripp, Tobias; Wensing, Michael; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga; He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia

    2008-06-15

    It has now been recognized that some hardcopy devices emit ultrafine particles (d(p) < 100 nm) during their operation. As a consequence, the time-dependent characterization of particle release from laser printers is of high interest in order to evaluate the exposure of office workers to such emissions. The emission profiles of different printers can be compared in test chambers using a standardized test protocol and measuring devices with high time resolution. The extraction of meaningful and comparable data from the obtained data set is a complex procedure due to the different emission behavior patterns of the printers. The calculation of the unit specific emission rate (SERu) is of limited use because the emission profiles during the printing process ranged between short-term bursts and constant particle release. Therefore, other parameters such as the particle loss-rate coefficient, beta, which provides information about the testing conditions, and the area belowthe time vs concentration curve, F, which characterizes the particle release, allow for a comparison of the different printer tests. Variations in the emission behavior could not be associated with specific manufacturers or product lines. In addition, when performing several print jobs on the same device, with only short pauses between jobs, the emission rate was reduced in some cases. This further complicates the ability to determine the influence of printer construction and consumables, such as toner and paper, on the concentration of particles emitted. PMID:18605552

  15. Up-regulation of Tissue Factor in Human Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells after Ultrafine Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Karoly, Edward D.; Li, Zhuowei; Dailey, Lisa A.; Hyseni, Xhevahire; Huang, Yuh-Chin T.

    2007-01-01

    Background Epidemiology studies have linked exposure to pollutant particles to increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Objectives We tested the hypothesis that the ultrafine fraction of ambient pollutant particles would cause endothelial cell dysfunction. Methods We profiled gene expression of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC) exposed to ultrafine particles (UFPs; 100 ?g/mL) from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, or vehicle for 4 hr with Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 chips (n = 4 each). Results We found 320 up-regulated genes and 106 down-regulated genes (p < 0.01, 5% false discovery rate). We noted up-regulation of genes related to coagulation [tissue factor (F3) and coagulation factor II receptor-like 2 (F2RL2)] and differential regulation of genes related to F3 signaling (FOS, JUN, and NFKBIA). Results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction show a significant up-regulation of F3 after 10 and 100 ?g/mL UFP exposures. Additionally, the water-soluble fractions of UFPs were sufficient to induce the expression of F3, F2RL2, and heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1). Treatment of HPAEC with UFPs for 16 hr increased the release of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Pretreatment of HPAEC with a blocking antibody against F3 attenuated IL-6 and IL-8 release by 30 and 70%, respectively. Conclusions Using gene profiling, we discovered that UFPs may induce vascular endothelial cells to express genes related to clotting. These results indicate that PM may cause adverse cardiovascular health effects by activating coagulation-inflammation circuitry. PMID:17450221

  16. Comparisons of ultrafine and fine particles in their associations with biomarkers reflecting physiological pathways.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jicheng; Zhu, Tong; Kipen, Howard; Wang, Guangfa; Hu, Min; Guo, Qingfeng; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Lu, Shou-En; Wang, Yuedan; Zhu, Ping; Rich, David Q; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Junfeng

    2014-05-01

    Using a quasi-experimental opportunity offered by greatly restricted air pollution emissions during the Beijing Olympics compared to before and after the Olympics, we conducted the current study to compare ultrafine particles (UFPs) and fine particles (PM2.5) in their associations with biomarkers reflecting multiple pathophysiological pathways linking exposure and cardiorespiratory events. Number concentrations of particles (13.0-764.7 nm) and mass concentrations of PM2.5 were measured at two locations within 9 km from the residence and workplace of 125 participating Beijing residents. Each participant was measured 6 times for biomarkers of autonomic function (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures), hemostasis (von Willebrand factor, soluble CD40 ligand, and P-selectin), pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress (exhaled nitric oxide and exhaled breath condensate pH, malondialdehyde, and nitrite), and systemic inflammation and oxidative stress (urinary malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, plasma fibrinogen, and white blood cells). Linear mixed models were used to estimate associations of biomarkers with UFPs and PM2.5 measured 1-7 days prior to biomarker measurements (lags). We found that the correlation coefficient for UFPs at two locations (? 9 km apart) was 0.45, and at the same location, the correlation coefficient for PM2.5 vs UFPs was -0.18. Changes in biomarker levels associated with increases in UFPs and PM2.5 were comparable in magnitude. However, associations of certain biomarkers with UFPs had different lag patterns compared to those with PM2.5, suggesting that the ultrafine size fraction (? 100 nm) and the fine size fraction (? 100 nm to 2.5 ?m) of PM2.5 are likely to affect PM-induced pathophysiological pathways independently. PMID:24666379

  17. Chemical, dimensional and morphological ultrafine particle characterization from a waste-to-energy plant.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Avino, Pasquale; Belluso, Elena

    2011-11-01

    Waste combustion processes are responsible of particles and gaseous emissions. Referring to the particle emission, in the last years specific attention was paid to ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter less than 0.1 ?m), mainly emitted by combustion processes. In fact, recent findings of toxicological and epidemiological studies indicate that fine and ultrafine particles could represent a risk for health and environment. Therefore, it is necessary to quantify particle emissions from incinerators also to perform an exposure assessment for the human populations living in their surrounding areas. To these purposes, in the present work an experimental campaign aimed to monitor UFPs was carried out at the incineration plant in San Vittore del Lazio (Italy). Particle size distributions and total concentrations were measured both at the stack and before the fabric filter inlet in order to evaluate the removal efficiency of the filter in terms of UFPs. A chemical characterization of UFPs in terms of heavy metal concentration was performed through a nuclear method, i.e., Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), as well as a mineralogical investigation was carried out through a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) in order to evaluate shape, crystalline state and mineral compound of sampled particles. Maximum values of 2.7 10(7) part. cm(-3) and 2.0 10(3) part. cm(-3) were found, respectively, for number concentration before and after the fabric filter showing a very high efficiency in particle removing by the fabric filter. With regard to heavy metal concentrations, the elements with higher boiling temperature present higher concentrations at lower diameters showing a not complete evaporation in the combustion section and the consequent condensation of semi-volatile compounds on solid nuclei. In terms of mineralogical and morphological analysis, the most abundant compounds found in samples collected before the fabric filter are Na-K-Pb oxides followed by phyllosilicates, otherwise, different oxides of comparable abundance were detected in the samples collected at the stack. PMID:21802934

  18. Potential health impact of ultrafine particles under clean and polluted urban atmospheric conditions: a model-based study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Leila Droprinchinski; Martins, Jorge A; Freitas, Edmilson D; Mazzoli, Caroline R; Gonalves, Fabio Luiz T; Ynoue, Rita Y; Hallak, Ricardo; Albuquerque, Taciana Toledo A; Andrade, Maria de Fatima

    2010-03-01

    The main goal of this study was to improve the knowledge of ultrafine particle number distributions in large urban areas and also to call the attention to the importance of these particles on assessing health risks. Measurements of aerosol size distributions were performed during 2 weeks, with distinct pollutant concentrations (polluted and clean periods), on the rooftop of a building located in downtown of the megacity of So Paulo, Brazil. CO, NO(2), PM(10), SO(2), and O(3) concentrations and meteorological variables were also used. Aerosol size distribution measurements showed that geometric mean diameters of the size spectra in the polluted period are on average considerably larger than those in the clean one. Besides the fact that total number of ultrafine particles did not show significant differences, during the polluted period, geometric mean diameter was larger than during the clean one. The results of a mathematical model of particle deposition on human respiratory tract indicated a more significant effect of smaller particles fraction of the spectra, which predominate under clean atmospheric conditions. The results also indicated that urban environmental conditions usually considered good for air quality, under the criteria of low mass concentration, do not properly serve as air quality standard to very small particles. In the size range of ultrafine particles, this traditional clean atmospheric condition can offer a strong risk to pulmonary hazards, since the cleansing of the atmosphere creates good conditions to increase the concentration of nucleation mode particles. PMID:20376166

  19. Apportionment of motor vehicle emissions from fast changes in number concentration and chemical composition of ultrafine particles near a roadway intersection.

    PubMed

    Klems, Joseph P; Pennington, M Ross; Zordan, Christopher A; McFadden, Lauren; Johnston, Murray V

    2011-07-01

    High frequency spikes in ultrafine number concentration near a roadway intersection arise from motor vehicles that accelerate after a red light turns green. The present work describes a method to determine the contribution of motor vehicles to the total ambient ultrafine particle mass by correlating these number concentration spikes with fast changes in ultrafine particle chemical composition measured with the nano aerosol mass spectrometer, NAMS. Measurements were performed at an urban air quality monitoring site in Wilmington, Delaware during the summer and winter of 2009. Motor vehicles were found to contribute 48% of the ultrafine particle mass in the winter measurement period, but only 16% of the ultrafine particle mass in the summer period. Chemical composition profiles and contributions to the ultrafine particle mass of spark vs diesel vehicles were estimated by correlating still camera images, chemical composition and spike contribution at each time interval.. The spark and diesel contributions were roughly equal, but the uncertainty in the split was large. The distribution of emissions from individual vehicles was determined by correlating camera images with the spike contribution to particle number concentration at each time interval. A small percentage of motor vehicles were found to emit a disproportionally large concentration of ultrafine particles, and these high emitters included both spark ignition and diesel vehicles. PMID:21667963

  20. Real-time gaseous, PM and ultrafine particle emissions from a modern marine engine operating on biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Varalakshmi; Agrawal, Harshit; Welch, William A; Miller, J Wayne; Cocker, David R

    2011-03-15

    Emissions from harbor-craft significantly affect air quality in populated regions near ports and inland waterways. This research measured regulated and unregulated emissions from an in-use EPA Tier 2 marine propulsion engine on a ferry operating in a bay following standard methods. A special effort was made to monitor continuously both the total Particulate Mass (PM) mass emissions and the real-time Particle Size Distribution (PSD). The engine was operated following the loads in ISO 8178-4 E3 cycle for comparison with the certification standards and across biodiesel blends. Real-time measurements were also made during a typical cruise in the bay. Results showed the in-use nitrogen oxide (NOx) and PM(2.5) emission factors were within the not to exceed standard for Tier 2 marine engines. Comparing across fuels we observed the following: a) no statistically significant change in NO(x) emissions with biodiesel blends (B20, B50); b) ? 16% and ? 25% reduction of PM(2.5) mass emissions with B20 and B50 respectively; c) a larger organic carbon (OC) to elemental carbon (EC) ratio and organic mass (OM) to OC ratio with B50 compared to B20 and B0; d) a significant number of ultrafine nuclei and a smaller mass mean diameter with increasing blend-levels of biodiesel. The real-time monitoring of gaseous and particulate emissions during a typical cruise in the San Francisco Bay (in-use cycle) revealed important effects of ocean/bay currents on emissions: NO(x) and CO(2) increased 3-fold; PM(2.5) mass increased 6-fold; and ultrafine particles disappeared due to the effect of bay currents. This finding has implications on the use of certification values instead of actual in-use emission values when developing inventories. Emission factors for some volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbonyls, and poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are reported as supplemental data. PMID:21344849

  1. Traffic-generated emissions of ultrafine particles from pavement-tire interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Andreas; Gharibi, Arash; Swietlicki, Erik; Gudmundsson, Anders; Bohgard, Mats; Ljungman, Anders; Blomqvist, Göran; Gustafsson, Mats

    In a road simulator study, a significant source of sub-micrometer fine particles produced by the road-tire interface was observed. Since the particle size distribution and source strength is dependent on the type of tire used, it is likely that these particles largely originate from the tires, and not the road pavement. The particles consisted most likely of mineral oils from the softening filler and fragments of the carbon-reinforcing filler material (soot agglomerates). This identification was based on transmission electron microscopy studies of collected ultrafine wear particles and on-line thermal treatment using a thermodesorber. The mean particle number diameters were between 15-50 nm, similar to those found in light duty vehicle (LDV) tail-pipe exhaust. A simple box model approach was used to estimate emission factors in the size interval 15-700 nm. The emission factors increased with increasing vehicle speed, and varied between 3.7×10 11 and 3.2×10 12 particles vehicle -1 km -1 at speeds of 50 and 70 km h -1. This corresponds to between 0.1-1% of tail-pipe emissions in real-world emission studies at similar speeds from a fleet of LDV with 95% gasoline and 5% diesel-fueled cars. The emission factors for particles originating from the road-tire interface were, however, similar in magnitude to particle number emission factors from liquefied petroleum gas-powered vehicles derived in test bench studies in Australia 2005. Thus the road-tire interface may be a significant contributor to particle emissions from ultraclean vehicles.

  2. Nasal deposition of ultrafine particles in human volunteers and its relationship to airway geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.S.; Yeh, H.C.; Guilmette, R.A.; Simpson, S.Q.; Cheng, K.H.; Swift, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    Very large and very small particles most often deposit in the nasal airways. Studies in airway models provide large data sets with which to evaluate the deposition mechanism, while in vivo deposition data are needed to validate results obtained with nasal models. Four adult male, nonsmoking, healthy human volunteers (ages 36-57 yr) participated in this study. Deposition was measured in each subject at constant flow rates of 4, 7.5, 10, and 20 L min{sup -1}. Monodisperse silver particles (5, 8, and 20 nm) and polystyrene latex particles (50 and 100 nm) were used. Bach subject held his breath for 30-60 sec, during which time, the aerosol was drawn through the nasal airway and exhausted through a mouth tube. Aerosol concentrations in the intake and exhaust air were measured by an ultrafine condensation particle counter. The deposition efficiency in the nasal airway was calculated taking into account particle losses in the mask, mouth tube, and transport lines. Our results were consistent with the turbulent diffusional deposition model previously established from studies using nasal airway casts. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Aerosol Measurements of the Fine and Ultrafine Particle Content of Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Chen, Da-Ren; Smith, Sally A.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first quantitative measurements of the ultrafine (20 to 100 nm) and fine (100 nm to 20 m) particulate components of Lunar surface regolith. The measurements were performed by gas-phase dispersal of the samples, and analysis using aerosol diagnostic techniques. This approach makes no a priori assumptions about the particle size distribution function as required by ensemble optical scattering methods, and is independent of refractive index and density. The method provides direct evaluation of effective transport diameters, in contrast to indirect scattering techniques or size information derived from two-dimensional projections of high magnification-images. The results demonstrate considerable populations in these size regimes. In light of the numerous difficulties attributed to dust exposure during the Apollo program, this outcome is of significant importance to the design of mitigation technologies for future Lunar exploration.

  4. Long-term study of urban ultrafine particles and other pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yungang; Hopke, Philip K.; Chalupa, David C.; Utell, Mark J.

    2011-12-01

    Continuous measurements of number size distributions of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and other pollutants (PM 2.5, SO 2, CO and O 3) have been performed in Rochester, New York since late November 2001. The 2002-2009 average number concentrations of particles in three size ranges (10-50 nm, 50-100 nm and 100-500 nm) were 4730 cm -3, 1838 cm -3, and 1073 cm -3, respectively. The lowest annual average number concentrations of particles in 10-50 nm and 50-100 nm were observed during 2008-2009. The lowest monthly average number concentration of 10-50 nm particles was observed in July and the highest in February. The daily patterns of 10-50 nm particles had two peaks at early morning (7-8 AM) and early afternoon (2 PM). There was a distinct declining trend in the peak number concentrations from 2002-2005 to 2008-2009. Large reductions in SO 2 concentrations associated with northerly winds between 2007 and 2009 were observed. The most significant annual decrease in the frequency of morning particle nucleation was observed from 2005 to 2007. The monthly variation in the morning nucleation events showed a close correlation with number concentrations of 10-50 nm particles ( r = 0.89). The frequency of the local SO 2-related nucleation events was much higher before 2006. All of these results suggest significant impacts of highway traffic and industrial sources. The decrease in particle number concentrations and particle nucleation events likely resulted from a combination of the U.S. EPA 2007 Heavy-Duty Highway Rule implemented on October 1, 2006, the closure of a large coal-fired power plant in May 2008, and the reduction of Eastman Kodak emissions.

  5. Measurements of ultrafine particles from a gas-turbine burning biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Allouis, C.; Beretta, F.; Minutolo, P.; Pagliara, R.; Sirignano, M.; Sgro, L.A.; D'Anna, A.

    2010-04-15

    Measurements of ultrafine particles have been performed at the exhaust of a low emission microturbine for power generation. This device has been fuelled with liquid fuels, including a commercial diesel oil, a mixture of the diesel oil with a biodiesel and kerosene, and tested under different loads. Primarily attention has been focused on the measurements of the size distribution functions of the particles emitted from the system by using particle differential mobility analysis. A bimodal size distribution function of the particle emitted has been found in all the examined conditions. Burning diesel oil, the first mode of the size distribution function of the combustion-formed particles is centered at around 2-3 nm, whereas the second mode is centered at about 20-30 nm. The increase of the turbine load and the addition of 50% of biodiesel has not caused changes in the shape of size distribution of the particles. A slightly decrease of the amount of particle formed has been found. By using kerosene the amount of emitted particles increases of more than one order of magnitude. Also the shape of the size distribution function changes with the first mode shifted towards larger particles of the order of 8-10 nm but with a lower emission of larger 20-30 nm particles. Overall, in this conditions, the mass concentration of particles is increased respect to the diesel oil operation. Particle sizes measured with the diesel oil have been compared with the results on a diesel engine operated in the same power conditions and with the same fuel. Measurements have showed that the mean sizes of the formed particles do not change in the two combustion systems. However, diesel engine emits a number concentration of particles more than two orders of magnitude higher in the same conditions of power and with the same fuel. By running the engine in more premixed-like conditions, the size distribution function of the particles approaches that measured by burning kerosene in the microturbine indicating that the distribution function of the sizes of the emitted particles can be strongly affected by combustion conditions. (author)

  6. Soft-X-Ray-Enhanced Electrostatic Precipitation for Protection against Inhalable Allergens, Ultrafine Particles, and Microbial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kettleson, Eric M.; Schriewer, Jill M.; Buller, R. Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 μm with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. PMID:23263945

  7. Soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation for protection against inhalable allergens, ultrafine particles, and microbial infections.

    PubMed

    Kettleson, Eric M; Schriewer, Jill M; Buller, R Mark L; Biswas, Pratim

    2013-02-01

    Protection of the human lung from infectious agents, allergens, and ultrafine particles is difficult with current technologies. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters remove airborne particles of >0.3 ?m with 99.97% efficiency, but they are expensive to maintain. Electrostatic precipitation has been used as an inexpensive approach to remove large particles from airflows, but it has a collection efficiency minimum in the submicrometer size range, allowing for a penetration window for some allergens and ultrafine particles. Incorporating soft X-ray irradiation as an in situ component of the electrostatic precipitation process greatly improves capture efficiency of ultrafine particles. Here we demonstrate the removal and inactivation capabilities of soft-X-ray-enhanced electrostatic precipitation technology targeting infectious agents (Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and poxviruses), allergens, and ultrafine particles. Incorporation of in situ soft X-ray irradiation at low-intensity corona conditions resulted in (i) 2-fold to 9-fold increase in capture efficiency of 200- to 600-nm particles and (ii) a considerable delay in the mean day of death as well as lower overall mortality rates in ectromelia virus (ECTV) cohorts. At the high-intensity corona conditions, nearly complete protection from viral and bacterial respiratory infection was afforded to the murine models for all biological agents tested. When optimized for combined efficient particle removal with limited ozone production, this technology could be incorporated into stand-alone indoor air cleaners or scaled for installation in aircraft cabin, office, and residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. PMID:23263945

  8. Spatial distribution of ultrafine particles in urban settings: A land use regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Marcela; Basagaa, Xavier; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Agis, David; Bouso, Laura; Foraster, Maria; Medina-Ramn, Mercedes; Pey, Jorge; Knzli, Nino; Hoek, Gerard

    2012-07-01

    BackgroundThe toxic effects of ultrafine particles (UFP) are a public health concern. However, epidemiological studies on the long term effects of UFP are limited due to lacking exposure models. Given the high spatial variation of UFP, the assignment of exposure levels in epidemiological studies requires a fine spatial scale. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a short-term measurement protocol used at a large number of locations to derive a land use regression (LUR) model of the spatial variation of UFP in Girona, Spain. MethodsWe measured UFP for 15 min on the sidewalk of 644 participants' homes in 12 towns of Girona province (Spain). The measurements were done during non-rush traffic hours 9:15-12:45 and 15:15-16:45 during 32 days between June 15 and July 31, 2009. In parallel, we counted the number of vehicles driving in both directions. Measurements were repeated on a different day for a subset of 25 sites in Girona city. Potential predictor variables such as building density, distance to bus lines and land cover were derived using geographic information systems. We adjusted for temporal variation using daily mean NOx concentrations at a central monitor. Land use regression models for the entire area (Core model) and for individual towns were derived using a supervised forward selection algorithm. ResultsThe best predictors of UFP were traffic intensity, distance to nearest major crossroad, area of high density residential land and household density. The LUR Core model explained 36% of UFP total variation. Adding sampling date and hour of the day to the Core model increased the R2 to 51% without changing the regression slopes. Local models included predictor variables similar to those in the Core model, but performed better with an R2 of 50% in Girona city. Independent LUR models for the first and second measurements at the subset of sites with repetitions had R2's of about 47%. When the mean of the two measurements was used R2 improved to 72%. ConclusionsLUR models for UFP were developed, based on a highly cost-effective short-term monitoring campaign at a large number of sites, with fair performance. Complementing the approach with further strategies to address sources of temporal variation of UFP is likely to result in improved models as indicated by the good performance of the model based on the subset of sites with one repeated measurement. Our approach is promising for UFP and possibly for other PM components requiring active sampling.

  9. Performance of school bus retrofit systems: ultrafine particles and other vehicular pollutants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qunfang; Zhu, Yifang

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated the performance of retrofit systems for diesel-powered school buses, a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) muffler and a spiracle crankcase filtration system (CFS), regarding ultrafine particles (UFPs) and other air pollutants from tailpipe emissions and inside bus cabins. Tailpipe emissions and in-cabin air pollutant levels were measured before and after retrofitting when the buses were idling and during actual pick-up/drop off routes. Retrofit systems significantly reduced tailpipe emissions with a reduction of 20-94% of total particles with both DOC and CFS installed. However, no unequivocal decrease was observed for in-cabin air pollutants after retrofitting. The AC/fan unit and the surrounding air pollutant concentrations played more important roles for determining the in-cabin air quality of school buses than did retrofit technologies. Although current retrofit systems reduce children's exposure while waiting to board at a bus station, retrofitting by itself does not protect children satisfactorily from in-cabin particle exposures. Turning on the bus engine increased in-cabin UFP levels significantly only when the wind blew from the bus' tailpipe toward its hood with its windows open. This indicated that wind direction and window position are significant factors determining how much self-released tailpipe emissions may penetrate into the bus cabin. The use of an air purifier was found to remove in-cabin particles by up to 50% which might be an alternative short-to-medium term strategy to protect children's health. PMID:21710985

  10. Using the Aerasense NanoTracer for simultaneously obtaining several ultrafine particle exposure metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, J.

    2011-07-01

    The expanding production and use of nanomaterials increases the chance of human exposure to engineered nanoparticles (NP), also referred to as ultrafine particles (UFP; <= 100 - 300 nm). This is particularly true in workplaces where they can become airborne and thereafter inhaled by workers during nanopowder processing. Considering the suspected hazard of many engineered UFPs, the general recommendation is to take measures for minimizing personal exposure while monitoring the UFP pollution for assessment and control purposes. The portable Aerasense NanoTracer accomplishes this UFP monitoring, either intermittently or in real time. This paper reviews its design and operational characteristics and elaborates on a number of application extensions and constraints. The NanoTracer's output signals enable several UFP exposure metrics to be simultaneously inferred. These include the airborne UFP number concentration and the number-averaged particle size, serving as characteristics of the pertaining UFP pollution. When non-hygroscopic particles are involved, the NanoTracer's output signals also allow an estimation of the lung-deposited UFP surface area concentration and the lung-deposited UFP mass concentration. It is thereby possible to distinguish between UFP depositions in the alveolar region, the trachea-bronchial region and the head airway region, respectively, by making use of the ICRP particle deposition model.

  11. Commuter exposure to ultrafine particles in different urban locations, transportation modes and routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Corradi, Elisabetta; Braun-Fahrlnder, Charlotte; Schindler, Christian; de Nazelle, Audrey; Jerrett, Michael; Ducret-Stich, Regina E.; Knzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C.

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding of ultrafine particle (UFP) exposure in different urban transport microenvironments is important for epidemiological exposure assessments and for policy making. Three sub-studies were performed to characterize personal exposure to UFP concentration and average particle size distribution diameters in frequently traveled commuter microenvironments in the city of Basel, Switzerland. First, the spatial variation of sidewalk UFP exposures within urban areas and transport-specific microenvironments was explored. Second, exposure to UFP concentration and average particle size were quantified for five modes of transportation (walking, bicycle, bus, tram, car) during different times of the day and week, along the same route. Finally, the contribution of bicycle commuting along two different routes (along main roads, away from main roads) to total daily exposures was assessed by 24-h personal measurements. In general, smaller average particle sizes and higher UFP levels were measured at places and for travel modes in close proximity to traffic. Average trip UFP concentrations were higher in car (31,784 particles cm-) and on bicycle (22,660 particles cm-) compared to walking (19,481 particles cm-) and public transportation (14,055-18,818 particles cm-). Concentrations were highest for all travel modes during weekday morning rush hours, compared to other time periods. UFP concentration was lowest in bus, regardless of time period. Bicycle travel along main streets between home and work place (24 min on average) contributed 21% and 5% to total daily UFP exposure in winter and summer, respectively. Contribution of bicycle commutes to total daily UFP exposure could be reduced by half if main roads are avoided. Our results show the importance of considering commuter behavior and route choice in exposure assessment studies.

  12. Magnetic property and microstructure of single crystalline Nd2Fe14B ultrafine particles ball milled from HDDR powders

    SciTech Connect

    Li, WF; Hu, XC; Cui, BZ; Yang, JB; Han, JZ; Hadjipanayis, GC

    2013-08-01

    In this work we report the microstructure and magnetic property of single crystalline Nd2Fe14B ultrafine particles ball milled from HDDR Nd-Fe-B alloys. The average size of the particles is 283 nm, and TEM observation reveals that these particles are single crystalline. The coercivity of these particles is 6.0 kOe, which is much higher than that of the particles ball milled from sintered and hot pressed Nd-Fe-B magnets. Micromagnetic analysis shows that the coercivity degradation is caused by surface damage during ball milling. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of leaf area density variation on the particle collection efficiency in the size range of ultrafine particles (UFP).

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Ming-Yeng; Khlystov, Andrey; Katul, Gabriel

    2013-10-15

    Carbonaceous particles were generated during a "sooting burn" experiment to explore how heterogeneity in horizontal leaf area density (LAD) within the canopy impacts the ultrafine particle (UFP) collection efficiency at the branch-scale. To address this goal, wind tunnel experiments and a particle-size resolving model, which couples the turbulent flow field within the vegetated volume and the collection efficiency, were presented. Three scenarios were examined in a wind-tunnel packed with Juniperus chinensis branches: An LAD that was uniformly distributed, linearly increasing and linearly decreasing along the longitudinal or mean wind direction. The concentration measurements were conducted at multiple locations within the vegetated volume to evaluate the performance of the proposed model needed in discerning the role of LAD heterogeneity on UFP collection. Differences not exceeding 20% were found between modeled and measured concentration for all particle sizes across a wide range of wind speeds. The overall particle collection efficiency was found to be primarily governed by the spatially integrated LAD when differences in aerodynamic attributes (e.g., foliage drag) were accounted for. When combined with earlier studies, the results suggest that one parameter linking the laminar boundary layer conductance to the Schmidt number depends on particle size. PMID:24001338

  14. Environmentally persistent free radicals amplify ultrafine particle mediated cellular oxidative stress and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Lomnicki, Slawo; McAvey, Kevin M; Cole, Richard B; Dellinger, Barry; Cormier, Stephania A

    2009-01-01

    Background Combustion generated particulate matter is deposited in the respiratory tract and pose a hazard to the lungs through their potential to cause oxidative stress and inflammation. We have previously shown that combustion of fuels and chlorinated hydrocarbons produce semiquinone-type radicals that are stabilized on particle surfaces (i.e. environmentally persistent free radicals; EPFRs). Because the composition and properties of actual combustion-generated particles are complex, heterogeneous in origin, and vary from day-to-day, we have chosen to use surrogate particle systems. In particular, we have chosen to use the radical of 2-monochlorophenol (MCP230) as the EPFR because we have previously shown that it forms a EPFR on Cu(II)O surfaces and catalyzes formation of PCDD/F. To understand the physicochemical properties responsible for the adverse pulmonary effects of combustion by-products, we have exposed human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to MCP230 or the CuO/silica substrate. Our general hypothesis was that the EPFR-containing particle would have greater toxicity than the substrate species. Results Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to our combustion generated particle systems significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decreased cellular antioxidants resulting in cell death. Resveratrol treatment reversed the decline in cellular glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels for both types of combustion-generated particle systems. Conclusion The enhanced cytotoxicity upon exposure to MCP230 correlated with its ability to generate more cellular oxidative stress and concurrently reduce the antioxidant defenses of the epithelial cells (i.e. reduced GSH, SOD activity, and GPx). The EPFRs in MCP230 also seem to be of greater biological concern due to their ability to induce lipid peroxidation. These results are consistent with the oxidizing nature of the CuO/silica ultrafine particles and the reducing nature and prolonged environmental and biological lifetimes of the EPFRs in MCP230. PMID:19374750

  15. Contrasting macrophage activation by fine and ultrafine titanium dioxide particles is associated with different uptake mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation of (nano)particles may lead to pulmonary inflammation. However, the precise mechanisms of particle uptake and generation of inflammatory mediators by alveolar macrophages (AM) are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between particles and AM and their associated pro-inflammatory effects in relation to particle size and physico-chemical properties. NR8383 rat lung AM were treated with ultrafine (uf), fine (f) TiO2 or fine crystalline silica (DQ12 quartz). Physico-chemical particle properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis and thermogravimetry. Aggregation and agglomeration tendency of the particles were determined in assay-specific suspensions by means of dynamic light scattering. All three particle types were rapidly taken up by AM. DQ12 and ufTiO2 , but not fTiO2 , caused increased extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) mRNA expression and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? release. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression was increased most strongly by ufTiO2 , while DQ12 exclusively triggered interleukin (IL) 1? release. However, oscillations of intracellular calcium concentration and increased intracellular ROS were observed with all three samples. Uptake inhibition experiments with cytochalasin D, chlorpromazine and a Fc? receptor II (Fc?RII) antibody revealed that the endocytosis of fTiO2 by the macrophages involves actin-dependent phagocytosis and macropinocytosis as well as clathrin-coated pit formation, whereas the uptake of ufTiO2 was dominated by Fc?IIR. The uptake of DQ12 was found to be significantly reduced by all three inhibitors. Our findings suggest that the contrasting AM responses to fTiO2 , ufTiO2 and DQ12 relate to differences in the involvement of specific uptake mechanisms. PMID:21995556

  16. Production of Ultrafine, High-purity Ceramic Powders Using the US Bureau of Mines Developed Turbomill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyer, Jesse L.

    1993-01-01

    Turbomilling, an innovative grinding technology developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in the early 1960's for delaminating filler-grade kaolinitic clays, has been expanded into the areas of particle size reduction, material mixing, and process reaction kinetics. The turbomill, originally called an attrition grinder, has been used for particle size reduction of many minerals, including natural and synthetic mica, pyrophyllite, talc, and marble. In recent years, an all-polymer version of the turbomill has been used to produce ultrafine, high-purity, advanced ceramic powders such as SiC, Si3N4, TiB2, and ZrO2. In addition to particle size reduction, the turbomill has been used to produce intimate mixtures of high surface area powders and whiskers. Raw materials, TiN, AlN, and Al2O3, used to produce a titanium nitride/aluminum oxynitride (TiN/AlON) composite, were mixed in the turbomill, resulting in strength increases over samples prepared by dry ball milling. Using the turbomill as a leach vessel, it was found that 90.4 pct of the copper was extracted from the chalcopyrite during a 4-hour leach test in ferric sulfate versus conventional processing which involves either roasting of the ore for Cu recovery or leaching of the ore for several days.

  17. Combustion of PTFE: The Effects of Gravity and Pigmentation on Ultrafine Particle Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinnon, J. Thomas; Srivastava, Rajiv; Todd, Paul

    1997-01-01

    Ultrafine particles generated during polymer thermodegradation are a major health hazard, owing to their unique pathway of processing in the lung. This hazard in manned spacecraft is poorly understood, because the particulate products of polymer thermodegradation are generated under low gravity conditions. Particulate generated from the degradation of PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE), insulation coating for 20 AWG copper wire (representative of spacecraft application) under intense ohmic heating were studied in terrestrial gravity and microgravity. Microgravity tests were done in a 1.2-second drop tower at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). Thermophoretic sampling was used for particulate collection. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) were used to examine the smoke particulates. Image software was used to calculate particle size distribution. In addition to gravity, the color of PTFE insulation has an overwhelming effect on size, shape and morphology of the particulate. Nanometer-sized primary particles were found in all cases, and aggregation and size distribution was dependent on both color and gravity; higher aggregation occurred in low gravity. Particulates from white, black, red and yellow colored PTFE insulations were studied. Elemental analysis of the particulates shows the presence of inorganic pigments.

  18. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m (3 h/day 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile. PMID:21281223

  19. Ambient ultrafine particle levels at residential and reference sites in urban and rural Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Meier, Reto; Eeftens, Marloes; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Phuleria, Harish C; Ineichen, Alex; Davey, Mark; Ragettli, Martina S; Fierz, Martin; Schindler, Christian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Knzli, Nino

    2015-03-01

    Although there is evidence that ultrafine particles (UFP) do affect human health there are currently no legal ambient standards. The main reasons are the absence of spatially resolved exposure data to investigate long-term health effects and the challenge of defining representative reference sites for monitoring given the high dependence of UFP on proximity to sources. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the spatial distribution of UFP in four areas of the Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) and to investigate the representativeness of routine air monitoring stations for residential sites in these areas. Repeated UFP measurements during three seasons have been conducted at a total of 80 residential sites and four area specific reference sites over a median duration of 7 days. Arithmetic mean residential PNC scattered around the median of 10,800 particles/cm(3) (interquartile range [IQR] = 7800 particles/cm(3)). Spatial within area contrasts (90th/10th percentile ratios) were around two; increased contrasts were observed during weekday rush-hours. Temporal UFP patterns were comparable at reference and residential sites in all areas. Our data show that central monitoring sites can represent residential conditions when locations are well chosen with respect to the local sources--namely traffic. For epidemiological research, locally resolved spatial models are needed to estimate individuals' long-term exposures to UFP of outdoor origin at home, during commute and at work. PMID:25648954

  20. Effect of time-activity adjustment on exposure assessment for traffic-related ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Kevin J; Levy, Jonathan I; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Patton, Allison P; Durant, John L; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Exposures to ultrafine particles (<100?nm, estimated as particle number concentration, PNC) differ from ambient concentrations because of the spatial and temporal variability of both PNC and people. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of time-activity adjustment on exposure assignment and associations with blood biomarkers for a near-highway population. A regression model based on mobile monitoring and spatial and temporal variables was used to generate hourly ambient residential PNC for a full year for a subset of participants (n=140) in the Community Assessment of Freeway Exposure and Health study. We modified the ambient estimates for each hour using personal estimates of hourly time spent in five micro-environments (inside home, outside home, at work, commuting, other) as well as particle infiltration. Time-activity adjusted (TAA)-PNC values differed from residential ambient annual average (RAA)-PNC, with lower exposures predicted for participants who spent more time away from home. Employment status and distance to highway had a differential effect on TAA-PNC. We found associations of RAA-PNC with high sensitivity C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6, although exposure-response functions were non-monotonic. TAA-PNC associations had larger effect estimates and linear exposure-response functions. Our findings suggest that time-activity adjustment improves exposure assessment for air pollutants that vary greatly in space and time. PMID:25827314

  1. Effect of time-activity adjustment on exposure assessment for traffic-related ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Lane, Kevin J; Levy, Jonathan I; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Patton, Allison P; Durant, John L; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug

    2015-09-01

    Exposures to ultrafine particles (<100?nm, estimated as particle number concentration, PNC) differ from ambient concentrations because of the spatial and temporal variability of both PNC and people. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of time-activity adjustment on exposure assignment and associations with blood biomarkers for a near-highway population. A regression model based on mobile monitoring and spatial and temporal variables was used to generate hourly ambient residential PNC for a full year for a subset of participants (n=140) in the Community Assessment of Freeway Exposure and Health study. We modified the ambient estimates for each hour using personal estimates of hourly time spent in five micro-environments (inside home, outside home, at work, commuting, other) as well as particle infiltration. Time-activity adjusted (TAA)-PNC values differed from residential ambient annual average (RAA)-PNC, with lower exposures predicted for participants who spent more time away from home. Employment status and distance to highway had a differential effect on TAA-PNC. We found associations of RAA-PNC with high sensitivity C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6, although exposure-response functions were non-monotonic. TAA-PNC associations had larger effect estimates and linear exposure-response functions. Our findings suggest that time-activity adjustment improves exposure assessment for air pollutants that vary greatly in space and time. PMID:25827314

  2. Ultrafine particles formed by heating droplets of simulated ash containing metals

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, F.; Barone, A.; Pagliara, R.; Beretta, F.; D'Anna, A.; D'Alessio, A.

    2008-12-15

    Coal and biomass combustion and waste incineration produce inorganic aerosol, whose ultrafine fraction is hypothesized to be generated mainly by metal vaporization and subsequent nucleation and growth in a high-temperature atmosphere. To investigate this mechanism, we investigated nanoparticle inception and early growth processes at high temperature by spraying monodisperse droplets of simulated ash containing metals in the centerline of a laboratory ethylene/air laminar premixed flame at stoichiometric conditions. Particles were collected by thermophoresis on mica substrates for atomic force microscopy dimensional and morphological analysis. Chemical nature, volume fraction, and mean diameter of particles were evaluated by in situ UV-Vis broadband light absorption and laser light-scattering measurements. We also measured size distribution of material sampled from the flame without dilution using differential mobility analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy provided further information on the chemical composition of particles deposited on substrates. Size distributions showed that the flame-generated aerosol have a high number concentration, are mostly smaller than 10 nm, and persist far downstream of the droplet injection point. Preliminary results showed that the coagulation rate of those nanoparticles is much slower than their collision rate, which implies that their lifetime may be long and may represent a severe problem for environmental pollution.

  3. The rural carbonaceous aerosols in coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles during haze pollution in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chong-Shu; Cao, Jun-Ji; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Shen, Zhen-Xing; Liu, Sui-Xin; Huang, Ru-Jin; Zhang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Ping

    2016-03-01

    The carbonaceous aerosol concentrations in coarse particle (PM10: Dp ≤ 10 μm, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm), fine particle (PM2.5: Dp ≤ 2.5 μm), and ultrafine particle (PM0.133: Dp ≤ 0.133 μm) carbon fractions in a rural area were investigated during haze events in northwestern China. The results indicated that PM2.5 contributed a large fraction in PM10. OC (organic carbon) accounted for 33, 41, and 62 % of PM10, PM2.5, and PM0.133, and those were 2, 2.4, and 0.4 % for EC (elemental carbon) in a rural area, respectively. OC3 was more abundant than other organic carbon fractions in three PMs, and char dominated EC in PM10 and PM2.5 while soot dominated EC in PM0.133. The present study inferred that K(+), OP, and OC3 are good biomass burning tracers for rural PM10 and PM2.5, but not for PM0.133 during haze pollution. Our results suggest that biomass burning is likely to be an important contributor to rural PMs in northwestern China. It is necessary to establish biomass burning control policies for the mitigation of severe haze pollution in a rural area. PMID:26518000

  4. Ultrafine particle concentrations and exposures in four high-rise Beijing apartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Nasim A.; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Yinping; Wang, Shuxiao; Nazaroff, William W.

    2011-12-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) exposures have the potential to elicit adverse health effects. People spend most of their time within their place of residence. Little information is available on UFP levels in homes in mainland China. To contribute new data to this important topic, we made time-series measurements of particle number (PN) concentrations and resident activities inside four apartments in high-rise buildings in Beijing during June to August 2009. Indoor PN concentrations at the four sites, averaged over the few-day duration of monitoring at each site, spanned an order of magnitude, from 2800 to 29,100 cm -3. This wide range resulted from differences among apartments in three main factors: (1) the frequency of indoor source events, including cooking activities and intrusion of cooking exhaust from neighboring apartments; (2) the extent of natural ventilation via open windows; and (3) the extent of active air filtration. Daily-integrated PN exposure of the thirteen residents, while in their apartments, ranged from 45,000 to 494,000 cm -3 h/d. For two sites at which outdoor PN concentrations were also measured, the percentage of daily-integrated residential exposure attributable to particles of outdoor origin was 58% for the residents of one site and 81% for residents of the other.

  5. Impact of superplasticizer concentration and of ultra-fine particles on the rheological behaviour of dense mortar suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Artelt, C. Garcia, E.

    2008-05-15

    This work aims at investigating the impact of the addition of superplasticizer and of ultra-fine particles, namely of silica fume and of precipitated titania, on the rheological behaviour of water-lean mortar pastes. The pastes are characterised in terms of their spread, their flowing behaviour and by means of performing a shear test, giving access to viscosity/shear gradient correlations. Adding superplasticizer is shown to shift the onset of shear thickening of the referring pastes to higher shear rates and to attenuate its otherwise rapid evolution, possibly by means of favouring steric particle-particle interactions. The workability of these mortars, which is characterised in terms of spread values and draining, is also improved. For the case of fly ash based mortars, adding ultra-fine particles is another way of (slightly) 'retarding' shear thickening and of attenuating its evolution, possibly because of resulting in - on the average - lower hydrodynamic forces and reduced attractive Van der Waals interactions between particles. However, at the same time these mortars are characterised by a worsening in workability which is attributed to the huge amount of surface area provided by the ultra-fines.

  6. Assessment of atmospheric ultrafine carbon particle-induced human health risk based on surface area dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chio, Chia-Pin; Liao, Chung-Min

    Evidence shows a strong correlation between human mortality/morbidity and atmospheric ultrafine carbon particle (UFCP with aerodynamic diameter <18 nm). Theoretical and experimental studies have attempted to use mass concentration/dose as exposure dosimetry to construct the dose-response relationships. Yet little attention has been given to the problem of using surface area dosimetry in UFCP-related risk assessment. We introduced an integrated risk assessment framework based on surface area dosimetry to estimate the adverse health potential risk exposed to atmospheric UFCP. We used the neutrophil cells elevation effect as adverse health effect endpoint. We reanalyzed the published data of UFCP particle diameter ( dp) and associated specific surface area (SSA) to reconstruct their relationship through log-linear regression method. Our results show that smaller particle size ( dp < 51 nm) demonstrated steep slope (ln SSA = 11.0-2.03 ln dp), whereas larger particle size ( dp > 51 nm) was found close to the theoretical relationship (ln SSA = 8.65-1.20 ln dp). We applied the modeled relationships to estimate the surface area doses of human inhaled particles in specific scenarios or subgroups. Our findings show that Adult and Youth subgroups in northern Taiwan region posed the highest potential risk, indicating that the median 10% exceedance risks are 39.6 (95%CI: 36.4-42.9) fold compared to control based on neutrophil cells elevation effect. The result provides a preliminary aspect for discussing the human health adverse effect exposed to atmospheric UFCP for specific groups based on particle surface area dosimetry.

  7. Ultrafine particle and fine trace metal (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) pollution episodes induced by industrial emissions in Huelva, SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Camacho, R.; Rodríguez, S.; de la Rosa, J.; Sánchez de la Campa, A. M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; González-Castanedo, Y.; Garcia-Orellana, I.; Nava, S.

    2012-12-01

    Urban air quality impairment by ultrafine particles has become a matter of concern due to the adverse effects on human health. Most of the studies of ultrafine particles in urban air quality have focused on vehicle exhaust emissions. We studied how industrial emissions contribute to ultrafine particle concentrations in downwind urban ambient air. This research is based on experimental data collected in the ambient air of the industrial city of Huelva (SW Spain) over April 2008-December 2009 period (particle number, gaseous pollutants and black carbon concentrations and levels and chemical composition of PM10 and PM2.5 with daily and hourly resolution). This city is affected by emissions from the second largest Cu-smelter in Europe, phosphoric acid and fertilizer production plants and an oil refinery and petrochemical plant. Industrial emissions are the main cause of ultrafine particle episodes. When vehicle exhaust emissions are the main source, ultrafine particles typically show (24-h mean) concentrations within the range 14,700-5000 cm-3 (50th-1st), with 60% of these linked to this source and 30% to industrial emissions. In contrast, when daily mean levels of N are within the range 50,000-25,500 cm-3 (100th-70th), industrial and vehicle exhaust emissions accounted for 49 and 30%, respectively. High concentrations of toxic trace metals (As, Cu, Cd, Zn and Pb) were recorded when the study city suffered fumigations of the Cu-smelter plumes (e.g. 10-25 ng m-3 As, 1-2 ng m-3 Cd and >105 cm-3 of ultrafine particles). Because of these industrial emissions, ultrafine particle concentrations during daylight are about two times higher than those observed in other European cities. Recently, ultrafine particle emissions in vehicle exhausts have been subject to limit values in a recent stage of the EURO standards. Industrial emissions should also be considered.

  8. GENE PROFILING AND THE ROLE OF COAGULATION FACTORS IN INFLAMMATION SIGNALING IN HUMAN PULMONARY ARTERY ENDOTHELIAL CELLS FOLLOWING ULTRAFINE PARTICLES EXPOUSRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have linked exposures to particulate air pollution and increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, however, the mechanisms are not clear. Ultrafine particles within air pollution represent a particular area of concern because the small size fraction o...

  9. Ultrafine Angelica gigas powder normalizes ovarian hormone levels and has antiosteoporosis properties in ovariectomized rats: particle size effect.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong-Ok; Lee, Inae; Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Dong Eun; Lim, Jung Dae; Kang, Wie-Soo; Ko, Sanghoon

    2012-10-01

    The root of Angelica gigas (Korean angelica) is traditionally used to treat women's ailments that are caused by an impairment of menstrual blood flow and cycle irregularities. This study evaluated the effect particle size of Korean angelica powder on its efficacy for treating estrogen-related symptoms of menopause. Initially, Korean angelica roots were pulverized into ultrafine powder, and orally administered to the rats at a concentration of 500 mg/kg body weight for 8 weeks. The effects of Korean angelica powder particle size on extraction yield, contents of bioactive compounds (decursin and decursinol angelate), levels of serum ovarian hormones (estradiol and progesterone), reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), and experimental osteoporosis parameters (mineral density, strength, and histological features) were determined. A significant increase (fivefold) in the contents of decursin and decursinol angelate in the extract of the ultrafine Korean angelica powder was observed compared to coarse Korean angelica powder. Rats were divided into sham-operated or ovariectomized (OVX) groups that were fed coarse (CRS) or ultrafine (UF) ground Korean angelica root. The serum levels of estradiol in the OVX_UF group were 19.2% and 54.1% higher than that of OVX_CRS group. Serum bone-alkaline phosphatase/total-alkaline phosphatase index in the OVX_UF group was half that of the OVX_CRS group. In addition, less trabecular bone loss and thick cortical areas were observed in rats administered ultrafine powder. Therefore, ultrafine grinding may enhance the bioactivity of herbal medicines and be especially useful when their extracted forms lose bioactivity during processing, storage, and oral intake. PMID:23039111

  10. Ultrafine Angelica gigas Powder Normalizes Ovarian Hormone Levels and Has Antiosteoporosis Properties in Ovariectomized Rats: Particle Size Effect

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong-Ok; Lee, Inae; Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Dong Eun; Lim, Jung Dae; Kang, Wie-Soo; Ko, Sanghoon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The root of Angelica gigas (Korean angelica) is traditionally used to treat women's ailments that are caused by an impairment of menstrual blood flow and cycle irregularities. This study evaluated the effect particle size of Korean angelica powder on its efficacy for treating estrogen-related symptoms of menopause. Initially, Korean angelica roots were pulverized into ultrafine powder, and orally administered to the rats at a concentration of 500?mg/kg body weight for 8 weeks. The effects of Korean angelica powder particle size on extraction yield, contents of bioactive compounds (decursin and decursinol angelate), levels of serum ovarian hormones (estradiol and progesterone), reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), and experimental osteoporosis parameters (mineral density, strength, and histological features) were determined. A significant increase (fivefold) in the contents of decursin and decursinol angelate in the extract of the ultrafine Korean angelica powder was observed compared to coarse Korean angelica powder. Rats were divided into sham-operated or ovariectomized (OVX) groups that were fed coarse (CRS) or ultrafine (UF) ground Korean angelica root. The serum levels of estradiol in the OVX_UF group were 19.2% and 54.1% higher than that of OVX_CRS group. Serum bone-alkaline phosphatase/total-alkaline phosphatase index in the OVX_UF group was half that of the OVX_CRS group. In addition, less trabecular bone loss and thick cortical areas were observed in rats administered ultrafine powder. Therefore, ultrafine grinding may enhance the bioactivity of herbal medicines and be especially useful when their extracted forms lose bioactivity during processing, storage, and oral intake. PMID:23039111

  11. Composition of fine and ultrafine particles and source identification by stable isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gone, Jec-Kong

    Fine (da < 2.1 ?m) and ultra-fine (da < 0.1?m) atmosphere particulate samples collected from two sites in the United States were analyzed for elemental compositions by Instrumental, Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The eastern site samples were collected at the Great Smoky Mountain National Park from July 15 to August 25, 1995. The western site samples were collected from a rooftop in Pasadena, California over one winter month in January/February, 1996. Elemental concentrations determined by INAA for the eastern site samples were compared with results from samples (da < 2.4 ?m) collected concurrently but analyzed by other techniques. The results showed consistency between different analytical techniques. Factor Analysis (FA) and Absolute Factor Score-Multiple Linear Regression (AFS-MLR) methods were used to identify sources and their contributions to fine particulate samples at the eastern site. The results showed that the crustal contribution to fine aerosol mass was significant around July 24-26, 1995, and the coal combustion contribution peaked around August 14-18, 1995. The average contribution from crustal sources to the fine particulate mass was 7 +/- 3% for the 2.1 ?m samples and 11 +/- 4% for the 2.4 ?m samples. The mass difference may be due to the different maximum size of the particles. The average contribution from combustion sources was 77 +/- 4% for the 2.1 ?m samples and 90 +/- 6% for the 2.4 ?m samples. Elemental patterns were used to identify sources of ultra-fine particles. Motor vehicle emissions might be the cause of the increase in the ultra-fine particle concentration of Al and Fe at the western site. Variations in stable isotope ratios of 130Ba/138 Ba, 121Sb/123Sb, 84Sr/ 86Sr and 79Br/81Br were investigated using INAA. This technique was applied to fine particulate samples with sources identified by FA. The results showed that the 130Ba/ 138Ba ratio of the dust sample was 0.00151 +/- 0.00008, and the ratio was 0.00109 +/- 0.00003 for the combustion sample. This suggests that the 130Ba/138Ba ratio can be used to separate contributions from soil and combustion sources even if they have similar chemical compositions. Crustal material may have a lower 121Sb/ 123Sb ratio than the combustion source of fine particles. The 84Sr/86Sr and 79Br/81Br ratios also showed differences between these samples, but the differences were not greater than the statistical uncertainty of the measurements. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  12. Lung cancer risk in relation to traffic-related nano/ultrafine particle-bound PAHs exposure: a preliminary probabilistic assessment.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chung-Min; Chio, Chia-Pin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Ju, Yun-Ru; Li, Wen-Hsuan; Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, Szu-Chieh; Ling, Min-Pei

    2011-06-15

    Exposures to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been linked to human lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess lung cancer risk caused by inhalation exposure to nano/ultrafine particle-bound PAHs at the population level in Taiwan appraised with recent published data. A human respiratory tract model was linked with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to estimate deposition fraction and internal organic-specific PAHs doses. A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed to estimate potential lung cancer risk. We reanalyzed particle size distribution, total-PAHs, particle-bound benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P) and PM concentrations. A dose-response profile describing the relationships between external B[a]P concentration and lung cancer risk response was constructed based on population attributable fraction (PAF). We found that 90% probability lung cancer risks ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-4) for traffic-related nano and ultrafine particle-bound PAHs, indicating a potential lung cancer risk. The particle size-specific PAF-based excess annual lung cancer incidence rate due to PAHs exposure was estimated to be less than 1 per 100,000 population, indicating a mild risk factor for lung cancer. We concluded that probabilistic risk assessment linked PAF for limiting cumulative PAHs emissions to reduce lung cancer risk plays a prominent role in future government risk assessment program. PMID:21458918

  13. On the spatial distribution and evolution of ultrafine particles in Barcelona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Wenger, J.; Gmez-Moreno, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Sources and evolution of ultrafine particles were investigated both horizontally and vertically in the large urban agglomerate of Barcelona, Spain. Within the SAPUSS project (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies), a large number of instruments was deployed simultaneously at different monitoring sites (road, two urban background, regional background, urban tower 150 m a.s.l., urban background tower site 80 m a.s.l.) during a 4 week period in September-October 2010. Particle number concentrations (N>5 nm) are highly correlated with black carbon (BC) at all sites only under strong vehicular traffic influences. By contrast, under cleaner atmospheric conditions (low condensation sink, CS) such correlation diverges towards much higher N/BC ratios at all sites, indicating additional sources of particles including secondary production of freshly nucleated particles. Size-resolved aerosol distributions (N10-500) as well as particle number concentrations (N>5 nm) allow us to identify three types of nucleation and growth events: (1) a regional type event originating in the whole study region and impacting almost simultaneously the urban city of Barcelona and the surrounding urban background area; (2) a regional type event impacting only the regional background area but not the urban agglomerate; (3) an urban type event which originates only within the city centre but whose growth continues while transported away from the city to the regional background. Furthermore, during these clean air days, higher N are found at tower level than at ground level only in the city centre whereas such a difference is not so pronounced at the remote urban background tower. In other words, this study suggests that the column of air above the city ground level possesses the optimal combination between low CS and high vapour source, hence enhancing the concentrations of freshly nucleated particles. By contrast, within stagnant polluted atmospheric conditions, higher N and BC concentrations are always measured at ground level relative to tower level at all sites. Our study suggests that the city centre of Barcelona is a source of non-volatile traffic primary particles (29-39% of N>5 nm), but other sources, including secondary freshly nucleated particles contribute up to 61-71% of particle number (N>5 nm) at all sites. We suggest that organic compounds evaporating from freshly emitted traffic particles are a possible candidate for new particle formation within the city and urban plume.

  14. Estimates of HVAC filtration efficiency for fine and ultrafine particles of outdoor origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Parham; Zhao, Dan; Stephens, Brent

    2014-12-01

    This work uses 194 outdoor particle size distributions (PSDs) from the literature to estimate single-pass heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) filter removal efficiencies for PM2.5 and ultrafine particles (UFPs: <100 nm) of outdoor origin. The PSDs were first fitted to tri-modal lognormal distributions and then mapped to size-resolved particle removal efficiency of a wide range of HVAC filters identified in the literature. Filters included those with a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) of 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16, as well as HEPA filters. We demonstrate that although the MERV metric defined in ASHRAE Standard 52.2 does not explicitly account for UFP or PM2.5 removal efficiency, estimates of filtration efficiency for both size fractions increased with increasing MERV. Our results also indicate that outdoor PSD characteristics and assumptions for particle density and typical size-resolved infiltration factors (in the absence of HVAC filtration) do not drastically impact estimates of HVAC filter removal efficiencies for PM2.5. The impact of these factors is greater for UFPs; however, they are also somewhat predictable. Despite these findings, our results also suggest that MERV alone cannot always be used to predict UFP or PM2.5 removal efficiency given the various size-resolved removal efficiencies of different makes and models, particularly for MERV 7 and MERV 12 filters. This information improves knowledge of how the MERV designation relates to PM2.5 and UFP removal efficiency for indoor particles of outdoor origin. Results can be used to simplify indoor air quality modeling efforts and inform standards and guidelines.

  15. Filter performance of n99 and n95 facepiece respirators against viruses and ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Honda, Takeshi; Adhikari, Atin; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2008-07-01

    The performance of three filtering facepiece respirators (two models of N99 and one N95) challenged with an inert aerosol (NaCl) and three virus aerosols (enterobacteriophages MS2 and T4 and Bacillus subtilis phage)-all with significant ultrafine components-was examined using a manikin-based protocol with respirators sealed on manikins. Three inhalation flow rates, 30, 85, and 150 l min(-1), were tested. The filter penetration and the quality factor were determined. Between-respirator and within-respirator comparisons of penetration values were performed. At the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), >3% of MS2 virions penetrated through filters of both N99 models at an inhalation flow rate of 85 l min(-1). Inhalation airflow had a significant effect upon particle penetration through the tested respirator filters. The filter quality factor was found suitable for making relative performance comparisons. The MPPS for challenge aerosols was <0.1 mum in electrical mobility diameter for all tested respirators. Mean particle penetration (by count) was significantly increased when the size fraction of <0.1 mum was included as compared to particles >0.1 mum. The filtration performance of the N95 respirator approached that of the two models of N99 over the range of particle sizes tested ( approximately 0.02 to 0.5 mum). Filter penetration of the tested biological aerosols did not exceed that of inert NaCl aerosol. The results suggest that inert NaCl aerosols may generally be appropriate for modeling filter penetration of similarly sized virions. PMID:18477653

  16. Children exposure assessment to ultrafine particles and black carbon: The role of transport and cooking activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Stabile, L.; Morawska, L.; Russi, A.

    2013-11-01

    An accurate evaluation of the airborne particle dose-response relationship requires detailed measurements of the actual particle concentration levels that people are exposed to, in every microenvironment in which they reside. The aim of this work was to perform an exposure assessment of children in relation to two different aerosol species: ultrafine particles (UFPs) and black carbon (BC). To this purpose, personal exposure measurements, in terms of UFP and BC concentrations, were performed on 103 children aged 8-11 years (10.1 1.1 years) using hand-held particle counters and aethalometers. Simultaneously, a time-activity diary and a portable GPS were used to determine the children's daily time-activity pattern and estimate their inhaled dose of UFPs and BC. The median concentration to which the study population was exposed was found to be comparable to the high levels typically detected in urban traffic microenvironments, in terms of both particle number (2.2 104 part. cm-3) and BC (3.8 ?g m-3) concentrations. Daily inhaled doses were also found to be relatively high and were equal to 3.35 1011 part. day-1 and 3.92 101 ?g day-1 for UFPs and BC, respectively. Cooking and using transportation were recognized as the main activities contributing to overall daily exposure, when normalized according to their corresponding time contribution for UFPs and BC, respectively. Therefore, UFPs and BC could represent tracers of children exposure to particulate pollution from indoor cooking activities and transportation microenvironments, respectively.

  17. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-09-30

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

  18. Exposure to carbon monoxide, fine particle mass, and ultrafine particle number in Jakarta, Indonesia: effect of commute mode.

    PubMed

    Both, Adam F; Westerdahl, Dane; Fruin, Scott; Haryanto, Budi; Marshall, Julian D

    2013-01-15

    We measured real-time exposure to PM(2.5), ultrafine PM (particle number) and carbon monoxide (CO) for commuting workers school children, and traffic police, in Jakarta, Indonesia. In total, we measured exposures for 36 individuals covering 93 days. Commuters in private cars experienced mean (st dev) exposures of 22 (9.4) ppm CO, 91 (38) ?g/m(3)PM(2.5), and 290 (150)10(3) particles cm(-3). Mean concentrations were higher in public transport than in private cars for PM(2.5) (difference in means: 22%) and particle counts (54%), but not CO, likely reflecting in-vehicle particle losses in private cars owing to air-conditioning. However, average commute times were longer for private car commuters than public transport commuters (in our sample, 24% longer: 3.0 vs. 2.3 h per day). Commute and traffic-related exposures experienced by Jakarta residents are among the highest in the world, owing to high on-road concentrations and multi-hour commutes. PMID:23314255

  19. Personal day-time exposure to ultrafine particles in different microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianwei; Kraus, Ute; Schneider, Alexandra; Hampel, Regina; Pitz, Mike; Breitner, Susanne; Wolf, Kathrin; Hnninen, Otto; Peters, Annette; Cyrys, Josef

    2015-03-01

    In order to assess the personal exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) during individual day-time activities and to investigate the impact of different microenvironments on exposure, we measured personal exposure to particle number concentrations (PNC), a surrogate for UFP, among 112 non-smoking participants in Augsburg, Germany over a nearly two-year period from March 2007 to December 2008. We obtained 337 personal PNC measurements from 112 participants together with dairies of their activities and locations. The measurements lasted on average 5.5h and contained on average 330 observations. In addition, ambient PNC were measured at an urban background stationary monitoring site. Personal PNC were highly variable between measurements (IQR of mean: 11780-24650cm(-3)) and also within a single measurement. Outdoor personal PNC in traffic environments were about two times higher than in non-traffic environments. Higher indoor personal PNC were associated with activities like cooking, being in a bistro or exposure to passive smoking. Overall, personal and stationary PNC were weakly to moderately correlated (r<0.41). Personal PNC were much higher than stationary PNC in traffic (ratio: 1.5), when shopping (ratio: 2.4), and indoors with water vapor (ratio: 2.5). Additive mixed models were applied to predict personal PNC by participants' activities and locations. Traffic microenvironments were significant determinants for outdoor personal PNC. Being in a bistro, passive smoking, and cooking contributed significantly to an increased indoor personal PNC. PMID:25458919

  20. [Adverse effects of ultrafine particles on the cardiovascular system and its mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Yi, Tie-ci; Li, Jian-ping

    2014-12-18

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the major threats to human. Air pollution, which , as it become a problem too serious to be ignored in China, is known to be an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Among all pollutants, ultrafine particles ( UFPs) , defined as particles with their diameter less than 0. 1 f.Lm, are a specific composition. They are very small in size, large in quantity and surface area, and most important, capable of passing through the air-blood barrier. These unique features of UFPs make them special in their impact on cardiovascular system. Nowadays, the influence of UFPs on the cardiovascular system has become a hot topic. On the one side, studies have shown that UFPs can cause inflammation and oxidative stress in the lung, and then induce systemic inflammation by releasing cytokine and reactive oxygen species into the circulation. On the other side, UFPs themselves can "spillout"into the circulation and interact with their targets. By this way, UFPs directly affect endothelial cells, myocardial cells and the autonomic nervous system, which ultimately result in increased cardiovascular events. We intend to make an overview about the recent progress about the influence of UFPs on human cardiovascular disease and the related mechanisms, and argue for more attention to this issue. PMID:25651605

  1. Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Joshua, S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Reich, Alexander, H.; Deshpande, Shyam J.; Kaushik, Geetanjali; Chel, Arvind; Marshall, Julian D.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2011-08-01

    Concentrations of air pollutants from vehicles are elevated along roadways, indicating that human exposure in transportation microenvironments may not be adequately characterized by centrally located monitors. We report results from 180 h of real-time measurements of fine particle and black carbon mass concentration (PM 2.5, BC) and ultrafine particle number concentration (PN) inside a common vehicle, the auto-rickshaw, in New Delhi, India. Measured exposure concentrations are much higher in this study (geometric mean for 60 trip-averaged concentrations: 190 ?g m -3 PM 2.5, 42 ?g m -3 BC, 280 10 3 particles cm -3; GSD 1.3 for all three pollutants) than reported for transportation microenvironments in other megacities. In-vehicle concentrations exceeded simultaneously measured ambient levels by 1.5 for PM 2.5, 3.6 for BC, and 8.4 for PN. Short-duration peak concentrations (averaging time: 10 s), attributable to exhaust plumes of nearby vehicles, were greater than 300 ?g m -3 for PM 2.5, 85 ?g m -3 for BC, and 650 10 3 particles cm -3 for PN. The incremental increase of within-vehicle concentration above ambient levelswhich we attribute to in- and near-roadway emission sourcesaccounted for 30%, 68% and 86% of time-averaged in-vehicle PM 2.5, BC and PN concentrations, respectively. Based on these results, we estimate that one's exposure during a daily commute by auto-rickshaw in Delhi is as least as large as full-day exposures experienced by urban residents of many high-income countries. This study illuminates an environmental health concern that may be common in many populous, low-income cities.

  2. Quinones and Aromatic Chemical Compounds in Particulate Matter Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Implications for Ultrafine Particle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Korge, Paavo; Weiss, James N.; Li, Ning; Venkatesen, M. Indira; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Particulate pollutants cause adverse health effects through the generation of oxidative stress. A key question is whether these effects are mediated by the particles or their chemical compounds. In this article we show that aliphatic, aromatic, and polar organic compounds, fractionated from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), exert differential toxic effects in RAW 264.7 cells. Cellular analyses showed that the quinone-enriched polar fraction was more potent than the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)enriched aromatic fraction in O2? generation, decrease of membrane potential (??m), loss of mitochondrial membrane mass, and induction of apoptosis. A major effect of the polar fraction was to promote cyclosporin A (CsA)sensitive permeability transition pore (PTP) opening in isolated liver mitochondria. This opening effect is dependent on a direct effect on the PTP at low doses as well as on an effect on ??m at high doses in calcium (Ca2+)-loaded mitochondria. The direct PTP effect was mimicked by redox-cycling DEP quinones. Although the aliphatic fraction failed to perturb mitochondrial function, the aromatic fraction increased the Ca2+ retention capacity at low doses and induced mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in ??m at high doses. This swelling effect was mostly CsA insensitive and could be reproduced by a mixture of PAHs present in DEPs. These chemical effects on isolated mitochondria could be reproduced by intact DEPs as well as ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs). In contrast, commercial polystyrene nanoparticles failed to exert mitochondrial effects. These results suggest that DEP and UFP effects on the PTP and ??m are mediated by adsorbed chemicals rather than the particles themselves. PMID:15471724

  3. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2005-03-31

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

  4. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstdter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Kthner, R.; Baars, H.; Bange, J.; Lampert, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard Karls University of Tbingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturised by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space-saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time to less than 1.3 s. Each system was characterised in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated in this study with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 11 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs (?N). Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on 2 days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the boundary layer, derived from backscatter signals of a portable Raman lidar POLLYXT, allows a quick overview of the current vertical structure of atmospheric particles. Ground-based aerosol number concentrations are consistent with the results from flights in heights of a few metres. In addition, a direct comparison of ALADINA aerosol data and ground-based aerosol data, sampling the air at the same location for more than 1 h, shows comparable values within the range of 20 %. MASC was operated simultaneously with complementary flight patterns. It is equipped with the same meteorological instruments that offer the possibility to determine turbulent fluxes. Therefore, additional information about meteorological conditions was collected in the lowest part of the atmosphere. Vertical profiles up to 1000 m in altitude indicate a high variability with distinct layers of aerosol, especially for the small particles of a few nanometres in diameter on 1 particular day. The stratification was almost neutral and two significant aerosol layers were detected with total aerosol number concentrations up to 17 000 3400 cm-3 between 180 and 220 m altitude and 14 000 2800 cm-3 between 550 and 650 m. Apart from those layers, the aerosol distribution was well mixed and reached the total number concentration of less than 8000 1600 cm-3. During another day, the distribution of the small particles in the lowermost ABL was related to the stratification, with continuously decreasing number concentrations from 16 000 3200 cm-3 to a minimum of 4000 800 cm-3 at the top of the inversion at 320 m. Above this, the total number concentration was rather constant. In the region of 500 to 600 m altitude, a significant difference of both CPCs was observed. This event occurred during the boundary layer development in the morning and represents a particle burst within the ABL.

  5. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in an urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Huang, W.-R.; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2013-09-01

    An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E) in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan, during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM1 (d ≤ 1 μm), and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D). The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal), accumulation mode (Nacu), Aitken mode (NAitken), and nucleation mode (Nnuc) particles were 13.9 × 103 cm-3, 1.2 × 103 cm-3, 6.1 × 103 cm-3, and 6.6 × 103 cm-3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) accounted for 91% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm), indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc / NOx ratio of 192.4 cm-3 ppbv-1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times of the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Averages (± 1σ) of the diameter growth rate (GR) and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10, were 11.9 ± 10.6 nm h-1 and 6.9 ± 3.0 cm-3 s-1, respectively. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB · SO2/CS, for new particle formation (NPF) events suggested that photooxidation of SO2 was likely one of the major mechanisms for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover, it was revealed that the particle growth rate correlated exponentially with the photolysis of ozone, implying that the condensable vapors were produced mostly from photooxidation reactions. In addition, this study also revealed that Nnuc exhibited a quadratic relationship with J10. The quadratic relationship was inferred as a result of aerosol dynamics and featured NPF processes in urban areas.

  6. Measurements of fine and ultrafine particles formation in photocopy centers in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Der-Jen

    This study investigates the levels of particulate matter smaller than 2.5 ?m (PM 2.5) and some selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 12 photocopy centers in Taiwan from November 2004 to June 2005. The results of BTEXS (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and styrene) measurements indicated that toluene had the highest concentration in all photocopy centers, while the concentration of the other four compounds varied among the 12 photocopy centers. The average background-corrected eight-hour PM 2.5 in the 12 photocopy centers ranged from 10 to 83 ?g m -3 with an average of 40 ?g m -3. The 24-h indoor PM 2.5 at the photocopy centers was estimated and at two photocopy centers exceeded 100 ?g m -3, the 24-h indoor PM 2.5 guideline recommended by the Taiwan EPA. The ozone level and particle size distribution at another photocopy center were monitored and indicated that the ozone level increased when the photocopying started and the average ozone level at some photocopy centers during business hour may exceed the value (50 ppb) recommended by the Taiwan EPA. The particle size distribution monitored during photocopying indicated that the emitted particles were much smaller than the original toner powders. Additionally, the number concentration of particles that were smaller than 0.5 ?m was found to increase during the first hour of photocopying and it increased as the particle size decreased. The ultrafine particle (UFP, <100 nm) dominated the number concentration and the peak concentration appeared at sizes of under 50 nm. A high number concentration of UFP was found with a peak value of 1E+8 particles cm -3 during photocopying. The decline of UFP concentration was observed after the first hour and the decline is likely attributable to the surface deposition of charged particles, which are charged primarily by the diffusion charging of corona devices in the photocopier. This study concludes that ozone and UFP concentrations in photocopy centers should be concerned in view of indoor air quality and human health. The corona devices in photocopiers and photocopier-emitted VOCs have the potential to initiate indoor air chemistry during photocopying and result in the formation of UFP.

  7. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstdter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Lampert, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Kthner, R.; Bange, J.; Baars, H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN-situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard-Karls University of Tbingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturized by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time. Each system was characterized in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 6 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs. Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on two days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the boundary layer, derived from backscatter signals of a portable Raman lidar POLLYXT, allows a quick overview of the current vertical structure of atmospheric particles. Ground-based aerosol number concentrations are consistent with the results from flights in heights of a few meters. In addition, a direct comparison of ALADINA aerosol data and ground-based aerosol data, sampling the air at the same location, shows comparable values. MASC was operated simultaneously with complementary flight patterns. It is equipped with the same meteorological instruments that offer the possibility to determine turbulent fluxes. Therefore additional information about meteorological conditions was collected in the lowest part of the atmosphere. Vertical profiles up to 1000 m altitude indicate a high variability with distinct layers of aerosol especially for the small particles of a few nanometers in diameter. Particle bursts were observed on one day during the boundary layer development in the morning.

  8. Correlation analysis of noise and ultrafine particle counts in a street canyon.

    PubMed

    Can, A; Rademaker, M; Van Renterghem, T; Mishra, V; Van Poppel, M; Touhafi, A; Theunis, J; De Baets, B; Botteldooren, D

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP, diameter<100 nm) are very likely to negatively affect human health, as underlined by some epidemiological studies. Unfortunately, further investigation and monitoring are hindered by the high cost involved in measuring these UFP. Therefore we investigated the possibility to correlate UFP counts with data coming from low-cost sensors, most notably noise sensors. Analyses are based on an experiment where UFP counts, noise levels, traffic counts, nitrogen oxide (NO, NO(2) and their combination NO(x)) concentrations, and meteorological data were collected simultaneously in a street canyon with a traffic intensity of 3200 vehicles/day, over a 3-week period during summer. Previous reports that NO(x) concentrations could be used as a proxy to UFP monitoring were verified in our setup. Traffic intensity or noise level data were found to correlate with UFP to a lesser degree than NO(x) did. This can be explained by the important influence of meteorological conditions (mainly wind and humidity), influencing UFP dynamics. Although correlations remain moderate, sound levels are more correlated to UFP in the 20-30 nm range. The particles in this size range have indeed rather short atmospheric residence times, and are thus more closely short-term traffic-related. Finally, the UFP estimates were significantly improved by grouping data with similar relative humidity and wind conditions. By doing this, we were able to devise noise indicators that correlate moderately with total particle counts, reaching a Spearman correlation of R=0.62. Prediction with noise indicators is even comparable to the more-expensive-to-measure NO(x) for the smallest UFP, showing the potential of using microphones to estimate UFP counts. PMID:21075426

  9. Exposure to Ultrafine Particles from Ambient Air and Oxidative StressInduced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Elvira Vaclavik; Forchhammer, Lykke; Mller, Peter; Simonsen, Jacob; Glasius, Marianne; Whlin, Peter; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Loft, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Background Particulate matter, especially ultrafine particles (UFPs), may cause health effects through generation of oxidative stress, with resulting damage to DNA and other macromolecules. Objective We investigated oxidative damage to DNA and related repair capacity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during controlled exposure to urban air particles with assignment of number concentration (NC) to four size modes with average diameters of 12, 23, 57, and 212 nm. Design Twenty-nine healthy adults participated in a randomized, two-factor cross-over study with or without biking exercise for 180 min and with exposure to particles (NC 6169-15362/cm3) or filtered air (NC 91-542/cm3) for 24 hr. Methods The levels of DNA strand breaks (SBs), oxidized purines as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycolase (FPG) sites, and activity of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) in PBMCs were measured by the Comet assay. mRNA levels of OGG1, nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X-type motif 1 (NUDT1), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) were determined by real-time reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction. Results Exposure to UFPs for 6 and 24 hr significantly increased the levels of SBs and FPG sites, with a further insignificant increase after physical exercise. The OGG1 activity and expression of OGG1, NUDT1, and HO1 were unaltered. There was a significant doseresponse relationship between NC and DNA damage, with the 57-nm mode as the major contributor to effects. Concomitant exposure to ozone, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide had no influence. Conclusion Our results indicate that UFPs, especially the 57-nm soot fraction from vehicle emissions, causes systemic oxidative stress with damage to DNA and no apparent compensatory up-regulation of DNA repair within 24 hr. PMID:17687444

  10. Ultrafine particle exposures while walking, cycling, and driving along an urban residential roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, David C.; Lee, Eon S.; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yifang

    2013-07-01

    Elevated concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs, <0.1 ?m), which have been linked to adverse health effects, are commonly found along roadways. This study reports UFP and PM2.5 concentrations and respiratory exposures among four transportation modes on an urban residential street in Santa Monica, California while walking, cycling, and driving with windows open and windows closed (with air recirculation on). Repeated measurements were made for nine days during morning (7:30-9:30), afternoon (12:30-14:30), and evening (17:00-19:00) periods. Median UFP concentrations ranged 1-3 104 particles cm-3, were 70% lower in afternoon or evening periods compared to the morning, and were 60% lower when driving with windows closed than open. Median PM2.5 ranged 2-15 ?g m-3, well below the annual National Ambient Air Quality standard of 15 ?g m-3. Respiratory UFP exposure (particles inhaled trip-1) was 2 times higher while driving with windows open, 15 times higher when cycling, and 30 times higher walking, than driving with windows closed. During one evening session with perpendicular rather than parallel wind conditions, absolute UFP concentration was 80% higher, suggesting influence of off-roadway sources. Under parallel wind conditions, a parameter called emissions-weighted traffic volume, used to account for higher and lower emitting vehicles, was correlated with beach-site-subtracted UFP using second-order polynomial model (R2 = 0.61). Based on this model, an 83% on-roadway UFP reduction could be achieved by (1) requiring all trucks to meet California 2007 model-year engine standards, (2) reducing light-duty vehicle flows by 25%, and (3) replacing high-emitting light-duty vehicles (pre 1978) with newer 2010 fleet-average vehicles.

  11. Exposure to ultrafine and fine particles and noise during cycling and driving in 11 Dutch cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogaard, Hanna; Borgman, Frank; Kamminga, Jaap; Hoek, Gerard

    Recent studies have suggested that exposures during traffic participation may be associated with adverse health effects. Traffic participation involves relatively short but high exposures. Potentially relevant exposures include ultrafine particles, fine particles (PM 2.5) and noise. Simultaneously, detailed real time exposure of particle number concentration (PNC), PM 2.5 and noise has been measured while driving and cycling 12 predefined routes of approximately 10-20 min duration. Sampling took place in eleven medium-sized Dutch cities on eleven weekdays in August till October 2006. To investigate variability in cyclists exposure, we systematically collected information on meteorology, GPS coordinates, type of road, traffic intensity, passing vehicles and mopeds while cycling. The overall mean PNC of car drivers was 5% higher than the mean PNC of cyclists. The overall mean concentration of PM 2.5 in the car was 11% higher than during cycling. Slightly higher 1-min peak concentrations were measured in the car (PNC 14%; PM 2.5 29% for 95-percentiles). Shorter duration peaks of PNC were higher during cycling (43% for 99-percentile of 1-s averages). Peaks in PNC typically last for less than 10 s. A large variability of exposure was found within and between routes. Factors that significantly predicted PNC variability during cycling were: passing vehicles (mopeds, cars), waiting for traffic lights, passing different types of (large) intersections and bicycle lanes and bike paths close to motorized traffic. No relation was found between PM 2.5 and those predictor variables. The correlation between PNC and noise was moderate (median 0.34). PM 2.5 had very low correlations with PNC and noise. PNC and PM 2.5 exposure of car drivers was slightly higher than that of cyclists. PNC was largely uncorrelated with PM 2.5 and reflected local traffic variables more than PM 2.5. Different factors were associated with high PNC and high noise exposures.

  12. Satellite-derived estimates of ultrafine particle concentrations over eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, Paola; Spracklen, Dominick; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-09-01

    High concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFP, i.e., particles with diameter < 100 nm) impact both human health and Earth's climate. Recent innovations in remote sensing technologies and data retrievals offer the potential for predicting UFP concentrations based on data from satellite-borne instrumentation. Herein we present a physically based statistical algorithm to estimate UFP concentrations across eastern North America using remotely sensed aerosol optical depth, ngstrom exponent, ultraviolet solar radiation flux, and ammonia and sulfur dioxide concentrations. The proposed algorithm is built and independently evaluated using an array of in situ observations. The algorithm is able to capture up to 60% of the variability in daily measured UFP number concentrations at a regionally representative reference site and is thus applied to generate seasonal UFP concentration estimates across eastern North America. The resulting UFP concentrations are cross-evaluated with simulations from a global aerosol microphysics model. There is a negative bias in the model output relative to the satellite-driven proxy, which is largest (up to 76%) in summer and may be due to overestimation of UFP from the satellite-based algorithm derived herein, due to the higher availability of remote sensing data in clear-sky conditions or uncertainty in the model simulation of new particle formation. Nevertheless, the model and algorithm indicate similar spatial and seasonal variability (spatial correlation coefficients of 0.10 to 0.56), indicating the value of the satellite-based UFP proxy in global and regional model evaluation exercises and in efforts to identify regions where future in situ data collection should be prioritized.

  13. Levels of ultrafine particles in different microenvironments--implications to children exposure.

    PubMed

    Diapouli, E; Chaloulakou, A; Spyrellis, N

    2007-12-15

    Indoor and outdoor ultrafine particles (UFPs) (0.01 to greater than 1 microm) concentration levels were examined in the area of Athens during cold period of 2003 and 2004. Seven primary schools, located in areas with different characteristics of urbanization and traffic density, as well as a typical suburban residence, were monitored. Moreover, in-vehicle concentration levels, while driving along major avenues and in the heavy-trafficked centre of Athens, were measured (mean route duration: 45 min). UFPs number concentration was monitored by condensation particle counter (model CPC 3007), with a logging time interval of 1 min. The highest mean indoor concentrations were observed in a small carpet-covered library and a teachers' office (8-hour mean equal to 52.6x10(3) particles/cm(3) and 50.2x10(3) particles/cm(3), respectively), at the same school unit. The highest outdoor concentrations (8-hour mean equal to 36.9x10(3) particles/cm(3) and 38.8x10(3) particles/cm(3)) were measured at two schools, both affected by heavy traffic. Finally, the highest in-vehicle concentrations (148.0x10(3)-173.0x10(3) particles/cm(3)) were measured in central commercial areas of Athens during, on average, 55 min drives. Indoor-to-outdoor concentration (I/O) ratios were below 1.00 at all sites. The largest ratio (0.88) was observed in the residence, during a day when there was cleaning activity in the room monitored. Outdoor concentrations diurnal cycles, both outside the schools and the residence, were closely related to traffic. Indoor concentrations inside schools were relatively stable in classrooms. Nevertheless, number concentrations exhibited variability when there were significant changes in room occupancy. Diurnal variation of indoor concentrations at the residence followed the respective outdoor one with a delay of 1 h or less, in the absence of strong indoor sources, indicating the major contribution of outdoor UFPs to the indoor concentration levels. The present work is the first effort to examine UFPs indoor and outdoor concentration levels in the area of Athens. The obtained concentration data give an insight on the concentration levels to which children may be exposed. They may be also very useful in epidemiological studies, in order to estimate children total personal exposure though the calculation of exposures received in different microenvironments. This kind of studies may contribute to the design of effective policies and mitigation measures for the protection of public health. PMID:17888492

  14. Effect of cabin ventilation rate on ultrafine particle exposure inside automobiles.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Luke D; de Dear, Richard J; Morawska, Lidia

    2010-05-01

    We alternately measured on-road and in-vehicle ultrafine (<100 nm) particle (UFP) concentration for 5 passenger vehicles that comprised an age range of 18 years. A range of cabin ventilation settings were assessed during 301 trips through a 4 km road tunnel in Sydney, Australia. Outdoor air flow (ventilation) rates under these settings were quantified on open roads using tracer gas techniques. Significant variability in tunnel trip average median in-cabin/on-road (I/O) UFP ratios was observed (0.08 to approximately 1.0). Based on data spanning all test automobiles and ventilation settings, a positive linear relationship was found between outdoor air flow rate and I/O ratio, with the former accounting for a substantial proportion of variation in the latter (R(2) = 0.81). UFP concentrations recorded in-cabin during tunnel travel were significantly higher than those reported by comparable studies performed on open roadways. A simple mathematical model afforded the ability to predict tunnel trip average in-cabin UFP concentrations with good accuracy. Our data indicate that under certain conditions, in-cabin UFP exposures incurred during tunnel travel may contribute significantly to daily exposure. The UFP exposure of automobile occupants appears strongly related to their choice of ventilation setting and vehicle. PMID:20369882

  15. Ambient ultrafine particles reduce endothelial nitric oxide production via S-glutathionylation of eNOS

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunfeng; Navab, Mohamad; Shen, Melody; Hill, James; Pakbin, Payam; Sioutas, Constantinos; Hsiai, Tzung; Li, Rongsong

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate pollutants is intimately linked to vascular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses with clinical relevance to atherosclerosis. Particulate matter (PM) has been reported to induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we tested whether ambient ultrafine particles (UFP, diameter < 200 nm) modulate eNOS activity in terms of nitric oxide (NO) production via protein S-glutathionylation. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) with UFP significantly reduced NO production. UFP-mediated reduction in NO production was restored in the presence of JNK inhibitor (SP600125), NADPH oxidase inhibitor (Apocynin), anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine), and superoxide dismutase mimetics (Tempol and MnTMPyP). UFP exposure increased the GSSG/GSH ratio and eNOS S-glutathionylation, whereas over-expression of Glutaredoxin-1 (to inhibit S-glutathionylation) restored UFP-mediated reduction in NO production by nearly 80%. Thus, our findings suggest that eNOS S-glutathionylation is a potential mechanism underlying ambient UFP-induced reduction of NO production. PMID:23751346

  16. Ultrafine particle content in exhaled breath condensate in airways of asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Benor, Shira; Alcalay, Yfat; Domany, Keren Armoni; Gut, Guy; Soferman, Ruth; Kivity, Shmuel; Fireman, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    Air pollution triggers and exacerbates airway inflammation. Particulate material (PM) in ambient is characterized as being coarse (PM 10, aerodynamic diameter range 2.5-10?m), fine (PM 2.5, 2.5-0.1?m) and ultrafine (UFP, nano-sized, <0.1?m). It is known that smaller inhaled PM produced more inflammation than larger ones. Most data on human exposure to PM are based on environmental monitoring. We evaluated the effect of individual exposure to UFP on functional respiratory parameters and airway inflammation in 52 children aged 6-18?years referred to the Pulmonary and Allergic Diseases Laboratory due to respiratory symptoms. Spirometry, bronchial provocation challenge, induced sputum (IS), exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and franctional exhaled nitric oxide evaluations were performed by conventional methods. UFP content in EBC was analyzed by using a NanoSight Light Microscope LM20. The total EBC UFP content correlated with wheezing (r = 0.28, p = 0.04), breath symptom score (r = 0.3, p = 0.03), and sputum eosinophilia (R = 0.64, p = 0.005). The percent of EBC particles in the nano-sized range also correlated with wheezing (r = 0.36, p = 0.007), breath symptom score (r = 0.33, p ? 0.02), and sputum eosinophilia (r = 0.72, p = 0.001). Respiratory symptoms and airway inflammation positively correlated to UFP content in EBC of symptomatic children. PMID:25830607

  17. Morphology of Nano and Micro Fiber Structures in Ultrafine Particles Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmer, Dusan; Vincent, Ivo; Fenyk, Jan; Petras, David; Zatloukal, Martin; Sambaer, Wannes; Zdimal, Vladimir

    2011-07-15

    Selected procedures permitting to prepare homogeneous nanofibre structures of the desired morphology by employing a suitable combination of variables during the electrospinning process are presented. A comparison (at the same pressure drop) was made of filtration capabilities of planar polyurethane nanostructures formed exclusively by nanofibres, space polycarbonate nanostructures having bead spacers, structures formed by a combination of polymethyl methacrylate micro- and nanofibres and polypropylene meltblown microstructures, through which ultrafine particles of ammonium sulphate 20-400 nm in size were filtered. The structures studied were described using a new digital image analysis technique based on black and white images obtained by scanning electron microscopy. More voluminous structures modified with distance microspheres and having a greater thickness and mass per square area of the material, i.e. structures possessing better mechanical properties, demanded so much in nanostructures, enable preparation of filters having approximately the same free volume fraction as flat nanofibre filters but an increased effective fibre surface area, changed pore size morphology and, consequently, a higher filter quality.

  18. An hourly regression model for ultrafine particles in a near-highway urban area

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Allison P.; Collins, Caitlin; Naumova, Elena N.; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNC) near highways for exposure assessment in chronic health studies requires models capable of capturing PNC spatial and temporal variations over the course of a full year. The objectives of this work were to describe the relationship between near-highway PNC and potential predictors, and to build and validate hourly log-linear regression models. PNC was measured near Interstate 93 (I-93) in Somerville, MA (USA) using a mobile monitoring platform driven for 234 hours on 43 days between August 2009 and September 2010. Compared to urban background, PNC levels were consistently elevated within 100200 m of I-93, with gradients impacted by meteorological and traffic conditions. Temporal and spatial variables including wind speed and direction, temperature, highway traffic, and distance to I-93 and major roads contributed significantly to the full regression model. Cross-validated model R2 values ranged from 0.380.47, with higher values achieved (0.430.53) when short-duration PNC spikes were removed. The model predicts highest PNC near major roads and on cold days with low wind speeds. The model allows estimation of hourly ambient PNC at 20-m resolution in a near-highway neighborhood. PMID:24559198

  19. Determinants of spikes in ultrafine particle concentration whilst commuting by bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shanon; Dirks, Kim N.; Salmond, Jennifer A.; Xie, Shanju

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines concentration of ultrafine particles (UFPs) based on data collected using high-resolution UFP monitors whilst travelling by bus during rush hour along three different urban routes in Auckland, New Zealand. The factors influencing in-bus UFP concentration were assessed using a combination of spatial, statistical and GIS analysis techniques to determine both spatial and temporal variability. Results from 68 bus trips showed that concentrations varied more within a route than between on a given day, despite differences in urban morphology, land use and traffic densities between routes. A number of trips were characterised by periods of very rapid increases in UFPs (concentration 'spikes'), followed by slow declines. Trips which recorded at least one spike (an increase of greater than 10,000 pt/cm3) resulted in significantly higher mean concentrations. Spikes in UFPs were significantly more likely to occur when travelling at low speeds and when passengers were alighting and boarding at bus stops close to traffic light intersections.

  20. Atmospheric ultrafine particles promote vascular calcification via the NF-?B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Mittelstein, David; Kam, Winnie; Pakbin, Payam; Du, Yunfeng; Tintut, Yin; Navab, Mohamad; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a modifiable risk factor of cardiovascular disease. Ultrafine particles (UFP, diameter <0.1 ?m), a subfraction of PM2.5, promote vascular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Epidemiologic studies suggest that PM exposure promotes vascular calcification. Here, we assessed whether UFP exposure promotes vascular calcification via NF-?B signaling. UFP exposure at 50 ?g/ml increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity by 4.4 0.2-fold on day 3 (n = 3, P < 0.001) and matrix calcification by 3.5 1.7-fold on day 10 (n = 4, P < 0.05) in calcifying vascular cells (CVC), a subpopulation of vascular smooth muscle cells with osteoblastic potential. Treatment of CVC with conditioned media derived from UFP-treated macrophages (UFP-CM) also led to an increase in ALP activities and matrix calcification. Furthermore, both UFP and UFP-CM significantly increased NF-?B activity, and cotreatment with an NF-?B inhibitor, JSH23, attenuated both UFP- and UFP-CM-induced ALP activity and calcification. When low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice were exposed to UFP at 359.5 ?g/m3 for 10 wk, NF-?B activation and vascular calcification were detected in the regions of aortic roots compared with control filtered air-exposed mice. These findings suggest that UFP promotes vascular calcification via activating NF-?B signaling. PMID:23242187

  1. Breathing resistance and ultrafine particle deposition in nasal-laryngeal airways of a newborn, an infant, a child, and an adult.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Berlinski, Ariel; Zhou, Yue; Greenberg, Bruce; Ou, Xiawei

    2012-12-01

    As a human grows from birth to adulthood, both airway anatomy and breathing conditions vary, altering the deposition rate and pattern of inhaled aerosols. However, deposition studies have typically focused on adult subjects, results of which may not be readily extrapolated to children. This study numerically evaluated the age-related effects on the airflow and aerosol dynamics in image-based nose-throat models of a 10-day-old newborn, a 7-month-old infant, a 5-year-old child, and a 53-year-old adult. Differences in airway physiology, breathing resistance, and aerosol filtering efficiency among the four models were quantified and compared. A high-fidelity fluid-particle transport model was employed to simulate the multi-regime airflows and particle transport within the nasal-laryngeal airways. Ultrafine particles were evaluated under breathing conditions ranging from sedentary to heavy activities. Results of this study indicate that the nasal-laryngeal airways at different ages, albeit differ significantly in morphology and dimension, do not significantly affect the total deposition fractions or maximum local deposition enhancement for ultrafine aerosols. Further, the deposition partitioning in the sub-regions of interest is different among the four models. Results of this study corroborate the use of the in vivo-based diffusion parameter (D(0.5)Q(-0.28)) over the replica-based parameter in correlating nasal-laryngeal depositions of ultrafine aerosols. Improved correlations have been developed for the four age groups by implementing this in vivo-based diffusion parameter as well as the Cunningham correction factor. PMID:22660850

  2. Effect of particle-fiber friction coefficient on ultrafine aerosol particles clogging in nanofiber based filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambaer, Wannes; Zatloukal, Martin; Kimmer, Dusan

    2013-04-01

    Realistic SEM image based 3D filter model considering transition/free molecular flow regime, Brownian diffusion, aerodynamic slip, particle-fiber and particle-particle interactions together with a novel Euclidian distance map based methodology for the pressure drop calculation has been utilized for a polyurethane nanofiber based filter prepared via electrospinning process in order to more deeply understand the effect of particle-fiber friction coefficient on filter clogging and basic filter characteristics. Based on the performed theoretical analysis, it has been revealed that the increase in the fiber-particle friction coefficient causes, firstly, more weaker particle penetration in the filter, creation of dense top layers and generation of higher pressure drop (surface filtration) in comparison with lower particle-fiber friction coefficient filter for which deeper particle penetration takes place (depth filtration), secondly, higher filtration efficiency, thirdly, higher quality factor and finally, higher quality factor sensitivity to the increased collected particle mass. Moreover, it has been revealed that even if the particle-fiber friction coefficient is different, the cake morphology is very similar.

  3. Partitioning of Black Carbon between ultrafine and fine particle modes in an urban airport vs. urban background environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Angelini, F.; Barnaba, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we characterize the Black Carbon (BC) aerosol in an urban airport vs. urban background environment with the objective to evaluate when and how the ultrafine BC dominates the bulk aerosol. Aerosol optical and microphysical properties were measured in a Mediterranean urban area (Rome) at sites impacted by BC sources including fossil fuels (FF), and biomass burning (BB). Experimental BC data were interpreted through measurement-constrained simulations of BC microphysics and optical properties. A "scheme" to separate the ultrafine BC was experimented on the basis of the relation found between changes in the BC partitioning between Aitken and accumulation mode particles, and relevant changes in particle size distribution and optical properties of the bulk aerosol. This separation scheme, applied to experimental data, proved useful to reveal the impact of airport and road traffic emissions. Findings may have important atmospheric implications. The experimented scheme can help separating different BC sources (FF, BB, "aged" BC) when BC size distributions may be very difficult to obtain (satellite, columnar observations, routine monitoring). Indeed, separating the ultrafine BC from the fine BC may provide significant benefits in addressing BC impact on air quality and climate.

  4. Modeling ultrafine particle growth at a pine forest site influenced by anthropogenic pollution during BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y. Y.; Hodzic, A.; Smith, J. N.; Ortega, J.; Brioude, J.; Matsui, H.; Turnipseed, A.; Winkler, P.; de Foy, B.

    2014-03-01

    Formation and growth of ultrafine particles is crudely represented in chemistry-climate models, which contributes to uncertainties in aerosol composition, size distribution, and aerosol effects on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. Measurements of ultrafine particles, their precursor gases, and meteorological parameters were performed in a ponderosa pine forest in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2011, and were analyzed to study processes leading to Aitken-mode Particle burst Events (APEs). These measurements suggest that APEs were associated with the arrival at the site of anthropogenic pollution plumes around noon or in the early afternoon. Number concentrations of ultrafine (4 to 30 nm diameter) particles typically exceeded 10 000 cm-3 during APEs, and these elevated concentrations coincided with increased SO2 and monoterpene concentrations, and led to a factor of two increase in CCN concentrations at 0.5% supersaturation. The APEs were simulated using the regional WRF-Chem model, which was extended to account for ultrafine particle sizes starting at 1 nm in diameter, to include an empirical activation nucleation scheme in the planetary boundary layer, and to explicitly simulate the subsequent growth of Aitken particles by condensation of organic and inorganic vapors. Comparisons with aerosol size distribution measurements showed that simulations using the activation nucleation parameterization reasonably captured aerosol number concentrations and size distribution during APEs, as well as ground level CCN concentrations. Results suggest that sulfuric acid from anthropogenic SO2 triggers APEs, and that the condensation of monoterpene oxidation products onto freshly nucleated particles drives their growth. The simulated growth rate of 3.4 nm h-1 for small particles (4-30 nm in diameter) was comparable to the measured average value of 2.3 nm h-1. Model results also suggest that the presence of APEs tends to modify the composition of sub-100 nm diameter particles, leading to generally higher absolute mass concentrations of sulfate as well as organic aerosols with a higher sulfate content. Sensitivity simulations suggest that the representation of nucleation processes in the model largely influences the predicted number concentrations and thus CCN concentrations. We estimate that nucleation contributes to 65% of surface CCN at 0.5% supersaturation in this pine forest environment.

  5. The effects of roadside structures on the transport and dispersion of ultrafine particles from highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowker, George E.; Baldauf, Richard; Isakov, Vlad; Khlystov, Andrey; Petersen, William

    Understanding local-scale transport and dispersion of pollutants emitted from traffic sources is important for urban planning and air quality assessments. Predicting pollutant concentration patterns in complex environments depends on accurate representations of local features (e.g., noise barriers, trees, buildings) affecting near-field air flows. This study examined the effects of roadside barriers on the flow patterns and dispersion of pollutants from a high-traffic highway in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. The effects of the structures were analyzed using the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) model, an empirically based diagnostic tool which simulates fine-scale wind field and dispersion patterns around obstacles. Model simulations were compared with the spatial distributions of ultrafine particles (UFP) from vehicular emissions measured using a passenger van equipped with a Differential Mobility Analyzer/Condensation Particle Counter. The field site allowed for an evaluation of pollutant concentrations in open terrain, with a noise barrier present near the road, and with a noise barrier and vegetation present near the road. Results indicated that air pollutant concentrations near the road were generally higher in open terrain situations with no barriers present; however, concentrations for this case decreased faster with distance than when roadside barriers were present. The presence of a noise barrier and vegetation resulted in the lowest downwind pollutant concentrations, indicating that the plume under this condition was relatively uniform and vertically well-mixed. Comparison of the QUIC model with the mobile UFP measurements indicated that QUIC reasonably represented pollutant transport and dispersion for each of the study configurations.

  6. A branch scale analytical model for predicting the vegetation collection efficiency of ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.; Katul, G. G.; Khlystov, A.

    2012-05-01

    The removal of ultrafine particles (UFP) by vegetation is now receiving significant attention given their role in cloud physics, human health and respiratory related diseases. Vegetation is known to be a sink for UFP, prompting interest in their collection efficiency. A number of models have tackled the UFP collection efficiency of an isolated leaf or a flat surface; however, up-scaling these theories to the ecosystem level has resisted complete theoretical treatment. To progress on a narrower scope of this problem, simultaneous experimental and theoretical investigations are carried out at the “intermediate” branch scale. Such a scale retains the large number of leaves and their interaction with the flow without the heterogeneities and added geometric complexities encountered within ecosystems. The experiments focused on the collection efficiencies of UFP in the size range 12.6-102 nm for pine and juniper branches in a wind tunnel facility. Scanning mobility particle sizers were used to measure the concentration of each diameter class of UFP upstream and downstream of the vegetation branches thereby allowing the determination of the UFP vegetation collection efficiencies. The UFP vegetation collection efficiency was measured at different wind speeds (0.3-1.5 m s-1), packing density (i.e. volume fraction of leaf or needle fibers; 0.017 and 0.040 for pine and 0.037, 0.055 for juniper), and branch orientations. These measurements were then used to investigate the performance of a proposed analytical model that predicts the branch-scale collection efficiency using conventional canopy properties such as the drag coefficient and leaf area density. Despite the numerous simplifications employed, the proposed analytical model agreed with the wind tunnel measurements mostly to within 20%. This analytical tractability can benefit future air quality and climate models incorporating UFP.

  7. Occupational Exposure to Ultrafine Particles among Airport Employees - Combining Personal Monitoring and Global Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Mller, Karina Lauenborg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Schipperijn, Jasper; Loft, Steffen; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) has been linked to cardiovascular and lung diseases. Combustion of jet fuel and diesel powered handling equipment emit UFP resulting in potentially high exposure levels among employees working at airports. High levels of UFP have been reported at several airports, especially on the apron, but knowledge on individual exposure profiles among different occupational groups working at an airport is lacking. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare personal exposure to UFP among five different occupational groups working at Copenhagen Airport (CPH). Method 30 employees from five different occupational groups (baggage handlers, catering drivers, cleaning staff and airside and landside security) at CPH were instructed to wear a personal monitor of particle number concentration in real time and a GPS device. The measurements were carried out on 8 days distributed over two weeks in October 2012. The overall differences between the groups were assessed using linear mixed model. Results Data showed significant differences in exposure levels among the groups when adjusted for variation within individuals and for effect of time and date (p<0.01). Baggage handlers were exposed to 7 times higher average concentrations (geometric mean, GM: 37103 UFP/cm3, 95% CI: 2555103 UFP/cm3) than employees mainly working indoors (GM: 5103 UFP/cm3, 95% CI: 211103 UFP/cm3). Furthermore, catering drivers, cleaning staff and airside security were exposed to intermediate concentrations (GM: 12 to 20103 UFP/cm3). Conclusion The study demonstrates a strong gradient of exposure to UFP in ambient air across occupational groups of airport employees. PMID:25203510

  8. Continuous monitoring of ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles in a residence for 18 months in 1999-2000.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Howard-Reed, Cynthia

    2002-07-01

    Continuous monitors were employed for 18 months in an occupied townhouse to measure ultrafine, fine, and coarse particles; air change rates; wind speed and direction; temperature; and relative humidity (RH). A main objective was to document short-term and long-term variation in indoor air concentrations of size-resolved particles (0.01-20 microm) caused by (1) diumal and seasonal variation of outdoor air concentrations and meteorological variables, (2) indoor sources such as cooking and using candles, and (3) activities affecting air change rates such as opening windows and using fans. A second objective was to test and compare available instruments for their suitability in providing real-time estimates of particle levels and ancillary variables. Despite different measuring principles, the instruments employed in this study agreed reasonably well for particles less than 10 microm in diameter. The three instruments measuring fine and coarse particles (aerodynamic diameter between 0.3 and 20 microm) agreed to within 30% in their overall estimates of total volume. Two of these instruments employed optical scattering, and the third used an aerodynamic acceleration principle. However, several lines of evidence indicated that the instrument employing aerodynamic acceleration overestimated concentrations for particle diameters greater than 10 microm. A fourth instrument measuring ultrafine and accumulation-mode particles (0.01-1 microm) was operated with two different inlets providing somewhat different particle size ranges. The two inlets agreed in the ultrafine region (< 0.1 microm) but diverged increasingly for larger particles (up to 0.445 microm). Indoor sources affecting ultrafine particle concentrations were observed 22% of the time, and sources affecting fine and coarse particle concentrations were observed 12 and 15% of the time, respectively. When an indoor source was operating, particle concentrations for different sizes ranged from 2 to 20 times the average concentrations when no indoor source was apparent. Indoor sources, such as cooking with natural gas, and simple physical activities, such as walking, accounted for a majority (50-90%) of the ultrafine and coarse particle concentrations, whereas outdoor sources were more important for accumulation-mode particles between 0.1 and 1 microm in diameter. Averaged for the entire year and including no periods when indoor sources were apparent, the number distribution was bimodal, with a peak at approximately 10 nm (possibly smaller), a shallow minimum at approximately 14 nm, and a second broad peak at approximately 68 nm. The volume distribution was also bimodal, with a broad peak at approximately 200 nm, a minimum at approximately 1.2 microm, and then an upward slope again through the remaining size fractions. A database was created on a 5-min averaging time basis. It contains more than 90,000 measurements by two of the instruments and approximately 30,000 by the two optical scattering instruments. About 4500 hour-long average air change rates were also calculated throughout the year using a dedicated gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC/ECD). At high air change rates [> 0.8 air changes per hour (hr(-1))], particle concentrations were either elevated (when no source was present) or depressed (when an indoor source was operating) by factors of up to 2 compared with low air change rates. PMID:12139348

  9. Comparison Between Different Processing Schedules for the Development of Ultrafine-Grained Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Anish; Sivaprasad, S.; Nath, S. K.; Misra, R. D. K.; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2014-05-01

    A comparative study was carried out on the development of ultrafine-grained dual-phase (DP) (ferrite-martensite) structures in a low-carbon microalloyed steel processed using two thermomechanical processing routes, (i) intercritical deformation and (ii) warm-deformation and intercritical annealing. The samples were deformed using Gleeble3500® simulator, maintaining a constant total strain ( ɛ = 1) and strain rate ( = 1/s). Evolution of microstructure and micro-texture was investigated by SEM, TEM, and EBSD. Ultrafine-grained DP structures could be formed by careful selection of deformation temperature, T def (for intercritical deformation) or annealing temperature, T anneal (for warm-deformation and annealing). Overall, the ferrite grain sizes ranged from 1.5 to 4.0 μm, and the sizes and fractions of the uniformly distributed fine-martensitic islands ranged from 1.5 to 3.0 μm and 15 to 45 pct, respectively. Dynamic strain-induced austenite-to-ferrite transformation followed by continuous (dynamic) recrystallization of the ferrite dictated the grain refinement during intercritical deformation, while, continuous (static) recrystallization by pronounced recovery dictated the grain refinement during the warm-deformation and the annealing. Regarding intercritical deformation, the samples cooled to T def indicated finer grain size compared with the samples heated to T def, which are explained in terms of the effects of strain partitioning on the ferrite and the heating during deformation. Alpha-fiber components dominated the texture in all the samples, and the fraction of high-angle boundaries (with >15 deg misorientation) increased with the increasing T def or T anneal, depending on the processing schedule. Fine carbide particles, microalloyed precipitates and austenitic islands played important roles in defining the mechanism of grain refinement that involved retarding conventional ferrite recrystallization and ferrite grain growth. With regard to the intercritical deformation, warm-deformation followed by annealing is a simpler process to control in the rolling mill; however, the need for high-power rolling mill and controlled annealing facility imposes industrial challenges.

  10. Concentration levels and source apportionment of ultrafine particles in road microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyropoulos, G.; Samara, C.; Voutsa, D.; Kouras, A.; Manoli, E.; Voliotis, A.; Tsakis, A.; Chasapidis, L.; Konstandopoulos, A.; Eleftheriadis, K.

    2016-03-01

    A mobile laboratory unit (MOBILAB) with on-board instrumentation (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, SMPS; Ambient NOx analyzer) was used to measure size-resolved particle number concentrations (PNCs) of quasi-ultrafine particles (UFPs, 9-372 nm), along with NOx, in road microenvironments. On-road measurements were carried out in and around a large Greek urban agglomeration, the Thessaloniki Metropolitan Area (TMA). Two 2-week measurement campaigns were conducted during the warm period of 2011 and the cold period of 2012. During each sampling campaign, MOBILAB was driven through a 5-day inner-city route and a second 5-day external route covering in total a wide range of districts (urban, urban background, industrial and residential), and road types (major and minor urban roads, freeways, arterial and interurban roads). All routes were conducted during working days, in morning and in afternoon hours under real-world traffic conditions. Spatial classification of MOBILAB measurements involved the assignment of measurement points to location bins defined by the aspect ratio of adjacent urban street canyons (USCs). Source apportionment was further carried out, by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to particle size distribution data. Apportioned PMF factors were interpreted, by employing a two-step methodology, which involved (a) statistical association of PMF factor contributions with 12 h air-mass back-trajectories ending at the TMA during MOBILAB measurements, and (b) Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) using PMF factor contributions as the dependent variables, while relative humidity, solar radiation flux, and vehicle speed were used as the independent variables. The applied data analysis showed that low-speed cruise and high-load engine operation modes are the two dominant sources of UFPs in most of the road microenvironments in the TMA, with significant contributions from background photochemical processes during the warm period, explaining the reversed seasonal variation of UFP concentrations, compared to those observed in cities across Northern Europe. It was also demonstrated that town planning exerts a profound effect on the mitigation of traffic emissions.

  11. Ultrafine particle concentrations in the surroundings of an urban area: comparing downwind to upwind conditions using Generalized Additive Models (GAMs).

    PubMed

    Sartini, Claudio; Zauli Sajani, Stefano; Ricciardelli, Isabella; Delgado-Saborit, Juana Mari; Scotto, Fabiana; Trentini, Arianna; Ferrari, Silvia; Poluzzi, Vanes

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of an urban area on ultrafine particle (UFP) concentration in nearby surrounding areas. We assessed how downwind and upwind conditions affect the UFP concentration at a site placed a few kilometres from the city border. Secondarily, we investigated the relationship among other meteorological factors, temporal variables and UFP. Data were collected for 44 days during 2008 and 2009 at a rural site placed about 3 kilometres from Bologna, in northern Italy. Measurements were performed using a spectrometer (FMPS TSI 3091). The average UFP number concentration was 11?776 (7836) particles per cm(3). We analysed the effect of wind direction in a multivariate Generalized Additive Model (GAM) adjusted for the principal meteorological parameters and temporal trends. An increase of about 25% in UFP levels was observed when the site was downwind of the urban area, compared with the levels observed when wind blew from rural areas. The size distribution of particles was also affected by the wind direction, showing higher concentration of small size particles when the wind blew from the urban area. The GAM showed a good fit to the data (R(2) = 0.81). Model choice was via Akaike Information Criteria (AIC). The analysis also revealed that an approach based on meteorological data plus temporal trends improved the goodness of the fit of the model. In addition, the findings contribute to evidence on effects of exposure to ultrafine particles on a population living in city surroundings. PMID:24077061

  12. Pro-inflammatory potential of ultrafine particles in mono- and co-cultures of primary cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Totlandsdal, Annike I; Skomedal, Tor; Lg, Marit; Osnes, Jan-Bjrn; Refsnes, Magne

    2008-05-01

    Inhalation of particulate air pollution has been associated with increased risks for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, but the underlying mechanisms are still under discussion. One possible pathway may be that inhaled particles cross the air-blood barrier and interact directly with cardiac tissue. The aim of the present study was to examine the pro-inflammatory potential of particles in cardiac cells. Mono- and co-cultures of primary adult male Wistar (Han) rat cardiomyocytes (CMs) and cardiofibroblasts (CFs) were exposed to increasing concentrations of ultrafine (<100nm) carbon black particles (Printex 90). Expression and release of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha) were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Cytotoxicity was estimated by measuring cellular release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A particle concentration-dependent increase in IL-6 release was observed in both CM mono- and co-cultures (EC(50) approximately 57microg/ml). Furthermore, IL-6 levels detected in both control and particle-exposed co-cultures were synergistically increased compared to mono-cultures (10-19-fold, dependent on the exposure). Experiments with contact and non-contact co-cultures indicate that direct cellular contact is of key importance for the enhanced release of IL-6 in co-cultures. An apparent particle-induced release of IL-1beta was only detected in co-cultures. The release of TNF-alpha was low and did not seem notably influenced by particle exposure. Treatment with an IL-1 receptor antagonist apparently eliminated the particle-induced release of IL-6. In conclusion, ultrafine particles have a pro-inflammatory potential in primary cardiac cells. Furthermore, IL-1 seems critical in triggering particle-induced release of IL-6. These pro-inflammatory responses may be elicited when particles are translocated into the pulmonary circulation upon inhalation or administered intravascularly during medical procedures. PMID:18339468

  13. Seasonality of ultrafine and sub-micron aerosols and the inferences on particle formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Chen, M.-J.; Huang, W.-R.; Huang, S.-H.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Lee, C. S.-L.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the seasonal variations in the physicochemical properties of atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100nm) and submicron particles (PM1, d ≤ 1 μm) in an East-Asian urban area, which are hypothesized to be affected by the interchange of summer and winter monsoons. An observation experiment was conducted at the TARO, an urban aerosol station in Taipei, Taiwan, from October 2012 to August 2013. The measurements included the mass concentration and chemical composition of UFPs and PM1, as well as the particle number concentration (PNC) and size distribution (PSD) with size range of 4-736 nm. The results indicate that the mass concentration of PM1 was elevated during cold seasons with peak level of 18.5 μg m-3 in spring, whereas the highest UFPs concentration was measured in summertime with a seasonal mean of 1.62 μg m-3. Moreover, chemical analysis revealed that the UFPs and PM1 were characterized by distinct composition; UFPs were composed mostly of organics, whereas ammonium and sulfate were the major constituents in PM1. The seasonal median of total PNCs ranged from 13.9 × 103 cm-3 in autumn to 19.4 × 103 cm-3 in spring. The PSD information retrieved from the corresponding PNC measurements indicates that the nucleation mode PNC (N4-25) peaked at 11.6 × 103 cm-3 in winter, whereas the Aitken mode (N25-100) and accumulation mode (N100-736) exhibited summer maxima at 6.0 × 103 and 3.1 × 103 cm-3, respectively. The shift in PSD during summertime is attributed to the enhancement in the photochemical production of condensable organic matter that, in turn, contributes to the growth of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. In addition, remarkable photochemical production of particles was observed in spring and summer seasons, which was characterized with averaged particle growth and formation rates of 4.3 ± 0.8 nm h-1 and 1.6 ± 0.8 cm-3 s-1, respectively. The prevalence of new particle formation (NPF) in summer is suggested as a result of seasonally enhanced photochemical oxidation of SO2, which contributes to the production of H2SO4, and low level of PM10 (d ≤ 10 μm) that serves as the condensation sink. Regarding the sources of aerosol particles, correlation analysis upon the PNCs against NOx revealed that the local vehicular exhaust was the dominant contributor of the UFPs throughout a year. On the contrary, the Asian pollution outbreaks can have significant influence in the PNC of accumulation mode particles during the seasons of winter monsoons. The results of this study underline the significance of secondary organic aerosols in the seasonal variations of UFPs and the influences of continental pollution outbreaks in the downwind areas of Asian outflows.

  14. Translocation of Inhaled Ultrafine Manganese Oxide Particles to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Alison; Gelein, Robert; Silva, Vanessa; Feikert, Tessa; Opanashuk, Lisa; Carter, Janet; Potter, Russell; Maynard, Andrew; Ito, Yasuo; Finkelstein, Jacob; Oberdörster, Günter

    2006-01-01

    Background Studies in monkeys with intranasally instilled gold ultrafine particles (UFPs; < 100 nm) and in rats with inhaled carbon UFPs suggested that solid UFPs deposited in the nose travel along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb. Methods To determine if olfactory translocation occurs for other solid metal UFPs and assess potential health effects, we exposed groups of rats to manganese (Mn) oxide UFPs (30 nm; ~ 500 μg/m3) with either both nostrils patent or the right nostril occluded. We analyzed Mn in lung, liver, olfactory bulb, and other brain regions, and we performed gene and protein analyses. Results After 12 days of exposure with both nostrils patent, Mn concentrations in the olfactory bulb increased 3.5-fold, whereas lung Mn concentrations doubled; there were also increases in striatum, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. Lung lavage analysis showed no indications of lung inflammation, whereas increases in olfactory bulb tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA (~ 8-fold) and protein (~ 30-fold) were found after 11 days of exposure and, to a lesser degree, in other brain regions with increased Mn levels. Macrophage inflammatory protein-2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule mRNA were also increased in olfactory bulb. With the right nostril occluded for a 2-day exposure, Mn accumulated only in the left olfactory bulb. Solubilization of the Mn oxide UFPs was < 1.5% per day. Conclusions We conclude that the olfactory neuronal pathway is efficient for translocating inhaled Mn oxide as solid UFPs to the central nervous system and that this can result in inflammatory changes. We suggest that despite differences between human and rodent olfactory systems, this pathway is relevant in humans. PMID:16882521

  15. Modeling Population Exposure to Ultrafine Particles in a Major Italian Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Spinazz, Andrea; Cattaneo, Andrea; Peruzzo, Carlo; Cavallo, Domenico M.

    2014-01-01

    Average daily ultrafine particles (UFP) exposure of adult Milan subpopulations (defined on the basis of gender, and then for age, employment or educational status), in different exposure scenarios (typical working day in summer and winter) were simulated using a microenvironmental stochastic simulation model. The basic concept of this kind of model is that time-weighted average exposure is defined as the sum of partial microenvironmental exposures, which are determined by the product of UFP concentration and time spent in each microenvironment. In this work, environmental concentrations were derived from previous experimental studies that were based on microenvironmental measurements in the city of Milan by means of personal or individual monitoring, while time-activity patterns were derived from the EXPOLIS study. A significant difference was observed between the exposures experienced in winter (W: 28,415 pt/cm3) and summer (S: 19,558 pt/cm3). Furthermore, simulations showed a moderate difference between the total exposures experienced by women (S: 19,363 pt/cm3; W: 27,623 pt/cm3) and men (S: 18,806 pt/cm3; W: 27,897 pt/cm3). In addition, differences were found as a function of (I) age, (II) employment status and (III) educational level; accordingly, the highest total exposures resulted for (I) 5559 years old people, (II) housewives and students and (III) people with higher educational level (more than 10 years of scholarity). Finally, significant differences were found between microenvironment-specific exposures. PMID:25321878

  16. Different exposure of infants and adults to ultrafine particles in the urban area of Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Canchucaja, Lizzeth; d'Orazzio, Valentina; Manich, Andrea; Joya, Xavier; Vall, Oriol

    2015-01-01

    Air pollutants have been linked with a number of adverse health effects. Children are especially sensitive, particularly when they get close to the exhaust emissions of the vehicles on the street. The objective of this study was to measure the different exposure of infants and adults to ultrafine particles (UFP) as a surrogate marker of air pollution and of risk of deleterious health effects. Two different portable P-TRAK were used to measure simultaneously exposure to UFPs at different heights, one corresponding to the height of an infant in a stroller (0.55 m) and the other one to the height of the face of an adult pedestrian (1.70 m). Measurements were taken on three different streets with high traffic density in Barcelona, in 10 consecutive days during spring, with two sampling sessions of 1 h each day, moving afoot and taking into account temperature, humidity, and wind speed. Fifty-two thousand and eight (52,008) paired values were obtained, and the results showed about 10% higher levels of UFP concentration at 0.55 m (48,198 ± 25,296 pt/cm(3)) compared to 1.70 m (43,151 ± 22,517 pt/cm(3)). Differences between working and nonworking days were observed. Concentration patterns and variation by days of the week and time periods were related to traffic intensity. This study revealed that infants transported by stroller in urban areas are more exposed to air pollution than walking adults. As infants are more vulnerable and UFP have more effects on their health, measures should be taken to protect this population when it is transported in the street. PMID:25433547

  17. Vegetation collection efficiency of ultrafine particles: From single fiber to porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Yeng; Khlystov, Andrey; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2014-01-01

    A number of parameterization schemes are available to determine the collection efficiency of ultrafine particles (UFP) onto vegetated surfaces. One approach represents the vegetated elements as a fibrous filter with a characteristic fiber size that is difficult to a priori determine, while the other, a more conventional approach, represents vegetation as a porous medium. To date, no attempts have been made to compare the performance of these two distinct approaches or bridge them so as to show the necessary conditions leading to their potential equivalence. In a wind tunnel study, the UFP collection efficiencies of pine branches at five different wind speeds, two branch orientations, and two packing densities were measured and analyzed using these two vegetation representations. This vegetation type was selected because pines are a dominant species in the Southeastern United States and pine needles geometrically resemble fibrous material with a well-defined foliage diameter. The porous media and the fibrous filter representations described well observed UFP deposition at the branch scale. Conditions promoting their equivalence are thus explored. The difficult to determine effective fiber diameter was recovered from conventional canopy attributes such as the leaf area index by matching the collection efficiencies of UFP for the two vegetation representations. These results provide a working "aerodynamic" definition of the effective single-fiber diameter thereby rendering the simplified single-fiber formulation usable in large-scale atmospheric deposition models. Furthermore, the aerodynamic correction factor allows upscaling of pine needles to an effective leaf area index and provides some quantification of the effect of needle spatial clustering on UFP deposition. The applicability of the results to other vegetation species remains to be verified.

  18. Development of the electroacoustic dewatering (EAD) process for fine/ultrafine coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-07-01

    Battelle, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ashbrook-Simon-Hartley (ASH), Kaiser Engineers (KE), Lewis Corporation, and Professor S. H. Chiang of the University of Pittsburgh, is developing an advanced process for the dewatering of fine and ultrafine coals. The advanced process, called Electroacoustic Dewatering (EAD), capitalizes on the adaptation of synergistic effects of electric and acoustic fields to commercial coal dewatering systems, such as belt filter presses.

  19. Identification and verification of ultrafine particle affinity zones in urban neighbourhoods: sample design and data pre-processing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A methodology is presented and validated through which long-term fixed site air quality measurements are used to characterise and remove temporal signals in sample-based measurements which have good spatial coverage but poor temporal resolution. The work has been carried out specifically to provide a spatial dataset of atmospheric ultrafine particle (UFP < 100 nm) data for ongoing epidemiologic cohort analysis but the method is readily transferable to wider epidemiologic investigations and research into the health effects of other pollutant species. PMID:20102590

  20. Identification and verification of ultrafine particle affinity zones in urban neighbourhoods: sample design and data pre-processing.

    PubMed

    Harris, Paul; Lindley, Sarah; Gallagher, Martin; Agius, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    A methodology is presented and validated through which long-term fixed site air quality measurements are used to characterise and remove temporal signals in sample-based measurements which have good spatial coverage but poor temporal resolution. The work has been carried out specifically to provide a spatial dataset of atmospheric ultrafine particle (UFP < 100 nm) data for ongoing epidemiologic cohort analysis but the method is readily transferable to wider epidemiologic investigations and research into the health effects of other pollutant species. PMID:20102590

  1. TRANSLOCATION AND POTENTIAL NEUROLOGICAL EFFECTS OF FINE AND ULTRAFINE PARTICLES: A CRITICAL UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proceedings book is a collection of seminars presented in a symposium organized by by Munich's GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health. Research presented at this symposium indicated inhaled ultrafine particulate matter quickly exits the lungs and target...

  2. Children's Indoor Exposures to (Ultra)Fine Particles in an Urban Area: Comparison Between School and Home Environments.

    PubMed

    Slezakova, Klara; Texeira, Ctia; Morais, Simone; Pereira, Maria do Carmo

    2015-01-01

    Due to their detrimental effects on human health, scientific interest in ultrafine particles (UFP), has been increasing but available information is far from comprehensive. Children, who represent one of the most susceptible subpopulation, spend the majority of time in schools and homes. Thus, the aim of this study is to (1) assess indoor levels of particle number concentrations (PNC) in ultrafine and fine (20-1000 nm) range at school and home environments and (2) compare indoor respective dose rates for 3- to 5-yr-old children. Indoor particle number concentrations in range of 20-1000 nm were consecutively measured during 56 d at two preschools (S1 and S2) and three homes (H1-H3) situated in Porto, Portugal. At both preschools different indoor microenvironments, such as classrooms and canteens, were evaluated. The results showed that total mean indoor PNC as determined for all indoor microenvironments were significantly higher at S1 than S2. At homes, indoor levels of PNC with means ranging between 1.09 10(4) and 1.24 10(4) particles/cm(3) were 10-70% lower than total indoor means of preschools (1.32 10(4) to 1.84 10(4) particles/cm(3)). Nevertheless, estimated dose rates of particles were 1.3- to 2.1-fold higher at homes than preschools, mainly due to longer period of time spent at home. Daily activity patterns of 3- to 5-yr-old children significantly influenced overall dose rates of particles. Therefore, future studies focusing on health effects of airborne pollutants always need to account for children's exposures in different microenvironments such as homes, schools, and transportation modes in order to obtain an accurate representation of children overall exposure. PMID:26167754

  3. Personal exposure of street canyon intersection users to PM 2.5, ultrafine particle counts and carbon monoxide in Central London, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, S.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.; Colvile, R.

    Short-term human exposure to PM 2.5, ultrafine particle counts (particle range: 0.02-1 ?m) and carbon monoxide (CO) was investigated at and around a street canyon intersection in Central London, UK. During a four-week field campaign, groups of four volunteers collected samples at three timings (morning, lunch and afternoon), along two different routes (a heavily trafficked route and a backstreet route) via five modes of transport (walking, cycling, bus, car and taxi). PM 2.5 was sampled using high-flow gravimetric personal samplers, ultrafine particle counts were measured using TSI P-TRAKs and Langans were used to measure CO exposure. Three hundred and ninety-four samples were collected197 PM 2.5, 86 ultrafine particle count and 111 CO. Arithmetic means of PM 2.5 personal exposure were 27.5, 33.5, 34.5, 38.0 and 41.5 ?g m -3, ultrafine particle counts were 67 773, 93 968, 101 364, 99 736 and 87 545 pt cm -3 and CO levels were 0.9, 1.1, 0.8, 1.3 and 1.1 ppm for walking, cycling, bus, car and taxi respectively. On the heavily trafficked route, personal exposure was 35.3 ?g m -3, 101142 pt cm -3 and 1.3 ppm, and on the backstreet route it was 31.8 ?g m -3, 71628 pt cm -3 and 0.6 ppm for PM 2.5, ultrafine particle counts and CO, respectively. Personal exposure levels were high during the morning measurements for all three pollutants (34.6 ?g m -3, 106 270 pt cm -3 and 1.5 ppm for PM 2.5, ultrafine particle counts and CO, respectively).There was a moderately strong correlation between personal exposure of ultrafine particle counts and CO ( r=0.7, N=67) but a weaker correlation between PM 2.5 and ultrafine particle counts ( r=0.5, N=83) and a low correlation between PM 2.5 and CO exposure ( r=0.2, N=105). The exposure assessment also revealed that the background and kerbside monitoring stations were not representative of the personal exposure of individuals to PM 2.5 and CO at and around a street canyon intersection.

  4. On-road and laboratory investigations on non-exhaust ultrafine particles from the interaction between the tire and road pavement under braking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jihyun; Lee, Sunyoup; Lee, Seokhwan

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the physical and chemical characteristics of non-exhaust ultrafine particles from on-road driving and laboratory measurements using a mobile sampling vehicle. The on-road driving and laboratory measurements during constant speed conditions revealed no enhancement of ultrafine particles. Under braking events, the total number concentrations of tire particles (TPs) sampled 90 mm above the road surface was 6 times higher with broader mode diameters when compared to 40 mm above the road surface. In contrast to braking events, under cornering conditions, the total number concentrations of TPs sampled 40 mm above the road surface were 50 times higher relative to 90 mm above the road surface. From the morphological and elemental analyses, it is likely that the ultrafine particles generated from the interaction between the tire and the road surface under braking conditions might originated from sulfur-containing materials or anti-oxidants which are contained in TPs, and/or graphite and solid lubricants which are mainly present in brake particles (BPs). However, Zn which was a distinguishing elemental marker of tire wear particles didn't show in EDS spectra. Further research would be required as to the exact emission source of ultrafine particles.

  5. Characterizing ultrafine particles and other air pollutants in and around school buses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yifang; Zhang, Qunfang

    2014-03-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated toxic effects of ultrafine particles (UFP*, diameter < 100 nm). Children are particularly at risk because of their immature respiratory systems and higher breathing rates per body mass. This study aimed to characterize UFP, PM2.5 (particulate matter < or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter), and other vehicular-emitted pollutants in and around school buses. Four sub-studies were conducted, including: 1. On-road tests to measure in-cabin air pollutant levels while school buses were being driven; 2. Idling tests to determine the contributions of tailpipe emissions from idling school buses to air pollutant levels in and around school buses under different scenarios; 3. Retrofit tests to evaluate the performance of two retrofit systems, a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) muffler and a crankcase filtration system (CFS), on reducing tailpipe emissions and in-cabin air pollutant concentrations under idling and driving conditions; and 4. High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter air purifier tests to evaluate the effectiveness of in-cabin filtration. In total, 24 school buses were employed to cover a wide range of school buses commonly used in the United States. Real-time air quality measurements included particle number concentration (PNC), fine and UFP size distribution in the size range 7.6-289 nm, PM2.5 mass concentration, black carbon (BC) concentration, and carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. For in-cabin measurements, instruments were placed on a platform secured to the rear seats inside the school buses. For all other tests, a second set of instruments was deployed to simultaneously measure the ambient air pollutant levels. For tailpipe emission measurements, the exhaust was diluted and then measured by instruments identical to those used for the in-cabin measurements. The results show that when driving on roads, in-cabin PNC, fine and UFP size distribution, PM2.5, BC, and CO varied by engine age, window position, driving speed, driving route, and operating conditions. Emissions from idling school buses increased the PNC close to the tailpipe by a factor of up to 26.0. Under some circumstances, tailpipe emissions of idling school buses increased the in-cabin PNC by factors ranging from 1.2 to 5.8 in the 10-30 nm particle size range. Retrofit systems significantly reduced the tailpipe emissions of idling school buses. With both DOC and CFS installed, PNC in tailpipe emissions dropped by 20%-94%. No unequivocal decrease was observed for in-cabin air pollutants after retrofitting. The operation of the air conditioning (AC) unit and the pollutant concentrations in the surrounding ambient air played more important roles than retrofit technologies in determining in-cabin air quality. The use of a HEPA air purifier removed up to 50% of in-cabin particles. Because each sub-study tested only a subset of the 24 school buses, the results should be seen as more exploratory than definitive. PMID:24834688

  6. Activation of endothelial cells after exposure to ambient ultrafine particles: The role of NADPH oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Yiqun; Wan Rong; Chien Sufan; Tollerud, David J.; Zhang Qunwei

    2009-04-15

    Several studies have shown that ultrafine particles (UFPs) may pass from the lungs to the circulation because of their very small diameter, and induce lung oxidative stress with a resultant increase in lung epithelial permeability. The direct effects of UFPs on vascular endothelium remain unknown. We hypothesized that exposure to UFPs leads to endothelial cell O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} generation via NADPH oxidase and results in activation of endothelial cells. Our results showed that UFPs, at a non-toxic dose, induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mouse pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MPMVEC) that was inhibited by pre-treatment with the ROS scavengers or inhibitors, but not with the mitochondrial inhibitor, rotenone. UFP-induced ROS generation in MPMVEC was abolished by p67{sup phox} siRNA transfection and UFPs did not cause ROS generation in MPMVEC isolated from gp91{sup phox} knock-out mice. UFP-induced ROS generation in endothelial cells was also determined in vivo by using a perfused lung model with imaging. Moreover, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining results showed that MPMVEC treated with UFPs resulted in the translocation of cytosolic proteins of NADPH oxidase, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox} and rac 1, to the plasma membrane. These results demonstrate that NADPH oxidase in the pulmonary endothelium is involved in ROS generation following exposure to UFPs. To investigate the activation of endothelial cells by UFP-induced oxidative stress, we determined the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in MPMVEC. Our results showed that exposure of MPMVEC to UFPs caused increased phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs that was blocked by pre-treatment with DPI or p67{sup phox} siRNA. Exposure of MPMVEC obtained from gp91{sup phox} knock-out mice to UFPs did not cause increased phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs. These findings confirm that UFPs can cause endothelial cells to generate ROS directly via activation of NADPH oxidase. UFP-induced ROS lead to activation of MAPKs through induced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs that may further result in endothelial dysfunction through production of cytokines such as IL-6. Our results suggest that endothelial oxidative stress may be an important mechanism for PM-induced cardiovascular effects.

  7. Physicochemical properties and ability to generate free radicals of ambient coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles in the atmosphere of Xuanwei, China, an area of high lung cancer incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Senlin; Yi, Fei; Hao, Xiaojie; Yu, Shang; Ren, Jingjing; Wu, Minghong; Jialiang, Feng; Yonemochi, Shinich; Wang, Qingyue

    2014-11-01

    The link between the high incidence of lung cancer and harmful pollutants emitted by local coal combustion in Xuanwei, Yunnan province, China, has been a focus of study since the 1980s. However, the mechanisms responsible for the high lung cancer rate remain unclear, necessitating further study. Since a close relationship between ambient air particle pollution and respiratory diseases exists, we sampled size-resolved ambient particles from the atmosphere of Xuanwei. In our indoor experiment, cutting-edge methods, including scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray detection (SEM/EDX), particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and the cell-free DCFH-DA assay, were employed to investigate the physicochemical properties, the potential to generate free radicals and the oxidative potential of ambient coarse (diameter, 1.8-10 ?m), fine (diameter, 0.1-1.8 ?m), and ultrafine (diameter, <0.1 ?m) particles. We found the total mass concentrations of the size-resolved particles collected in spring were higher than that in early winter. Mass percentage of fine particles accounted for 68% and 61% of the total particulate mass in spring and in early winter samples, respectively, indicating that fine particles were the major component of the Xuanwei ambient particulate matters. On the other hand, the results of SEM/EDX analysis showed that the coarse particles were dominated by minerals, the fine particles by soot aggregates and fly ashes, and the ultrafine particles by soot particles and unidentified particles. Our PIXE results revealed that crustal elements (Ca, Ti Si, Fe) were mainly distributed in coarse particles, while trace metals (Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) dominated in the fine particle fraction, and S, a typical element emitted by coal combustion, mainly resided in fine particles collected from the winter atmosphere. EPR results indicated that the magnitude of free radical intensity caused by size-resolved particles followed these patterns: fine particles > coarse particles > ultrafine particles for spring samples and ultrafine particles > fine particles > coarse particles for winter samples. Cell-free DCFH assay results conclusively showed that all of the measured particle suspensions displayed a higher oxidative potential than the negative control. The correlation coefficient (R2) between free radical intensity and fluorescent intensity generated by the size-resolved particles was 0.535 and 0.507 for the spring and winter seasons, respectively, implying that ambient air particles in the Xuanwei atmosphere have the ability to generate free radicals, and fine and ultrafine particles could be hazardous to local residents.

  8. The effects of leaf size and microroughness on the branch-scale collection efficiency of ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. W.; Lin, M. Y.; Khlystov, A.; Katul, G. G.

    2015-04-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed to explore how leaf size and leaf microroughness impact the collection efficiency of ultrafine particles (UFP) at the branch scale. A porous media model previously used to characterize UFP deposition onto conifers (Pinus taeda and Juniperus chinensis) was employed to interpret these wind tunnel measurements for four different broadleaf species (Ilex cornuta, Quercus alba, Magnolia grandiflora, and Lonicera fragrantissima) and three wind speed (0.3-0.9 ms-1) conditions. Among the four broadleaf species considered, Ilex cornuta with its partially folded shape and sharp edges was the most efficient at collecting UFP followed by the other three flat-shaped broadleaf species. The findings here suggest that a connection must exist between UFP collection and leaf dimension and roughness. This connection is shown to be primarily due to the thickness of a quasi-laminar boundary layer pinned to the leaf surface assuming the flow over a leaf resembles that of a flat plate. A scaling analysis that utilizes a three-sublayer depositional model for a flat plate of finite size and roughness embedded within the quasi-laminar boundary layer illustrates these connections. The analysis shows that a longer leaf dimension allows for thicker quasi-laminar boundary layers to develop. A thicker quasi-laminar boundary layer depth in turn increases the overall resistance to UFP deposition due to an increase in the diffusional path length thereby reducing the leaf-scale UFP collection efficiency. It is suggested that the effects of leaf microroughness are less relevant to the UFP collection efficiency than are the leaf dimensions for the four broadleaf species explored here.

  9. Single particle characterization of ultrafine and accumulation mode particles from heavy duty diesel vehicles using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Toner, Stephen M; Sodeman, David A; Prather, Kimberly A

    2006-06-15

    The aerodynamic size and chemical composition of individual ultrafine and accumulation mode particle emissions (Da = 50-300 nm) were characterized to determine mass spectral signatures for heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) emissions that can be used for atmospheric source apportionment. As part of this study, six in-use HDDVs were operated on a chassis dynamometer using the heavy heavy-duty diesel truck (HHDDT) five-cycle driving schedule under different simulated weight loads. The exhaust emissions were passed through a dilution/residence system to simulate atmospheric dilution conditions, after which an ultrafine aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UF-ATOFMS) was used to sample and characterize the HDDV exhaust particles in real-time. This represents the first study where refractory species including elemental carbon and metals are characterized directly in HDDV emissions using on-line mass spectrometry. The top three particle classes observed with the UF-ATOFMS comprise 91% of the total particles sampled and show signatures indicative of a combination of elemental carbon (EC) and engine lubricating oil. In addition to the vehicle make/year, the effects of driving cycle and simulated weight load on exhaust particle size and composition were investigated. PMID:16830561

  10. Ultrafine particles from electric appliances and cooking pans: experiments suggesting desorption/nucleation of sorbed organics as the primary source.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L A; Ott, W R; Weschler, C J

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafine particles are observed when metal surfaces, such as heating elements in electric appliances, or even empty cooking pans, are heated. The source of the particles has not been identified. We present evidence that particles >10 nm are not emitted directly from the heating elements or the metal surfaces. Using repeated heating of an electric burner, several types of cooking pans, and a steam iron, the increase in the number of particles (>10 nm) can be reduced to 0. After the devices are exposed to indoor air for several hours or days, subsequent heating results in renewed particle production, suggesting that organic matter has sorbed on their surfaces. Also, after a pan has been heated to the point that no increase in particles is observed, washing with detergent results in copious production of particles the next time the pan is heated. These observations suggest that detergent residue and organics sorbed from indoor air are the sources of the particles. We hypothesize that organic compounds are thermally desorbed from the hot surface as gaseous molecules; as they diffuse from the hot air near the pan into cooler air, selected compounds exceed their saturation concentration and nucleation occurs. PMID:25250820

  11. Response of spontaneously hypertensive rats to inhalation of fine and ultrafine particles from traffic: experimental controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kooter, Ingeborg M; Boere, A John F; Fokkens, Paul HB; Leseman, Daan LAC; Dormans, Jan AMA; Cassee, Flemming R

    2006-01-01

    Background Many epidemiological studies have shown that mass concentrations of ambient particulate matter (PM) are associated with adverse health effects in the human population. Since PM is still a very crude measure, this experimental study has explored the role of two distinct size fractions: ultrafine (<0.15 ?m) and fine (0.15- 2.5 ?m) PM. In a series of 2-day inhalation studies, spontaneously hypersensitive (SH) rats were exposed to fine, concentrated, ambient PM (fCAP) at a city background location or a combination of ultrafine and fine (u+fCAP) PM at a location dominated by traffic. We examined the effect on inflammation and both pathological and haematological indicators as markers of pulmonary and cardiovascular injury. Exposure concentrations ranged from 399 ?g/m3 to 3613 ?g/m3 for fCAP and from 269?g/m3 to 556 ?g/m3 for u+fCAP. Results Ammonium, nitrate, and sulphate ions accounted for 56 16% of the total fCAP mass concentrations, but only 17 6% of the u+fCAP mass concentrations. Unambiguous particle uptake in alveolar macrophages was only seen after u+fCAP exposures. Neither fCAP nor u+fCAP induced significant changes of cytotoxicity or inflammation in the lung. However, markers of oxidative stress (heme oxygenase-1 and malondialdehyde) were affected by both fCAP and u+fCAP exposure, although not always significantly. Additional analysis revealed heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels that followed a nonmonotonic function with an optimum at around 600 ?g/m3 for fCAP. As a systemic response, exposure to u+fCAP and fCAP resulted in significant decreases of the white blood cell concentrations. Conclusion Minor pulmonary and systemic effects are observed after both fine and ultrafine + fine PM exposure. These effects do not linearly correlate with the CAP mass. A greater component of traffic CAP and/or a larger proportion ultrafine PM does not strengthen the absolute effects. PMID:16700918

  12. Spatial variation of ultrafine particles and black carbon in two cities: results from a short-term measurement campaign.

    PubMed

    Klompmaker, Jochem O; Montagne, Denise R; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard; Brunekreef, Bert

    2015-03-01

    Recently, short-term monitoring campaigns have been carried out to investigate the spatial variation of air pollutants within cities. Typically, such campaigns are based on short-term measurements at relatively large numbers of locations. It is largely unknown how well these studies capture the spatial variation of long term average concentrations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the within-site temporal and between-site spatial variation of the concentration of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and black carbon (BC) in a short-term monitoring campaign. In Amsterdam and Rotterdam (the Netherlands) measurements of number counts of particles larger than 10nm as a surrogate for UFP and BC were performed at 80 sites per city. Each site was measured in three different seasons of 2013 (winter, spring, summer). Sites were selected from busy urban streets, urban background, regional background and near highways, waterways and green areas, to obtain sufficient spatial contrast. Continuous measurements were performed for 30 min per site between 9 and 16 h to avoid traffic spikes of the rush hour. Concentrations were simultaneously measured at a reference site to correct for temporal variation. We calculated within- and between-site variance components reflecting temporal and spatial variations. Variance ratios were compared with previous campaigns with longer sampling durations per sample (24h to 14 days). The within-site variance was 2.17 and 2.44 times higher than the between-site variance for UFP and BC, respectively. In two previous studies based upon longer sampling duration much smaller variance ratios were found (0.31 and 0.09 for UFP and BC). Correction for temporal variation from a reference site was less effective for the short-term monitoring campaign compared to the campaigns with longer duration. Concentrations of BC and UFP were on average 1.6 and 1.5 times higher at urban street compared to urban background sites. No significant differences between the other site types and urban background were found. The high within to between-site concentration variances may result in the loss of precision and low explained variance when average concentrations from short-term campaigns are used to develop land use regression models. PMID:25486637

  13. The Effects of Leaf Size and Micro-Roughness on the Collection Efficiency of Ultrafine Particles (UFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. W.; Lin, M. Y.; Khlystov, A.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    While the significance of ultra-fine particle (UFP) deposition onto vegetated surfaces is rarely questioned, how to incorporate leaf attributes into global climate models continues to draw research attention. How leaf dimension and micro-roughness impact UFP collection efficiency is explored here through wind-tunnel experiments across a wide range of broadleaf species. Ilex cornuta with its partially folded shape and sharp edges is shown to be more efficient at collecting UFP than the other flat broadleaf species, but less efficient than the needle-like coniferous species. This finding suggests that UFP collection efficiency is linked to leaf attributes (i.e., dimension and micro-roughness). Analogies to flat-plate boundary layer theory are used to explain these findings, where the laminar boundary layer is assumed to be pinned to the leaf surface. For scaling arguments with maximum simplicity, the solid boundary is flat and possesses a finite dimension and micro-roughness. These simplifications allow explicit description of the area-averaged velocity and diffusivity profiles as a function of leaf dimension and micro-roughness. Further assuming the boundary behaves as hydraulically smooth (roughness elements do not protrude outside the viscous sub-layer), the analysis here shows that longer leaf dimension allows for thicker laminar boundary layers to develop. A thicker laminar boundary layer depth in turn increases the overall resistance to UFP deposition due to an increase in the diffusional path length thereby reducing the leaf-scale UFP collection efficiency. The mean velocity and diffusivity profiles over hydraulically smooth surfaces are not altered by the presence of micro-roughness elements. However, rougher surfaces in hydraulically smooth flow lead to shorter depositing distances (i.e., shorter diffusional path length) from the boundary, which enhances the particle deposition velocity. When the mean micro-roughness height is sufficiently larger than the size of UFP but still embedded within the viscous sub-layer, the dependence of the UFP collection efficiency on the size of UFP vanishes. The proposed flat-plate boundary layer analogy explains the observed features of UFP collection efficiencies onto leaves.

  14. Contribution of gas and electric stoves to residential ultrafine particle concentrations between 2 and 64 nm: size distributions and emission and coagulation remission and coagulation rates.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lance; Wang, Fang; Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Persily, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Three indoor sources (a gas stove, an electric stove, and an electric toaster oven) of ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been studied in an instrumented test house on the campus of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Previous studies have reported the concentration of ultrafine particles indoors due to cooking, but have been limited to particles with diameters greater than 10 nm. New technology now makes it possible to measure particles as small as 2 nm. Therefore, NIST conducted a study to measure typical concentrations and estimate emission rates and coagulation rates of UFPs in the size range from 2 to 64 nm. More than 150 tests were completed. Peak concentrations from the gas and electric stovetop burners/coils occurred at a particle size of approximately 5 nm. Total number concentrations were as much as 10 times greater than reported in previous studies of particle sizes above 10 nm. Because of these high concentrations of very small particles, coagulation was the dominant process affecting the evolution of the size distribution after the source was turned off. The observed number concentration changes due to coagulation were fit by models including corrections for van der Waals and viscosity forces and fractal shapes. Indoor/outdoor ratios indicated that less than 5% of the <10 nm particles penetrated the house. This suggests that outdoor sources of these ultrafine particles will not contribute substantially to human exposure if indoor sources are present. PMID:19192775

  15. Size distribution of chemical elements and their source apportionment in ambient coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles in Shanghai urban summer atmosphere.

    PubMed

    L, Senlin; Zhang, Rui; Yao, Zhenkun; Yi, Fei; Ren, Jingjing; Wu, Minghong; Feng, Man; Wang, Qingyue

    2012-01-01

    Ambient coarse particles (diameter 1.8-10 microm), fine particles (diameter 0.1-1.8 microm), and ultrafine particles (diameter < 0.1 microm) in the atmosphere of the city of Shanghai were sampled during the summer of 2008 (from Aug 27 to Sep 08). Microscopic characterization of the particles was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Mass concentrations of Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, and Pb in the size-resolved particles were quantified by using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF). Source apportionment of the chemical elements was analyzed by means of an enrichment factor method. Our results showed that the average mass concentrations of coarse particles, fine particles and ultrafine particles in the summer air were 9.38 +/- 2.18, 8.82 +/- 3.52, and 2.02 +/- 0.41 microg/m3, respectively. The mass percentage of the fine particles accounted for 51.47% in the total mass of PM10, indicating that fine particles are the major component in the Shanghai ambient particles. SEM/EDX results showed that the coarse particles were dominated by minerals, fine particles by soot aggregates and fly ashes, and ultrafine particles by soot particles and unidentified particles. SRXRF results demonstrated that crustal elements were mainly distributed in the coarse particles, while heavy metals were in higher proportions in the fine particles. Source apportionment revealed that Si, K, Ca, Fe, Mn, Rb, and Sr were from crustal sources, and S, Cl, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, and Pb from anthropogenic sources. Levels of P, V, Cr, and Ni in particles might be contributed from multi-sources, and need further investigation. PMID:22893966

  16. Method for making fine and ultrafine spherical particles of zirconium titanate and other mixed metal oxide systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.

    2006-05-23

    Disclosed is a method for making amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate and crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate comprising the steps of mixing an aqueous solution of zirconium salt and an aqueous solution of titanium salt into a mixed solution having equal moles of zirconium and titanium and having a total salt concentration in the range from 0.01 M to about 0.5 M. A stearic dispersant and an organic solvent is added to the mixed salt solution, subjecting the zirconium salt and the titanium salt in the mixed solution to a coprecipitation reaction forming a solution containing amorphous spherical particles of zirconium titanate wherein the volume ratio of the organic solvent to aqueous part is in the range from 1 to 5. The solution of amorphous spherical particles is incubated in an oven at a temperature .ltoreq.100.degree. C. for a period of time .ltoreq.24 hours converting the amorphous particles to fine or ultrafine crystalline spherical particles of zirconium titanate.

  17. Synthesis of Supported Ultrafine Non-noble Subnanometer-Scale Metal Particles Derived from Metal-Organic Frameworks as Highly Efficient Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xinchen; Liu, Huizhen; Hou, Minqiang; Sun, Xiaofu; Han, Hongling; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Zhaofu; Han, Buxing

    2016-01-01

    The properties of supported non-noble metal particles with a size of less than 1?nm are unknown because their synthesis is a challenge. A strategy has now been created to immobilize ultrafine non-noble metal particles on supports using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as metal precursors. Ni/SiO2 and Co/SiO2 catalysts were synthesized with an average metal particle size of 0.9?nm. The metal nanoparticles were immobilized uniformly on the support with a metal loading of about 20?wt?%. Interestingly, the ultrafine non-noble metal particles exhibited very high activity for liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzene to cyclohexane even at 80?C, while Ni/SiO2 with larger Ni particles fabricated by a conventional method was not active under the same conditions. PMID:26617066

  18. The application of wavelet decomposition to quantify the local and regional sources of ultrafine particles in cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaliauskas, Kelly; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Yao, Xiaohong; Evans, Greg J.

    2014-10-01

    This study explores the application of wavelet decomposition as a means to distinguish between local and regional sources of ultrafine particles (UFP). Particle number concentrations were measured at a central site, two downtown sites, and four residential sites located across Toronto, Canada. Using a wavelet decomposition algorithm, particle concentration time series were separated into two signals: high frequency local-to-neighbourhood scale sources and low frequency urban-to-regional scale sources and processes. At the field sites, local-neighbourhood sources contributed between 13 and 32% of the total particle concentration. The urban-regional signal at each field site exhibited stronger correlation and greater homogeneity with respect to the central site than the original concentration time series. In contrast, the high frequency local-neighbourhood source signals exhibited limited correlation and high heterogeneity with respect to the central site. Traffic volume within a 2.5 km buffer explained 87% of the variability in the local-neighbourhood level signal observed between field sites while no significant association with traffic was found for the original particle number concentration data. This study has demonstrated that wavelet decomposition can be a useful tool for estimating exposure to UFP from local-neighbourhood and urban-regional scale sources and processes.

  19. A comparison of strategies for estimation of ultrafine particle number concentrations in urban air pollution monitoring networks.

    PubMed

    Reggente, Matteo; Peters, Jan; Theunis, Jan; Van Poppel, Martine; Rademaker, Michael; De Baets, Bernard; Kumar, Prashant

    2015-04-01

    We propose three estimation strategies (local, remote and mixed) for ultrafine particles (UFP) at three sites in an urban air pollution monitoring network. Estimates are obtained through Gaussian process regression based on concentrations of gaseous pollutants (NOx, O3, CO) and UFP. As local strategy, we use local measurements of gaseous pollutants (local covariates) to estimate UFP at the same site. As remote strategy, we use measurements of gaseous pollutants and UFP from two independent sites (remote covariates) to estimate UFP at a third site. As mixed strategy, we use local and remote covariates to estimate UFP. The results suggest: UFP can be estimated with good accuracy based on NOx measurements at the same location; it is possible to estimate UFP at one location based on measurements of NOx or UFP at two remote locations; the addition of remote UFP to local NOx, O3 or CO measurements improves models' performance. PMID:25681816

  20. Determinants of ultrafine particle exposures in transportation environments: findings of an 8-month survey conducted in Montral, Canada.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, Scott; Dufresne, Andr; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Joseph, Lawrence

    2008-11-01

    An 8-month sampling campaign was conducted in Montral, Canada to explore determinants of ultrafine particle (UFP) exposures in transportation environments and to develop models to predict such exposures. Between April and November 2006, UFP (0.02-1 mum) count exposure data were collected for one researcher during 80 morning and evening commutes including a 0.5-km walk, a 3-km bus ride, and a 26-km automobile ride in each direction. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, and wind speed/direction data were collected for each transit period and the positions of bus and automobile windows were recorded. Mixing heights were also estimated. Morning UFP exposures were significantly greater than those in the evening, with the highest levels observed in the automobile and the lowest while walking. Wind speed and mixing height were highly correlated, and as a result only wind speed was considered in multivariable models owing to the accessibility of quantitative hourly monitoring data. In these models, each 10 degrees C increase in morning temperature was associated with decreases of 14,560/cm(3) (95% CI=11,111 to 18,020), 8160/cm(3) (95% CI=5060 to 11,260), and 11,310/cm(3) (95% CI=6820 to 15,810) for UFP exposures in walk, bus, and automobile environments, respectively. Likewise, each 10-km/h increase in morning wind speed corresponded to decreases of 8252/cm(3) (95% CI=5130 to 11,360), 6210/cm(3) (95% CI=3420 to 9000), and 6350/cm(3) (95% CI=2440 to 10,260) for UFP exposures in walk, bus, and automobile environments, respectively. Similar trends were observed in the evening hours. In an evaluation of model performance, moderate correlations were observed between measured and predicted UFP exposures on new bus (r=0.65) and automobile (r=0.77) routes. Further research is required to incorporate variables such as traffic density and vehicle ventilation settings into the models presented. PMID:18183044

  1. Fine and Ultrafine Particle Characterization and Modeling in High-Speed Milling of 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghbani, Imed; Songmene, Victor; Khettabi, Riad

    2009-02-01

    In this study, an experimental investigation was carried out on fine and ultrafine metallic dust emission during high-speed milling of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy in wet and dry conditions. Measurements of dust emission were conducted using a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer and an aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer. These instruments were used to characterize particles in the micrometer and the nanometer size ranges. It was confirmed that the machining process produces nanoparticles as small as 10 nm and that the characteristics of the generated nanoparticles are not significantly influenced by the cutting conditions. The cutting forces and chip compression ratio were measured to validate the proposed dust generation model based on an energy approach. Good agreement was observed between the model and the experimental measurements for the investigated conditions. It was demonstrated that the majority of generated dust is caused by deformations in the primary shear zone. In addition, the percentage of generated dust is significantly influenced by deformation conditions in the chip formation zone. It was found that high cutting speeds could reduce the percentage of the generated particles during the milling process.

  2. Ultrafine particle emissions by in-use diesel buses of various generations at low-load regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, L.; Baibikov, V.; Comte, P.; Czerwinski, J.; Mayer, A.; Veinblat, M.; Zimmerli, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) are major contributors to air pollution due to their easy gas-like penetration into the human organism, causing adverse health effects. This study analyzes UFP emissions by buses of different technologies (from Euro II till Euro V EEV - Enhanced Environmentally-friendly Vehicle) at low-load regimes. Additionally, the emission-reduction potential of retrofitting with a diesel particle filter (DPF) is demonstrated. A comparison of the measured, engine-out, particle number concentrations (PNC) for buses of different technological generations shows that no substantial reduction of engine-out emissions at low-load operating modes is observed for newer bus generations. Retrofitting the in-use urban and interurban buses of Euro II till Euro IV technologies by the VERT-certified DPF confirmed its high efficiency in reduction of UFP emissions. Particle-count filtration efficiency values of the retrofit DPF were found to be extremely high - greater than 99.8%, similar to that of the OEM filter in the Euro V bus.

  3. An electrical sensor for long-term monitoring of ultrafine particles in workplaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanki, Timo; Tikkanen, Juha; Janka, Kauko; Taimisto, Pekka; Lehtimki, Matti

    2011-07-01

    Pegasor Oy Ltd. (Finland) has developed a diffusion charging measurement device that enables continuous monitoring of fine particle concentration at a low initial and lifecycle cost. The innovation, for which an international process and apparatus patent has been applied for, opens doors for monitoring nanoparticle concentrations in workplaces. The Pegasor Particle Sensor (PPS) operates by electrostatically charging particles passing through the sensor and then measuring the current caused by the charged particles as they leave the sensor. The particles never touch the sensor and so never accumulate on its surfaces or need to be cleaned off. The sensor uses an ejector pump to draw a constant sample flow into the sensing area where it is mixed with the clean, charged pump flow air (provided by an external source). The sample flow containing charged particles passes through the sensor. The current generated by the charge leaving the detection volume is measured and related to the particle surface area. This system is extremely simple and reliable - no contact, no moving parts, and all critical parts of the sensor are constantly cleaned by a stream of fresh, filtered air. Due to the ejector pump, the sample flow, and respectively the sensor response is independent of the flow and pressure conditions around the sampling inlet. Tests with the Pegasor Particle Sensor have been conducted in a laboratory, and at a workplace producing nanoparticles for glass coatings. A new measurement protocol has been designed to ensure that process workers are not exposed to unusually high nanoparticle concentrations at any time during their working day. One sensor is placed inside the process line, and a light alarm system indicates the worker not to open any protective shielding or ventilation systems before concentration inside has reached background levels. The benefits of PPS in industrial hygiene are that the same monitoring technology can be used at the source as well as at the worker breathing zone. Up to eight sensors can be installed in series for centralized monitoring of the whole process in real time.

  4. A PEMS study of the emissions of gaseous pollutants and ultrafine particles from gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng; Lou, Diming; Hu, Zhiyuan; Feng, Qian; Chen, Yiran; Chen, Changhong; Tan, Piqiang; Yao, Di

    2013-10-01

    On-road emission measurements of gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles were conducted by a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) in Shanghai, China. Horiba OBS 2200 and TSI EEPS 3090 were employed to detect gaseous and ultrafine particle emissions during the tests. The driving-based emission factors of gaseous pollutants and particle mass and number were obtained on various road types. The average NOx emission factors of the diesel bus, diesel car, and gasoline car were 8.86, 0.68, and 0.17 g km-1, all of which were in excess of their emission limits. The particle number emission factors were 7.06 1014, 6.08 1014, and 1.57 1014 km-1, generally higher than the results for similar vehicle types reported in the previous studies. The size distributions of the particles emitted from the diesel vehicles were mainly concentrated in the accumulation mode, while those emitted from the gasoline car were mainly distributed in the nucleation mode. Both gaseous and particle emission rates exhibit significant correlations with the change in vehicle speed and power demand. The lowest emission rates for each vehicle type were produced during idling. The highest emission rates for each vehicle type were generally found in high-VSP bins. The particle number emission rates of the gasoline car show the strongest growth trend with increasing VSP and speed. The particle number emission for the gasoline car increased by 3 orders of magnitude from idling to the highest VSP and driving speed conditions. High engine power caused by aggressive driving or heavy loads is the main contributor to high emissions for these vehicles in real-world situations.

  5. Comparative studies on exenatide-loaded poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles prepared by a novel ultra-fine particle processing system and spray drying.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chune; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoying; Mei, Liling; Pan, Xin; Li, Ge; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the properties of exenatide-loaded poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles (Ex-PLGA-MPs) prepared by a novel ultra-fine particle processing system (UPPS) and spray drying. UPPS is a proprietary technology developed by our group based on the disk rotation principle. Characteristics of the MPs including morphology, particle size distribution, drug content, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release were comparatively studied. Cytotoxicity of the MPs was examined on A549 cells and the pharmacodynamics was investigated in vivo in type 2 diabetes Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Ex-PLGA-MPs prepared by UPPS showed larger particle size, denser surface, greater encapsulation efficiency, less initial burst release, and stable sustained release for more than one month in vitro as compared with the spray drying MPs. Meanwhile, the UPPS MPs effectively controlled the body growth rate and blood glucose in diabetes rats for at least three weeks after a single injection, while the spray drying MPs showed effective control period of about two weeks. UPPS technology was demonstrated to manufacture Ex-PLGA-MPs as a potential sustained release protein/polypeptide delivery system, which is an alternative method for the most commonly used spray drying. This comparative research provides a new guidance for microparticle preparation technology. PMID:26037698

  6. Emissions of Ultrafine Particles and Volatile Organic Compounds from Commercially Available Desktop Three-Dimensional Printers with Multiple Filaments.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Parham; Zhao, Dan; Pouzet, Claire; Crain, Neil E; Stephens, Brent

    2016-02-01

    Previous research has shown that desktop 3D printers can emit large numbers of ultrafine particles (UFPs, particles less than 100 nm) and some hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during printing, although very few filament and 3D printer combinations have been tested to date. Here we quantify emissions of UFPs and speciated VOCs from five commercially available filament extrusion desktop 3D printers utilizing up to nine different filaments by controlled experiments in a test chamber. Median estimates of time-varying UFP emission rates ranged from ∼10(8) to ∼10(11) min(-1) across all tested combinations, varying primarily by filament material and, to a lesser extent, bed temperature. The individual VOCs emitted in the largest quantities included caprolactam from nylon-based and imitation wood and brick filaments (ranging from ∼2 to ∼180 μg/min), styrene from acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) filaments (ranging from ∼10 to ∼110 μg/min), and lactide from polylactic acid (PLA) filaments (ranging from ∼4 to ∼5 μg/min). Results from a screening analysis of potential exposure to these products in a typical small office environment suggest caution should be used when operating many of the printer and filament combinations in poorly ventilated spaces or without the aid of combined gas and particle filtration systems. PMID:26741485

  7. Contribution of various microenvironments to the daily personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Personal monitoring coupled with GPS tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Kjeldsen, Birthe Uldahl; Olsen, Yulia; Schipperijn, Jasper; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Toftum, Jørn; Loft, Steffen; Clausen, Geo

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) may have adverse health effects. Central monitoring stations do not represent the personal exposure to UFP accurately. Few studies have previously focused on personal exposure to UFP. Sixty non-smoking residents living in Copenhagen, Denmark were asked to carry a backpack equipped with a portable monitor, continuously recording particle number concentrations (PN), in order to measure the real-time individual exposure over a period of ∼48 h. A GPS logger was carried along with the particle monitor and allowed us to estimate the contribution of UFP exposure occurring in various microenvironments (residence, during active and passive transport, other indoor and outdoor environments) to the total daily exposure. On average, the fractional contribution of each microenvironment to the daily integrated personal exposure roughly corresponded to the fractions of the day the subjects spent in each microenvironment. The home environment accounted for 50% of the daily personal exposure. Indoor environments other than home or vehicles contributed with ∼40%. The highest median UFP concentration was obtained during passive transport (vehicles). However, being in transit or outdoors contributed 5% or less to the daily exposure. Additionally, the subjects recorded in a diary the periods when they were at home. With this approach, 66% of the total daily exposure was attributable to the home environment. The subjects spent 28% more time at home according to the diary, compared to the GPS. These results may indicate limitations of using diaries, but also possible inaccuracy and miss-classification in the GPS data.

  8. Characterizing ultrafine particle growth at a pine forest site influenced by anthropogenic pollution during BEACHON-RoMBAS-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Hodzic, A.; Smith, J. N.; Ortega, J. V.; de Foy, B.

    2013-12-01

    Representing the formation and growth of ultrafine particles in chemistry and climate models is challenging due to the complexity of processes involved, which leads to uncertainties in aerosol size distributions and their effects on Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). The Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (RoMBAS) was an intensive measurement campaign as part of the broader BEACHON (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen) project. This took place during July - August 2011 at the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory. The location is situated in the rural-urban interface along the Colorado Front Range and allows us to study the effects of aerosol formation and other atmospheric chemistry phenomenon in a forested region with periodic urban influences. Surface measurements of gases, aerosols and meteorological parameters from this campaign were used to examine the formation and growth processes leading to observed Aiken-mode Particle burst Events (APEs), and to quantify their effects on aerosol properties and cloud condensation nuclei CCN concentrations. Results suggest that APEs were observed at the forest site in the early afternoon associated with the arrival of anthropogenic plumes from Denver and Colorado Springs. Mean number concentrations of ultrafine particles (4-30nm) typically exceeded 5000 cm-3 during APEs and these elevated concentrations were correlated with elevated SO2. The Weather Research and Forecasting model with on-line Chemistry (WRF-Chem) was used to model APEs during BEACHON-RoMBAS. The model was updated to include an activation nucleation (AN) scheme with an empirical representation of aerosol nucleation rate, and subsequent growth due to the condensation of organic and inorganic vapors. Comparisons with ground measurements show that the updated model reasonably captures aerosol number concentrations and size distribution during APEs, as well as CN and CCN concentrations. Model results suggest that anthropogenic SO2 trigger APEs, and that the condensation of monoterpene oxidation products onto freshly nucleated particles drives their growth. The simulated growth rate is 1.2 nm/hr which is comparable with 2 nm/hr in the measurement. Comparing with a sensitivity test excluding nucleation process in the model, model calculations with AN show the presence of APEs in the forest area tends to modify the composition of small aerosols (<100nm), leading to 2.3 times higher values of sulfate aerosols.Therefore, the predicted volume-averaged hygroscopicity parameter and CCN concentration are significantly influenced.

  9. Intra-urban variation of ultrafine particles as evaluated by process related land use and pollutant driven regression modelling.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, Yahya; Ruths, Matthias; Lwner, Marc-Oliver; Weber, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    The microscale intra-urban variation of ultrafine particle concentrations (UFP, diameter Dp<100 nm) and particle number size distributions was studied by two statistical regression approaches. The models were applied to a 1 km2 study area in Braunschweig, Germany. A land use regression model (LUR) using different urban morphology parameters as input is compared to a multiple regression type model driven by pollutant and meteorological parameters (PDR). While the LUR model was trained with UFP concentration the PDR model was trained with measured particle number size distribution data. The UFP concentration was then calculated from the modelled size distributions. Both statistical approaches include explanatory variables that try to address the 'process chain' of particle emission, dilution and deposition. LUR explained 74% and 85% of the variance of UFP for the full data set with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 668 cm(-3) and 1639 cm(-3) in summer and winter, respectively. PDR explained 56% and 74% of the variance with RMSE of 4066 cm(-3) and 6030 cm(-3) in summer and winter, respectively. Both models are capable to depict the spatial variation of UFP across the study area and in different outdoor microenvironments. The deviation from measured UFP concentrations is smaller in the LUR model than in PDR. The PDR model is well suited to predict urban particle number size distributions from the explanatory variables (total particle number concentration, black carbon and wind speed). The urban morphology parameters in the LUR model are able to resolve size dependent concentration variations but not as adequately as PDR. PMID:26204051

  10. Development of ultrafine grains and related properties in Hadfield manganese steels. [Superplasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A.; Sherby, O.D.

    1987-06-16

    Through appropriate thermomechanical processing ultrafine grains were developed in Hadfield manganese steels. The austenite grains, 2- to 8-..mu..m size, were stabilized against grain growth by dispersions of fine carbides, typically less than 1 ..mu..m. The steels contained from 1.2 to 1.7 wt % carbon and 12.3 to 16.3 wt % manganese. The processed materials were evaluated for superplastic properties at elevated temperatures (750 to 900/sup 0/C). Values for the strain-rate sensitivity exponent (m) in the expression sigma = k epsilon dot/sup m/ ranged from 0.37 to 0.65. The value of m was found to depend on composition, grain size, temperature, and strain rate. At 23/sup 0/C the fine-grain steels showed higher yield strengths and hardness values, but lower ductility, relative to values reported for commercially processed materials.

  11. Development of the electroacoustic dewatering (EAD) process for fine/ultrafine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.P.; Kim, B.C.; Menton, R.; Senapati, N.; Criner, C.L.; Jirjis, B.; Muralidhara, H.S.; Chou, Y.L.; Wu, H.; Hsieh, P. ); Johnson, H.R.; Eason, R. ); Chiang, S.M.; Cheng, Y.S. ); Kehoe, D. )

    1991-10-31

    Battelle (Columbus, Ohio) undertook development of its electro-acoustic (EAD) process to demonstrate its commercial potential for continuous dewatering of fine and ultrafine coals. The pilot plant and laboratory results, provided in this report, show that a commercial-size EAD machine is expected to economically achieve the dewatering targets for {minus}100 mesh and {minus}325 mesh coals. The EAD process utilizes a synergistic combination of electric and acoustic (e.g., ultrasonic) fields in conjunction with conventional mechanical processes, such as belt presses, screw presses, plate and frame filter presses, and vacuum filters. The application of EAD is typically most beneficial after a filter cake is formed utilizing conventional mechanical filtration. (VC)

  12. Development of the electroacoustic dewatering (EAD) process for fine/ultrafine coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.P.; Kim, B.C.; Menton, R.; Senapati, N.; Criner, C.L.; Jirjis, B.; Muralidhara, H.S.; Chou, Y.L.; Wu, H.; Hsieh, P.; Johnson, H.R.; Eason, R.; Chiang, S.M.; Cheng, Y.S.; Kehoe, D.

    1991-10-31

    Battelle (Columbus, Ohio) undertook development of its electro-acoustic (EAD) process to demonstrate its commercial potential for continuous dewatering of fine and ultrafine coals. The pilot plant and laboratory results, provided in this report, show that a commercial-size EAD machine is expected to economically achieve the dewatering targets for {minus}100 mesh and {minus}325 mesh coals. The EAD process utilizes a synergistic combination of electric and acoustic (e.g., ultrasonic) fields in conjunction with conventional mechanical processes, such as belt presses, screw presses, plate and frame filter presses, and vacuum filters. The application of EAD is typically most beneficial after a filter cake is formed utilizing conventional mechanical filtration. (VC)

  13. Modification of laminar flow ultrafine condensation particle counters for the enhanced detection of 1 nm condensation nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; McMurry, P. H.; Wang, J.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes simple modifications to thermally diffusive laminar flow ultrafine condensation particle counters (UCPCs) that allow detection of {approx}1 nm condensation nuclei with much higher efficiencies than have been previously reported. These nondestructive modifications were applied to a commercial butanol based UCPC (TSI 3025A) and to a diethylene glycol-based UCPC (UMN DEG-UCPC). Size and charge dependent detection efficiencies using the modified UCPCs (BNL 3025A and BNL DEGUCPC) were measured with high resolution mobility classified aerosols composed of NaCl, W, molecular ion standards of tetraalkyl ammonium bromide, and neutralizer-generated ions. With negatively charged NaCl aerosol, the BNL 3025A and BNL DEGUCPC achieved detection efficiencies of 37% (90x increase over TSI 3025A) at 1.68 nm mobility diameter (1.39 nm geometric diameter) and 23% (8x increase over UMN DEG-UCPC) at 1.19 nm mobility diameter (0.89 nm geometric diameter), respectively. Operating conditions for both UCPCs were identified that allowed negatively charged NaCl and W particles, but not negative ions of exactly the same mobility size, to be efficiently detected. This serendipitous material dependence, which is not fundamentally understood, suggests that vapor condensation might sometimes allow for the discrimination between air 'ions' and charged 'particles.' As a detector in a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a UCPC with this strong material dependence would allow for more accurate measurements of sub-2 nm aerosol size distributions due to the reduced interference from neutralizer-generated ions and atmospheric ions, and provide increased sensitivity for the determination of nucleation rates and initial particle growth rates.

  14. Ultra-fine coal characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Odekirk, J.R.; Baltich, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    The objectives of this Preparation Program include beneficiation of coal to produce high-quality solid or slurry fuel as alternatives for fuel oil and natural gas. Fine grinding is a necessary prerequisite if physical separations are being considered during such beneficiation since the impurity minerals are very fine-grained and dispersed throughout the coal mass. It is the purpose of this research to study the properties of ultra-fine coal since the behavior of such coal can be different from the behavior of the coarser coal normally encountered during cleaning. Research was divided into six tasks: (1) Sample Collection and Preparation: Suitable samples of the base case coal and eight other representative coals were collected and prepared for the subsequent test work. (2) Chemical and Bulk Property Determinations: Compositions, washabilities, moisture levels, and other coal properties which effect behavior of the fine coal in beneficiation systems were determined for each coal. (3) Mineral Liberation Studies: Liberation of the mineral matter in the coal achieved by fine and ultra-fine grinding and the degree of liberation was determined. (4) Hydrodynamic Study of Particles and Slurries: The deviation of individual fine coal particles from Stoke's Law free-settling behavior was determined. (5) Study of the Surface Properties of Particles: The surface characteristics of fine particles of coal which relate to the effectiveness of beneficiation processes were studied. These included electrical charges in aqueous media (zeta potential) and the wettability of the coals (contact angles), and (6) Predictive Model Development: Empirical predictive equations were developed relating measurable coal characteristics of ultra-fine coal to the response of the coal to froth flotation. Accomplishments are discussed in this report. 55 refs., 53 figs., 64 tabs.

  15. Lead and cadmium phytoavailability and human bioaccessibility for vegetables exposed to soil or atmospheric pollution by process ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tiantian; Leveque, Thibault; Shahid, Muhammad; Foucault, Yann; Mombo, Stphane; Dumat, Camille

    2014-09-01

    When plants are exposed to airborne particles, they can accumulate metals in their edible portions through root or foliar transfer. There is a lack of knowledge on the influence of plant exposure conditions on human bioaccessibility of metals, which is of particular concern with the increase in urban gardening activities. Lettuce, radish, and parsley were exposed to metal-rich ultrafine particles from a recycling factory via field atmospheric fallouts or polluted soil. Total lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in of the edible plant parts and their human bioaccessibility were measured, and Pb translocation through the plants was studied using Pb isotopic analysis. The Pb and Cd bioaccessibility measured for consumed parts of the different polluted plants was significantly higher for root exposure (70% for Pb and 89% for Cd in lettuce) in comparison to foliar exposure (40% for Pb and 69% for Cd in lettuce). The difference in metal bioaccessibility could be linked to the metal compartmentalization and speciation changes in relation to exposure conditions. Metal nature strongly influences the measured bioaccessibility: Cd presents higher bioaccessibility in comparison to Pb. In the case of foliar exposure, a significant translocation of Pb from leaves toward the roots was observed. To conclude, the type of pollutant and the method of exposure significantly influences the phytoavailability and human bioaccessibility of metals, especially in relation to the contrasting phenomena involved in the rhizosphere and phyllosphere. The conditions of plant exposure must therefore be taken into account for environmental and health risk assessment. PMID:25603245

  16. Crucial Role for Outdoor Chemistry in Ultrafine Particle Formation in Modern Office Buildings.

    PubMed

    Carslaw, Nicola; Ashmore, Mike; Terry, Andrew C; Carslaw, David C

    2015-09-15

    In the developed world, we spend most of our time indoors, where we receive the majority of our exposure to air pollution. This paper reports model simulations of PM2.5 and ozone concentrations in identical landscape offices in three European cities: Athens, Helsinki, and Milan. We compare concentrations during an intense heatwave in August 2003 with a meteorologically more typical August in 2009. During the heatwave, average indoor ozone concentrations during office hours were 44, 19, and 41 ppb in Athens, Helsinki, and Milan respectively, enhanced by 7, 4, and 17 ppb respectively relative to 2009. Total predicted PM2.5 concentrations were 13.5, 3.6, and 17.2 ?g m(-3) in Athens, Helsinki, and Milan respectively, enhanced by 0.5, 0.4, and 6.7 ?g m(-3) respectively relative to 2009: the three cities were affected to differing extents by the heatwave. A significant portion of the indoor PM2.5 derived from gas-phase chemistry outdoors, producing 2.5, 0.8, and 4.8 ?g m(-3) of the total concentrations in Athens, Helsinki, and Milan, respectively. Despite filtering office inlet supplies to remove outdoor particles, gas-phase precursors for particles can still enter offices, where conditions are ripe for new particles to form, particularly where biogenic emissions are important outdoors. This result has important implications for indoor air quality, particularly given the current trend for green walls on buildings, which will provide a potential source of biogenic emissions near to air inlet systems. PMID:26301707

  17. ASSESSMENT OF REGIONAL DEPOSITION DISTRIBUTION OF INHALED ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICLES IN HUMAN LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deposition site and dose of inhaled particles are key determinants in health risk assessment of particulate pollutants. Previous lung deposition studies have dealt largely with total lung deposition measurement. However, particle deposition does not take place uniformly in the lu...

  18. Development of a High-Strength Ultrafine-Grained Ferritic Steel Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanifard, Roohollah; Farhangi, Hasan; Novinrooz, Abdul Javad; Moniri, Samira

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the microstructural and mechanical properties of 12YWT oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS)-ferritic steel nanocomposite. According to the annealing results obtained from X-ray diffraction line profile analysis on mechanically alloyed powders milled for 80 hours, the hot extrusion at 1123 K (850 C) resulted in a nearly equiaxed ultrafine structure with an ultimate tensile strength of 1470 MPa, yield strength of 1390 MPa, and total elongation of 13 pct at room temperature comparable with high-strength 14YWT ODS steel. Maximum total elongation was found at 973 K (600 C) where fractography of the tensile specimen showed a fully ductile dimple feature compared with the splitting cracks and very fine dimpled structure observed at room temperature. The presence of very small particles on the wall of dimples at 1073 K (800 C) with nearly chemical composition of the matrix alloy was attributed to the activation of the boundaries decohesion mechanism as a result of diffusion of solute atoms. The results of Charpy impact test also indicated significant improvement of transition temperature with respect to predecessor 12YWT because of the decreased grain size and more homogeneity of grain size distribution. Hence, this alloy represented a good compromise between the strength and Charpy impact properties.

  19. Pulmonary Delivery of an Ultra-Fine Oxytocin Dry Powder Formulation: Potential for Treatment of Postpartum Haemorrhage in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Jibriil P.; Bischof, Robert J.; Nassta, Gemma C.; Olerile, Livesey D.; Russell, Adrian S.; Meiser, Felix; Parkington, Helena C.; Coleman, Harold A.; Morton, David A. V.; McIntosh, Michelle P.

    2013-01-01

    Oxytocin is recommended by the World Health Organisation as the most effective uterotonic for the prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage. The requirement for parenteral administration by trained healthcare providers and the need for the drug solution to be maintained under cold-chain storage limit the use of oxytocin in the developing world. In this study, a spray-dried ultrafine formulation of oxytocin was developed with an optimal particle size diameter (1-5 m) to facilitate aerosolised delivery via the lungs. A powder formulation of oxytocin, using mannitol, glycine and leucine as carriers, was prepared with a volume-based median particle diameter of 1.9 m. Oxytocin content in the formulation was assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and was found to be unchanged after spray-drying. Ex vivo contractility studies utilising human and ovine uterine tissue indicated no difference in the bioactivity of oxytocin before and after spray-drying. Uterine electromyographic (EMG) activity in postpartum ewes following pulmonary (in vivo) administration of oxytocin closely mimicked that observed immediately postpartum (0-12 h following normal vaginal delivery of the lamb). In comparison to the intramuscular injection, pulmonary administration of an oxytocin dry powder formulation to postpartum ewes resulted in generally similar EMG responses, however a more rapid onset of uterine EMG activity was observed following pulmonary administration (129 18 s) than intramuscular injection (275 22 s). This is the first study to demonstrate the potential for oxytocin to elicit uterine activity after systemic absorption as an aerosolised powder from the lungs. Aerosolised oxytocin has the potential to provide a stable and easy to administer delivery system for effective prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage in resource-poor settings in the developing world. PMID:24376618

  20. A comparative study on the ultrafine particle episodes induced by vehicle exhaust: A crude oil refinery and ship emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzlez, Yenny; Rodrguez, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    A study on the contribution of vehicle exhausts, ships and an oil refinery emission to the ambient air concentration of ultrafine particles (UFPs) is presented. It is based on a data set of particle number coarser than 2.5 nm (N), black carbon (BC), gaseous pollutants (NOx, SO2, CO and O3), PM2.5 and PM10 measured from 2008 to 2010 in the ambient air of Santa Cruz de Tenerife City, where a previous study found an association between hospitalizations due to heart failure and exposure to UFPs in the ambient air. The observed relationship between N, BC and gaseous pollutants allowed segregating UFP concentrations in a set of components linked to each source. It was found that vehicle exhausts contribute to the background of UFPs, whereas high UFP episodes were due to the emissions of the refinery and ships. The concentration of UFP linked to vehicle exhaust emissions maximized in the morning (07:00-09:00 GMT, 5000-25,000 cm- 3 = 25th-75th percentile), whereas those linked to ship (15,000-45,000 cm- 3) and refinery (25,000-95,000 cm- 3) emissions maximized in the 10:00-17:00 GMT period due to the effects of meteorology and photochemistry. It was found that the UFP concentrations were more sensitive to the fresh emissions of the three sources than PM2.5, which was mostly linked to aged fine particles (0.1-1 ?m) of the urban background. BC was the better tracer of vehicle exhaust emissions. It was concluded that the simultaneous monitoring of UFP, BC and PM2.5 is a suitable strategy of tracing aerosol pollutants of different nature (fresh vs. aged) and from different sources.

  1. Evaluation of Multi-Year Continuous Measurements of Ultrafine Particles at Two Near-Road Stations in Toronto, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Sofowote, U.; Debosz, J.; Munoz, T.; Whitelaw, C.

    2013-12-01

    Particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 100 nanometre (nm) are referred to as ultrafine particles (UFPs). Relative to fine and course particles, UFPs have greater potential to be suspended in air for a longer time and absorb toxic chemicals due to their larger surface areas per unit mass. UFPs could penetrate deep into the respiratory or cardiovascular systems and pose adverse health effects. In urban environments, primary sources of UFPs are from road traffic emissions and account for most of the total particle numbers. Controls on UPFs rely on better understanding of their emission sources and environmental behaviour. Ontario Ministry of the Environment have monitored UFPs since 2010 at two near-road stations in Toronto by using TSI 3031 UFP monitors. The two monitoring stations are approximately 20-30 meters adjacent to major arterial roads with over 20,000 vehicles per day. UFPs concentrations were monitored using six size channels: 20-30nm, 30-50nm, 50-70nm, 70-100nm, 100-200nm, and 200-450nm. Data are collected at time intervals of 11 or 15 minutes and averaged hourly. Concurrent measurements include wind speeds, wind directions, and concentrations of other air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and black carbon. Data influenced by road-side traffic emissions were filtered by wind direction within 45° of normal to the road and wind speed greater than 1 m/s. Number concentrations were found higher for particles with sizes of 20-30nm and 30-50nm than for other sizes of UFPs. The observed particle number distributions are generally consistent with the theoretical understanding of particle nuclei mode and accumulation mode. During the day, for UFPs with sizes of 20-30nm and 30-50nm, elevated number concentrations were observed in morning traffic hours and to a less extent in the late afternoon. The elevated UFPs number concentrations coincided with nitrogen oxides and black carbon. Moreover, higher number concentrations were found on weekdays than weekends. The observations suggest that UFPs are mostly from traffic emissions. This presentation will provide an overview of the 3-year continuous near-road UPFs monitoring in Toronto and discuss how different factors influence number concentrations and environmental behaviour of UFPs.

  2. Dynamic variations of ultrafine, fine and coarse particles at the Lu-Lin background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Chieh; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Lin, Neng-Huei; Lee, Chung-Te; Roam, Gwo-Dong; Pui, David Y. H.

    2013-10-01

    The characteristics of atmospheric ultrafine particles (i.e. <100 nm, nanoparticles or PM0.1), PM2.5 and PM10 were studied at the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (LABS, 2862 m a.s.l., Taiwan) as part of the 7SEAS/Dongsha campaign. Sampling was conducted in July and August of 2009 and September to November of 2010, during which two 96-h and four 72-h PM samples were taken. Real-time particle size distributions were measured continuously from July to August of 2009 and July to November of 2010. PM0.1, PM2.5 and PM10 were collected by using two MOUDIs (micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor, MSP 110) and a Dichotomous PM10 sampler (Andersen SA-241) while real-time size distributions of particles of 5.5-350 nm in diameter were measured by an SMPS (scanning mobility particle sizer, TSI 3936). Filter samples were analyzed for gravimetric mass and chemical compositions, including organic carbon (OC), element carbon (EC), water-soluble ions and trace elements. Meteorology parameters and gaseous O3 and CO concentrations were also monitored along with the SMPS data for studying particle nucleation, condensation, SOA (secondary organic aerosol) formation and long-range air pollutant transport at the LABS. SMPS data showed that nanoparticle concentrations at the LABS remained relatively stable at low level (300-500 #/cm3) during the nighttime (22:00-04:00), increased during daytime, and reached a maximum (2000-4000 #/cm3) in the afternoon (12:00-16:00). The NMD (number median diameter) showed an opposite trend with the peak number concentrations observed in the afternoon corresponding to the smallest NMD (20-40 nm). These results indicate the dominance of local sources rather than the transport from other atmospheric air because that the lifetime of nanoparticles was only few minutes. Chemical analysis of filter samples showed that the concentrations of trace elements K and Mn, which serve as biomass burning markers, were elevated in the fine particle fractions during November 9-12th when the air mass passed through South and Southeast Asia prior to reaching the LABS. The concentrations of K and Mn would have been low if the aerosols had local origins The biomass burning derived K was found in all fine particle samples at the LABS suggesting that the free troposphere around Taiwan is frequently impacted by the long-range transport of biomass burning plumes via the westerly winds.

  3. Chemical and physical properties of ultrafine diesel exhaust particles sampled downstream of a catalytic trap.

    PubMed

    Grose, Melissa; Sakurai, Hiromu; Savstrom, Jake; Stolzenburg, Mark R; Watts, Winthrop F; Morgan, Christopher G; Murray, Ian P; Twigg, Martyn V; Kittelson, David B; McMurry, Peter H

    2006-09-01

    The chemical and physical properties of exhaust particles produced by a Caterpillar 3176 C-12 heavy duty diesel engine equipped with a catalytic trap (CRT) are reported. The engine was operated at 600 Nm and 1500 rpm, using fuels containing 15 and 49 ppm sulfur. A two-stage dilution tunnel designed to simulate the reactions that occur when hot combustion products mix with cooler atmospheric air was used. Particle size distributions were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and nano-scanning mobility particle sizer (nano SMPS); a nanomicro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (nano MOUDI) collected size-resolved samples for gravimetric and chemical analysis. A nanometer tandem differential mobility analyzer (nano TDMA) was used to measure the volatility and hygroscopicity of 4-15 nm particles. These measurements confirm that the particles consisted primarily of sulfates. PMID:16999131

  4. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A; Gookin, Glenn R; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre E

    2010-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects. PMID:20562226

  5. Air pollution upregulates endothelial cell procoagulant activity via ultrafine particle-induced oxidant signaling and tissue factor expression.

    PubMed

    Snow, S J; Cheng, W; Wolberg, A S; Carraway, M S

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular events triggered by clot formation. Endothelial activation and initiation of coagulation are pathophysiological mechanisms that could link inhaled air pollutants to vascular events. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms of increased endothelial cell procoagulant activity following exposure to soluble components of ultrafine particles (soluble UF). Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were exposed to soluble UF and assessed for their ability to trigger procoagulant activity in platelet-free plasma. Exposed HCAEC triggered earlier thrombin generation and faster fibrin clot formation, which was abolished by an anti-tissue factor (TF) antibody, indicating TF-dependent effects. Soluble UF exposure increased TF mRNA expression without compensatory increases in key anticoagulant proteins. To identify early events that regulate TF expression, we measured endothelial H2O2 production following soluble UF exposure and identified the enzymatic source. Soluble UF exposure increased endothelial H2O2 production, and antioxidants attenuated UF-induced upregulation of TF, linking the procoagulant responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Chemical inhibitors and RNA silencing showed that NOX-4, an important endothelial source of H2O2, was involved in UF-induced upregulation of TF mRNA. These data indicate that soluble UF exposure induces endothelial cell procoagulant activity, which involves de novo TF synthesis, ROS production, and the NOX-4 enzyme. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with air pollution exposure. PMID:24752501

  6. Air Pollution Upregulates Endothelial Cell Procoagulant Activity via Ultrafine Particle-Induced Oxidant Signaling and Tissue Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Snow, S. J.; Cheng, W.; Wolberg, A. S.; Carraway, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular events triggered by clot formation. Endothelial activation and initiation of coagulation are pathophysiological mechanisms that could link inhaled air pollutants to vascular events. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms of increased endothelial cell procoagulant activity following exposure to soluble components of ultrafine particles (soluble UF). Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were exposed to soluble UF and assessed for their ability to trigger procoagulant activity in platelet-free plasma. Exposed HCAEC triggered earlier thrombin generation and faster fibrin clot formation, which was abolished by an anti-tissue factor (TF) antibody, indicating TF-dependent effects. Soluble UF exposure increased TF mRNA expression without compensatory increases in key anticoagulant proteins. To identify early events that regulate TF expression, we measured endothelial H2O2 production following soluble UF exposure and identified the enzymatic source. Soluble UF exposure increased endothelial H2O2 production, and antioxidants attenuated UF-induced upregulation of TF, linking the procoagulant responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Chemical inhibitors and RNA silencing showed that NOX-4, an important endothelial source of H2O2, was involved in UF-induced upregulation of TF mRNA. These data indicate that soluble UF exposure induces endothelial cell procoagulant activity, which involves de novo TF synthesis, ROS production, and the NOX-4 enzyme. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with air pollution exposure. PMID:24752501

  7. Influence of soil ageing on bioavailability and ecotoxicity of lead carried by process waste metallic ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Schreck, E; Foucault, Y; Geret, F; Pradere, P; Dumat, C

    2011-11-01

    Ultrafine particulate matters enriched with metals are emitted into the atmosphere by industrial activities and can impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Thus, this study investigated the environmental effects of process particles from a lead-recycling facility after atmospheric deposition on soils and potential run-off to surface waters. The toxicity of lead-enriched PM for ecosystems was investigated on lettuce and bacteria by (i) germination tests, growth assays, lead transfer to plant tissues determination and (ii) Microtox analysis. The influence of ageing and soil properties on metal transfer and ecotoxicity was studied using three different soils and comparing various aged, spiked or historically long-term polluted soils. Finally, lead availability was assessed by 0.01 M CaCl(2) soil extraction. The results showed that process PM have a toxic effect on lettuce seedling growth and on Vibrio fischeri metabolism. Soil-PM interactions significantly influence PM ecotoxicity and bioavailability; the effect is complex and depends on the duration of ageing. Solubilisation or stabilisation processes with metal speciation changes could be involved. Finally, Microtox and phytotoxicity tests are sensitive and complementary tools for studying process PM ecotoxicity. PMID:21868052

  8. Nrf2 Deficiency in Dendritic Cells Enhances the Adjuvant Effect of Ambient Ultrafine Particles on Allergic Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wang, Meiying; Barajas, Berenice; Sioutas, Constantinos; Williams, Marc A; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is an important risk factor for asthma. Generation of oxidative stress by PM is a major mechanism of its health effects. Transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) mediates antioxidant and phase II enzymes and is essential in protecting against oxidative stress and lung inflammation. We have previously shown that ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) could exert a potent adjuvant effect on allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. We hypothesized that Nrf2 deficiency in dendritic cells (DC) could enhance the adjuvant potential of UFP on allergic sensitization. We show that the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP is significantly enhanced in Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2-/-) mice compared with their wild-type (Nrf2+/+) counterparts. Under resting conditions Nrf2-/- DC displayed an intrinsic predilection to a T-helper 2 (Th2)-favoring cytokine profile characterized by low level of IL-12p70 and high level of IL-6 as compared to Nrf2+/+ DC. Adoptive transfer of OVA/UFP-treated Nrf2-/- DC provoked a more severe allergic inflammation in the lung than Nrf2+/+ DC in the same treatment group. We conclude that Nrf2 deficiency in DC may promote a constitutive immune-polarizing cytokine milieu, which we propose may have contributed to the augmented adjuvant effect of UFP on allergic sensitization. PMID:23595026

  9. Ultrafine particles and platelet activation in patients with coronary heart disease results from a prospective panel study

    PubMed Central

    Rckerl, Regina; Phipps, Richard P; Schneider, Alexandra; Frampton, Mark; Cyrys, Josef; Oberdrster, Gnther; Wichmann, H Erich; Peters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies on health effects of air pollution have consistently shown adverse cardiovascular effects. Toxicological studies have provided evidence for thrombogenic effects of particles. A prospective panel study in a susceptible population was conducted in Erfurt, Germany, to study the effects of daily changes in ambient particles on various blood cells and soluble CD40ligand (sCD40L, also known as CD154), a marker for platelet activation that can cause increased coagulation and inflammation. Blood cells and plasma sCD40L levels were repeatedly measured in 57 male patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) during winter 2000/2001. Fixed effects linear regression models were applied, adjusting for trend, weekday and meteorological parameters. Hourly data on ultrafine particles (UFP, number concentration of particles from 0.01 to 0.1 ?m), mass concentration of particles less than 10 and 2.5 ?m in diameter (PM10, PM2.5), accumulation mode particle counts (AP, 0.11.0 ?m), elemental and organic carbon, gaseous pollutants and meteorological data were collected at central monitoring sites. Results An immediate increase in plasma sCD40L was found in association with UFP and AP (% change from geometric mean: 7.1; CI: [0.1, 14.5] and 6.9; CI: [0.5, 13.8], respectively). Platelet counts decreased in association with UFP showing an immediate, a three days delayed (lag 3) and a 5-day average response (% change from the mean: -1.8; CI: [-3.4,-0.2]; -2.4; CI: [-4.5,-0.3] and -2.2; CI: [-4.0,-0.3] respectively). Conclusion The increased plasma sCD40L levels support the hypothesis that higher levels of ambient air pollution lead to an inflammatory response in patients with CHD thus providing a possible explanation for the observed association between air pollution and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in susceptible parts of the population. PMID:17241467

  10. Evaluation of the Quick Urban and Industrial Complex (QUIC) Modeling System to Predict Ultrafine Particle Levels in an Urban Neighborhood near a Highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Vincent, A.; Milando, C.; Zhu, S.; Zamore, W.; Brugge, D.; Durant, J.

    2010-12-01

    Exposure to vehicle-generated ultrafine particles (<100 nm; UFP) has been linked to cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases in people living near highways. Due to the high degree of temporal and spatial variation of UFP near highways, models are needed to help predict UFP exposures in near-highway neighborhoods. The goals of this work were to evaluate the ability of QUIC, a random-walk dispersion model, to predict near-highway UFP in an urban neighborhood (<1 km2) for different wind conditions and land-surface detail. QUIC was chosen because it is able to capture a wide variety of land-surface features and has relatively small computational requirements. QUIC models were developed with and without individually-resolved buildings for a neighborhood near Interstate 93 in Somerville (MA, USA), and tested using wind conditions characteristic of the area. Model results were then compared to field data collected with a mobile air pollution monitoring laboratory. Generally good agreement was observed between the model results and field data for winds parallel and perpendicular to the highway. In addition, models that treated neighborhood blocks (i.e., collections of houses surrounded by four intersecting streets) as porous structures through which attenuated wind and UFP could pass performed better than models containing non-porous solid blocks or individual buildings. These results will help inform the development of a predictive UFP model that will be used as part of a cardiovascular health study being conducted in several neighborhoods near I-93 in Somerville.

  11. Reduction of exposure to ultrafine particles by kitchen exhaust hoods: the effects of exhaust flow rates, particle size, and burner position.

    PubMed

    Rim, Donghyun; Wallace, Lance; Nabinger, Steven; Persily, Andrew

    2012-08-15

    Cooking stoves, both gas and electric, are one of the strongest and most common sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in homes. UFP have been shown to be associated with adverse health effects such as DNA damage and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. This study investigates the effectiveness of kitchen exhaust hoods in reducing indoor levels of UFP emitted from a gas stove and oven. Measurements in an unoccupied manufactured house monitored size-resolved UFP (2 nm to 100 nm) concentrations from the gas stove and oven while varying range hood flow rate and burner position. The air change rate in the building was measured continuously based on the decay of a tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride, SF(6)). The results show that range hood flow rate and burner position (front vs. rear) can have strong effects on the reduction of indoor levels of UFP released from the stove and oven, subsequently reducing occupant exposure to UFP. Higher range hood flow rates are generally more effective for UFP reduction, though the reduction varies with particle diameter. The influence of the range hood exhaust is larger for the back burner than for the front burner. The number-weighted particle reductions for range hood flow rates varying between 100 m(3)/h and 680 m(3)/h range from 31% to 94% for the front burner, from 54% to 98% for the back burner, and from 39% to 96% for the oven. PMID:22750181

  12. High-resolution mobile monitoring of carbon monoxide and ultrafine particle concentrations in a near-road environment.

    PubMed

    Hagler, Gayle S W; Thoma, Eben D; Baldauf, Richard W

    2010-03-01

    Assessment of near-road air quality is challenging in urban environments that have roadside structures, elevated road sections, or depressed roads that may impact the dispersion of traffic emissions. Vehicles traveling on arterial roadways may also contribute to air pollution spatial variability in urban areas. To characterize the nature of near-road air quality in a complex urban environment, an instrumented all-electric vehicle was deployed to perform high spatial- and temporal-resolution mapping of ultrafine particles (UFPs, particle diameter <100 nm) and carbon monoxide (CO). Sampling was conducted in areas surrounding a highway in Durham, NC, with multiple repeats of the driving route accomplished within a morning or evening commute time frame. Six different near-road transects were driven, which included features such as noise barriers, vegetation, frontage roads, and densely built houses. Under downwind conditions, median UFP and CO levels in near-road areas located 20-150 m from the highway were a factor of 1.8 and 1.2 higher, respectively, than in areas characterized as urban background. Sampling in multiple near-road neighborhoods during downwind conditions revealed significant variability in absolute UFP and CO concentrations as well as in the rate of concentration attenuation with increasing distance from the highway. During low-speed meandering winds, regional UFP and CO concentrations nearly doubled relative to crosswind conditions; however, near-road UFP levels were still higher than urban background levels by a factor of 1.2, whereas near-road CO concentrations were not significantly different than the urban background. PMID:20397562

  13. Indoor/outdoor relationships and mass closure of quasi-ultrafine, accumulation and coarse particles in Barcelona schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Rivas, I.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Sunyer, J.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Bouso, L.; Sioutas, C.

    2014-05-01

    The mass concentration, chemical composition and sources of quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UFP, PM0.25), accumulation (PM0.25-2.5) and coarse mode (PM2.5-10) particles were determined in indoor and outdoor air at 39 schools in Barcelona (Spain). Quasi-UFP mass concentrations measured (25.6 μg m-3 outdoors, 23.4 μg m-3 indoors) are significantly higher than those reported in other studies, and characterised by higher carbonaceous and mineral matter contents and a lower proportion of secondary inorganic ions. Results suggest that quasi-UFPs in Barcelona are affected by local sources in the schools, mainly human activity (e.g. organic material from textiles, etc., contributing 23-46% to total quasi-UFP mass) and playgrounds (in the form of mineral matter, contributing about 9% to the quasi-UFP mass). The particle size distribution patterns of toxicologically relevant metals and major aerosol components was characterised, displaying two modes for most elements and components, and one mode for inorganic salts (ammonium nitrate and sulfate) and elemental carbon (EC). Regarding metals, Ni and Cr were partitioned mainly in quasi-UFPs and could thus be of interest for epidemiological studies, given their high redox properties. Exposure of children to quasi-UFP mass and chemical species was assessed by comparing the concentrations measured at urban background and traffic areas schools. Finally, three main indoor sources across all size fractions were identified by assessing indoor / outdoor ratios (I / O) of PM species used as their tracers: human activity (organic material), cleaning products, paints and plastics (Cl- source), and a metallic mixed source (comprising combinations of Cu, Zn, Co, Cd, Pb, As, V and Cr). Our results support the need to enforce targeted legislation to determine a minimum "safe" distance between major roads and newly built schools to reduce exposure to traffic-derived metals in quasi-UFPs.

  14. Size controllable synthesis of ultrafine spherical gold particles and their simulation of plasmonic and SERS behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zao; Xu, Xibin; Luo, Jiangshan; Li, Xibo; Yi, Yong; Jiang, Xiaodong; Yi, Yougen; Tang, Yongjian

    2014-04-01

    A simple and reproducible way was explored to synthesize quasi-spherical gold particles with different size distributions in water by rapidly adding a mixture solution of HAuCl4, sodium citrate, and a trace amount of silver nitrate. By careful tuning of the reaction parameters, mono-disperse gold particles with the diameter of 5-220 nm can be obtained controllably. The particle size of 130 nm for the particles film showed the highest SERS activity with the 632.8 nm excitation. The theoretical calculations of the UV-vis extinction spectra can be directly compared with experiments by using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA). Control of nanostructure shape allows optimization of plasmon resonance for molecular detection and spectroscopy.

  15. Validation and Application of the Mass Balance Model To Determine the Effectiveness of Portable Air Purifiers in Removing Ultrafine and Submicrometer Particles in an Apartment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Chen; Catalano, Paul J; Yoo, Jun Young; Park, Chan Jung; Koutrakis, Petros

    2015-08-18

    We validated the use of the mass balance model to determine the effectiveness of portable air purifiers in removing ultrafine (<0.10 ?m) and submicrometer particles (0.10-0.53 ?m) in an apartment. We evaluated two identical portable air purifiers, equipped with high efficiency particulate air filters, for their performance under three different air flow settings and three target air exchange rates: 0.60, 0.90, and 1.20 h(-1). We subsequently used a mixed effects model to estimate the slope between the measured and modeled effectiveness by particle size. Our study showed that effectiveness was highly particle size-dependent. For example, at the lowest target air exchange rate, it ranged from 0.33 to 0.56, 0.51 to 0.75, and 0.60 to 0.81 for the three air purifier flow settings, respectively. Our findings suggested that filtration was the dominant removal mechanism for submicrometer particles, whereas deposition could play a more important role in ultrafine particle removal. We found reasonable agreement between measured and modeled effectiveness with size-resolved slopes ranging from 1.11 0.06 to 1.25 0.07 (mean SE), except for particles <35 nm. Our study design can be applied to investigate the performances of other portable air purifiers as well as the influences of various parameters on effectiveness in different residential settings. PMID:26207386

  16. Transferability and Generalizability of Regression Models of Ultrafine Particles in Urban Neighborhoods in the Boston Area

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Land use regression (LUR) models have been used to assess air pollutant exposure, but limited evidence exists on whether location-specific LUR models are applicable to other locations (transferability) or general models are applicable to smaller areas (generalizability). We tested transferability and generalizability of spatial-temporal LUR models of hourly particle number concentration (PNC) for Boston-area (MA, U.S.A.) urban neighborhoods near Interstate 93. Four neighborhood-specific regression models and one Boston-area model were developed from mobile monitoring measurements (34–46 days/neighborhood over one year each). Transferability was tested by applying each neighborhood-specific model to the other neighborhoods; generalizability was tested by applying the Boston-area model to each neighborhood. Both the transferability and generalizability of models were tested with and without neighborhood-specific calibration. Important PNC predictors (adjusted-R2 = 0.24–0.43) included wind speed and direction, temperature, highway traffic volume, and distance from the highway edge. Direct model transferability was poor (R2 < 0.17). Locally-calibrated transferred models (R2 = 0.19–0.40) and the Boston-area model (adjusted-R2 = 0.26, range: 0.13–0.30) performed similarly to neighborhood-specific models; however, some coefficients of locally calibrated transferred models were uninterpretable. Our results show that transferability of neighborhood-specific LUR models of hourly PNC was limited, but that a general model performed acceptably in multiple areas when calibrated with local data. PMID:25867675

  17. Transferability and generalizability of regression models of ultrafine particles in urban neighborhoods in the Boston area.

    PubMed

    Patton, Allison P; Zamore, Wig; Naumova, Elena N; Levy, Jonathan I; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L

    2015-05-19

    Land use regression (LUR) models have been used to assess air pollutant exposure, but limited evidence exists on whether location-specific LUR models are applicable to other locations (transferability) or general models are applicable to smaller areas (generalizability). We tested transferability and generalizability of spatial-temporal LUR models of hourly particle number concentration (PNC) for Boston-area (MA, U.S.A.) urban neighborhoods near Interstate 93. Four neighborhood-specific regression models and one Boston-area model were developed from mobile monitoring measurements (34-46 days/neighborhood over one year each). Transferability was tested by applying each neighborhood-specific model to the other neighborhoods; generalizability was tested by applying the Boston-area model to each neighborhood. Both the transferability and generalizability of models were tested with and without neighborhood-specific calibration. Important PNC predictors (adjusted-R(2) = 0.24-0.43) included wind speed and direction, temperature, highway traffic volume, and distance from the highway edge. Direct model transferability was poor (R(2) < 0.17). Locally-calibrated transferred models (R(2) = 0.19-0.40) and the Boston-area model (adjusted-R(2) = 0.26, range: 0.13-0.30) performed similarly to neighborhood-specific models; however, some coefficients of locally calibrated transferred models were uninterpretable. Our results show that transferability of neighborhood-specific LUR models of hourly PNC was limited, but that a general model performed acceptably in multiple areas when calibrated with local data. PMID:25867675

  18. Development of the electroacoustic dewatering (EAD) process for fine/ultrafine coal: Third quarterly progress report, (April--June 1989)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-18

    Battelle, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ashbrook-Simon-Hartley (ASH), Kaiser Engineers (KE), Lewis Corporation, and Professor S.H. Chiang of the University of Pittsburgh, is developing an advanced process for the dewatering of fine and ultrafine coals. The advanced process, called Electroacoustic Dewatering (EAD), capitalizes on the adaptation of synergistic effects of electric and acoustic fields to commercial coal dewatering systems, such as belt filter presses. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Ultrafine particle sources and in-situ formation in a European megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikridas, M.; Sciare, J.; Freutel, F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; von der Weiden-Reinmller, S.-L.; Borbon, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Merkel, M.; Crippa, M.; Kostenidou, E.; Psichoudaki, M.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Petj, T.; Prvt, A. S. H.; Drewnick, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Beekmann, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    Ambient particle number size distributions were measured in Paris, France during summer (1-31 July 2009) and winter (15 January-15 February 2010) at three fixed ground sites and using two mobile laboratories and one airplane. The campaigns were part of the MEGAPOLI project. New particle formation (NPF) was observed only during summer at approximately 50% of the campaign days, assisted by the low condensation sink (about 10.7 5.9 10-3 s-1). NPF events inside the Paris plume were also observed at 600 m altitude onboard an aircraft simultaneously with regional events identified on the ground. Increased particle number concentrations were measured aloft also outside of the Paris plume at the same altitude, and were attributed to NPF. The Paris plume was identified, based on increased particle number and black carbon concentration, up to 200 km away from Paris center during summer. The number concentration of particles with diameter exceeding 2.5 nm measured on the surface at Paris center was on average 6.9 8.7 104 and 12.1 8.6 104 cm-3 during summer and winter, respectively, and was found to decrease exponentially with distance from Paris. However, further than 30 km from the city center, the particle number concentration at the surface was similar during both campaigns. During summer one suburban site in the NE was not significantly affected by Paris emissions due to higher background number concentrations, while the particle number concentration at the second suburban site in the SW increased by a factor of three when it was downwind of Paris.

  20. [Experimental study on ultrafine particle characteristics exhausted from various fuelled vehicles].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-song; Chan, T L; Ning, Zhi; Cheung, C S; Huang, Zhen

    2006-12-01

    The fine particle size distribution characteristics obtained from a diesel taxi, a diesel light bus, a gasoline private car and a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fuelled taxi were carried out on a chassis dynamometer system. The measurements were performed at different driving modes, i.e. , with low and high idling and from 10 kmxh(-1) to 70 kmxh(-1), 4 cruise operations using the instrument SMPS for collecting particles of 0.015-0.7microm diameter in range. It was found that different fuelled vehicles and different driving modes characterize considerable differences in size number and mass concentration distributions. Diesel vehicles contribute much more nuclei and accumulation mode particles of 30 - 150 nm, while LPG and gasoline fuelled vehicles exhaust much more nuclei mode particles of 15-30 nm. Overall, diesel-fuelled vehicles exhaust much more particles number and mass than gasoline and LPG fuelled vehicles; In the present study, diesel vehicles exhaust the ranges of total SMPS particle number, mass concentration with (0.3-3.6) x 10(8) number x cm(-3), 0.03 - 0.6 microg cm(- 3) respectively, and gasoline and LPG fuelled vehicles exhaust 2.3 x 10(4) - 1.2 x 10(7) number x cm(-3), 8 x 10(-5)-0.1 microgxcm(-3); 8.2 x 10(3)8.8 x 10(6) number x cm(-3), 1.7 x 10(-5) -0.09 microg x cm(-3), respectively; For all types of vehicles, the particle number and mass concentrations are small at low-idle and low-speed-driving modes, and are large at high-idle and high-speed-driving modes. They generally increase with the vehicle speed increasing from 10 to 70 kmx h(-1). PMID:17304827

  1. Application of a high-efficiency cabin air filter for simultaneous mitigation of ultrafine particle and carbon dioxide exposures inside passenger vehicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eon S; Zhu, Yifang

    2014-02-18

    Modern passenger vehicles are commonly equipped with cabin air filters but their filtration efficiency for ultrafine particle (UFP) is rather low. Although setting the vehicle ventilation system to recirculation (RC) mode can reduce in-cabin UFPs by ∼ 90%, passenger-exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2) can quickly accumulate inside the cabin. Using outdoor air (OA) mode instead can provide sufficient air exchange to prevent CO2 buildup, but in-cabin UFP concentrations would increase. To overcome this dilemma, we developed a simultaneous mitigation method for UFP and CO2 using high-efficiency cabin air (HECA) filtration in OA mode. Concentrations of UFP and other air pollutants were simultaneously monitored in and out of 12 different vehicles under 3 driving conditions: stationary, on local roadways, and on freeways. Under each experimental condition, data were collected with no filter, in-use original equipment manufacturer (OEM) filter, and two types of HECA filters. The HECA filters offered an average in-cabin UFP reduction of 93%, much higher than the OEM filters (∼ 50% on average). Throughout the measurements, the in-cabin CO2 concentration remained in the range of 620-930 ppm, significantly lower than the typical level of 2500-4000 ppm observed in the RC mode. PMID:24471775

  2. Capture efficiency of cooking-related fine and ultrafine particles by residential exhaust hoods.

    PubMed

    Lunden, M M; Delp, W W; Singer, B C

    2015-02-01

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking-generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80%. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38% for low (51-68 l/s) and 54-72% for high (109-138 l/s) settings. CEs for 0.3-2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3-11% on low and 16-70% on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80% both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles. PMID:24750219

  3. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

  4. Air quality in the German-Czech border region: A focus on harmful fractions of PM and ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, Alexander; Leníček, Jan; Beneš, Ivan; Kováč, Martin; Skorkovský, Jiří; Soukup, Aleš; Jandlová, Jana; Poulain, Laurent; Plachá, Helena; Löschau, Gunter; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive air quality study has been carried out at two urban background sites in Annaberg-Buchholz (Germany) and Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic) in the German-Czech border region between January 2012 and June 2014. Special attention was paid to quantify harmful fractions of particulate matter (PM) and ultrafine particle number concentration (UFP) from solid fuel combustion and vehicular traffic. Source type contributions of UFP were quantified by using the daily concentration courses of UFP and nitrogen oxide. Two different source apportionment techniques were used to quantify relative and absolute mass contributions: positive matrix factorization for total PM2.5 and elemental carbon in PM2.5 and chemical mass balance for total PM1 and organic carbon in PM1. Contributions from solid fuel combustion strongly differed between the non-heating period (April-September) and the heating period (October-March). Major sources of solid fuel combustion in this study were wood and domestic coal combustion, while the proportion of industrial coal combustion was low (<3%). In Ústí nad Labem combustion of domestic brown coal was the most important source of organic carbon ranging from 34% to 43%. Wood combustion was an important source of organic carbon in Annaberg-Buchholz throughout the year. Heavy metals and less volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the accumulation mode were related to solid fuel combustion with enhanced concentrations during the heating period. In contrast, vehicular PAH emissions were allocated to the Aitken mode. Only in Ústí nad Labem a significant contribution of photochemical new particle formation (e.g. from sulfur dioxide) to UFP of almost 50% was observed during noontime. UFPs from traffic emissions (nucleation particles) and primary emitted soot particles dominated at both sites during the rest of the day. The methodology of a combined source apportionment of UFP and PM can be adapted to other regions of the world with similar problems of atmospheric pollution to calculate the relative risk in epidemiological health studies for different sub-fractions of PM and UFP. This will enhance the meaningfulness of published relative risks in health studies based on total PM and UFP number concentrations.

  5. Fine and ultrafine particles generated during fluidized bed combustion of different solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Urciuolo, M.; Barone, A.; D'Alessio, A.; Chirone, R.

    2008-12-15

    The paper reports an experimental study carried out with a 110-mm ID fluidized bed combustor focused on the characterization of particulates formation/emission during combustion of coal and non-fossil solid fuels. Fuels included: a bituminous coal, a commercial predried and granulated sludge (GS), a refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and a biomass waste (pine seed shells). Stationary combustion experiments were carried out analyzing the fate of fuel ashes. Fly ashes collected at the combustor exhaust were characterized both in terms of particle size distribution and chemical composition, with respect to both trace and major elements. Tapping-Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM) technique and high-efficiency cyclone-type collector devices were used to characterize the size and morphology of the nanometric-and micronic-size fractions of fly ash emitted at the exhaust respectively. Results showed that during the combustion process: I) the size of the nanometric fraction ranges between 2 and 65 nm; ii) depending on the fuel tested, combustion-assisted attrition or the production of the primary ash particles originally present in the fuel particles, are responsible of fine particle generation. The amount in the fly ash of inorganic compounds is larger for the waste-derived fuels, reflecting the large inherent content of these compounds in the parent fuels.

  6. Effects of Particle Filters and Accelerated Engine Replacement on Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions of Black Carbon, Nitrogen Oxides, and Ultrafine Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchstetter, T.; Preble, C.; Dallmann, T. R.; DeMartini, S. J.; Tang, N. W.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Hering, S. V.; Harley, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Diesel particle filters have become widely used in the United States since the introduction in 2007 of a more stringent exhaust particulate matter emission standard for new heavy-duty diesel vehicle engines. California has instituted additional regulations requiring retrofit or replacement of older in-use engines to accelerate emission reductions and air quality improvements. This presentation summarizes pollutant emission changes measured over several field campaigns at the Port of Oakland in the San Francisco Bay Area associated with diesel particulate filter use and accelerated modernization of the heavy-duty truck fleet. Pollutants in the exhaust plumes of hundreds of heavy-duty trucks en route to the Port were measured in 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2013. Ultrafine particle number, black carbon (BC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations were measured at a frequency ≤ 1 Hz and normalized to measured carbon dioxide concentrations to quantify fuel-based emission factors (grams of pollutant emitted per kilogram of diesel consumed). The size distribution of particles in truck exhaust plumes was also measured at 1 Hz. In the two most recent campaigns, emissions were linked on a truck-by-truck basis to installed emission control equipment via the matching of transcribed license plates to a Port truck database. Accelerated replacement of older engines with newer engines and retrofit of trucks with diesel particle filters reduced fleet-average emissions of BC and NOx. Preliminary results from the two most recent field campaigns indicate that trucks without diesel particle filters emit 4 times more BC than filter-equipped trucks. Diesel particle filters increase emissions of NO2, however, and filter-equipped trucks have NO2/NOx ratios that are 4 to 7 times greater than trucks without filters. Preliminary findings related to particle size distribution indicate that (a) most trucks emitted particles characterized by a single mode of approximately 100 nm in diameter and (b) new trucks originally equipped with diesel particle filters were 5 to 6 times more likely than filter-retrofitted trucks and trucks without filters to emit particles characterized by a single mode in the range of 10 to 30 nm in diameter.

  7. Development of Ultrafine-Grained Dual-Phase Steels: Mechanism of Grain Refinement During Intercritical Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Anish; Misra, R. D. K.; Neogy, S.; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2013-09-01

    Heavy deformation of metastable austenite (below Ae3) or both austenite and ferrite in the two-phase region (between Ar3 and Ar1) is known to develop an ultrafine ferrite grain structure with an average grain size of less than 3 ?m. Different dynamic softening mechanisms, such as dynamic recovery, dynamic recrystallization, and dynamic strain-induced austenite?ferrite transformation (DSIT), are responsible for such grain refinement. However, the sequence of those metallurgical events and the temperature range over which any particular mechanism dominates is not yet well understood. The current study throws some light on this aspect by applying heavy, single-pass compressive deformation (with true strain of 1.0) on the microalloyed steel samples over a temperature range of 1173 K to 873 K (900 C to 600 C) using a Gleeble simulator (Dynamic Systems Inc., Poestenkill, NY) and water quenching the samples immediately after deformation. The current study showed the dominating effect of the following mechanisms with respect to the deformation temperature: (1) DSIT followed by conventional dynamic recrystallization (Conv-DRX) of ferrite at higher deformation temperatures (?1073 K [800 C]), (2) extended recovery and continuous dynamic recrystallization (Cont-DRX) of ferrite at intermediate deformation temperatures (~1023 K [750 C]), and (3) simple dynamic recovery of ferrite at lower deformation temperatures (?923 K [650 C]).

  8. A CFD modeling study in an urban street canyon for ultrafine particles and population exposure: The intake fraction approach.

    PubMed

    Habilomatis, George; Chaloulakou, Archontoula

    2015-10-15

    Air quality in street canyons is of major importance, since the highest pollution levels are often encountered in these microenvironments. The canyon effect (reduced natural ventilation) makes them "hot spots" for particulate pollution contributing to adverse health effects for the exposed population. In this study we tried to characterize the influence of UFP (ultrafine particle) emissions from traffic on population exposure in an urban street canyon, by applying the intake fraction (iF) approach. One month long measurements of UFP levels have been monitored and used for the need of this study. We applied a three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on real measurements for the simulation of UFP levels. We used infiltration factors, evaluated on a daily basis for the under study area, to estimate the indoor UFP levels. As a result the intake fraction for the pedestrians, residents and office workers is in the range of (1E-5)-(1E-4). The street canyon is mostly residential justifying partially the higher value of intake fraction for residents (1E-4). The above iF value is on the same order of magnitude with the corresponding one evaluated in a relative street canyon study. The total iF value in this microenvironment is one order of magnitude higher than ours, explained partially by the different use and activities. Two specific applications of iF to assess prioritization among emission sources and environmental justice issues are also examined. We ran a scenario with diesel and gasoline cars and diesel fueled vehicle seems to be a target source to improve overall iF. Our application focus on a small residential area, typical of urban central Athens, in order to evaluate high resolution iF. The significance of source-exposure relationship study in a micro scale is emphasized by recent research. PMID:26047855

  9. Estimation of ultrafine particle concentrations at near-highway residences using data from local and central monitors.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Christina H; Brugge, Doug; Williams, Paige; Mittleman, Murray; Durant, John L; Spengler, John D

    2012-09-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP; aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 micrometers) are a ubiquitous exposure in the urban environment and are elevated near highways. Most epidemiological studies of UFP health effects use central site monitoring data, which may misclassify exposure. Our aims were to: (1) examine the relationship between distant and proximate monitoring sites and their ability to predict hourly UFP concentration measured at residences in an urban community with a major interstate highway and; (2) determine if meteorology and proximity to traffic improve explanatory power. Short-term (1 - 3 weeks) residential monitoring of UFP concentration was conducted at 18 homes. Long-term monitoring was conducted at two near-highway monitoring sites and a central site. We created models of outdoor residential UFP concentration based on concentrations at the near-highway site, at the central site, at both sites together and without fixed sites. UFP concentration at residential sites was more highly correlated with those at a near-highway site than a central site. In regression models of each site alone, a 10% increase in UFP concentration at a near-highway site was associated with a 6% (95% CI: 6%, 7%) increase at residences while a 10% increase in UFP concentration at the central site was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 3%) increase at residences. A model including both sites showed minimal change in the magnitude of the association between the near-highway site and the residences, but the estimated association with UFP concentration at the central site was substantially attenuated. These associations remained after adjustment for other significant predictors of residential UFP concentration, including distance from highway, wind speed, wind direction, highway traffic volume and precipitation. The use of a central site as an estimate of personal exposure for populations near local emissions of traffic-related air pollutants may result in exposure misclassification. PMID:23645993

  10. Estimation of ultrafine particle concentrations at near-highway residences using data from local and central monitors

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Christina H.; Brugge, Doug; Williams, Paige; Mittleman, Murray; Durant, John L.; Spengler, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP; aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 micrometers) are a ubiquitous exposure in the urban environment and are elevated near highways. Most epidemiological studies of UFP health effects use central site monitoring data, which may misclassify exposure. Our aims were to: (1) examine the relationship between distant and proximate monitoring sites and their ability to predict hourly UFP concentration measured at residences in an urban community with a major interstate highway and; (2) determine if meteorology and proximity to traffic improve explanatory power. Short-term (1 3 weeks) residential monitoring of UFP concentration was conducted at 18 homes. Long-term monitoring was conducted at two near-highway monitoring sites and a central site. We created models of outdoor residential UFP concentration based on concentrations at the near-highway site, at the central site, at both sites together and without fixed sites. UFP concentration at residential sites was more highly correlated with those at a near-highway site than a central site. In regression models of each site alone, a 10% increase in UFP concentration at a near-highway site was associated with a 6% (95% CI: 6%, 7%) increase at residences while a 10% increase in UFP concentration at the central site was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 3%) increase at residences. A model including both sites showed minimal change in the magnitude of the association between the near-highway site and the residences, but the estimated association with UFP concentration at the central site was substantially attenuated. These associations remained after adjustment for other significant predictors of residential UFP concentration, including distance from highway, wind speed, wind direction, highway traffic volume and precipitation. The use of a central site as an estimate of personal exposure for populations near local emissions of traffic-related air pollutants may result in exposure misclassification. PMID:23645993

  11. Using mobile monitoring to characterize roadway and aircraft contributions to ultrafine particle concentrations near a mid-sized airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Houseman, E. Andres; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) have complex spatial and temporal patterns that can be difficult to characterize, especially in areas with multiple source types. In this study, we utilized mobile monitoring and statistical modeling techniques to determine the contributions of both roadways and aircraft to spatial and temporal patterns of UFP in the communities surrounding an airport. A mobile monitoring campaign was conducted in five residential areas surrounding T.F. Green International Airport (Warwick, RI, USA) for one week in both spring and summer of 2008. Monitoring equipment and geographical positioning system (GPS) instruments were carried following scripted walking routes created to provide broad spatial coverage while recognizing the complexities of simultaneous spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Autoregressive integrated moving average models (ARIMA) were used to predict UFP concentrations as a function of distance from roadway, landing and take-off (LTO) activity, and meteorology. We found that distance to the nearest Class 2 roadway (highways and connector roads) was inversely associated with UFP concentrations in all neighborhoods. Departures and arrivals on a major runway had a significant influence on UFP concentrations in a neighborhood proximate to the end of the runway, with a limited influence elsewhere. Spatial patterns of regression model residuals indicate that spatial heterogeneity was partially explained by traffic and LTO terms, but with evidence that other factors may be contributing to elevated UFP close to the airport grounds. Regression model estimates indicate that mean traffic contributions exceed mean LTO contributions, but LTO activity can dominate the contribution during some minutes. Our combination of monitoring and statistical modeling techniques demonstrated contributions from major surrounding runways and LTO activity to UFP concentrations near a mid-sized airport, providing a methodology for source attribution within a community with multiple distinct sources.

  12. Redox Dynamics of Mixed Metal (Mn, Cr, and Fe) Ultrafine Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, Peter S.; Kumfer, Benjamin M.; Kennedy, Ian M.; Anastasio, Cort

    2008-08-01

    The impact of particle composition on metal oxidation state, and on changes in oxidation state with simulated atmospheric aging, are investigated experimentally in flame-generated nanoparticles containing Mn, Cr, and Fe. The results demonstrate that the initial fraction of Cr(VI) within the particles decreases with increasing total metal concentration in the flame. In contrast, the initial Mn oxidation state was only partly controlled by metal loading, suggesting the importance of other factors. Two reaction pathways, one reductive and one oxidative, were found to be operating simultaneously during simulated atmospheric aging. The oxidative pathway depended upon the presence of simulated sunlight and O{sub 3}, whereas the reductive pathway occurred in the presence of simulated sunlight alone. The reductive pathway appears to be rapid but transient, allowing the oxidative pathway to dominate with longer aging times, i.e. greater than {approx}8 hours. The presence of Mn within the particles enhanced the importance of the oxidative pathway, leading to more net Cr oxidation during aging implying that Mn can mediate oxidation by removal of electrons from other particulate metals.

  13. Assessment of ultrafine particles and noise measurements using fuzzy logic and data mining techniques.

    PubMed

    Fernndez-Camacho, R; Brito Cabeza, I; Aroba, J; Gmez-Bravo, F; Rodrguez, S; de la Rosa, J

    2015-04-15

    This study focuses on correlations between total number concentrations, road traffic emissions and noise levels in an urban area in the southwest of Spain during the winter and summer of 2009. The high temporal correlation between sound pressure levels, traffic intensity, particle number concentrations related to traffic, black carbon and NOx concentrations suggests that noise is linked to traffic emissions as a main source of pollution in urban areas. First, the association of these different variables was studied using PreFuRGe, a computational tool based on data mining and fuzzy logic. The results showed a clear association between noise levels and road-traffic intensity for non-extremely high wind speed levels. This behaviour points, therefore, to vehicular emissions being the main source of urban noise. An analysis for estimating the total number concentration from noise levels is also proposed in the study. The high linearity observed between particle number concentrations linked to traffic and noise levels with road traffic intensity can be used to calculate traffic related particle number concentrations experimentally. At low wind speeds, there are increases in noise levels of 1 dB for every 100 vehicles in circulation. This is equivalent to 2000 cm(-3) per vehicle in winter and 500 cm(-3) in summer. At high wind speeds, wind speed could be taken into account. This methodology allows low cost sensors to be used as a proxy for total number concentration monitoring in urban air quality networks. PMID:25616226

  14. Redox Dynamics of Mixed Metal (Mn, Cr, and Fe) Ultrafine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Nico, Peter S.; Kumfer, Benjamin M.; Kennedy, Ian M.; Anastasio, Cort

    2008-01-01

    The impact of particle composition on metal oxidation state, and on changes in oxidation state with simulated atmospheric aging, are investigated experimentally in flame-generated nanoparticles containing Mn, Cr, and Fe. The results demonstrate that the initial fraction of Cr(VI) within the particles decreases with increasing total metal concentration in the flame. In contrast, the initial Mn oxidation state was only partly controlled by metal loading, suggesting the importance of other factors. Two reaction pathways, one reductive and one oxidative, were found to be operating simultaneously during simulated atmospheric aging. The oxidative pathway depended upon the presence of simulated sunlight and O3, whereas the reductive pathway occurred in the presence of simulated sunlight alone. The reductive pathway appears to be rapid but transient, allowing the oxidative pathway to dominate with longer aging times, i.e. greater than ∼8 hours. The presence of Mn within the particles enhanced the importance of the oxidative pathway, leading to more net Cr oxidation during aging implying that Mn can mediate oxidation by removal of electrons from other particulate metals. PMID:20046215

  15. Ultrafine cementitious grout

    DOEpatents

    Ahrens, Ernst H.

    1998-01-01

    An ultrafine cementitious grout having a particle size 90% of which are less than 6 .mu.m in diameter and an average size of about 2.5 .mu.m or less, and preferably 90% of which are less than 5 .mu.m in diameter and an average size of about 2 .mu.m or less containing Portland cement, pumice as a pozzolanic material and superplasticizer in the amounts of about 40 wt. % to about 50 wt. % Portland cement; from about 50 wt. % to about 60 wt. % pumice containing at least 60% amorphous silicon dioxide; and from 0.1 wt. % to about 1.5 wt. % superplasticizer. The grout is mixed with water in the W/CM ratio of about 0.4-0.6/1. The grout has very high strength and very low permeability with good workability. The ultrafine particle sizes allow for sealing of microfractures below 10 .mu.m in width.

  16. Ultrafine cementitious grout

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, Ernst H.

    1999-01-01

    An ultrafine cementitious grout in three particle grades containing Portland cement, pumice as a pozzolanic material and superplasticizer in the amounts of about 30 wt. % to about 70 wt. % Portland cement; from about 30 wt. % to about 70 wt. % pumice containing at least 70% amorphous silicon dioxide; and from 1.2 wt. % to about 5.0 wt. % superplasticizer. The superplasticizer is dispersed in the mixing water prior to the addition of dry grout and the W/CM ratio is about 0.4 to 1/1. The grout has very high strength and very low permeability with good workability. The ultrafine particle sizes allow for sealing of microfractures below 10 .mu.m in width.

  17. Ultrafine cementitious grout

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, E.H.

    1999-10-19

    An ultrafine cementitious grout in three particle grades containing Portland cement, pumice as a pozzolanic material and superplasticizer in the amounts of about 30 wt. % to about 70 wt. % Portland cement; from about 30 wt. % to about 70 wt. % pumice containing at least 70% amorphous silicon dioxide; and from 1.2 wt. % to about 5.0 wt. % superplasticizer. The superplasticizer is dispersed in the mixing water prior to the addition of dry grout and the W/CM ratio is about 0.4 to 1/1. The grout has very high strength and very low permeability with good workability. The ultrafine particle sizes allow for sealing of microfractures below 10 {mu}m in width.

  18. Simple and rapid HPLC-UV method using an ultrafine particle octadecylsilane for determination of residual fentanyl in applied Durotep MT transdermal matrix patches and its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Naito, Takafumi; Takashina, Yoshiaki; Yagi, Tatsuya; Kawakami, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    A few complicated and time-consuming methods are available for the determination of residual fentanyl in Durotep MT transdermal patches, however, their application to clinical settings is limited. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and rapid HPLC-UV method using an ultrafine particle octadecylsilane (ODS) for the determination of residual fentanyl in applied Durotep MT transdermal matrix patches. Patch extraction involved sonicating a shredded Durotep MT patch in acetonitrile for 15 min. Fentanyl separation was completed within 2 min using a 2.3-?m particle ODS column (50 4.6 mm i.d.) at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min. No peaks interfering with fentanyl (1.27 min) and papaverine (0.89 min) as an internal standard were observed. The calibration curve for fentanyl was linear over the range of 0.015-9.0 mg as a Durotep MT patch. The intra- and inter-assay precisions and accuracies of each patch were within 5.3% and 103.9-110.5% and within 8.2% and 97.1-104.3%, respectively. The validated method was applied to determine residual fentanyl in Durotep MT patches used in 35 cancer patients. Although the plasma fentanyl concentration was significantly correlated with its measured absorption rate, the measured absorption rate normalized fentanyl concentration showed a large inter-individual variation. The validated simple and rapid HPLC-UV method established in the present study is helpful for evaluating the absorption rate of fentanyl in patients receiving Durotep MT patches. PMID:22223375

  19. Source apportionment of size segregated fine/ultrafine particle by PMF in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ji-hua; Duan, Jing-chun; Chai, Fa-he; He, Ke-bin; Hao, Ji-Ming

    2014-03-01

    Considering the adverse health effects to human body, the number concentration of atmospheric PM (particulate material) is more important than the mass concentration. CO, NO, NO2, SO2 and number concentrations of PM were obtained from a remote site (Miyun), a roadside site (North Fourth Ring Road) and an urban residential site (Tsinghua University) in Beijing in winter. The size distribution and the possible sources of number concentrations were examined using EPA PMF (positive matrix factorization) model. A data set of totally 9610 of number concentration with the size range of 0.028 ?m to 0.948 ?m was included in the PMF analysis. The highest total particle number, mass and area of fine particles concentrations were observed at the North Fourth Ring Road site and the lowest were observed at Miyun site. Four factors were identified at Miyun site, as Factor 1 and Factor 4 may be related to long distance transportation, and Factor 2 and Factor 3 may be assigned as coal combustion and locomotive emission nearby, respectively; three factors were identified at North Fourth Ring Road, of which Factor 1 and Factor 3 are traffic related and Factor 2 may be coal combustion related. Compared with Factor 1, the contributions of Factor 3 to NOx and SO2 were 4-5 times higher. Additionally, Factor 3 was also a major contributor to CO. It suggested that Factor 1 and Factor 3 had the same source emission of motor vehicle, but different engine types, fuel types or exhaust treatments. Three factors were identified at Tsinghua site, as Factor 1 may come from aging vehicle emission, and Factor 2 and Factor 3 may be coal combustion related.

  20. Seasonal and spatial variability in chemical composition and mass closure of ambient ultrafine particles in the megacity of Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Daher, Nancy; Hasheminassaba, Sina; Shafer, Martin M; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2013-01-01

    Emerging toxicological research has shown that ultrafine particles (UFP, dp < 0.10.2 ?m) may be more potent than coarse or fine particulate matter. To better characterize quasi-UFP (PM0.25, dp < 0.25 ?m), we conducted a year-long sampling campaign at 10 distinct areas in the megacity of Los Angeles, including source, near-freeway, semi-rural receptor and desert-like locations. Average PM0.25 mass concentration ranged from 5.9 to 16.1 ?g m?3 across the basin and over different seasons. Wintertime levels were highest at the source site, while lowest at the desert-like site. Conversely, summertime concentrations peaked at the inland receptor locations. Chemical mass reconstruction revealed that quasi-UFP in the basin consisted of 4964% organic matter, 36.4% elemental carbon, 915% secondary ions (SI), 0.71.3% trace ions, and 5.717% crustal material and trace elements, on a yearly average basis. Organic carbon (OC), a major constituent of PM0.25, exhibited greatest concentrations in fall and winter at all sites, with the exception of the inland areas. Atmospheric stability conditions and particle formation favored by condensation of low-volatility organics contributed to these levels. Inland, OC concentrations peaked in summer due to increased PM0.25 advection from upwind sources coupled with secondary organic aerosol formation. Among SI, nitrate peaked at semi-rural Riverside sites, located downwind of strong ammonia sources. Moreover, ionic balance indicated an overall neutral quasi-UFP aerosol, with somewhat lower degree of neutralization at near-freeway sites in winter. Anthropogenic metals peaked at the urban sites in winter while generally increased at the receptor areas in summer. Lastly, coefficients of divergence analysis showed that while PM0.25 mass is relatively spatially homogeneous in the basin, some of its components, mainly EC, nitrate and several toxic metals, are unevenly distributed. These results suggest that population exposure to quasi-UFP can substantially vary by season and over short spatial scales in the megacity of Los Angeles. PMID:24592446

  1. Ultrafine aerosol size distributions and sulfuric acid vapor pressures: Implications for new particle formation in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    This project has two components with different but related objectives. One component deals with measurement of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor pressures in air under temperature and relative humidity conditions similar to those found in the atmosphere. The second deals with measurement of ultrafine aerosol size distributions. Substantial progress has been made on each of these projects.

  2. FORMATION OF FINE PARTICLES FROM RESIDUAL OIL COMBUSTION: REDUCING ULTRAFINE NUCLEI THROUGH THE ADDITION OF INORGANIC SORBENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation, using an 82-kW-rated laboratory-scale refractory-lined combustor, of the characteristics of particulate matter emitted from residual oil combustion and the reduction of ultrafine nuclei by postflame sorbent injection. Without sorbent a...

  3. CONCENTRATIONS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE AND PM2.5 PARTICLES IN THREE EUROPEAN CITIES. (R827354C002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total number concentrations, number concentrations of ultrafine (0.010.1small mu, Greekm) and accumulation (0.10.5ULTRAFINE PARTICLE CELL INTERACTIONS IN VITRO: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS LEADING TO ALTERED GENE EXPRESSION IN RELATION TO PARTICLE COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of these in vitro studies will identify specific mechanisms that are triggered following particle cell contact in a cell specific context and identify markers of cellular response. We predict that many of the subsequent physiologic effects in vivo are...

  4. Associations of Mortality with Long-Term Exposures to Fine and Ultrafine Particles, Species and Sources: Results from the California Teachers Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianlin; Goldberg, Debbie; Reynolds, Peggy; Hertz, Andrew; Bernstein, Leslie; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although several cohort studies report associations between chronic exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) and mortality, few have studied the effects of chronic exposure to ultrafine (UF) particles. In addition, few studies have estimated the effects of the constituents of either PM2.5 or UF particles. Methods We used a statewide cohort of > 100,000 women from the California Teachers Study who were followed from 2001 through 2007. Exposure data at the residential level were provided by a chemical transport model that computed pollutant concentrations from > 900 sources in California. Besides particle mass, monthly concentrations of 11 species and 8 sources or primary particles were generated at 4-km grids. We used a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the association between the pollutants and all-cause, cardiovascular, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and respiratory mortality. Results We observed statistically significant (p < 0.05) associations of IHD with PM2.5 mass, nitrate, elemental carbon (EC), copper (Cu), and secondary organics and the sources gas- and diesel-fueled vehicles, meat cooking, and high-sulfur fuel combustion. The hazard ratio estimate of 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31) for IHD in association with a 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 is consistent with findings from the American Cancer Society cohort. We also observed significant positive associations between IHD and several UF components including EC, Cu, metals, and mobile sources. Conclusions Using an emissions-based model with a 4-km spatial scale, we observed significant positive associations between IHD mortality and both fine and ultrafine particle species and sources. Our results suggest that the exposure model effectively measured local exposures and facilitated the examination of the relative toxicity of particle species. Citation Ostro B, Hu J, Goldberg D, Reynolds P, Hertz A, Bernstein L, Kleeman MJ. 2015. Associations of mortality with long-term exposures to fine and ultrafine particles, species and sources: results from the California Teachers Study cohort. Environ Health Perspect 123:549–556; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408565 PMID:25633926

  5. A land use regression model for ambient ultrafine particles in Montreal, Canada: A comparison of linear regression and a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, Scott; Ryswyk, Keith Van; Goldstein, Alon; Bagg, Scott; Shekkarizfard, Maryam; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    Existing evidence suggests that ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs) (<0.1µm) may contribute to acute cardiorespiratory morbidity. However, few studies have examined the long-term health effects of these pollutants owing in part to a need for exposure surfaces that can be applied in large population-based studies. To address this need, we developed a land use regression model for UFPs in Montreal, Canada using mobile monitoring data collected from 414 road segments during the summer and winter months between 2011 and 2012. Two different approaches were examined for model development including standard multivariable linear regression and a machine learning approach (kernel-based regularized least squares (KRLS)) that learns the functional form of covariate impacts on ambient UFP concentrations from the data. The final models included parameters for population density, ambient temperature and wind speed, land use parameters (park space and open space), length of local roads and rail, and estimated annual average NOx emissions from traffic. The final multivariable linear regression model explained 62% of the spatial variation in ambient UFP concentrations whereas the KRLS model explained 79% of the variance. The KRLS model performed slightly better than the linear regression model when evaluated using an external dataset (R(2)=0.58 vs. 0.55) or a cross-validation procedure (R(2)=0.67 vs. 0.60). In general, our findings suggest that the KRLS approach may offer modest improvements in predictive performance compared to standard multivariable linear regression models used to estimate spatial variations in ambient UFPs. However, differences in predictive performance were not statistically significant when evaluated using the cross-validation procedure. PMID:26720396

  6. Indoor ultrafine particle exposures and home heating systems: a cross-sectional survey of Canadian homes during the winter months.

    PubMed

    Weichenthal, Scott; Dufresne, Andre; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Joseph, Lawrence

    2007-05-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter has a negative effect on respiratory health in both children and adults. Ultrafine particle (UFP) exposures are of particular concern owing to their enhanced ability to cause oxidative stress and inflammation in the lungs. In this investigation, our objective was to examine the contribution of home heating systems (electric baseboard heaters, wood stoves, forced-air oil/natural gas furnace) to indoor UFP exposures. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 36 homes in the cities of Montral, Qubec, and Pembroke, Ontario. Real-time measures of indoor UFP concentrations were collected in each home for approximately 14 h, and an outdoor UFP measurement was collected outside each home before indoor sampling. A home-characteristic questionnaire was also administered, and air exchange rates were estimated using carbon dioxide as a tracer gas. Average UFP exposures of 21,594 cm(-3) (95% confidence interval (CI): 14,014, 29,174) and 6660 cm(-3) (95% CI: 4339, 8982) were observed for the evening (1600-2400) and overnight (2400-0800) hours, respectively. In an unadjusted comparison, overnight baseline UFP exposures were significantly greater in homes with electric baseboard heaters as compared to homes using forced-air oil or natural gas furnaces, and homes using wood stoves had significantly greater overnight baseline UFP exposures than homes using forced-air natural gas furnaces. However, in multivariate models, electric oven use (beta=12,253 cm(-3), 95% CI: 3524, 20,982), indoor relative humidity (beta=1136 cm(-3) %, 95% CI: 372, 1899), and indoor smoking (beta=18,192 cm(-3), 95% CI: 2073, 34,311) were the only significant determinants of mean indoor UFP exposure, whereas air exchange rate (beta=4351 cm(-3) h(-1), 95% CI: 1507, 7195) and each 10,000 cm(-3) increase in outdoor UFPs (beta=811 cm(-3), 95% CI: 244,1377) were the only significant determinants of overnight baseline UFP exposures. In general, our findings suggest that home heating systems are not important determinants of indoor UFP exposures. PMID:17033678

  7. Relaxation in ordered systems of ultrafine magnetic particles: effect of the exchange interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Stefanie; Bunde, Armin

    2011-03-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations to study the relaxation of single-domain nanoparticles that are located on a simple cubic lattice with anisotropy axes pointing in the z-direction, under the combined influence of anisotropy energy, dipolar interaction and ferromagnetic interaction of strength J. We compare the results of classical Heisenberg systems with three-dimensional magnetic moments \\vec \\mu_i to those of Ising systems and find that Heisenberg systems show a much richer and more complex dynamical behavior. In contrast to Heisenberg systems, Ising systems need large activation energies to turn a spin and also possess a smaller configuration space for the orientation of the \\vec \\mu_i . Accordingly, Heisenberg systems possess a whole landscape of different states with very close-lying energies, while Ising systems tend to get frozen in one random state far away from the ground state. For Heisenberg systems, we identify two phase transitions: (i) at intermediate J between domain and layered states and (ii) at larger J between layered and ferromagnetic states. Between these two transitions, the layered states change their appearance and develop a sub-structure, where the orientation of the \\vec \\mu_i in each layer depends on J, so that for each value of J, a new ground state appears.

  8. One-step thermolysis synthesis of two-dimensional ultrafine Fe3O4 particles/carbon nanonetworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanqun; Li, Xiaona; Liang, Jianwen; Tang, Kaibin; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-02-18

    To tackle the issue of inferior cycle stability and rate capability for Fe3O4 anode materials in lithium ion batteries, ultrafine Fe3O4 nanocrystals uniformly encapsulated in two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanonetworks have been fabricated through thermolysis of a simple, low-cost iron(iii) acetylacetonate without any extra processes. Moreover, compared to the reported Fe3O4/carbon composites, the particle size of Fe3O4 is controllable and held down to ?3 nm. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of the excellent electroconductive carbon nanonetworks and uniform distribution of ultrafine Fe3O4 particles, the prepared 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork anode exhibits high reversible capacity, excellent rate capability and superior cyclability. A high capacity of 1534 mA h g(-1) is achieved at a 1 C rate and is maintained without decay up to 500 cycles (1 C = 1 A g(-1)). Even at the high current density of 5 C and 10 C, the 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetworks maintain a reversible capacity of 845 and 647 mA h g(-1) after 500 discharge/charge cycles, respectively. In comparison with other reported Fe3O4-based anodes, the 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork electrode is one of the most attractive of those in energy storage applications. PMID:26859122

  9. Development of Ultrafine, Lamellar Structures in Two-Phase {gamma}-TiAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J., Liu, C.T.

    1997-12-31

    Processing of two-phase gamma-TiAl alloys (Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb or minor modifications thereof) above the alpha-transus temperature (T {sub alpha}) produced unique refined-colony/ultrafine lamellar structures in both powder- and ingot-metallurgy (P/M and I/M, respectively) alloys. These ultrafine lamellar structures consist of fine laths of the gamma and alpha {sub 2} phases, with average interlamellar spacings (lambda {sub Lambda}) of 100-200 nm and alpha {sub 2}-alpha {sub 2} spacings (lambda {sub alpha}) of 200-500 nm, and are dominated by gamma/alpha {sub 2} interfaces. This characteristic microstructure forms by extruding P/M Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloys above T {sub alpha}, and also forms with finer colony size but slightly coarser fully-lamellar structures by hot-extruding similar I/M alloys. Alloying additions of B and W refine lambda {sub L} and lambda {sub alpha} in both I/M Ti-47Al (cast and heat-treated above T {sub alpha}) or in extruded Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloys. The ultrafine lamellar structure in the P/M alloy remains stable during heat-treatment at 900 {degrees}C for 2h, but becomes unstable after 4h at 982 {degrees}C; the ultrafine lamellar structure remains relatively stable after aging for {gt}5000 h at 800 {degrees}C. Additions of B+W dramatically improve the coarsening resistance of lambda L and lambda alpha in the I/M Ti-47Al alloys aged for 168 h at 1000{degrees}C. In both the P/M and I/M Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb alloys, these refined-colony/ultrafine-lamellar structures correlate with high strength and good ductility at room temperature, and very good strength at high temperatures. While refining the colony size improves the room-temperature ductility, alloys with finer lambda {sub L} are stronger at both room- and high-temperatures. Additions of B+W produce finer as-processed lambda {sub L} and lambda {sub alpha} in I/M TiAl alloys, and stabilize such structures during heat-treatment or aging.

  10. Effects of ultrafine particles on the allergic inflammation in the lung of asthmatics: results of a double-blinded randomized cross-over clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) might aggravate the allergic inflammation of the lung in asthmatics. Methods We exposed 12 allergic asthmatics in two subgroups in a double-blinded randomized cross-over design, first to freshly generated ultrafine carbon particles (64?g/m3; 6.1??0.4 105 particles/cm3 for 2h) and then to filtered air or vice versa with a 28-day recovery period in-between. Eighteen hours after each exposure, grass pollen was instilled into a lung lobe via bronchoscopy. Another 24hours later, inflammatory cells were collected by means of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). (Trial registration: NCT00527462) Results For the entire study group, inhalation of UFP by itself had no significant effect on the allergen induced inflammatory response measured with total cell count as compared to exposure with filtered air (p?=?0.188). However, the subgroup of subjects, which inhaled UFP during the first exposure, exhibited a significant increase in total BAL cells (p?=?0.021), eosinophils (p?=?0.031) and monocytes (p?=?0.013) after filtered air exposure and subsequent allergen challenge 28days later. Additionally, the potential of BAL cells to generate oxidant radicals was significantly elevated at that time point. The subgroup that was exposed first to filtered air and 28days later to UFP did not reveal differences between sessions. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that pre-allergen exposure to UFP had no acute effect on the allergic inflammation. However, the subgroup analysis lead to the speculation that inhaled UFP particles might have a long-term effect on the inflammatory course in asthmatic patients. This should be reconfirmed in further studies with an appropriate study design and sufficient number of subjects. PMID:25204642

  11. Endocytosis, oxidative stress and IL-8 expression in human lung epithelial cells upon treatment with fine and ultrafine TiO{sub 2}: Role of the specific surface area and of surface methylation of the particles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Seema |; Shi, Tingming |; Duffin, Rodger |; Albrecht, Catrin; Berlo, Damien van; Hoehr, Doris; Fubini, Bice; Martra, Gianmario; Fenoglio, Ivana; Borm, Paul J.A. |; Schins, Roel P.F. . E-mail: roel.schins@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2007-07-15

    Inhaled ultrafine particles show considerably stronger pulmonary inflammatory effects when tested at equal mass dose with their fine counterparts. However, the responsible mechanisms are not yet fully understood. We investigated the role of particle size and surface chemistry in initiating pro-inflammatory effects in vitro in A549 human lung epithelial cells on treatment with different model TiO{sub 2} particles. Two samples of TiO{sub 2}, i.e. fine (40-300 nm) and ultrafine (20-80 nm) were tested in their native forms as well as upon surface methylation, as was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Radical generation during cell treatment was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl. Interleukin-8 mRNA expression/release was determined by RT-PCR and ELISA, whereas particle uptake was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. TiO{sub 2} particles were rapidly taken up by the cells, generally as membrane bound aggregates and large intracellular aggregates in vesicles, vacuoles and lamellar bodies. Aggregate size tended to be smaller for the ultrafine samples and was also smaller for methylated fine TiO{sub 2} when compared to non-methylated fine TiO{sub 2}. No particles were observed inside nuclei or any other vital organelle. Both ultrafine TiO{sub 2} samples but not their fine counterparts elicited significantly stronger oxidant generation and IL-8 release, despite their aggregation state and irrespective of their methylation. The present data indicate that ultrafine TiO{sub 2}, even as aggregates/agglomerates, can trigger inflammatory responses that appear to be driven by their large surface area. Furthermore, our results indicate that these effects result from oxidants generated during particle-cell interactions through a yet to be elucidated mechanism(s)

  12. Ultrafine particle levels at an international port of entry between the US and Mexico: exposure implications for users, workers, and neighbors.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Hector A; Lopez, Mario; Guerrero, Veronica; Garcia, Humberto; Li, Wen-Whai

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to diesel-emitted particles has been linked to increased cancer risk and cardiopulmonary diseases. Because of their size (<100 nm), exposure to ultrafine particles (UFPs) emitted from heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) might result in greater health risks than those associated with larger particles. Seasonal UFP levels at the International Bridge of the Americas, which connects the US and Mexico and has high HDDV traffic demands, were characterized. Hourly average UFP concentrations ranged between 1.7 10(3)/cc and 2.9 10(5)/cc with a mean of 3.5 10(4)/cc. Wind speeds <2 m?s(-1) and temperatures <15?C were associated with particle number concentrations above normal conditions. The presence of HDDV had the strongest impact on local UFP levels. Varying particle size distributions were associated with south- and northbound HDDV traffic. Peak exposure occurred on weekday afternoons. Although in winter, high exposure episodes were also observed in the morning. Particle number concentrations were estimated to reach background levels at 400 m away from traffic. The populations exposed to UFP above background levels include law enforcement officers, street vendors, private commuters, and commercial vehicle drivers as well as neighbors on both sides of the border, including a church and several schools. PMID:23321858

  13. Deposition velocity of ultrafine particles measured with the Eddy-Correlation Method over the Nansen Ice Sheet (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, D.; Donateo, A.; Belosi, F.; Grasso, F. M.; Santachiara, G.; Prodi, F.

    2010-08-01

    This work reports an analysis of the concentration, size distribution, and deposition velocity of atmospheric particles over snow and iced surfaces on the Nansen Ice Sheet (Antarctica). Measurements were performed using the eddy-correlation method at a remote site during the XXII Italian expedition of the National Research Program in Antarctica (PNRA) in 2006. The measurement system was based on a condensation particle counter (CPC) able to measure particles down to 9 nm in diameter with a 50% efficiency and a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer for evaluating particle size distributions from 11 to 521 nm diameter in 39 channels. A method based on postprocessing with digital filters was developed to take into account the effect of the slow time response of the CPC. The average number concentration was 1338 cm-3 (median, 978 cm-3; interquartile range, 435-1854 cm-3). Higher concentrations were observed at low wind velocities. Results gave an average deposition velocity of 0.47 mm/s (median, 0.19 mm/s; interquartile range, -0.21 -0.88 mm/s). Deposition increased with the friction velocity and was on average 0.86 mm/s during katabatic wind characterized by velocities higher than 4 m/s. Observed size distributions generally presented two distinct modes, the first at approximately 15-20 nm and the second (representing on average 70% of the total particles) at 60-70 nm. Under strong-wind conditions, the second mode dominated the average size distribution.

  14. Ultrafine atmospheric aerosols, clouds and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Jeffrey Robert

    Changes in atmospheric aerosol due to anthropogenic emissions are the most uncertain factors that have contributed to recent climate change. Much of this uncertainty is from the effect that particles have on cloud radiative properties, the aerosol indirect effect. Particles on which cloud droplets form are called cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Particles larger than about 80--100 nm dry diameter typically act as CCN in stratus clouds. In order to predict how cloud radiative properties have changed since pre-industrial times, the CCN concentrations in both present-day and pre-industrial times must be known. Much of the uncertainty in CCN predictions is from uncertainty in the sources of ultrafine particles (particles with diameter smaller than 100 nm) as well as the processes that grow these particles to CCN sizes. This thesis explores various aspects of the how uncertainties in ultrafine particles affect predictions of CCN. First, we explore the uncertainty in CCN due to uncertain sea-salt emissions and also the affect of recently quantified ultrafine sea-salt on CCN. In the Southern Ocean, uncertainty in sea-salt emissions contributed to uncertainties in CCN(0.2%) by a factor of 2. Ultrafine sea-salt aerosol increased CCN(0.2%) in remote marine regions by more than 20%. Next, we look at how primary carbonaceous particles affect CCN as well as how uncertainties in their chemical properties affect CCN. The addition of primary carbonaceous aerosol increased CCN(0.2%) concentrations by 65--90% in the globally averaged surface layer. A sensitivity study showed that approximately half of this increase occurs even if all carbonaceous aerosols are completely insoluble. To study the growth of ultrafine particles to CCN sizes, we develop the Probability of Ultrafine Growth (PUG) model. It was found in most cases that condensation is the dominant growth mechanism and coagulation with larger particles is the dominant sink mechanism for ultrafine particles. We found that the probability of a 30 nm ultrafine particle generating a 100 nm CCN varies from <0.1% to 90% in different parts of the atmosphere. For a given mass of primary ultrafine aerosol, an uncertainty of a factor of two in the median emission diameter can lead to an uncertainty in the number of CCN generated as high as a factor for eight. Next, we develop a method for parameterizing sub-grid scale aerosol dynamics of freshly-emitted aerosol. This approach is based on the calculation of the probability that a given particle emitted inside a computational grid cell will survive and be available for transfer outside the cell. The method for applying the sub-grid coagulation parameterization to a CTM is discussed. In order to elucidate the computational burden of simulating aerosol nucleation in 3-D models, we derive the pseudo-steady-state approximation (PSSA) for sulfuric acid vapor and tested it in a box model with size-resolved aerosol microphysics. The associated errors in prediction of the sulfuric acid vapor concentration and particle concentrations are small. The PSSA model was faster than a model that explicitly solves for the sulfuric acid vapor concentration in 97% of the tests, more than ten times faster in 91% of the points, and more than 100 times faster in 69% of the tests. Next, we evaluate the sensitivity of CCN(0.2%) concentrations to changes in the nucleation rates. The difference in predicted nucleation rates in simulations using a binary nucleation parameterization and a ternary nucleation parameterization was six orders of magnitude, globally. The global CCN(0.2%) concentration was 12% higher when the ternary parameterization was used instead of the binary parameterization. The sensitivity of CCN(0.2%) to changes in nucleation rate increased both when the primary particle emissions were reduced and when the SOA formation rates were increased. In our pre-industrial simulations, the sensitivity of CCN(0.2%) to the nucleation rates were similar to the present day simulations. We found that the proposed ion-aerosol clear-air mechanism cannot explain t

  15. One-step thermolysis synthesis of two-dimensional ultrafine Fe3O4 particles/carbon nanonetworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wanqun; Li, Xiaona; Liang, Jianwen; Tang, Kaibin; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-02-01

    To tackle the issue of inferior cycle stability and rate capability for Fe3O4 anode materials in lithium ion batteries, ultrafine Fe3O4 nanocrystals uniformly encapsulated in two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanonetworks have been fabricated through thermolysis of a simple, low-cost iron(iii) acetylacetonate without any extra processes. Moreover, compared to the reported Fe3O4/carbon composites, the particle size of Fe3O4 is controllable and held down to ~3 nm. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of the excellent electroconductive carbon nanonetworks and uniform distribution of ultrafine Fe3O4 particles, the prepared 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork anode exhibits high reversible capacity, excellent rate capability and superior cyclability. A high capacity of 1534 mA h g-1 is achieved at a 1 C rate and is maintained without decay up to 500 cycles (1 C = 1 A g-1). Even at the high current density of 5 C and 10 C, the 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetworks maintain a reversible capacity of 845 and 647 mA h g-1 after 500 discharge/charge cycles, respectively. In comparison with other reported Fe3O4-based anodes, the 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork electrode is one of the most attractive of those in energy storage applications.To tackle the issue of inferior cycle stability and rate capability for Fe3O4 anode materials in lithium ion batteries, ultrafine Fe3O4 nanocrystals uniformly encapsulated in two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanonetworks have been fabricated through thermolysis of a simple, low-cost iron(iii) acetylacetonate without any extra processes. Moreover, compared to the reported Fe3O4/carbon composites, the particle size of Fe3O4 is controllable and held down to ~3 nm. Benefitting from the synergistic effects of the excellent electroconductive carbon nanonetworks and uniform distribution of ultrafine Fe3O4 particles, the prepared 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork anode exhibits high reversible capacity, excellent rate capability and superior cyclability. A high capacity of 1534 mA h g-1 is achieved at a 1 C rate and is maintained without decay up to 500 cycles (1 C = 1 A g-1). Even at the high current density of 5 C and 10 C, the 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetworks maintain a reversible capacity of 845 and 647 mA h g-1 after 500 discharge/charge cycles, respectively. In comparison with other reported Fe3O4-based anodes, the 2D Fe3O4/carbon nanonetwork electrode is one of the most attractive of those in energy storage applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TGA results of Fe3O4/C-350 and Fe3O4/C-450, TEM and HRTEM images of Fe3O4/C-350 composite electrode after 500 electrochemical cycles at the current of 1 A g-1. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06843f

  16. Analysis of heat and mass transfer between air and falling film desiccant for different flow configurations in the presence of ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmad A.

    This work focuses on the enhancement of heat and mass transfer between air and falling desiccant film for different flow channel configurations. Cu-Ultrafine particles are added to the desiccant film to investigate the enhancement in heat and mass transfer between air and desiccant film for dehumidification and cooling processes of the air and regeneration of desiccant film. A detailed comparative study between parallel and counter flow channels is performed using a parametric study to investigate the enhancements in dehumidification, cooling, and regeneration processes in terms of the pertinent parameters. The results reveal that the parallel flow arrangement provides better dehumidification and cooling for the air than the counter flow channel for a wide range of parameters. Next, the inclined parallel and counter flow configurations are investigated using an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) and successive over-relaxation methods to discretize the vorticity and stream-function equations, respectively. A parametric study is employed to investigate the inclination angle effects in enhancing the heat and mass transfer in terms of the controlling parameters. It is shown that inclination angle plays a significant role in enhancing the dehumidification, cooling, and regeneration processes. Finally, the enhancements in heat and mass transfer in cross flow channel between air and desiccant film is examined based on a parametric study to investigate the dehumidification and cooling processes of the air in terms of the pertinent controlling parameters. These parameters are air and desiccant Reynolds numbers, dimensions of the channel, volume fraction of Cu-ultrafine particles, and thermal dispersion effects. It is found that an increase in the Cu-volume fraction increases dehumidification and cooling capabilities and produce more stable Cu-desiccant film.

  17. Frequency-dependent AMS of rocks: A tool for the investigation of the fabric of ultrafine magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrouda, Frantiek; Jeek, Josef

    2014-08-01

    In some geological processes, new very fine-grained magnetic minerals may originate. The variation in content of these minerals is routinely investigated by frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is traditionally interpreted in terms of the presence of viscous superparamagnetic (SP) particles in addition to stable single domain (SSD) and multidomain (MD) magnetic particles. In addition, the fabric of these grains can be investigated through the frequency-dependent AMS. Through standard AMS measurement at different frequencies, one can evaluate the contribution of SP particles to the whole-rock AMS; appropriate methods were developed. Various rocks, soils and ceramics, showing frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, were investigated. Measurable changes of AMS with operating frequency were revealed and attempts are made of their fabric interpretation.

  18. Frequency-dependent AMS of rocks as a tool for the investigation of the fabric of ultrafine magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrouda, Frantisek; Jezek, Josef

    2014-05-01

    In some geological processes, new very fine-grained magnetic minerals may originate. The variation in content of these minerals is routinely investigated by frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is traditionally interpreted in terms of presence of viscous superparamagnetic (SP) particles in addition to stable single domain (SSD) and multidomain (MD) magnetic particles. In addition, the fabric of these grains can be investigated through the frequency-dependent AMS. Through standard AMS measurement at different frequencies, one can evaluate the contribution of SP particles to the whole-rock AMS; appropriate methods were developed. Various rocks, soils and ceramics, showing frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, were investigated. Measurable changes of AMS with operating frequency were revealed and attempts are made of their fabric interpretation.

  19. Traffic-related fine and ultrafine particle exposures of professional drivers and illness: an opportunity to better link exposure science and epidemiology to address an occupational hazard?

    PubMed

    Knibbs, L D; Morawska, L

    2012-11-15

    Exposures to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) can be particularly high in transport microenvironments (i.e. in and around vehicles) despite the short durations typically spent there. There is a mounting body of evidence that suggests that this is especially true for fine (<2.5 m) and ultrafine (<100 nm, UF) particles. Professional drivers, who spend extended periods of time in transport microenvironments due to their job, may incur exposures markedly higher than already elevated non-occupational exposures. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a raised incidence of adverse health outcomes among professional drivers, and exposure to TRAP has been suggested as one of the possible causal factors. Despite this, data describing the range and determinants of occupational exposures to fine and UF particles are largely conspicuous in their absence. Such information could strengthen attempts to define the aetiology of professional drivers' illnesses as it relates to traffic combustion-derived particles. In this article, we suggest that the drivers' occupational fine and UF particle exposures are an exemplar case where opportunities exist to better link exposure science and epidemiology in addressing questions of causality. The nature of the hazard is first introduced, followed by an overview of the health effects attributable to exposures typical of transport microenvironments. Basic determinants of exposure and reduction strategies are also described, and finally the state of knowledge is briefly summarised along with an outline of the main unanswered questions in the topic area. PMID:23010254

  1. Effect of central fans and in-duct filters on deposition rates of ultrafine and fine particles in an occupied townhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Lance A.; Emmerich, Steven J.; Howard-Reed, Cynthia

    Airborne particles are implicated in morbidity and mortality of certain high-risk subpopulations. Exposure to particles occurs mostly indoors, where a main removal mechanism is deposition to surfaces. Deposition can be affected by the use of forced-air circulation through ducts or by air filters. In this study, we calculate the deposition rates of particles in an occupied house due to forced-air circulation and the use of in-duct filters such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP) and fibrous mechanical filters (MECH). Deposition rates are calculated for 128 size categories ranging from 0.01 to 2.5 ?m. More than 110 separate "events" (mostly cooking, candle burning, and pouring kitty litter) were used to calculate deposition rates for four conditions: fan off, fan on, MECH installed, ESP installed. For all cases, deposition rates varied in a "U"-shaped distribution with the minimum occurring near 0.1 ?m, as predicted by theory. The use of the central fan with no filter or with a standard furnace filter increased deposition rates by amounts on the order of 0.1-0.5 h -1. The MECH increased deposition rates by up to 2 h -1 for ultrafine and fine particles but was ineffective for particles in the 0.1-0.5 ?m range. The ESP increased deposition rates by 2-3 h -1 and was effective for all sizes. However, the ESP lost efficiency after several weeks and needed regular cleaning to maintain its effectiveness. A reduction of particle levels by 50% or more could be achieved by use of the ESP when operating properly. Since the use of fans and filters reduces particle concentrations from both indoor and outdoor sources, it is more effective than the alternative approach of reducing ventilation by closing windows or insulating homes more tightly. For persons at risk, use of an air filter may be an effective method of reducing exposure to particles.

  2. Ultrafine cementitious grout

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, E.H.

    1998-07-07

    An ultrafine cementitious grout is described having a particle size 90% of which are less than 6 {micro}m in diameter and an average size of about 2.5 {micro}m or less, and preferably 90% of which are less than 5 {micro}m in diameter and an average size of about 2 {micro}m or less containing Portland cement, pumice as a pozzolanic material and superplasticizer in the amounts of about 40 wt. % to about 50 wt. % Portland cement; from about 50 wt. % to about 60 wt. % pumice containing at least 60% amorphous silicon dioxide; and from 0.1 wt. % to about 1.5 wt. % superplasticizer. The grout is mixed with water in the W/CM ratio of about 0.4--0.6/1. The grout has very high strength and very low permeability with good workability. The ultrafine particle sizes allow for sealing of microfractures below 10 {micro}m in width. 4 figs.

  3. Short-term exposure to PM 10, PM 2.5, ultrafine particles and CO 2 for passengers at an intercity bus terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Hsiao-Peng; Hsieh, Cheng-Ju

    2011-04-01

    The Taipei Bus Station is the main transportation hub for over 50 bus routes to eastern, central, and southern Taiwan. Daily traffic volume at this station is about 2500 vehicles, serving over 45,000 passengers daily. The station is a massive 24-story building housing a bus terminal, a business hotel, a shopping mall, several cinemas, offices, private residential suites, and over 900 parking spaces. However, air quality inside this bus terminal is a concern as over 2500 buses are scheduled to run daily. This study investigates the PM 10, PM 2.5, UFP and CO 2 levels inside and outside the bus terminal. All measurements were taken between February and April 2010. Measurement results show that coarse PM inside the bus terminal was resuspended by the movement of large numbers of passengers. The fine and ultrafine PM in the station concourse were from outside vehicles. Moreover, fine and ultrafine PM at waiting areas were exhausted directly from buses in the building. The CO 2 levels at waiting areas were likely elevated by bus exhaust and passengers exhaling. The PM 10, PM 2.5 and CO 2 levels at the bus terminal were lower than Taiwan's EPA suggested standards for indoor air quality. However, UFP levels at the bus terminal were significantly higher than those in the urban background by about 10 times. Therefore, the effects of UFPs on the health of passengers and workers must be addressed at this bus terminal since the levels of UFPs are higher than >1.0 10 5 particles cm -3.

  4. A novel technique for evaluating cleaned fine and ultrafine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    As a standard industrial practice all commercially cleaned coals are evaluated by washability analysis to predict their cleaning potential. The results of this analysis are so important that coal washability is a major factor in deciding to purchase and develop coal holdings. However, washability analysis are at present limited to coal particle sizes of greater than {minus}28 mesh (0.6 mm). Coal particles smaller than this limit do separate well in the standard sink-float process used in the washability tests. The increasing demand for cleaner coals requires that coals be crushed to fine ({minus}100 mesh - 0.15 mm) and ultrafine ({minus}325 mesh - 0.045 mm) sizes to liberate more of the fine-grained mineral matter including pyrite. However, such small coal particles can not be analyzed in the standard washability analysis. The purpose of this study is to develop a washability analysis system for fine and ultrafine coal particles using Density Gradient Centrifugation (DGC) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) techniques. The unique advantages of this proposed technique is that is provides a means to obtain usable washability curves on fine and ultrafine coal samples. The DGC technique will produce a large number of density fractions in a single run and, thus, is much faster and more efficient that normal washability analysis. During this quarter all of the samples to be used in this study have been ordered from the Illinois Basin Coal Sample Program and the initial results for one sample have been examined.

  5. Ultrafine-Particle Emission Factors as a Function of Vehicle Mode of Operation for LDVs Based on Near-Roadway Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Wenjuan; Wen, Dongqi; Xiang, Sheng; Hu, Zhice; Noll, Kenneth E

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents ultrafine-particle (UFP) emission factors (EFs) as a function of vehicle mode of operation (free flow and congestion) using (1) concurrent 5 min measurements of UFPs and carbon monoxide (CO) concentration, wind speed and direction, traffic volume and speed near a roadway that is restricted to light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and (2) inverse dispersion model calculations. Short-term measurements are required to characterize the highly variable and rapidly changing UFP concentration generated by vehicles. Under congestion conditions, the UFP vehicle EFs increased from 0.5 × 10(13) to 2 × 10(13) (particles km(-1) vehicle(-1)) when vehicle flow increased from 5500 to 7500 vehicles/h. For free-flow conditions, the EF is constant at 1.5 × 10(13) (particles km(-1) vehicle(-1)). The analysis is based on the assumption that air-quality models adequately describe the dilution process due to both traffic and atmospheric turbulence. The approach used to verify this assumption was to use an emission factor model to determine EFs for CO and then estimate dilution factors using measured CO concentrations. This procedure eliminates the need to rely only on air quality models to generate dilution factors. The EFs are suitable for fleet emissions under real-world traffic conditions. PMID:26674658

  6. Identification of extratropical two-way troposphere-stratosphere mixing based on CARIBIC measurements of O3, CO, and ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Maiss, M.; Scharffe, D. H.; Crutzen, P. J.; Hermann, M.; Heintzenberg, J.; Wiedensohler, A.; Gsten, H.; Heinrich, G.; Fischer, H.; Cuijpers, J. W. M.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.

    2000-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of O3, CO, and ultrafine aerosol particles (UFP), conducted on board of a Boeing 767-ER passenger aircraft flying from Sri Lanka to Germany (project CARIBIC), are used to study two-way cross-tropopause mixing near a subtropical tropopause fold. On the equatorward side of the fold, downward mixing of stratospheric air into the upper troposphere is identified by enhanced concentrations of O3 and 14CO. Very high UFP number concentrations of up to 1.5104 cm-3 (STP) were encountered inside the poleward half of the fold. This accumulation of small particles is explained by recent extensive aerosol nucleation, most likely triggered by the mixing of stratospheric air with tropospheric air injected into the fold. Further, nine particle formation events were observed outside the fold which are attributed to isolated cells of deep convection and to rising air parcels under cyclonic conditions that mix with surrounding air. In the upper troposphere O3 and CO were found to be correlated with high ?O3/?CO ratios of 0.6 to 1.5. In the fold the correlation was strongly negative with ?O3/?CO; = -3.5; but the high CO mixing ratios of 100 ppb at O3 mixing ratios of 250 ppb point to earlier injection of tropospheric air, in agreement with the UFP measurements.

  7. FINE PARTICLE CHARGING DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the changing of fine particles by unipolar ions in an electric field, and evaluation of a specially designed small pilot-scale (600-1000 acfm) precharging device. Following an extensive review of the lit...

  8. Spatial and temporal variability of ultrafine particles, NO2, PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance, PM10 and PMcoarse in Swiss study areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eeftens, Marloes; Phuleria, Harish C.; Meier, Reto; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Corradi, Elisabetta; Davey, Mark; Ducret-Stich, Regina; Fierz, Martin; Gehrig, Robert; Ineichen, Alex; Keidel, Dirk; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Ragettli, Martina S.; Schindler, Christian; Knzli, Nino; Tsai, Ming-Yi

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to outdoor air pollutants remains an important concern in Europe, as limit values for NO2 and PM10 continue to be exceeded. Few studies have addressed the long-term spatial contrasts in PM2.5, PM absorbance, PMcoarse and especially ultrafine particles. This scarcity of data hampers the possibility to conduct epidemiological studies, assessing the health relevance of these markers of potentially harmful pollutants. Air pollution measurements were performed in eight geographically distinct areas of the Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) in Switzerland. NO2 was measured in all eight areas at 40 sites per area, and PM2.5, PM2.5 absorbance, PM10 and ultrafine particles (particle number concentration (PNC) and lung deposited surface area (LDSA)) were measured in 4 of these areas, at a subset of 20 out of 40 sites. Each site was sampled three times during different seasons of the year, using the same equipment, sampling protocols and the same central facilities for analysis of samples. We assessed the spatial variability between areas and between individual sites, as well as pollution contrasts between the seasons and correlations between different pollutants. Within-area spatial contrasts (defined as the ratio between the 90th and 10th percentile) were highest for NO2 (3.14), moderate for PMcoarse (2.19), PNC (2.00) and PM2.5 absorbance (1.94), and lowest for LDSA (1.63), PM2.5 (1.50) and PM10 (1.46). Concentrations in the larger cities were generally higher than in smaller towns and rural and alpine areas, and were higher in the winter than in the summer and intermediate seasons, for all pollutants. Between-area differences accounted for more variation than within-area differences for all pollutants except NO2 and PMcoarse. Despite substantial within-area contrasts for PNC and LDSA, 74.7% and 83.3% of the spatial variance was attributed to between-area variability, respectively. Coefficients of determination between long-term adjusted pollutants were high (R>0.70) between NO2, PM2.5 absorbance, PNC and LDSA and between PM2.5 and PM10. The measurement of spatial patterns for this large range of outdoor air pollutants will contribute to a highly standardized estimation of individual long-term exposure levels for SAPALDIA cohort participants.

  9. Development of Ultrafine Grained Zircaloy-2 by Room Temperature Cross Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Sunkulp; Keskar, Nachiket; Jayaganthan, R.; Singh, I. V.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Saibaba, N.

    2015-02-01

    Effect of change in strain path by cross rolling up to a true strain of 1.89 has been studied in the present work. The Zircaloy-2 was subjected to solutionising heat treatment at 800 °C in argon environment for 2 h and subsequently quenched in mercury prior to cross rolling at room temperature. The fragmentation of near basal grains due to change in strain path is evident from the EBSD micrographs. The dislocation density in the crossrolled alloy increases with true strain as calculated from the XRD and EBSD data and it is found to be 2.806453 × 1016/m2. extension twins are observed initially up to 25% reduction, with the further reduction in thickness, near basal grains are oriented toward the normal direction. These basal grains undergone fragmentation due to changes in strain path upon cross-rolling as observed from KAM and EBSD images. TEM results of the cross-rolled sample confirm the formation of ultrafine and nanograins in the alloy due to orientation of incidental dislocation boundaries in the direction of macroscopic plastic flow and post-annealing treatment of the deformed alloy. A tensile strength of 991 MPa with 7.5% ductility is observed in the 85% cross-rolled alloy. The cross-rolled alloy upon annealing at 400 °C for 30 min improves ductility to 11%.

  10. Comparison of carcinogen, carbon monoxide, and ultrafine particle emissions from narghile waterpipe and cigarette smoking: Sidestream smoke measurements and assessment of second-hand smoke emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, Nancy; Saleh, Rawad; Jaroudi, Ezzat; Sheheitli, Hiba; Badr, Thérèse; Sepetdjian, Elizabeth; Al Rashidi, Mariam; Saliba, Najat; Shihadeh, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The lack of scientific evidence on the constituents, properties, and health effects of second-hand waterpipe smoke has fueled controversy over whether public smoking bans should include the waterpipe. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare emissions of ultrafine particles (UFP, <100 nm), carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), volatile aldehydes, and carbon monoxide (CO) for cigarettes and narghile (shisha, hookah) waterpipes. These smoke constituents are associated with a variety of cancers, and heart and pulmonary diseases, and span the volatility range found in tobacco smoke. Sidestream cigarette and waterpipe smoke was captured and aged in a 1 m 3 Teflon-coated chamber operating at 1.5 air changes per hour (ACH). The chamber was characterized for particle mass and number surface deposition rates. UFP and CO concentrations were measured online using a fast particle spectrometer (TSI 3090 Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer), and an indoor air quality monitor. Particulate PAH and gaseous volatile aldehydes were captured on glass fiber filters and DNPH-coated SPE cartridges, respectively, and analyzed off-line using GC-MS and HPLC-MS. PAH compounds quantified were the 5- and 6-ring compounds of the EPA priority list. Measured aldehydes consisted of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, methacrolein, and propionaldehyde. We found that a single waterpipe use session emits in the sidestream smoke approximately four times the carcinogenic PAH, four times the volatile aldehydes, and 30 times the CO of a single cigarette. Accounting for exhaled mainstream smoke, and given a habitual smoker smoking rate of 2 cigarettes per hour, during a typical one-hour waterpipe use session a waterpipe smoker likely generates ambient carcinogens and toxicants equivalent to 2-10 cigarette smokers, depending on the compound in question. There is therefore good reason to include waterpipe tobacco smoking in public smoking bans.

  11. Comparison of carcinogen, carbon monoxide, and ultrafine particle emissions from narghile waterpipe and cigarette smoking: Sidestream smoke measurements and assessment of second-hand smoke emission factors

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Nancy; Saleh, Rawad; Jaroudi, Ezzat; Sheheitli, Hiba; Badr, Thrse; Sepetdjian, Elizabeth; Al Rashidi, Mariam; Saliba, Najat; Shihadeh, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The lack of scientific evidence on the constituents, properties, and health effects of second-hand waterpipe smoke has fueled controversy over whether public smoking bans should include the waterpipe. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare emissions of ultrafine particles (UFP, <100 nm), carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), volatile aldehydes, and carbon monoxide (CO) for cigarettes and narghile (shisha, hookah) waterpipes. These smoke constituents are associated with a variety of cancers, and heart and pulmonary diseases, and span the volatility range found in tobacco smoke. Sidestream cigarette and waterpipe smoke was captured and aged in a 1 m3 Teflon-coated chamber operating at 1.5 air changes per hour (ACH). The chamber was characterized for particle mass and number surface deposition rates. UFP and CO concentrations were measured online using a fast particle spectrometer (TSI 3090 Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer), and an indoor air quality monitor. Particulate PAH and gaseous volatile aldehydes were captured on glass fiber filters and DNPH-coated SPE cartridges, respectively, and analyzed off-line using GCMS and HPLCMS. PAH compounds quantified were the 5- and 6-ring compounds of the EPA priority list. Measured aldehydes consisted of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, methacrolein, and propionaldehyde. We found that a single waterpipe use session emits in the sidestream smoke approximately four times the carcinogenic PAH, four times the volatile aldehydes, and 30 times the CO of a single cigarette. Accounting for exhaled mainstream smoke, and given a habitual smoker smoking rate of 2 cigarettes per hour, during a typical one-hour waterpipe use session a waterpipe smoker likely generates ambient carcinogens and toxicants equivalent to 210 cigarette smokers, depending on the compound in question. There is therefore good reason to include waterpipe tobacco smoking in public smoking bans. PMID:20161525

  12. Numerical analysis of nitrogen-mixed argon plasma characteristics and injected particle behavior in an ICP torch for ultrafine powder synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Hong, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The ICP (inductively coupled plasma) torches have been extensively used for the synthesis of various ceramics and new materials as effective hot-temperature heat sources in the field of material processing. Here, a numerical model is presented for the analysis of plasma characteristics of an ICP torch and gas mixing effects on the plasma when a nitrogen gas is added into the argon plasma as a carrier or sheath gas at the torch inlet. The fluid equations describing the plasma flow and temperature fields and the diffusions between two different gases are solved along with a magnetic vector potential equation for electromagnetic fields. The trajectory and the temperature change with time for a particle injected into the plasma are also investigated by a plasma-particle interaction model to find out optimum injection conditions for the synthesis of ultra/fine nitride ceramic powders. It is found from the calculations that the nitrogen-mixed argon plasma with a nitrogen carrier gas for the reaction kinetics of nitride synthesis. It is also found that the radial injection through the holes of the tube wall is preferable to the axial injection at the torch inlet for the complete evaporation of injected particle and the effective chemical reaction of reactant vapor with nitrogen. For the radial injection in an ICP torch of 20 cm in axial length, the optimum injection locations and initial velocities of 50-{micro}m aluminum particles are found for synthesizing aluminum nitride are in the range of 6{approximately}12 cm apart from the torch inlet and over 15 m/s, respectively.

  13. Comparison of carcinogen, carbon monoxide, and ultrafine particle emissions from narghile waterpipe and cigarette smoking: Sidestream smoke measurements and assessment of second-hand smoke emission factors.

    PubMed

    Daher, Nancy; Saleh, Rawad; Jaroudi, Ezzat; Sheheitli, Hiba; Badr, Thrse; Sepetdjian, Elizabeth; Al Rashidi, Mariam; Saliba, Najat; Shihadeh, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The lack of scientific evidence on the constituents, properties, and health effects of second-hand waterpipe smoke has fueled controversy over whether public smoking bans should include the waterpipe. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare emissions of ultrafine particles (UFP, <100 nm), carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), volatile aldehydes, and carbon monoxide (CO) for cigarettes and narghile (shisha, hookah) waterpipes. These smoke constituents are associated with a variety of cancers, and heart and pulmonary diseases, and span the volatility range found in tobacco smoke.Sidestream cigarette and waterpipe smoke was captured and aged in a 1 m(3) Teflon-coated chamber operating at 1.5 air changes per hour (ACH). The chamber was characterized for particle mass and number surface deposition rates. UFP and CO concentrations were measured online using a fast particle spectrometer (TSI 3090 Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer), and an indoor air quality monitor. Particulate PAH and gaseous volatile aldehydes were captured on glass fiber filters and DNPH-coated SPE cartridges, respectively, and analyzed off-line using GC-MS and HPLC-MS. PAH compounds quantified were the 5- and 6-ring compounds of the EPA priority list. Measured aldehydes consisted of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, methacrolein, and propionaldehyde.We found that a single waterpipe use session emits in the sidestream smoke approximately four times the carcinogenic PAH, four times the volatile aldehydes, and 30 times the CO of a single cigarette. Accounting for exhaled mainstream smoke, and given a habitual smoker smoking rate of 2 cigarettes per hour, during a typical one-hour waterpipe use session a waterpipe smoker likely generates ambient carcinogens and toxicants equivalent to 2-10 cigarette smokers, depending on the compound in question. There is therefore good reason to include waterpipe tobacco smoking in public smoking bans. PMID:20161525

  14. Impact of meteorology, traffic characteristics, and distance from roadway on roadside concentrations of ultrafine particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traffic-laden roadways are major contributors to poor air quality in developed areas, elevating pollutants such as particulate matter (PM) and ozone. Among the numerous air pollutants emitted by vehicles, ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter <100 nm) are of interest as a potentia...

  15. Size-Resolved Ultrafine Particle Deposition and Brownian Coagulation from Gasoline Vehicle Exhaust in an Environmental Test Chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Jianing

    2015-10-20

    Size-resolved deposition rates and Brownian coagulation of particles between 20 and 900 nm (mobility diameter) were estimated in a well-mixed environmental chamber from a gasoline vehicle exhaust with a total peak particle concentration of 10(5)-10(6) particles/cm(3) at 12.24-25.22 C. A deposition theory with modified friction velocity and coagulation model was also employed to predict particle concentration decay. Initially during particle decay, approximately 85% or more of the particles had diameters of <100 nm. Particle deposition rates with standard deviations were highly dependent on particle size ranges, and varied from 0.012 0.003 to 0.48 0.02 h(-1). In the experiment, the friction velocity obtained was in the range 1.5-2.5 cm/s. The most explainable fractal dimension and Hamaker constant in coagulation model were 2.5-3 and 20 kT, respectively, and the contribution from coagulation dominated the total particle decay during the first 1 h of decay. It is considered that the modified friction velocity and best fitted fractal dimension and Hamaker constants could be further used to analyze gasoline vehicle exhaust particle dynamics and assess human exposure to vehicle particle pollutants in urban areas, tunnels, and underground parking lots. PMID:26402743

  16. Development of the Electroacoustic Dewatering (EAD) process for fine/ultrafine coal: First quarterly progress report, period ending December 15, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-05

    Battelle, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ashbrook-Simon-Hartley (ASH), Kaiser Engineers (KE), Lewis Corporation, and Prof. S.H. Chiang of the University of Pittsburgh, is developing an advanced process for the dewatering of fine and ultrafine coals. The advanced process, called Electroacoustic Dewatering (EAD), capitalizes on the adaptation of synergistic effects of electric and acoustic fields to a commercial belt filter press design that is used in many other applications. 1 fig.

  17. Ultrafine particles derived from mineral processing: A case study of the Pb-Zn sulfide ore with emphasis on lead-bearing colloids.

    PubMed

    Mikhlin, Yuri; Vorobyev, Sergey; Romanchenko, Alexander; Karasev, Sergey; Karacharov, Anton; Zharkov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Although mining and mineral processing industry is a vast source of heavy metal pollutants, the formation and behavior of micrometer- and nanometer-sized particles and their aqueous colloids entered the environment from the technological media has received insufficient attention to date. Here, the yield and characteristics of ultrafine mineral entities produced by routine grinding of the Pb-Zn sulfide ore (Gorevskoe ore deposit, Russia) were studied using laser diffraction analysis (LDA), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurement, microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, with most attention given to toxic lead species. It was revealed, in particular, that the fraction of particles less that 1 μm in the ground ore typical reaches 0.4 vol. %. The aquatic particles in supernatants were micrometer size aggregates with increased content of zinc, sulfur, calcium as compared with the bulk ore concentrations. The hydrodynamic diameter of the colloidal species decreased with time, with their zeta potentials remaining about -12 mV. The colloids produced from galena were composed of 20-50 nm PbS nanoparticles associated with lead sulfate and thiosulfate, while the surface oxidation products at precipitated galena were largely lead oxyhydroxides. The size and zeta potential of the lead-bearing colloids decreased with time down to about 100 nm and from -15 mV to -30 mV, respectively. And, conversely, lead sulfide nanoparticles were mobilized before the aggregates during redispersion of the precipitates in fresh portions of water. The potential environmental impact of the metal-bearing colloids, which is due to the large-scale production and relative stability, is discussed. PMID:26761598

  18. Nano-porous TiO2 layer using ultrafine nano-particles for the blocking layer in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hai-Long; Ma, Jun-Hua; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Xue-Long; Fan, Sheng-Qiang; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-04-01

    A nano-porous TiO2 layer was produced by spray-deposition using ultrafine anatase nano-particles for the blocking layer for the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The microstructure and the electrochemical properties of the spray-deposited TiO2 layer were examined. The results of electrochemical properties showed that the spray-deposited TiO2 layer was capable to suppress the I3- ions diffusion to FTO substrate, reducing the electron recombination between the electrons on FTO substrate and I3- ions in electrolyte. In addition, the connection between TiO2 film and FTO substrate was improved by the TiO2 layer. Therefore, the short circuit current density and thereby the photo-to-electric energy conversion efficiency were improved by this blocking layer. The blocking effect of the porous layer was attributed to both the complicated pore structure of the spray-deposited layer and the enhanced connections between TiO2 film and FTO substrate. The low temperature characteristic of spray deposition approach indicates that it is suitable to the flexible-based DSCs. PMID:24734697

  19. Consequences of developmental exposure to concentrated ambient ultrafine particle air pollution combined with the adult paraquat and maneb model of the Parkinson's disease phenotype in male mice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joshua L; Liu, Xiufang; Weston, Douglas; Conrad, Katherine; Oberdrster, Gnter; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A

    2014-03-01

    Current evidence suggests suceptibility of both the substantia nigra and striatum to exposure to components of air pollution. Further, air pollution has been associated with increased risk of PD diagnsosis in humans or PD-like pathology in animals. This study examined whether exposure of mice to concentrated ambient ultrafine particles (CAPS; <100nm diameter) during the first two weeks of life would alter susceptibility to induction of the Parkinson's disease phenyotype (PDP) in a pesticide-based paraquat and maneb (PQ+MB) model during adulthood utilizing i.p. injections of 10mg/kg PQ and 30mg/kg MB 2 per week for 6 weeks. Evidence of CAPS-induced enhancement of the PQ+MB PDP was limited primarily to delayed recovery of locomotor activity 24 post-injection of PQ+MB that could be related to alterations in striatal GABA inhibitory function. Absence of more extensive interactions might also reflect the finding that CAPS and PQ+MB appeared to differentially target the nigrostriatal dopamine and amino acid systems, with CAPS impacting striatum and PQ+MB impacting dopamine-glutamate function in midbrain; both CAPS and PQ+MB elevated glutamate levels in these specific regions, consistent with potential excitotoxicity. These findings demonstrate the ability of postnatal CAPS to produce locomotor dysfunction and dopaminergic and glutamateric changes, independent of PQ+MB, in brain regions involved in the PDP. PMID:24486957

  20. Long-term observations of tropospheric particle number size distributions and equivalent black carbon mass concentrations in the German Ultrafine Aerosol Network (GUAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Merkel, M.; Rasch, F.; Sonntag, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Bastian, S.; Schladitz, A.; Löschau, G.; Cyrys, J.; Pitz, M.; Gu, J.; Kusch, T.; Flentje, H.; Quass, U.; Kaminski, H.; Kuhlbusch, T. A. J.; Meinhardt, F.; Schwerin, A.; Bath, O.; Ries, L.; Wirtz, K.; Fiebig, M.

    2015-11-01

    The German Ultrafine Aerosol Network (GUAN) is a cooperative atmospheric observation network, which aims at improving the scientific understanding of aerosol-related effects in the troposphere. The network addresses research questions dedicated to both, climate and health related effects. GUAN's core activity has been the continuous collection of tropospheric particle number size distributions and black carbon mass concentrations at seventeen observation sites in Germany. These sites cover various environmental settings including urban traffic, urban background, rural background, and Alpine mountains. In association with partner projects, GUAN has implemented a high degree of harmonisation of instrumentation, operating procedures, and data evaluation procedures. The quality of the measurement data is assured by laboratory intercomparisons as well as on-site comparisons with reference instruments. This paper describes the measurement sites, instrumentation, quality assurance and data evaluation procedures in the network as well as the EBAS repository, where the data sets can be obtained (doi:10.5072/guan).

  1. Health risks caused by short term exposure to ultrafine particles generated by residential wood combustion: a case study of Temuco, Chile.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Robles, Luis A; Fu, Joshua S; Vergara-Fernández, Alberto; Etcharren, Pablo; Schiappacasse, Luis N; Reed, Gregory D; Silva, María P

    2014-05-01

    Temuco is one of the most highly wood smoke polluted cities in Chile; however, there is scarce evidence of respiratory morbidity due to fine particulate matter. We aimed to estimate the relationship between daily concentration of ultrafine particles (UFP), with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 0.1 μm, and outpatient visits for respiratory illness at medical care centers of Temuco, Chile, from August the 20th, 2009 to June the 30th, 2011. The Air Pollution Health Effects European Approach (APHEA2) protocol was followed, and a multivariate semi-parametric Poisson regression model was fitted with GAM techniques using R-Project statistical package; controlling for trend, seasonality, and confounders. The daily UFP were measured by a MOUDI NR-110 sampler. We found that results of the statistical analyses show significant associations between UFP and respiratory outpatient visits, with the elderly (population ≥ 65 years), being the group that presented the greatest risk. An interquartile increase of 4.73 μg/m(3) in UFP (lag 5 days) was associated with respiratory outpatient visits with a relative risk (RR) of 1.1458 [95% CI (1.0497-1.2507)] for the elderly. These results show novel findings regarding the relevance of daily UFP concentrations and health risk, especially for susceptible population in a wood smoke polluted city. PMID:24607502

  2. Effect of Exposure to Atmospheric Ultrafine Particles on Production of Free Fatty Acids and Lipid Metabolites in the Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Navab, Kaveh; Hough, Greg; Daher, Nancy; Zhang, Min; Mittelstein, David; Lee, Katherine; Pakbin, Payam; Saffari, Arian; Bhetraratana, May; Sulaiman, Dawoud; Beebe, Tyler; Wu, Lan; Jen, Nelson; Wine, Eytan; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Araujo, Jesus A.; Fogelman, Alan; Sioutas, Constantinos; Navab, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ambient ultrafine particulate matter (UFP) is a well-recognized risk factor for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, little is known about the effects of air pollution on gastrointestinal disorders. Objective: We sought to assess whether exposure to ambient UFP (diameter < 180 nm) increased free fatty acids and lipid metabolites in the mouse small intestine. Methods: Ldlr-null mice were exposed to filtered air (FA) or UFP collected at an urban Los Angeles, California, site that was heavily affected by vehicular emissions; the exposure was carried out for 10 weeks in the presence or absence of D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide with antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties on a high-fat or normal chow diet. Results: Compared with FA, exposure to UFP significantly increased intestinal hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), including 15-HETE, 12-HETE, 5-HETE, as well as hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), including 13-HODE and 9-HODE. Arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) as well as some of the lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) in the small intestine were also increased in response to UFP exposure. Administration of D-4F significantly reduced UFP-mediated increase in HETEs, HODEs, AA, PGD2, and LPA. Although exposure to UFP further led to shortened villus length accompanied by prominent macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the intestinal villi, administration of D-4F mitigated macrophage infiltration. Conclusions: Exposure to UFP promotes lipid metabolism, villus shortening, and inflammatory responses in mouse small intestine, whereas administration of D-4F attenuated these effects. Our findings provide a basis to further assess the mechanisms underlying UFP-mediated lipid metabolism in the digestive system with clinical relevance to gut homeostasis and diseases. Citation: Li R, Navab K, Hough G, Daher N, Zhang M, Mittelstein D, Lee K, Pakbin P, Saffari A, Bhetraratana M, Sulaiman D, Beebe T, Wu L, Jen N, Wine E, Tseng CH, Araujo JA, Fogelman A, Sioutas C, Navab M, Hsiai TK. 2015. Effect of exposure to atmospheric ultrafine particles on production of free fatty acids and lipid metabolites in the mouse small intestine. Environ Health Perspect 123:34–41; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307036 PMID:25170928

  3. Investigations of percutaneous uptake of ultrafine TiO 2 particles at the high energy ion nanoprobe LIPSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, F.; Reinert, T.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.

    2004-06-01

    Micronised TiO 2 particles with a diameter of about 15 nm are used in sunscreens as physical UV filter. Due to the small particle size it may be supposed that TiO 2 particles can pass through the uppermost horny skin layer ( stratum corneum) via intercellular channels and penetrate into deeper vital skin layers. Accumulations of TiO 2 particles in the skin can decrease the threshold for allergies of the immune system or cause allergic reactions directly. Spatially resolved ion beam analysis (PIXE, RBS, STIM and secondary electron imaging) was carried out on freeze-dried cross-sections of biopsies of pig skin, on which four different formulations containing TiO 2 particles were applied. The investigations were carried out at the high energy ion nanoprobe LIPSION in Leipzig with a 2.25 MeV proton beam, which was focused to a diameter of 1 μm. The analysis concentrated on the penetration depth and on pathways of the TiO 2 particles into the skin. In these measurements a penetration of TiO 2 particles through the s. corneum into the underlying stratum granulosum via intercellular space was found. Hair follicles do not seem to be important penetration pathways because no TiO 2 was detected inside. The TiO 2 particle concentration in the stratum spinosum was below the minimum detection limit of about 1 particle/μm 2. These findings show the importance of coating the TiO 2 particles in order to prevent damage of RNA and DNA of skin cells by photocatalytic reactions of the penetrated particles caused by absorption of UV light.

  4. The effects of leaf area density variation on the collection efficiency of black carbon in the size range of ultrafine particles (UFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Lin, M.; Khlystov, A.; Katul, G. G.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon is mainly produced in the ultra-fine particle (UFP) size range of 10-100 nm from combustion processes and is now receiving significant attention given its role in global and regional climate change, cloud physics, human health and respiratory related diseases. Likewise, the role of vegetated surfaces in removing UFP is drawing increased attention, prompting interest in the relationship between leaf area density and UFP collection efficiency. Here, carbonaceous particles, mainly black carbon, were generated by burning candles during "sooting burn" to explore the effects of leaf area density (LAD) variation on the collection efficiency of black carbon in the UFP size range. Three scenarios were explored in a wind tunnel: (1) Juniperus Chinensis branches that are uniformly distributed within the test section; (2) LAD that is linearly increasing with downwind distance and (3) LAD that is decreasing with downwind distance. The total leaf area index (LAI) was maintained constant in all three cases. Particle concentrations were measured at multiple locations within the vegetated volume for a range of sizes of UFP (12.6-102 nm) using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The measured concentration can be used to evaluate the performance of a size-resolving model that couples the turbulent flow field and the collection efficiency for the variable LAD. The model assumes that (i) the mean longitudinal momentum balance is controlled only by the interplay between drag force and the pressure gradient, and (ii) the dominant collection mechanism for UFP is Brownian diffusion. Hence, other collection mechanisms such as inertial impaction, interception and phoretic effects are negligible. Good agreement was found between the model calculations of the UFP collection efficiency by the vegetation and the wind tunnel measurements for all three cases and across a wide range of wind speeds and particle size. It was shown that variations in leaf area density lead to a modification in the mean pressure gradient, resulting in an adjustment in the drag coefficient via the mean momentum balance. Once this adjustment is accounted for, the over-all particle collection efficiency is governed by the integrated LAD.

  5. Ultrafine particles and associated pollutants on roadways and in community air of Los Angeles California, Beijing China, and the Los Angeles International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerdahl, Frederick Dane

    Particles smaller than 10 microm in diameter are harmful to health. However, the smallest of these particles, ultrafine particles (UFP), equal to or smaller than 100 nm, may be especially harmful. Most are emitted by combustion sources, with transportation sources being a dominant contributor. While these particles have recently been under intense research, little is known regarding UFP concentrations or its components where people live, work, and commute. This dissertation reports on investigations of UFP and other pollutants in transportation-dominated areas. Included are findings from on-road, near-road and community monitoring studies performed in two megacities: Los Angeles, California and Beijing, China. A common feature of these studies was the application of advanced technologies to gather time-resolved measurements. An important finding made in Los Angeles was that real-time pollutant measurements could be made on busy roadways. UFP size distribution measurements made on a freeway with heavy-duty truck traffic demonstrated that UFP were much higher than on other highways or in community air. Nitric oxide (NO) levels were also much higher in these truck-dominated microenvironments. High correlations were found between UFP, black carbon (BC), particle counts, (NO), and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Monitoring at Los Angeles International Airport demonstrated that aircraft are important sources of UFP. Elevated UFP counts were found 900 meters from a runway used for take offs, while smaller values were found 500 meters downwind of a runway used for landings. These measurements showed a persistence of UFP at the community boundary in excess of measurements from roadside studies. A peak UFP measurement of 4.8 million particles cm -3 was made approximately 75 meters from a jet aircraft waiting to takeoff. Measurements made in Beijing demonstrated that heavy-duty diesel truck activity severely impacts community air quality. Black carbon was a marker of this activity. Levels of BC were approximately 5 microg m-3 in community air when trucks were not allowed in the city and exceeded 10--30 microg m-3 when trucks entered the city. On-road measurements made on expressways used by diesel-fueled trucks and light-duty gasoline-powered vehicles provided an opportunity to make emission estimates for carbon monoxide, BC, and UFP.

  6. The formation of ultra-fine particles during ozone-initiated oxidations with terpenes emitted from natural paint.

    PubMed

    Lamorena, Rheo B; Jung, Sang-Guen; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Lee, Woojin

    2007-03-01

    The formation of secondary products during the ozone-initiated oxidations with biogenic VOCs emitted from natural paint was investigated in this study. Mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy measurements have shown that the major components of gas-phase chemicals emitted from natural paint are monoterpenes including alpha- and beta-pinenes, camphene, p-cymene, and limonene. A significant formation of gaseous carbonyl products and nano-sized particles (4.4-168nm) was observed in the presence of ozone. Carboxylic acids were also observed to form during the reactions (i.e. formic acid at 0.170ppm and acetic acid at 0.260ppm). The formation of particles increased as the volume of paint introduced into a reaction chamber increased. A secondary increase in the particle number concentration was observed after 440min, which suggests further partitioning of oxidation products (i.e. carboxylic acids) into the particles previously existing in the reaction chamber. The growth of particles increased as the mean particle diameter and particle mass concentrations increased during the reaction. The experimental results obtained in this study may provide insight into the potential exposure of occupants to irritating chemical compounds formed during the oxidations of biogenic VOCs emitted from natural paint in indoor environments. PMID:16908097

  7. Indoor/outdoor relationships of quasi-ultrafine, accumulation and coarse mode particles in school environments in Barcelona: chemical composition and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Rivas, I.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Sunyer, J.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Bouso, L.; Sioutas, C.

    2013-12-01

    The mass concentration, chemical composition and sources of quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UFP, PM0.25), accumulation (PM0.25-2.5) and coarse mode (PM2.5-10) particles were determined in indoor and outdoor air at 39 schools in Barcelona (Spain). Quasi-UFP mass concentrations measured (25.6 μg m-3 outdoors, 23.4 μg m-3 indoors) are significantly higher than those reported in other studies, and characterised by higher carbonaceous and mineral matter contents and a lower proportion of secondary inorganic ions. Results suggest that quasi-UFPs in Barcelona are affected by local sources in the schools, mainly human activity (e.g. organic material from textiles, etc.; contributing 23-46% to total quasi-UFP mass) and playgrounds (in the form of mineral matter, contributing about 9% to the quasi-UFP mass). The particle size distribution of toxicologically relevant metals and major aerosol components was characterised, displaying bimodal size distributions for most elements and components, and a unimodal distribution for inorganic salts (ammonium nitrate and sulphate) and elemental carbon (EC). Regarding metals, Ni and Cr were partitioned mainly in quasi-UFPs and could thus be of interest for epidemiological studies, given their high redox properties. Children exposure to quasi-UFP mass and chemical species was assessed by comparing the concentrations measured at urban background and traffic areas schools. Finally, three main indoor sources across all size fractions were identified by assessing indoor/outdoor ratios (I/O) of PM species used as their tracers: human activity (organic material), cleaning products, paints and plastics (Cl- source), and a metallic mixed source (comprising combinations of Cu, Zn, Co, Cd, Pb, As, V and Cr).

  8. Effect of advanced aftertreatment for PM and NOx reduction on heavy-duty diesel engine ultrafine particle emissions.

    PubMed

    Herner, Jorn Dinh; Hu, Shaohua; Robertson, William H; Huai, Tao; Chang, M-C Oliver; Rieger, Paul; Ayala, Alberto

    2011-03-15

    Four heavy-duty and medium-duty diesel vehicles were tested in six different aftertreament configurations using a chassis dynamometer to characterize the occurrence of nucleation (the conversion of exhaust gases to particles upon dilution). The aftertreatment included four different diesel particulate filters and two selective catalytic reduction (SCR) devices. All DPFs reduced the emissions of solid particles by several orders of magnitude, but in certain cases the occurrence of a volatile nucleation mode could increase total particle number emissions. The occurrence of a nucleation mode could be predicted based on the level of catalyst in the aftertreatment, the prevailing temperature in the aftertreatment, and the age of the aftertreatment. The particles measured during nucleation had a high fraction of sulfate, up to 62% of reconstructed mass. Additionally the catalyst reduced the toxicity measured in chemical and cellular assays suggesting a pathway for an inverse correlation between particle number and toxicity. The results have implications for exposure to and toxicity of diesel PM. PMID:21322629

  9. The Ultrafine Mineralogy of a Molten Interplanetary Dust Particle as an Example of the Quench Regime of Atmospheric Entry Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Melting and degassing of interplanetary dust particle L2005B22 at approx. 1200 C was due to flash heating during atmospheric entry. Preservation of the porous particle texture supports rapid quenching from the peak heating temperature whereby olivine and pyroxene nanocrystals (3 nm-26 nm) show partial devitrification of the quenched melt at T approx. = 450 C - 740 C. The implied ultrahigh cooling rates are calculated at approx. 105 C/h-106 C/h, which is consistent with quench rates inferred from the temperature-time profiles based on atmospheric entry heating models. A vesicular rim on a nonstoichiometric relic forsterite grain in this particle represents either evaporative magnesium loss during flash heating or thermally annealed ion implantation texture.

  10. Seasonal variations of ultra-fine and submicron aerosols in Taipei, Taiwan: implications for particle formation processes in a subtropical urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Chen, M.-J.; Huang, W.-R.; Huang, S.-H.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Lee, C. S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the seasonal variations in the physicochemical properties of atmospheric ultra-fine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) and submicron particles (PM1, d ≤ 1 µm) in an east Asian urban area, which are hypothesized to be affected by the interchange of summer and winter monsoons. An observation experiment was conducted at TARO (Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory), an urban aerosol station in Taipei, Taiwan, from October 2012 to August 2013. The measurements included the mass concentration and chemical composition of UFPs and PM1, as well as the particle number concentration (PNC) and the particle number size distribution (PSD) with size range of 4-736 nm. The results indicated that the mass concentration of PM1 was elevated during cold seasons with a peak level of 18.5 µg m-3 in spring, whereas the highest concentration of UFPs was measured in summertime with a mean of 1.64 µg m-3. Moreover, chemical analysis revealed that the UFPs and PM1 were characterized by distinct composition; UFPs were composed mostly of organics, whereas ammonium and sulfate were the major constituents of PM1. The seasonal median of total PNCs ranged from 13.9 × 103 cm-3 in autumn to 19.4 × 103 cm-3 in spring. Median concentrations for respective size distribution modes peaked in different seasons. The nucleation-mode PNC (N4 - 25) peaked at 11.6 × 103 cm-3 in winter, whereas the Aitken-mode (N25 - 100) and accumulation-mode (N100 - 736) PNC exhibited summer maxima at 6.0 × 103 and 3.1 × 103 cm-3, respectively. The change in PSD during summertime was attributed to the enhancement in the photochemical production of condensable organic matter that, in turn, contributed to the growth of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. In addition, clear photochemical production of particles was observed, mostly in the summer season, which was characterized by average particle growth and formation rates of 4.0 ± 1.1 nm h-1 and 1.4 ± 0.8 cm-3 s-1, respectively. The prevalence of new particle formation (NPF) in summer was suggested as a result of seasonally enhanced photochemical oxidation of SO2 that contributed to the production of H2SO4, and a low level of PM10 (d ≤ 10 µm) that served as the condensation sink. Regarding the sources of aerosol particles, correlation analysis of the PNCs against NOx revealed that the local vehicular exhaust was the dominant contributor of the UFPs throughout the year. Conversely, the Asian pollution outbreaks had significant influence in the PNC of accumulation-mode particles during the seasons of winter monsoons. The results of this study implied the significance of secondary organic aerosols in the seasonal variations of UFPs and the influences of continental pollution outbreaks in the downwind areas of Asian outflows.

  11. Particle Deposition in a Child Respiratory Tract Model: In Vivo Regional Deposition of Fine and Ultrafine Aerosols in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque-Silva, Iolanda; Vecellio, Laurent; Durand, Marc; Avet, John; Le Pennec, Dborah; de Monte, Michle; Montharu, Jrme; Diot, Patrice; Cottier, Michle; Dubois, Francis; Pourchez, Jrmie

    2014-01-01

    To relate exposure to adverse health effects, it is necessary to know where particles in the submicron range deposit in the respiratory tract. The possibly higher vulnerability of children requires specific inhalation studies. However, radio-aerosol deposition experiments involving children are rare because of ethical restrictions related to radiation exposure. Thus, an in vivo study was conducted using three baboons as a child respiratory tract model to assess regional deposition patterns (thoracic region vs. extrathoracic region) of radioactive polydisperse aerosols ([d16d84], equal to [0.15 m0.5 m], [0.25 m1 m], or [1 m9 m]). Results clearly demonstrated that aerosol deposition within the thoracic region and the extrathoraic region varied substantially according to particle size. High deposition in the extrathoracic region was observed for the [1 m9 m] aerosol (72%17%). The [0.15 m0.5 m] aerosol was associated almost exclusively with thoracic region deposition (84%4%). Airborne particles in the range of [0.25 m1 m] showed an intermediate deposition pattern, with 49%8% in the extrathoracic region and 51%8% in the thoracic region. Finally, comparison of baboon and human inhalation experiments for the [1 m9 m] aerosol showed similar regional deposition, leading to the conclusion that regional deposition is species-independent for this airborne particle sizes. PMID:24787744

  12. Particle deposition in a child respiratory tract model: in vivo regional deposition of fine and ultrafine aerosols in baboons.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque-Silva, Iolanda; Vecellio, Laurent; Durand, Marc; Avet, John; Le Pennec, Dborah; de Monte, Michle; Montharu, Jrme; Diot, Patrice; Cottier, Michle; Dubois, Francis; Pourchez, Jrmie

    2014-01-01

    To relate exposure to adverse health effects, it is necessary to know where particles in the submicron range deposit in the respiratory tract. The possibly higher vulnerability of children requires specific inhalation studies. However, radio-aerosol deposition experiments involving children are rare because of ethical restrictions related to radiation exposure. Thus, an in vivo study was conducted using three baboons as a child respiratory tract model to assess regional deposition patterns (thoracic region vs. extrathoracic region) of radioactive polydisperse aerosols ([d16-d84], equal to [0.15 m-0.5 m], [0.25 m-1 m], or [1 m-9 m]). Results clearly demonstrated that aerosol deposition within the thoracic region and the extrathoraic region varied substantially according to particle size. High deposition in the extrathoracic region was observed for the [1 m-9 m] aerosol (72% 17%). The [0.15 m-0.5 m] aerosol was associated almost exclusively with thoracic region deposition (84% 4%). Airborne particles in the range of [0.25 m-1 m] showed an intermediate deposition pattern, with 49% 8% in the extrathoracic region and 51% 8% in the thoracic region. Finally, comparison of baboon and human inhalation experiments for the [1 m-9 m] aerosol showed similar regional deposition, leading to the conclusion that regional deposition is species-independent for this airborne particle sizes. PMID:24787744

  13. Experimental Study on Ultrafine Particle Removal Performance of Portable Air Cleaners with Different Filters in an Office Room.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huan; Shen, Henggen; Shui, Tiantian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Liuke

    2016-01-01

    Size- and time-dependent aerodynamic behaviors of indoor particles, including PM1.0, were evaluated in a school office in order to test the performance of air-cleaning devices using different filters. In-situ real-time measurements were taken using an optical particle counter. The filtration characteristics of filter media, including single-pass efficiency, volume and effectiveness, were evaluated and analyzed. The electret filter (EE) medium shows better initial removal efficiency than the high efficiency (HE) medium in the 0.3-3.5 ?m particle size range, while under the same face velocity, the filtration resistance of the HE medium is several times higher than that of the EE medium. During service life testing, the efficiency of the EE medium decreased to 60% with a total purifying air flow of 25 10? m/m. The resistance curve rose slightly before the efficiency reached the bottom, and then increased almost exponentially. The single-pass efficiency of portable air cleaner (PAC) with the pre-filter (PR) or the active carbon granule filter (CF) was relatively poor. While PAC with the pre-filter and the high efficiency filter (PR&HE) showed maximum single-pass efficiency for PM1.0 (88.6%), PAC with the HE was the most effective at removing PM1.0. The enhancement of PR with HE and electret filters augmented the single-pass efficiency, but lessened the airflow rate and effectiveness. Combined with PR, the decay constant of large-sized particles could be greater than for PACs without PR. Without regard to the lifetime, the electret filters performed better with respect to resource saving and purification improvement. A most penetrating particle size range (MPPS: 0.4-0.65 ?m) exists in both HE and electret filters; the MPPS tends to become larger after HE and electret filters are combined with PR. These results serve to provide a better understanding of the indoor particle removal performance of PACs when combined with different kinds of filters in school office buildings. PMID:26742055

  14. Experimental Study on Ultrafine Particle Removal Performance of Portable Air Cleaners with Different Filters in an Office Room

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Shen, Henggen; Shui, Tiantian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Liuke

    2016-01-01

    Size- and time-dependent aerodynamic behaviors of indoor particles, including PM1.0, were evaluated in a school office in order to test the performance of air-cleaning devices using different filters. In-situ real-time measurements were taken using an optical particle counter. The filtration characteristics of filter media, including single-pass efficiency, volume and effectiveness, were evaluated and analyzed. The electret filter (EE) medium shows better initial removal efficiency than the high efficiency (HE) medium in the 0.3–3.5 μm particle size range, while under the same face velocity, the filtration resistance of the HE medium is several times higher than that of the EE medium. During service life testing, the efficiency of the EE medium decreased to 60% with a total purifying air flow of 25 × 104 m3/m2. The resistance curve rose slightly before the efficiency reached the bottom, and then increased almost exponentially. The single-pass efficiency of portable air cleaner (PAC) with the pre-filter (PR) or the active carbon granule filter (CF) was relatively poor. While PAC with the pre-filter and the high efficiency filter (PR&HE) showed maximum single-pass efficiency for PM1.0 (88.6%), PAC with the HE was the most effective at removing PM1.0. The enhancement of PR with HE and electret filters augmented the single-pass efficiency, but lessened the airflow rate and effectiveness. Combined with PR, the decay constant of large-sized particles could be greater than for PACs without PR. Without regard to the lifetime, the electret filters performed better with respect to resource saving and purification improvement. A most penetrating particle size range (MPPS: 0.4–0.65 μm) exists in both HE and electret filters; the MPPS tends to become larger after HE and electret filters are combined with PR. These results serve to provide a better understanding of the indoor particle removal performance of PACs when combined with different kinds of filters in school office buildings. PMID:26742055

  15. Field investigation of roadside vegetative and structural barrier impact on near-road ultrafine particle concentrations under a variety of wind conditions.

    PubMed

    Hagler, Gayle S W; Lin, Ming-Yeng; Khlystov, Andrey; Baldauf, Richard W; Isakov, Vlad; Faircloth, James; Jackson, Laura E

    2012-03-01

    Roadside barriers, such as tree stands or noise barriers, are prevalent in many populated areas and have been shown to affect the dispersion of traffic emissions. If roadside noise barriers or tree stands are found to consistently lower ground-level air pollution concentrations in the near-road environment, this may be a practical strategy for reducing exposures to air contaminants along populated traffic corridors. This study measured ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations using an instrumented mobile measurement approach, collecting data on major roadways and in near-road locations for more than forty sampling sessions at three locations in central North Carolina, USA. Two of the sampling sites had relatively thin tree stands, one evergreen and one deciduous, along a portion of the roadway. The third sampling site had a brick noise wall along a portion of the road. At 10 m from the road, UFPs measured using a mobile sampling platform were lower by approximately 50% behind the brick noise wall relative to a nearby location without a barrier for multiple meteorological conditions. The UFP trends at the vegetative barrier sites were variable and the barrier effect is uncertain. In some cases, higher concentrations were observed behind the vegetative barrier, with respect to the clearing, which may be due to gaps in the thin tree stands allowing the transport of traffic-related air pollution to near-road areas behind the vegetation. On-road sampling revealed no consistent difference in UFP levels in on-road portions of the road with or without a roadside barrier present. These findings support the notion that solid roadside barriers may mitigate near-road impact. Given the co-benefits of vegetative barriers in the urban landscape, research regarding the mitigation potential of vegetative barriers of other configurations (e.g., greater density, wider buffer) is encouraged. PMID:22281040

  16. Negative effects of ultrafine particle exposure during forced exercise on the expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Bos, I; De Boever, P; Int Panis, L; Sarre, S; Meeusen, R

    2012-10-25

    Exercise improves cognitive function, and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) plays a key role in this process. We recently reported that particulate matter (PM) exposure negatively contributed to the exercise-induced increase in human serum BDNF concentration. Furthermore, PM exposure is associated with neuroinflammation and cognitive decline. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) during a single bout of forced exercise on the expression of inflammatory (IL1?, IL1?, TNF, IL6, NOS2, NOS3) and oxidative stress (NFE2L2)-related genes, as well as BDNF in the brain of rats. Four groups (n=6/group) of Wistar rats were exposed for 90 min to one of the following exposure regimes: UFP+exercise, UFP+rest, ambient air+exercise, ambient air+rest (control). Hippocampus, olfactory bulb and prefrontal cortex were collected 24h after exposure. Gene expression changes were analyzed with real-time PCR. In the condition ambient air+exercise, hippocampal expression of BDNF and NFE2L2 was up-regulated, while the expression of IL1? and NOS3 in the prefrontal cortex and IL1? in the olfactory bulb was down-regulated compared to the control. In contrast, gene expression in the condition UFP+exercise did not differ from the control. In the condition UFP+rest, hippocampal expression of NFE2L2 was down-regulated and there was a trend toward down-regulation of BDNF expression compared to the control. This study shows a negative effect of UFP exposure on the exercise-induced up-regulation of BDNF gene expression in the hippocampus of rats. PMID:22867973

  17. A velocity map imaging photoelectron spectrometer for the study of ultrafine aerosols with a table-top VUV laser and Na-doping for particle sizing applied to dimethyl ether condensation.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Bruce L; West, Adam H C; Schlppi, Bernhard; Chasovskikh, Egor; Signorell, Ruth

    2013-01-28

    We present a new experimental configuration for the study of size-dependent, angle-resolved photoelectron and photoion spectra of weakly bound ultrafine aerosol particles targeted at particle sizes below ~20 nm. It combines single photon ionization by a tunable, table-top vacuum ultraviolet laser at energies up to 18 eV with velocity map imaging detection and independent size determination of the aerosol particles using the Na-doping method. As an example, the size-dependence of the valence photoelectron spectrum of dimethyl ether clusters and ultrafine aerosols is investigated. Up to a mean particle diameter of ~3-4 nm, the first ionization energy (value at band maximum) decreases systematically (up to ~1 eV) and the corresponding band broadens systematically (up to a factor of ~3) with increasing aggregate size. Plateau values for band positions and bandwidths are reached beyond a diameter of ~3-4 nm. Experimental evidence for the dominance of the fast intermolecular proton transfer over monomer fragmentation reactions upon ionization is presented via photoion imaging. PMID:23387577

  18. Lung burden and deposition distribution of inhaled atmospheric urban ultrafine particles as the first step in their health risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, Imre; Füri, Péter; Németh, Zoltán; Balásházy, Imre; Hofmann, Werner; Farkas, Árpád

    2015-03-01

    Realistic median particle number size distributions were derived by a differential mobility particle sizer in a diameter range of 6-1000 nm for near-city background, city centre, street canyon and road tunnel environments in Budapest. Deposition of inhaled particles within airway generations of an adult woman was determined by a stochastic lung deposition model for sleeping, sitting, light and heavy exercise breathing conditions. Deposition fractions in the respiratory tract were considerable and constant for all physical activities with a mean of 56%. Mean deposition fraction in the extra-thoracic region averaged for the urban environments was decreasing monotonically from 26% for sleeping to 9.4% for heavy exercise. The mean deposition fractions in the tracheobronchial region were constant for the physical activities and urban environments with an overall mean of 12.5%, while the mean deposition fraction in the acinar region averaged for the urban locations increased monotonically with physical activity from 14.7% for sleeping to 34% for heavy exercise. The largest contribution of the acinar deposition to the lung deposition was 75%. The deposition rates in the lung were larger than in the extra-thoracic region, and the deposition rate in the lung was increasingly realised in the AC region by physical activity. It was the extra-thoracic region that received the largest surface density deposition rates; its loading was higher by 3 orders of magnitude than for the lung. Deposition fractions in the airway generations exhibited a distinct peak in the acinar region. The maximum of the curves was shifted to peripheral airway generations with physical activity. The shapes of the surface density deposition rate curves were completely different from those for the deposition rates, indicating that the first few airway generations received the highest surface loading in the lung.

  19. Cellular uptake and toxic effects of fine and ultrafine metal-sulfate particles in human A549 lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Knczl, Mathias; Goldenberg, Ella; Ebeling, Sandra; Schfer, Bianca; Garcia-Kufer, Manuel; Gminski, Richard; Grobty, Bernard; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Merfort, Irmgard; Gier, Reto; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2012-12-17

    Ambient airborne particulate matter is known to cause various adverse health effects in humans. In a recent study on the environmental impacts of coal and tire combustion in a thermal power station, fine crystals of PbSO(4) (anglesite), ZnSO(4)H(2)O (gunningite), and CaSO(4) (anhydrite) were identified in the stack emissions. Here, we have studied the toxic potential of these sulfate phases as particulates and their uptake in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549). Both PbSO(4) and CaSO(4) yielded no loss of cell viability, as determined by the WST-1 and NR assays. In contrast, a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity was observed for Zn sulfate. For all analyzed sulfates, an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), assessed by the DCFH-DA assay and EPR, was observed, although to a varying extent. Again, Zn sulfate was the most active compound. Genotoxicity assays revealed concentration-dependent DNA damage and induction of micronuclei for Zn sulfate and, to a lower extent, for CaSO(4), whereas only slight effects could be found for PbSO(4). Moreover, changes of the cell cycle were observed for Zn sulfate and PbSO(4). It could be shown further that Zn sulfate increased the nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-?B) DNA binding activity and activated JNK. During our TEM investigations, no effect on the appearance of the A549 cells exposed to CaSO(4) compared to the nonexposed cells was observed, and in our experiments, only one CaSO(4) particle was detected in the cytoplasm. In the case of exposure to Zn sulfate, no particles were found in the cytoplasm of A549 cells, but we observed a concentration-dependent increase in the number and size of dark vesicles (presumably zincosomes). After exposure to PbSO(4), the A549 cells contained isolated particles as well as agglomerates both in vesicles and in the cytoplasm. Since these metal-sulfate particles are emitted into the atmosphere via the flue gas of coal-fired power stations, they may be globally abundant. Therefore, our study is of direct relevance to populations living near such power plants. PMID:23116259

  20. Development of manufacturing systems for nanocrystalline and ultra-fine grain materials employing indexing equal channel angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Michael Wayne

    Nanotechnology offers significant opportunities in providing solutions to existing engineering problems as well as breakthroughs in new fields of science and technology. In order to fully realize benefits from such initiatives, nanomanufacturing methods must be developed to integrate enabling constructs into commercial mainstream. Even though significant advances have been made, widespread industrialization in many areas remains limited. Manufacturing methods, therefore, must continually be developed to bridge gaps between nanoscience discovery and commercialization. A promising technology for integration of top-down nanomanufacturing yet to receive full industrialization is equal channel angular pressing, a process transforming metallic materials into nanostructured or ultra-fine grained materials with significantly improved performance characteristics. To bridge the gap between process potential and actual manufacturing output, a prototype top-down nanomanufacturing system identified as indexing equal channel angular pressing (IX-ECAP) was developed. The unit was designed to capitalize on opportunities of transforming spent or scrap engineering elements into key engineering commodities. A manufacturing system was constructed to impose severe plastic deformation via simple shear in an equal channel angular pressing die on 1100 and 4043 aluminum welding rods. 1/4 fraction factorial split-plot experiments assessed significance of five predictors on the response, microhardness, for the 4043 alloy. Predictor variables included temperature, number of passes, pressing speed, back pressure, and vibration. Main effects were studied employing a resolution III design. Multiple linear regression was used for model development. Initial studies were performed using continuous processing followed by contingency designs involving discrete variable length work pieces. IX-ECAP offered a viable solution in severe plastic deformation processing. Discrete variable length work piece pressing proved very successful. With three passes through the system, 4043 processed material experienced an 88.88% increase in microhardness, 203.4% increase in converted yield strength, and a 98.5% reduction in theoretical final grain size to 103 nanometers using the Hall-Petch relation. The process factor, number of passes, was statistically significant at the 95% confidence level; whereas, temperature was significant at the 90% confidence level. Limitations of system components precluded completion of studies involving continuous pressing. Proposed system redesigns, however, will ensure mainstream commercialization of continuous length work piece processing.

  1. Development of the electroacoustic dewatering (EAD) process for fine/ultrafine coal: Second quarterly progress report period ending 31 March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-18

    Battelle, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ashbrook-Simon-Hartley (ASH), Kaiser Engineers (KE), Lewis Corporation, and Prof. S.H. Chiang of the University of Pittsburgh, is developing an advanced process for the dewatering of fine and ultrafine coals. The advanced process, called Electroacoustic Dewatering (EAD), capitalizes on the adaptation of synergistic effects of electric and acoustic fields to a commercial belt filter press design that is used in many other applications. The EAD equipment is described. 2 figs.

  2. Ultrafine aerosol size distributions and sulfuric acid vapor pressures: Implications for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Year 1 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1992-07-01

    This project has two components with different but related objectives. One component deals with measurement of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor pressures in air under temperature and relative humidity conditions similar to those found in the atmosphere. The second deals with measurement of ultrafine aerosol size distributions. Substantial progress has been made on each of these projects.

  3. Ultrafine aerosol size distributions and sulfuric acid vapor pressures: Implications for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Year 2 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.

    1993-07-01

    This project has two components: (1) measurement of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor pressures in air under temperature/relative humidity conditions similar to atmospheric, and (2) measurement of ultrafine aerosol size distributions. During Year 2, more effort was put on size distribution measurements. 4 figs.

  4. [Oxidative stress derived from airborne fine and ultrafine particles and the effects on brain-nervous system: part 1].

    PubMed

    Sagai, Masaru; Win-Shwe, Tin Tin

    2015-01-01

    Traffic-related air pollution is a major contributor to urban air pollution. Diesel exhaust (DE) is the most important component of near-road and urban air pollution and is commonly used as a surrogate model of air pollution in health effects studies. In particular, diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and the nanoparticles in DEP are considered hazardous components on health effects. It is widely known that exposure to DEP is associated with mortality due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, there has been accumulating evidence that DEP and the nanoparticles in DEP may be causes of neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we introduce the evidence suggesting their association with such disorders. First, we describe the chemical components and the translocation of DEP and nanoparticles to the brain, and then introduce the evidence and a mechanism by which reactive oxygen species (ROS) and any inflammatory mediators can be produced by DEP phagocytosis of macrophages, microglia and astrocyte cells in the brain. There are many lines of evidence showing that the neurodegenerative disorders are profoundly associated with enhanced oxidative and inflammatory events. Second, we describe a mechanism by which neurodegenerative diseases, such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, are induced via oxidative stress and inflammatory events. PMID:25994344

  5. Development of a highly active electrocatalyst via ultrafine Pd nanoparticles dispersed on pristine graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Liu, Zhensheng; Li, Hongqi; Hu, Wenbin; Zhao, Changzhi; Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu

    2015-03-01

    A unique synthesis was developed to immobilize Pd nanoparticles on pristine graphene (PG) sheets via a facile supercritical carbon dioxide route. Pristine graphene was obtained by sonication-assisted exfoliation of graphite in an organic solvent. Finely dispersed worm-like Pd nanoparticles are homogeneously deposited on the hydrophobic graphene surfaces. The combination of pristine graphene sheets and well-dispersed Pd nanoparticles provided large electrochemically active surface areas (ECSA) for both direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) and methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The ECSA values are more than twice as large as those of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotube based counterparts or six times those of conventional XC-72 carbon black. Significant enhancements were also observed in the electrocatalytic activity and stability measurements. The excellent electrochemical property of Pd/PG is attributable to the well-preserved graphene structure that ensures electrical conductivity and stability of the composite. Its large surface area also allows for the deposition of small size and high dispersion of the Pd nanoparticles. This straightforward synthesis offers a new pathway for developing highly active electrocatalysts based on pristine graphene with fully optimized properties. PMID:25692321

  6. Ultrafine particles from diesel vehicle emissions at different driving cycles induce differential vascular pro-inflammatory responses: Implication of chemical components and NF-?B signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence supports the association between exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular diseases. Chronic exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP; Dp <100 nm) is reported to promote atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice. Atherogenesis-prone factors induce endothelial dysfunction that contributes to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. We previously demonstrated that UFP induced oxidative stress via c-Jun N-terminal Kinases (JNK) activation in endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated pro-inflammatory responses of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) exposed to UFP emitted from a diesel truck under an idling mode (UFP1) and an urban dynamometer driving schedule (UFP2), respectively. We hypothesize that UFP1 and UFP2 with distinct chemical compositions induce differential pro-inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. Results UFP2 contained a higher level of redox active organic compounds and metals on a per PM mass basis than UFP1. While both UFP1 and UFP2 induced superoxide production and up-regulated stress response genes such as heme oxygenease-1 (HO-1), OKL38, and tissue factor (TF), only UFP2 induced the expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as IL-8 (2.8 0.3-fold), MCP-1 (3.9 0.4-fold), and VCAM (6.5 1.1-fold) (n = 3, P < 0.05). UFP2-exposed HAEC also bound to a higher number of monocytes than UFP1-exposed HAEC (Control = 70 7.5, UFP1 = 106.7 12.5, UFP2 = 137.0 8.0, n = 3, P < 0.05). Adenovirus NF-?B Luciferase reporter assays revealed that UFP2, but not UFP1, significantly induced NF-?B activities. NF-?B inhibitor, CAY10512, significantly abrogated UFP2-induced pro-inflammatory gene expression and monocyte binding. Conclusion While UFP1 induced higher level of oxidative stress and stress response gene expression, only UFP2, with higher levels of redox active organic compounds and metals, induced pro-inflammatory responses via NF-?B signaling. Thus, UFP with distinct chemical compositions caused differential response patterns in endothelial cells. PMID:20307321

  7. Facile Fabrication of Ultrafine Copper Nanoparticles in Organic Solvent

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A facile chemical reduction method has been developed to fabricate ultrafine copper nanoparticles whose sizes can be controlled down to ca. 1 nm by using poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as the stabilizer and sodium borohyrdride as the reducing agent in an alkaline ethylene glycol (EG) solvent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results and UVvis absorption spectra demonstrated that the as-prepared particles were well monodispersed, mostly composed of pure metallic Cu nanocrystals and extremely stable over extended period of simply sealed storage. PMID:20596465

  8. Coated particle waste form development

    SciTech Connect

    Oma, K.H.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Chick, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Coated particle waste forms have been developed as part of the multibarrier concept at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the Alternative Waste Forms Program for the Department of Energy. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed (FB) coaters, screw agitated coaters (SAC), and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated at PNL as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders-of-magnitude increase in chemical durability. Because the aluminum coatings were porous, the superior leach resistance must be due to either a chemical interaction or to a pH buffer effect. Because they are complex, coated waste form processes rank low in process feasibility. Of all the possible coated particle processes, plasma sprayed marbles have the best rating. Carbon coating of pellets by CVD ranked ninth when compared with ten other processes. The plasma-spray-coated marble process ranked sixth out of eleven processes.

  9. Coated particle waste form development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oma, K. H.; Buckwalter, C. Q.; Chick, L. A.

    1981-12-01

    Coated particle waste forms were developed as part of the multibarrier concept. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed coaters, screw agitated coaters, and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders of magnitude increase in chemical durability.

  10. Ultrafine aerosol penetration through electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2002-11-01

    This work measures the penetration of ultrafine particles through a single-stage and a two-stage ESP as a function of particle size. Also studied herein are how parameters including particle size, rate of airflow through the ESP, and voltage of the discharging electrode affect aerosol penetration through the ESP. Monodisperse particles with sizes between 10 and 60 nm were generated as the challenge aerosols to investigate the particle charges given by an ESP. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results confirms that a partial charging regime exists when the particle diameter is several tens of nanometers. Experimental results indicated that aerosol penetration through the single- and two-stage ESPs increased significantly for particles below 20 and 50 nm, respectively. However, the exact regime depends on the parameters including airflow rate, applied voltage, and configuration of the ESP. Phenomena such as ionic flow, particle space charge, and flow turbulence may significantly affect the collection efficiency of an ESP for ultrafine particles. To achieve the same collection efficiency, it is more economical to use single-stage ESPs to collect particles less than 16 nm from the standpoint of energy consumption. However, it is more economical to use two-stage ESPs to collect particles larger than 16 nm. PMID:12433174

  11. Source apportionment of fine (PM1.8) and ultrafin