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Sample records for ultrasound tissue typing

  1. Ultrasound-triggered Release of Recombinant Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator from Echogenic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Denise A.B.; Vaidya, Sampada S.; Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Huang, Shao-Ling; Klegerman, Melvin E.; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2009-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) were developed as ultrasound-triggered targeted drug or gene delivery vehicles (Lanza et al., 1997; Huang et al., 2001). Recombinant tissue-type Plasminogen Activator (rt-PA), a thrombolytic, has been loaded into ELIP (Tiukinhoy-Laing et al., 2007). These vesicles have the potential to be used for ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, deep vein thrombosis, or pulmonary embolus. A clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner (Philips HDI 5000) equipped with a linear array transducer (L12-5) was employed for in vitro studies using rt-PA-loaded ELIP (T-ELIP). The goal of this study was to quantify ultrasound-triggered drug release from rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes. T-ELIP samples were exposed to 6.9-MHz B-mode pulses at a low pressure amplitude (600 kPa) to track the echogenicity over time under four experimental conditions: 1) flow alone to monitor gas diffusion from the T-ELIP, 2) pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler exposure above the acoustically driven threshold (0.8 MPa) to force gas out of the liposome gently, 3) pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler above the rapid fragmentation threshold (2.6 MPa), or 4) Triton X-100 to rupture the T-ELIP chemically as a positive control. Release of rt-PA for each ultrasound exposure protocol was assayed spectrophotometrically. T-ELIP were echogenic in the flow model (5 ml/min) for thirty minutes. The thrombolytic drug remained associated with the liposome when exposed to low-amplitude B-mode pulses over 60 min and was released when exposed to color Doppler pulses or Triton X-100. The rt-PA released from the liposomes had similar enzymatic activity as the free drug. These T-ELIP are robust and echogenic during continuous fundamental 6.9-MHz B-mode imaging at a low exposure output level (600 kPa). Furthermore, a therapeutic concentration of rt-PA can be released by fragmenting the T-ELIP with pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler ultrasound above the rapid

  2. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  3. How does performance of ultrasound tissue typing affect design of prostate IMRT dose-painting protocols?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Pengpeng . E-mail: pz2010@columbia.edu; Osterman, K. Sunshine; Liu Tian; Li Xiang; Kessel, Jack; Wu, Leester; Schiff, Peter; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate how the performance characteristics of ultrasound tissue typing (UTT) affect the design of a population-based prostate dose-painting protocol. Methods and Materials: The performance of UTT is evaluated using the receiver operating characteristic curve. As the imager's sensitivity increases, more tumors are detected, but the specificity worsens, causing more false-positive results. The UTT tumor map, obtained with a specific sensitivity and specificity setup, was used with the patient's CT image to guide intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning. The optimal escalation dose to the UTT positive region, as well as the safe dose to the negative background, was obtained by maximizing the uncomplicated control (i.e., a combination of tumor control probability and weighted normal tissue complication probability). For high- and low-risk tumors, IMRT plans guided by conventional ultrasound or UTT with a one-dimensional or two-dimensional spectrum analysis technique were compared with an IMRT plan in which the whole prostate was dose escalated. Results: For all imaging modalities, the specificity of 0.9 was chosen to reduce complications resulting from high false-positive results. If the primary tumors were low risk, the IMRT plans guided by all imaging modalities achieved high tumor control probability and reduced the normal tissue complication probability significantly compared with the plan with whole gland dose escalation. However, if the primary tumors were high risk, the accuracy of the imaging modality was critical to maintain the tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability at acceptable levels. Conclusion: The performance characteristics of an imager have important implications in dose painting and should be considered in the design of dose-painting protocols.

  4. Whole breast tissue characterization with ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Schmidt, Steve; Seamans, John; Wallen, Andrea; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    A number of clinical trials have shown that screening ultrasound, supplemental to mammography, detects additional cancers in women with dense breasts. However, labor intensity, operator dependence and high recall rates have limited adoption. This paper describes the use of ultrasound tomography for whole-breast tissue stiffness measurements as a first step toward addressing the issue of high recall rates. The validation of the technique using an anthropomorphic phantom is described. In-vivo applications are demonstrated on 13 breast masses, indicating that lesion stiffness correlates with lesion type as expected. Comparison of lesion stiffness measurements with standard elastography was available for 11 masses and showed a strong correlation between the 2 measures. It is concluded that ultrasound tomography can map out the 3 dimensional distribution of tissue stiffness over the whole breast. Such a capability is well suited for screening where additional characterization may improve the specificity of screening ultrasound, thereby lowering barriers to acceptance.

  5. Experimental research on wild-type p53 plasmid transfected into retinoblastoma cells and tissues using an ultrasound microbubble intensifier.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhou, X; Diao, L; Wang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The transfection efficiency of wild-type p53 (wtp53) was investigated in retinoblastoma (RB) Y79 cells using an ultrasound microbubble technique. A human RB nude mouse xenograft tumour model was also used to investigate whether this technique could deliver wtp53 into solid tumours. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated that wtp53 was successfully transfected into Y79 cells in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group and in the plasmid with liposomes group, but not in the plasmid with ultrasound group or in the untreated control group. Flow cytometry showed that apoptosis was highest in the microbubbles and ultrasound group (25.58%) compared with the plasmid with liposomes group (19.50%), and the other two groups (< 10%). RT-PCR also showed that the wtp53 gene was successfully transfected into solid tumours in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group. This study provides preliminary evidence in support of a potential new approach to RB gene therapy. PMID:20819437

  6. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  7. Preparation of ultrasound microbubbles crosslinked to albumin nanoparticles packaged with tissue-type plasminogen activator gene plasmid and method of in vivo transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Ji; Shang-Yi, Ji; Xia, He; Wen-Ping, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Aims To observe the effect of constructed ultrasound microbubble crosslinked to albium nanoparticles packaged with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) gene plasmid on the in vivo transfection. Methods The rabbits were chosen for all experiments. A highly expressive gene plasmid for tPA was constructed and packaged into a prepared nanoparticle with bovine serum albumin (BSA). This albium nanoparticle packaged with tPA gene plasmid was crosslinked to an ultrasound microbubble prepared with BSA and sucrose to form a nano-targeting vector system for tPA gene transfection. The transfection and effective expression of tPA in heart, liver, leg skeletal muscle and the cervical rib were detected with polyclonal antibodies to tPA using immunohistochemical method; the tPA level and D-dimer content of blood were also tested. Results The expression of tPA could be seen in the tissues mentioned above, with the increase in blood tPA level and D-dimer content from 0.20 ± 0.05 µg/L and 81.76 ± 9.84 µg/L before the operation, to the higher levels of 0.44 ± 0.05 µg/L and 669.28 ± 97.74 µg/L after transfection. Conclusion The nano-targeting vector system for tPA gene was contructed successfully. This provides a new theory and experimental method for the nano-targeted transgene.

  8. Ultrasound-targeted transfection of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene carried by albumin nanoparticles to dog myocardium to prevent thrombosis after heart mechanical valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jun; Ji, Shang-Yi; Yang, Jian-An; He, Xia; Yang, Xiao-Han; Ling, Wen-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Background There are more than 300,000 prosthetic heart valve replacements each year worldwide. These patients are faced with a higher risk of thromboembolic events after heart valve surgery and long-term or even life-long anticoagulative and antiplatelet therapies are necessary. Some severe complications such as hemorrhaging or rebound thrombosis can occur when the therapy ceases. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a thrombolytic agent. One of the best strategies is gene therapy, which offers a local high expression of t-PA over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhaging and local rebound thrombosis. There are some issues with t-PA that need to be addressed: currently, there is no up-to-date report on how the t-PA gene targets the heart in vivo and the gene vector for t-PA needs to be determined. Aims To fabricate an albumin nano-t-PA gene ultrasound-targeted agent and investigate its targeting effect on prevention of thrombosis after heart mechanic valve replacement under therapeutic ultrasound. Methods A dog model of mechanical tricuspid valve replacement was constructed. A highly expressive t-PA gene plasmid was constructed and packaged by nanoparticles prepared with bovine serum albumin. This nanopackaged t-PA gene plasmid was further cross-linked to ultrasonic microbubbles prepared with sucrose and bovine serum albumin to form the ultrasonic-targeted agent for t-PA gene transfection. The agent was given intravenously followed by a therapeutic ultrasound treatment (1 MHz, 1.5 w/cm2, 10 minutes) of the heart soon after valve replacement had been performed. The expression of t-PA in myocardium was detected with multiclonal antibodies to t-PA by the indirect immunohistochemical method. Venous blood t-PA and D-dimer contents were tested before and 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the operation. Results The high expression of t-PA could be seen in myocardium with increases in blood t-PA and D-dimer contents and thrombosis was prevented 8 weeks

  9. Effects of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agent on vascular tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US) imaging can be enhanced using gas-filled microbubble contrast agents. Strong echo signals are induced at the tissue-gas interface following microbubble collapse. Applications include assessment of ventricular function and virtual histology. Aim While ultrasound and US contrast agents are widely used, their impact on the physiological response of vascular tissue to vasoactive agents has not been investigated in detail. Methods and results In the present study, rat dorsal aortas were treated with US via a clinical imaging transducer in the presence or absence of the US contrast agent, Optison. Aortas treated with both US and Optison were unable to contract in response to phenylephrine or to relax in the presence of acetylcholine. Histology of the arteries was unremarkable. When the treated aortas were stained for endothelial markers, a distinct loss of endothelium was observed. Importantly, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) staining of treated aortas demonstrated incipient apoptosis in the endothelium. Conclusions Taken together, these ex vivo results suggest that the combination of US and Optison may alter arterial integrity and promote vascular injury; however, the in vivo interaction of Optison and ultrasound remains an open question. PMID:22805356

  10. Tissue mimicking materials for dental ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul S; Culjat, Martin O; Grundfest, Warren S; Brown, Elliott R; White, Shane N

    2008-04-01

    While acoustic tissue mimicking materials have been explored for a variety of soft and hard biological tissues, no dental hard tissue mimicking materials have been characterized. Tooth phantoms are necessary to better understand acoustic phenomenology within the tooth environment and to accelerate the advancement of dental ultrasound imaging systems. In this study, soda lime glass and dental composite were explored as surrogates for human enamel and dentin, respectively, in terms of compressional velocity, attenuation, and acoustic impedance. The results suggest that a tooth phantom consisting of glass and composite can effectively mimic the acoustic behavior of a natural human tooth. PMID:18396919

  11. Fuzzy similarity measures for ultrasound tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emara, Salem M.; Badawi, Ahmed M.; Youssef, Abou-Bakr M.

    1995-03-01

    Computerized ultrasound tissue characterization has become an objective means for diagnosis of diseases. It is difficult to differentiate diffuse liver diseases, namely cirrhotic and fatty liver from a normal one, by visual inspection from the ultrasound images. The visual criteria for differentiating diffused diseases is rather confusing and highly dependent upon the sonographer's experience. The need for computerized tissue characterization is thus justified to quantitatively assist the sonographer for accurate differentiation and to minimize the degree of risk from erroneous interpretation. In this paper we used the fuzzy similarity measure as an approximate reasoning technique to find the maximum degree of matching between an unknown case defined by a feature vector and a family of prototypes (knowledge base). The feature vector used for the matching process contains 8 quantitative parameters (textural, acoustical, and speckle parameters) extracted from the ultrasound image. The steps done to match an unknown case with the family of prototypes (cirr, fatty, normal) are: Choosing the membership functions for each parameter, then obtaining the fuzzification matrix for the unknown case and the family of prototypes, then by the linguistic evaluation of two fuzzy quantities we obtain the similarity matrix, then by a simple aggregation method and the fuzzy integrals we obtain the degree of similarity. Finally, we find that the similarity measure results are comparable to the neural network classification techniques and it can be used in medical diagnosis to determine the pathology of the liver and to monitor the extent of the disease.

  12. Quantitative Ultrasound for Nondestructive Characterization of Engineered Tissues and Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dalecki, Diane; Mercado, Karla P; Hocking, Denise C

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive, non-destructive technologies for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the development of artificial tissues are critical for the advancement of tissue engineering. Current standard techniques for evaluating engineered tissues, including histology, biochemical assays and mechanical testing, are destructive approaches. Ultrasound is emerging as a valuable tool for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the properties of engineered tissues and biomaterials longitudinally during fabrication and post-implantation. Ultrasound techniques are rapid, non-invasive, non-destructive and can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation. This review provides an overview of ultrasound imaging, quantitative ultrasound techniques, and elastography, with representative examples of applications of these ultrasound-based techniques to the field of tissue engineering. PMID:26581347

  13. Ovarian tissue characterization in ultrasound: a review.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Molinari, Filippo; Sree, S Vinitha; Swapna, G; Saba, Luca; Guerriero, Stefano; Suri, Jasjit S

    2015-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among gynecological malignancies. We discuss different types of clinical and nonclinical features that are used to study and analyze the differences between benign and malignant ovarian tumors. Computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) systems of high accuracy are being developed as an initial test for ovarian tumor classification instead of biopsy, which is the current gold standard diagnostic test. We also discuss different aspects of developing a reliable CAD system for the automated classification of ovarian cancer into benign and malignant types. A brief description of the commonly used classifiers in ultrasound-based CAD systems is also given. PMID:25230716

  14. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  16. Quantitative Evaluation of Atherosclerotic Plaque Using Ultrasound Tissue Characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigiter, Ersin

    Evaluation of therapeutic methods directed toward interrupting and/or delaying atherogenesis is impeded by the lack of a reliable, non-invasive means for monitoring progression or regression of disease. The ability to characterize the predominant component of plaque may be very valuable in the study of this disease's natural history. The earlier the lesion, the more likely is lipid to be the predominant component. Progression of plaque is usually by way of overgrowth of fibrous tissues around the fatty pool. Calcification is usually a feature of the older or complicated lesion. To explore the feasibility of using ultrasound to characterize plaque we have conducted measurements of the acoustical properties of various atherosclerotic lesions found in freshly excised samples of human abdominal aorta. Our objective has been to determine whether or not the acoustical properties of plaque correlate with the type and/or chemical composition of plaque and, if so, to define a measurement scheme which could be done in-vivo and non-invasively. Our current data base consists of individual tissue samples from some 200 different aortas. Since each aorta yields between 10 to 30 tissue samples for study, we have data on some 4,468 different lesions or samples. Measurements of the acoustical properties of plaque were found to correlate well with the chemical composition of plaque. In short, measurements of impedance and attenuation seem sufficient to classify plaque as to type and to composition. Based on the in-vitro studies, the parameter of attenuation was selected as a means of classifying the plaque. For these measurements, an intravascular ultrasound scanner was modified according to our specifications. Signal processing algorithms were developed which would analyze the complex ultrasound waveforms and estimate tissue properties such as attenuation. Various methods were tried to estimate the attenuation from the pulse-echo backscattered signal. Best results were obtained by

  17. Computer-aided tissue characterization using ultrasound-induced thermal effects: analytical formulation and in-vitro animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, Mohammad I.; Mousavi, Parvin; Imani, Farhad; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound radio-frequency (RF) time series analysis provides an effective tissue characterization method to differentiate between healthy and cancerous prostate tissues. In this paper, an analytical model is presented that partially describes the variations in tissue acoustic properties that accompany ultrasound RF time series acquisition procedures. These ultrasound-induced effects, which depend on tissue mechanical and thermophysical properties, are hypothesized to be among the major contributors to the tissue typing capabilities of the RF time series analysis. The model is used to derive two tissue characterization features. The two features are used with a support vector machine classifier to characterize three animal tissue types: chicken breast, bovine liver, and bovine steak. Accuracy values as high as 90% are achieved when the proposed features are employed to differentiate these tissue types. The proposed model may provide a framework to optimize the ultrasound RF time series analysis for future clinical procedures.

  18. Multimodal classification of prostate tissue: a feasibility study on combining multiparametric MRI and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashab, Hussam Al-Deen; Haq, Nandinee Fariah; Nir, Guy; Kozlowski, Piotr; Black, Peter; Jones, Edward C.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Moradi, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    The common practice for biopsy guidance is through transrectal ultrasound, with the fusion of ultrasound and MRI-based targets when available. However, ultrasound is only used as a guidance modality in MR-targeted ultrasound-guided biopsy, even though previous work has shown the potential utility of ultrasound, particularly ultrasound vibro-elastography, as a tissue typing approach. We argue that multiparametric ultrasound, which includes B-mode and vibro-elastography images, could contain information that is not captured using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and therefore play a role in refining the biopsy and treatment strategies. In this work, we combine mpMRI with multiparametric ultrasound features from registered tissue areas to examine the potential improvement in cancer detection. All the images were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy and cancer detection was validated based on 36 whole mount histology slides. We calculated a set of 24 texture features from vibro-elastography and B-mode images, and five features from mpMRI. Then we used recursive feature elimination (RFE) and sparse regression through LASSO to find an optimal set of features to be used for tissue classification. We show that the set of these selected features increases the area under ROC curve from 0.87 with mpMRI alone to 0.94 with the selected mpMRI and multiparametric ultrasound features, when used with support vector machine classification on features extracted from peripheral zone. For features extracted from the whole-gland, the area under the curve was 0.75 and 0.82 for mpMRI and mpMRI along with ultrasound, respectively. These preliminary results provide evidence that ultrasound and ultrasound vibro-elastography could be used as modalities for improved cancer detection in combination with MRI.

  19. Classification of kidney and liver tissue using ultrasound backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Rivaz, Hassan; Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Jago, James; Safdar, Nabile; Boctor, Emad M.; Linguraru, Marius G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) tissue characterization provides valuable information for the initialization of automatic segmentation algorithms, and can further provide complementary information for diagnosis of pathologies. US tissue characterization is challenging due to the presence of various types of image artifacts and dependence on the sonographer's skills. One way of overcoming this challenge is by characterizing images based on the distribution of the backscatter data derived from the interaction between US waves and tissue. The goal of this work is to classify liver versus kidney tissue in 3D volumetric US data using the distribution of backscatter US data recovered from end-user displayed Bmode image available in clinical systems. To this end, we first propose the computation of a large set of features based on the homodyned-K distribution of the speckle as well as the correlation coefficients between small patches in 3D images. We then utilize the random forests framework to select the most important features for classification. Experiments on in-vivo 3D US data from nine pediatric patients with hydronephrosis showed an average accuracy of 94% for the classification of liver and kidney tissues showing a good potential of this work to assist in the classification and segmentation of abdominal soft tissue.

  20. Tissue Bioeffects during Ultrasound-mediated Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Jonathan

    Ultrasound has been developed as both a valuable diagnostic tool and a potent promoter of beneficial tissue bioeffects for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Vascular effects can be mediated by mechanical oscillations of circulating microbubbles, or ultrasound contrast agents, which may also encapsulate and shield a therapeutic agent in the bloodstream. Oscillating microbubbles can create stresses directly on nearby tissue or induce fluid effects that effect drug penetration into vascular tissue, lyse thrombi, or direct drugs to optimal locations for delivery. These investigations have spurred continued research into alternative therapeutic applications, such as bioactive gas delivery. This dissertation addresses a fundamental hypothesis in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound-mediated drug delivery is capable of increasing the penetration of drugs across different physiologic barriers within the cardiovascular system, such as the vascular endothelium, blood clots, and smooth muscle cells.

  1. A Temporal View of Soft Tissue Quantitative Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.

    The objective of soft tissue quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is to improve diagnostic ultrasound imaging capabilities via quantitative outcomes. Over the past three or so decades, there have been an increasing number of QUS successes. A temporal view moves us back in history almost six decades when techniques and theoretical developments were in their earliest stages that impacted modern QUS successes. The earliest theoretical developments and techniques some six decades ago can be attributed to Lev Chernov, Philip Morse, Herman Feshbach, Uno Ingard, John Wild and Jack Reid. Later, Floyd Dunn developed important views as to how connective tissue affected the interaction between ultrasound and soft tissue. Then, as the theory of wave propagation in soft tissues with random inhomogeneities was extended and applied by Fred Lizzi, Jim Zagzebski and Mike Insana (and their colleagues), contemporary QUS successes started to emerge.

  2. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography for thick tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.; Zhao, Xuemei; Jacques, Steven L.

    1995-12-01

    Continuous-wave ultrasonic modulation of scattered laser light has been used to image objects in tissue-simulating turbid media for the first time. We hypothesize that the ultrasound wave focused into the turbid media modulates the laser light passing through the ultrasonic focal spot. The modulated laser light collected by a photomultiplier tube reflects the local mechanical and optical properties in the focal zone. Buried objects in 5-cm thick tissue phantoms are located with millimeter resolution by scanning and detecting alterations of the ultrasound-modulated optical signal. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography separates the conflict between signal and resolution in purely optical imaging of tissue and does not rely on ballistic or quasi-ballistic photons but on the abundant diffuse photons. The imaging resolution is determined by the focused ultrasonic wave. This technique has the potential to provide a noninvasive, nonionizing, inexpensive diagnostic tool for diseases such as breast cancer.

  3. Ultrasound strain imaging for quantification of tissue function: cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.

    2013-03-01

    With ultrasound imaging, the motion and deformation of tissue can be measured. Tissue can be deformed by applying a force on it and the resulting deformation is a function of its mechanical properties. Quantification of this resulting tissue deformation to assess the mechanical properties of tissue is called elastography. If the tissue under interrogation is actively deforming, the deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as `strain imaging'. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaques characterization, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. We developed radio frequency (RF) based ultrasound methods to assess the deformation at higher resolution and with higher accuracy than commercial methods using conventional image data (Tissue Doppler Imaging and 2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so 1D. We further extended this method to multiple directions and further improved precision by using compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. In arteries, the presence of vulnerable plaques may lead to acute events like stroke and myocardial infarction. Consequently, timely detection of these plaques is of great diagnostic value. Non-invasive ultrasound strain compounding is currently being evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify the vulnerability of plaques. In the heart, we determined the strain locally and at high resolution resulting in a local assessment in contrary to conventional global functional parameters like cardiac output or shortening fraction.

  4. Pressure and temperature distribution in biological tissues by focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal, Ajit K.; Feng, Feng; Kabo, Michael; Wang, Jeffrey; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2003-07-01

    The interaction between ultrasound and biological tissues has been the subject of a number of investigators for nearly half a century and the number of applications of high intensity, focused ultrasound for therapeutic purposes continues to grow. This paper is motivated by possible medical applications of focused ultrasound in minimally invasive treatment of a variety of musculoskeletal disorders that are responsive to thermal treatment. The mechanical and thermal effects in a subject"s body induced by high-frequency ultrasound are simulated using PZFlex, a finite element based program. The FEM model described in this report is of a transverse section of the body at the level of the second lumbar vertebra (L2) extracted from a CT image. In order to protect the nerves inside the spinal canal as well as to obtain an effective heating result at the focal region within the intervertebral disk, a suitable orientation of axis of the focused ultrasound lens have to be determined in advance. The pressure, energy loss distribution and temperature distribution are investigated in this paper with the different orientations of the axis and different transverse diameter of the spherical ultrasound lens. Since nonlinear effects are expected to be important in the therapeutic application in some literatures, this paper also demonstrates the effects of nonlinearities on the pressure and temperature distribution induced by focused ultrasound in a two dimensional model. Finally, a comparison of the results between linear and nonlinear cases is reported.

  5. The thresholds and mechanisms of tissue injury by focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Julianna

    Therapeutic ultrasound is used in clinics around the world to treat ailments such as uterine fibroids, kidney stones, and plantar fasciitis. While many of the therapeutic effects of ultrasound are elicited by hyperthermia, bubbles can also interact with tissue to produce beneficial effects. For example, bubbles are used in boiling histotripsy to de-bulk tissue and are used in shock wave lithotripsy to break kidney stones. However, the same bubbles that break the kidney stones also damage the kidney, which is why bubble damage is a concern in every ultrasound application including fetal imaging. Whether the aim is to emulsify a tumor or image a fetus, understanding the thresholds and mechanisms of tissue injury by bubbles in an ultrasound field is important for all ultrasound applications and was the goal of this dissertation. One specific application of therapeutic ultrasound, known as boiling histotripsy, uses shock wave heating to explosively expand a millimeter-size boiling bubble at the transducer focus and fractionate bulk tissue. Yet it was unclear how the millimeter-size boiling or vapor bubble broke down the tissue into its submicron components. In this dissertation, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of fine droplets from an acoustically excited liquid film, is the mechanism by which the millimeter-size boiling bubble in boiling histotripsy fractionates tissue into its submicron components. Using high speed photography, we showed that tissue can behave as a liquid such that a miniature acoustic fountain forms and atomization occurs within a millimeter-size cavity that approximates the boiling or vapor bubble produced by boiling histotripsy. The end result of tissue atomization was a hole in the tissue surface. After showing that tissue can be eroded by atomization, a series of experiments were conducted to determine the tissue properties that influence atomization. The results indicated that highly

  6. Investigating ultrasound imaging in the frequency domain for tissue characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromer, Jeremy; Ladani, Leila

    2016-07-01

    The potential of ultrasound imaging for use in distinguishing structures present in soft materials is investigated. In this study, images were reconstructed using non-standard parameters, which have been shown to vary according to different tissue structures. Due to the previously determined dependence on material microstructure, we investigate the possibility of these parameters as a basis for imaging soft materials. The feasibility of imaging methods was first tested on a large scale using 0.5-MHz ultrasound transducers. Imaging was then extended to a smaller scale using small-diameter 25-MHz transducers. The resulting images were compared to conventional C-scans with minimal data processing and were found to be of at least similar quality. These initial results show the possibility of using nonconventional ultrasound measurements as another means of imaging tissue and other soft materials for the presence of internal inclusions.

  7. Therapeutic Ultrasound Enhancement of Drug Delivery to Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, George; Wang, Peng; Lewis, George; Olbricht, William

    2009-04-01

    Effects of exposure to 1.58 MHz focused ultrasound on transport of Evans Blue Dye (EBD) in soft tissues are investigated when an external pressure gradient is applied to induce convective flow through the tissue. The magnitude of the external pressure gradient is chosen to simulate conditions in brain parenchyma during convection-enhanced drug delivery (CED) to the brain. EBD uptake and transport are measured in equine brain, avian muscle and agarose brain-mimicking phantoms. Results show that ultrasound enhances EBD uptake and transport, and the greatest enhancement occurs when the external pressure gradient is applied. The results suggest that exposure of the brain parenchyma to ultrasound could enhance penetration of material infused into the brain during CED therapy.

  8. Effects of an implant on temperature distribution in tissue during ultrasound diathermy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Kuan; Shieh, Jay; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Chiang, Hongsen; Huang, Chang-Wei; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2016-09-01

    The effects of an implant on temperature distribution in a tissue-mimicking hydrogel phantom during the application of therapeutic ultrasound were investigated. In vitro experiments were conducted to compare the influences of plastic and metal implants on ultrasound diathermy and to calibrate parameters in finite element simulation models. The temperature histories and characteristics of the opaque (denatured) areas in the hydrogel phantoms predicted by the numerical simulations show good correlation with those observed in the in vitro experiments. This study provides an insight into the temperature profile in the vicinity of an implant by therapeutic ultrasound heating typically used for physiotherapy. A parametric study was conducted through numerical simulations to investigate the effects of several factors, such as implant material type, ultrasound operation frequency, implant thickness and tissue thickness on the temperature distribution in the hydrogel phantom. The results indicate that the implant material type and implant thickness are the main parameters influencing the temperature distribution. In addition, once the implant material and ultrasound operation frequency are chosen, an optimal implant thickness can be obtained so as to avoid overheating injuries in tissue. PMID:27150744

  9. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... called voluntary) muscles that move the skeleton, and smooth muscle, such as the muscles that surround the stomach. Nerve tissue is made up of nerve cells (neurons) and is used to carry "messages" to ...

  10. Opto-ultrasound imaging in vivo in deep tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Ke; YanXu; Zheng, Yao; Zhu, Xinpei; Gong, Wei

    2016-02-01

    It is of keen importance of deep tissue imaging with high resolution in vivo. Here we present an opto-ultrasound imaging method which utilizes an ultrasound to confine the laser pulse in a very tiny spot as a guide star. The results show that the imaging depth is 2mm with a resolution of 10um. Meanwhile, the excitation power we used is less than 2mW, which indicates that our methods can be applied in vivo without optical toxicity and optical bleaching due to the excitation power.

  11. Ultrasound-enhanced chemiluminescence tomography in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kikuchi, Naoto; Sato, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports ultrasound-assisted optical imaging of chemiluminescent probes in biological tissue. A focused low power ultrasound sonochemically enhances a peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence (CL) that involves indocyanine green (ICG) as luminescent pigments. By scanning the focus, it produces tomographic images of CL in scattering media. The authors demonstrate imaging using a slab of porcine muscle measuring 50 × 50 × 75 mm, in which a capsuled CL reagent is embedded at 25 mm depth. Spatial resolution of imaging and concentration characteristics of CL reagents to enhanced CL intensity are also studied to evaluate the potential for use in bio-imaging applications with exploring the CL enhancement mechanisms. CL enhancement ratio, defined as the ratio of ultrasonically enhanced CL intensity to the base intensity without ultrasound irradiation, was found to be constant even in varying ICG and oxidizer concentrations, implying to be applicable for quantitative determination of these molecules. PMID:26964918

  12. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  13. Incorporating tissue absorption and scattering in rapid ultrasound beam modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Douglas; Almquist, Scott

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a new approach for modeling the propagation of an ultrasound beam in inhomogeneous tissues such as encountered with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for treatment of various diseases. This method, called the hybrid angular spectrum (HAS) approach, alternates propagation steps between the space and the spatial frequency domains throughout the inhomogeneous regions of the body; the use of spatial Fourier transforms makes this technique considerably faster than other modeling approaches (about 10 sec for a 141 x 141 x 121 model). In HIFU thermal treatments, the acoustic absorption property of the tissues is of prime importance since it leads to temperature rise and the achievement of desired thermal dose at the treatment site. We have recently added to the HAS method the capability of independently modeling tissue absorption and scattering, the two components of acoustic attenuation. These additions improve the predictive value of the beam modeling and more accurately describes the thermal conditions expected during a therapeutic ultrasound exposure. Two approaches to explicitly model scattering were developed: one for scattering sizes smaller than a voxel, and one when the scattering scale is several voxels wide. Some anatomically realistic examples that demonstrate the importance of independently modeling absorption and scattering are given, including propagation through the human skull for noninvasive brain therapy and in the human breast for treatment of breast lesions.

  14. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  15. Ultrasonic atomization of tissue and its role in tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Atomization and fountain formation is a well-known phenomenon that occurs when a focused ultrasound wave in liquid encounters an air interface. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to fractionate tissue into submicron-size fragments in a process termed boiling histotripsy, wherein the focused ultrasound wave superheats the tissue at the focus, producing a millimetre-size boiling or vapour bubble in several milliseconds. Yet the question of how this millimetre-size boiling bubble creates submicron-size tissue fragments remains. The hypothesis of this work is that tissue can behave as a liquid such that it forms a fountain and atomization within the vapour bubble produced in boiling histotripsy. We describe an experiment, in which a 2-MHz HIFU transducer (maximum in situ intensity of 24,000 W/cm2) was aligned with an air-tissue interface meant to simulate the boiling bubble. Atomization and fountain formation were observed with high-speed photography and resulted in tissue erosion. Histological examination of the atomized tissue showed whole and fragmented cells and nuclei. Air-liquid interfaces were also filmed. Our conclusion was that HIFU can fountain and atomize tissue. Although this process does not entirely mimic what was observed in liquids, it does explain many aspects of tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy. PMID:23159812

  16. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in the walls of the heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  17. Can ultrasound be used to stimulate nerve tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Stephen J

    2003-01-01

    Background The stimulation of nerve or cortical tissue by magnetic induction is a relatively new tool for the non-invasive study of the brain and nervous system. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), for example, has been used for the functional mapping of the motor cortex and may have potential for treating a variety of brain disorders. Methods and Results A new method of stimulating active tissue is proposed by propagating ultrasound in the presence of a magnetic field. Since tissue is conductive, particle motion created by an ultrasonic wave will induce an electric current density generated by Lorentz forces. An analytical derivation is given for the electric field distribution induced by a collimated ultrasonic beam. An example shows that peak electric fields of up to 8 V/m appear to be achievable at the upper range of diagnostic intensities. This field strength is about an order of magnitude lower than fields typically associated with TMS; however, the electric field gradients induced by ultrasound can be quite high (about 60 kV/m2 at 4 MHz), which theoretically play a more important role in activation than the field magnitude. The latter value is comparable to TMS-induced gradients. Conclusion The proposed method could be used to locally stimulate active tissue by inducing an electric field in regions where the ultrasound is focused. Potential advantages of this method compared to TMS is that stimulation of cortical tissue could be highly localized as well as achieved at greater depths in the brain than is currently possible with TMS. PMID:12702213

  18. Characterizing Tissue with Acoustic Parameters Derived from Ultrasound Data

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    In contrast to standard reflection ultrasound (US), transmission US holds the promise of more thorough tissue characterization by generating quantitative acoustic parameters. We compare results from a conventional US scanner with data acquired using an experimental circular scanner operating at frequencies of 0.3 - 1.5 MHz. Data were obtained on phantoms and a normal, formalin-fixed, excised breast. Both reflection and transmission-based algorithms were used to generate images of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation.. Images of the phantoms demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and quantify acoustic properties such as sound speed and attenuation. The human breast specimen showed full field evaluation, improved penetration and tissue definition. Comparison with conventional US indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of masses, particularly in the complex scattering environments of human breast tissue. The use of morphology, in the context of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation, for characterizing tissue, is discussed.

  19. Ultrasound of soft tissue masses of the hand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Most soft tissue mass lesions of the hand are benign. Ganglia are the commonest lesions encountered, followed by giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath. Malignant tumors are rare. Often a specific diagnosis can be achieved on imaging by considering the location and anatomical relations of the lesion within the hand or wrist, and assessing its morphology. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent modality for evaluating soft tissue tumors with its multiplanar capability and ability to characterize tissue. Ultrasound plays a complementary role to MRI. It is often the initial modality used for assessing masses as it is cheap and available, and allows reliable differentiation of cystic from solid lesions, along with a real time assessment of vascularity. This review describes the US appearances of the most frequently encountered soft tissue masses of the wrist and hand, correlating the findings with MRI where appropriate. PMID:26673615

  20. Diffraction tomography applied to simulated ultrasound through breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David H.

    2002-11-01

    Diffraction tomography is used to obtain images of sound speed and attenuation of a slice of breast tissue obtained from the Visible Woman data set. Simulated ultrasound data was generated using an acoustic propagation code run on the ASCI Blue Pacific computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Data was generated for a slice of healthy tissue, and a slice with simulated lesions to determine the ability of the imaging method to detect various abnormalities in the breast. In addition, the time reversal operator for the slice was constructed from the data and the eigenfunctions backpropagated into the slice as first suggested by Mast [Mast, Nachman, and Waag, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102(2)] to identify structures associated with each time reversal mode for both the healthy tissue and tissue with lesions.

  1. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Soft Tissue with Ultrasound Vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenadich, I.; Bernal, M.; Greenleaf, J. F.

    The cardiovascular diseases atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, hypertension and heart failure have been related to stiffening of vessels and myocardium. Noninvasive measurements of mechanical properties of cardiovascular tissue would facilitate detection and treatment of disease in early stages, thus reducing mortality and possibly reducing cost of treatment. While techniques capable of measuring tissue elasticity have been reported, the knowledge of both elasticity and viscosity is necessary to fully characterize mechanical properties of soft tissues. In this article, we summarize the Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) method developed by our group and report on advances made in characterizing stiffness of large vessels and myocardium. The method uses radiation forceFadiation force to excite shear waves in soft tissue and pulse echo ultrasound to measure the motion. The speed of propagation of shear waves at different frequencies is used to generate dispersions curves for excised porcine left-ventricular free-wall myocardium and carotid arteries. An antisymmetric Lamb wave model was fitted to the LV myocardium dispersion curves to obtain elasticity and viscosity moduli. The results suggest that the speed of shear wave propagation in four orthogonal directions on the surface of the excised myocardium is similar. These studies show that the SDUV method has potential for clinical application in noninvasive quantification of elasticity and viscosity of vessels and myocardium.

  2. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment of tissue properties for Achilles tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yung-Fu; Chen, Pei-Jarn; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chen, Tainsong; Lin, Chii-Jeng

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques have recently been widely applied for the characterization of tissues. For example, they can be used for the quantification of Achilles tendon properties based on the broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and the speed of sound (SOS) when the ultrasound wave passes through the tissues. This study is to develop an integrated system to investigate the properties of Achilles tendons using QUS images from UBIS 5000 (DMS, Montpellier, France) and B-mode ultrasound images from HDI 5000 (ATL, Ultramark, USA). Subjects including young (32 females and 17 males; mean age: 23.7 ± 2.0) and middle-aged groups (8 female and 8 males; mean age: 47.3 ± 8.5 s) were recruited and tested for this study. Only subjects who did not exercise regularly and had no record of tendon injury were studied. The results show that the BUA is significantly higher for the young group (45.2 ± 1.6 dB MHz-1) than the middle-age group (40.5 ± 1.9 dB MHz-1), while the SOS is significantly lower for the young (1601.9 ± 11.2 ms-1) compared to the middle-aged (1624.1 ± 8.7 m s-1). On the other hand, the thicknesses of Achilles tendons for both groups (young: 4.31 ± 0.23 mm; middle age: 4.24 ± 0.23 mm) are very similar. For one patient who had an Achilles tendon lengthening (ATL) surgery, the thickness of the Achilles tendon increased from 4 mm to 4.33 mm after the surgery. In addition, the BUA increased by about 7.2% while the SOS decreased by about 0.6%. In conclusion, noninvasive ultrasonic assessment of Achilles tendons is useful for assisting clinical diagnosis and for the evaluation of a therapeutic regimen.

  3. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in dentofacial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Kuroda, Shingo; Horiuchi, Shinya; Tabata, Akira; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2015-04-01

    Oral and maxillofacial diseases affect millions of people worldwide and hence tissue engineering can be considered an interesting and clinically relevant approach to regenerate orofacial tissues after being affected by different diseases. Among several innovations for tissue regeneration, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used extensively in medicine as a therapeutic, operative, and diagnostic tool. LIPUS is accepted to promote bone fracture repair and regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of LIPUS on soft tissues regeneration has been paid much attention, and many studies have performed to evaluate the potential use of LIPUS to tissue engineering soft tissues. The present article provides an overview about the status of LIPUS stimulation as a tool to be used to enhance regeneration/tissue engineering. This review consists of five parts. Part 1 is a brief introduction of the acoustic description of LIPUS and mechanical action. In Part 2, biological problems in dentofacial tissue engineering are proposed. Part 3 explores biologic mechanisms of LIPUS to cells and tissues in living body. In Part 4, the effectiveness of LIPUS on cell metabolism and tissue regeneration in dentistry are summarized. Finally, Part 5 relates the possibility of clinical application of LIPUS in orthodontics. The present review brings out better understanding of the bioeffect of LIPUS therapy on orofacial tissues which is essential to the successful integration of management remedies for tissue regeneration/engineering. To develop an evidence-based approach to clinical management and treatment of orofacial degenerative diseases using LIPUS, we would like to be in full pursuit of LIPUS biotherapy. Still, there are many challenges for this relatively new strategy, but the up to date achievements using it promises to go far beyond the present possibilities. PMID:25672801

  4. Measuring tissue blood flow using ultrasound modulated diffused light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, A.; Racheli, N.; Breskin, I.; Metzger, Y.; Silman, Z.; Kamar, M.; Nini, A.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate the ability of a novel device employing ultrasound modulation of near infrared light (referred as "Ultrasound tagged light" or UTL) to perform non-invasive monitoring of blood flow in the microvascular level in tissue. Monitoring microcirculatory blood flow is critical in clinical situations affecting flow to different organs, such as the brain or the limbs. . However, currently there are no non-invasive devices that measure microcirculatory blood flow in deep tissue continuously. Our prototype device (Ornim Medical, Israel) was used to monitor tissue blood flow on anesthetized swine during controlled manipulations of increased and decreased blood flow. Measurements were done on the calf muscle and forehead of the animal and compared with Laser Doppler (LD). ROC analysis of the sensitivity and specificity for detecting an increase in blood flow on the calf muscle, demonstrated AUC = 0.951 for 23 systemic manipulations of cardiac output by Epinephrine injection, which is comparable to AUC = 0.943 using laser Doppler. Some examples of cerebral blood flow monitoring are presented, along with their individual ROC curves. UTL flowmetry is shown to be effective in detecting changes in cerebral and muscle blood flow in swine, and has merit in clinical applications.

  5. Ultrasound-guided joint and soft tissue interventions.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta

    2014-06-01

    Minor procedures with an injection needle are frequently performed in orthopedic clinics. They may be of a diagnostic, diagnostic and therapeutic or purely therapeutic nature. Ultrasound guidance while inserting the needle allows for a safe medicine administration and evacuation of fluid contents. It improves the efficacy of such procedures by ensuring accurate needle insertion in the target site. Ultrasound-guided procedures reduce the duration of treatment (e.g. medicines reach the target site directly; all fluid collections are removed, even multilocular ones) and minimize pain (by the selection of optimal access sites omitting tendons, vessels and peripheral nerves). This paper presents the principles of performing ultrasound-guided interventions. A detailed description of such a technique is provided and the most commonly injected medicines as well as their adverse reactions and contraindications are discussed. Attention is also paid to image optimization and the role of procedure site selection with the exclusion of other pathologies in the puncture site (such as tumors, foreign bodies and vascular or nerve pathologies). What is more, the author also discusses the principles of needle length and thickness selection as well as the manners of its insertion in relation to the transducer. Moreover, the principles of aseptics that are mandatory during such interventions are also presented and the way to protect transducers from the effects of chemical disinfectants is discussed. Furthermore, the paper contains numerous photographs of performed interventions. It is addressed to clinical practitioners and its aim is to facilitate and improve the efficacy of the procedures which are commonly performed in orthopedics. Ultrasound guidance of joint and soft tissue interventions should become a gold standard in all orthopedic clinics. PMID:26672495

  6. Statistical parameter estimation in ultrasound backscattering from tissue mimicking media

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Several tissue characterization parameters, including the effective scatterer number density and the backscatter coefficient, were derived from the statistical properties of ultrasonic echo signals. The effective scatterer number density is the actual scatterer number density in a medium multiplied by a frequency-dependent factor that depends on the differential scattering cross-sections of all scatterers. The method described in this thesis for determining the scatterer number density explicitly retains both the temporal nature of the data acquisition and the properties of the ultrasound field in the data reduction. Moreover, it accounts for the possibility that different sets of scatterers may dominate the echo signal at different frequencies. The random processes involved in forming ultrasound echo signals from random media give rise to an uncertainty in the estimated effective scatterer number density. This uncertainty is evaluated using error propagation. The statistical uncertainty depends on the effective number of scatterers contributing to the segmented echo signal, increasing when the effective number of scatterers increases. Tests of the scatterer number density data reduction method and the statistical uncertainty estimator were done using phantoms with known ultrasound scattering properties. Good agreement was found between measured values and those calculated from first-principles. The properties of the non-Gaussian and non-Rayleigh parameters of ultrasound echo signals are also studied. Both parameters depend on the measurement system, including the transducer field and pulse frequency content, as well as on the medium`s properties. The latter is expressed in terms of the scatterer number density and the second and fourth moments of the medium`s scattering function. A simple relationship between the non-Gaussian and non-Rayleigh parameters is derived and verified experimentally.

  7. Ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound in an in vivo porcine liver model.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C; Cunitz, Bryan W; Starr, Frank; Paun, Marla; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2014-06-01

    The clinical use of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy for noninvasive tissue ablation has been recently gaining momentum. In HIFU, ultrasound energy from an extracorporeal source is focused within the body to ablate tissue at the focus while leaving the surrounding organs and tissues unaffected. Most HIFU therapies are designed to use heating effects resulting from the absorption of ultrasound by tissue to create a thermally coagulated treatment volume. Although this approach is often successful, it has its limitations, such as the heat sink effect caused by the presence of a large blood vessel near the treatment area or heating of the ribs in the transcostal applications. HIFU-induced bubbles provide an alternative means to destroy the target tissue by mechanical disruption or, at its extreme, local fractionation of tissue within the focal region. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a recently developed approach to HIFU-induced ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation in an in vivo pig model. In this approach, termed boiling histotripsy, a millimeter-sized boiling bubble is generated by ultrasound and further interacts with the ultrasound field to fractionate porcine liver tissue into subcellular debris without inducing further thermal effects. Tissue selectivity, demonstrated by boiling histotripsy, allows for the treatment of tissue immediately adjacent to major blood vessels and other connective tissue structures. Furthermore, boiling histotripsy would benefit the clinical applications, in which it is important to accelerate resorption or passage of the ablated tissue volume, diminish pressure on the surrounding organs that causes discomfort, or insert openings between tissues. PMID:24843132

  8. Dual-focus therapeutic ultrasound transducer for production of broad tissue lesions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Cannata, Jonathan M; Shung, K Kirk

    2010-11-01

    In noninvasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, formation of a large tissue lesion per sonication is desirable for reducing the overall treatment time. The goal of this study is to show the feasibility of enlarging tissue lesion size with a dual-focus therapeutic ultrasound transducer (DFTUT) by increasing the depth-of-focus (DOF). The proposed transducer consists of a disc- and an annular-type element of different radii of curvatures to produce two focal zones. To increase focal depth and to maintain uniform beamwidth of the elongated DOF, each element transmits ultrasound of a different center frequency: the inner element at a higher frequency for near field focusing and the outer element at a lower frequency for far field focusing. By activating two elements at the same time with a single transmitter capable of generating a dual-frequency mixed signal, the overall DOF of the proposed transducer may be extended considerably. A prototype transducer composed of a 4.1 MHz inner element and a 2.7 MHz outer element was fabricated to obtain preliminary experimental results. The feasibility the proposed technique was demonstrated through sound field, temperature and thermal dose simulations. The performance of the prototype transducer was verified by hydrophone measurements and tissue ablation experiments on a beef liver specimen. When several factors affecting the length and the uniformity of elongated DOF of the DFTUT are optimized, the proposed therapeutic ultrasound transducer design may increase the size of ablated tissues in the axial direction and, thus, decreasing the treatment time for a large volume of malignant tissues especially deep-seated targets. PMID:20870346

  9. Statistical Parameter Estimation in Ultrasound Backscattering from Tissue Mimicking Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Feng

    Several tissue characterization parameters, including the effective scatterer number density and the backscatter coefficient, were derived from the statistical properties of ultrasonic echo signals. The effective scatterer number density is the actual scatterer number density in a medium multiplied by a frequency-dependent factor that depends on the differential scattering cross-sections of all scatterers. The method described in this thesis for determining the scatterer number density explicitly retains both the temporal nature of the data acquisition and the properties of the ultrasound field in the data reduction. Moreover, it accounts for the possibility that different sets of scatterers may dominate the echo signal at different frequencies. The random processes involved in forming ultrasound echo signals from random media give rise to an uncertainty in the estimated effective scatterer number density. This uncertainty is evaluated using error propagation. The statistical uncertainty depends on the effective number of scatterers contributing to the segmented echo signal, increasing when the effective number of scatterers increases. Tests of the scatterer number density data reduction method and the statistical uncertainty estimator were done using phantoms with known ultrasound scattering properties. Good agreement was found between measured values and those calculated from first-principles. The properties of the non-Gaussian and non-Rayleigh parameters of ultrasound echo signals are also studied. Both parameters depend on the measurement system, including the transducer field and pulse frequency content, as well as on the medium's properties. The latter is expressed in terms of the scatterer number density and the second and fourth moments of the medium's scattering function. A simple relationship between the non-Gaussian and non-Rayleigh parameters is derived and verified experimentally. Finally, a reference phantom method is proposed for measuring the

  10. Optimal conditions for tissue perforation using high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Kihara, Taizo; Ogawa, Kouji; Tanabe, Ryoko; Yosizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2012-10-01

    To perforate tissue lying deep part in body, a large size transducer was assembled by combining four spherical-shaped transducers, and the optimal conditions for tissue perforation have studied using ventricle muscle of chicken as a target. The ex vivo experiments showed that ventricle muscle was successfully perforated both when it was exposed to High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) directly and when it was exposed to HIFU through atrial muscle layer. Moreover, it was shown that calculated acoustic power distributions are well similar to the perforation patterns, and that the acoustic energy distributes very complexly near the focus. Lastly, perforation on the living rabbit bladder wall was demonstrated as a preliminary in vivo experiment.

  11. Characterization of various tissue mimicking materials for medical ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenot, Audrey; Poepping, Tamie; Peters, Terry M.; Chen, Elvis C. S.

    2016-04-01

    Tissue mimicking materials are physical constructs exhibiting certain desired properties, which are used in machine calibration, medical imaging research, surgical planning, training, and simulation. For medical ultrasound, those specific properties include acoustic propagation speed and attenuation coefficient over the diagnostic frequency range. We investigated the acoustic characteristics of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisol, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and isopropanol using a time-of-light technique, where a pulse was passed through a sample of known thickness contained in a water bath. The propagation speed in PVC is approximately 1400ms-1 depending on the exact chemical composition, with the attenuation coefficient ranging from 0:35 dB cm-1 at 1MHz to 10:57 dB cm-1 at 9 MHz. The propagation speed in PDMS is in the range of 1100ms-1, with an attenuation coefficient of 1:28 dB cm-1 at 1MHz to 21:22 dB cm-1 at 9 MHz. At room temperature (22 °C), a mixture of water-isopropanol (7:25% isopropanol by volume) exhibits a propagation speed of 1540ms-1, making it an excellent and inexpensive tissue-mimicking liquid for medical ultrasound imaging.

  12. Medical ultrasound: imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Peter N. T.; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2011-01-01

    After X-radiography, ultrasound is now the most common of all the medical imaging technologies. For millennia, manual palpation has been used to assist in diagnosis, but it is subjective and restricted to larger and more superficial structures. Following an introduction to the subject of elasticity, the elasticity of biological soft tissues is discussed and published data are presented. The basic physical principles of pulse-echo and Doppler ultrasonic techniques are explained. The history of ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is summarized, together with a brief critique of previously published reviews. The relevant techniques—low-frequency vibration, step, freehand and physiological displacement, and radiation force (displacement, impulse, shear wave and acoustic emission)—are described. Tissue-mimicking materials are indispensible for the assessment of these techniques and their characteristics are reported. Emerging clinical applications in breast disease, cardiology, dermatology, gastroenterology, gynaecology, minimally invasive surgery, musculoskeletal studies, radiotherapy, tissue engineering, urology and vascular disease are critically discussed. It is concluded that ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is now sufficiently well developed to have clinical utility. The potential for further research is examined and it is anticipated that the technology will become a powerful mainstream investigative tool. PMID:21680780

  13. Doppler ultrasound detection of shear waves remotely induced in tissue phantoms and tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barannik, E A; Girnyk, A; Tovstiak, V; Marusenko, A I; Emelianov, S Y; Sarvazyan, A P

    2002-05-01

    In shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI), mechanical excitation within the tissue is remotely generated using radiation force of focused ultrasound. The induced shear strain is subsequently detected to estimate visco-elastic properties of tissue and thus aid diagnostics. In this paper, the mechanical response of tissue to radiation force was detected using a modified ultrasound Doppler technique. The experiments were performed on tissue mimicking and tissue containing phantoms using a commercial diagnostic scanner. This scanner was modified to control both the pushing and probing beams. The pushing beam was fired repetitively along a single direction while interlaced probing beams swept the surrounding region of interest to detect the induced motion. The detectability of inhomogeneous inclusions using ultrasonic Doppler SWEI method has been demonstrated in this study. The displacement fields measured in elastic phantoms clearly reveal the oscillatory nature of the mechanical relaxation processes in response to impulsive load due to the boundary effects. This relaxation dynamics was also present in cooked muscle tissue, but was not detected in more viscous and less elastic phantom and raw muscles. Presence of a local heterogeneity in the vicinity of the focal region of the pushing beam results in generation of a standing wave field pattern which is manifested in the oscillatory response of the excited region of the tissue. There has been made an assumption that dynamic characteristics of the relaxation process may be used for visualization of inhomogeneities. PMID:12160057

  14. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p−) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p− = 26.0–30.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p− = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p− = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  15. Study of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods using tissue mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Seshadri, Suresh

    2014-02-01

    A pilot study was carried out to investigate the performance of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods namely Ultrasound Elastography Imaging (UEI) and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging. Specifically their potential for characterizing different classes of solid mass lesions was analyzed using agar based tissue mimicking phantoms. Composite tissue mimicking phantom was prepared with embedded inclusions of varying stiffness from 50 kPa to 450 kPa to represent different stages of cancer. Acoustic properties such as sound speed, attenuation coefficient and acoustic impedance were characterized by pulse echo ultrasound test at 5 MHz frequency and they are ranged from (1564 ± 88 to 1671 ± 124 m/s), (0.6915 ± 0.123 to 0.8268 ± 0.755 db cm(-1)MHz(-1)) and (1.61 × 10(6) ± 0.127 to 1.76 × 10(6) ± 0.045 kg m(-2)s(-1)) respectively. The elastic property Young's Modulus of the prepared samples was measured by conducting quasi static uni axial compression test under a strain rate of 0.5mm/min upto 10 % strain, and the values are from 50 kPa to 450 kPa for a variation of agar concentration from 1.7% to 6.6% by weight. The composite phantoms were imaged by Siemens Acuson S2000 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) machine using linear array transducer 9L4 at 8 MHz frequency; strain and displacement images were collected by UEI and ARFI. Shear wave velocity 4.43 ± 0.35 m/s was also measured for high modulus contrast (18 dB) inclusion and X.XX m/s was found for all other inclusions. The images were pre processed and parameters such as Contrast Transfer Efficiency and lateral image profile were computed and reported. The results indicate that both ARFI and UEI represent the abnormalities better than conventional US B mode imaging whereas UEI enhances the underlying modulus contrast into improved strain contrast. The results are corroborated with literature and also with clinical patient images. PMID:24083832

  16. Nonlinear viscoelastic properties of tissue assessed by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sinkus, Ralph; Bercoff, Jeremy; Tanter, Mickaël; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; El-Khoury, Carl; Servois, Vincent; Tardivon, Anne; Fink, Mathias

    2006-11-01

    A technique to assess qualitatively the presence of higher-order viscoelastic parameters is presented. Low-frequency, monochromatic elastic waves are emitted into the material via an external vibrator. The resulting steady-state motion is detected in real time via an ultra fast ultrasound system using classical, one-dimensional (1-D) ultrasound speckle correlation for motion estimation. Total data acquisition lasts only for about 250 ms. The spectrum of the temporal displacement data at each image point is used for analysis. The presence of nonlinear effects is detected by inspection of the ratio of the second harmonics amplitude with respect to the total amplitude summed up to the second harmonic. Results from a polyacrylamide-based phantom indicate a linear response (i.e., the absence of higher harmonics) for this type of material at 65 Hz mechanical vibration frequency and about 100 microm amplitude. A lesion, artificially created by injection of glutaraldehyde into a beef specimen, shows the development of higher harmonics at the location of injection as a function of time. The presence of upper harmonics is clearly evident at the location of a malignant lesion within a mastectomy. PMID:17091837

  17. Viscoelastic Property Measurement in Thin Tissue Constructs Using Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a dual-element concave ultrasound transducer system for generating and tracking of localized tissue displacements in thin tissue constructs on rigid substrates. The system is comprised of a highly focused PZT-4 5-MHz acoustic radiation force (ARF) transducer and a confocal 25-MHz polyvinylidene fluoride imaging transducer. This allows for the generation of measurable displacements in tissue samples on rigid substrates with thickness values down to 500 µm. Impulse-like and longer duration sine-modulated ARF pulses are possible with intermittent M-mode data acquisition for displacement tracking. The operations of the ARF and imaging transducers are strictly synchronized using an integrated system for arbitrary waveform generation and data capture with a shared timebase. This allows for virtually jitter-free pulse-echo data well suited for correlation-based speckle tracking. With this technique we could faithfully capture the entire dynamics of the tissue axial deformation at pulse-repetition frequency values up to 10 kHz. Spatio-temporal maps of tissue displacements in response to a variety of modulated ARF beams were produced in tissue-mimicking elastography phantoms on rigid substrates. The frequency response was measured for phantoms with different modulus and thickness values. The frequency response exhibited resonant behavior with the resonance frequency being inversely proportional to the sample thickness. This resonant behavior can be used in obtaining high-contrast imaging using magnitude and phase response to sinusoidally modulated ARF beams. Furthermore, a second order forced harmonic oscillator (FHO) model was shown to capture this resonant behavior. Based on the FHO model, we used the extended Kalman filter (EKF) for tracking the apparent modulus and viscosity of samples subjected to dc and sinusoidally modulated ARF. The results show that the stiffness (apparent modulus) term in the FHO is largely time-invariant and can be estimated robustly

  18. Intense focused ultrasound preferentially stimulates subcutaneous and focal neuropathic tissue: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    McClintic, Abbi M.; Dickey, Trevor C.; Gofeld, Michael; Kliot, Michel; Loeser, John D.; Richebe, Philippe; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Potential peripheral sources of pain from subcutaneous tissue can require invasive evocative tests for their localization and assessment. Here we describe studies whose ultimate goal is development of a non-invasive evocative test for subcutaneous, painful tissue. Design We used a rat model of a focal and subcutaneous neuroma to test the hypothesis that intense focused ultrasound can differentiate focal and subcutaneous neuropathic tissue from control tissue. To do so we first applied intense focused ultrasound (2 MHz, with individual pulses of 0.1 seconds in duration) to the rat’s neuroma while the rat was under light anesthesia. We started with low values of intensity which we increased until intense focused ultrasound stimulation caused the rat to reliably flick its paw. We then applied that same intense focused ultrasound protocol to control tissue away from the neuroma and assayed for the rat’s response to that stimulation. Results Intense focused ultrasound of sufficient strength (I_sata of 600 +/− 160 W/cm^2) applied to the neuroma caused the rat to flick its paw, while the same intense focused ultrasound applied millimeters to a centimeter away failed to induce a paw flick. Conclusion Successful stimulation of the neuroma by intense focused ultrasound required co-localization of the neuroma and intense focused ultrasound, supporting our hypothesis. PMID:23137045

  19. Heating in vascular tissue and flow-through tissue phantoms induced by focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinlan

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to control bleeding, both from individual blood vessels as well as from gross damage to the capillary bed. This process, called acoustic hemostasis, is being studied in the hope that such a method would ultimately provide a lifesaving treatment during the so-called "golden hour", a brief grace period after a severe trauma in which prompt therapy can save the life of an injured person. Thermal effects play a major role in occlusion of small vessels and also appear to contribute to the sealing of punctures in major blood vessels. However, aggressive ultrasound-induced tissue heating can also impact healthy tissue and can lead to deleterious mechanical bioeffects. Moreover, the presence of vascularity can limit one's ability to elevate the temperature of blood vessel walls owing to convective heat transport. In an effort to better understand the heating process in tissues with vascular structure we have developed a numerical simulation that couples models for ultrasound propagation, acoustic streaming, ultrasound heating and blood cooling in Newtonian viscous media. The 3-D simulation allows for the study of complicated biological structures and insonation geometries. We have also undertaken a series of in vitro experiments, in non-uniform flow-through tissue phantoms, designed to provide a ground truth verification of the model predictions. The calculated and measured results were compared over a range of values for insonation pressure, insonation time, and flow rate; we show good agreement between predictions and measurements. We then conducted a series of simulations that address two limiting problems of interest: hemostasis in small and large vessels. We employed realistic human tissue properties and considered more complex geometries. Results show that the heating pattern in and around a blood vessel is different for different vessel sizes, flow rates and for varying beam orientations relative to the flow axis

  20. AUGMENTATION OF LIMB PERFUSION AND REVERSAL OF TISSUE ISCHEMIA PRODUCED BY ULTRASOUND-MEDIATED MICROBUBBLE CAVITATION

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Mott, Brian H.; Xie, Aris; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Sajeevani; Lindner, Nathan J.; Ammi, Azzdine; Linden, Joel M.; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound can increase tissue blood flow in part through the intravascular shear produced by oscillatory pressure fluctuations. We hypothesized that ultrasound-mediated increases in perfusion can be augmented by microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation, and sought to characterize the biologic mediators. Methods and Results Contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging of hindlimb skeletal muscle and femoral artery diameter measurement were performed in non-ischemic mice after unilateral 10 min exposure to intermittent ultrasound alone (mechanical index [MI] 0.6 or 1.3) or ultrasound with lipid microbubbles (2×108 I.V.). Studies were also performed after inhibiting shear- or pressure-dependent vasodilator pathways, and in mice with hindlimb ischemia. Ultrasound alone produced a 2-fold increase (p<0.05) in muscle perfusion regardless of ultrasound power. Ultrasound-mediated augmentation in flow was greater with microbubbles (3-fold and 10-fold higher than control for MI 0.6 and 1.3, respectively; p<0.05), as was femoral artery dilation. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) attenuated flow augmentation produced by ultrasound and microbubbles by 70% (p<0.01), whereas inhibition of adenosine-A2a receptors and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids had minimal effect. Limb nitric oxide (NO) production and muscle phospho-eNOS increased in a stepwise fashion by ultrasound and ultrasound with microbubbles. In mice with unilateral hindlimb ischemia (40–50% reduction in flow), ultrasound (MI 1.3) with microbubbles increased perfusion by 2-fold to a degree that was greater than the control non-ischemic limb. Conclusions Increases in muscle blood flow during high-power ultrasound are markedly amplified by the intravascular presence of microbubbles and can reverse tissue ischemia. These effects are most likely mediated by cavitation-related increases in shear and activation of eNOS. PMID:25834183

  1. Broadband miniature optical ultrasound probe for high resolution vascular tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colchester, Richard J.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Mosse, Charles A.; Beard, Paul C.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-01-01

    An all-optical ultrasound probe for vascular tissue imaging was developed. Ultrasound was generated by pulsed laser illumination of a functionalized carbon nanotube composite coating on the end face of an optical fiber. Ultrasound was detected with a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity on the end face of an adjacent optical fiber. The probe diameter was < 0.84 mm and had an ultrasound bandwidth of ~20 MHz. The probe was translated across the tissue sample to create a virtual linear array of ultrasound transmit/receive elements. At a depth of 3.5 mm, the axial resolution was 64 µm and the lateral resolution was 88 µm, as measured with a carbon fiber target. Vascular tissues from swine were imaged ex vivo and good correspondence to histology was observed. PMID:25909031

  2. Broadband miniature optical ultrasound probe for high resolution vascular tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Colchester, Richard J; Zhang, Edward Z; Mosse, Charles A; Beard, Paul C; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2015-04-01

    An all-optical ultrasound probe for vascular tissue imaging was developed. Ultrasound was generated by pulsed laser illumination of a functionalized carbon nanotube composite coating on the end face of an optical fiber. Ultrasound was detected with a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity on the end face of an adjacent optical fiber. The probe diameter was < 0.84 mm and had an ultrasound bandwidth of ~20 MHz. The probe was translated across the tissue sample to create a virtual linear array of ultrasound transmit/receive elements. At a depth of 3.5 mm, the axial resolution was 64 µm and the lateral resolution was 88 µm, as measured with a carbon fiber target. Vascular tissues from swine were imaged ex vivo and good correspondence to histology was observed. PMID:25909031

  3. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands. PMID:26771992

  4. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  5. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of cancellous bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lifeng; Lashkari, Bahman; Tan, Joel W. Y.; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    We used ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities to characterize cattle trabecular bones. The PA signals were generated with an 805-nm continuous wave laser used for optimally deep optical penetration depth. The detector for both modalities was a 2.25-MHz US transducer with a lateral resolution of ˜1 mm at its focal point. Using a lateral pixel size much larger than the size of the trabeculae, raster scanning generated PA images related to the averaged values of the optical and thermoelastic properties, as well as density measurements in the focal volume. US backscatter yielded images related to mechanical properties and density in the focal volume. The depth of interest was selected by time-gating the signals for both modalities. The raster scanned PA and US images were compared with microcomputed tomography (μCT) images averaged over the same volume to generate similar spatial resolution as US and PA. The comparison revealed correlations between PA and US modalities with the mineral volume fraction of the bone tissue. Various features and properties of these modalities such as detectable depth, resolution, and sensitivity are discussed.

  6. Interaction of ultrasound with vortices in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sonin, E.B.

    1996-04-01

    The theory of ultrasound in the mixed state of type-II superconductors is suggested which takes into account the Magnus force on vortices, the anti-Magnus force on ions, and diamagnetism of the mixed state. The acoustic Faraday effect (rotation of polarization of the transverse ultrasonic wave propagating along vortices) is linear in the Magnus force in any regime of the flux flow for wavelengths now used in the ultrasound experiments. Therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, the Faraday effect should be looked for only in clean superconductors with a strong Magnus force. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Ultrasound-guided characterization of interstitial ablated tissue using RF time series: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Imani, Farhad; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Wu, Mark Z; Lasso, Andras; Burdette, Everett C; Ghoshal, Goutam; Heffter, Tamas; Williams, Emery; Neubauer, Paul; Fichtinger, Gabor; Mousavi, Parvin

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a feasibility study to demonstrate the application of ultrasound RF time series imaging to accurately differentiate ablated and nonablated tissue. For 12 ex vivo and two in situ tissue samples, RF ultrasound signals are acquired prior to, and following, high-intensity ultrasound ablation. Spatial and temporal features of these signals are used to characterize ablated and nonablated tissue in a supervised-learning framework. In cross-validation evaluation, a subset of four features extracted from RF time series produce a classification accuracy of 84.5%, an area under ROC curve of 0.91 for ex vivo data, and an accuracy of 85% for in situ data. Ultrasound RF time series is a promising approach for characterizing ablated tissue. PMID:23335657

  8. Validity and reliability of an ultrasound system for estimating adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, Jeremy P; Barnes, Jeremy T; Wagganer, Jason D; Wilson, Jacob M; Lowery, Ryan P; Green, Cody E; Pujol, Thomas J

    2014-03-01

    When health professionals measure the fitness levels of clients, body composition is usually estimated. In field settings, body composition is commonly estimated with skinfolds or bioelectrical impedance analysis. Recently, a portable ultrasound device has been manufactured to estimate what percentage of body mass is composed of adipose tissue (AT%). A reported advantage of using ultrasound is that inter- and intrarater variations may be minimized when compared with the skinfold technique. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was twofold; 1) to determine the validity of a portable ultrasound device compared with skinfolds and 2) determine the reliability of the portable ultrasound device. Participants had their measurements taken in the following order: urine specific gravity, body mass, height, skinfolds and ultrasound determined. Participants had their urine specific gravity and ultrasound determined AT% estimates measured again 48 h later. The current pilot study found that the ultrasound was not a valid estimate of AT% when compared with the skinfold estimate (TE > 4%). In addition, the 1-site estimate from the ultrasound was more reliable than the 3-site estimate of AT%. These data are of importance to practitioners because it demonstrates that while the ultrasound is not a valid estimate compared with skinfolds, the 1-site estimate may be able to track changes in AT% over time, making the ultrasound an option for assessing changes in body composition. PMID:23879395

  9. Investigation of Post-mortem Tissue Effects Using Long-time Decorrelation Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csány, Gergely; Balogh, Lajos; Gyöngy, Miklós

    Decorrelation ultrasound is being increasingly used to investigate long-term biological phenomena. In the current work, ultrasound image sequences of mice who did not survive anesthesia (in a separate investigation) were analyzed and post-mortem tissue effects were observed via decorrelation calculation. A method was developed to obtain a quantitative parameter characterizing the rate of decorrelation. The results show that ultrasound decorrelation imaging is an effective method of observing post-mortem tissue effects and point to further studies elucidating the mechanism behind these effects.

  10. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to ... no known risks for ultrasound at present, it is highly recommended that pregnant women consult their physician ...

  11. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions.

  12. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  13. Pulmonary ultrasound elastography: a feasibility study with phantoms and ex-vivo tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Xie, Hua; Paluch, Kamila; Stanton, Douglas; Ramachandran, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Elastography has become widely used for minimally invasive diagnosis in many tumors as seen with breast, liver and prostate. Among different modalities, ultrasound-based elastography stands out due to its advantages including being safe, real-time, and relatively low-cost. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among both men and women, the use of ultrasound elastography for lung cancer diagnosis has hardly been investigated due to the limitations of ultrasound in air. In this work, we investigate the use of static-compression based endobronchial ultrasound elastography by a 3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer for lung cancer diagnosis. A water-filled balloon was designed to 1) improve the visualization of endobronchial ultrasound and 2) to induce compression via pumping motion inside the trachea and bronchiole. In a phantom study, we have successfully generated strain images indicating the stiffness difference between the gelatin background and agar inclusion. A similar strain ratio was confirmed with Philips ultrasound strain-based elastography product. For ex-vivo porcine lung study, different tissue ablation methods including chemical injection, Radio Frequency (RF) ablation, and direct heating were implemented to achieve tumor-mimicking tissue. Stiff ablated lung tissues were obtained and detected with our proposed method. These results suggest the feasibility of pulmonary elastography to differentiate stiff tumor tissue from normal tissue.

  14. Towards 3D ultrasound image based soft tissue tracking: a transrectal ultrasound prostate image alignment system.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Michael; Mozer, Pierre; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of real-time 3D ultrasound (US) makes it possible to consider image-based tracking of subcutaneous soft tissue targets for computer guided diagnosis and therapy. We propose a 3D transrectal US based tracking system for precise prostate biopsy sample localisation. The aim is to improve sample distribution, to enable targeting of unsampled regions for repeated biopsies, and to make post-interventional quality controls possible. Since the patient is not immobilized, since the prostate is mobile and due to the fact that probe movements are only constrained by the rectum during biopsy acquisition, the tracking system must be able to estimate rigid transformations that are beyond the capture range of common image similarity measures. We propose a fast and robust multi-resolution attribute-vector registration approach that combines global and local optimization methods to solve this problem. Global optimization is performed on a probe movement model that reduces the dimensionality of the search space and thus renders optimization efficient. The method was tested on 237 prostate volumes acquired from 14 different patients for 3D to 3D and 3D to orthogonal 2D slices registration. The 3D-3D version of the algorithm converged correctly in 96.7% of all cases in 6.5s with an accuracy of 1.41mm (r.m.s.) and 3.84mm (max). The 3D to slices method yielded a success rate of 88.9% in 2.3s with an accuracy of 1.37mm (r.m.s.) and 4.3mm (max). PMID:18044549

  15. Pathological tendons maintain sufficient aligned fibrillar structure on ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC).

    PubMed

    Docking, S I; Cook, J

    2016-06-01

    Structural disorganization in the tendon is associated with tendinopathy, with little research investigating whether disorganization overwhelms the overall structural integrity of the tendon. This study investigated the mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of aligned fibrillar structure as detected by ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) in the pathological and normal Achilles and patellar tendons. Ninety-one participants had their Achilles and/or patellar tendons scanned using UTC to capture a three-dimensional image of the tendon and allow a semi-quantification of the echopattern. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure (echo type I + II) and disorganized structure (echo type III + IV) was calculated based on UTC algorithms. Each tendon was classified as either pathological or normal based solely on gray-scale ultrasound. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.001) in the pathological tendon compared with the normal tendon, despite the pathological tendon containing greater amounts of disorganized structure (P ≤ 0.001). A significant relationship was observed between the mean CSA of disorganized structure and anteroposterior diameter of the Achilles (R(2)  = 0.587) and patellar (R(2)  = 0.559) tendons. This study is the first to show that pathological tendons have sufficient levels of aligned fibrillar structure. Pathological tendons may compensate for areas of disorganization by increasing in tendon thickness. PMID:26059532

  16. Modeling and Predicting Tissue Movement and Deformation for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiangyun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Lai, Qianfeng; Guo, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Qi; Yu, Sijiao; Tong, Qianqian; Si, Weixin; Sun, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, the target tissue (such as a tumor) often moves and/or deforms in response to an external force. This problem creates difficulties in treating patients and can lead to the destruction of normal tissue. In order to solve this problem, we present a novel method to model and predict the movement and deformation of the target tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. Methods Our method computationally predicts the position of the target tissue under external force. This prediction allows appropriate adjustments in the focal region during the application of HIFU so that the treatment head is kept aligned with the diseased tissue through the course of therapy. To accomplish this goal, we utilize the cow tissue as the experimental target tissue to collect spatial sequences of ultrasound images using the HIFU equipment. A Geodesic Localized Chan-Vese (GLCV) model is developed to segment the target tissue images. A 3D target tissue model is built based on the segmented results. A versatile particle framework is constructed based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Further, an iterative parameter estimation algorithm is utilized to determine the essential parameters of the versatile particle framework. Finally, the versatile particle framework with the determined parameters is used to estimate the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Results To validate our method, we compare the predicted contours with the ground truth contours. We found that the lowest, highest and average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) values between predicted and ground truth contours were, respectively, 0.9615, 0.9770 and 0.9697. Conclusion Our experimental result indicates that the proposed method can effectively predict the dynamic contours of the moving and deforming tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. PMID:25993644

  17. Registration of 3D ultrasound computer tomography and MRI for evaluation of tissue correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. In the current state of development it is essential to correlate USCT with a known imaging modality like MRI to evaluate how different tissue types are depicted. Due to different imaging conditions, e.g. with the breast subject to buoyancy in USCT, a direct correlation is demanding. We present a 3D image registration method to reduce positioning differences and allow direct side-by-side comparison of USCT and MRI volumes. It is based on a two-step approach including a buoyancy simulation with a biomechanical model and free form deformations using cubic B-Splines for a surface refinement. Simulation parameters are optimized patient-specifically in a simulated annealing scheme. The method was evaluated with in-vivo datasets resulting in an average registration error below 5mm. Correlating tissue structures can thereby be located in the same or nearby slices in both modalities and three-dimensional non-linear deformations due to the buoyancy are reduced. Image fusion of MRI volumes and USCT sound speed volumes was performed for intuitive display. By applying the registration to data of our first in-vivo study with the KIT 3D USCT, we could correlate several tissue structures in MRI and USCT images and learn how connective tissue, carcinomas and breast implants observed in the MRI are depicted in the USCT imaging modes.

  18. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and structures inside the ... part of your body. The transducer sends out sound waves, which bounce off the tissues inside your body. ...

  19. Acoustically accessible window determination for ultrasound mediated treatment of glycogen storage disease type Ia patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shutao; Raju, Balasundar I.; Leyvi, Evgeniy; Weinstein, David A.; Seip, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is caused by an inherited single-gene defect resulting in an impaired glycogen to glucose conversion pathway. Targeted ultrasound mediated delivery (USMD) of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to liver in conjunction with microbubbles may provide a potential treatment for GSDIa patients. As the success of USMD treatments is largely dependent on the accessibility of the targeted tissue by the focused ultrasound beam, this study presents a quantitative approach to determine the acoustically accessible liver volume in GSDIa patients. Models of focused ultrasound beam profiles for transducers of varying aperture and focal lengths were applied to abdomen models reconstructed from suitable CT and MRI images. Transducer manipulations (simulating USMD treatment procedures) were implemented via transducer translations and rotations with the intent of targeting and exposing the entire liver to ultrasound. Results indicate that acoustically accessible liver volumes can be as large as 50% of the entire liver volume for GSDIa patients and on average 3 times larger compared to a healthy adult group due to GSDIa patients' increased liver size. Detailed descriptions of the evaluation algorithm, transducer-and abdomen models are presented, together with implications for USMD treatments of GSDIa patients and transducer designs for USMD applications.

  20. Dynamic morphometric characterization of local connective tissue network structure in humans using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M; Rizzo, Donna M; Fox, James R; Badger, Gary J; Wu, Junru; Konofagou, Elisa E; Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie; Bouffard, Nicole A; Krag, Martin H

    2007-01-01

    Background In humans, connective tissue forms a complex, interconnected network throughout the body that may have mechanosensory, regulatory and signaling functions. Understanding these potentially important phenomena requires non-invasive measurements of collagen network structure that can be performed in live animals or humans. The goal of this study was to show that ultrasound can be used to quantify dynamic changes in local connective tissue structure in vivo. We first performed combined ultrasound and histology examinations of the same tissue in two subjects undergoing surgery: in one subject, we examined the relationship of ultrasound to histological images in three dimensions; in the other, we examined the effect of a localized tissue perturbation using a previously developed robotic acupuncture needling technique. In ten additional non-surgical subjects, we quantified changes in tissue spatial organization over time during needle rotation vs. no rotation using ultrasound and semi-variogram analyses. Results 3-D renditions of ultrasound images showed longitudinal echogenic sheets that matched with collagenous sheets seen in histological preparations. Rank correlations between serial 2-D ultrasound and corresponding histology images resulted in high positive correlations for semi-variogram ranges computed parallel (r = 0.79, p < 0.001) and perpendicular (r = 0.63, p < 0.001) to the surface of the skin, indicating concordance in spatial structure between the two data sets. Needle rotation caused tissue displacement in the area surrounding the needle that was mapped spatially with ultrasound elastography and corresponded to collagen bundles winding around the needle on histological sections. In semi-variograms computed for each ultrasound frame, there was a greater change in the area under the semi-variogram curve across successive frames during needle rotation compared with no rotation. The direction of this change was heterogeneous across subjects. The frame

  1. Non-invasive estimation of thermal tissue properties by high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appanaboyina, Sunil; Partanen, Ari; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance guided High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU) can be used to locally heat tissue while non-invasively monitoring tissue temperature via MR-based thermometry. The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a computational technique based on inverse heat-transfer modeling for the non-invasive measurement of thermal tissue properties from data collected using an MR-HIFU system.

  2. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make images of organs and structures inside the body. ... An ultrasound machine makes images so that organs inside the body can be examined. The machine sends out high- ...

  3. Cavitation-induced damage in soft tissue phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Hutchens, Shelby B.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation in soft tissues, similar to that in purely hydrodynamic configurations, is thought to cause tissue injury in therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Our goal is to generalize bubble dynamics models to represent this phenomenon, which we pursue experimentally with observations in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide and agarose phantoms and semi-analytic generalization of Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics models. The phantoms were imaged with high-speed cameras while subjected to a series of multiple pressure wave bursts, of the kind being considered specifically for burst-wave lithotripsy (BWL). The experimental observations show bubble activation at multiple sites during the initial pulses. After multiple pulses, a further onset of cavitation is observed at some new locations suggesting material failure due to fatigue under cyclic loading. A nonlinear strain-energy with strain hardening is used to represent the elasticity of the surrounding medium. Griffith's fracture criterion is then applied in order to determine the onset of material damage. The damaged material is then represented as a Newtonian fluid. By assuming that such a decrease in the fracture toughness occurs under cyclic loading, the fatigue behavior observed in the experiments can be reproduced by our model. This work was supported by NIH grant NIDDK PO1-DK043881.

  4. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in-vitro and predict in-vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom’s response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue, at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-Mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High speed imaging of the optically-transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. PMID:21030142

  5. The role of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of childhood febrile urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    İlarslan, Nisa Eda Çullas; Fitöz, Ömer Suat; Öztuna, Derya Gökmen; Küçük, Nuriye Özlem; Yalçınkaya, Fatma Fatoş

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study assessed the ability of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of childhood febrile urinary tract infections in comparison with the gold standard reference method: Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinicacid renal cortical scintigraphy. Material and Methods: This prospective study included 60 patients who were hospitalized with a first episode of febrile urinary tract infections. All children were examined with dimercaptosuccinicacid scan and tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound within the first 3 days of admission. Results: Signs indicative of acute infection were observed in 29 patients according to the results of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound while dimercaptosuccinicacid scan revealed abnormal findings in 33 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tissue harmonic imaging combined with power Doppler ultrasound using dimercaptosuccinicacid scintigraphy as the reference method in patients diagnosed with first episode febrile urinary tract infections were calculated as 57.58% (95% confidence interval: 40.81%–72.76%); 62.96% (95% confidence interval: 44.23%–78.47%); 65.52% (95% confidence interval: 52.04%–77%); 54.84% (95% confidence interval: 41.54%–67.52%); respectively. Conclusions: Although current results exhibit inadequate success of power Doppler ultrasound, this practical and radiation-free method may soon be comprise a part of the routine ultrasonographic evaluation of febrile urinary tract infections of childhood if patients are evaluated early and under appropriate sedation. PMID:26265892

  6. PE-CMOS based C-scan ultrasound for foreign object detection in soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chu-Chuan; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Freedman, Matthew T; Lasser, Marvin E; Kula, John; Sarcone, Anita; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a C-scan ultrasound prototype and three imaging modalities for the detection of foreign objects inserted in porcine soft tissue. The object materials include bamboo, plastics, glass and aluminum alloys. The images of foreign objects were acquired using the C-scan ultrasound, a portable B-scan ultrasound, film-based radiography, and computerized radiography. The C-scan ultrasound consists of a plane wave transducer, a compound acoustic lens system, and a newly developed ultrasound sensor array based on the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor coated with piezoelectric material (PE-CMOS). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the images were analyzed to quantitatively evaluate the detectability using different imaging modalities. The experimental results indicate that the C-scan prototype has better CNR values in 4 out of 7 objects than other modalities. Specifically, the C-scan prototype provides more detail information of the soft tissues without the speckle artifacts that are commonly seen with conventional B-scan ultrasound, and has the same orientation as the standard radiographs but without ionizing radiation. PMID:20036873

  7. Structural Quality Control of Swiss-Type Cheese with Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, J.; Alavuotunki, A.; Hæggström, E.; Alatossava, T.

    2007-03-01

    A study on structural quality control of Swiss-type cheese with ultrasound is presented. We used a longitudinal mode pulse-echo setup using 1-2MHz ultrasonic frequencies to detect cheese-eyes and ripening induced cracks. Results show that the ultrasonic method posses good potential to monitor the cheese structure during the ripening process. Preliminary results indicate that maturation stage could be monitored with ultrasonic velocity measurements. Further studies to verify the method's on-line potential to detect low-structural-quality cheeses are planned.

  8. MODEL-BASED CORRECTION OF TISSUE COMPRESSION FOR TRACKED ULTRASOUND IN SOFT TISSUE IMAGE-GUIDED SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Thompson, Reid C.; Rucker, Daniel C.; Simpson, Amber L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Acquisition of ultrasound data negatively affects image registration accuracy during image-guided therapy because of tissue compression by the probe. We present a novel compression correction method that models sub-surface tissue displacement resulting from application of a tracked probe to the tissue surface. Patient landmarks are first used to register the probe pose to pre-operative imaging. The ultrasound probe geometry is used to provide boundary conditions to a biomechanical model of the tissue. The deformation field solution of the model is inverted to non-rigidly transform the ultrasound images to an estimation of the tissue geometry before compression. Experimental results with gel phantoms indicated that the proposed method reduced the tumor margin modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) from 5.0 ± 1.6 to 1.9 ± 0.6 mm, and reduced tumor centroid alignment error from 7.6 ± 2.6 to 2.0 ± 0.9 mm. The method was applied to a clinical case and reduced the tumor margin MHD error from 5.4 ± 0.1 to 2.6 ± 0.1 mm and the centroid alignment error from 7.2 ± 0.2 to 3.5 ± 0.4 mm. PMID:24412172

  9. Model-based correction of tissue compression for tracked ultrasound in soft tissue image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Pheiffer, Thomas S; Thompson, Reid C; Rucker, Daniel C; Simpson, Amber L; Miga, Michael I

    2014-04-01

    Acquisition of ultrasound data negatively affects image registration accuracy during image-guided therapy because of tissue compression by the probe. We present a novel compression correction method that models sub-surface tissue displacement resulting from application of a tracked probe to the tissue surface. Patient landmarks are first used to register the probe pose to pre-operative imaging. The ultrasound probe geometry is used to provide boundary conditions to a biomechanical model of the tissue. The deformation field solution of the model is inverted to non-rigidly transform the ultrasound images to an estimation of the tissue geometry before compression. Experimental results with gel phantoms indicated that the proposed method reduced the tumor margin modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) from 5.0 ± 1.6 to 1.9 ± 0.6 mm, and reduced tumor centroid alignment error from 7.6 ± 2.6 to 2.0 ± 0.9 mm. The method was applied to a clinical case and reduced the tumor margin MHD error from 5.4 ± 0.1 to 2.6 ± 0.1 mm and the centroid alignment error from 7.2 ± 0.2 to 3.5 ± 0.4 mm. PMID:24412172

  10. Ultrasound Technologies for the Spatial Patterning of Cells and Extracellular Matrix Proteins and the Vascularization of Engineered Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, Kelley A.

    Technological advancements in the field of tissue engineering could save the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. Currently, two of the primary challenges preventing tissue engineers from developing functional replacement tissues and organs are the need to recreate complex cell and extracellular microenvironments and to vascularize the tissue to maintain cell viability and function. Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy that can noninvasively and nondestructively interact with tissues at the cell and protein level. In this thesis, novel ultrasound-based technologies were developed for the spatial patterning of cells and extracellular matrix proteins and the vascularization of three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields were utilized to noninvasively control the spatial organization of cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within collagen-based engineered tissue. Additionally, ultrasound induced thermal mechanisms were exploited to site-specifically pattern various extracellular matrix collagen microstructures within a single engineered tissue construct. Finally, ultrasound standing wave field technology was used to promote the rapid and extensive vascularization of three-dimensional tissue constructs. As such, the ultrasound technologies developed in these studies have the potential to provide the field of tissue engineering with novel strategies to spatially pattern cells and extracellular matrix components and to vascularize engineered tissue, and thus, could advance the fabrication of functional replacement tissues and organs in the field of tissue engineering.

  11. Ultrasound-modulated optical microscopy for ex-vivo imaging of scattering biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical microscopy (UOM) based on a long-cavity confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer (CFPI) [J.Biomed.Opt. 13(5), 0504046, (2008)] is used for real time detection of multiply scattered light modulated by high frequency (30 MHz) ultrasound pulses propagating in an optically strongly scattering medium. In this article, we use this microscope to study the dependence of ultrasound-modulated optical signals on the optical absorption of objects embedded about 3 mm deep in tissue mimicking phantoms. These results demonstrate that the dependence is nearly linear. Most importantly, we imaged blood vasculature and melanin in highly scattering tissue samples from a mouse and a rat. Thus UOM can be used to study the morphology of blood vasculature and blood-associated functional parameters, such as oxygen saturation.

  12. Ultrasound and Doppler US in Evaluation of Superficial Soft-tissue Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Huseyin; Kiliç, Erkan; Serter, Asli; Kocakoç, Ercan; Ozgocmen, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Improved developments in digital ultrasound technology and the use of high-frequency broadband transducers make ultrasound (US) imaging the first screening tool in investigating superficial tissue lesions. US is a safe (no ionizing radiation), portable, easily repeatable, and cheap form of imaging compared to other imaging modalities. US is an excellent imaging modality to determine the nature of a mass lesion (cystic or solid) and its anatomic relation to adjoining structures. Masses can be characterized in terms of their size, number, component, and vascularity with US and Doppler US especially with power Doppler US. US, however, is operator dependent and has a number of artifacts that can result in misinterpretation. In this review, we emphasize the role of ultrasound, particularly power Doppler, in superficial soft-tissue lesions. PMID:24744969

  13. A review on ultrasound-based thyroid cancer tissue characterization and automated classification.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U R; Swapna, G; Sree, S V; Molinari, F; Gupta, S; Bardales, R H; Witkowska, A; Suri, J S

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we review the different studies that developed Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) for automated classification of thyroid cancer into benign and malignant types. Specifically, we discuss the different types of features that are used to study and analyze the differences between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. These features can be broadly categorized into (a) the sonographic features from the ultrasound images, and (b) the non-clinical features extracted from the ultrasound images using statistical and data mining techniques. We also present a brief description of the commonly used classifiers in ultrasound based CAD systems. We then review the studies that used features based on the ultrasound images for thyroid nodule classification and highlight the limitations of such studies. We also discuss and review the techniques used in studies that used the non-clinical features for thyroid nodule classification and report the classification accuracies obtained in these studies. PMID:24206204

  14. Radio Frequency Ultrasound Time Series Signal Analysis to Evaluate High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesion Formation Status in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Saeedeh; Behnam, Hamid; Rangraz, Parisa; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel treatment modality used by scientists and clinicians in the recent decades. This modality has had a great and significant success as a noninvasive surgery technique applicable in tissue ablation therapy and cancer treatment. In this study, radio frequency (RF) ultrasound signals were acquired and registered in three stages of before, during, and after HIFU exposures. Different features of RF time series signals including the sum of amplitude spectrum in the four quarters of the frequency range, the slope, and intercept of the best-fit line to the entire power spectrum and the Shannon entropy were utilized to distinguish between the HIFU-induced thermal lesion and the normal tissue. We also examined the RF data, frame by frame to identify exposure effects on the formation and characteristics of a HIFU thermal lesion at different time steps throughout the treatment. The results obtained showed that the spectrum frequency quarters and the slope and intercept of the best fit line to the entire power spectrum both increased two times during the HIFU exposures. The Shannon entropy, however, decreased after the exposures. In conclusion, different characteristics of RF time series signal possess promising features that can be used to characterize ablated and nonablated tissues and to distinguish them from each other in a quasi-quantitative fashion. PMID:27186536

  15. Radio Frequency Ultrasound Time Series Signal Analysis to Evaluate High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesion Formation Status in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Saeedeh; Behnam, Hamid; Rangraz, Parisa; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel treatment modality used by scientists and clinicians in the recent decades. This modality has had a great and significant success as a noninvasive surgery technique applicable in tissue ablation therapy and cancer treatment. In this study, radio frequency (RF) ultrasound signals were acquired and registered in three stages of before, during, and after HIFU exposures. Different features of RF time series signals including the sum of amplitude spectrum in the four quarters of the frequency range, the slope, and intercept of the best-fit line to the entire power spectrum and the Shannon entropy were utilized to distinguish between the HIFU-induced thermal lesion and the normal tissue. We also examined the RF data, frame by frame to identify exposure effects on the formation and characteristics of a HIFU thermal lesion at different time steps throughout the treatment. The results obtained showed that the spectrum frequency quarters and the slope and intercept of the best fit line to the entire power spectrum both increased two times during the HIFU exposures. The Shannon entropy, however, decreased after the exposures. In conclusion, different characteristics of RF time series signal possess promising features that can be used to characterize ablated and nonablated tissues and to distinguish them from each other in a quasi-quantitative fashion. PMID:27186536

  16. High resolution ultrasound elastomicroscopy imaging of soft tissues: system development and feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. P.; Bridal, S. L.; Shi, J.; Saied, A.; Lu, M. H.; Jaffre, B.; Mak, A. F. T.; Laugier, P.

    2004-09-01

    Research in elasticity imaging typically relies on 1-10 MHz ultrasound. Elasticity imaging at these frequencies can provide strain maps with a resolution in the order of millimetres, but this is not sufficient for applications to skin, articular cartilage or other fine structures. We developed a prototype high resolution elastomicroscopy system consisting of a 50 MHz ultrasound backscatter microscope system and a calibrated compression device using a load cell to measure the pressure applied to the specimen, which was installed between a rigidly fixed face-plate and a specimen platform. Radiofrequency data were acquired in a B-scan format (10 mm wide × 3 mm deep) in specimens of mouse skin and bovine patellar cartilage. The scanning resolution along the B-scan plane direction was 50 µm, and the ultrasound signals were digitized at 500 MHz to achieve a sensitivity better than 1 µm for the axial displacement measurement. Because of elevated attenuation of ultrasound at high frequencies, special consideration was necessary to design a face-plate permitting efficient ultrasound transmission into the specimen and relative uniformity of the compression. Best results were obtained using a thin plastic film to cover a specially shaped slit in the face-plate. Local tissue strain maps were constructed by applying a cross-correlation tracking method to signals obtained at the same site at different compression levels. The speed of sound in the tissue specimen (1589.8 ± 7.8 m s-1 for cartilage and 1532.4 ± 4.4 m s-1 for skin) was simultaneously measured during the compression test. Preliminary results demonstrated that this ultrasound elastomicroscopy technique was able to map deformations of the skin and articular cartilage specimens to high resolution, in the order of 50 µm. This system can also be potentially used for the assessment of other biological tissues, bioengineered tissues or biomaterials with fine structures.

  17. Realization of a poro-elastic ultrasound replica of pulmonary tissue.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Andrea; Vinci, Bruna; Tirella, Annalisa; Matteucci, Marco; Gargani, Luna; Ahluwalia, Arti; Domenici, Claudio; Picano, Eugenio; Chiarelli, Piero

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe the fabrication of a biocompatible hydrophilic scaffold composed of cross-linked gelatin that mimics the porous three-dimensional structure of pulmonary tissue as well as its water content and mechanical properties. The lung replica also reproduces the characteristic sonographic signs of pulmonary interstitial syndrome, the B-lines or ultrasound lung comets. PMID:23507784

  18. Estimating Cell Concentration in Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues using High Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Karla P.; Helguera, Marίa; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Histology and biochemical assays are standard techniques for estimating cell concentration in engineered tissues. However, these techniques are destructive and cannot be used for longitudinal monitoring of engineered tissues during fabrication processes. The goal of this study was to develop high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques to nondestructively estimate cell concentration in three-dimensional (3-D) engineered tissue constructs. High-frequency ultrasound backscatter measurements were obtained from cell-embedded, 3-D agarose hydrogels. Two broadband single-element transducers (center frequencies of 30 and 38 MHz) were employed over the frequency range of 13 to 47 MHz. Agarose gels with cell concentrations ranging from 1×104 to 1×106 cells mL−1 were investigated. The integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), a quantitative ultrasound spectral parameter, was calculated and used to estimate cell concentration. Accuracy and precision of this technique were analyzed by calculating the percent error and coefficient of variation of cell concentration estimates. The IBC increased linearly with increasing cell concentration. Axial and lateral dimensions of regions of interest that resulted in errors of less than 20% were determined. Images of cell concentration estimates were employed to visualize quantitatively regional differences in cell concentrations. This ultrasound technique provides the capability to rapidly quantify cell concentration within 3-D tissue constructs noninvasively and nondestructively. PMID:24627179

  19. Ultrasound screening of periarticular soft tissue abnormality around metal-on-metal bearings.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Takashi; Sakai, Takashi; Takao, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Although metal hypersensitivity or pseudotumors are concerns for metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings, detailed pathologies of patterns, severity, and incidence of periprosthetic soft tissue lesions are incompletely understood. We examined the potential of ultrasound for screening of periarticular soft tissue lesions around MoM bearings. Ultrasound examinations were conducted in 88 hips (79 patients) with MoM hip resurfacings or MoM total hip arthroplasties with a large femoral head. Four qualitative ultrasound patterns were shown, including normal pattern in 69 hips, joint-expansion pattern in 11 hips, cystic pattern in 5 hips, and mass pattern in 3 hips. Hips with the latter 3 abnormal patterns showed significantly higher frequency of clinical symptoms, without significant differences of sex, duration of implantation, head sizes, and cup abduction/anteversion angles, compared with hips with normal pattern. Ultrasound examination provides sensitive screening of soft tissue reactions around MoM bearings and may be useful in monitoring progression and defining treatment for periarticular soft tissue abnormalities. PMID:22047978

  20. High intensity focused ultrasound as a tool for tissue engineering: Application to cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nover, Adam B; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Wang, Shutao; O'Connell, Grace D; Ateshian, Gerard A; Konofagou, Elisa E; Hung, Clark T

    2016-02-01

    This article promotes the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) as a tool for affecting the local properties of tissue engineered constructs in vitro. HIFU is a low cost, non-invasive technique used for eliciting focal thermal elevations at variable depths within tissues. HIFU can be used to denature proteins within constructs, leading to decreased permeability and potentially increased local stiffness. Adverse cell viability effects remain restricted to the affected area. The methods described in this article are explored through the scope of articular cartilage tissue engineering and the fabrication of osteochondral constructs, but may be applied to the engineering of a variety of different tissues. PMID:26724968

  1. Can pulsed ultrasound increase tissue damage during ischemia? A study of the effects of ultrasound on infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium in anesthetized pigs

    PubMed Central

    Olivecrona, Göran K; Härdig, Bjarne Madsen; Roijer, Anders; Block, Mattias; Grins, Edgars; Persson, Hans W; Johansson, Leif; Olsson, Bertil

    2005-01-01

    Background The same mechanisms by which ultrasound enhances thrombolysis are described in connection with non-beneficial effects of ultrasound. The present safety study was therefore designed to explore effects of beneficial ultrasound characteristics on the infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium. Methods In an open chest porcine model (n = 17), myocardial infarction was induced by ligating a coronary diagonal branch. Pulsed ultrasound of frequency 1 MHz and intensity 0.1 W/cm2 (ISATA) was applied during one hour to both infarcted and non-infarcted myocardial tissue. These ultrasound characteristics are similar to those used in studies of ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Using blinded assessment technique, myocardial damage was rated according to histopathological criteria. Results Infarcted myocardium exhibited a significant increase in damage score compared to non-infarcted myocardium: 6.2 ± 2.0 vs. 4.3 ± 1.5 (mean ± standard deviation), (p = 0.004). In the infarcted myocardium, ultrasound exposure yielded a further significant increase of damage scores: 8.1 ± 1.7 vs. 6.2 ± 2.0 (p = 0.027). Conclusion Our results suggest an instantaneous additive effect on the ischemic damage in myocardial tissue when exposed to ultrasound of stated characteristics. The ultimate damage degree remains to be clarified. PMID:15831106

  2. Localized Ablation of Thyroid Tissue by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: an Alternative to Surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esnault, Olivier; Franc, Brigitte; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lacoste, Francois

    2006-05-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device to obtain a localised destruction of the thyroid with no damage to adjacent tissues. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The ewe model was used because its thyroid gland is easily accessible with ultrasound. The animals were anaesthetised with 10 mg / kg IV injection of Penthothal. The HIFU pulses were generated by a 3-MHz spherical transducer under ultrasound guidance. Macroscopic and microscopic tissue lesions were identified after formalin fixation of the anterior part of the ewe's neck. RESULTS: After determining the optimal instrument settings to obtain localized thyroid ablation, the repeatability of the method was evaluated using a HIFU prototype designed specifically for human use: in 13 ewes (26 treated lobes), an average of 20 (range: 14-27) ultrasound pulses (pulse duration: 3 s) per lobe covering a mean volume of 0.5 cm3 (range: 0.3-0.7 cm3) were delivered. The ewes were sacrificed 2-5 weeks after treatment delivery. No damage to the nerves, trachea, esophagus or muscle was observed. Only 3 ewes suffered superficial skin burns. The desired thyroid lesions were obtained in 25/26 treated lobes, as demonstrated by fibrotic tissues, which replaced necrotic areas. CONCLUSION: These results obtained in the ewe model show that thyroid lesions of defined volume can be induced safely and suggest that the HIFU device is now ready for human trials.

  3. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Canney, Michael S.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound. PMID:22088025

  4. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound. PMID:22088025

  5. Dependence of ultrasound echo decorrelation on local tissue temperature during ex vivo radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Swetha; Schmidt, Daniel T.; Rao, Marepalli B.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates echo decorrelation imaging, an ultrasound method for thermal ablation monitoring. The effect of tissue temperature on the mapped echo decorrelation parameter was assessed in radiofrequency ablation experiments performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Echo decorrelation maps were compared with corresponding tissue temperatures simulated using the finite element method. For both echo decorrelation imaging and integrated backscatter imaging, the mapped tissue parameters correlated significantly but weakly with local tissue temperature. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the ability of echo decorrelation and integrated backscatter to predict tissue temperature greater than 40, 60, and 80 °C. Significantly higher area under the ROC curve (AUROC) values were obtained for prediction of tissue temperatures greater than 40, 60, and 80 ° C using echo decorrelation imaging (AUROC =0.871,~0.948 and 0.966) compared to integrated backscatter imaging (AUROC =0.865,~0.877 and 0.832).

  6. Dependence of ultrasound echo decorrelation on local tissue temperature during ex vivo radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Schmidt, Daniel T; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2016-03-21

    This study investigates echo decorrelation imaging, an ultrasound method for thermal ablation monitoring. The effect of tissue temperature on the mapped echo decorrelation parameter was assessed in radiofrequency ablation experiments performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Echo decorrelation maps were compared with corresponding tissue temperatures simulated using the finite element method. For both echo decorrelation imaging and integrated backscatter imaging, the mapped tissue parameters correlated significantly but weakly with local tissue temperature. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the ability of echo decorrelation and integrated backscatter to predict tissue temperature greater than 40, 60, and 80 °C. Significantly higher area under the ROC curve (AUROC) values were obtained for prediction of tissue temperatures greater than 40, 60, and 80 ° C using echo decorrelation imaging (AUROC [Formula: see text] and 0.966) compared to integrated backscatter imaging (AUROC [Formula: see text] and 0.832). PMID:26943026

  7. Mechanical Model Analysis for Quantitative Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Based on Ultrasound Tissue Elasticity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Maki, Tomonori; Yamakawa, Makoto; Mitake, Tsuyoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    Precise evaluation of the stage of chronic hepatitis C with respect to fibrosis has become an important issue to prevent the occurrence of cirrhosis and to initiate appropriate therapeutic intervention such as viral eradication using interferon. Ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, i.e., elastography can visualize tissue hardness/softness, and its clinical usefulness has been studied to detect and evaluate tumors. We have recently reported that the texture of elasticity image changes as fibrosis progresses. To evaluate fibrosis progression quantitatively on the basis of ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, we introduced a mechanical model of fibrosis progression and simulated the process by which hepatic fibrosis affects elasticity images and compared the results with those clinical data analysis. As a result, it was confirmed that even in diffuse diseases like chronic hepatitis, the patterns of elasticity images are related to fibrous structural changes caused by hepatic disease and can be used to derive features for quantitative evaluation of fibrosis stage.

  8. The effects of ultrasound and alternating current on the laser penetration in the tissue.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Munqith Saleem

    2016-07-01

    The visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) lasers are now widely used in therapeutic and other medical applications. Some of these applications require to deliver the laser energy deep toward the desired tissue target or organ. The aim of this in vitro study is to investigate practically whether the modulation of laser energy by employing the therapeutic ultrasound or electrical energies can increase the penetration depth of the laser light inside the tissue. Such modulation was implemented in this study by coupling the (c.w.) diode and Nd:YAG laser energies with the ultrasound or AC current simultaneously as they pass through preprepared ex vivo bovine muscular tissue strips. Two wavelengths of diode lasers were used, 637 and 808 nm beside the 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. The results showed a noticeable decrease of these laser attenuation factors as they pass through the tissue strips in the presence of the ultrasound or AC energies. By using this coupling modulation, the capability of increasing the laser penetration depths inside the tissue was confirmed without having to increase their applied power. PMID:27098338

  9. Mathematical modeling of ultrasound in tissue engineering: From bioreactors to the cellular scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louw, Tobias M.

    Tissue engineering seeks to provide a means to treat injuries that are beyond the body's natural ability to repair without the issues associated with allografts. Autologous cells are cultured in a bioreactor which controls the cellular environment (including mechanical stimulation) for optimal tissue growth. We investigate ultrasound as an effective means of mechanical stimulation by predicting the ultrasonic field in a bioreactor, as well as ultrasonic bioeffects at the cellular level. The Transfer Matrix Angular Spectrum Approach was found to be the most accurate and computationally efficient bioreactor model. Three critical factors influence experimental results: (1) the diameter of the tissue engineering scaffold greatly affects the ultrasonic field; (2) the position of the ultrasonic transducer and liquid level in the tissue culture well determines the maximum pressure amplitude in the bioreactor, but the pressure can be controlled by measuring the transducer input electrical impedance and manipulating the applied voltage; and (3) the position of pressure nodes are influenced by ultrasonic frequency and liquid level; this will affect the response of cells to applied ultrasound. On the cellular level, it was shown that chondrocytes respond to ultrasound with frequency dependence. A predicted resonance frequency near 5MHz matched experimental results showing maximum expression of load inducible genes at 5MHz. Mechanical stresses are concentrated near the nucleus at resonance, alluding to the possibility that the nucleus may directly sense ultrasonic stimulation. We postulate that ultrasound influences the transport of p-ERK to the nucleus or causes minor chromatin reorganization, leading to the observed frequency dependent gene expression. We linked in vitro ultrasonic stimulation to in vivo mechanical stimulation generated by natural movement. The chondrocyte's response to impact is under-damped, and the cell oscillates with a frequency close to the model

  10. Heterogeneous Tissue Characterization Using Ultrasound: A Comparison of Fractal Analysis Backscatter Models on Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Al-Kadi, Omar S; Chung, Daniel Y F; Coussios, Constantin C; Noble, J Alison

    2016-07-01

    Assessment of tumor tissue heterogeneity via ultrasound has recently been suggested as a method for predicting early response to treatment. The ultrasound backscattering characteristics can assist in better understanding the tumor texture by highlighting the local concentration and spatial arrangement of tissue scatterers. However, it is challenging to quantify the various tissue heterogeneities ranging from fine to coarse of the echo envelope peaks in tumor texture. Local parametric fractal features extracted via maximum likelihood estimation from five well-known statistical model families are evaluated for the purpose of ultrasound tissue characterization. The fractal dimension (self-similarity measure) was used to characterize the spatial distribution of scatterers, whereas the lacunarity (sparsity measure) was applied to determine scatterer number density. Performance was assessed based on 608 cross-sectional clinical ultrasound radiofrequency images of liver tumors (230 and 378 representing respondent and non-respondent cases, respectively). Cross-validation via leave-one-tumor-out and with different k-fold methodologies using a Bayesian classifier was employed for validation. The fractal properties of the backscattered echoes based on the Nakagami model (Nkg) and its extend four-parameter Nakagami-generalized inverse Gaussian (NIG) distribution achieved best results-with nearly similar performance-in characterizing liver tumor tissue. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of Nkg/NIG were 85.6%/86.3%, 94.0%/96.0% and 73.0%/71.0%, respectively. Other statistical models, such as the Rician, Rayleigh and K-distribution, were found to not be as effective in characterizing subtle changes in tissue texture as an indication of response to treatment. Employing the most relevant and practical statistical model could have potential consequences for the design of an early and effective clinical therapy. PMID:27056610

  11. Observation of a cavitation cloud in tissue using correlation between ultrafast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan; Souchon, Rémi; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-07-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup in which two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short excitation bursts, the evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. The frame rate of the system is several thousands of images per second, which provides several tens of images between consecutive excitation bursts. Using the correlation between consecutive images for speckle tracking, a decorrelation of the imaging signal appears due to the creation, fast movement, and dissolution of the bubbles in the cavitation cloud. By analyzing this area of decorrelation, the cavitation cloud can be localized and the spatial extent of the cavitation activity characterized. PMID:26168172

  12. Tracking the deformation of a tissue phantom induced by ultrasound-driven bubble oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinguely, M.; Matar, O. K.; Garbin, V.

    2015-12-01

    Microbubbles are used as contrast agents in ultrasound medical imaging. Once the microbubbles are injected into the body, they flow through the vascular system, confined by viscoelastic boundaries. The proximity of the boundaries affects the dynamics of the bubbles in ultrasound, in a manner that depends on the boundary's viscoelastic properties. Experiments on violently collapsing bubbles have revealed the dynamics of deformation of blood vessel walls. However, the deformation field induced by a bubble undergoing small-amplitude oscillations, relevant for ultrasound imaging, is difficult to access in experiment, and has not been reported yet. We present an experimental method to measure the deformation field induced by a bubble oscillating inside a microchannel within a tissue phantom. We use high-speed video microscopy to track the displacement of tracer particles embedded in the phantom, along with the dynamics of the bubble.

  13. Ultrasound elastography assessment of bone/soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Biren J.; Yang, Xu; Chaudhry, Anuj; Shafeeq Shajudeen, Peer; Nair, Sanjay P.; Weiner, Bradley K.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Righetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of elastographic imaging techniques to assess the bone/soft tissue interface, a region that has not been previously investigated but may provide important information about fracture and bone healing. The performance of axial strain elastograms and axial shear strain elastograms at the bone/soft tissue interface was studied ex vivo on intact and fractured canine and ovine tibias. Selected ex vivo results were corroborated on intact sheep tibias in vivo. The elastography results were statistically analyzed using elastographic image quality tools. The results of this study demonstrate distinct patterns in the distribution of the normalized local axial strains and axial shear strains at the bone/soft tissue interface with respect to the background soft tissue. They also show that the relative strength and distribution of the elastographic parameters change in the presence of a fracture and depend on the degree of misalignment between the fracture fragments. Thus, elastographic imaging modalities might be used in the future to obtain information regarding the integrity of bones and to assess the severity of fractures, alignment of bone fragments as well as to follow bone healing.

  14. [The efficacy of ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block with hockey stick typed probe].

    PubMed

    Iwase, Naoto; Fukui, Hidekimi; Yuunaiyama, Youko; Kaneko, Kouki; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block with a hockey stick typed probe in plane approach. Individual difference of infraorbital anatomy makes it difficult to puncture the infraorbital for a man, and the risks include bleeding, double vision and paranasal sinus puncture. The advantage of ultrasound-guided nerve block has been reported. Compared with conventional land mark method approach, ultrasound technique is thought to be easy to perform, more quickly and safely without any complications. From our results, we have demonstrated that ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block assisted by hockey stick typed probe could become one of the safe methods for this purpose. PMID:24228458

  15. Noninvasive surgery of prostate tissue by high-intensity focused ultrasound: an updated report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Syrus, J.; Foster, Richard S.; Bihrle, Richard; Casey, Richard W.; Uchida, Toyoak

    2000-05-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and it is experimentally applied for the treatment of localized prostate caner (PC). Recent advances in the transducer material and technology have permitted to combine the ultrasound visualization capability and HIFU on the same ceramic crystal. Also, the transducer efficiency has increased to a level that a smaller size intracavity probe can be made to produce sufficient acoustic power required for the focused ultrasound surgery of the prostate. Using this technology, 4 MHz mechanically scanning transrectal ultrasound probes has been designed. The transrectal probes are used with Sonablate (SB-200, manufactured by Focus Surgery, Inc., Indianapolis, IN) device. The SB-200 produces both transverse and longitudinal images of the prostate. The transverse and longitudinal images are used for selection of tissue volume, treatment planning and monitoring of tissue during the HIFU treatment cycle. The paper reviews the present operation of the device and recent clinical protocol that has improved efficiency, efficacy and safety of the device. The two years follow-up clinical results from the multi-site US Pilot Study (USPS) and The Male Health Centre are compared with the Kitasato-study (Kitasato School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Japan).

  16. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to make images of organs and structures inside ... examined. The machine sends out high-frequency sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives ...

  17. Optimization of contrast resolution by genetic algorithm in ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ménigot, Sébastien; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-01

    The development of ultrasound imaging techniques such as pulse inversion has improved tissue harmonic imaging. Nevertheless, no recommendation has been made to date for the design of the waveform transmitted through the medium being explored. Our aim was therefore to find automatically the optimal "imaging" wave which maximized the contrast resolution without a priori information. To overcome assumption regarding the waveform, a genetic algorithm investigated the medium thanks to the transmission of stochastic "explorer" waves. Moreover, these stochastic signals could be constrained by the type of generator available (bipolar or arbitrary). To implement it, we changed the current pulse inversion imaging system by including feedback. Thus the method optimized the contrast resolution by adaptively selecting the samples of the excitation. In simulation, we benchmarked the contrast effectiveness of the best found transmitted stochastic commands and the usual fixed-frequency command. The optimization method converged quickly after around 300 iterations in the same optimal area. These results were confirmed experimentally. In the experimental case, the contrast resolution measured on a radiofrequency line could be improved by 6% with a bipolar generator and it could still increase by 15% with an arbitrary waveform generator. PMID:27403642

  18. Effects of Ultrasound Frequency and Tissue Stiffness on the Histotripsy Intrinsic Threshold for Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew; Mancia, Lauren; Singh, Rahul; Putnam, Andrew J.; Fowlkes, Brian; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Previous work has demonstrated a cavitation cloud can be formed by a single pulse with one high amplitude negative cycle, when the negative pressure amplitude directly exceeds a pressure threshold intrinsic to the medium. We hypothesize that the intrinsic threshold in water-based tissues is determined by the properties of the water inside the tissue and changes in tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency will have a minimal impact on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold. To test this hypothesis, the histotripsy intrinsic threshold was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The probability of cavitation was measured by subjecting tissue phantoms with adjustable mechanical properties and ex vivo tissues to a histotripsy pulse of 1–2 cycles produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. Cavitation was detected and characterized by passive cavitation detection and high-speed photography, from which the probability of cavitation was measured vs. pressure amplitude. The results demonstrated that the intrinsic threshold (the negative pressure at which probability=0.5) is independent of stiffness for Young’s moduli (E) < 1 MPa with only a small increase (~2–3 MPa) in the intrinsic threshold for tendon (E=380 MPa). Additionally, results for all samples showed only a small increase of ~2–3 MPa when the frequency was increased from 345 kHz to 3 MHz. The intrinsic threshold was measured to be between 24.7–30.6 MPa for all samples and frequencies tested in this study. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the intrinsic threshold to initiate a histotripsy bubble cloud is not significantly impacted by tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency in hundreds of kHz to MHz range. PMID:25766571

  19. Effects of Tissue Stiffness, Ultrasound Frequency, and Pressure on Histotripsy-induced Cavitation Bubble Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 microns. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness causes a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  20. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  1. Ultrasound-based transient elastography compared to magnetic resonance elastography in soft tissue-mimicking gels.

    PubMed

    Oudry, Jennifer; Vappou, Jonathan; Choquet, Philippe; Willinger, Rémy; Sandrin, Laurent; Constantinesco, André

    2009-11-21

    Ultrasound-based transient elastography (TE) and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) are increasingly used methods for the clinical evaluation of soft tissue mechanical properties and their alteration under diseased conditions. This study proposes a comparison between magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and ultrasound-based transient elastography (TE). Both methods were tested on the same soft tissue-mimicking gels in a common frequency range in order to allow for direct quantitative comparison. For the four gels tested, relatively good agreement was found between the shear moduli measured by both methods, with an averaged relative difference of 23%. This study demonstrates that under the assumption of homogeneous media that are significantly more elastic than viscous, quantitative results obtained by both methods are comparable. PMID:19887718

  2. Novel tissue mimicking materials for high frequency breast ultrasound phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Louise M; Fagan, Andrew J; Browne, Jacinta E

    2011-01-01

    The development and acoustical characterisation of a range of novel agar-based tissue mimicking material (TMMs) for use in clinically relevant, quality assurance (QA) and anthropomorphic breast phantoms are presented. The novel agar-based TMMs described in this study are based on a comprehensive, systematic variation of the ingredients in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) TMM. A novel, solid fat-mimicking material was also developed and acoustically characterised. Acoustical characterisation was carried out using an in-house scanning acoustic macroscope at low (7.5 MHz) and high frequencies (20 MHz), using the pulse-echo insertion technique. The speeds of sound range from 1490 to 1570 m. s(-1), attenuation coefficients range from 0.1 to 0.9 dB. cm(‑1). MHz(-1) and relative backscatter ranges from 0 to -20 dB. It was determined that tissues can be mimicked in terms of independently controllable speeds of sound and attenuation coefficients. These properties make these novel TMMs suitable for use in clinically relevant QA and anthropomorphic phantoms and would potentially be useful for other high frequency applications such as intravascular and small animal imaging. PMID:21084158

  3. Ultrasound Tissue-Mimicking Materials using Oil Gel and Measurement of Their Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Toshio; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2002-05-01

    Ultrasound tissue-mimicking material using oil gel for a phantom is proposed. As the material has advantages in that bacteria do not propagate in it and organic liquids contained in it tend not to evaporate, its characteristics are stable with time. The oil gel is manufactured from ethylene glycol and propylene glycol or polypropylene glycol. The sound velocities and the densities of the organic materials for making the oil gel are measured for evaluation of phantom materials.

  4. Nonlinearity parameter B/A of biological tissue ultrasound imaging in echo mode

    SciTech Connect

    Toulemonde, M. Varray, F.; Bernard, A.; Basset, O.; Cachard, C.

    2015-10-28

    The nonlinearity B/A parameter influences the distortion of ultrasound waves during their propagation in tissue. Normal and pathological media have different B/A values and this parameter may be used to characterize them. In this paper the multitaper coherent plane wave compounding (MCPWC) is combined with the extended comparative method (ECM) to estimate the B/A parameter in simulation and acquisition. Using plane wave transmission and orthogonal apodization during beam forming improves the B/A estimation and delineation.

  5. Nonlinearity parameter B/A of biological tissue ultrasound imaging in echo mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulemonde, M.; Varray, F.; Bernard, A.; Basset, O.; Cachard, C.

    2015-10-01

    The nonlinearity B/A parameter influences the distortion of ultrasound waves during their propagation in tissue. Normal and pathological media have different B/A values and this parameter may be used to characterize them. In this paper the multitaper coherent plane wave compounding (MCPWC) is combined with the extended comparative method (ECM) to estimate the B/A parameter in simulation and acquisition. Using plane wave transmission and orthogonal apodization during beam forming improves the B/A estimation and delineation.

  6. Mechanical high-intensity focused ultrasound destruction of soft tissue: working mechanisms and physiologic effects.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan; den Brok, Martijn H; Heerschap, Arend; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-06-01

    The best known method of high-intensity focused ultrasound is thermal ablation, but interest in non-thermal, mechanical destruction is increasing. The advantages of mechanical ablation are that thermal protein denaturation remains limited and less damage is created to the surrounding tissue by thermal diffusion. The two main techniques for mechanical fragmentation of tissue are histotripsy and boiling histotripsy. These techniques can be used for complete liquefaction of tumor tissue into submicron fragments, after which the fragmented tissue can be easily removed by natural (immunologic) responses. Interestingly it seems that there is a correlation between the degree of destruction and tissue specific characteristics based on the treatment settings used. In this review article, the technical aspects of these two techniques are described, and an overview of the in vivo pathologic and immunologic responses is provided. PMID:25813532

  7. EGFP gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction

    PubMed Central

    JING, XIANG-XIANG; LIU, JIE; YANG, BING-ANG; FU, SHAO-QING; WU, TANG-NA; WANG, DONG-LIN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of enhancing green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction. An optimal SonoVue dose was determined using 40 normal rats categorized into five groups according to the various doses of microbubbles used. At 1 week after ultrasound irradiation, the rats were sacrificed. Damage to the joint synovial tissues was observed with hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining under a microscope. A further 44 normal rats were used to establish a rat model of RA, and were then categorized into four groups: EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP, microbubbles + EGFP and ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP. The last group was irradiated with ultrasound for 10 min following the injection of 300 μl SonoVue and 10 μg EGFP into the joint cavity. Rats were sacrificed after 3 days and synovial tissue was collected from the knee joints for observation of EGFP with fluorescence microscopy and analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. EGFP expression was observed in the synovial tissues of all groups. However, high EGFP expression levels were observed in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed in the EGFP expression levels between the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups. However, EGFP expression levels in the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups significantly differed (P<0.05) from that in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. Therefore, ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction improved EGFP transfection efficiency into the joint synovial tissues of rats with RA. PMID:24940446

  8. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  9. Ultrasound tissue characterization: Comparison of statistical results using fundamental and harmonic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fanglue; Cristea, Anca; Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging has been studied for decades to characterize biological tissue. The QUS estimates can be obtained from the envelope statistics. Previous studies are mainly based on the whole backscattered signals analysis. The present study compares the statistics of filtered fundamental and harmonic signal envelopes. Results show that the statistical estimation using second-harmonic envelops can provide tissue characterization capabilities, similarly to the one obtained with the fundamental. In addition, the parameters are also related to the non-linear property of the investigated medium.

  10. A simplified training method for soft tissue foreign body detection using ultrasound in emergency medicine residency program

    PubMed Central

    Farahmand, Shervin; Mehran, Sadjad; Arbab, Mona; Khazaeipour, Zahra; Basir-Ghafouri, Hamed; Saeedi, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Using ultrasound for detecting soft tissue foreign bodies seems to be the preferred choice with minimum invasion and easy availability at the bedside in emergency departments. In this study, a workshop (1 hour of lecture presentation and 3 hours of interactive hands-on) was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a short course of simple interactive training to improve the ability of emergency medicine residents to detect foreign bodies with ultrasound. Eight pieces of fresh full thickness (10 × 10 × 10 cm) lamb leg muscle were used in this study. Five different types of foreign bodies, including: a piece of glass (5 × 5 × 4 mm), wood (5 × 5 × 4 mm), gravel (5 mm diameter), plastic (5 × 5 × 2 mm) and a nail (25 mm in length) were placed deep inside each lamb leg. An ultrasound machine with a 7.5 MHz linear probe was used in this study. 35 emergency medicine residents (12 PGY1, 11 PGY2 and 12 PGY3) were enrolled in this study. Pretest and post-test results were compared and analyzed. Among all 35 participants in the training session, foreign body detection was significantly improved after the workshop (p < 0.001). Overall sensitivity and specificity for differentiating the presence and absence of a foreign body with 95% confidence were 60% (75% for PGY3) and 85.7% (91.7% for PGY3), respectively. The overall accuracy increased from 20.2% to 72.8% due to this session. This study supported the possibility of using ultrasound to detect foreign bodies by emergency physicians with a very short training course. This is highly beneficial for overcrowded emergency departments.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Elevation in Soft Tissue by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il; Sim, Imbo; Kang, Gwan Suk; Choi, Min Joo

    In focused ultrasound surgery, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to destroy pathological tissue deep inside the body without any damage to the surrounding normal tissue. This noninvasive technique has been used to treat malignant tumors of the liver, prostate, kidney, and benign breast tumors via a percutaneous or transrectal approach without the need for general anaesthesia. In the present study, a finite element method was used for the simulation of temperature elevation in soft tissue by HIFU. First, the HIFU field was modeled using the Westervelt equation for the propagation of finite-amplitude sound in a thermoviscous fluid in order to account for the effects of diffraction, absorption, and nonlinearity. Second, the Pennes bioheat transfer equation was used to predict the temperature elevation in soft tissue by HIFU. In order to verify the numerical simulation, the simulated temperature elevation at the focus in a tissue-mimicking phantom was compared with the measurements, using a concave focused transducer with a focal length of 62.6 mm, a radius of 35.0 mm, and a center frequency of 1.1 MHz.

  12. Ultrasound evidence of altered lumbar connective tissue structure in human subjects with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the connective tissues forming the fascial planes of the back have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic low back pain (LBP), there have been no previous studies quantitatively evaluating connective tissue structure in this condition. The goal of this study was to perform an ultrasound-based comparison of perimuscular connective tissue structure in the lumbar region in a group of human subjects with chronic or recurrent LBP for more than 12 months, compared with a group of subjects without LBP. Methods In each of 107 human subjects (60 with LBP and 47 without LBP), parasagittal ultrasound images were acquired bilaterally centered on a point 2 cm lateral to the midpoint of the L2-3 interspinous ligament. The outcome measures based on these images were subcutaneous and perimuscular connective tissue thickness and echogenicity measured by ultrasound. Results There were no significant differences in age, sex, body mass index (BMI) or activity levels between LBP and No-LBP groups. Perimuscular thickness and echogenicity were not correlated with age but were positively correlated with BMI. The LBP group had ~25% greater perimuscular thickness and echogenicity compared with the No-LBP group (ANCOVA adjusted for BMI, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusion This is the first report of abnormal connective tissue structure in the lumbar region in a group of subjects with chronic or recurrent LBP. This finding was not attributable to differences in age, sex, BMI or activity level between groups. Possible causes include genetic factors, abnormal movement patterns and chronic inflammation. PMID:19958536

  13. Coregistered three-dimensional ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system for ovarian tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Andres; Guo, Puyun; Gamelin, John; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary M.; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers, with a five-year survival rate of only 30% or less. Current imaging techniques are limited in sensitivity and specificity in detecting early stage ovarian cancer prior to its widespread metastasis. New imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed to reduce the high mortality of this disease. One such promising technique is photoacoustic imaging. We develop a 1280-element coregistered 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system based on a 1.75-D acoustic array. Volumetric images over a scan range of 80 deg in azimuth and 20 deg in elevation can be achieved in minutes. The system has been used to image normal porcine ovarian tissue. This is an important step toward better understanding of ovarian cancer optical properties obtained with photoacoustic techniques. To the best of our knowledge, such data are not available in the literature. We present characterization measurements of the system and compare coregistered ultrasound and photoacoustic images of ovarian tissue to histological images. The results show excellent coregistration of ultrasound and photoacoustic images. Strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea and low absorption from follicles, is demonstrated. PMID:19895116

  14. Quantitative assessment of photoacoustic tomography systems integrating clinical ultrasound transducers using novel tissue-simulating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) systems based on commercial ultrasound instruments have the benefit of dualmodality imaging, which increases their appeal from a clinical standpoint. However, factors that influence PAT system performance have not been thoroughly investigated and standardized test methods have not been established for image quality evaluation. To address these issues we have adapted phantom-based approaches from ultrasound imaging standards and implemented them to assess a PAT system developed for vascular imaging. Our system comprises a tunable near-infrared pulsed laser and a commercial ultrasound imaging system, including four interchangeable linear array clinical ultrasound transducers with varying center frequencies, acoustic bandwidths and geometries. Phantoms consisted of a customized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisol gel that simulates both optical and acoustic properties of breast tissue. One phantom incorporates a sub-resolution filament array suitable for bimodal ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging, while another contains an array of hemoglobin-filled cylindrical inclusions at various depths. Key performance characteristics were evaluated, including spatial resolution, signal uniformity, contrast, and penetration depth. These characteristics were evaluated at 750 nm at radiant exposures below ANSI safety limits. Effects of transducer properties on imaging performance were evaluated. Axial and lateral resolution ranged from 0.27-0.83 mm and 0.28-1.8 mm, respectively, and penetration depths from 1.9-4.2 cm were achieved. These results demonstrate variation in PAT system performance based on clinical transducer selection, as well as the utility of realistic phantom-based test methods in performing benchtop evaluations of system performance.

  15. Investigation of bubble dynamics and heating during focused ultrasound insonation in tissue-mimicking materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinmai

    2003-10-01

    The deposition of ultrasonic energy in tissue can cause tissue damage due to local heating. For pressures above a critical threshold, cavitation will occur in tissue and bubbles will be created. These oscillating bubbles can induce a much larger thermal energy deposition in the local region. The present work is an attempt to control and utilize this bubble-enhanced heating. First, by applying appropriate bubble dynamic models, limits on the asymptotic bubble size distribution are obtained for different driving pressures at 1 MHz. The size distributions are bounded by two thresholds: the bubble shape instability threshold and the rectified diffusion threshold. The growth rate of bubbles in this region is also given, and the resulting time evolution of the heating in a given insonation scenario is modeled. Experimental results have been obtained to investigate the bubble-enhanced heating in an agar and graphite based tissue-mimicking material. By fitting appropriate bubble densities in the ultrasound field, the peak temperature changes observed in experiments are simulated. Finally, a simple bubbly liquid model is presented to estimate shielding effects which may be important even for low void fraction during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. Thesis advisor: R. Glynn Holt Copies of this thesis may be obtained by contacting the advisor, Glynn Holt, Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 110 Cummington St., Boston, MA 02215. E-mail address: rgholt@bu.edu

  16. Experimental high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion formation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; Kalisz, Andrew; Lee, Paul; Lizzi, Frederic; Fujikura, Kana; Otsuka, Ryo; Homma, Shunichi

    2001-05-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) (4.5-7.5 MHz) was used to form lesions in cardiac tissue, with an ultimate objective of treating conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia. Ultrasound attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined in vitro for calf myocardial tissue, both muscle and pericardial fat. These coefficients were employed in computational models of linear beam propagation, tissue heating profiles and thermal lesion formation for a variety of focused transducers. Modeling was performed for continuous and pulsed exposures. These models suggested initial power levels and exposure durations for in vitro experiments on calf ventricles and septa and ex vivo experiments on canine whole hearts. Repeatability of lesion size and placement was studied as power and exposure parameters varied around the initial values. With these experimental results, power and exposure parameters were selected to create lesions in vivo in canine ventricles and septa in open-chest, anesthetized dogs. Pulsed exposures were synchronized to cardiac and respiration cycles to ensure accurate placement of the lesions. These initial in vivo experiments showed that HIFU treatments in the beating heart are feasible; they also identified refinements that are now being implemented for better control of lesion size and placement. [Work supported by NCI and NHLBI Grant 5R01 CA84588.

  17. Ultrasound Elastography for Estimation of Regional Strain of Multilayered Hydrogels and Tissue-Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Baskaran, Harihara; Welter, Jean F; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage constructs tend to develop inhomogeneously, thus, to predict the mechanical performance of the tissue, conventional biomechanical testing, which yields average material properties, is of limited value. Rather, techniques for evaluating regional and depth-dependent properties of TE cartilage, preferably non-destructively, are required. The purpose of this study was to build upon our previous results and to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound elastography to non-destructively assess the depth-dependent biomechanical characteristics of TE cartilage while in a sterile bioreactor. As a proof-of-concept, and to standardize an assessment protocol, a well-characterized three-layered hydrogel construct was used as a surrogate for TE cartilage, and was studied under controlled incremental compressions. The strain field of the construct predicted by elastography was then validated by comparison with a poroelastic finite-element analysis (FEA). On average, the differences between the strains predicted by elastography and the FEA were within 10%. Subsequently engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated in the same test fixture. Results from these examinations showed internal regions where the local strain was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that near the surface. These studies document the feasibility of using ultrasound to evaluate the mechanical behaviors of maturing TE constructs in a sterile environment. PMID:26077987

  18. Numerical Analysis of Temperature Rise in Tissue Using Electronically Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2006-05-01

    Recently, the use of higher power ultrasonic equipment has been extended to not only therapy but also diagnosis because the new diagnostic imaging techniques, such as Doppler color flow imaging and harmonic imaging, require a higher ultrasound power than conventional imaging techniques. It is very important to ensure the safety of temperature rise caused by the absorption of ultrasound energy in new ultrasonic imaging systems. In this two-dimensional finite difference time domain-heat conduction equation study, the temperature rise in tissue has been simulated at a focal point radiated by a phased array focused transducer, such as like a common B-mode imagine system. The center frequency of radiated wave pulses is 2.5 MHz and ISPTA=0.72 W/cm2. When the sound pulse repetition frequency (PRF) is changed from 100 to 400 kHz, the temperature rise in tissue at a focal point is proportional to the PRF. The maximum temperature rise in tissue has been simulated only at 0.0004 °C at a focal point of a transducer when PRF is 400 kHz.

  19. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard) tumor and surrounding tissue (soft). The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression. PMID:27293476

  20. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard) tumor and surrounding tissue (soft). The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression. PMID:27293476

  1. Synergistic ablation of liver tissue and liver cancer cells with high-intensity focused ultrasound and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen H; Murad, Hakm Y; Ratnayaka, Sithira H; Chen, Chong; Khismatullin, Damir B

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the combined effect of ethanol and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), first, on heating and cavitation bubble activity in tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine liver tissues and, second, on the viability of HepG2 liver cancer cells. Phantoms or porcine tissues were injected with ethanol and then subjected to HIFU at acoustic power ranging from 1.2 to 20.5 W (HIFU levels 1-7). Cavitation events and the temperature around the focal zone were measured with a passive cavitation detector and embedded type K thermocouples, respectively. HepG2 cells were subjected to 4% ethanol solution in growth medium (v/v) just before the cells were exposed to HIFU at 2.7, 8.7 or 12.0 W for 30 s. Cell viability was measured 2, 24 and 72 h post-treatment. The results indicate that ethanol and HIFU have a synergistic effect on liver cancer ablation as manifested by greater temperature rise and lesion volume in liver tissues and reduced viability of liver cancer cells. This effect is likely caused by reduction of the cavitation threshold in the presence of ethanol and the increased rate of ethanol diffusion through the cell membrane caused by HIFU-induced streaming, sonoporation and heating. PMID:24798386

  2. Ultrasound and clinical evaluation of soft-tissue versus hardware biceps tenodesis: is hardware tenodesis worth the cost?

    PubMed

    Elkousy, Hussein; Romero, Jose A; Edwards, T Bradley; Gartsman, Gary M; O'Connor, Daniel P

    2014-02-01

    This study assesses the failure rate of soft-tissue versus hardware fixation of biceps tenodesis by ultrasound to determine if the expense of a hardware tenodesis technique is warranted. Seventy-two patients that underwent arthroscopic biceps tenodesis over a 3-year period were evaluated using postoperative ultrasonography and clinical examination. The tenodesis technique employed was either a soft-tissue technique with sutures or an interference screw technique using hardware based on surgeon preference. Patient age was 57.9 years on average with ultrasound and clinical examination done at an average of 9.3 months postoperatively. Thirty-one patients had a hardware technique and 41 a soft-tissue technique. Overall, 67.7% of biceps tenodesis done with hardware were intact, compared with 75.6% for the soft-tissue technique by ultrasound (P = .46). Clinical evaluation indicated that 80.7% of hardware techniques and 78% of soft-tissue techniques were intact. Average material cost to the hospital for the hardware technique was $514.32, compared with $32.05 for the soft-tissue technique. Biceps tenodesis success, as determined by clinical deformity and ultrasound, was not improved using hardware as compared to soft-tissue techniques. Soft-tissue techniques are equally efficacious and more cost effective than hardware techniques. PMID:24551861

  3. Application of the ultrasound hyperthermia model for a multi-layered tissue system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lörincz, A.

    2004-01-01

    This work models the thermal effect of several planar transducers targeting the tumour interactively in a ceramics-coupling-skin-muscle-tumour system. The most important inputs of the model include the following: emitted electric output, J/s; mechanical efficiency, %; number of transducers, pieces; surface area of the transducer, m2; area, m2 and temperature, K of the cooling surface, attenuation coefficients, Np/cm MHz; specific heats, J/gK; densities, g/cm3; heat conductivities, J/msK; sound velocities m/s; flow rate of blood in the tissues, ml/gtissue/min; sound path in the tissues and in the blood flowing through the tissues, m. From the inputs, a number of intermediate data are determined, e.g. the geometry of the irradiated bodies that are in the path of ultrasound, acoustic hardness, Pas/m; sound reflection and sound transmission occurring at the interfaces, Np; heat exchanger wall thickness of the irradiated bodies, m; heat dissipation and heat exchanger surface areas, m2; flow rate of blood in the tissues located in the path of ultrasound, ml/tissue mass in g/min; and the sound attenuation of the tissues, Np. The amount of generated heat, K/s decreased by the heat energy transported, J/s to the surrounding tissues by blood and heat conductivity, and the actual temperature, K of the irradiated tissue are the output parameters calculated by the model. The output results are available in the form of functions. The expected temperature of the target area, K can be set to either the denaturation temperature or to the respiratory decomposition temperature (43.5°C) without damaging the surrounding tissues by setting in the following parameters properly: electric output power, W; the number and surface area, m2 of the transducers; the area, m2 and temperature, K of the cooling surfaces. After further development, the model will be suitable for handling more than three tissue layers, increased blood flow rates different angles of incidence, and tumours having

  4. Harmonic Band Spectrum Analysis of Backscattered Ultrasound from Lesioned and Normal Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; Lizzi, Frederic L.; Silverman, Ronald H.

    2006-05-01

    HIFU dose curves (lesion size vs. exposure parameters) exhibit scatter because of local variations in the acoustic properties of tissue. Therefore, clinical applications of HIFU, such as cardiac and cancer ablation, will benefit from the ability to distinguish treated from normal tissue, which can provide the surgeon with lesion monitoring. However, HIFU lesions, especially protein-denaturing lesions (PDLs), may be difficult to visualize with conventional B-mode ultrasound. In this study, spectrum analysis of backscattered radiofrequency (RF) ultrasound was successful in imaging lesions. HIFU lesions were formed at 5 MHz for various intensities and durations in model tissues including degassed chicken breast in vitro, fresh rabbit liver ex vivo, and canine cardiac left ventricle in vivo. The tissues were scanned pre- and post-exposure using confocal array and single-element diagnostic probes incorporated into the HIFU transducer assembly. The diagnostic probes were excited with a monocycle pulse under conditions previously shown to generate a second harmonic comparable in amplitude to the fundamental, and RF echo-signal data were recorded. In an alternate set, the therapy and diagnostic transducers were operated pitch-catch, with the therapy transducer sending out a series of 0.4 ms pulses and the diagnostic transducer in passive receive mode. Spectrum analysis of the RF data was performed separately on first (fundamental) and second harmonic frequency bands. Linear regression fits to spectra computed for sliding regions-of-interest yielded 3 parameters: midband fit (integrated backscatter), y-intercept and slope; grayscale images were produced for each parameter. Differences among the B-mode and parameter images, and between the lesion site and adjacent untreated tissues, were characterized statistically. The results indicate that midband fit images of both the fundamental and harmonic offer improved contrast and lateral resolution compared to conventional images

  5. High-resolution vascular tissue characterization in mice using 55 MHz ultrasound hybrid imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Sandoval, Cesar; Teng, Bunyen; Schnermann, Jurgen B.; Martin, Karen H.; Mustafa, S. Jamal; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound and Duplex ultrasonography in particular are routinely used to diagnose cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, these techniques may not be able to characterize vascular tissue compositional changes due to CVD. This work describes an ultrasound-based hybrid imaging technique that can be used for vascular tissue characterization and the diagnosis of atherosclerosis. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired and processed in time, frequency, and wavelet domains to extract six parameters including time integrated backscatter (TIB), time variance (Tvar), time entropy (TE), frequency integrated backscatter (FIB), wavelet root mean square value (Wrms), and wavelet integrated backscatter (WIB). Each parameter was used to reconstruct an image co-registered to morphological B-scan. The combined set of hybrid images were used to characterize vascular tissue in vitro and in vivo using three mouse models including control (C57BL/6), and atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E-knockout (APOE-KO) and APOE/A1 adenosine receptor double knockout (DKO) mice. The technique was tested using high-frequency ultrasound including single-element (center frequency = 55 MHz) and commercial array (center frequency = 40 MHz) systems providing superior spatial resolutions of 24 μm and 40 μm, respectively. Atherosclerotic vascular lesions in the APOE-KO mouse exhibited the highest values (contrast) of −10.11 ± 1.92 dB, −12.13 ± 2.13 dB, −7.54 ± 1.45 dB, −5.10 ± 1.06 dB, −5.25 ± 0.94 dB, and −10.23 ± 2.12 dB in TIB, Tvar, TE, FIB, Wrms, WIB hybrid images (n = 10, p < 0.05), respectively. Control segments of normal vascular tissue showed the lowest values of −20.20 ± 2.71 dB, −22.54 ± 4.54 dB, −14.94 ± 2.05 dB, −9.64 ± 1.34 dB, −10.20 ± 1.27 dB, and −19.36 ± 3.24 dB in same hybrid images (n = 6, p < 0.05). Results from both histology and optical images showed good agreement with

  6. A Feed-forward Neural Network Algorithm to Detect Thermal Lesions Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Shakhssalim, Naser; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive ultrasound surgeries such as high intensity focused ultrasound have been developed to treat tumors or to stop bleeding. In this technique, incorporation of a suitable imaging modality to monitor and control the treatments is essential so several imaging methods such as X-ray, Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging have been proposed to monitor the induced thermal lesions. Currently, the only ultrasound imaging technique that is clinically used for monitoring this treatment is standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging. This paper describes a novel method for detecting high intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions using a feed forward neural-network. This study was carried on in vitro animal tissue samples. Backscattered radio frequency signals were acquired in real-time during treatment in order to detect induced thermal lesions. Changes in various tissue properties including tissue's attenuation coefficient, integrated backscatter, scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution, frequency dependent scatterer amplitudes and tissue vibration derived from the backscattered radio frequency data acquired 10 minutes after treatment regarding to before treatment were used in this study. These estimated parameters were used as features of the neural network. Estimated parameters of two sample tissues including two thermal lesions and their segmented B-mode images were used along with the pathological results as training data for the neural network. The results of the study shows that the trained feed forward neural network could effectively detect thermal lesions in vitro. Comparing the estimated size of the thermal lesion (9.6 mm × 8.5 mm) using neural network with the actual size of that from physical examination (10.1 mm × 9 mm) shows that we could detect high intensity focused ultrasound thermal lesions with the difference of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm. PMID:23724369

  7. Fuzzy logic algorithm for quantitative tissue characterization of diffuse liver diseases from ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Badawi, A M; Derbala, A S; Youssef, A M

    1999-08-01

    Computerized ultrasound tissue characterization has become an objective means for diagnosis of liver diseases. It is difficult to differentiate diffuse liver diseases, namely cirrhotic and fatty liver by visual inspection from the ultrasound images. The visual criteria for differentiating diffused diseases are rather confusing and highly dependent upon the sonographer's experience. This often causes a bias effects in the diagnostic procedure and limits its objectivity and reproducibility. Computerized tissue characterization to assist quantitatively the sonographer for the accurate differentiation and to minimize the degree of risk is thus justified. Fuzzy logic has emerged as one of the most active area in classification. In this paper, we present an approach that employs Fuzzy reasoning techniques to automatically differentiate diffuse liver diseases using numerical quantitative features measured from the ultrasound images. Fuzzy rules were generated from over 140 cases consisting of normal, fatty, and cirrhotic livers. The input to the fuzzy system is an eight dimensional vector of feature values: the mean gray level (MGL), the percentile 10%, the contrast (CON), the angular second moment (ASM), the entropy (ENT), the correlation (COR), the attenuation (ATTEN) and the speckle separation. The output of the fuzzy system is one of the three categories: cirrhosis, fatty or normal. The steps done for differentiating the pathologies are data acquisition and feature extraction, dividing the input spaces of the measured quantitative data into fuzzy sets. Based on the expert knowledge, the fuzzy rules are generated and applied using the fuzzy inference procedures to determine the pathology. Different membership functions are developed for the input spaces. This approach has resulted in very good sensitivities and specificity for classifying diffused liver pathologies. This classification technique can be used in the diagnostic process, together with the history

  8. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-07-01

    Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated.

  9. Temperature Increase Dependence on Ultrasound Attenuation Coefficient in Innovative Tissue-mimicking Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccaro, R.; Magnetto, C.; Albo, P. A. Giuliano; Troia, A.; Lago, S.

    Although high intensity focused ultrasound beams (HIFU) have found rapid agreement in clinical environment as a tool for non invasive surgical ablation and controlled destruction of cancer cells, some aspects related to the interaction of ultrasonic waves with tissues, such as the conversion of acoustic energy into heat, are not thoroughly understood. In this work, innovative tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs), based on Agar and zinc acetate, have been used to conduct investigations in order to determine a relation between the sample attenuation coefficient and its temperature increase measured in the focus region when exposed to an HIFU beam. An empirical relation has been deduced establishing useful basis for further processes of validations of numerical models to be adopted for customizing therapeutic treatments.

  10. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated. PMID:25069009

  11. Feasibility of freehand ultrasound to measure anatomical features associated with deep tissue injury risk.

    PubMed

    Akins, Jonathan S; Vallely, Jaxon J; Karg, Patricia E; Kopplin, Kara; Gefen, Amit; Poojary-Mazzotta, Prerna; Brienza, David M

    2016-09-01

    Deep tissue injuries (DTI) are severe forms of pressure ulcers that start internally and are difficult to diagnose. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the currently preferred imaging modality to measure anatomical features associated with DTI, but is not a clinically feasible risk assessment tool. B-mode ultrasound (US) is proposed as a practical, alternative technology suitable for bedside or outpatient clinic use. The goal of this research was to confirm US as an imaging modality for acquiring measurements of anatomical features associated with DTI. Tissue thickness measurements using US were reliable (ICC=.948) and highly correlated with MRI measurements (muscle r=.988, p ≤ .001; adipose r=.894, p ≤ .001; total r=.919; p ≤ .001). US measures of muscle tissue thickness were 5.4mm (34.1%) higher than MRI, adipose tissue thickness measures were 1.6mm (11.9%) lower, and total tissue thickness measures were 3.8mm (12.8%) higher. Given the reliability and ability to identify high-risk anatomies, as well as the cost effectiveness and availability, US measurements show promise for use in future development of a patient-specific, bedside, biomechanical risk assessment tool to guide clinicians in appropriate interventions to prevent DTI. PMID:27387907

  12. Ultrasound Backscatter Tensor Imaging (BTI): Analysis of the spatial coherence of ultrasonic speckle in anisotropic soft tissues

    PubMed Central

    Papadacci, Clement; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of fiber architecture is of major interest in the progression of myocardial disease. Recent techniques such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) Diffusion Tensor Imaging or Ultrasound Elastic Tensor Imaging (ETI) can derive the fiber directions by measuring the anisotropy of water diffusion or tissue elasticity, but these techniques present severe limitations in clinical setting. In this study, we propose a new technique, the Backscatter Tensor Imaging (BTI) which enables determining the fibers directions in skeletal muscles and myocardial tissues, by measuring the spatial coherence of ultrasonic speckle. We compare the results to ultrasound ETI. Acquisitions were performed using a linear transducer array connected to an ultrasonic scanner mounted on a motorized rotation device with angles from 0° to 355° by 5° increments to image ex vivo bovine skeletal muscle and porcine left ventricular myocardial samples. At each angle, multiple plane waves were transmitted and the backscattered echoes recorded. The coherence factor was measured as the ratio of coherent intensity over incoherent intensity of backscattered echoes. In skeletal muscle, maximal/minimal coherence factor was found for the probe parallel/perpendicular to the fibers. In myocardium, the coherence was assessed across the entire myocardial thickness, and the position of maxima and minima varied transmurally due to the complex fibers distribution. In ETI, the shear wave speed variation with the probe angle was found to follow the coherence variation. Spatial coherence can thus reveal the anisotropy of the ultrasonic speckle in skeletal muscle and myocardium. BTI could be used on any type of ultrasonic scanner with rotative phased-array probes or 2-D matrix probes for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial fibers. PMID:24859662

  13. Biomechanics-Based Curvature Estimation for Ultrasound-guided Flexible Needle Steering in Biological Tissues.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-08-01

    Needle-based procedures are commonly performed during minimally invasive surgery for treatment and diagnosis. Accurate needle tip placement is important for the success of the procedures. Misplacement of the needle tip might cause unsuccessful treatment or misdiagnosis. Robot-assisted needle insertion systems have been developed in order to steer flexible bevel-tipped needles. However, current systems depend on the information of maximum needle curvature, which is estimated by performing prior insertions. This work presents a new three-dimensional flexible needle steering system which integrates an optimal steering control, ultrasound-based needle tracking system, needle deflection model, online needle curvature estimation and offline curvature estimation based on biomechanics properties. The online and the offline curvature estimations are used to update the steering control in real time. The system is evaluated by experiments in gelatin phantoms and biological tissues (chicken breast tissues). The average targeting error in gelatin phantoms is 0.42 ± 0.17 mm, and in biological tissues is 1.63 ± 0.29 mm. The system is able to accurately steer a flexible needle in multi-layer phantoms and biological tissues without performing prior insertions to estimate the maximum needle curvature. PMID:25465619

  14. Development of an ultrasound sensitive oxygen carrier for oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissue.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Albala, Lorenzo; Kramer, Michael R; Daroshefski, Nick; Brown, David; Liu, Ji-Bin; Stanczak, Maria; O'Kane, Patrick; Forsberg, Flemming; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2015-01-15

    Radiation therapy is frequently used in the treatment of malignancies, but tumors are often more resistant than the surrounding normal tissue to radiation effects, because the tumor microenvironment is hypoxic. This manuscript details the fabrication and characterization of an ultrasound-sensitive, injectable oxygen microbubble platform (SE61O2) for overcoming tumor hypoxia. SE61O2 was fabricated by first sonicating a mixture of Span 60 and water-soluble vitamin E purged with perfluorocarbon gas. SE61O2 microbubbles were separated from the foam by flotation, then freeze dried under vacuum to remove all perfluorocarbon, and reconstituted with oxygen. Visually, SE61O2 microbubbles were smooth, spherical, with an average diameter of 3.1 μm and were reconstituted to a concentration of 6.5 E7 microbubbles/ml. Oxygen-filled SE61O2 provides 16.9 ± 1.0 dB of enhancement at a dose of 880 μl/l (5.7 E7 microbubbles/l) with a half-life under insonation of approximately 15 min. In in vitro release experiments, 2 ml of SE61O2 (1.3 E8 microbubbles) triggered with ultrasound was found to elevate oxygen partial pressures of 100ml of degassed saline 13.8 mmHg more than untriggered bubbles and 20.6 mmHg more than ultrasound triggered nitrogen-filled bubbles. In preliminary in vivo delivery experiments, triggered SE61O2 resulted in a 30.4 mmHg and 27.4 mmHg increase in oxygen partial pressures in two breast tumor mouse xenografts. PMID:25448552

  15. Error in Estimates of Tissue Material Properties from Shear Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are used in elasticity imaging to find the shear elasticity and viscosity of tissue. A technique called shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) has been introduced to use the dispersive nature of shear wave velocity to locally estimate the material properties of tissue. Shear waves are created using a multifrequency ultrasound radiation force, and the propagating shear waves are measured a few millimeters away from the excitation point. The shear wave velocity is measured using a repetitive pulse-echo method and Kalman filtering to find the phase of the harmonic shear wave at 2 different locations. A viscoelastic Voigt model and the shear wave velocity measurements at different frequencies are used to find the shear elasticity (μ1) and viscosity (μ2) of the tissue. The purpose of this paper is to report the accuracy of the SDUV method over a range of different values of μ1 and μ2. A motion detection model of a vibrating scattering medium was used to analyze measurement errors of vibration phase in a scattering medium. To assess the accuracy of the SDUV method, we modeled the effects of phase errors on estimates of shear wave velocity and material properties while varying parameters such as shear stiffness and viscosity, shear wave amplitude, the distance between shear wave measurements (Δr), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ultrasound pulse-echo method, and the frequency range of the measurements. We performed an experiment in a section of porcine muscle to evaluate variation of the aforementioned parameters on the estimated shear wave velocity and material property measurements and to validate the error prediction model. The model showed that errors in the shear wave velocity and material property estimates were minimized by maximizing shear wave amplitude, pulse-echo SNR, Δr, and the bandwidth used for shear wave measurements. The experimental model showed optimum performance could be obtained for Δr = 3-6 mm

  16. Multiparametric MRI Analysis for the Identification of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound-Treated Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study endogenous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers for accurate segmentation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)-treated tumor tissue and residual or recurring non-treated tumor tissue were identified. Methods Multiparametric MRI, consisting of quantitative T1, T2, Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) and Magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR) mapping, was performed in tumor-bearing mice before (n = 14), 1 h after (n = 14) and 72 h (n = 7) after HIFU treatment. A non-treated control group was included (n = 7). Cluster analysis using the Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis (ISODATA) technique was performed on subsets of MRI parameters (feature vectors). The clusters resulting from the ISODATA segmentation were divided into a viable and non-viable class based on the fraction of pixels assigned to the clusters at the different experimental time points. ISODATA-derived non-viable tumor fractions were quantitatively compared to histology-derived non-viable tumor volume fractions. Results The highest agreement between the ISODATA-derived and histology-derived non-viable tumor fractions was observed for feature vector {T1, T2, ADC}. R1 (1/T1), R2 (1/T2), ADC and MTR each were significantly increased in the ISODATA-defined non-viable tumor tissue at 1 h after HIFU treatment compared to viable, non-treated tumor tissue. R1, ADC and MTR were also significantly increased at 72 h after HIFU. Conclusions This study demonstrates that non-viable, HIFU-treated tumor tissue can be distinguished from viable, non-treated tumor tissue using multiparametric MRI analysis. Clinical application of the presented methodology may allow for automated, accurate and objective evaluation of HIFU treatment. PMID:24927280

  17. Imaging monitored loosening of dense fibrous tissues using high-intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Li, Pai-Chi; Shih, Wen-Pin; Huang, Pei-Shin; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is proposed as a new alternative treatment for contracture of dense fibrous tissue. It is hypothesized that the pulsed-HIFU can release the contracted tissues by attenuating tensile stiffness along the fiber axis, and that the stiffness reduction can be quantitatively monitored by change of B-mode images. Fresh porcine tendons and ligaments were adapted to an ex vivo model and insonated with pulsed-HIFU for durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. The pulse length was 91 µs with a repetition frequency of 500 Hz, and the peak rarefactional pressure was 6.36 MPa. The corresponding average intensities were kept around 1606 W cm-2 for ISPPA and 72.3 W cm-2 for ISPTA. B-mode images of the tissues were acquired before and after pulsed-HIFU exposure, and the changes in speckle intensity and organization were analyzed. The tensile stiffness of the HIFU-exposed tissues along the longitudinal axis was examined using a stretching machine. Histology examinations were performed by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Pulsed-HIFU exposure significantly decreased the tensile stiffness of the ligaments and tendons. The intensity and organization of tissue speckles in the exposed region were also decreased. The speckle changes correlated well with the degree of stiffness alteration. Histology examinations revealed that pulsed-HIFU exposure probably damages tissues via a cavitation-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that pulsed-HIFU with a low duty factor is a promising tool for developing new treatment strategies for orthopedic disorders.

  18. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  19. VISUALIZING THE STRESS DISTRIBUTION WITHIN VASCULAR TISSUES USING INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY: A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson’s ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson’s ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography. PMID:25837424

  20. Ultrasound phase contrast thermal imaging with reflex transmission imaging methods in tissue phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Farny, Caleb H.; Clement, Gregory T.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal imaging measurements using ultrasound phase contrast have been performed in tissue phantoms heated with a focused ultrasound source. Back projection and reflex transmission imaging principles were employed to detect sound speed-induced changes in the phase caused by an increase in the temperature. The temperature was determined from an empirical relationship for the temperature dependence on sound speed. The phase contrast was determined from changes in the sound field measured with a hydrophone scan conducted before and during applied heating. The lengthy scanning routine used to mimic a large two-dimensional array required a steady-state temperature distribution within the phantom. The temperature distribution in the phantom was validated with magnetic resonance (MR) thermal imaging measurements. The peak temperature was found to agree within 1°C with MR and good agreement was found between the temperature profiles. The spatial resolution was 0.3 × 0.3 × 0.3 mm, comparing favorably with the 0.625 × 0.625 × 1.5 mm MR spatial resolution. PMID:19683380

  1. Visualizing the stress distribution within vascular tissues using intravascular ultrasound elastography: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael S; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M

    2015-06-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson's ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson's ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography. PMID:25837424

  2. Ultrasound for noninvasive control of laser-induced tissue heating and coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleffner, Bernhard; Kriegerowski, Martin; Oltrup, Theo; Bende, Thomas; Jean, Benedikt J.

    1996-05-01

    The application of lasers to achieve localized thermal tissue damage is a common technique in minimally invasive surgery. Currently, there is no control during these treatments. In glaucoma therapy the laser energy applied and the beam direction are estimated prior to treatment, according to clinical experience and anatomic norm values. This lack of on-line control may limit success and lead to side effects. Precision and efficiency of treatment could be improved markedly by analysis of spatially resolved, temperature-dependent data obtained by Ultrasound Reflectometry. Thermally induced changes, as well as their localization were detected qualitatively in B-scan. Quantification was achieved by integration of high frequency RF-signals with the following resolution: spatial 50 micrometers , temporal 200 microsecond(s) , temperature 0.5 degree(s). The presented method is suitable for a non-invasive on-line therapy control.

  3. Hybrid optoacoustic and ultrasound biomicroscopy monitors’ laser-induced tissue modifications and magnetite nanoparticle impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Sobol, Emil; Baum, Olga; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Tissue modification under laser radiation is emerging as one of the advanced applications of lasers in medicine, with treatments ranging from reshaping and regeneration of cartilage to normalization of the intraocular pressure. Laser-induced structural alterations can be studied using conventional microscopic techniques applied to thin specimen. Yet, development of non-invasive imaging methods for deep tissue monitoring of structural alterations under laser radiation is of great importance, especially for attaining efficient feedback during the procedures. We developed a fast scanning biomicroscopy system that can simultaneously deliver both optoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound contrast from intact tissues and show that both modalities allow manifesting the laser-induced changes in cartilage and sclera. Furthermore, images of the sclera samples reveal a crater developing around the center of the laser-irradiated spot as well as a certain degree of thickening within the treated zone, presumably due to pore formation. Finally, we were able to observe selective impregnation of magnetite nanoparticles into the cartilage, thus demonstrating a possible contrast enhancement approach for studying specific treatment effects. Overall, the new imaging approach holds promise for development of noninvasive feedback control systems that could guarantee efficacy and safety of laser-based medical procedures.

  4. High resolution imaging beyond the acoustic diffraction limit in deep tissue via ultrasound-switchable NIR fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yanbo; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Cheng, Bingbing; Liu, Yuan; Xie, Zhiwei; Nguyen, Kytai; Yuan, Baohong

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescence imaging in deep tissue with high spatial resolution is highly desirable because it can provide details about tissue's structural, functional, and molecular information. Unfortunately, current fluorescence imaging techniques are limited either in penetration depth (microscopy) or spatial resolution (diffuse light based imaging) as a result of strong light scattering in deep tissue. To overcome this limitation, we developed an ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging technique whereby ultrasound was used to switch on/off the emission of near infrared (NIR) fluorophores. We synthesized and characterized unique NIR USF contrast agents. The excellent switching properties of these agents, combined with the sensitive USF imaging system developed in this study, enabled us to image fluorescent targets in deep tissue with spatial resolution beyond the acoustic diffraction limit.

  5. Comparison between shear wave dispersion magneto motive ultrasound and transient elastography for measuring tissue-mimicking phantom viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Thiago W J; Sampaio, Diego R Thomaz; Bruno, Alexandre Colello; Pavan, Theo Z; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2015-12-01

    Several methods have been developed over the last several years to analyze the mechanical properties of soft tissue. Elastography, for example, was proposed to evaluate soft tissue stiffness in an attempt to reduce the need for invasive procedures, such as breast biopsies; however, its qualitative nature and the fact that it is operator-dependent have proven to be limitations of the technique. Quantitative shearwave- based techniques have been proposed to obtain information about tissue stiffness independent of the operator. This paper describes shear wave dispersion magnetomotive ultrasound (SDMMUS), a new shear-wave-based method in which a viscoelastic medium labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles is displaced by an external tone burst magnetic field. As in magnetomotive ultrasound (MMUS), SDMMUS uses ultrasound to detect internal mechanical vibrations induced by the interaction between a magnetic field and magnetic nanoparticles. These vibrations generated shear waves that were evaluated to estimate the viscoelastic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms. These phantoms were manufactured with different concentrations of gelatin and labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles. The elasticity and viscosity obtained with SDMMUS agreed well with the results obtained by traditional ultrasound-based transient elastography. PMID:26670853

  6. Analysis of cooling effect by blood vessel on temperature rise due to ultrasound radiation in tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuma; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Fukasawa, Kota; Hatano, Yuichi; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound diagnostic equipment using ultrasound pulse-echo techniques is considered minimally invasive and highly versatile. However, one of the causes of damage due to ultrasound radiation is temperature rise caused by the absorption of sound energy. Therefore, it is very important to estimate the temperature rise caused by the radiation of ultrasound. Sound intensity in a medium is analyzed by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and the temperature distribution caused by sound is estimated by the heat conduction equation (HCE) method in this study. Because blood vessels keep the temperature constant in tissues, the cooling effect of blood flow has to be taken into account for the precise estimation of temperature rise in human tissues. In general, it is well known that capillary vessels are mainly responsible for the cooling effect in tissues and their effect can be estimated as a function of bloodstream ratio. In this paper, a preliminary study on the cooling effect by a large vessel is described for the precise estimation of temperature rise. Blood flow in blood vessels is analyzed using the Navier-Stokes equation. To confirm the precision of the numerical analysis, the results of the numerical analysis are compared with the experimental results using a soft tissue phantom.

  7. A Hertzian contact mechanics based formulation to improve ultrasound elastography assessment of uterine cervical tissue stiffness.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Brandi N; Stender, Michael E; Muljadi, Patrick M; Donnelly, Meghan A; Winn, Virginia D; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-06-25

    Clinical practice requires improved techniques to assess human cervical tissue properties, especially at the internal os, or orifice, of the uterine cervix. Ultrasound elastography (UE) holds promise for non-invasively monitoring cervical stiffness throughout pregnancy. However, this technique provides qualitative strain images that cannot be linked to a material property (e.g., Young's modulus) without knowledge of the contact pressure under a rounded transvaginal transducer probe and correction for the resulting non-uniform strain dissipation. One technique to standardize elastogram images incorporates a material of known properties and uses one-dimensional, uniaxial Hooke's law to calculate Young's modulus within the compressed material half-space. However, this method does not account for strain dissipation and the strains that evolve in three-dimensional space. We demonstrate that an analytical approach based on 3D Hertzian contact mechanics provides a reasonable first approximation to correct for UE strain dissipation underneath a round transvaginal transducer probe and thus improves UE-derived estimates of tissue modulus. We validate the proposed analytical solution and evaluate sources of error using a finite element model. As compared to 1D uniaxial Hooke's law, the Hertzian contact-based solution yields significantly improved Young's modulus predictions in three homogeneous gelatin tissue phantoms possessing different moduli. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to image human cervical tissue, where UE-derived moduli estimations for the uterine cervix anterior lip agreed well with published, experimentally obtained values. Overall, UE with an attached reference standard and a Hertzian contact-based correction holds promise for improving quantitative estimates of cervical tissue modulus. PMID:26003483

  8. Pulsed ultrasound enhances the delivery of nitric oxide from bubble liposomes to ex vivo porcine carotid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, JT; Raymond, JL; Verleye, MC; Pyne-Geithman, GJ; Holland, CK

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery is a novel technique for enhancing the penetration of drugs into diseased tissue beds noninvasively. By encapsulating drugs into microsized and nanosized liposomes, the therapeutic can be shielded from degradation within the vasculature until delivery to a target site by ultrasound exposure. Traditional in vitro or ex vivo techniques to quantify this delivery profile include optical approaches, cell culture, and electrophysiology. Here, we demonstrate an approach to characterize the degree of nitric oxide (NO) delivery to porcine carotid tissue by direct measurement of ex vivo vascular tone. An ex vivo perfusion model was adapted to assess ultrasound-mediated delivery of NO. This potent vasodilator was coencapsulated with inert octafluoropropane gas to produce acoustically active bubble liposomes. Porcine carotid arteries were excised post mortem and mounted in a physiologic buffer solution. Vascular tone was assessed in real time by coupling the artery to an isometric force transducer. NO-loaded bubble liposomes were infused into the lumen of the artery, which was exposed to 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at a peak-to-peak acoustic pressure amplitude of 0.34 MPa. Acoustic cavitation emissions were monitored passively. Changes in vascular tone were measured and compared with control and sham NO bubble liposome exposures. Our results demonstrate that ultrasound-triggered NO release from bubble liposomes induces potent vasorelaxation within porcine carotid arteries (maximal relaxation 31%±8%), which was significantly stronger than vasorelaxation due to NO release from bubble liposomes in the absence of ultrasound (maximal relaxation 7%±3%), and comparable with relaxation due to 12 μM sodium nitroprusside infusions (maximal relaxation 32%±3%). This approach is a valuable mechanistic tool for assessing the extent of drug release and delivery to the vasculature caused by ultrasound. PMID:25336947

  9. Implementation of a Rotational Ultrasound Biomicroscopy System Equipped with a High-Frequency Angled Needle Transducer — Ex Vivo Ultrasound Imaging of Porcine Ocular Posterior Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Juho; Bae, Jinho; Lee, Chong Hyun; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical scanning of a single element transducer has been mostly utilized for high-frequency ultrasound imaging. However, it requires space for the mechanical motion of the transducer. In this paper, a rotational scanning ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) system equipped with a high-frequency angled needle transducer is designed and implemented in order to minimize the space required. It was applied to ex vivo ultrasound imaging of porcine posterior ocular tissues through a minimal incision hole of 1 mm in diameter. The retina and sclera for the one eye were visualized in the relative rotating angle range of 270° ∼ 330° and at a distance range of 6 ∼ 7 mm, whereas the tissues of the other eye were observed in relative angle range of 160° ∼ 220° and at a distance range of 7.5 ∼ 9 mm. The layer between retina and sclera seemed to be bent because the distance between the transducer tip and the layer was varied while the transducer was rotated. Certin features of the rotation system such as the optimal scanning angle, step angle and data length need to be improved for ensure higher accuracy and precision. Moreover, the focal length should be considered for the image quality. This implementation represents the first report of a rotational scanning UBM system. PMID:25254305

  10. Determining temperature distribution in tissue in the focal plane of the high (>100 W/cm(2)) intensity focused ultrasound beam using phase shift of ultrasound echoes.

    PubMed

    Karwat, Piotr; Kujawska, Tamara; Lewin, Peter A; Secomski, Wojciech; Gambin, Barbara; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    In therapeutic applications of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) the guidance of the HIFU beam and especially its focal plane is of crucial importance. This guidance is needed to appropriately target the focal plane and hence the whole focal volume inside the tumor tissue prior to thermo-ablative treatment and beginning of tissue necrosis. This is currently done using Magnetic Resonance Imaging that is relatively expensive. In this study an ultrasound method, which calculates the variations of speed of sound in the locally heated tissue volume by analyzing the phase shifts of echo-signals received by an ultrasound scanner from this very volume is presented. To improve spatial resolution of B-mode imaging and minimize the uncertainty of temperature estimation the acoustic signals were transmitted and received by 8 MHz linear phased array employing Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) technique. Initially, the validity of the algorithm developed was verified experimentally in a tissue-mimicking phantom heated from 20.6 to 48.6 °C. Subsequently, the method was tested using a pork loin sample heated locally by a 2 MHz pulsed HIFU beam with focal intensity ISATA of 129 W/cm(2). The temperature calibration of 2D maps of changes in the sound velocity induced by heating was performed by comparison of the algorithm-determined changes in the sound velocity with the temperatures measured by thermocouples located in the heated tissue volume. The method developed enabled ultrasound temperature imaging of the heated tissue volume from the very inception of heating with the contrast-to-noise ratio of 3.5-12 dB in the temperature range 21-56 °C. Concurrently performed, conventional B-mode imaging revealed CNR close to zero dB until the temperature reached 50 °C causing necrosis. The data presented suggest that the proposed method could offer an alternative to MRI-guided temperature imaging for prediction of the location and extent of the thermal lesion prior to applying the

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is used to see organs in and near the digestive ... Ultrasound is a way to see the inside of the body using high-frequency sound waves. Endoscopic ...

  12. Usefulness of High Suction Pressure for Sufficient Tissue Collection During Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Okamoto, Norio; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Yamadori, Tadahiro; Morishita, Naoko; Otsuka, Tomoyuki; Morita, Satomu; Kurata, Kanako; Okimura, Akira; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Sasada, Shinji; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kawase, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The optimal suction pressure during endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to compare suction pressures for performance in collecting sufficient tissue specimens from mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes during EBUS-TBNA. Methods Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy who underwent EBUS-TBNA over a 3-year period. Results from patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA using a dedicated 20-mL VacLoc (Merit Medical Systems, Inc, South Jordan, UT) syringe (conventional method, group C) were compared with results from patients in whom a disposable 30-mL syringe (high pressure group, group H) was used. The yield for sufficient histologic specimen retrieval and amount of tissue obtained were compared between the 2 groups. Results Of 178 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA, 131 had lung cancer confirmed by EBUS-TBNA: 35 in group C and 96 in group H. There were 7 patients in group C and 6 in group H who received final diagnoses by cytology alone. There were 28 in group C and 90 in group H who were diagnosed by both cytology and histology. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of the rate of sufficient sampling for histological specimens (p = 0.04). The H group revealed a tissue area approximately twice that of the C group (p = 0.003). There were no major procedure-related complications in either group. Conclusion Higher suction pressures with larger syringe volumes during EBUS-TBNA may be useful for safely collecting sufficient tissue specimens. PMID:24340058

  13. Achondrogenesis type 2 diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasound at 12 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Soothill, P W; Vuthiwong, C; Rees, H

    1993-06-01

    Ultrasound examination at 12 weeks' gestation revealed severe generalised subcutaneous oedema in a pregnancy at risk for achondrogenesis type II. Transvaginal scanning confirmed the oedema and suggested abnormal limb development. The prenatal diagnosis was confirmed by X-ray examination after transvaginal termination. PMID:8372079

  14. Feasibility of coded vibration in a vibro-ultrasound system for tissue elasticity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinxin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Li, Tianjie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The ability of various methods for elasticity measurement and imaging is hampered by the vibration amplitude on biological tissues. Based on the inference that coded excitation will improve the performance of the cross-correlation function of the tissue displacement waves, the idea of exerting encoded external vibration on tested samples for measuring its elasticity is proposed. It was implemented by integrating a programmable vibration generation function into a customized vibro-ultrasound system to generate Barker coded vibration for elasticity measurement. Experiments were conducted on silicone phantoms and porcine muscles. The results showed that coded excitation of the vibration enhanced the accuracy and robustness of the elasticity measurement especially in low signal-to-noise ratio scenarios. In the phantom study, the measured shear modulus values with coded vibration had an R(2 )= 0.993 linear correlation to that of referenced indentation, while for single-cycle pulse the R(2) decreased to 0.987. In porcine muscle study, the coded vibration also obtained a shear modulus value which is more accurate than the single-cycle pulse by 0.16 kPa and 0.33 kPa at two different depths. These results demonstrated the feasibility and potentiality of the coded vibration for enhancing the quality of elasticity measurement and imaging. PMID:27475130

  15. Nonlinear inversion modeling for Ultrasound Computer Tomography: transition from soft to hard tissues imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaygues, Philippe; Mensah, Serge; Guillermin, Régine; Rouyer, Julien; Franceschini, Emilie

    2012-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (UCT) is an imaging technique which has proved effective for soft-tissue (breast, liver,...) characterization. More recently, the use of UCT has been envisaged for bone imaging. In this field, the large variations of impedance distribution (high contrast) require that a finer model of wave propagation be integrated into the reconstruction scheme. Here, the tomographic procedure used is adapted to broadband data acquired in scattering configurations while the heterogeneous objects (Born approximation) are probed by spherical waves. An "elliptical" Fourier transform has been derived to solve the near-field inverse problem. This transform differs from the standard Fourier Transform in that, instead of plane waves, families of harmonic ellipsoidal waves are considered. For soft tissues it is possible to separate the impedance and speed of sound contributions and to reconstruct their cartographies using dedicated near-field Radon transforms. In the case of highly heterogeneous media such as bones, iterative inversion schemes are proposed. The various reconstruction procedures are set against experiments.

  16. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Tissue Inflammation Using an Animal Model of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Warram, Jason M.; Wang, Dezhi; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular ultrasound (US) imaging for monitoring the early inflammatory effects following acute kidney injury. Procedures A population of rats underwent 30 min of renal ischemia (acute kidney injury, N=6) or sham injury (N=4) using established surgical methods. Animals were divided and molecular US imaging was performed during the bolus injection of a targeted microbubble (MB) contrast agent to either P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Imaging was performed before surgery and 4 and 24 h thereafter. After manual segmentation of renal tissue space, the molecular US signal was calculated as the difference between time-intensity curve data before MB injection and after reaching steady-state US image enhancement. All animals were terminated after the 24 h imaging time point and kidneys excised for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Results Renal inflammation was analyzed using molecular US imaging. While results using the P-selectin and VCAM-1 targeted MBs were comparable, it appears that the former was more sensitive to biomarker expression. All molecular US imaging measures had a positive correlation with IHC findings. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is a serious disease in need of improved noninvasive methods to help diagnose the extent of injury and monitor the tissue throughout disease progression. Molecular US imaging appears well suited to address this challenge and more research is warranted. PMID:25905474

  17. High-frequency ultrasound M-mode monitoring of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, R. E.; Gudur, M. S. R.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2012-10-01

    Effective real-time HIFU lesion detection is important for expanded use of HIFU in interventional electrophysiology (e.g., epicardial ablation of cardiac arrhythmia). The goal of this study was to investigate rapid, high-frequency M-mode ultrasound imaging for monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tissue during HIFU application. The HIFU application (4.33 MHz, 1000 Hz PRF, 50% duty cycle, 1 s exposure, 6100 W/cm2) was perpendicularly applied to porcine cardiac tissue with a high-frequency imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 770, 55 MHz, 4.5 mm focal distance) confocally aligned. Radiofrequency (RF) M-mode data (1 kHz PRF, 4 s × 7 mm) was acquired before, during, and after HIFU treatment. Gross lesions were compared with M-mode data to correlate lesion and cavity formation. Integrated backscatter, echo-decorrelation parameters, and their cumulative extrema over time were analyzed for automatically identifying lesion width and bubble formation. Cumulative maximum integrated backscatter showed the best results for identifying the final lesion width, and a criterion based on line-to-line decorrelation was proposed for identification of transient bubble activity.

  18. Spectroscopic measurement of adipose tissue thickness and comparison with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, Dmitri; Boeth, Heide; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is widely applied for applications monitoring skeletal muscle oxygenation. However, this method is obstructed by the subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness (ATT) which might vary between < 1 mm to more than 12 mm. Though diffuse optical imaging can be applied to measure ATT, the objective here is to get this measure from spectroscopic data of a single source-detector distance. For the measurement of the optical lipid signal we used a broad band spatially resolved system (SRS), which is based on measurements of the wavelength dependence of the attenuation A for source detector distances ρ between 29 mm and 39 mm. Ultrasound images served as an anatomical reference of the lipid layer. The measurements were taken on 5 different muscle groups of 20 healthy volunteers, each for left and right limbs, e.g. vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscle on the leg and ventral forearm muscles and biceps brachii muscle on the arm. Different analysis strategies were tested for the best calculation of ATT. There is a good non-linear correlation between optical lipid signal and ultrasound data, with an overall error in ATT prediction of about 0.5 mm. This finding is supported experimentally by additional MRI measurements as well as a multi-layer Monte Carlo (MC) model. Based on this data of the ATT thickness, a newly developed algorithm which exploits the wavelength dependence of the slope in attenuation with respect to source-detector distance and MC simulation for these parameters as a function of absorption and scattering coefficients delivers a considerably better fit of reflectance spectra when fitting haemoglobin concentrations. Implications for the monitoring of muscle oxygen saturation are discussed.

  19. Ultrasound -Assisted Gene Transfer to Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem/Progenitor Cells (ASCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ueno, Hitomi; Hokari, Rei; Yuan, Wenji; Kuno, Shuichi; Kakimoto, Takashi; Enosawa, Shin; Negishi, Yoichi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Chiba, Toshio; Hayashi, Shuji

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, multilineage adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) have become increasingly attractive as a promising source for cell transplantation and regenerative medicine. Particular interest has been expressed in the potential to make tissue stem cells, such as ASCs and marrow stromal cells (MSCs), differentiate by gene transfection. Gene transfection using highly efficient viral vectors such as adeno- and sendai viruses have been developed for this purpose. Sonoporation, or ultrasound (US)-assisted gene transfer, is an alternative gene manipulation technique which employs the creation of a jet stream by ultrasonic microbubble cavitation. Sonoporation using non-viral vectors is expected to be a much safer, although less efficient, tool for prospective clinical gene therapy. In this report, we assessed the efficacy of the sonoporation technique for gene transfer to ASCs. We isolated and cultured adipocyets from mouse adipose tissue. ASCs that have the potential to differentiate with transformation into adipocytes or osteoblasts were obtained. Using the US-assisted system, plasmid DNA containing beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were transferred to the ASCs. For this purpose, a Sonopore 4000 (NEPAGENE Co.) and a Sonazoid (Daiichi Sankyo Co.) instrument were used in combination. ASCs were subjected to US (3.1 MHz, 50% duty cycle, burst rate 2.0 Hz, intensity 1.2 W/cm2, exposure time 30 sec). We observed that the gene was more efficiently transferred with increased concentrations of plasmid DNA (5-150 μg/mL). However, further optimization of the US parameters is required, as the gene transfer efficiency was still relatively low. In conclusion, we herein demonstrate that a gene can be transferred to ASCs using our US-assisted system. In regenerative medicine, this system might resolve the current issues surrounding the use of viral vectors for gene transfer.

  20. Heating of tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound to stimulate enhanced HSP expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    The main aim of this work was numerical modeling of temperature fields induced in soft tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound during neurodegenerative disease treatment and experimental verification of the proposed model for a rat liver. The new therapeutic approach to neurodegenerative diseases consists of stimulation of enhanced expression of the Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) which are responsible for immunity of cells to stress. During therapy the temperature rise in tissues in vivo should not exceed 6 °C above level of the thermal norm (37 °C). First, the 3D acoustic pressure field, and the rate of heat production per unit volume due to that field, were calculated using our 3D numerical solver capable of predicting nonlinear propagation of pulsed high intensity waves generated from circular focused acoustic sources in multilayer configuration of attenuating media. The two-layer configuration of media (water—rat liver) assumed in calculations fairly well approximated both the real anatomic dimensions of rat liver and the geometric scheme of our experimental set-up. A numerical solution of the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation which accounted for the effects of heat diffusion, blood perfusion and metabolism rates, was employed to calculate the temperature fields induced in the rat liver by the ultrasonic beam. The numerical simulation results were verified experimentally using a thermocouple inserted in the liver of a rat under anesthesia at the beam focus. The quantitative analysis of the obtained results enabled estimation of the effects of several acoustic and thermal parameters of the rat liver in vivo on the temperature rise, as well as determination of exposure time for ultrasonic beams with varied acoustic power generated by a 2-MHz circular transducer of 15-mm diameter and 25-mm focal length, in order to avoid the tissue overheating that leads to cells necrosis, which would be unacceptable in neurodegenerative disease treatment.

  1. High-speed observation of cavitation bubble clouds near a tissue boundary in high-intensity focused ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin

    2009-03-01

    Cavitation bubble clouds generated near a tissue boundary by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) were studied using high-speed photography. In all, 171 image series were captured during the initial 100 ms of continuous HIFU exposure, which showed that cavitation bubble clouds at the tissue boundary organized into two structures - "cone-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 146 image series and "crown-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 18 image series. The remaining 7 image series showed the interchanging of these two structures. It was found that when cavitation bubbles first appeared at the tissue boundary, they developed to cone-shape bubble cloud. The cone-shape bubble cloud structure was characterized by a nearly fixed tip in front of the tissue boundary. When the cavitation bubbles initially appeared away from the tissue boundary they evolved into a crown-shape bubble cloud. Deformation of tissue boundary was shown in all the recorded image series. PMID:19041998

  2. Microscopic observation of glass bead movement in soft tissue-mimicking phantom under ultrasound PW mode scanning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Funamoto, Kenichi; Tanabe, Masayuki; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that stones and calcification in soft tissue show special enhancement in response to color flow (CF) or pulse Doppler (PW) mode ultrasound scan. This phenomenon is known as the "twinkling sign (TS)". The authors conducted an in vitro experiment to investigate the mechanism of TS occurrence by observing a glass bead in a transparent PVA-H soft tissue-mimicking phantom. The TS in PW mode showed a low-power and slow-velocity spectrum. At the same time, analysis of images by high-speed camera showed that the glass bead in the phantom oscillated following the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the PW mode ultrasound scan. The harmonic oscillations were confirmed, as well. The ultrasound radiation force-driven micro-oscillation possibly affects the ultrasound propagation around the scatterer and triggers random signals in the received echo signals. The results indicate that TS is a phenomenon based on complicated acoustic-mechanical interaction of multiple mechanisms. Further investigation is required for gaining a full understanding of the mechanism of TS occurrence and its clinical application. PMID:26578491

  3. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer (sonoporation) in fibrin-based matrices: potential for use in tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Feichtinger, Georg A; Redl, Heinz; McHale, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that gene transfer into donor cells is an efficient and practical means of locally supplying requisite growth factors for applications in tissue regeneration. Here we describe, for the first time, an ultrasound-mediated system that can non-invasively facilitate gene transfer into cells entrapped within fibrin-based matrices. Since ultrasound-mediated gene transfer is enhanced using microbubbles, we compared the efficacy of neutral and cationic forms of these reagents on the ultrasound-stimulated gene transfer process in gel matrices. In doing so we demonstrated the beneficial effects associated with the use of cationic microbubble preparations that interact directly with cells and nucleic acid within matrices. In some cases, gene expression was increased two-fold in gel matrices when cationic microbubbles were compared with neutral microbubbles. In addition, incorporating collagen into fibrin gels yielded a 25-fold increase in gene expression after application of ultrasound to microbubble-containing matrices. We suggest that this novel system may facilitate non-invasive temporal and spatial control of gene transfer in gel-based matrices for the purposes of tissue regeneration. PMID:23596105

  4. Quantitative determination of fatty tissue on body surface in obese children by ultrasound method.

    PubMed

    Czinner, A; Várady, M

    1992-01-01

    Authors compared a new ultrasound method with the recognized anthropometrical examination in obese children. Between the two methods the determination of body fat did not indicate any divergence. In extreme obesity they considered the advantage of ultrasound examination more reliable. A further advantage of the ultrasound method is that it is well documentable, reproducible and is not invasive. In this way the therapeutic result is well followable. PMID:1560996

  5. Towards the feasibility of using ultrasound to determine mechanical properties of tissues in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Joseph M; Gu, Di-Win Marine; Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Althans, Jake; Abdalian, Sarah; Schluchter, Mark D; Liu, Yiying; Welter, Jean F

    2014-10-01

    Our ultimate goal is to non-destructively evaluate mechanical properties of tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage using ultrasound (US). We used agarose gels as surrogates for TE cartilage. Previously, we showed that mechanical properties measured using conventional methods were related to those measured using US, which suggested a way to non-destructively predict mechanical properties of samples with known volume fractions. In this study, we sought to determine whether the mechanical properties of samples, with unknown volume fractions could be predicted by US. Aggregate moduli were calculated for hydrogels as a function of SOS, based on concentration and density using a poroelastic model. The data were used to train a statistical model, which we then used to predict volume fractions and mechanical properties of unknown samples. Young's and storage moduli were measured mechanically. The statistical model generally predicted the Young's moduli in compression to within <10% of their mechanically measured value. We defined positive linear correlations between the aggregate modulus predicted from US and both the storage and Young's moduli determined from mechanical tests. Mechanical properties of hydrogels with unknown volume fractions can be predicted successfully from US measurements. This method has the potential to predict mechanical properties of TE cartilage non-destructively in a bioreactor. PMID:25092421

  6. Quality assurance for ultrasound scanners using a durable tissue-mimicking phantom and radial MTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaar, Marcus; Semturs, Friedrich; Figl, Michael; Hoffmann, Rainer; Hummel, Johann

    2014-03-01

    For the use in routine technical quality assurance (TQA) we developed a tissue-mimicking phantom and an evaluation algorithm. Key properties of US phantom materials are sound velocity and acoustic attenuation. For daily clinical use the material also has to be nontoxic, durable and easy in handling and maintenance. The base material of our phantom is Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), a synthetic polymer. By freezing the phantom body during the production process, it changes its sound velocity to closely match the one of the human body. The phantom's base form is a cuboid containing a large anechoic cylindric target. In routine QA it is required to gain comparable and reproducible results from a single image. To determine spatial resolution of phantom images, we calculate a modulation transfer function (MTF). We developed an algorithm, that calculates a radial MTF from a circular structure representing spatial resolution averaged across all directions. For evaluation of the algorithm, we created a set of synthetic images. A comparison of the results from a traditional slanted edge algorithm and our solution showed a close correlation. The US phantom was imaged with a commercial US-scanner at different sound frequencies. The computed MTFs of higher frequency images show higher transfer percentages in all spatial frequencies than the MTFs of lower frequency images. The results suggest that the proposed method produces clear statements about the spatial resolution of evaluated imaging devices. We therefore consider the method as suitable for application in technical quality assurance of diagnostic ultrasound scanners.

  7. Classification algorithm of ovarian tissue based on co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Alqasemi, Umar; Zhu, Quing

    2014-03-01

    Human ovarian tissue features extracted from photoacoustic spectra data, beam envelopes and co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic images are used to characterize cancerous vs. normal processes using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The centers of suspicious tumor areas are estimated from the Gaussian fitting of the mean Radon transforms of the photoacoustic image along 0 and 90 degrees. Normalized power spectra are calculated using the Fourier transform of the photoacoustic beamformed data across these suspicious areas, where the spectral slope and 0-MHz intercepts are extracted. Image statistics, envelope histogram fitting and maximum output of 6 composite filters of cancerous or normal patterns along with other previously used features are calculated to compose a total of 17 features. These features are extracted from 169 datasets of 19 ex vivo ovaries. Half of the cancerous and normal datasets are randomly chosen to train a SVM classifier with polynomial kernel and the remainder is used for testing. With 50 times data resampling, the SVM classifier, for the training group, gives 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. For the testing group, it gives 89.68+/- 6.37% sensitivity and 93.16+/- 3.70% specificity. These results are superior to those obtained earlier by our group using features extracted from photoacoustic raw data or image statistics only.

  8. Design of optimal light delivery system for co-registered transvaginal ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of ovarian tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Hassan S.; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Li, Hai; Alqasemi, Umar; Wang, Tianheng; Xu, Chen; Zhu, Quing

    2015-01-01

    A hand-held transvaginal probe suitable for co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of ovarian tissue was designed and evaluated. The imaging probe consists of an ultrasound transducer and four 1-mm-core multi-mode optical fibers both housed in a custom-made sheath. The probe was optimized for the highest light delivery output and best beam uniformity on tissue surface, by simulating the light fluence and power output for different design parameters. The laser fluence profiles were experimentally measured through chicken breast tissue and calibrated intralipid solution at various imaging depths. Polyethylene tubing filled with rat blood mimicking a blood vessel was successfully imaged up to ∼30 mm depth through porcine vaginal tissue at 750 nm. This imaging depth was achieved with a laser fluence on the tissue surface of 20 mJ/cm2, which is below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) of 25 mJ/cm2 recommended by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Furthermore, the probe imaging capability was verified with ex vivo imaging of benign and malignant human ovaries. The co-registered images clearly showed different vasculature distributions on the surface of the benign cyst and the malignant ovary. These results suggest that our imaging system has the clinical potential for in vivo imaging and characterization of ovarian tissues. PMID:26640774

  9. Ex vivo viscoelastic characterization of head and neck tissue abnormalities using ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccabi, Ashkan; Garritano, James; Arshi, Armin; Saddik, George; Tajudeen, Bobby A.; St. John, Maie; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2014-03-01

    In the absence of an imaging technique that offers a highly dynamic range detection of malignant tissue intra-operatively, surgeons are often forced to excise excess healthy tissue to ensure clear margins of resection. Techniques that are currently used in the detection of tumor regions include palpation, optical coherence tomography (OCT) elastography, dye injections, and conventional ultrasound to pinpoint the affected area. However, these methods suffer from limitations such as minimal specificity, low contrast, and limited depth of penetration. Lack of specificity and low contrast result in the production of vague disease margins and fail to provide a reliable guidance tool for surgeons. The proposed work presents an alternative diagnostic technique, ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA), which may potentially provide surgeons with detailed intra-operative imagery characterized by enhanced structural boundaries and well-defined borders based on the viscoelastic properties of tissues. We demonstrate selective imaging using ex vivo tissue samples of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with the presence of both malignant and normal areas. Spatially resolved maps of varying acoustic properties were generated and show good contrast between the areas of interest. While the results are promising, determining the precision and sensitivity of the USVA imaging system in identifying boundary regions as well as intensities of ex vivo tissue targets may provide additional information to non-invasively assess confined regions of diseased tissues from healthy areas.

  10. Fibroid-associated heavy menstrual bleeding: correlation between clinical features, Doppler ultrasound assessment of vasculature, and tissue gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Tsiligiannis, Sophia E; Zaitseva, Marina; Coombs, Peter R; Shekleton, Paul; Olshansky, Moshe; Hickey, Martha; Vollenhoven, Beverley; Rogers, Peter A W

    2013-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of uterine fibroids (Fs), few studies have investigated the links between clinical features and the cellular or molecular mechanisms that drive F growth and development. Such knowledge will ultimately help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic Fs and could result in the development of more effective and individualized treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between ultrasound appearance, blood flow, and angiogenic gene expression in F, perifibroid (PM), and distant myometrial (DM) tissues. We hypothesized that angiogenic gene expression would be increased in tissues and participants that showed increased blood flow by Doppler ultrasound. The study was performed using Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow prior to hysterectomy, with subsequent tissue samples from the F, PM, and DM being investigated for angiogenic gene expression. Overall, PM blood flow (measured as peak systolic velocity [PSV]) was higher than F blood flow, although significant heterogeneity was seen in vascularity and blood flow between different Fs and their surrounding myometrium. We did not find any correlation between PSV and any other clinical or molecular parameter in this study. We identified 19 angiogenesis pathway-related genes with significant differences in expression between F and DM, and 2 genes, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and Neuropilin 2 (NRP2), that were significantly different between F and PM. These results are consistent with subtle differences between PM and DM. Understanding the differences between symptomatic versus asymptomatic Fs may eventually lead to more effective treatments that directly target the source of heavy menstrual bleeding. PMID:22995988

  11. Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE): A Novel Method for Two-dimensional Shear Elasticity Imaging of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2012-01-01

    Fast and accurate tissue elasticity imaging is essential in studying dynamic tissue mechanical properties. Various ultrasound shear elasticity imaging techniques have been developed in the last two decades. However, to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear elasticity map, multiple data acquisitions are typically required. In this paper, a novel shear elasticity imaging technique, comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE), is introduced in which only one rapid data acquisition (less than 35 ms) is needed to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear wave speed map (40 mm × 38 mm). Multiple unfocused ultrasound beams arranged in a comb pattern (comb-push) are used to generate shear waves. A directional filter is then applied upon the shear wave field to extract the left-to-right (LR) and right-to-left (RL) propagating shear waves. Local shear wave speed is recovered using a time-of-flight method based on both LR and RL waves. Finally a 2D shear wave speed map is reconstructed by combining the LR and RL speed maps. Smooth and accurate shear wave speed maps are reconstructed using the proposed CUSE method in two calibrated homogeneous phantoms with different moduli. Inclusion phantom experiments demonstrate that CUSE is capable of providing good contrast (contrast-to-noise-ratio ≥ 25 dB) between the inclusion and background without artifacts and is insensitive to inclusion positions. Safety measurements demonstrate that all regulated parameters of the ultrasound output level used in CUSE sequence are well below the FDA limits for diagnostic ultrasound. PMID:22736690

  12. Partial shrinkage of venous tissues near valves using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Curiel, Laura; Milleret, René; Pichot, Olivier; Lacoste, François; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    The cross-section of a vein can be reduced by exposing the collagen of the vein wall to high temperature (85° C) for a few seconds. Partial shrinkage of the vein is appropriate for correcting deformations of valvular tissues that can cause the abnormal blood reflux which is the main cause of varicose veins and Superficial Venous Insufficiency. Due to its suitability for inducing localized heating, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is a good method for correcting valvular tissue. In the present study, the feasibility of using HIFU for inducing partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein wall is demonstrated. The position and size of valvular deformations are well suited to being heated and, consequently, reduced with HIFU. The resulting shrinkage of deformations should restore normal function of the valve. An experimental protocol was used in which several in vitro segments of human saphenous vein were exposed with a monochromatic signal produced by a real-time imaging HIFU probe. The probe has a focal length of 45 mm, a diameter of 52.5 mm and operates at 3 MHz. Ultrasonic imaging, obtained with an 8-MHz 128-element linear array placed at the centre of the HIFU probe, was used to target the vein. The segment was inserted in a porcine muscle sample, and both were placed into a PVC cylinder. Individual sonications of the vein wall were performed for acoustic power values ranging between 8.75 and 35 W at a constant sonication duration of 5 s. Different durations ranging between 3 and 7 s at constant power were also tested. Finally, a long duration of 18 s was tested while the focal point was displaced along the vein wall at a speed of 0.5 mm/s. Results showed that shrinkage of the vein wall was observed using echographic and macroscopic analysis. In particular, the vein diameter was reduced by 15% for a sonication-duration of 18 s with continuous displacement of the focal point. Results showed that HIFU is suitable for partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein and

  13. Intense acoustic burst ultrasound modulated optical tomography for elasticity mapping of soft biological tissue mimicking phantom: a laser speckle contrast analysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. Suheshkumar; Rajan, K.; Vasu, R. M.

    2014-03-01

    This report addresses the assessment of variation in elastic property of soft biological tissues non-invasively using laser speckle contrast measurement. The experimental as well as the numerical (Monte-Carlo simulation) studies are carried out. In this an intense acoustic burst of ultrasound (an acoustic pulse with high power within standard safety limits), instead of continuous wave, is employed to induce large modulation of the tissue materials in the ultrasound insonified region of interest (ROI) and it results to enhance the strength of the ultrasound modulated optical signal in ultrasound modulated optical tomography (UMOT) system. The intensity fluctuation of speckle patterns formed by interference of light scattered (while traversing through tissue medium) is characterized by the motion of scattering sites. The displacement of scattering particles is inversely related to the elastic property of the tissue. We study the feasibility of laser speckle contrast analysis (LSCA) technique to reconstruct a map of the elastic property of a soft tissue-mimicking phantom. We employ source synchronized parallel speckle detection scheme to (experimentally) measure the speckle contrast from the light traversing through ultrasound (US) insonified tissue-mimicking phantom. The measured relative image contrast (the ratio of the difference of the maximum and the minimum values to the maximum value) for intense acoustic burst is 86.44 % in comparison to 67.28 % for continuous wave excitation of ultrasound. We also present 1-D and 2-D image of speckle contrast which is the representative of elastic property distribution.

  14. Prediction and validation of DXA-derived appendicular lean soft tissue mass by ultrasound in older adults.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Thiebaud, Robert S; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Young, Kaelin C

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop regression-based prediction equations for estimating dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived appendicular lean soft tissue mass (aLM) using ultrasound and to investigate the validity of these equations in 102 Caucasian adults aged 50 to 76 years. The subjects were randomly separated into two groups: 71 in the model-development group (41 men and 30 women) and 31 in the cross-validation group (18 men and 13 women). aLM was measured using a DXA, and muscle thickness (MT) was measured using ultrasound at 9 sites. Stepwise linear regression analysis was used to determine predictive models for DXA-derived aLM from MT variables, sex, and age. A number of ultrasound prediction equations for estimation of aLM were developed and then cross-validated in a subsample of older adults. The results indicated that ultrasound MT and MT × height can be used to accurately and reliably estimate DXA-derived aLM in older Caucasian adults. PMID:26552906

  15. Modelling and characterisation of a ultrasound-actuated needle for improved visibility in ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Y; Hilgers, A; Sadiq, M; Cochran, S; Corner, G; Huang, Z

    2016-07-01

    Clear needle visualisation is recognised as an unmet need for ultrasound guided percutaneous needle procedures including regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy. With inadequate needle visibility, these procedures may result in serious complications or a failed operation. This paper reports analysis of the modal behaviour of a previously proposed ultrasound-actuated needle configuration, which may overcome this problem by improving needle visibility in colour Doppler imaging. It uses a piezoelectric transducer to actuate longitudinal resonant modes in needles (outer diameter 0.8-1.2mm, length>65mm). The factors that affect the needle's vibration mode are identified, including the needle length, the transducer's resonance frequency and the gripping position. Their effects are investigated using finite element modelling, with the conclusions validated experimentally. The actuated needle was inserted into porcine tissue up to 30mm depth and its visibility was observed under colour Doppler imaging. The piezoelectric transducer is able to generate longitudinal vibration with peak-to-peak amplitude up to 4μm at the needle tip with an actuating voltage of 20Vpp. Actuated in longitudinal vibration modes (distal mode at 27.6kHz and transducer mode at 42.2kHz) with a drive amplitude of 12-14Vpp, a 120mm needle is delineated as a coloured line in colour Doppler images, with both needle tip and shaft visualised. The improved needle visibility is maintained while the needle is advanced into the tissue, thus allowing tracking of the needle position in real time. Moreover, the needle tip is highlighted by strong coloured artefacts around the actuated needle generated by its flexural vibration. A limitation of the technique is that the transducer mode requires needles of specific lengths so that the needle's resonance frequency matches the transducer. This may restrict the choice of needle lengths in clinical applications. PMID:27022669

  16. Achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro): study of collagen in the tissue and in chondrocytes cultured in agarose.

    PubMed

    Freisinger, P; Stanescu, V; Jacob, B; Cohen-Solal, L; Maroteaux, P; Bonaventure, J

    1994-02-15

    A lethal chondrodysplasia characterized by extreme micromelia was diagnosed by ultrasound examination in two sibs whose nonconsanguineous parents were healthy. Radiographic and histopathologic data indicated that the two foetuses (18 and 21 weeks old) had achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro). Quantitation of total collagen extractable from dried cartilage samples demonstrated a 50% decrease when compared to an age-related control. This decrease was essentially related to type II collagen. Nevertheless, the alpha chains and the CB peptides of type II collagen had a normal electrophoretic mobility. A significant amount of collagen type I was also detected. The electrophoretic pattern of collagens type IX and XI did not differ significantly from control sample. The extracellular matrix elaborated by patient chondrocytes cultured in agarose for 10-12 days, contained less collagen type II than normal cells. Labelling with 14C-proline of cultured cells showed the presence of procollagen and type II collagen chains with a normal electrophoretic mobility, but an alpha 2(I) chain was detectable in the patient material, indicating the presence of collagen type I which supported the tissue findings. The significance of the type II collagen reduction in the patient's cartilage is unclear but it is unlikely to be the primary defect in achondrogenesis type I. PMID:8160740

  17. Experimental validation of a tractable numerical model for focused ultrasound heating in flow-through tissue phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinlan; Holt, R. Glynn; Cleveland, Robin O.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2004-10-01

    Heating from high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to control bleeding, both from individual blood vessels as well as from gross damage to the capillary bed. The presence of vascularity can limit one's ability to elevate the temperature owing to convective heat transport. In an effort to better understand the heating process in tissues with vascular structure we have developed a numerical simulation that couples models for ultrasound propagation, acoustic streaming, ultrasound heating and blood cooling in a Newtonian viscous medium. The 3-D simulation allows for the study of complicated biological structures and insonation geometries. We have also undertaken a series of in vitro experiments employing non-uniform flow-through tissue phantoms and designed to provide verification of the model predictions. We show that blood flow of 2 cm/s (6.4 ml/min through a 2.6 mm `vessel') can reduce peak temperature in a vessel wall by 25%. We also show that HIFU intensities of 6.5×105 W/m2 can induce acoustic streaming with peak velocities up to 5 cm/s and this can reduce heating near a vessel wall by more than 10%. These results demonstrate that convective cooling is important in HIFU and can be accounted for within simulation models. .

  18. Monitoring tissue inflammation and responses to drug treatments in early stages of mice bone fracture using 50 MHz ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Chu; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Lin, Shih-Ping; Shung, K Kirk; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Bone fracture induces moderate inflammatory responses that are regulated by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) or 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) for initiating tissue repair and bone formation. Only a handful of non-invasive techniques focus on monitoring acute inflammation of injured bone currently exists. In the current study, we monitored in vivo inflammation levels during the initial 2 weeks of the inflammatory stage after mouse bone fracture utilizing 50 MHz ultrasound. The acquired ultrasonic images were correlated well with histological examinations. After the bone fracture in the tibia, dynamic changes in the soft tissue at the medial-posterior compartment near the fracture site were monitored by ultrasound on the days of 0, 2, 4, 7, and 14. The corresponding echogenicity increased on the 2nd, 4th, and 7th day, and subsequently declined to basal levels after the 14th day. An increase of cell death was identified by the positive staining of deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and was consistent with ultrasound measurements. The increases of both COX-2 and Leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1, 5-LO-relative receptor), which are regulators for tissue inflammation, in the immunohistochemistry staining revealed their involvement in bone fracture injury. Monitoring the inflammatory response to various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) treatments was investigated by treating injured mice with a daily oral intake of aspirin (Asp), indomethacin (IND), and a selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236). The Asp treatment significantly reduced fracture-increased echogenicity (hyperechogenicity, p<0.05) in ultrasound images as well as inhibited cell death, and expression of COX-2 and BLT1. In contrast, treatment with IND or SC-236 did not reduce the hyperechogenicity, as confirmed by cell death (TUNEL) and expression levels of COX-2 or BLT1. Taken together, the current study reports the feasibility of a non-invasive ultrasound method capable of monitoring post

  19. A Tissue-Mimicking Ultrasound Test Object Using Droplet Vaporization to Create Point Targets

    PubMed Central

    Carneal, Catherine M.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Krücker, Jochen; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound test objects containing reference point targets could be useful for evaluating ultrasound systems and phase aberration correction methods. Polyacrylamide gels containing albumin-stabilized droplets (3.6 µm mean diameter) of dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) are being developed for this purpose. Perturbation by ultrasound causes spontaneous vaporization of the superheated droplets to form gas bubbles, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). The resulting bubbles (20 to 160 µm diameter) are small compared with acoustic wavelengths in diagnostic ultrasound and are theoretically suitable for use as point targets (phase errors <20° for typical f-numbers). Bubbles distributed throughout the material are convenient for determining the point spread function in an imaging plane or volume. Cooling the gel causes condensation of the DDFP droplets, which may be useful for storage. Studying ADV in such viscoelastic media could provide insight into potential bioeffects from rapid bubble formation. PMID:21937339

  20. Quantitative Imaging of Young's Modulus of Soft Tissues from Ultrasound Water Jet Indentation: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min-Hua; Mao, Rui; Lu, Yin; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Tian-Fu; Chen, Si-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Indentation testing is a widely used approach to evaluate mechanical characteristics of soft tissues quantitatively. Young's modulus of soft tissue can be calculated from the force-deformation data with known tissue thickness and Poisson's ratio using Hayes' equation. Our group previously developed a noncontact indentation system using a water jet as a soft indenter as well as the coupling medium for the propagation of high-frequency ultrasound. The novel system has shown its ability to detect the early degeneration of articular cartilage. However, there is still lack of a quantitative method to extract the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissue from water jet indentation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between the loading-unloading curves and the mechanical properties of soft tissues to provide an imaging technique of tissue mechanical properties. A 3D finite element model of water jet indentation was developed with consideration of finite deformation effect. An improved Hayes' equation has been derived by introducing a new scaling factor which is dependent on Poisson's ratios v, aspect ratio a/h (the radius of the indenter/the thickness of the test tissue), and deformation ratio d/h. With this model, the Young's modulus of soft tissue can be quantitatively evaluated and imaged with the error no more than 2%. PMID:22927890

  1. Quantitative imaging of young's modulus of soft tissues from ultrasound water jet indentation: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min-Hua; Mao, Rui; Lu, Yin; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Tian-Fu; Chen, Si-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Indentation testing is a widely used approach to evaluate mechanical characteristics of soft tissues quantitatively. Young's modulus of soft tissue can be calculated from the force-deformation data with known tissue thickness and Poisson's ratio using Hayes' equation. Our group previously developed a noncontact indentation system using a water jet as a soft indenter as well as the coupling medium for the propagation of high-frequency ultrasound. The novel system has shown its ability to detect the early degeneration of articular cartilage. However, there is still lack of a quantitative method to extract the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissue from water jet indentation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between the loading-unloading curves and the mechanical properties of soft tissues to provide an imaging technique of tissue mechanical properties. A 3D finite element model of water jet indentation was developed with consideration of finite deformation effect. An improved Hayes' equation has been derived by introducing a new scaling factor which is dependent on Poisson's ratios v, aspect ratio a/h (the radius of the indenter/the thickness of the test tissue), and deformation ratio d/h. With this model, the Young's modulus of soft tissue can be quantitatively evaluated and imaged with the error no more than 2%. PMID:22927890

  2. Estimation and imaging of breast lesions using a two-layer tissue structure by ultrasound-guided optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2015-06-01

    A new two-step estimation and imaging method is developed for a two-layer breast tissue structure consisting of a breast tissue layer and a chest wall underneath. First, a smaller probe with shorter distance source-detector pairs was used to collect the reflected light mainly from the breast tissue layer. Then, a larger probe with 9×14 source-detector pairs and a centrally located ultrasound transducer was used to collect reflected light from the two-layer tissue structure. The data collected from the smaller probe were used to estimate breast tissue optical properties. With more accurate estimation of the average breast tissue properties, the second layer properties can be assessed from data obtained from the larger probe. Using this approach, the unknown variables have been reduced from four to two and the estimated bulk tissue optical properties are more accurate and robust. In addition, a two-step reconstruction using a genetic algorithm and conjugate gradient method is implemented to simultaneously reconstruct the absorption and reduced scattering maps of targets inside a two-layer tissue structure. Simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to validate the new reconstruction method, and a clinical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  3. Estimation and imaging of breast lesions using a two-layer tissue structure by ultrasound-guided optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A new two-step estimation and imaging method is developed for a two-layer breast tissue structure consisting of a breast tissue layer and a chest wall underneath. First, a smaller probe with shorter distance source-detector pairs was used to collect the reflected light mainly from the breast tissue layer. Then, a larger probe with 9×14 source-detector pairs and a centrally located ultrasound transducer was used to collect reflected light from the two-layer tissue structure. The data collected from the smaller probe were used to estimate breast tissue optical properties. With more accurate estimation of the average breast tissue properties, the second layer properties can be assessed from data obtained from the larger probe. Using this approach, the unknown variables have been reduced from four to two and the estimated bulk tissue optical properties are more accurate and robust. In addition, a two-step reconstruction using a genetic algorithm and conjugate gradient method is implemented to simultaneously reconstruct the absorption and reduced scattering maps of targets inside a two-layer tissue structure. Simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to validate the new reconstruction method, and a clinical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. PMID:26046722

  4. Effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on endothelin-1, nitrogen monoxide and oxytocin receptor in the uterine tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats following abortion

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YANXIA; GUO, JUFANG; LIN, CHUAN; LU, LU; LI, CHENGZHI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on endothelin-1 (ET-1), nitrogen monoxide (NO) and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) levels in the uterine tissues of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats following abortion. A total of 30 SD rats undergoing complete abortion were randomly divided into ultrasound irradiation and sham irradiation groups (15 rats per group). The rats in the ultrasound irradiation group were treated with low-intensity ultrasound (sound intensity, 2 W/cm2; frequency, 0.8 MHz) for 30 min daily for 5 consecutive days, and those in the sham irradiation group received sham treatment. The uterine tissue was removed to measure the levels of ET-1, NO and OXTR using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The ET-1 level in the uterine tissues was significantly higher in the ultrasound irradiation group compared to the sham irradiation group (P<0.05); however, the NO level was similar in the 2 groups (P>0.05). In the uterine myometrium and endometrium, the strong positive expression of OXTR was observed in the ultrasound irradiation group, which was significantly higher compared to the sham irradiation group (P<0.05). Low-intensity ultrasound could promote uterine involution by increasing ET-1 levels, modifying the balance of ET-1 and NO, and enhancing the expression of OXTR in the uterine myometrium and endometrium. PMID:26998272

  5. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Breast ultrasound is a test that uses sound waves to examine the breasts. How the Test is ... to the left or right. The device sends sound waves to the breast tissue. The sound waves help ...

  6. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines traditional ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create ...

  7. Integrated photoacoustic, ultrasound and fluorescence platform for diagnostic medical imaging-proof of concept study with a tissue mimicking phantom

    PubMed Central

    James, Joseph; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham; Woh, Lye Sun

    2014-01-01

    The structural and molecular heterogeneities of biological tissues demand the interrogation of the samples with multiple energy sources and provide visualization capabilities at varying spatial resolution and depth scales for obtaining complementary diagnostic information. A novel multi-modal imaging approach that uses optical and acoustic energies to perform photoacoustic, ultrasound and fluorescence imaging at multiple resolution scales from the tissue surface and depth is proposed in this paper. The system comprises of two distinct forms of hardware level integration so as to have an integrated imaging system under a single instrumentation set-up. The experimental studies show that the system is capable of mapping high resolution fluorescence signatures from the surface, optical absorption and acoustic heterogeneities along the depth (>2cm) of the tissue at multi-scale resolution (<1µm to <0.5mm). PMID:25071954

  8. Research of Ultrasound-Mediated Transdermal Drug Delivery System Using Cymbal-Type Piezoelectric Composite Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Huiting; Gao, Chunming; Liu, Lixian; Sun, Qiming; Zhao, Binxing; Yan, Laijun

    2015-06-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) implemented by especially low-frequency ultrasound is generally known as sonophoresis or phonophoresis which has drawn considerable wide attention. However, TDD has not yet achieved its full potential as an alternative to conventional drug delivery methods due to its bulky instruments. In this paper, a cymbal-type piezoelectric composite transducer (CPCT) which has advantages over a traditional ultrasound generator in weight, flexibility, and power consumption, is used as a substitute ultrasonicator to realize TDD. First, theoretical research on a CPCT based on the finite element analysis was carried out according to which a series of applicable CPCTs with bandwidths of 20 kHz to 100 kHz were elaborated. Second, a TDD experimental setup was built with previously fabricated CPCTs aimed at the administration of glucose. Finally, the TDD performance of glucose molecule transport in porcine skin was measured in vitro by quantifying the concentration of glucose, and the time variation curves were subsequently obtained. During the experiment, the driving wave form, frequency, and power consumption of the transducers were selected as the main elements which determined the efficacy of glucose delivery. The results indicate that the effectiveness of the CPCT-based delivery is constrained more by the frequency and intensity of ultrasound rather than the driving waveform. The light-weight, flexibility, and low-power consumption of a CPCT can potentially achieve effective TDD.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX(®), Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4-5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  11. Development of a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom for Evaluating the Focusing Performance of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongyu, Jing; Faqi, Li; Jiangzhong, Zou; Zhibiao, Wang

    2006-05-01

    Objectives: To develop a tissue mimicking phantom which can be used to evaluate the focusing performance of the HIFU transducer, and the phantom should has the same acoustic characteristic and thermotics characteristic as the biological tissue. Materials and methods: The tissue mimicking phantom was made from water, gelatin, fresh biologic tissue Its ultrasonic parameters (attenuation coefficient) of the phantom was measured by the method of radiation pressure, and thermotics parameters of the phantom, including thermal conductivity, specific heat/fusion point et al were tested under the Measurement meter. The HIFU biological effect of the phantom was evaluated under the Model JC focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system, developed and produced by Chongqing HIFU Technology Co. Ltd (working frequency: 0.7MHz; acoustic power: 200W; focal distance: 135mm; Acoustic focal region: 3×3×25 cubic mm). Results: The self-made phantom is sable, has smooth and glossy appearance, well-distributed construction, and good elasticity. We measured the followed values for acoustic and thermal properties: density 1049±2 kg/m3; attenuation 0.532±0.017 dB/cm (0.8 MHz), 0.612±0.021 dB/cm (1.0 MHz); thermal conductivity 0.76±0.08 W/m/-°C; specific heat 3653±143 J/kg-°C; fusion point154±8°C. The BFR induced in the phantom after HIFU exposure was stable in its size and appearance. Conclusion: We produced and improved one tissue mimicking phantom successfully which had semblable ultrasound and thermphysical properties like the soft tissue, and can replace the bovine liver to investigate the HIFU biological effect and to detect the focusing performance of the HIFU energy transducer. The research was supported by Chongqing University of Medical Science (CX200320).

  12. Development of a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom for Evaluating the Focusing Performance of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Zongyu; Li Faqi; Zou Jiangzhong; Wang Zhibiao

    2006-05-08

    Objectives: To develop a tissue mimicking phantom which can be used to evaluate the focusing performance of the HIFU transducer, and the phantom should has the same acoustic characteristic and thermotics characteristic as the biological tissue. Materials and methods: The tissue mimicking phantom was made from water, gelatin, fresh biologic tissue Its ultrasonic parameters (attenuation coefficient) of the phantom was measured by the method of radiation pressure, and thermotics parameters of the phantom, including thermal conductivity, specific heat/fusion point et al were tested under the Measurement meter. The HIFU biological effect of the phantom was evaluated under the Model JC focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system, developed and produced by Chongqing HIFU Technology Co. Ltd (working frequency: 0.7MHz; acoustic power: 200W; focal distance: 135mm; Acoustic focal region: 3x3x25 cubic mm). Results: The self-made phantom is sable, has smooth and glossy appearance, well-distributed construction, and good elasticity. We measured the followed values for acoustic and thermal properties: density 1049{+-}2 kg/m3; attenuation 0.532{+-}0.017 dB/cm (0.8 MHz), 0.612{+-}0.021 dB/cm (1.0 MHz); thermal conductivity 0.76{+-}0.08 W/m/- deg. C; specific heat 3653{+-}143 J/kg- deg. C; fusion point154{+-}8 deg. C. The BFR induced in the phantom after HIFU exposure was stable in its size and appearance. Conclusion: We produced and improved one tissue mimicking phantom successfully which had semblable ultrasound and thermphysical properties like the soft tissue, and can replace the bovine liver to investigate the HIFU biological effect and to detect the focusing performance of the HIFU energy transducer. The research was supported by Chongqing University of Medical Science (CX200320)

  13. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young’s modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r2 > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r2 = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62  ±  0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2  ±  2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens.

  14. Non-contact, Ultrasound-based Indentation Method for Measuring Elastic Properties of Biological Tissues Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    PubMed Central

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking RF signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the actual Young’s modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r2>0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r2=0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI=2.62±0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting=4.2±2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens. PMID:25776065

  15. Ultrasound and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  16. Stereotypic Laryngeal and Respiratory Motor Patterns Generate Different Call Types in Rat Ultrasound Vocalization

    PubMed Central

    RIEDE, TOBIAS

    2014-01-01

    Rodents produce highly variable ultrasound whistles as communication signals unlike many other mammals, who employ flow-induced vocal fold oscillations to produce sound. The role of larynx muscles in controlling sound features across different call types in ultrasound vocalization (USV) was investigated using laryngeal muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity, subglottal pressure measurements and vocal sound output in awake and spontaneously behaving Sprague–Dawley rats. Results support the hypothesis that glottal shape determines fundamental frequency. EMG activities of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles were aligned with call duration. EMG intensity increased with fundamental frequency. Phasic activities of both muscles were aligned with fast changing fundamental frequency contours, for example in trills. Activities of the sternothyroid and sternohyoid muscles, two muscles involved in vocal production in other mammals, are not critical for the production of rat USV. To test how stereotypic laryngeal and respiratory activity are across call types and individuals, sets of ten EMG and subglottal pressure parameters were measured in six different call types from six rats. Using discriminant function analysis, on average 80% of parameter sets were correctly assigned to their respective call type. This was significantly higher than the chance level. Since fundamental frequency features of USV are tightly associated with stereotypic activity of intrinsic laryngeal muscles and muscles contributing to build-up of subglottal pressure, USV provide insight into the neurophysiological control of peripheral vocal motor patterns. PMID:23423862

  17. Real-time interlaced ultrasound and photoacoustic system for in vivo ovarian tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we report an ultrafast co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system based on FPGA parallel processing. The system features 128-channel parallel acquisition and digitization, along with FPGA-based reconfigurable processing for real-time co-registered imaging of up to 15 frames per second that is only limited by the laser pulse repetition frequency of 15 Hz. We demonstrated the imaging capability of the system by live imaging of a mouse tumor model in vivo, and imaging of human ovaries ex vivo. A compact transvaginal probe that includes the PAT illumination using a fiber-optic assembly was used for this purpose. The system has the potential ability to assist a clinician to perform transvaginal ultrasound scanning and to localize the ovarian mass, while simultaneously mapping the light absorption of the ultrasound detected mass to reveal its vasculature using the co-registered PAT.

  18. Non-invasive characterization of polyurethane-based tissue constructs in a rat abdominal repair model using high frequency ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao; Takanari, Keisuke; Hong, Yi; Lee, Kee-Won; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Wang, Yadong; Wagner, William R; Kim, Kang

    2013-04-01

    The evaluation of candidate materials and designs for soft tissue scaffolds would benefit from the ability to monitor the mechanical remodeling of the implant site without the need for periodic animal sacrifice and explant analysis. Toward this end, the ability of non-invasive ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) to assess temporal mechanical property changes in three different types of porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds was evaluated in a rat abdominal wall repair model. The polymers utilized were salt-leached scaffolds of poly(carbonate urethane) urea, poly(ester urethane) urea and poly(ether ester urethane) urea at 85% porosity. A total of 60 scaffolds (20 each type) were implanted in a full thickness muscle wall replacement in the abdomens of 30 rats. The constructs were ultrasonically scanned every 2 weeks and harvested at weeks 4, 8 and 12 for compression testing or histological analysis. UEI demonstrated different temporal stiffness trends among the different scaffold types, while the stiffness of the surrounding native tissue remained unchanged. The changes in average normalized strains developed in the constructs from UEI compared well with the changes of mean compliance from compression tests and histology. The average normalized strains and the compliance for the same sample exhibited a strong linear relationship. The ability of UEI to identify herniation and to characterize the distribution of local tissue in-growth with high resolution was also investigated. In summary, the reported data indicate that UEI may allow tissue engineers to sequentially evaluate the progress of tissue construct mechanical behavior in vivo and in some cases may reduce the need for interim time point animal sacrifice. PMID:23347836

  19. Non-invasive Characterization of Polyurethane-based Tissue Constructs in a Rat Abdominal Repair Model Using High Frequency Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiao; Takanari, Keisuke; Hong, Yi; Lee, Kee-Won; Amoroso, Nicholas J.; Wang, Yadong; Wagner, William R.; Kim, Kang

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of candidate materials and designs for soft tissue scaffolds would benefit from the ability to monitor the mechanical remodeling of the implant site without the need for periodic animal sacrifice and explant analysis. Toward this end, the ability of non-invasive ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) to assess temporal mechanical property changes in three different types of porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds was evaluated in a rat abdominal wall repair model. The polymers utilized were salt-leached scaffolds of poly(carbonate urethane) urea, poly(ester urethane) urea and poly(ether ester urethane) urea at 85% porosity. A total of 60 scaffolds (20 each type) were implanted in a full thickness muscle wall replacement in the abdomens of 30 rats. The constructs were ultrasonically scanned every 2 weeks and harvested at weeks 4, 8 and 12 for compression testing or histological analysis. UEI demonstrated different temporal stiffness trends among the different scaffold types, while the stiffness of the surrounding native tissue remained unchanged. The changes in average normalized strains developed in the constructs from UEI compared well with the changes of mean compliance from compression tests and histology. The average normalized strains and the compliance for the same sample exhibited a strong linear relationship. The ability of UEI to identify herniation and to characterize the distribution of local tissue in-growth with high resolution was also investigated. In summary, the reported data indicate that UEI may allow tissue engineers to sequentially evaluate the progress of tissue construct mechanical behavior in vivo and in some cases may reduce the need for interim time point animal sacrifice. PMID:23347836

  20. Real-Time Assessment of Tissue Hypoxia In Vivo with Combined Photoacoustics and High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Marco; Zhao, Ying; Nania, Salvatore; Norberg, K. Jessica; Verbeke, Caroline S.; Englert, Benjamin; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Bergström, Åsa; Hassan, Moustapha; Neesse, Albrecht; Löhr, J. Matthias; Heuchel, Rainer L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In preclinical cancer studies, non-invasive functional imaging has become an important tool to assess tumor development and therapeutic effects. Tumor hypoxia is closely associated with tumor aggressiveness and is therefore a key parameter to be monitored. Recently, photoacoustic (PA) imaging with inherently co-registered high-frequency ultrasound (US) has reached preclinical applicability, allowing parallel collection of anatomical and functional information. Dual-wavelength PA imaging can be used to quantify tissue oxygen saturation based on the absorbance spectrum differences between hemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental Design: A new bi-modal PA/US system for small animal imaging was employed to test feasibility and reliability of dual-wavelength PA for measuring relative tissue oxygenation. Murine models of pancreatic and colon cancer were imaged, and differences in tissue oxygenation were compared to immunohistochemistry for hypoxia in the corresponding tissue regions. Results: Functional studies proved feasibility and reliability of oxygenation detection in murine tissue in vivo. Tumor models exhibited different levels of hypoxia in localized regions, which positively correlated with immunohistochemical staining for hypoxia. Contrast-enhanced imaging yielded complementary information on tissue perfusion using the same system. Conclusion: Bimodal PA/US imaging can be utilized to reliably detect hypoxic tumor regions in murine tumor models, thus providing the possibility to collect anatomical and functional information on tumor growth and treatment response live in longitudinal preclinical studies. PMID:24723982

  1. Use of shock-wave heating for faster and safer ablation of tissue volumes in high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, V.; Yuldashev, P.; Sinilshchikov, I.; Partanen, A.; Khokhlova, T.; Farr, N.; Kreider, W.; Maxwell, A.; Sapozhnikov, O.

    2015-10-01

    Simulation of enhanced heating of clinically relevant tissue volumes using nonlinear ultrasound waves generated by a multi-element HIFU phased array were conducted based on the combined Westervelt and bio-heat equations. A spatial spectral approach using the fast Fourier transform algorithm and a corresponding analytic solution to the bioheat equation were used to optimize temperature modeling in tissue. Localized shock-wave heating within a much larger treated tissue volume and short, single HIFU pulses within a much longer overall exposure time were accounted for in the algorithm. Separation of processes with different time and spatial scales made the calculations faster and more accurate. With the proposed method it was shown that for the same time-average power, the use of high peak power pulsing schemes that produce high-amplitude shocks at the focus result in faster tissue heating compared to harmonic, continuous-wave sonications. Nonlinear effects can significantly accelerate volumetric heating while also permitting greater spatial control to reduce the impact on surrounding tissues. Such studies can be further used to test and optimize various steering trajectories of shock-wave sonications for faster and more controlled treatment of tissue volumes.

  2. DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is not yet known whether DNA methylation levels can be used to accurately predict age across a broad spectrum of human tissues and cell types, nor whether the resulting age prediction is a biologically meaningful measure. Results I developed a multi-tissue predictor of age that allows one to estimate the DNA methylation age of most tissues and cell types. The predictor, which is freely available, was developed using 8,000 samples from 82 Illumina DNA methylation array datasets, encompassing 51 healthy tissues and cell types. I found that DNA methylation age has the following properties: first, it is close to zero for embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells; second, it correlates with cell passage number; third, it gives rise to a highly heritable measure of age acceleration; and, fourth, it is applicable to chimpanzee tissues. Analysis of 6,000 cancer samples from 32 datasets showed that all of the considered 20 cancer types exhibit significant age acceleration, with an average of 36 years. Low age-acceleration of cancer tissue is associated with a high number of somatic mutations and TP53 mutations, while mutations in steroid receptors greatly accelerate DNA methylation age in breast cancer. Finally, I characterize the 353 CpG sites that together form an aging clock in terms of chromatin states and tissue variance. Conclusions I propose that DNA methylation age measures the cumulative effect of an epigenetic maintenance system. This novel epigenetic clock can be used to address a host of questions in developmental biology, cancer and aging research. PMID:24138928

  3. Noninvasive Quantification of In Vitro Osteoblastic Differentiation in 3D Engineered Tissue Constructs Using Spectral Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Alexis W.; Caldwell, David J.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive monitoring of engineered tissues is needed for translation of these products from the lab to the clinic. In this study, non-invasive, high resolution spectral ultrasound imaging (SUSI) was used to monitor the differentiation of MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts seeded within collagen hydrogels. SUSI was used to measure the diameter, concentration and acoustic attenuation of scatterers within such constructs cultured in either control or osteogenic medium over 21 days. Conventional biochemical assays were used on parallel samples to determine DNA content and calcium deposition. Construct volume and morphology were accurately imaged using ultrasound. Cell diameter was estimated to be approximately 12.5–15.5 µm using SUSI, which corresponded well to measurements of fluorescently stained cells. The total number of cells per construct assessed by quantitation of DNA content decreased from 5.6±2.4×104 at day 1 to 0.9±0.2×104 at day 21. SUSI estimation of the equivalent number of acoustic scatters showed a similar decreasing trend, except at day 21 in the osteogenic samples, which showed a marked increase in both scatterer number and acoustic impedance, suggestive of mineral deposition by the differentiating MC3T3 cells. Estimation of calcium content by SUSI was 41.7±11.4 µg/ml, which agreed well with the biochemical measurement of 38.7±16.7 µg/ml. Color coded maps of parameter values were overlaid on B-mode images to show spatiotemporal changes in cell diameter and calcium deposition. This study demonstrates the use of non-destructive ultrasound imaging to provide quantitative information on the number and differentiated state of cells embedded within 3D engineered constructs, and therefore presents a valuable tool for longitudinal monitoring of engineered tissue development. PMID:24465680

  4. Noninvasive quantification of in vitro osteoblastic differentiation in 3D engineered tissue constructs using spectral ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Rao, Rameshwar R; Peterson, Alexis W; Caldwell, David J; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive monitoring of engineered tissues is needed for translation of these products from the lab to the clinic. In this study, non-invasive, high resolution spectral ultrasound imaging (SUSI) was used to monitor the differentiation of MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts seeded within collagen hydrogels. SUSI was used to measure the diameter, concentration and acoustic attenuation of scatterers within such constructs cultured in either control or osteogenic medium over 21 days. Conventional biochemical assays were used on parallel samples to determine DNA content and calcium deposition. Construct volume and morphology were accurately imaged using ultrasound. Cell diameter was estimated to be approximately 12.5-15.5 µm using SUSI, which corresponded well to measurements of fluorescently stained cells. The total number of cells per construct assessed by quantitation of DNA content decreased from 5.6±2.4×10(4) at day 1 to 0.9±0.2×10(4) at day 21. SUSI estimation of the equivalent number of acoustic scatters showed a similar decreasing trend, except at day 21 in the osteogenic samples, which showed a marked increase in both scatterer number and acoustic impedance, suggestive of mineral deposition by the differentiating MC3T3 cells. Estimation of calcium content by SUSI was 41.7±11.4 µg/ml, which agreed well with the biochemical measurement of 38.7±16.7 µg/ml. Color coded maps of parameter values were overlaid on B-mode images to show spatiotemporal changes in cell diameter and calcium deposition. This study demonstrates the use of non-destructive ultrasound imaging to provide quantitative information on the number and differentiated state of cells embedded within 3D engineered constructs, and therefore presents a valuable tool for longitudinal monitoring of engineered tissue development. PMID:24465680

  5. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  6. SOUND-SPEED AND ATTENUATION IMAGING OF BREAST TISSUE USING WAVEFORM TOMOGRAPHY OF TRANSMISSION ULTRASOUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; PRATT, R. GERHARD; DURIC, NEB; LITTRUP, PETER

    2007-01-25

    Waveform tomography results are presented from 800 kHz ultrasound transmission scans of a breast phantom, and from an in vivo ultrasound breast scan: significant improvements are demonstrated in resolution over time-of-flight reconstructions. Quantitative reconstructions of both sound-speed and inelastic attenuation are recovered. The data were acquired in the Computed Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system, comprising a 20 cm diameter solid-state ultrasound ring array with 256 active, non-beamforming transducers. Waveform tomography is capable of resolving variations in acoustic properties at sub-wavelength scales. This was verified through comparison of the breast phantom reconstructions with x-ray CT results: the final images resolve variations in sound speed with a spatial resolution close to 2 mm. Waveform tomography overcomes the resolution limit of time-of-flight methods caused by finite frequency (diffraction) effects. The method is a combination of time-of-flight tomography, and 2-D acoustic waveform inversion of the transmission arrivals in ultrasonic data. For selected frequency components of the waveforms, a finite-difference simulation of the visco-acoustic wave equation is used to compute synthetic data in the current model, and the data residuals are formed by subtraction. The residuals are used in an iterative, gradient-based scheme to update the sound-speed and attenuation model to produce a reduced misfit to the data. Computational efficiency is achieved through the use of time-reversal of the data residuals to construct the model updates. Lower frequencies are used first, to establish the long wavelength components of the image, and higher frequencies are introduced later to provide increased resolution.

  7. Sound-speed and attenuation imaging of breast tissue using waveform tomography of transmission ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, R. Gerhard; Huang, Lianjie; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Waveform tomography results are presented from 800 kHz ultrasound transmission scans of a breast phantom, and from an in vivo ultrasound breast scan: significant improvements are demonstrated in resolution over time-of-flight reconstructions. Quantitative reconstructions of both sound-speed and inelastic attenuation are recovered. The data were acquired in the Computed Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system, comprising a 20 cm diameter solid-state ultrasound ring array with 256 active, non-beamforming transducers. Waveform tomography is capable of resolving variations in acoustic properties at sub-wavelength scales. This was verified through comparison of the breast phantom reconstructions with x-ray CT results: the final images resolve variations in sound speed with a spatial resolution close to 2 mm. Waveform tomography overcomes the resolution limit of time-of-flight methods caused by finite frequency (diffraction) effects. The method is a combination of time-of-flight tomography, and 2-D acoustic waveform inversion of the transmission arrivals in ultrasonic data. For selected frequency components of the waveforms, a finite-difference simulation of the visco-acoustic wave equation is used to compute synthetic data in the current model, and the data residuals are formed by subtraction. The residuals are used in an iterative, gradient-based scheme to update the sound-speed and attenuation model to produce a reduced misfit to the data. Computational efficiency is achieved through the use of time-reversal of the data residuals to construct the model updates. Lower frequencies are used first, to establish the long wavelength components of the image, and higher frequencies are introduced later to provide increased resolution.

  8. High-frequency ultrasound for monitoring changes in liver tissue during preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, Roxana M.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Giles, Anoja; Sherar, Michael D.; Hunt, John W.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    Currently the only method to assess liver preservation injury is based on liver appearance and donor medical history. Previous work has shown that high-frequency ultrasound could detect ischemic cell death due to changes in cell morphology. In this study, we use high-frequency ultrasound integrated backscatter to assess liver damage in experimental models of liver ischemia. Ultimately, our goal is to predict organ suitability for transplantation using high-frequency imaging and spectral analysis techniques. To examine the effects of liver ischemia at different temperatures, livers from Wistar rats were surgically excised, immersed in phosphate buffer saline and stored at 4 and 20 °C for 24 h. To mimic organ preservation, livers were excised, flushed with University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and stored at 4 °C for 24 h. Preservation injury was simulated by either not flushing livers with UW solution or, before scanning, allowing livers to reach room temperature. Ultrasound images and corresponding radiofrequency data were collected over the ischemic period. No significant increase in integrated backscatter (~2.5 dBr) was measured for the livers prepared using standard preservation conditions. For all other ischemia models, the integrated backscatter increased by 4-9 dBr demonstrating kinetics dependent on storage conditions. The results provide a possible framework for using high-frequency imaging to non-invasively assess liver preservation injury.

  9. AB172. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound recovers erectile function in streptozotocin-induced type I diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Guan, Ruili; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) as a treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) in a rat model of type I diabetes mellitus (DM) induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Methods Seventy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two cohorts: a normal control (NC) group and a STZ-induced DM group, which was further sub-divided into DM, DM + LIPUS 100, DM + LIPUS 200 and DM + LIPUS 300 groups and a DM+LESWT (low-energy shock wave therapy) 300 positive control group. Animals in the LIPUS subgroups were treated at different energy levels (100, 200, 300 mW/cm2) for 3 min, and animals in the LESWT group received 300 shocks at 0.09 mJ/mm2. All procedures were repeated 3 times per week for 2 weeks. After a 2-week wash-out period, intracavernous pressure (ICP) was measured; the midpenile region was examined histologically; and VEGF, αSMA, eNOS and nNOS expression, and activity of the TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF signaling pathway were examined in penile tissue by Western blot analysis. Results LIPUS therapy significantly improved erectile function in diabetic rats, as evidenced by enhanced ICP levels, increased endothelial and smooth muscle content, a higher collagen I/collagen III ratio, increased quantity of elastic fibers, and elevated eNOS and nNOS expression. Interestingly, LIPUS was also associated with down-regulation of the TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF signaling pathway in penile tissue, whose activation is correlated with ED pathology. Conclusions LIPUS therapy improved erectile function and reversed pathological changes in penile tissue of STZ-induced diabetic rats. LIPUS therapy has potential as a non-invasive therapy for diabetic ED in the clinic.

  10. Ultrasound Transducer and System for Real-Time Simultaneous Therapy and Diagnosis for Noninvasive Surgery of Prostate Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Chang, Jin Ho; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    For noninvasive treatment of prostate tissue using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), this paper proposes a design of an integrated multi-functional confocal phased array (IMCPA) and a strategy to perform both imaging and therapy simultaneously with this array. IMCPA is composed of triple-row phased arrays: a 6 MHz array in the center row for imaging and two 4 MHz arrays in the outer rows for therapy. Different types of piezoelectric materials and stack configurations may be employed to maximize their respective functionalities, i.e., therapy and imaging. Fabrication complexity of IMCPA may be reduced by assembling already constructed arrays. In IMCPA, reflected therapeutic signals may corrupt the quality of imaging signals received by the center row array. This problem can be overcome by implementing a coded excitation approach and/or a notch filter when B-mode images are formed during therapy. The 13-bit Barker code, which is a binary code with unique autocorrelation properties, is preferred for implementing coded excitation, although other codes may also be used. From both Field II simulation and experimental results, whether these remedial approaches would make it feasible to simultaneously carry out imaging and therapy by IMCPA was verifeid. The results showed that the 13-bit Barker code with 3 cycles per bit provided acceptable performances. The measured −6 dB and −20 dB range mainlobe widths were 0.52 mm and 0.91 mm, respectively, and a range sidelobe level was measured to be −48 dB regardless of whether a notch filter was used. The 13-bit Barker code with 2 cycles per bit yielded −6dB and −20dB range mainlobe widths of 0.39 mm and 0.67 mm. Its range sidelobe level was found to be −40 dB after notch filtering. These results indicate the feasibility of the proposed transducer design and system for real-time imaging during therapy. PMID:19811994

  11. Shock-induced heating and millisecond boiling in gels and tissue due to high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Bessonova, Olga V; Bailey, Michael R; Crum, Lawrence A

    2010-02-01

    Nonlinear propagation causes high-intensity ultrasound waves to distort and generate higher harmonics, which are more readily absorbed and converted to heat than the fundamental frequency. Although such nonlinear effects have been investigated previously and found to not significantly alter high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, two results reported here change this paradigm. One is that at clinically relevant intensity levels, HIFU waves not only become distorted but form shock waves in tissue. The other is that the generated shock waves heat the tissue to boiling in much less time than predicted for undistorted or weakly distorted waves. In this study, a 2-MHz HIFU source operating at peak intensities up to 25,000 W/cm(2) was used to heat transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo bovine liver samples. Initiation of boiling was detected using high-speed photography, a 20-MHz passive cavitation detector and fluctuation of the drive voltage at the HIFU source. The time to boil obtained experimentally was used to quantify heating rates and was compared with calculations using weak shock theory and the shock amplitudes obtained from nonlinear modeling and measurements with a fiber optic hydrophone. As observed experimentally and predicted by calculations, shocked focal waveforms produced boiling in as little as 3 ms and the time to initiate boiling was sensitive to small changes in HIFU output. Nonlinear heating as a result of shock waves is therefore important to HIFU, and clinicians should be aware of the potential for very rapid boiling because it alters treatments. PMID:20018433

  12. Shock-induced heating and millisecond boiling in gels and tissue due to high intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Bessonova, Olga V.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation causes high intensity ultrasound waves to distort and generate higher harmonics, which are more readily absorbed and converted to heat than the fundamental frequency. Although such nonlinear effects have previously been investigated and found not to significantly alter high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, two results reported here change this paradigm. One is that at clinically relevant intensity levels, HIFU waves not only become distorted but form shock waves in tissue. The other is that the generated shock waves heat the tissue to boiling in much less time than predicted for undistorted or weakly distorted waves. In this study, a 2-MHz HIFU source operating at peak intensities up to 25,000 W/cm2 was used to heat transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo bovine liver samples. Initiation of boiling was detected using high-speed photography, a 20-MHz passive cavitation detector, and fluctuation of the drive voltage at the HIFU source. The time to boil obtained experimentally was used to quantify heating rates and was compared to calculations using weak shock theory and the shock amplitudes obtained from nonlinear modeling and from measurements with a fiber optic hydrophone. As observed experimentally and predicted by calculations, shocked focal waveforms produced boiling in as little as 3 ms and the time to initiate boiling was sensitive to small changes in HIFU output. Nonlinear heating due to shock waves is therefore important to HIFU and clinicians should be aware of the potential for very rapid boiling since it alters treatments. PMID:20018433

  13. Interaction of vortices with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B. |; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    We study the interaction of sound waves with vortices in type-II superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. We propose ultrasound techniques as a method for obtaining information about vortex dynamics. This is particularly appropiate at low temperatures where transport measurements are ineffective. The changes in sound velocity and attenuation due to vortices, can provide information on the elastic constants of the vortex system and on vortex dissipation, respectively. At low temperatures the Magnus force acting on vortices leads to the {ital acoustic} {ital Faraday} {ital effect}: there is a rotation of the polarization plane of tranverse sound waves propagating along the magnetic field. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. We discuss how this effect can be measured by means of either pulse-echo techniques or standing sound waves. Also, we show that an ac electromagnetic field acting on the vortex system can generate ultrasound. We calculate the amplitude of the generated sound waves in the linear regime and compare with recent experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Method of and Apparatus for Histological Human Tissue Characterization Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Taler, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining important histological characteristics of tissue, including a determination of the tissue's health is discussed. Electrical pulses are converted into meaningful numerical representations through the use of Fourier Transforms. These numerical representations are then used to determine important histological characteristics of tissue. This novel invention does not require rectification and thus provides for detailed information from the ultrasonic scan.

  15. Method of and Apparatus for Histological Human Tissue Characterization Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); TalEr, George A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining important histological characteristics of tissue, including a determination of the tissue's health. Electrical pulses are converted into meaningful numerical representations through the use of Fourier Transforms. These numerical representations are then used to determine important histological characteristics of tissue. This novel invention does not require rectification and thus provides for detailed information from the ultrasonic scan.

  16. Coagulation and ablation patterns of high-intensity focused ultrasound on a tissue-mimicking phantom and cadaveric skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Han Gu; Zheng, Zhenlong; Park, Hyoun Jun; Yoon, Jeung Hyun; Oh, Wook; Lee, Cheol Woo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2015-12-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be applied noninvasively to create focused zones of tissue coagulation on various skin layers. We performed a comparative study of HIFU, evaluating patterns of focused tissue coagulation and ablation upon application thereof. A tissue-mimicking (TM) phantom was prepared with bovine serum albumin and polyacrylamide hydrogel to evaluate the geometric patterns of HIFU-induced thermal injury zones (TIZs) for five different HIFU devices. Additionally, for each device, we investigated histologic patterns of HIFU-induced coagulation and ablation in serial sections of cadaveric skin of the face and neck. All HIFU devices generated remarkable TIZs in the TM phantom, with different geometric values of coagulation for each device. Most of the TIZs seemed to be separated into two or more tiny parts. In cadaveric skin, characteristic patterns of HIFU-induced ablation and coagulation were noted along the mid to lower dermis at the focal penetration depth of 3 mm and along subcutaneous fat to the superficial musculoaponeurotic system or the platysma muscle of the neck at 4.5 mm. Additionally, remarkable pre-focal areas of tissue coagulation were observed in the upper and mid dermis at the focal penetration depth of 3 mm and mid to lower dermis at 4.5 mm. For five HIFU devices, we outlined various patterns of HIFU-induced TIZ formation along pre-focal, focal, and post-focal areas of TM phantom and cadaveric skin of the face and neck. PMID:26341380

  17. Controlling the spatial organization of cells and extracellular matrix proteins in engineered tissues using ultrasound standing wave fields

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kelley A.; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great potential for saving the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. However, to successfully fabricate tissues and organs in vitro, methodologies that recreate appropriate extracellular microenvironments to promote tissue regeneration are needed. In this study, we have developed an application of ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) technology to the field of tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with USWF were used to non-invasively control the spatial distribution of mammalian cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within three-dimensional collagen-based engineered tissues. Cells were suspended in unpolymerized collagen solutions and were exposed to a continuous wave USWF, generated using a 1 MHz source, for 15 min at room temperature. Collagen polymerization occurred during USWF exposure resulting in the formation of three-dimensional collagen gels with distinct bands of aggregated cells. The density of cell bands was dependent on both the initial cell concentration and the pressure amplitude of the USWF. Importantly, USWF exposure did not decrease cell viability, but rather enhanced cell function. Alignment of cells into loosely clustered, planar cell bands significantly increased levels of cell-mediated collagen gel contraction and collagen fiber reorganization as compared to sham-exposed samples with a homogeneous cell distribution. Additionally, the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, was localized to cell banded areas by binding the protein to the cell surface prior to USWF exposure. By controlling cell and extracellular organization, this application of USWF technology is a promising approach for engineering tissues in vitro. PMID:20870341

  18. Combined Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging to Noninvasively Assess Burn Injury and Selectively Monitor a Regenerative Tissue-Engineered Construct

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung Yun; Chung, Eunna; Suggs, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Current biomedical imaging tools have limitations in accurate assessment of the severity of open and deep burn wounds involving excess bleeding and severe tissue damage. Furthermore, sophisticated imaging techniques are needed for advanced therapeutic approaches such as noninvasive monitoring of stem cells seeded and applied in a biomedical 3D scaffold to enhance wound repair. This work introduces a novel application of combined ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to assess both burn injury and skin tissue regeneration. Tissue structural damage and bleeding throughout the epidermis and dermis till the subcutaneous skin layer were imaged noninvasively by US/PA imaging. Gold nanoparticle-labeled adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) within a PEGylated fibrin 3D gel were implanted in a rat model of cutaneous burn injury. ASCs were successfully tracked till 2 weeks and were distinguished from host tissue components (e.g., epidermis, fat, and blood vessels) through spectroscopic PA imaging. The structure and function of blood vessels (vessel density and perfusion) in the wound bed undergoing skin tissue regeneration were monitored both qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by the developed imaging approach. Imaging-based analysis demonstrated ASC localization in the top layer of skin and a higher density of regenerating blood vessels in the treated groups. This was corroborated with histological analysis showing localization of fluorescently labeled ASCs and smooth muscle alpha actin-positive blood vessels. Overall, the US/PA imaging-based strategy coupled with gold nanoparticles has a great potential for stem cell therapies and tissue engineering due to its noninvasiveness, safety, selectivity, and ability to provide long-term monitoring. PMID:25384558

  19. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging to noninvasively assess burn injury and selectively monitor a regenerative tissue-engineered construct.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung Yun; Chung, Eunna; Suggs, Laura J; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2015-06-01

    Current biomedical imaging tools have limitations in accurate assessment of the severity of open and deep burn wounds involving excess bleeding and severe tissue damage. Furthermore, sophisticated imaging techniques are needed for advanced therapeutic approaches such as noninvasive monitoring of stem cells seeded and applied in a biomedical 3D scaffold to enhance wound repair. This work introduces a novel application of combined ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to assess both burn injury and skin tissue regeneration. Tissue structural damage and bleeding throughout the epidermis and dermis till the subcutaneous skin layer were imaged noninvasively by US/PA imaging. Gold nanoparticle-labeled adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) within a PEGylated fibrin 3D gel were implanted in a rat model of cutaneous burn injury. ASCs were successfully tracked till 2 weeks and were distinguished from host tissue components (e.g., epidermis, fat, and blood vessels) through spectroscopic PA imaging. The structure and function of blood vessels (vessel density and perfusion) in the wound bed undergoing skin tissue regeneration were monitored both qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by the developed imaging approach. Imaging-based analysis demonstrated ASC localization in the top layer of skin and a higher density of regenerating blood vessels in the treated groups. This was corroborated with histological analysis showing localization of fluorescently labeled ASCs and smooth muscle alpha actin-positive blood vessels. Overall, the US/PA imaging-based strategy coupled with gold nanoparticles has a great potential for stem cell therapies and tissue engineering due to its noninvasiveness, safety, selectivity, and ability to provide long-term monitoring. PMID:25384558

  20. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  1. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  2. Enhancement of photoacoustic tomography in the tissue with speed-of-sound variance using ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ren-Xiang; Chao, Tao; Xiao-Jun, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The speed-of-sound variance will decrease the imaging quality of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue. In this study, ultrasound computed tomography is combined with photoacoustic tomography to enhance the photoacoustic tomography in this situation. The speed-of-sound information is recovered by ultrasound computed tomography. Then, an improved delay-and-sum method is used to reconstruct the image from the photoacoustic signals. The simulation results validate that the proposed method can obtain a better photoacoustic tomography than the conventional method when the speed-of-sound variance is increased. In addition, the influences of the speed-of-sound variance and the fan-angle on the image quality are quantitatively explored to optimize the image scheme. The proposed method has a good performance even when the speed-of-sound variance reaches 14.2%. Furthermore, an optimized fan angle is revealed, which can keep the good image quality with a low cost of hardware. This study has a potential value in extending the biomedical application of photoacoustic tomography. Projection supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11422439, 11274167, and 11274171), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20120091110001).

  3. Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

  4. INVESTIGATION INTO THE MECHANISMS OF TISSUE ATOMIZATION BY HIGH INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of a fog of droplets, was recently proposed to explain tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy. However, even though liquid atomization has been studied extensively, the mechanisms of tissue atomization remain unclear. In this paper, high-speed photography and overpressure were used to evaluate the role of bubbles in tissue atomization. As the static pressure increased, the degree of fractionation decreased, and the ex vivo tissue became thermally denatured. The effect of surface wetness on atomization was also evaluated in vivo and in tissue-mimicking gels where surface wetness was found to enhance atomization by forming surface instabilities that augment cavitation. In addition, experimental results indicated that wetting collagenous tissues, such as the liver capsule, allowed atomization to breach such barriers. These results highlight the importance of bubbles and surface instabilities in atomization and could be used to enhance boiling histotripsy for transition to clinical use. PMID:25662182

  5. Analysis of Temperature Rise Induced by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Tissue-Mimicking Gel Considering Cavitation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Ayumu; Okano, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) causes a selective temperature rise in tissue and is used as a noninvasive method for tumor treatment. However, there is a problem in that it typically takes several hours to treat a large tumor. The development of a highly efficient method is required to shorten the treatment time. It is known that cavitation bubbles generated by HIFU enhance HIFU heating. In this study, the enhancement of the heating effect by cavitation was estimated in a numerical simulation solving a bio-heat transfer equation (BHTE) by increasing the absorption coefficients in and out of the volume of cavitation bubbles. The absorption coefficients were obtained by a curve fitting the temperature rise near the focal point between experiment and simulation. The results show that cavitation bubbles caused the increase in ultrasonic absorption not only in but also near the volume of cavitation bubbles.

  6. Reconstruction of the sound velocity and absorption spatial distributions in soft biological tissue phantoms from experimental ultrasound tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Zotov, D. I.; Rumyantseva, O. D.

    2015-03-01

    The paper is devoted to implementing in a specific tomographic device a two-step algorithm designed to reconstruct the spatial distributions of the sound velocity and absorption coefficient, primarily in soft biological tissues. To generate the input data of the first and second steps, a correlation algorithm is used based on determination of the time shift in the signal propagation time in the presence of an object. The results of reconstruction are presented, which are based on data measured for objects-phantoms using a developed experimental ultrasound tomograph model. We discuss problems that arise during reconstruction with a low resolution at the first step of the algorithm, and we demonstrate the high spatial resolving power achieved at the second step.

  7. Comparison of pulsed photothermal radiometry, optical coherence tomography and ultrasound for melanoma thickness measurement in PDMS tissue phantoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyi; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Qiu, Jinze; Ma, Li L; Paranjape, Amit S; Sun, Jingjing; Kuranov, Roman V; Johnston, Keith P; Milner, Thomas E

    2011-05-01

    Melanoma accounts for 75% of all skin cancer deaths. Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and ultrasound (US) are non-invasive imaging techniques that may be used to measure melanoma thickness, thus, determining surgical margins. We constructed a series of PDMS tissue phantoms simulating melanomas of different thicknesses. PPTR, OCT and US measurements were recorded from PDMS tissue phantoms and results were compared in terms of axial imaging range, axial resolution and imaging time. A Monte Carlo simulation and three-dimensional heat transfer model was constructed to simulate PPTR measurement. Experimental results show that PPTR and US can provide a wide axial imaging range (75 μm-1.7 mm and 120-910 μm respectively) but poor axial resolution (75 and 120 μm respectively) in PDMS tissue phantoms, while OCT has the most superficial axial imaging range (14-450 μm) but highest axial resolution (14 μm). The Monte Carlo simulation and three-dimensional heat transfer model give good agreement with PPTR measurement. PPTR and US are suited to measure thicker melanoma lesions (>400 μm), while OCT is better to measure thin melanoma lesions (<400 μm). PMID:20954204

  8. Wavelet-transform-based active imaging of cavitation bubbles in tissues induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    Cavitation detection and imaging are essential for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapies. In this paper, an active cavitation imaging method based on wavelet transform is proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The Yang-Church model, which is a combination of the Keller-Miksis equation with the Kelvin-Voigt equation for the pulsations of gas bubbles in simple linear viscoelastic solids, is utilized to construct the bubble wavelet. Experiments with porcine muscles demonstrate that image quality is associated with the initial radius of the bubble wavelet and the scale. Moreover, the Yang-Church model achieves a somewhat better performance compared with the Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model. Furthermore, the pulse inversion (PI) technique is combined with bubble wavelet transform to achieve further improvement. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of the best tissue bubble wavelet transform (TBWT) mode image is improved by 5.1 dB compared with that of the B-mode image, while the CTR of the best PI-based TBWT mode image is improved by 7.9 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image. This work will be useful for better monitoring of cavitation in HIFU-induced therapies. PMID:27586712

  9. Ultrasound signal wavelet analysis to quantify the microstructures of normal and frozen tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Lei; Wang, Gubing; Li, Fubing; Luo, Jianwen; Liu, Jing

    2014-02-01

    Cryosurgery has a number of advantages that make it particularly appealing in the treatment of liver cancer. However, a major problem for the wide clinical adoption of hepatic cryosurgery is the lack of a cost effective high resolution imaging way which is capable of both performing precise monitoring of the freezing process in situ and evaluating the postoperative effects after surgery. The mean scatterer spacing has been found to be an important parameter for describing the ultrasonic scattering and characterization of biological tissues. However, its potential values in the evaluation of cryosurgical effects of tissues reserved unclear so far. Here, we investigated the wavelet analysis to estimate the mean scatterer spacing parameter in normal and freeze-thawed tissues on porcine livers in vitro. The experimental results carried out at 10 MHz using weakly focused pulse-echo signal element transducer indicated that the mean scatterer spacing in normal liver tissues is 1.12 ± 0.13 mm whereas it is 1.67 ± 0.25 mm in several pre-frozen and then thawed tissues. These results disclosed the good correlation between the wavelet data and microstructures of the normal or thawed tissues, and hence demonstrated that the wavelet analysis holds promise to be used as an effective method for the characterization of thawed tissues scatterer spacing. The present method offers a potential pragmatic strategy for monitoring the transition zone between frozen and unfrozen tissues during the surgical therapy, and evaluating postoperative effects. PMID:24269529

  10. An improved tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide hydrogel phantom for visualizing thermal lesions with high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Guntur, Sitaramanjaneya Reddy; Choi, Min Joo

    2014-11-01

    A recipe was created to improve the tissue-mimicking (TM) bovine serum albumin (BSA) polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAG) reported in our previous study (Choi MJ, Guntur SR, Lee KI, Paeng DG, Coleman AJ. Ultrasound Med Biol 2013; 29:439-448). In that work, the concentration of acrylamide in TM BSA PAG was increased to make its attenuation coefficient the same as that of a tissue. However, this increase made the PAG stiffer and less homogeneous. In addition, the increase in acrylamide caused a significant increase in temperature over the denaturation threshold of BSA during polymerization, which required forced cooling so that the PAG did not become opaque at room temperature after polymerization. To eliminate those shortcomings, we substituted the increased acrylamide with a viscous polysaccharide liquid (corn syrup). The concentration of corn syrup was optimized to 20% (w/v, tested in the volume of 50 mL), so that the acoustic properties of the PAG would be close to those of human liver. The improved TM (iTM) BSA PAG constructed in this study had a speed of sound of 1588 ± 9 m/s, an attenuation coefficient of 0.51 ± 0.06 dB cm(-1) at 1 MHz and a backscattering coefficient of 0.22 ± 0.09 × 10(-3) sr(-1) cm(-1) MHz(-1). The density and acoustic impedance were 1057 kg/m(3) and 1.68 MRayl, respectively, and the non-linear parameter (B/A) was 5.9 ± 0.3. The thermal, optical and mechanical properties were almost the same as those of the BSA PAG (Lafon et al.2005). Experimental verification indicated that the thermal lesions visualized in the proposed iTM BSA PAG by high-intensity focused ultrasound were highly reproducible. In conclusion, iTM BSA PAG was proven to eliminate TM BSA PAG shortcomings effectively and is expected to be a promising test phantom for clinical high-intensity focused ultrasound device. PMID:25220272

  11. Pathologic evaluation of a new endoscopic ultrasound needle designed to obtain core tissue samples: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Douglas G.; Witt, Benjamin; Chadwick, Barbara; Wells, Jason; Taylor, Linda Jo; Dimaio, Christopher; Schmidt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Standard endoscopic ultrasound-fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) needles are in widespread use. Meaningful differences between the available needles have been difficult to identify. Recently, a new EUS needle (Shark Core®, Covidien, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland), has been introduced in an attempt to improve diagnostic accuracy, tissue yield, and to potentially obtain a core tissue sample. We performed a pilot study prospectively to evaluate this new needle when compared to a standard EUS-FNA needle. Materials and Methods: Analysis of the first 15 patients undergoing EUS-FNA with the Shark Core needle was performed and it was compared to EUS-FNA in 15 patients who underwent EUS-FNA with a standard needle. Results: The Shark Core needle required fewer needle passes to obtain diagnostic adequacy than the standard needle [(χ2(1) = 11.3, P < 0.001]. The Shark Core needle required 1.5 passes to reach adequacy, whereas the standard needle required three passes. For cases with cell blocks, the Shark Core needle produced diagnostic material in 85% of cases [95% confidence interval (CI): 54–98], whereas the standard needle produced diagnostic material in 38% of the cases (95% CI: 9-76). The Shark Core needle produced actual tissue cores 82% of the time (95% CI: 48–98) and the standard needle produced no tissue cores (95% CI: 0-71) (P = 0.03). Conclusion: This pilot study found that the Shark Core needle had a high rate of producing adequate cytologic material for the diagnosis of pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions sampled by EUS with fewer passes required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and with a high rate of tissue cores being obtained when compared to a standard FNA needle.

  12. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind the rib cage using high intensity focused ultrasound phased array

    PubMed Central

    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Ilyin, Sergey A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path, and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to formation of high amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W·cm−2 in the free field in water and 40 W·cm−2 in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue. PMID:23528338

  13. Ultrasound measurement of peripheral endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients: correlation with risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bosevski, Marijan; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the endothelial dysfunction (ED) in type 2 diabetic patients ultrasonographically and estimate the correlation of ED with glycemia and other cardio-metabolic risk factors. 171 patient (age 60.0 + 8.5 years) with diagnosed type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) were randomly included in a cross sectional study. B-mode ultrasound system with a linear transducer of 7.5 MHz was used for evaluation of flow-mediated vasodilation in brachial artery (FMV). FMV was presented as a change of brachial artery diameter at rest and after limb ischemia, previously provoked by cuff inflation. Peripheral ED was found in 77.2% (132 patients). Multivariate logistic regression model defined: age (OR 1.071, 95% CI 1.003 1,143) and plasma cholesterol (OR 4.083 95% CI 1.080 17,017) as determinants for ED. Linear multivariate analysis presented duration of diabetes (Beta 0.173, Sig 0.024), and glycemia (Beta 0.132, Sig 0.044) to be associated independently with FMV value. Estimated factors influencing FMV, might be potential therapeutic targets for presented endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:20507285

  14. Study of Tissue Phantoms, Tissues, and Contrast Agent with the Biophotoacoustic Radar and Comparison to Ultrasound Imaging for Deep Subsurface Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwi, R.; Telenkov, S.; Mandelis, A.; Gu, F.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the imaging capability of our wide-spectrum frequency-domain photoacoustic (FD-PA) imaging alias "photoacoustic radar" methodology for imaging of soft tissues is explored. A practical application of the mathematical correlation processing method with relatively long (1 ms) frequency-modulated optical excitation is demonstrated for reconstruction of the spatial location of the PA sources. Image comparison with ultrasound (US) modality was investigated to see the complementarity between the two techniques. The obtained results with a phased array probe on tissue phantoms and their comparison to US images demonstrated that the FD-PA technique has strong potential for deep subsurface imaging with excellent contrast and high signal-to-noise ratio. FD-PA images of blood vessels in a human wrist and an in vivo subcutaneous tumor in a rat model are presented. As in other imaging modalities, the employment of contrast agents is desirable to improve the capability of medical diagnostics. Therefore, this study also evaluated and characterized the use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as PA contrast agents.

  15. Evaluation of an algorithm for semiautomated segmentation of thin tissue layers in high-frequency ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qiang; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Boughner, Derek R; Lacefield, James C

    2006-02-01

    An algorithm consisting of speckle reduction by median filtering, contrast enhancement using top- and bottom-hat morphological filters, and segmentation with a discrete dynamic contour (DDC) model was implemented for nondestructive measurements of soft tissue layer thickness. Algorithm performance was evaluated by segmenting simulated images of three-layer phantoms and high-frequency (40 MHz) ultrasound images of porcine aortic valve cusps in vitro. The simulations demonstrated the necessity of the median and morphological filtering steps and enabled testing of user-specified parameters of the morphological filters and DDC model. In the experiments, six cusps were imaged in coronary perfusion solution (CPS) then in distilled water to test the algorithm's sensitivity to changes in the dimensions of thin tissue layers. Significant increases in the thickness of the fibrosa, spongiosa, and ventricularis layers, by 53.5% (p < 0.001), 88.5% (p < 0.001), and 35.1% (p = 0.033), respectively, were observed when the specimens were submerged in water. The intraobserver coefficient of variation of repeated thickness estimates ranged from 0.044 for the fibrosa in water to 0.164 for the spongiosa in CPS. Segmentation accuracy and variability depended on the thickness and contrast of the layers, but the modest variability provides confidence in the thickness measurements. PMID:16529107

  16. Influence of Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue on High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Beam: Experimental Quantification and Numerical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Grisey, Anthony; Heidmann, Marc; Letort, Veronique; Lafitte, Pauline; Yon, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables the non-invasive thermal ablation of tumors. However, numerical simulations of the treatment remain complex and difficult to validate in clinically relevant situations. In this context, needle hydrophone measurements of the acoustic field downstream of seven rabbit tissue layers comprising skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle were performed in different geometrical configurations. Increasing curvature and thickness of the sample were found to decrease the focusing of the beam: typically, a curvature of 0.05 mm(-1) decreased the maximum pressure by 45% and doubled the focal area. A numerical model based on k-Wave Toolbox was found to be in very good agreement with the reported measurements. It was used to extrapolate the effect of the superficial tissues on peak positive and peak negative pressure at focus, which affects both cavitation and target heating. The shape of the interface was found to have a strong influence on the values, and it is therefore an important parameter to monitor or to control in the clinical practice. This also highlights the importance of modeling realistic configurations when designing treatment procedures. PMID:27471120

  17. Supervised domain adaptation of decision forests: Transfer of models trained in vitro for in vivo intravascular ultrasound tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Conjeti, Sailesh; Katouzian, Amin; Roy, Abhijit Guha; Peter, Loïc; Sheet, Debdoot; Carlier, Stéphane; Laine, Andrew; Navab, Nassir

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a supervised domain adaptation (DA) framework for adapting decision forests in the presence of distribution shift between training (source) and testing (target) domains, given few labeled examples. We introduce a novel method for DA through an error-correcting hierarchical transfer relaxation scheme with domain alignment, feature normalization, and leaf posterior reweighting to correct for the distribution shift between the domains. For the first time we apply DA to the challenging problem of extending in vitro trained forests (source domain) for in vivo applications (target domain). The proof-of-concept is provided for in vivo characterization of atherosclerotic tissues using intravascular ultrasound signals, where presence of flowing blood is a source of distribution shift between the two domains. This potentially leads to misclassification upon direct deployment of in vitro trained classifier, thus motivating the need for DA as obtaining reliable in vivo training labels is often challenging if not infeasible. Exhaustive validations and parameter sensitivity analysis substantiate the reliability of the proposed DA framework and demonstrates improved tissue characterization performance for scenarios where adaptation is conducted in presence of only a few examples. The proposed method can thus be leveraged to reduce annotation costs and improve computational efficiency over conventional retraining approaches. PMID:27035487

  18. Characterization of tissue-simulating phantom materials for ultrasound-guided needle procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Susan; Moore, John; Lammers, Deanna; Baxter, John; Peters, Terry

    2012-02-01

    Needle biopsies are standard protocols that are commonly performed under ultrasound (US) guidance or computed tomography (CT)1. Vascular access such as central line insertions, and many spinal needle therapies also rely on US guidance. Phantoms for these procedures are crucial as both training tools for clinicians and research tools for developing new guidance systems. Realistic imaging properties and material longevity are critical qualities for needle guidance phantoms. However, current commercially available phantoms for use with US guidance have many limitations, the most detrimental of which include harsh needle tracks obfuscating US images and a membrane comparable to human skin that does not allow seepage of inner media. To overcome these difficulties, we tested a variety of readily available media and membranes to evaluate optimal materials to fit our current needs. It was concluded that liquid hand soap was the best medium, as it instantly left no needle tracks, had an acceptable depth of US penetration and portrayed realistic imaging conditions, while because of its low leakage, low cost, acceptable durability and transparency, the optimal membrane was 10 gauge vinyl.

  19. Assessment of the effects of ultrasound-mediated glucose on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissues with the Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Huajiang; Wu, Guoyong; Guo, Zhouyi; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Xiao

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-mediated analyte diffusion on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro and to find more effective sonophoretic (SP) delivery in combination with the optical clearing agents (OCAs) method to distinguish normal and diseased lung tissues. The permeability coefficients of SP in combination with OCAs diffusion in lung tissue were measured with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). 30% glucose and SP with a frequency of 1 MHz and an intensity of 0.80 W/cm2 over a 3 cm probe was simultaneously applied for 15 min. Experimental results show that the mean permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP were found to be (2.01±0.21)×10-5 cm/s from normal lung (NL) tissue, (2.75±0.28)×10-5 cm/s from lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) tissue, (4.53±0.49)×10-5 cm/s from lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue, and (5.81±0.62)×10-5 cm/s from lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue, respectively. The permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP increase approximately 36.8%, 125.4%, and 189.1% for the LBG, LAT, and LSCC tissue compared with that for the NL tissue, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP between LBG and NL tissue (p<0.05), between LAT and NL tissue (p<0.05), and between LSCC and NL tissue (p<0.05). The results suggest that the OCT functional imaging technique to combine an ultrasound-OCAs combination method could become a powerful tool in early diagnosis and monitoring of changed microstructure of pathologic human lung tissue.

  20. Adult human adipose tissue contains several types of multipotent cells.

    PubMed

    Tallone, Tiziano; Realini, Claudio; Böhmler, Andreas; Kornfeld, Christopher; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Moccetti, Tiziano; Bardelli, Silvana; Soldati, Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells that can be easily isolated from various tissues and expanded in vitro. Many reports on their pluripotency and possible clinical applications have raised hopes and interest in MSCs. In an attempt to unify the terminology and the criteria to label a cell as MSC, in 2006 the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) proposed a standard set of rules to define the identity of these cells. However, MSCs are still extracted from different tissues, by diverse isolation protocols, are cultured and expanded in different media and conditions. All these variables may have profound effects on the selection of cell types and the composition of heterogeneous subpopulations, on the selective expansion of specific cell populations with totally different potentials and ergo, on the long-term fate of the cells upon in vitro culture. Therefore, specific molecular and cellular markers that identify MSCs subsets as well as standardization of expansion protocols for these cells are urgently needed. Here, we briefly discuss new useful markers and recent data supporting the rapidly emerging concept that many different types of progenitor cells are found in close association with blood vessels. This knowledge may promote the necessary technical improvements required to reduce variability and promote higher efficacy and safety when isolating and expanding these cells for therapeutic use. In the light of the discussed data, particularly the identification of new markers, and advances in the understanding of fundamental MSC biology, we also suggest a revision of the 2006 ISCT criteria. PMID:21327755

  1. Microbubble Type and Distribution Dependence of Focused Ultrasound Induced Blood Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shutao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Olumolade, Oluyemi; Feshitan, Jameel A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Focused Ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles has been used to non-invasively induce reversible blood brain barrier (BBB) opening in both rodents and non-human primates. This study aims at identifying the dependence of the BBB opening properties on the polydisperse microbubble (since all clinically approved microbubbles are polydisperse) type and distribution by using clinically approved UCA (Definity®) and in-house made polydisperse microbubbles (IHP) in mice. A total of 18 C57BL/6 mice (n = 3) were used in this study, and each mouse received either Definity® or IHP microbubbles via tail vein injection. The concentration and size distribution of both the activated Definity® and IHP microbubbles were measured and diluted to 6×108/ml prior to injection. Immediately after the microbubble administration, FUS sonications were carried out with the following parameters: frequency of 1.5 MHz, pulse repetition frequency of 10 Hz, 1000 cycles, in situ peak rarefactional acoustic pressures of 0.3 MPa, 0.45 MPa, and 0.6 MPa for a sonication duration of 60 s. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to confirm the BBB opening and allowed for image-based analysis. The permeability of the treated region and volumes of BBB opening using the two types of microbubbles did not show significant difference (P > 0.05) for PRPs of 0.45 MPa and 0.6 MPa, while IHP microbubbles showed significantly higher permeability and volume of opening (P < 0.05) at the relatively lower pressure of 0.3 MPa. The results from this study indicate that the microbubble type and distribution could have significant effects on the FUS-induced BBB opening at lower, but less important at higher, pressure levels, possibly due to the stable cavitation that governs the former. This difference may have become less significant at higher FUS pressure levels where inertial cavitation typically occurs. PMID:24239362

  2. Overexpression of type VI collagen in neoplastic lung tissues

    PubMed Central

    VOILES, LARRY; LEWIS, DAVID E.; HAN, LING; LUPOV, IVAN P.; LIN, TSANG-LONG; ROBERTSON, MICHAEL J.; PETRACHE, IRINA; CHANG, HUA-CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Type VI collagen (COL6), an extracellular matrix protein, is important in maintaining the integrity of lung tissue. An increase in COL6 mRNA and protein deposition was found in the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, a chronic inflammatory condition with a strong association with lung cancer. In the present study, we demonstrated overexpression of COL6 in the lungs of non-small cell lung cancers. We hypothesized that excessive COL6 in the lung interstitium may exert stimulatory effects on the adjacent cells. In vitro stimulation of monocytes with COL6 resulted in the production of IL-23, which may promote tumor development in an environment of IL-23-mediated lung inflammation, where tissue modeling occurs concurrently with excessive COL6 production. In addition, COL6 was capable of stimulating signaling pathways that activate focal adhesion kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in lung epithelial cells, which may also facilitate the development of lung neoplasms. Taken together, our data suggest the potential role of COL6 in promoting lung neoplasia in diseased lungs where COL6 is overexpressed. PMID:25176343

  3. Ultrasound monitoring of the influence of different accelerating admixtures and cement types for shotcrete on setting and hardening behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Belie, N. de . E-mail: nele.debelie@ugent.be; Grosse, C.U.; Kurz, J.; Reinhardt, H.-W.

    2005-11-15

    The possible use of ultrasound measurements for monitoring setting and hardening of mortar containing different accelerating admixtures for shotcrete was investigated. The sensitivity to accelerator type (alkaline aluminate or alkali-free) and dosage, and accelerator-cement compatibility were evaluated. Furthermore, a new automatic onset picking algorithm for ultrasound signals was tested. A stepwise increase of the accelerator dosage resulted in increasing values for the ultrasound pulse velocity at early ages. In the accelerated mortar no dormant period could be noticed before the pulse velocity started to increase sharply, indicating a quick change in solid phase connectivity. The alkaline accelerator had a larger effect than the alkali-free accelerator, especially at ages below 90 min. The effect of the alkali-free accelerator was at very early age more pronounced on mortar containing CEM I in comparison with CEM II, while the alkaline accelerator had a larger influence on mortar containing CEM II. The increase of ultrasound energy could be related to the setting phenomenon and the maximum energy was reached when the end of workability was approached. Only the alkaline accelerator caused a significant reduction in compressive strength and this for all the dosages tested.

  4. CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASOUND ASSESSMENT OF IMPAIRED ADIPOSE TISSUE AND MUSCLE PERFUSION IN INSULIN-RESISTANT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Davidson, Brian P.; Foster, Ted; Qi, Yue; Zhao, Yan; Peters, Dawn; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In diabetes mellitus reduced perfusion and capillary surface area in skeletal muscle, which is a major glucose storage site, contributes to abnormal glucose homeostasis. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) we investigated whether abdominal adipose tissue perfusion is abnormal in insulin resistance (IR) and correlates with glycemic control. Methods and Results Abdominal adipose tissue and skeletal muscle CEU perfusion imaging was performed in obese IR (db/db) mice at 11-12 or 14-16 weeks of age, and in control lean mice. Time-intensity data were analyzed to quantify microvascular blood flow (MBF) and capillary blood volume (CBV). Blood glucose response over one hour was measured after insulin challenge (1 u/Kg, I.P.). Compared to control mice, db/db mice at 11-12 and 14-16 weeks had a higher glucose concentration area-under-the-curve after insulin (11.8±2.8, 20.6±4.3, and 28.4±5.9 mg·min/dL [×1000], respectively, p=0.0002), and also had lower adipose MBF (0.094±0.038, 0.035±0.010, and 0.023±0.01 mL/min/g, p=0.0002) and CBV (1.6±0.6, 1.0±0.3, and 0.5±0.1 mL/100 g, p=0.0017). The glucose area-under-the-curve correlated in a non-linear fashion with both adipose and skeletal muscle MBF and CBV. There were significant linear correlations between adipose and muscle MBF (r=0.81) and CBV (r=0.66). Adipocyte cell volume on histology was 25-fold higher in 14-16 week db/db versus control mice. Conclusions Abnormal adipose MBF and CBV in IR can be detected by CEU and correlates with the degree of impairment in glucose storage. Abnormalities in adipose tissue and muscle appear to be coupled. Impaired adipose tissue perfusion is in part explained by an increase in adipocyte size without proportional vascular response. PMID:25855669

  5. Study on the refractive index matching effect of ultrasound on optical clearing of bio-tissues based on the derivative total reflection method

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huanhuan; Wang, Jin; Ye, Qing; Deng, Zhichao; Mei, Jianchun; Zhou, Wenyuan; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the tissue optical clearing (OC) technique in the biomedicine field has drawn lots of attention. Various physical and chemical methods have been introduced to improve the efficacy of OC. In this study, the effect of the combination of glycerol and ultrasound treatment on OC of in vitro porcine muscle tissues has been investigated. The refractive index (RI) matching mechanism of OC was directly observed based on the derivative total reflection method. A theoretical model was used to simulate the proportion of tissue fluid in the illuminated area. Moreover, the total transmittance spectra have been obtained by a spectrometer over the range from 450 nm to 700 nm. The administration of glycerol and ultrasound has led to an increase of the RI of background medium and a more RI matching environment was achieved. The experimental results support the validity of the ultrasound treatment for OC. The RI matching mechanism has been firstly quantitatively analyzed based on the derivative total reflection method. PMID:25360366

  6. Detection of radiotherapy-induced myocardial changes by ultrasound tissue characterisation in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuohinen, Suvi Sirkku; Skyttä, Tanja; Virtanen, Vesa; Virtanen, Marko; Luukkaala, Tiina; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Raatikainen, Pekka

    2016-05-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) in the thoracic region is associated with an increased risk of late cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Ultrasonic tissue characterisation (UTC) is a non-invasive method of identifying changes in myocardial tissue, such as increased fibrosis. The aim of this study was to assess whether UTC can detect early RT-induced myocardial alterations. Seventy-eight eligible patients with early stage breast cancer were evaluated before and immediately after RT. Twenty patients had right-sided and 58 left-sided breast cancer. None received chemotherapy. A comprehensive echocardiographic examination included 3D measurements and UTC of the right ventricular (RV) free wall, ventricular septum and left ventricular (LV) posterior wall. Integrated backscatter calibration was done for the pericardium (cpIBS) and LV cavity (ccIBS). RT for left-sided breast cancer was associated with increased echodensity in the UTC analysis. RV free wall and ventricular septum cpIBS increased from -15.0 ± 7.3 to -13.7 ± 7.9 dB (p = 0.079) and from -18.2 ± 5.1 to -16.0 ± 6.4 dB (p = 0.002), respectively. Likewise, ccIBS in the RV free wall increased from 20.4 ± 5.9 to 22.1 ± 5.6 dB (p = 0.046), and in the LV septum from 17.3 ± 5.2 to 19.8 ± 5.5 dB (p < 0.001). In 3D echocardiography, LV mass increased from 102 ± 18 to 107 ± 18 g (p = 0.005). Patients receiving RT for right-sided breast cancer did not display these changes. Left-sided RT increased myocardial echodensity, particularly in the structures receiving the highest radiation dose. Considering the progressive nature of the RT induced damage, these early changes may help us with individual risk stratification and serve as a tool for screening. PMID:26757708

  7. Multiple scattering of ultrasound in weakly inhomogeneous media: application to human soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Alexandre; Derode, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Waves scattered by a weakly inhomogeneous random medium contain a predominant single-scattering contribution as well as a multiple-scattering contribution which is usually neglected, especially for imaging purposes. A method based on random matrix theory is proposed to separate the single- and multiple-scattering contributions. The experimental setup uses an array of sources/receivers placed in front of the medium. The impulse responses between every couple of transducers are measured and form a matrix. Single-scattering contributions are shown to exhibit a deterministic coherence along the antidiagonals of the array response matrix, whatever the distribution of inhomogeneities. This property is taken advantage of to discriminate single- from multiple-scattered waves. This allows one to evaluate the absorption losses and the scattering losses separately, by comparing the multiple-scattering intensity with a radiative transfer model. Moreover, the relative contribution of multiple scattering in the backscattered wave can be estimated, which serves as a validity test for the Born approximation. Experimental results are presented with ultrasonic waves in the megahertz range, on a synthetic sample (agar-gelatine gel) as well as on breast tissues. Interestingly, the multiple-scattering contribution is found to be far from negligible in the breast around 4.3 MHz. PMID:21303005

  8. TU-F-12A-09: GLCM Texture Analysis for Normal-Tissue Toxicity: A Prospective Ultrasound Study of Acute Toxicity in Breast-Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Yang, X; Curran, W; Torres, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphologic and structural integrity of the breast glands using sonographic textural analysis, and identify potential early imaging signatures for radiation toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Thirty-eight patients receiving breast RT participated in a prospective ultrasound imaging study. Each participant received 3 ultrasound scans: 1 week before RT (baseline), and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Patients were imaged with a 10-MHz ultrasound on the four quadrant of the breast. A second order statistical method of texture analysis, called gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), was employed to assess RT-induced breast-tissue toxicity. The region of interest (ROI) was 28 mm × 10 mm in size at a 10 mm depth under the skin. Twenty GLCM sonographic features, ratios of the irradiated breast and the contralateral breast, were used to quantify breast-tissue toxicity. Clinical assessment of acute toxicity was conducted using the RTOG toxicity scheme. Results: Ninety-seven ultrasound studies (776 images) were analyzed; and 5 out of 20 sonographic features showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the baseline scans, the acute toxicity grade 1 and 2 groups. These sonographic features quantified the degree of tissue damage through homogeneity, heterogeneity, randomness, and symmetry. Energy ratio value decreased from 108±0.05 (normal) to 0.99±0.05 (Grade 1) and 0.84±0.04 (Grade 2); Entropy ratio value increased from 1.01±0.01 to 1.02±0.01 and 1.04±0.01; Contrast ratio value increased from 1.03±0.03 to 1.07±0.06 and 1.21±0.09; Variance ratio value increased from 1.06±0.03 to 1.20±0.04 and 1.42±0.10; Cluster Prominence ratio value increased from 0.98±0.02 to 1.01±0.04 and 1.25±0.07. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated that the sonographic features may serve as imaging signatures to assess radiation-induced normal tissue damage. While these findings need to be validated in a larger cohort, they suggest

  9. Doppler Ultrasound Detection of Preclinical Changes in Foot Arteries in Early Stage of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leoniuk, Jolanta; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Szorc, Małgorzata; Sackiewicz, Izabela; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are few reports regarding the changes within the vessels in the initial stage of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemodynamic and morphological parameters in foot arteries in type 2 diabetes subjects and to compare these parameters to those obtained in a control group of healthy volunteers. Material/Methods Ultrasound B-mode, color Doppler and pulse wave Doppler imaging of foot arteries was conducted in 37 diabetic patients and 36 non-diabetic subjects to determine their morphological (total vascular diameter and flow lumen diameter) and functional parameters (spectral analysis). Results In diabetic patients, the overall vascular diameter and wall thickness were statistically significantly larger when compared to the control group in the right dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.01; P=0.001), left dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.007; P=0.006), right posterior tibial artery (P=0.005; P=0.0005), and left posterior tibial artery (P=0.007; P=0.0002). No significant differences were observed in both groups in flow lumen diameters and blood flow parameters (PSV, EDV, PI, RI). In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index in the right dorsalis pedis artery (r=0.38; P=0.02), right posterior tibial artery (r=0.38; P=0.02) and left posterior tibial artery (r=0.42; P=0.009). The pulsatility index within the dorsalis pedis artery decreased with increased trophic skin changes (r=–0.431, P=0.009). Conclusions In the diabetic group, overall artery diameters larger than and flow lumina comparable to the control group suggest vessel wall thickening occurring in the early stage of diabetes. Doppler flow parameters are comparable in both groups. In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index and negative correlation was observed between the intensity of trophic skin changes and the pulsatility index. PMID:25202434

  10. Simulation of ultrasound radio-frequency signals in deformed tissue for validation of 2D motion estimation with sub-sample accuracy.

    PubMed

    Goksel, Orcun; Zahiri-Azar, Reza; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2007-01-01

    Motion estimation in sequences of ultrasound echo signals is essential for a wide range of applications. In time domain cross correlation, which is a common motion estimation technique, the displacements are typically not integral multiples of the sampling period. Therefore, to estimate the motion with sub-sample accuracy, 1D and 2D interpolation methods such as parabolic, cosine, and ellipsoid fitting have been introduced in the literature. In this paper, a simulation framework is presented in order to compare the performance of currently available techniques. First, the tissue deformation is modeled using the finite element method (FEM) and then the corresponding pre-/post-deformation radio-frequency (RF) signals are generated using Field II ultrasound simulation software. Using these simulated RF data of deformation, both axial and lateral tissue motion are estimated with sub-sample accuracy. The estimated displacements are then evaluated by comparing them to the known displacements computed by the FEM. This simulation approach was used to evaluate three different lateral motion estimation techniques employing (i) two separate 1D sub-sampling, (ii) two consecutive 1D sub-sampling, and (iii) 2D joint sub-sampling estimators. The estimation errors during two different tissue compression tests are presented with and without spatial filtering. Results show that RF signal processing methods involving tissue deformation can be evaluated using the proposed simulation technique, which employs accurate models. PMID:18002416

  11. Real-Time Tissue Change Monitoring on the Sonablate® 500 during High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wo-Hsing; Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Carlson, Roy; Uchida, Toyoaki

    2011-09-01

    Sonablate® 500 (SB-500) HIFU devices have been successfully used to treat prostate cancer non-invasively. In addition, Visually Directed HIFU with the SB-500 has demonstrated higher efficacy. Visually Directed HIFU works by displaying hyperechoic changes on the B-mode ultrasound images. However, small changes in the grey-scale images are not detectable by Visually Directed HIFU. To detect all tissue changes reliably, the SB-500 was enhanced with quantitative, real-time Tissue Change Monitoring (TCM) software. TCM uses pulse-echo ultrasound backscattered RF signals in 2D to estimate changes in the tissue properties caused by HIFU. The RF signal energy difference is calculated in selected frequency bands (pre and post HIFU) for each treatment site. The results are overlaid on the real-time ultrasound image in green, yellow and orange to represent low, medium and high degree of change in backscattered energy levels. The color mapping scheme was derived on measured temperature and backscattered RF signals from in vitro chicken tissue experiments. The TCM software was installed and tested in a clinical device to obtain human RF data. Post HIFU contrast enhanced MRI scans verified necrotic regions of the prostate. The color mapping success rate at higher HIFU power levels was 94% in the initial clinical test. Based on these results, TCM software has been released for wider usage. The clinical studies with TCM in Japan and The Bahamas have provided the following PSA (ng/ml) results. Japan (n = 97), PSA pre-treatment/post-treatment; minimum 0.7/0.0, maximum 76.0/4.73, median 6.89/0.07, standard deviation 11.19/0.62. The Bahamas (n = 59), minimum 0.4/0.0, maximum 13.0/1.4, median 4.7/0.1, standard deviation 2.8/0.3.

  12. Effect of biological characteristics of different types of uterine fibroids, as assessed with T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, on ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Peng; Chen, Jin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effects of the biological characteristics of different types of uterine fibroids, as assessed with T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) ablation. Thirty-five patients with 39 symptomatic uterine fibroids who underwent myomectomy or hysterectomy were enrolled. Before surgery, the uterine fibroids were subdivided into hypo-intense, iso-intense, heterogeneous hyper-intense and homogeneous hyper-intense categories based on signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. Tissue density and moisture content were determined in post-operative samples and normal uterine tissue, the isolated uterine fibroids were subjected to USgHIFU, and the extent of ablation was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and sirius red staining were undertaken to investigate the organizational structure of the uterine fibroids. Estrogen and progesterone receptor expression was assayed via immunohistochemical staining. The mean diameter of uterine fibroids was 6.9 ± 2.8 cm. For all uterine fibroids, the average density and moisture content were 10.7 ± 0.7 mg/mL and 75.7 ± 2.4%, respectively; and for the homogeneous hyper-intense fibroids, 10.3 ± 0.5 mg/mL and 76.6 ± 2.3%. The latter subgroup had lower density and higher moisture content compared with the other subgroups. After USgHIFU treatment, the extent of ablation of the hyper-intense fibroids was 102.7 ± 42.1 mm(2), which was significantly less than those of the hypo-intense and heterogeneous hyper-intense fibroids. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and sirius red staining revealed that the homogeneous hyper-intense fibroids had sparse collagen fibers and abundant cells. Immunohistochemistry results revealed that estrogen and progesterone receptors were highly expressed in the homogeneous hyper-intense fibroids. This study revealed that lower density, higher moisture content, sparse collagen

  13. Tissue type characterization using photoacoustic power spectrum, a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Goldstein, Seth D.; Kang, Jin U.; Choti, Michaal; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    The development of technologies capable of non-invasive characterization of tissue has the potential to significantly improve diagnostic and therapeutic medical interventions. In this study we investigated the feasibility of a noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) approach for characterizing biological tissues. The measurement was performed in the transmission mode with a wideband hydrophone while a tunable Q-switched Nd:YAG pulsed laser was used for illumination. The power spectrum of photoacoustic signal induced by a pulsed laser light from tissue was analyzed and features were extracted to study their correlation with tissue biomechanical properties. For a controlled study, tissue mimicking gelatin phantoms with different densities and equivalent optical absorptions were used as targets. The correlation between gelatin concentration of such phantoms and their mechanical properties were validated independently with a dynamic mechanical analyzer capable of calculating complex loss and storage moduli between two compression plates. It was shown that PA spectrums were shifted towards higher frequencies by increasing gelatin concentration. In order to quantify this effect, signal energy in two intervals of low and high frequency ranges were calculated. Gelatin concentration was correlated with PA energy in high frequency range with R2=0.94. Subsequently, PA signals generated from freshly resected human thyroid specimens were measured and analyzed in a similar fashion. We found that in aggregate, malignant thyroid tissue contains approximately 1.6 times lower energy in the high frequency range in comparison to normal thyroid tissue (p<0.01). This ratio increased with increasing illumination wavelength from 700 nm to 900nm. In summary, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using photoacoustic technique for characterizing tissue on the basis of viscoelastic properties of the tissue.

  14. Quantification of petroleum-type hydrocarbons in avian tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gay, M.L.; Belisle, A.A.; Patton, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    Summary: Methods were developed for the analysis of 16 hydrocarbons in avian tissue. Mechanical extraction with pentane was followed by clean-up on Florisil and Silicar. Residues were determined by gas--liquid chromatography and gas-liquid, chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was applied to the analysis of liver, kidney, fat, and brain tissue of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) fed a mixture of hydrocarbons. Measurable concentrations of all compounds analyzed were present in all tissues except brain. Highest concentrations were in fat.

  15. Quantification of petroleum-type hydrocarbons in avian tissue.

    PubMed

    Gay, M L; Belisle, A A; Patton, J F

    1980-01-01

    Methods were developed for the analysis of 16 hydrocarbons in avian tissue. Mechanical extraction with pentane was followed by clean-up on Florisil and Silicar. Residues were determined by gas-liquid chromatography and gas-liquid, chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was applied to the analysis of liver, kidney, fat, and brain tissue of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) fed a mixture of hydrocarbons. Measurable concentrations of all compounds analyzed were present in all tissues except brain. Highest concentrations were in fat. PMID:7358812

  16. Backward-mode multiwavelength photoacoustic scanner using a planar Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor for high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan; Beard, Paul

    2008-02-01

    A multiwavelength backward-mode planar photoacoustic scanner for 3D imaging of soft tissues to depths of several millimeters with a spatial resolution in the tens to hundreds of micrometers range is described. The system comprises a tunable optical parametric oscillator laser system that provides nanosecond laser pulses between 600 and 1200 nm for generating the photoacoustic signals and an optical ultrasound mapping system based upon a Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor for detecting them. The system enables photoacoustic signals to be mapped in 2D over a 50 mm diameter aperture in steps of 10 μm with an optically defined element size of 64 μm. Two sensors were used, one with a 22 μm thick polymer film spacer and the other with a 38 μm thick spacer providing -3 dB acoustic bandwidths of 39 and 22 MHz, respectively. The measured noise equivalent pressure of the 38 μm sensor was 0.21 kPa over a 20 MHz measurement bandwidth. The instrument line-spread function (LSF) was measured as a function of position and the minimum lateral and vertical LSFs found to be 38 and 15 μm, respectively. To demonstrate the ability of the system to provide high-resolution 3D images, a range of absorbing objects were imaged. Among these was a blood vessel phantom that comprised a network of blood filled tubes of diameters ranging from 62 to 300 μm immersed in an optically scattering liquid. In addition, to demonstrate the applicability of the system to spectroscopic imaging, a phantom comprising tubes filled with dyes of different spectral characteristics was imaged at a range of wavelengths. It is considered that this type of instrument may provide a practicable alternative to piezoelectric-based photoacoustic systems for high-resolution structural and functional imaging of the skin microvasculature and other superficial structures.

  17. Opto-acoustic diagnostics of the thermal action of high-intensity focused ultrasound on biological tissues: the possibility of its applications and model experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlova, Tanya D; Pelivanov, Ivan M; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Karabutov, Aleksander A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2006-12-31

    The possibility of using the opto-acoustic (OA) method for monitoring high-intensity ultrasonic therapy is studied. The optical properties of raw and boiled liver samples used as the undamaged model tissue and tissue destroyed by ultrasound, respectively, are measured. Experiments are performed with samples consisting of several alternating layers of raw and boiled liver of different thickness. The position and transverse size of the thermal lesion were determined from the temporal shape of the OA signals. The results of measurements are compared with the real size and position of the thermal lesion determined from the subsequent cuts of the sample. It is shown that the OA method permits the diagnostics of variations in biological tissues upon ultrasonic therapy. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  18. Automated classification of tissue by type using real-time spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaron, David A.; Cheong, Wai-Fung; Duckworth, Joshua L.; Noles, Kenneth; Nezhat, Camran; Seidman, Daniel; Hintz, Susan R.; Levinson, Carl J.; Murphy, Aileen L.; Price, John W., Jr.; Liu, Frank W.; Stevenson, David K.; Kermit, Eben L.

    1997-12-01

    Each tissue type has a unique spectral signature (e.g. liver looks distinct from bowel due to differences in both absorbance and in the way the tissue scatters light). While differentiation between normal tissues and tumors is not trivial, automated discrimination among normal tissue types (e.g. nerve, artery, vein, muscle) is feasible and clinically important, as many medical errors in medicine involve the misidentification of normal tissues. In this study, we have found that spectroscopic differentiation of tissues can be successfully applied to tissue samples (kidney and uterus) and model systems (fruit). Such optical techniques may usher in use of optical tissue diagnosis, leading to automated and portable diagnostic devices which can identify tissues, and guide use of medical instruments, such as during ablation or biopsy.

  19. Tissue cryobanking for conservation programs: effect of tissue type and storage time after death.

    PubMed

    Caputcu, Arzu Tas; Akkoc, Tolga; Cetinkaya, Gaye; Arat, Sezen

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the temporal post-mortem limits, within which there will be guarantees of obtaining living cells from several tissues of sheep and cattle and the effect of vitrification on the ability of cells from tissue stored at different times. Muscle tissue and auricular cartilage were stored at 4°C for 5, 48, 72, 96 and 216 h post-mortem (hpm). Tissue samples were sorted into two groups: one group was in vitro cultured immediately after storage and the other was vitrified after storage and then in vitro cultured. In cattle and sheep, no differences in subconfluence rates were observed between the two experimental groups. At the same time, no significant differences were observed in the number of days required in culture to reach confluence between non-vitrified and vitrified groups when tissues were stored at 4°C for different times. In sheep, while the population doubling times (PDT) were similar in cartilage cells from vitrified and non-vitrified tissues and stored at 4°C for 5 and 216 hpm, PDT of muscle cells were longer in 216 hpm stored groups than in 5 hpm stored groups. In bovine, although the PDT of muscle cells were similar for 5 and 216 hpm and both vitrified and non-vitrified tissues and the PDT were longer in cartilage cells from vitrified than from non-vitrified tissues. In conclusion, although storage times and vitrification have different effects on tissues from cattle and sheep, this study showed that living cells could be obtained from all groups. Therefore, cartilage and muscle tissues can be stored at 4°C for 216 hpm and used for cyrobanking. PMID:22271151

  20. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    IVUS; Ultrasound - coronary artery; Endovascular ultrasound; Intravascular echocardiography ... A tiny ultrasound wand is attached to the top of a thin tube called a catheter. This ultrasound catheter is inserted ...

  1. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound with Doppler ultrasound . Traditional ultrasound uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound records sound waves reflecting off moving objects, such as blood, to ...

  2. Influence of different sized nanoparticles combined with ultrasound on the optical properties of in vitro normal and cancerous human lung tissue studied with OCT and diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is concerned with the in vitro study of different sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles’ (NPs) penetration and accumulation in human normal lung (NL) tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue by the methods of continuous optical coherence tomography (OCT) monitoring and diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra measurement, and their evaluating the effects of TiO2 NPs in two sizes (60 nm and 100 nm) and their combination with ultrasound (US) on the optical properties of human NL and LAT tissue. Spectral measurements indicate that TiO2 NPs penetrate and accumulate into the tissues and thus induce enhancement of DR. The averaged and normalized OCT signal intensity suggests that light penetration depth is significantly enlarged by ultrasound. The average attenuation coefficient of NL tissue changes from 5.10  ±  0.26 mm-1 to 3.12  ±  0.43 mm-1 and 2.15  ±  0.54 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 5.54  ±  0.46 mm-1 to 3.24  ±  0.73 mm-1 and 2.69  ±  0.34 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The average attenuation coefficient of LAT tissue changes from 9.12  ±  0.54 mm-1 to 4.54  ±  0.39 mm-1 and 3.61  ±  0.38 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 9.79  ±  0.32 mm-1 to 5.12  ±  0.47 mm-1 and 4.89  ±  0.59 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The results suggest that the optical properties of NL and LAT tissues are greatly influenced by TiO2 NPs and their combination with ultrasound.

  3. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  4. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:26547117

  5. A μCT-based investigation of the influence of tissue modulus variation, anisotropy and inhomogeneity on ultrasound propagation in trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenlei; Shen, Yi; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound propagation is widely used in the diagnosis of osteoporosis by providing information on bone mechanical quality. When it loses calcium, the tissue properties will first decrease. However, limited research about the influence of tissue properties on ultrasound propagation have been done due to the cumbersome experiment. The goal of this study was to explore the relationships between tissue modulus (Es) and speed of sound (SOS) through numerical simulations, and to study the influence of Es on the acoustical behavior in characterizing the local structural anisotropy and inhomogeneity. In this work, three-dimensional finite element (FE) simulations were performed on a cubic high-resolution (15μm) bovine trabecular bone sample (4×4×4mm(3), BV/TV=0.18) mapped from micro-computed tomography. Ultrasound excitations of 50kHz, 500kHz and 2MHz were applied in three orthogonal axes and the first arriving signal (FAS) was collected to quantify wave velocity. In this study, a strong power law relationship between Es and SOS was measured with estimated exponential index β=2.08-3.44 for proximal-distal (PD), anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML), respectively (all R(2)>0.95). For various Es, a positive dispersion of sound speed with respect to sound frequency was observed and the velocity dispersion magnitude (VDM) was measured. Also, with Es=15GPa in three orientations, the SOS in PD axis is 2009±120m/s, faster than that of AP (1762±106m/s) and ML (1798±132m/s) (f=2MHz) directions. Besides, the standard deviation of SOS increases with the sound frequency and the Es in all directions except for that at 50kHz. For the mechanical properties, the apparent modulus with certain Es was highest in the longitudinal direction compared with the transverse directions. It indicates that the tissue modulus combining with anisotropy and inhomogeneity has great influence on ultrasound propagation. Simulation results agree well with theoretical and experimental

  6. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and ethanol induced tissue ablation: Thermal lesion volume and temperature ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Nguyen Hai

    HIFU is the upcoming technology for noninvasive or minimally invasive tumor ablation via the localized acoustic energy deposition at the focal region within the tumor target. The presence of cavitation bubbles had been shown to improve the therapeutic effect of HIFU. In this study, we have investigated the effect of HIFU on temperature rise and cavitation bubble activity in ethanol-treated porcine liver and kidney tissues. We have also explored changes in the viability and proliferation rate of HepG2, SW1376, and FB1 cancer cells with their exposure to ethanol and HIFU. Tissues were submerged in 95% ethanol for five hours and then exposed to HIFU generated by a 1.1 MHz transducer or injected into focal spot before HIFU exposure. Cavitation events were measured by a passive cavitation detection technique for a range of acoustic power from 1.17 W to 20.52 W. The temperature around the focal zone was measured by type K or type E thermocouples embedded in the samples. In experiments with cancer cells, 2.7 millions cells were treated with concentration of ethanol at concentration 2%, 4%, 10%, 25%, and 50% and the cell were exposed to HIFU with power of 2.73 W, 8.72 W, and 12.0 W for 30 seconds. Our data show that the treatment of tissues with ethanol reduces the threshold power for inertial cavitation and increases the temperature rise. The exposure of cancer cells to various HIFU power only showed a higher number of viable cells 24 to 72 hours after HIFU exposure. On the other hand, both the viability and proliferation rate were significantly decreased in cells treated with ethanol and then HIFU at 8.7 W and 12.0 W even at ethanol concentration of 2 and 4 percent. In conclusion, the results of our study indicate that percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) and HIFU have a synergistic effect on cancer cells ablation.

  7. Topographical Control of Ocular Cell Types for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Kevin J.; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Tao, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Visual impairment affects over 285 million people worldwide and has a major impact on an individual’s quality of life. Tissue engineering has the potential to increase quality of life for many of these patients by preventing vision loss or restoring vision using cell-based therapies. However, these strategies will require an understanding of the microenvironmental factors that influence cell behavior. The eye is a well-organized organ whose structural complexity is essential for proper function. Interactions between ocular cells and their highly ordered extracellular matrix are necessary for maintaining key tissue properties including corneal transparency and retinal lamination. Therefore, it is not surprising that culturing these cells in vitro on traditional flat substrates result in irregular morphology. Instead, topographically patterned biomaterials better mimic native extracellular matrix and have been shown to elicit in vivo-like morphology and gene expression which is essential for tissue engineering. Herein we review multiple methods for producing well-controlled topography and discuss optimal biomaterial scaffold design for cells of the cornea, retina, and lens. PMID:23744715

  8. Localization of the binding site of tissue-type plasminogen activator to fibrin.

    PubMed Central

    Ichinose, A; Takio, K; Fujikawa, K

    1986-01-01

    Functionally active A and B chains were separated from a two-chain form of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator after mild reduction and alkylation. The A chain was found to be responsible for the binding to lysine-Sepharose or fibrin and the B chain contained the catalytic activity of tissue-type plasminogen activator. An extensive reduction of two-chain tissue-type plasminogen activator, however, destroyed both the binding and catalytic activities. A thermolytic fragment, Fr. 1, of tissue-type plasminogen activator that contained a growth factor and two kringle segments retained its lysine binding activity. Additional thermolytic cleavages in the kringle-2 segment of Fr. 1 caused a total loss of the binding activity. These results indicated that the binding site of tissue-type plasminogen activator to fibrin was located in the kringle-2 segment. Images PMID:3088041

  9. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeshu; Pei, Jing; Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P; Martin, Edward W; Hitchcock, Charles L; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  10. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F.; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)—fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  11. Temperature estimation with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Matthew

    Hepatocelluar carcinoma is the fastest growing type of cancer in the United States. In addition, the survival rate after one year is approximately zero without treatment. In many instances, patients with hepatocelluar carcinoma may not be suitable candidates for the primary treatment options, i.e. surgical resection or liver transplantation. This has led to the development of minimally invasive therapies focused on destroying hepatocelluar by thermal or chemical methods. The focus of this dissertation is on the development of ultrasound-based image-guided monitoring options for minimally invasive therapies such as radiofrequency ablation. Ultrasound-based temperature imaging relies on relating the gradient of locally estimated tissue displacements to a temperature change. First, a realistic Finite Element Analysis/ultrasound simulation of ablation was developed. This allowed evaluation of the ability of ultrasound-based temperature estimation algorithms to track temperatures for three different ablation scenarios in the liver. It was found that 2-Dimensional block matching and a 6 second time step was able to accurately track the temperature over a 12 minute ablation procedure. Next, a tissue-mimicking phantom was constructed to determine the accuracy of the temperature estimation method by comparing estimated temperatures to that measured using invasive fiber-optic temperature probes. The 2-Dimensional block matching was able to track the temperature accurately over the entire 8 minute heating procedure in the tissue-mimicking phantom. Finally, two separate in-vivo experiments were performed. The first experiment examined the ability of our algorithm to track frame-to-frame displacements when external motion due to respiration and the cardiac cycle were considered. It was determined that a frame rate between 13 frames per second and 33 frames per second was sufficient to track frame-to-frame displacements between respiratory cycles. The second experiment examined

  12. CT-Based Assessment of Relative Soft-Tissue Alteration in Different Types of Ancient Mummies.

    PubMed

    Sydler, Christina; Öhrström, Lena; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Woitek, Ulrich; Rühli, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Mummification leads to alteration of soft-tissue morphology. No research has focused specifically on differences in soft-tissue shrinkage depending on mummification type. This study evaluated whether soft-tissue alteration is dependent on type of mummification. A total of 17 human mummies have been investigated by computed tomography (CT). Samples included artificially embalmed ancient Egyptian mummies, naturally mummified South American corpses, ice mummies (including the Iceman, South Tyrol Museum of Archeology, Bolzano, Italy, ca. 3,300 BC), bog bodies and a desiccated mummy of possibly Asian provenance. The acquired data were compared to four contemporary bodies. The extent of soft-tissue shrinkage was evaluated using CT data. Shrinkage was defined as soft-tissue relative to area of bone (in number of voxels). Measurements were taken at 13 anatomically defined locations. Ice mummies show the highest degree of preservation. This finding is most likely explained due to frozen water within tissues. All other types of mummies show significantly (at P < 0.05) smaller relative area of preserved soft-tissue. Variation between different anatomical structures (e.g., upper lip vs. mid-femur) is significant, unlike variation within one compartment (e.g., proximal vs. distal humerus). Mummification type strongly affects the degree of soft-tissue alteration, surprisingly mostly independent of overall historical age. These results highlight the unique morphological impact of taphonomy on soft-tissue preservation and are of particular interest in tissue research as well as in forensics. PMID:25998649

  13. Stable isotopes and elasmobranchs: tissue types, methods, applications and assumptions.

    PubMed

    Hussey, N E; MacNeil, M A; Olin, J A; McMeans, B C; Kinney, M J; Chapman, D D; Fisk, A T

    2012-04-01

    Stable-isotope analysis (SIA) can act as a powerful ecological tracer with which to examine diet, trophic position and movement, as well as more complex questions pertaining to community dynamics and feeding strategies or behaviour among aquatic organisms. With major advances in the understanding of the methodological approaches and assumptions of SIA through dedicated experimental work in the broader literature coupled with the inherent difficulty of studying typically large, highly mobile marine predators, SIA is increasingly being used to investigate the ecology of elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays). Here, the current state of SIA in elasmobranchs is reviewed, focusing on available tissues for analysis, methodological issues relating to the effects of lipid extraction and urea, the experimental dynamics of isotopic incorporation, diet-tissue discrimination factors, estimating trophic position, diet and mixing models and individual specialization and niche-width analyses. These areas are discussed in terms of assumptions made when applying SIA to the study of elasmobranch ecology and the requirement that investigators standardize analytical approaches. Recommendations are made for future SIA experimental work that would improve understanding of stable-isotope dynamics and advance their application in the study of sharks, skates and rays. PMID:22497393

  14. Type of MRI contrast, tissue gadolinium, and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Catherine; Barnes, Jeffrey L.; Tan, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    It has been presupposed that the thermodynamic stability constant (Ktherm) of gadolinium-based MRI chelates relate to the risk of precipitating nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The present study compared low-Ktherm gadodiamide with high-Ktherm gadoteridol in cultured fibroblasts and rats with uninephrectomies. Gadolinium content was assessed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in paraffin-embedded tissues. In vitro, fibroblasts demonstrated dose-dependent fibronectin generation, transforming growth factor-β production, and expression of activated myofibroblast stress fiber protein α-smooth muscle actin. There were negligible differences with respect to toxicity or proliferation between the two contrast agents. In the rodent model, gadodiamide treatment led to greater skin fibrosis and dermal cellularity than gadoteridol. In the kidney, both contrast agents led to proximal tubule vacuolization and increased fibronectin accumulation. Despite large detectable gadolinium signals in the spleen, skin, muscle, and liver from the gadodiamide-treated group, contrast-induced fibrosis appeared to be limited to the skin and kidney. These findings support the hypothesis that low-Ktherm chelates have a greater propensity to elicit nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and demonstrate that certain tissues are resistant to these effects. PMID:25100280

  15. Type of MRI contrast, tissue gadolinium, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Tan, Chunyan; Wagner, Brent

    2014-10-01

    It has been presupposed that the thermodynamic stability constant (K(therm)) of gadolinium-based MRI chelates relate to the risk of precipitating nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The present study compared low-K(therm) gadodiamide with high-K(therm) gadoteridol in cultured fibroblasts and rats with uninephrectomies. Gadolinium content was assessed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in paraffin-embedded tissues. In vitro, fibroblasts demonstrated dose-dependent fibronectin generation, transforming growth factor-β production, and expression of activated myofibroblast stress fiber protein α-smooth muscle actin. There were negligible differences with respect to toxicity or proliferation between the two contrast agents. In the rodent model, gadodiamide treatment led to greater skin fibrosis and dermal cellularity than gadoteridol. In the kidney, both contrast agents led to proximal tubule vacuolization and increased fibronectin accumulation. Despite large detectable gadolinium signals in the spleen, skin, muscle, and liver from the gadodiamide-treated group, contrast-induced fibrosis appeared to be limited to the skin and kidney. These findings support the hypothesis that low-K(therm) chelates have a greater propensity to elicit nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and demonstrate that certain tissues are resistant to these effects. PMID:25100280

  16. Liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 DNA into human prostate cancer cells is improved by low-frequency ultrasound combined with microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    BAI, WEN-KUN; ZHANG, WEI; HU, BING; YING, TAO

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common type of cancer in elderly men. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound exposure in combination with SonoVue microbubbles on liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 genes into human prostate cancer cells. PC-3 human prostate cancer cells were exposed to ultrasound; duty cycle was controlled at 20% (2 sec on, 8 sec off) for 5 min with and without SonoVue microbubble echo-contrast agent using a digital sonifier (frequency, 21 kHz; intensity, 46 mW/cm2). The cells were divided into eight groups, as follows: Group A (SonoVue + wild-type P53), group B (ultrasound + wild-type P53), group C (SonoVue + ultrasound + wild-type P53), group D (liposome + wild-type P53), group E (liposome + SonoVue + wild-type P53), group F (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound), group G (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound + SonoVue) and the control group (wild-type P53). Following treatment, a hemocytometer was used to measure cell lysis, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed to detect P53 gene transfection efficiency, Cell Counting Kit-8 was employed to reveal cell proliferation and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining was used to determine cell apoptosis. Cell lysis was minimal in each group. Wild-type P53 gene and protein expression were significantly increased in the PC-3 cells in group G compared with the control and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell proliferation was significantly suppressed in group G compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell apoptosis levels in group G were significantly improved compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Thus, the results of the present study indicate that the use of low-frequency and low-energy ultrasound in combination with SonoVue microbubbles may be a potent physical method for increasing liposome gene delivery efficiency. PMID:27313702

  17. Ultrasound of wrist and hand masses.

    PubMed

    Guerini, H; Morvan, G; Vuillemin, V; Campagna, R; Thevenin, F; Larousserie, F; Leclercq, C; Le Viet, D; Drapé, J-L

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound is a useful tool to investigate soft tissue masses in the wrist and hand. In most situations ultrasound helps distinguish between a cyst and a tissue mass. This article provides a simple clinical approach to the use of ultrasound imaging for the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of wrist and hand masses. PMID:26625731

  18. Investigation of synthetic aperture methods in ultrasound surface imaging using elementary surface types.

    PubMed

    Kerr, W; Pierce, S G; Rowe, P

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging methods have been employed widely in recent research in non-destructive testing (NDT), but uptake has been more limited in medical ultrasound imaging. Typically offering superior focussing power over more traditional phased array methods, these techniques have been employed in NDT applications to locate and characterise small defects within large samples, but have rarely been used to image surfaces. A desire to ultimately employ ultrasonic surface imaging for bone surface geometry measurement prior to surgical intervention motivates this research, and results are presented for initial laboratory trials of a surface reconstruction technique based on global thresholding of ultrasonic 3D point cloud data. In this study, representative geometry artefacts were imaged in the laboratory using two synthetic aperture techniques; the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) employing full and narrow synthetic apertures, respectively. Three high precision metallic samples of known geometries (cuboid, sphere and cylinder) which featured a range of elementary surface primitives were imaged using a 5MHz, 128 element 1D phased array employing both SAFT and TFM approaches. The array was manipulated around the samples using a precision robotic positioning system, allowing for repeatable ultrasound derived 3D surface point clouds to be created. A global thresholding technique was then developed that allowed the extraction of the surface profiles, and these were compared with the known geometry samples to provide a quantitative measure of error of 3D surface reconstruction. The mean errors achieved with optimised SAFT imaging for the cuboidal, spherical and cylindrical samples were 1.3mm, 2.9mm and 2.0mm respectively, while those for TFM imaging were 3.7mm, 3.0mm and 3.1mm, respectively. These results were contrary to expectations given the higher information content associated with the TFM images. However, it was

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  20. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  2. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  3. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  4. Tissue ablation after 120W greenlight laser vaporization and bipolar plasma vaporization of the prostate: a comparison using transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound volumetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranzbühler, Benedikt; Gross, Oliver; Fankhauser, Christian D.; Hefermehl, Lukas J.; Poyet, Cédric; Largo, Remo; Müntener, Michael; Seifert, Hans-Helge; Zimmermann, Matthias; Sulser, Tullio; Müller, Alexander; Hermanns, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Introduction and objectives: Greenlight laser vaporization (LV) of the prostate is characterized by simultaneous vaporization and coagulation of prostatic tissue resulting in tissue ablation together with excellent hemostasis during the procedure. It has been reported that bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) of the prostate might be an alternative for LV. So far, it has not been shown that BPV is as effective as LV in terms of tissue ablation or hemostasis. We performed transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound investigations to compare the efficiency of tissue ablation between LV and BPV. Methods: Between 11.2009 and 5.2011, 50 patients underwent pure BPV in our institution. These patients were matched with regard to the pre-operative prostate volume to 50 LV patients from our existing 3D-volumetry-database. Transrectal 3D ultrasound and planimetric volumetry of the prostate were performed pre-operatively, after catheter removal, 6 weeks and 6 months. Results: Median pre-operative prostate volume was not significantly different between the two groups (45.3ml vs. 45.4ml; p=1.0). After catheter removal, median absolute volume reduction (BPV 12.4ml, LV 6.55ml) as well as relative volume reduction (27.8% vs. 16.4%) were significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). After six weeks (42.9% vs. 33.3%) and six months (47.2% vs. 39.7%), relative volume reduction remained significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). Absolute volume reduction was non-significantly higher in the BPV group after six weeks (18.4ml, 13.8ml; p=0.051) and six months (20.8ml, 18ml; p=0.3). Clinical outcome parameters improved significantly in both groups without relevant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both vaporization techniques result in efficient tissue ablation with initial prostatic swelling. BPV seems to be superior due to a higher relative volume reduction. This difference had no clinical impact after a follow-up of 6M.

  5. [Radiology Update Ultrasound Elastography – Quintessence for the Primary Care Physician].

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Gubler, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Rominger, Marga

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound elastography visualizes and measures elasticity of tissue. Depending on the methods there are four types of elastography: strain elastography (SE), transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) and shear wave elastography (SWE). Due to the fact that pathological changes in the tissue in most of the cases mean a lower elasticity, ultrasound elastography is able to diagnose diseases such as liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, to help in the diagnosis of suspicious lesions in mamma, prostate and thyroid gland. So far, ultrasound elastography is not yet able to replace other standardized diagnostic tools but can add valuable diagnostic information. PMID:26837322

  6. Cell-Type-Specific Genome-wide Expression Profiling after Laser Capture Microdissection of Living Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Manohar, C F

    2005-02-09

    The purpose of this technical feasibility study was to develop and evaluate robust microgenomic tools for investigations of genome-wide expression of very small numbers of cells isolated from whole tissue sections. Tissues contain large numbers of cell-types that play varied roles in organ function and responses to endogenous and exogenous toxicants whether bacterial, viral, chemical or radiation. Expression studies of whole tissue biopsy are severely limited because heterogeneous cell-types result in an averaging of molecular signals masking subtle but important changes in gene expression in any one cell type(s) or group of cells. Accurate gene expression analysis requires the study of specific cell types in their tissue environment but without contamination from surrounding cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology to isolate morphologically distinct cells from tissue sections. Alternative methods are available for isolating single cells but not yet for their reliable genome-wide expression analyses. The tasks of this feasibility project were to: (1) Develop efficient protocols for laser capture microdissection of cells from tissues identified by antibody label, or morphological stain. (2) Develop reproducible gene-transcript analyses techniques for single cell-types and determine the numbers of cells needed for reliable genome-wide analyses. (3) Validate the technology for epithelial and endothelial cells isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

  7. A Novel Approach to Ultrasound-Mediated Tissue Decellularization and Intra-Hepatic Cell Delivery in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pahk, Ki Joo; Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Malago, Massimo; Saffari, Nader; Dhar, Dipok Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation is the mainstay of treatment for end stage liver diseases, including metabolic and congenital liver diseases. The number of suitable donor organs is, however, limited, and a whole-liver transplant requires complex surgery. Cell therapy, such as intra-portal hepatocytes transplantation, has been considered as a bridging therapy to liver transplantation but has shown a mixed clinical outcome with limited success, including low level of engraftment of transplanted hepatocytes. Here, we report a novel cell delivery technique in a rat model by creating a cavity inside the liver parenchyma by non-invasive high intensity focused ultrasound histotripsy. Our in vivo experimental results together with histologic observations show that direct injection of cells inside the cavity can facilitate successful uptake, proliferation and integration of the transplanted hepatocytes in the recipient liver. We were able to restore the plasma albumin level to 50% of the normal level in Nagase analbuminemic rats (serum albumin level of the Nagase rats was initially nil) by cell therapy after high intensity focused ultrasound-mediated histotripsy. We believe that this novel technique would enable the delivery of a large number of cells into the liver to restore liver function, particularly as a treatment for metabolic liver diseases. This novel method of intra-hepatic hepatocyte transplantation might be an invaluable tool for cell therapy in the future. PMID:27184248

  8. Ultrasound Device Approved to Treat Essential Tremor

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159817.html Ultrasound Device Approved to Treat Essential Tremor Uses MRI ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy small bits of brain tissue that ...

  9. Genetic Parameters of Pre-adjusted Body Weight Growth and Ultrasound Measures of Body Tissue Development in Three Seedstock Pig Breed Populations in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Yun Ho; Mahboob, Alam; Cho, Chung Il; Choi, Jae Gwan; Choi, Im Soo; Choi, Tae Jeong; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Park, Byoung Ho

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of body weight growth adjustment methods on genetic parameters of body growth and tissue among three pig breeds. Data collected on 101,820 Landrace, 281,411 Yorkshire, and 78,068 Duroc pigs, born in Korean swine breeder farms since 2000, were analyzed. Records included body weights on test day and amplitude (A)-mode ultrasound carcass measures of backfat thickness (BF), eye muscle area (EMA), and retail cut percentage (RCP). Days to 90 kg body weight (DAYS90), through an adjustment of the age based on the body weight at the test day, were obtained. Ultrasound measures were also pre-adjusted (ABF, EMA, AEMA, ARCP) based on their test day measures. The (co)variance components were obtained with 3 multi-trait animal models using the REMLF90 software package. Model I included DAYS90 and ultrasound traits, whereas model II and III accounted DAYS90 and pre-adjusted ultrasound traits. Fixed factors were sex (sex) and contemporary groups (herd-year-month of birth) for all traits among the models. Additionally, model I and II considered a linear covariate of final weight on the ultrasound measure traits. Heritability (h2) estimates for DAYS90, BF, EMA, and RCP ranged from 0.36 to 0.42, 0.34 to 0.43, 0.20 to 0.22, and 0.39 to 0.45, respectively, among the models. The h2 estimates of DAYS90 from model II and III were also somewhat similar. The h2 for ABF, AEMA, and ARCP were 0.35 to 0.44, 0.20 to 0.25, and 0.41 to 0.46, respectively. Our heritability estimates varied mostly among the breeds. The genetic correlations (rG) were moderately negative between DAYS90 and BF (−0.29 to −0.38), and between DAYS90 and EMA (−0.16 to −0.26). BF had strong rG with RCP (−0.87 to −0.93). Moderately positive rG existed between DAYS90 and RCP (0.20 to 0.28) and between EMA and RCP (0.35 to 0.44) among the breeds. For DAYS90, model II and III, its correlations with ABF, AEMA, and ARCP were mostly low or negligible except the r

  10. Genetic Parameters of Pre-adjusted Body Weight Growth and Ultrasound Measures of Body Tissue Development in Three Seedstock Pig Breed Populations in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choy, Yun Ho; Mahboob, Alam; Cho, Chung Il; Choi, Jae Gwan; Choi, Im Soo; Choi, Tae Jeong; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Park, Byoung Ho

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of body weight growth adjustment methods on genetic parameters of body growth and tissue among three pig breeds. Data collected on 101,820 Landrace, 281,411 Yorkshire, and 78,068 Duroc pigs, born in Korean swine breeder farms since 2000, were analyzed. Records included body weights on test day and amplitude (A)-mode ultrasound carcass measures of backfat thickness (BF), eye muscle area (EMA), and retail cut percentage (RCP). Days to 90 kg body weight (DAYS90), through an adjustment of the age based on the body weight at the test day, were obtained. Ultrasound measures were also pre-adjusted (ABF, EMA, AEMA, ARCP) based on their test day measures. The (co)variance components were obtained with 3 multi-trait animal models using the REMLF90 software package. Model I included DAYS90 and ultrasound traits, whereas model II and III accounted DAYS90 and pre-adjusted ultrasound traits. Fixed factors were sex (sex) and contemporary groups (herd-year-month of birth) for all traits among the models. Additionally, model I and II considered a linear covariate of final weight on the ultrasound measure traits. Heritability (h(2)) estimates for DAYS90, BF, EMA, and RCP ranged from 0.36 to 0.42, 0.34 to 0.43, 0.20 to 0.22, and 0.39 to 0.45, respectively, among the models. The h(2) estimates of DAYS90 from model II and III were also somewhat similar. The h(2) for ABF, AEMA, and ARCP were 0.35 to 0.44, 0.20 to 0.25, and 0.41 to 0.46, respectively. Our heritability estimates varied mostly among the breeds. The genetic correlations (rG) were moderately negative between DAYS90 and BF (-0.29 to -0.38), and between DAYS90 and EMA (-0.16 to -0.26). BF had strong rG with RCP (-0.87 to -0.93). Moderately positive rG existed between DAYS90 and RCP (0.20 to 0.28) and between EMA and RCP (0.35 to 0.44) among the breeds. For DAYS90, model II and III, its correlations with ABF, AEMA, and ARCP were mostly low or negligible except the r

  11. Validation of tissue change monitoring (TCM) on the Sonablate® 500 during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of prostate cancer with real-time thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wo-Hsing; Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Carlson, Roy; Schatzl, Georg; Marberger, Michael

    2012-10-01

    The Sonablate® 500 has quantitative, real-time Tissue Change Monitoring (TCM) software that estimates changes in tissue properties due to HIFU treatment of prostate cancer. This study validates the Sonablate 500 TCM system using real-time thermometry. Five patients with histologically confirmed, organ-confined prostate cancer were enrolled. Four patients with focal cancer had hemiablation and one had whole gland ablation. TCM generates energy reading based on spectral analysis on the RF backscattered ultrasound signals; results are used as an estimator of tissue temperature. Needle thermocouples were placed transperineally under TRUS guidance in the prostate to monitor temperatures from focal zone, posterior to the focal zone and on the lateral gland where no HIFU was applied. The HIFU treatments averaged 37, 35 and 19.7 Watts for the treatment for anterior, middle and posterior zones. The measured temperatures (Average, Max, and Min) in the HIFU treatment zones were 84, 114 and 70 degrees C. The temperature estimated by TCM energy readings were 83% 75-100 degrees C and 17% 60-75 degrees C with an average of 91 degrees C. Outside the focal zone, average recorded temperature was 50 degrees C. Average temperature in the lateral lobe where no HIFU was applied was 40.7 degrees C.

  12. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind a rib cage using a high-intensity focused ultrasound phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Ilyin, Sergey A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field, and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low-power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to the formation of high-amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W cm-2 in the free field in water and 40 W cm-2 in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue.

  13. Ultrasound Phantoms to Protect Patients from Novices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    With the growing use of ultrasound for pain management, we are interested in how to teach and practice ultrasound-guided procedures. Ethically, we should not insert a needle in a patient until after much practice on a phantom. Several types of phantoms have been introduced for ultrasound training, including water, agar/gelatin, elastomeric rubber, and meat phantoms and cadavers. The ideal phantom is similar to human tissue, is readily available and inexpensive, can be used repeatedly, provides tactile feedback, will hold a needle in place, does not generate needle tracks, and is not a health hazard. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of phantoms for improving the proficiency of novices. We hope that the application of phantoms in education leads to improved proficiency and increased patient safety. PMID:27103961

  14. Prostate tissue characterization/classification in 144 patient population using wavelet and higher order spectra features from transrectal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Gyan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Sree, S Vinitha; Swapna, G; Yantri, Ratna; Martis, Roshan Joy; Saba, Luca; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Mallarini, Giorgio; El-Baz, Ayman; Al Ekish, Shadi; Beland, Michael; Suri, Jasjit S

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we have proposed an on-line computer-aided diagnostic system called "UroImage" that classifies a Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) image into cancerous or non-cancerous with the help of non-linear Higher Order Spectra (HOS) features and Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) coefficients. The UroImage system consists of an on-line system where five significant features (one DWT-based feature and four HOS-based features) are extracted from the test image. These on-line features are transformed by the classifier parameters obtained using the training dataset to determine the class. We trained and tested six classifiers. The dataset used for evaluation had 144 TRUS images which were split into training and testing sets. Three-fold and ten-fold cross-validation protocols were adopted for training and estimating the accuracy of the classifiers. The ground truth used for training was obtained using the biopsy results. Among the six classifiers, using 10-fold cross-validation technique, Support Vector Machine and Fuzzy Sugeno classifiers presented the best classification accuracy of 97.9% with equally high values for sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value. Our proposed automated system, which achieved more than 95% values for all the performance measures, can be an adjunct tool to provide an initial diagnosis for the identification of patients with prostate cancer. The technique, however, is limited by the limitations of 2D ultrasound guided biopsy, and we intend to improve our technique by using 3D TRUS images in the future. PMID:23745787

  15. Ultrasound simulation in bone.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jonathan J; Luo, Gangming; Siffert, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    The manner in which ultrasound interacts with bone is of key interest in therapy and diagnosis alike. These may include applications directly to bone, as, for example, in treatment to accelerate the healing of bone fractures and in assessment of bone density in osteoporosis, or indirectly in diagnostic imaging of soft tissue with interest in assessing exposure levels to nearby bone. Because of the lack of analytic solutions to virtually every "practical problem" encountered clinically, ultrasound simulation has become a widely used technique for evaluating ultrasound interactions in bone. This paper provides an overview of the use of ultrasound simulation in bone. A brief description of the mathematical model used to characterize ultrasound propagation in bone is first provided. A number of simulation examples are then presented that explain how simulation may be utilized in a variety of practical configurations. The focus of this paper in terms of examples presented is on diagnostic applications in bone, and, in particular, for assessment of osteoporosis. However, the use of simulation in other areas of interest can easily be extrapolated from the examples presented. In conclusion, this paper describes the use of ultrasound simulation in bone and demonstrates the power of computational methods for ultrasound research in general and tissue and bone applications in particular. PMID:18599409

  16. Towards enabling ultrasound guidance in cervical cancer high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Adrian; Sojoudia, Samira; Gaudet, Marc; Yap, Wan Wan; Chang, Silvia D.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Moradi, Mehdi

    2014-03-01

    MRI and Computed Tomography (CT) are used in image-based solutions for guiding High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment of cervical cancer. MRI is costly and CT exposes the patients to ionizing radiation. Ultrasound, on the other hand, is affordable and safe. The long-term goal of our work is to enable the use of multiparametric ultrasound imaging in image-guided HDR for cervical cancer. In this paper, we report the development of enabling technology for ultrasound guidance and tissue typing. We report a system to obtain the 3D freehand transabdominal ultrasound RF signals and B-mode images of the uterus, and a method for registration of ultrasound to MRI. MRI and 3D ultrasound images of the female pelvis were registered by contouring the uterus in the two modalities, creating a surface model, followed by rigid and B-spline deformable registration. The resulting transformation was used to map the location of the tumor from the T2-weighted MRI to ultrasound images and to determine cancerous and normal areas in ultrasound. B-mode images show a contrast for cancer vs. normal tissue. Our study shows the potential and the challenges of ultrasound imaging in guiding cervical cancer treatments.

  17. Comparative analysis of codeword representation by clustering methods for the classification of histological tissue types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygili, Ahmet; Uysal, Gunalp; Bilgin, Gokhan

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the classification of several histological tissue types, i.e., muscles, nerves, connective and epithelial tissue cells, is studied in high resolutional histological images. In the feature extraction step, bag of features method is utilized to reveal distinguishing features of each tissue cell types. Local small blocks of sub-images/patches are extracted to find discriminative patterns for followed strategy. For detecting points of interest in local patches, Harris corner detection method is applied. Afterwards, discriminative features are extracted using the scale invariant feature transform method using these points of interests. Several code word representations are obtained by clustering approach (using k-means fuzzy c-means, expectation maximization method, Gaussian mixture models) and evaluated in comparative manner. In the last step, the classification of the tissue cells data are performed using k-nearest neighbor and support vector machines methods.

  18. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  19. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  20. 2-D PSTD Simulation of the time-reversed ultrasound-encoded deep-tissue imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Snow H.; Ting, Wei-Lun; Wang, Shiang-Jiu

    2014-01-01

    We present a robust simulation technique to model the time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) technique for deep-tissue imaging. The pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) algorithm is employed to rigorously model the electromagnetic wave interaction of light propagating through a macroscopic scattering medium. Based upon numerical solutions of Maxwell’s equations, the amplitude and phase are accurately accounted for to analyze factors that affect the TRUE propagation of light through scattering media. More generally, we demonstrate the feasibility of modeling light propagation through a virtual tissue model of macroscopic dimensions with numerical solutions of Maxwell’s equations. PMID:24688821

  1. Atherosclerotic plaque tissue characterization in 2D ultrasound longitudinal carotid scans for automated classification: a paradigm for stroke risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Vinitha Sree, S; Afonso, David; Sanches, Joao; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Pedro, L M; Fernandes E Fernandes, J; Suri, Jasjit S

    2013-05-01

    In the case of carotid atherosclerosis, to avoid unnecessary surgeries in asymptomatic patients, it is necessary to develop a technique to effectively differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. In this paper, we have presented a data mining framework that characterizes the textural differences in these two classes using several grayscale features based on a novel combination of trace transform and fuzzy texture. The features extracted from the delineated plaque regions in B-mode ultrasound images were used to train several classifiers in order to prepare them for classification of new test plaques. Our CAD system was evaluated using two different databases consisting of 146 (44 symptomatic to 102 asymptomatic) and 346 (196 symptomatic and 150 asymptomatic) images. Both these databases differ in the way the ground truth was determined. We obtained classification accuracies of 93.1 and 85.3 %, respectively. The techniques are low cost, easily implementable, objective, and non-invasive. For more objective analysis, we have also developed novel integrated indices using a combination of significant features. PMID:23292291

  2. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-01-01

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations. PMID:18474406

  3. Modelling tissue electrophysiology with multiple cell types: applications of the extended bidomain framework.

    PubMed

    Corrias, Alberto; Pathmanathan, Pras; Gavaghan, David J; Buist, Martin L

    2012-02-01

    The bidomain framework has been extensively used to model tissue electrophysiology in a variety of applications. One limitation of the bidomain model is that it describes the activity of only one cell type interacting with the extracellular space. If more than one cell type contributes to the tissue electrophysiology, then the bidomain model is not sufficient. Recently, evidence has suggested that this is the case for at least two important applications: cardiac and gastrointestinal tissue electrophysiology. In the heart, fibroblasts ubiquitously interact with myocytes and are believed to play an important role in the organ electrophysiology. Along the GI tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) generate electrical waves that are passed on to surrounding smooth muscle cells (SMC), which are interconnected with the ICC and with each other. Because of the contribution of more than one cell type to the overall organ electrophysiology, investigators in different fields have independently proposed similar extensions of the bidomain model to incorporate multiple cell types and tested it on simplified geometries. In this paper, we provide a general derivation of such an extended bidomain framework applicable to any tissue and provide a generic and efficient implementation applicable to any geometry. Proof-of-concept results of tissue electrophysiology on realistic 3D organ geometries using the extended bidomain framework are presented for the heart and the stomach. PMID:22222297

  4. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  6. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  7. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  8. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  9. Ultrasound-image-based Texture Variability along the Carotid Artery Wall in Asymptomatic Subjects with Low and High Stenosis Degrees: Unveiling Morphological Phenomena of the Vulnerable Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golemati, Spyretta; Lehareas, Symeon; Tsiaparas, Nikolaos N.; Nikita, Konstantina S.; Chatziioannou, Achilles; Perrea, Despina N.

    Valid identification of the vulnerable asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis remains a crucial clinical issue. In this study, texture differences were estimated along the atherosclerotic arterial wall, namely at the plaque, the wall adjacent to it and the plaque shoulder, i.e. the boundary between wall and plaque, in an attempt to reveal morphological phenomena, representative of the high stenosis (considered vulnerable) cases. A total of 25 arteries were interrogated, 11 with low (50-69%) and 14 with high (70-100%) degrees of stenosis. The two groups had similar ages. Texture features were estimated from B-mode ultrasound images, and included four second-order statistical parameters (contrast, correlation, energy and homogeneity), each calculated at four different image directions (00, 450, 900, 1350), yielding a total of 16 features. Texture differences between (a) wall and plaque and (b) wall and plaque shoulder were quantified as the differences in texture feature values for each tissue area normalised by the texture feature value of the wall, which was considered as reference, as illustrated in the following equation: dTFi = (TFi,W - TFi,P/S)/TFi,W, where dTFi the estimated texture difference, TFi,W the texture of the wall, and TFi,P/S the texture of the plaque (P) or the shoulder (S). Significant differences in texture variability of wall vs. shoulder were observed between high and low stenosis cases for 3 features at diastole and 7 features at systole. No differences were observed for wall vs plaque, although wall texture was significantly different than plaque texture, in absolute values. These findings suggest that texture variability along the atherosclerotic wall, which is indicative of tissue discontinuities, and proneness to rupture, can be quantitatively described with texture indices and reveal valuable morphological phenomena of the vulnerable tissue.

  10. Posttranslational Modifications in Type I Collagen from Different Tissues Extracted from Wild Type and Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase 1 Null Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Pokidysheva, Elena; Zientek, Keith D.; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Kazunori; Vranka, Janice A.; Montgomery, Nathan T.; Keene, Douglas R.; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Okuyama, Kenji; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen extracted from tendon, skin, and bone of wild type and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) null mice shows distinct patterns of 3-hydroxylation and glycosylation of hydroxylysine residues. The A1 site (Pro-986) in the α1-chain of type I collagen is almost completely 3-hydroxylated in every tissue of the wild type mice. In contrast, no 3-hydroxylation of this proline residue was found in P3H1 null mice. Partial 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site (Pro-707) was present in tendon and bone, but absent in skin in both α-chains of the wild type animals. Type I collagen extracted from bone of P3H1 null mice shows a large reduction in 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site in both α-chains, whereas type I collagen extracted from tendon of P3H1 null mice shows little difference as compared with wild type. These results demonstrate that the A1 site in type I collagen is exclusively 3-hydroxylated by P3H1, and presumably, this enzyme is required for the 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site of both α-chains in bone but not in tendon. The increase in glycosylation of hydroxylysine in P3H1 null mice in bone was found to be due to an increased occupancy of normally glycosylated sites. Despite the severe disorganization of collagen fibrils in adult tissues, the D-period of the fibrils is unchanged. Tendon fibrils of newborn P3H1 null mice are well organized with only a slight increase in diameter. The absence of 3-hydroxyproline and/or the increased glycosylation of hydroxylysine in type I collagen disturbs the lateral growth of the fibrils. PMID:23861401

  11. Feasibility of tissue characterization of coronary plaques using 320-detector row computed tomography: comparison with integrated backscatter intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigekiyo; Kawasaki, Masanori; Miyata, Shusaku; Suzuki, Keita; Yamaura, Makoto; Ido, Takahisa; Aoyama, Takuma; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) with 320-detector rows (DR) has become available in the clinical settings. The purpose of the present study was to determine the cutoff values of Hounsfield unit (HU) for discrimination of plaque components by comparing HU of coronary plaques with integrated backscatter intravascular ultrasound (IB-IVUS) serving as a gold standard. Seventy-seven coronary atherosclerotic lesions in 77 patients with angina were visualized by both 320-DR CT (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Japan) and IB-IVUS at the same site. To determine the thresholds for discrimination of plaque components, we compared HU with IB values as a gold standard. Optimal thresholds were determined from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves analysis. The HU values of lipid pool (n = 115), fibrosis (n = 93), vessel lumen and calcification (n = 73) were 28 ± 19 HU (range -18 to 69 HU), 98 ± 31 HU (44 to 195 HU), 357 ± 65 HU (227 to 534 HU) and 998 ± 236 HU (366 to 1,489 HU), respectively. The thresholds of 56 HU, 210 HU and 490 HU were the most reliable predictors of lipid pool, fibrosis, vessel lumen and calcification, respectively. Lipid volume measured by 320-DR CT was correlated with that measured by IB-IVUS (r = 0.63, p < 0.05), whereas fibrous volume measured by 320-DR CT was not. Lipid volume measured by 320-DR CT was correlated with that measured by IB-IVUS, whereas fibrous volume was not correlated with that measured by IB-IVUS because manual exclusion of the outside of vessel hindered rigorous discrimination between fibrosis and extravascular components. PMID:25217036

  12. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  13. Effect of Intravascular Ultrasound-assisted Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for “Complicated” Type B Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bao-Lei; Shi, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Da-Qiao; Wang, Li-Xin; Tang, Xiao; Li, Wei-Miao; Fu, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination can provide useful information during endovascular stent graft repair. However, its actual clinical utility in thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for type B aortic dissection (type B-AD) remains unclear, especially in complicated aortic dissection. We evaluated the effect of IVUS as a complementary tool during TEVAR. Methods: From September 2011 to April 2012, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 47 consecutive patients with “complicated” type B-AD diagnosed. We divided the patients into two groups: IVUS-assisted TEVAR group and TEVAR using angiography alone group. The general procedure of TEVAR was performed. We evaluated the perioperative and follow-up events. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative images, dissection morphology, details of operative strategy, intraoperative events, and postoperative course were recorded. Results: A total of 47 patients receiving TEVAR were enrolled. Among them (females, 8.51%; mean age, 57.38 ± 13.02 years), 13 cases (27.66%) were selected in the IVUS-assisted TEVAR group, and 34 were selected in the TEVAR group. All patients were symptomatic. The average diameter values of IVUS measurements in the landing zone were greater than those estimated by computed tomography angiography (31.82 ± 4.21 mm vs. 30.64 ± 4.13 mm, P < 0.001). The technique success rate was 100%. Among the postoperative outcomes, statistical differences were only observed between the IVUS-assisted TEVAR group and TEVAR group for total operative time and the amount of contrast used (P = 0.013 and P < 0.001, respectively). The follow-up ranged from 15 to 36 months for the IVUS-assisted TEVAR group and from 10 to 35 months for the TEVAR group (P = 0.646). The primary endpoints were no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusions: Intraoperative IVUS-assisted TEVAR is clinically feasible and safe. For the endovascular repair of “complicated” type B-AD, IVUS may be

  14. Tissue-specific expression of the human type II collagen gene in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell-Badge, R H; Bygrave, A; Bradley, A; Robertson, E; Tilly, R; Cheah, K S

    1987-01-01

    Type II collagen is crucial to the development of form in vertebrates as it is the major protein of cartilage. To study the factors regulating its expression we introduced a cosmid containing the human type II collagen gene, including 4.5 kilobases of 5' and 2.2 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA, into embryonic stem cells in vitro. The transformed cells contribute to all tissues in chimeric mice allowing the expression of the exogenous gene to be studied in vivo. Human type II collagen mRNA is restricted to tissues showing transcription from the endogenous gene and human type II collagen is found in extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes in cartilage. The results indicate that the cis-acting requirements for correct temporal and spatial regulation of the gene are contained within the introduced DNA. Images PMID:3033664

  15. Metabolic factors, adipose tissue, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by adipose tissue is increased in obesity, and its circulating levels are high in type 2 diabetes. PAI-1 increases cardiovascular risk by favoring clot stability, interfering with vascular remodeling, or both. We investigated in obese diabetic per...

  16. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  17. Scrotal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotal sac to help transmit the sound waves. A handheld probe (the ultrasound transducer) is then ... The ultrasound machine sends out high-frequency sound waves. These waves reflect off areas in the scrotum ...

  18. Pregnancy ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3D ultrasound References Richards DS. Obstetrical ultrasound: Imaging, dating, and growth. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson ... the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A. ...

  19. The discrimination of type I and type II collagen and the label-free imaging of engineered cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Chen, Wei-Liang; Li, Tsung-Hsien; Chou, Chen-Kuan; Chen, Te-Hsuen; Ho, Yi-Yun; Huang, Chi-Hsiu; Chang, Shwu-Jen; Huang, Yi-You; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-12-01

    Using excitation polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, we measured SHG intensity as a function of the excitation polarization angle for type I and type II collagens. We determined the second order susceptibility (χ((2))) tensor ratios of type I and II collagens at each pixel, and displayed the results as images. We found that the χ((2)) tensor ratios can be used to distinguish the two types of collagen. In particular, we obtained χ(zzz)/χ(zxx) = 1.40 ± 0.04 and χ(xzx)/χ(zxx) = 0.53 ± 0.10 for type I collagen from rat tail tendon, and χ(zzz)/χ(zxx) = 1.14 ± 0.09 and χ(xzx)/χ(zxx) = 0.29 ± 0.11 for type II collagen from rat trachea cartilage. We also applied this methodology on the label-free imaging of engineered cartilage tissue which produces type I and II collagen simultaneously. By displaying the χ((2)) tensor ratios in the image format, the variation in the χ((2)) tensor ratios can be used as a contrast mechanism for distinguishing type I and II collagens. PMID:20875682

  20. Analysis of type II diabetes mellitus adipose-derived stem cells for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle Marie; Young, Matthew T; Lin, Yen-Chih; Over, Patrick J; Rubin, J Peter; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2015-01-01

    To address the functionality of diabetic adipose-derived stem cells in tissue engineering applications, adipose-derived stem cells isolated from patients with and without type II diabetes mellitus were cultured in bioreactor culture systems. The adipose-derived stem cells were differentiated into adipocytes and maintained as functional adipocytes. The bioreactor system utilizes a hollow fiber-based technology for three-dimensional perfusion of tissues in vitro, creating a model in which long-term culture of adipocytes is feasible, and providing a potential tool useful for drug discovery. Daily metabolic activity of the adipose-derived stem cells was analyzed within the medium recirculating throughout the bioreactor system. At experiment termination, tissues were extracted from bioreactors for immunohistological analyses in addition to gene and protein expression. Type II diabetic adipose-derived stem cells did not exhibit significantly different glucose consumption compared to adipose-derived stem cells from patients without type II diabetes (p > 0.05, N = 3). Expression of mature adipocyte genes was not significantly different between diabetic/non-diabetic groups (p > 0.05, N = 3). Protein expression of adipose tissue grown within all bioreactors was verified by Western blotting.The results from this small-scale study reveal adipose-derived stem cells from patients with type II diabetes when removed from diabetic environments behave metabolically similar to the same cells of non-diabetic patients when cultured in a three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor, suggesting that glucose transport across the adipocyte cell membrane, the hindrance of which being characteristic of type II diabetes, is dependent on environment. The presented observation describes a tissue-engineered tool for long-term cell culture and, following future adjustments to the culture environment and increased sample sizes, potentially for anti-diabetic drug testing. PMID:26090087

  1. Assessment of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for the measurement of lead isotope ratios in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costas-Rodríguez, M.; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was evaluated as a sample preparation procedure for lead isotope ratio measurements in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 20 mg of marine biological tissue and 1 mL of acid extractant were sonicated for 3 min at 60% ultrasound amplitude. Matrix separation was performed in the supernatant using a chromatographic exchange resin (Sr-Spec™). Total elimination of organic matter was achieved during the separation step. Microwave-assisted digestion and dry-ashing were used for comparative purposes. No significant differences were found in lead isotope ratios at 95% of confidence level. UAE emerges as an advantageous alternative to classical methods for sample preparation owing to its simplicity and rapidity ( i.e. operation steps were reduced), low reagent consumption and low contamination risks.

  2. Hybrid use of combined and sequential delivery of growth factors and ultrasound stimulation in porous multilayer composite scaffolds to promote both vascularization and bone formation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoran; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Minghua; Luo, Guilin; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Taijun; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Keliang; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a multilayer coating technology would be adopted to prepare a porous composite scaffold and the growth factor release and ultrasound techniques were introduced into bone tissue engineering to finally solve the problems of vascularization and bone formation in the scaffold whilst the designed multilayer composite with gradient degradation characteristics in the space was used to match the new bone growth process better. The results of animal experiments showed that the use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with growth factors demonstrated excellent capabilities and advantages in both vascularization and new bone formation in bone tissue engineering. The degradation of the used scaffold materials could match new bone formation very well. The results also showed that only RGD-promoted cell adhesion was insufficient to satisfy the needs of new bone formation while growth factors and LIPUS stimulation were the key factors in new bone formation. PMID:26282063

  3. Pulse Inversion Chirp Coded Tissue Harmonic Imaging (PI-CTHI) of Zebrafish Heart Using High Frame Rate Ultrasound Biomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhyoung; Huang, Ying; Chen, Ruimin; Lee, Jungwoo; Cummins, Thomas M.; Zhou, Qifa; Lien, Ching-Ling; Shung, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI) method for visualizing small animal hearts that provides fine spatial resolution at a high frame rate without sacrificing the echo signal to noise ratio (eSNR). A 40 MHz lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single element transducer is employed to evaluate the performance of PI-CTHI by scanning tungsten wire targets, spherical anechoic voids, and zebrafish hearts. The wire phantom results show that PI-CTHI improves the eSNR by 4 dB from that of conventional pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging (PI-THI), while still maintaining a spatial resolution of 88 and 110 μm in the axial and lateral directions, respectively. The range side lobe level of PI-CTHI is 11 dB lower than that of band-pass filtered CTHI (or F-CTHI). In the anechoic sphere phantom study, the contrast-to-noise ratio of PI-CTHI is found to be 2.7, indicating a 34% enhancement over conventional PI-THI. Due to such improved eSNR and contrast resolution, blood clots in zebrafish hearts can be readily visualized throughout heart regeneration after 20% of the ventricle is removed. Disappearance of the clots in the early stages of the regeneration has been observed for 7 days without sacrificing the fish. PMID:22930467

  4. Value of Virtual Touch Tissue Imaging Quantification for Evaluation of Ultrasound Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System Category 4 Lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Long; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Liu, Bo-Ji; Huang, Xian; Li, Dan-Dan; Guo, Le-Hang; Xu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Li-Ping; Fang, Lin; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the value of 2-D shear wave elastography (SWE) of virtual touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ) for ultrasound (US) Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 4 lesions. One hundred sixteen lesions were subject to conventional US, conventional strain elastography (SE) of elasticity imaging (EI), acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced SE of virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) and VTIQ before biopsies. Of the 116 lesions, 69 (59.5%) were benign and 47 (40.5%) were malignant. Significant differences were found between benign and malignant lesions in EI score, VTI score and shear wave speed (SWS) on VTIQ (both p < 0.05). The cut-off values were EI score ≥4, VTI score ≥4 and SWS ≥3.49 m/s, respectively. The diagnostic performance of VTIQ in terms of area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) were the highest (i.e., AUROC = 0.907), in comparison with EI, VTI alone or a combination of both. The associated sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 87.2%, 82.6% and 84.5%, respectively. The combination of VTI and VTIQ, however, was similar with US BI-RADS (p = 0.475) in sensitivity in that only two (4.3%) of 47 malignant lesions were misdiagnosed as benign that were BI-RADS category 4b on US. VTIQ is valuable to differentiate benign from malignant BI-RADS category 4 lesions, and the combination of VTI and VTIQ might be useful for patient selection before biopsy. PMID:27174418

  5. Multi-Tissue Computational Modeling Analyzes Pathophysiology of Type 2 Diabetes in MKR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Harrelson, Thomas; Lewis, Nathan E.; Gallagher, Emily J.; LeRoith, Derek; Shiloach, Joseph; Betenbaugh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Computational models using metabolic reconstructions for in silico simulation of metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can provide a better understanding of disease pathophysiology and avoid high experimentation costs. There is a limited amount of computational work, using metabolic reconstructions, performed in this field for the better understanding of T2DM. In this study, a new algorithm for generating tissue-specific metabolic models is presented, along with the resulting multi-confidence level (MCL) multi-tissue model. The effect of T2DM on liver, muscle, and fat in MKR mice was first studied by microarray analysis and subsequently the changes in gene expression of frank T2DM MKR mice versus healthy mice were applied to the multi-tissue model to test the effect. Using the first multi-tissue genome-scale model of all metabolic pathways in T2DM, we found out that branched-chain amino acids' degradation and fatty acids oxidation pathway is downregulated in T2DM MKR mice. Microarray data showed low expression of genes in MKR mice versus healthy mice in the degradation of branched-chain amino acids and fatty-acid oxidation pathways. In addition, the flux balance analysis using the MCL multi-tissue model showed that the degradation pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid oxidation were significantly downregulated in MKR mice versus healthy mice. Validation of the model was performed using data derived from the literature regarding T2DM. Microarray data was used in conjunction with the model to predict fluxes of various other metabolic pathways in the T2DM mouse model and alterations in a number of pathways were detected. The Type 2 Diabetes MCL multi-tissue model may explain the high level of branched-chain amino acids and free fatty acids in plasma of Type 2 Diabetic subjects from a metabolic fluxes perspective. PMID:25029527

  6. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J.; Grüttner, Cordula; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time.

  7. Multiplatform analysis of 12 cancer types reveals molecular classification within and across tissues of origin.

    PubMed

    Hoadley, Katherine A; Yau, Christina; Wolf, Denise M; Cherniack, Andrew D; Tamborero, David; Ng, Sam; Leiserson, Max D M; Niu, Beifang; McLellan, Michael D; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Zhang, Jiashan; Kandoth, Cyriac; Akbani, Rehan; Shen, Hui; Omberg, Larsson; Chu, Andy; Margolin, Adam A; Van't Veer, Laura J; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Laird, Peter W; Raphael, Benjamin J; Ding, Li; Robertson, A Gordon; Byers, Lauren A; Mills, Gordon B; Weinstein, John N; Van Waes, Carter; Chen, Zhong; Collisson, Eric A; Benz, Christopher C; Perou, Charles M; Stuart, Joshua M

    2014-08-14

    Recent genomic analyses of pathologically defined tumor types identify "within-a-tissue" disease subtypes. However, the extent to which genomic signatures are shared across tissues is still unclear. We performed an integrative analysis using five genome-wide platforms and one proteomic platform on 3,527 specimens from 12 cancer types, revealing a unified classification into 11 major subtypes. Five subtypes were nearly identical to their tissue-of-origin counterparts, but several distinct cancer types were found to converge into common subtypes. Lung squamous, head and neck, and a subset of bladder cancers coalesced into one subtype typified by TP53 alterations, TP63 amplifications, and high expression of immune and proliferation pathway genes. Of note, bladder cancers split into three pan-cancer subtypes. The multiplatform classification, while correlated with tissue-of-origin, provides independent information for predicting clinical outcomes. All data sets are available for data-mining from a unified resource to support further biological discoveries and insights into novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25109877

  8. One-pot three-component Mannich-type reactions using sulfamic acid catalyst under ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongyao; Li, Hua; Shao, Huawu

    2009-08-01

    Sulfamic acid (NH(2)SO(3)H, SA) was used as an efficient, inexpensive, non-toxic and recyclable green catalyst for the ultrasound-assisted one-pot Mannich reaction of aldehydes with ketones and amines. This ultrasound protocol has advantages of high yield, mild condition, no environmental pollution, and simple work-up procedures. Most importantly, beta-aminocarbonyl compounds with ortho-substituted aromatic amines are obtained in acceptable to good yields by this methodology for the first time. PMID:19394889

  9. Synchrotron FTIR Imaging For The Identification Of Cell Types Within Human Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Michael J.; Pounder, F. Nell; Nasse, Michael J.; Macias, Virgilia; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Hirschmugl, Carol; Bhargava, Rohit

    2010-02-03

    The use of synchrotron Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been shown to be a very promising tool for biomedical research. S-FTIR spectroscopy allows for the fast acquisition of infrared (IR) spectra at a spatial resolution approaching the IR diffraction limit. The development of the Infrared Environmental Imaging (IRENI) beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has allowed for diffraction limited imaging measurements of cells in human prostate and breast tissues. This has allowed for the identification of cell types within tissues that would otherwise not have been resolvable using conventional FTIR sources.

  10. Introduction to ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna

    2016-06-01

    For centuries tissue palpation has been an important diagnostic tool. During palpation, tumors are felt as tissues harder than the surrounding tissues. The significance of palpation is related to the relationship between mechanical properties of different tissue lesions. The assessment of tissue stiffness through palpation is based on the fact that mechanical properties of tissues are changing as a result of various diseases. A higher tissue stiffness translates into a higher elasticity modulus. In the 90's, ultrasonography was extended by the option of examining the stiffness of tissue by estimating the difference in backscattering of ultrasound in compressed and non-compressed tissue. This modality is referred to as the static, compression elastography and is based on tracking the deformation of tissue subjected to the slowly varying compression through the recording of the backscattered echoes. The displacement is estimated using the methods of cross-correlation between consecutive ultrasonic lines of examined tissue, so calculating the degree of similarity of ultrasonic echoes acquired from tissue before and after the compression was applied. The next step in the development of ultrasound palpation was to apply the local remote tissue compression by using the acoustic radiation force generated through the special beam forming of the ultrasonic beam probing the tissue. The acoustic radiation force causes a slight deformation the tissue thereby forming a shear wave propagating in the tissue at different speeds dependent on the stiffness of the tissue. Shear wave elastography, carries great hopes in the field of quantitative imaging of tissue lesions. This article describes the physical basis of both elastographic methods: compression elastography and shear wave elastography. PMID:27446596

  11. Introduction to ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    For centuries tissue palpation has been an important diagnostic tool. During palpation, tumors are felt as tissues harder than the surrounding tissues. The significance of palpation is related to the relationship between mechanical properties of different tissue lesions. The assessment of tissue stiffness through palpation is based on the fact that mechanical properties of tissues are changing as a result of various diseases. A higher tissue stiffness translates into a higher elasticity modulus. In the 90's, ultrasonography was extended by the option of examining the stiffness of tissue by estimating the difference in backscattering of ultrasound in compressed and non-compressed tissue. This modality is referred to as the static, compression elastography and is based on tracking the deformation of tissue subjected to the slowly varying compression through the recording of the backscattered echoes. The displacement is estimated using the methods of cross-correlation between consecutive ultrasonic lines of examined tissue, so calculating the degree of similarity of ultrasonic echoes acquired from tissue before and after the compression was applied. The next step in the development of ultrasound palpation was to apply the local remote tissue compression by using the acoustic radiation force generated through the special beam forming of the ultrasonic beam probing the tissue. The acoustic radiation force causes a slight deformation the tissue thereby forming a shear wave propagating in the tissue at different speeds dependent on the stiffness of the tissue. Shear wave elastography, carries great hopes in the field of quantitative imaging of tissue lesions. This article describes the physical basis of both elastographic methods: compression elastography and shear wave elastography. PMID:27446596

  12. Assessment of three types of spaceflight hardware for tissue culture studies: Comparison of skeletal tissue growth and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, Brenda J.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1997-01-01

    Three different types of spaceflight hardware, the BioProcessing Module (BPM), the Materials Dispersion Apparatus (MDA), and the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA), were assessed for their ability to support pre-metatarsal growth and differentiation in experiments conducted on five space shuttle flights. BPM-cultured pre-metatarsal tissue showed no difference in flight and ground control lengths. Flight and ground controls cultured in the MDA grew 135 μm and 141 μm, respectively, in an 11 day experiment. Only five control rods and three flight rods mineralized. In another MDA experiment, pre-metatarsals were cultured at 4 °C (277K) or 20 °C (293K) for the 16 day mission, then cultured an additional 16 days in laboratory dishes at 37 °C (310K). The 20 °C (293K) cultures died post-flight. The 4 °C (277K) flight pre-metatarsals grew 417 μm more than the 4 °C (277K) ground controls post-flight. In 5 and 6 day experiments done in FPAs, flight rods grew longer than ground control rods. In a 14 day experiment, ground control and flight rods also expanded in length, but there was no difference between them. The pre-metatarsals cultured in the FPAs did not mineralize, or terminally differentiate. These experiments demonstrate, that while supporting pre-metatarsal growth in length, the three types of hardware are not suitable to support routine differentiation.

  13. Controlling collagen fiber microstructure in three-dimensional hydrogels using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kelley A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen is the primary fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix, and functional properties of collagen arise from variations in fiber structure. This study investigated the ability of ultrasound to control collagen microstructure during hydrogel fabrication. Under appropriate conditions, ultrasound exposure of type I collagen during polymerization altered fiber microstructure. Scanning electron microscopy and second-harmonic generation microscopy revealed decreased collagen fiber diameters in response to ultrasound compared to sham-exposed samples. Results of mechanistic investigations were consistent with a thermal mechanism for the effects of ultrasound on collagen fiber structure. To control collagen microstructure site-specifically, a high frequency, 8.3-MHz, ultrasound beam was directed within the center of a large collagen sample producing dense networks of short, thin collagen fibrils within the central core of the gel and longer, thicker fibers outside the beam area. Fibroblasts seeded onto these gels migrated rapidly into small, circularly arranged aggregates only within the beam area, and clustered fibroblasts remodeled the central, ultrasound-exposed collagen fibrils into dense sheets. These investigations demonstrate the capability of ultrasound to spatially pattern various collagen microstructures within an engineered tissue noninvasively, thus enhancing the level of complexity of extracellular matrix microenvironments and cellular functions achievable within three-dimensional engineered tissues. PMID:23927189

  14. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer. PMID:26856619

  15. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer. PMID:26856619

  16. Metformin Ameliorates Podocyte Damage by Restoring Renal Tissue Podocalyxin Expression in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Limin; Gu, Junfei; Yang, Di; Wang, Wei; Ye, Shandong

    2015-01-01

    Podocalyxin (PCX) is a signature molecule of the glomerular podocyte and of maintaining integrity of filtration function of glomerulus. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of different doses of metformin on renal tissue PCX expression in type 2 diabetic rats and clarify its protection on glomerular podocytes. Type 2 diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in which diabetes was induced by high-fat diet/streptozotocin (HFD-STZ) were treated with different doses of metformin (150, 300, and 500 mg/kg per day, resp.) for 8 weeks. Various biochemical parameters, kidney histopathology, and renal tissue PCX expression levels were examined. In type 2 diabetic rats, severe hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia were developed. Urinary albumin and PCX were markedly increased. Diabetes induced significant alterations in renal glomerular structure. In addition, protein and mRNA expression of renal tissue PCX were highly decreased. However, treatment of rats with different doses of metformin restored all these changes to a varying degree. These results suggested that metformin can ameliorate glomerular podocyte damage in type 2 diabetic rats, which may be partly associated with its role in restoring PCX expression and inhibiting urinary excretion of PCX with dose dependence. PMID:26075281

  17. Complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types prepared by inkjet printing technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Zhao, Weixin; Zhu, Jian-Ming; Albanna, Mohammad Z; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a versatile method for fabricating complex and heterogeneous three-dimensional (3D) tissue constructs using simultaneous ink-jetting of multiple cell types. Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), canine smooth muscle cells (dSMCs), and bovine aortic endothelial cells (bECs), were separately mixed with ionic cross-linker calcium chloride (CaCl(2)), loaded into separate ink cartridges and printed using a modified thermal inkjet printer. The three cell types were delivered layer-by-layer to pre-determined locations in a sodium alginate-collagen composite located in a chamber under the printer. The reaction between CaCl(2) and sodium alginate resulted in a rapid formation of a solid composite gel and the printed cells were anchored in designated areas within the gel. The printing process was repeated for several cycles leading to a complex 3D multi-cell hybrid construct. The biological functions of the 3D printed constructs were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Each of the printed cell types maintained their viability and normal proliferation rates, phenotypic expression, and physiological functions within the heterogeneous constructs. The bioprinted constructs were able to survive and mature into functional tissues with adequate vascularization in vivo. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating complex heterogeneous tissue constructs containing multiple cell types using inkjet printing technology. PMID:23063369

  18. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  19. Cortisol Release From Adipose Tissue by 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Stimson, Roland H.; Andersson, Jonas; Andrew, Ruth; Redhead, Doris N.; Karpe, Fredrik; Hayes, Peter C.; Olsson, Tommy; Walker, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) regenerates cortisol from cortisone. 11β-HSD1 mRNA and activity are increased in vitro in subcutaneous adipose tissue from obese patients. Inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is a promising therapeutic approach in type 2 diabetes. However, release of cortisol by 11β-HSD1 from adipose tissue and its effect on portal vein cortisol concentrations have not been quantified in vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Six healthy men underwent 9,11,12,12-[2H]4-cortisol infusions with simultaneous sampling of arterialized and superficial epigastric vein blood sampling. Four men with stable chronic liver disease and a transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt in situ underwent tracer infusion with simultaneous sampling from the portal vein, hepatic vein, and an arterialized peripheral vein. RESULTS—Significant cortisol and 9,12,12-[2H]3-cortisol release were observed from subcutaneous adipose tissue (15.0 [95% CI 0.4–29.5] and 8.7 [0.2–17.2] pmol · min−1 · 100 g−1 adipose tissue, respectively). Splanchnic release of cortisol and 9,12,12-[2H]3-cortisol (13.5 [3.6–23.5] and 8.0 [2.6–13.5] nmol/min, respectively) was accounted for entirely by the liver; release of cortisol from visceral tissues into portal vein was not detected. CONCLUSIONS—Cortisol is released from subcutaneous adipose tissue by 11β-HSD1 in humans, and increased enzyme expression in obesity is likely to increase local glucocorticoid signaling and contribute to whole-body cortisol regeneration. However, visceral adipose 11β-HSD1 activity is insufficient to increase portal vein cortisol concentrations and hence to influence intrahepatic glucocorticoid signaling. PMID:18852329

  20. Using Data Fusion to Characterize Breast Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    New ultrasound data, obtained with a circular experimental scanner, are compared with data obtained with standard X-ray CT. Ultrasound data obtained by scanning fixed breast tissue were used to generate images of sound speed and reflectivity. The ultrasound images exhibit approximately 1 mm resolution and about 20 dB of dynamic range. All data were obtained in a circular geometry. X-ray CT scans were used to generate X-ray images corresponding to the same 'slices' obtained with the ultrasound scanner. The good match of sensitivity, resolution and angular coverage between the ultrasound and X-ray data makes possible a direct comparison of the three types of images. We present the results of such a comparison for an excised breast fixed in formalin. The results are presented visually using various types of data fusion. A general correspondence between the sound speed, reflectivity and X-ray morphologies is found. The degree to which data fusion can help characterize tissue is assessed by examining the quantitative correlations between the ultrasound and X-ray images.

  1. AMUM LECTURE: Therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques.

  2. Medical ultrasound systems

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue. PMID:22866226

  3. Ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography using energy-scaled amplitude ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Shin, Junseob; Huang, Lianjie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound attenuation of breast tumors is related to their types and pathological states, and can be used to detect and characterize breast cancer. Particularly, ultrasound scattering attenuation can infer the margin properties of breast tumors. Ultrasound attenuation tomography quantitatively reconstructs the attenuation properties of the breast. Our synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays records both ultrasound reflection and transmission signals. We develop an ultrasound attenuation tomography method using ultrasound energy-scaled amplitude decays of ultrasound transmission signals and conduct ultrasound attenuation tomography using a known sound-speed model. We apply our ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography method to a breast phantom dataset, and compare the ultrasound attenuation tomography results with conventional beamforming ultrasound images obtained using reflection signals. We show that ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography complements beamforming images in identifying breast lesions.

  4. Modulation of ultrasound to produce multifrequency radiation force1

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Greenleaf, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic radiation force has been used in several types of applications, and is performed by modulating ultrasound with different methods. By modulating ultrasound, energy can be transmitted to tissue, in this case a dynamic force to elicit a low frequency cyclic displacement to inspect the material properties of the tissue. In this paper, different types of modulation are explored including amplitude modulation (AM), double sideband suppressed carrier amplitude modulation AM, linear frequency modulation, and frequency-shift keying. Generalized theory is presented for computing the radiation force through the short-term time average of the energy density for these various types of modulation. Examples of modulation with different types of signals including sine waves, square waves, and triangle waves are shown. Using different modulating signals, multifrequency radiation force with different numbers of frequency components can be created, and can be used to characterize tissue mimicking materials and soft tissue. Results for characterization of gelatin phantoms using a method of vibrating an embedded sphere are presented. Different degrees of accuracy were achieved using different modulation techniques and modulating signals. Modulating ultrasound is a very flexible technique to produce radiation force with multiple frequency components that can be used for various applications. PMID:20329821

  5. Proteomic profiling of cardiac tissue by isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types (INTACT)

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nirav M.; Greco, Todd M.; Kuchenbrod, Lauren M.; Rigney, Maggie M.; Chung, Mei-I; Wallingford, John B.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Conlon, Frank L.

    2014-01-01

    The proper dissection of the molecular mechanisms governing the specification and differentiation of specific cell types requires isolation of pure cell populations from heterogeneous tissues and whole organisms. Here, we describe a method for purification of nuclei from defined cell or tissue types in vertebrate embryos using INTACT (isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types). This method, previously developed in plants, flies and worms, utilizes in vivo tagging of the nuclear envelope with biotin and the subsequent affinity purification of the labeled nuclei. In this study we successfully purified nuclei of cardiac and skeletal muscle from Xenopus using this strategy. We went on to demonstrate the utility of this approach by coupling the INTACT approach with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic methodologies to profile proteins expressed in the nuclei of developing hearts. From these studies we have identified the Xenopus orthologs of 12 human proteins encoded by genes, which when mutated in human lead to congenital heart disease. Thus, by combining these technologies we are able to identify tissue-specific proteins that are expressed and required for normal vertebrate organ development. PMID:24496632

  6. Tissue Reaction to Different Types of Calcium Hydroxide Paste in Rat.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Gharechahi, Maryam; Kateb, Moaied; Zare, Reza; Kelagari, Ziba Shirkhani

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biocompatibility of two types of calcium hydroxide paste in subcutaneous tissue in rat. Twenty-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 experimental (n=5 each) and one control (n=2) group. A polyethylene tube filled with either Dentsply or Sure-Paste was implanted in each rat in the experimental groups, while an empty polyethylene tube was used in the control group. After 15 or 60 days, the animals were sacrificed and histopathological examination carried out. Tissue reaction was assessed by inflammatory cell infiltration using a 4-point scoring system, ranging from 0 to 3. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and McNemar tests. Both types of paste induced an inflammatory response at each time point, although the intensity varied. A significant reduction in the number of inflammatory cells was observed at 60 days. Dentsply appeared to induce a more marked inflammatory response at both time points, although the difference was not significant. These results suggest that both types of paste are biocompatible with subcutaneous tissue in rat. PMID:27320294

  7. Decreased type V collagen expression in human decidual tissues of spontaneous abortion during early pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, M; Nakano, R

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To provide some insight into the aetiology of spontaneous abortion, the contents of type V collagen was investigated in human decidual tissues in spontaneous abortion and normal pregnancy. METHODS: Collagens were extracted from decidual tissues in spontaneous abortion (n = 19) and normal pregnancy (n = 25). The different types of collagen alpha chains were separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), stained with Coomassie brilliant blue, and measured by densitometry. The relative amounts of the alpha 1 (III) and alpha 1 (V) chains were calculated by dividing the band intensities of the alpha 1 (III) and alpha 1 (V) chains by that of the alpha 1 (I) chain. RESULTS: The ratio of the alpha 1 (V) chain to that of the alpha 1 (I) chain in decidual tissues in spontaneous abortion was significantly lower than that found in normal pregnancy (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that type V collagen might play an important role in the maintenance of pregnancy and that decreased expression of this collagen could be associated with spontaneous abortion. Images PMID:9577371

  8. Assessment of three types of spaceflight hardware for tissue culture studies: Comparison of skeletal tissue growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Klement, B.J.; Spooner, B.S.

    1997-01-01

    Three different types of spaceflight hardware, the BioProcessing Module (BPM), the Materials Dispersion Apparatus (MDA), and the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA), were assessed for their ability to support pre-metatarsal growth and differentiation in experiments conducted on five space shuttle flights. BPM-cultured pre-metatarsal tissue showed no difference in flight and ground control lengths. Flight and ground controls cultured in the MDA grew 135 {mu}m and 141 {mu}m, respectively, in an 11 day experiment. Only five control rods and three flight rods mineralized. In another MDA experiment, pre-metatarsals were cultured at 4{degree}C (277K) or 20{degree}C (293K) for the 16 day mission, then cultured an additional 16 days in laboratory dishes at 37{degree}C (310K). The 20{degree}C (293K) cultures died post-flight. The 4{degree}C (277K) flight pre-metatarsals grew 417 {mu}m more than the 4{degree}C (277K) ground controls post-flight. In 5 and 6 day experiments done in FPAs, flight rods grew longer than ground control rods. In a 14 day experiment, ground control and flight rods also expanded in length, but there was no difference between them. The pre-metatarsals cultured in the FPAs did not mineralize, or terminally differentiate. These experiments demonstrate, that while supporting pre-metatarsal growth in length, the three types of hardware are not suitable to support routine differentiation. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Cryptic activity within the Type III1 domain of fibronectin regulates tissue inflammation and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Christina; Kelsh-Lasher, Rhiannon; Ambesi, Anthony; McKeown-Longo, Paula J.

    2016-01-01

    The fibronectin matrix provides mechanical and biochemical information to regulate homeostatic and pathological processes within tissues. Fibronectin consists of independently-folded modules termed Types I, II and III. In response to cellular contractile force, Type III domains unfold to initiate a series of homophilic binding events which result in the assembly of a complex network of intertwining fibrils. The unfolding of Type III modules provides elasticity to the assembled fibronectin matrix allowing it to function as a dynamic scaffold which provides binding sites for cellular receptors, growth factors and other matrix molecules. Access to bioactive sites within the fibronectin matrix is under complex regulation and controlled through a combination of mechanical and proteolytic activity. Mechanical unfolding of Type III modules and limited proteolysis can alter the topographical display of bioactive sites within the fibronectin fibrils by exposing previously cryptic sites and disrupting functional sites. In this review we will discuss cryptic activity found within the first Type III module of fibronectin and its impact on tissue angiogenesis and inflammation.

  10. Tissue Transglutaminase Regulates Chondrogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Collagen Type XI Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugasundaram, Shobana; Logan-Mauney, Sheila; Burgos, Kaitlin

    2011-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a multifunctional enzyme with a plethora of potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue bioengineering. In this study, we examined the role of tTG as a regulator of chondrogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) using nanofibrous scaffolds coated with collagen type XI. Transient treatment of collagen type XI films and 3D scaffolds with tTG results in enhanced attachment of MSC and supports rounded cell morphology compared to the untreated matrices or those incubated in the continuous presence of tTG. Accordingly, enhanced cell aggregation and augmented chondrogenic differentiation have been observed on the collagen type XI-coated poly (L-lactide) - nanofibrous scaffolds treated with tTG prior to cell seeding. Exogenous tTG increases resistance to collagenolysis in collagen type XI matrices by catalyzing intermolecular cross-linking, detected by a shift in the denaturation temperature. In addition, tTG auto-crosslinks to collagen type XI as detected by western blot and immunofluorescent analysis. This study identifies tTG as a novel regulator of MSC chondrogenesis further contributing to the expanding use of these cells in cartilage bioengineering. PMID:21830118

  11. A study of the ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction based triplex-forming oligodexinucleotide delivery system to inhibit tissue factor expression

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, WEIHUA; ZHANG, WEIWEI; ZHAO, SHIFU; LI, QIANNING; YANG, YIMING; LIANG, HUA; CENG, RONGCHUAN

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of cellular uptake of triplex-forming oligodexinucleotides (TFO), and the inhibition of tissue factor (TF) is low. The aim of the present study was to improve the absorption of TFO, and increase the inhibition of TF induced by shear stress both in vitro and in vivo, by using an ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD)-based delivery system. TFO-conjugated lipid ultrasonic microbubbles (TFO-M) were first constructed and characterised. The absorption of TFO was observed by a fluorescence-based method, and the inhibition of TF by immunofluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. ECV304 human umbilical vein endothelial cells were subjected to fluid shear stress for 6 h after treatment with TFO conjugated lipid ultrasonic microbubbles without sonication (TFO-M group); TFO alone; TFO conjugated lipid ultrasonic microbubbles, plus immediate sonication (TFO+U group and TFO-M+U group); or mock treated with 0.9% NaCl only (SSRE group). The in vivo experiments were established in a similar manner to the in vitro experiments, except that TFO or TFO-M was injected into rats through the tail vein. Six hours after the preparation of a carotid stenosis model, the rats were humanely sacrificed. The transfection efficiency of TFO in the TFO-M+U group was higher as compared with the TFO-M and TFO+U group (P<0.01). The protein and mRNA expression of TF in the TFO-M+U group was significantly decreased both in vitro and in vivo (P<0.01), as compared with the TFO-M, TFO+U and SSRE groups. The UTMD-based TFO delivery system promoted the absorption of TFO and the inhibition of TF, and was therefore considered to be favorable for preventing thrombosis induced by shear stress. PMID:25355395

  12. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  13. Tracked ultrasound elastography (TRUE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman

    Medical ultrasound research has experienced a renaissance in the past decade leading to innovations in flow mapping, elasticity and thermal imaging, measurement of optical properties, beamforming, and image enhancement. In this thesis, we focus on ultrasound elastography, an emerging imaging modality with great potential to become a part of several ultrasound diagnostic applications. Elastography images the stiffness of soft tissue by applying a mechanical stimulus and estimating the disturbance created by this stimulus. In freehand elastography, soft tissue is palpated by hand using the ultrasound transducer. The elastography image is generated by comparing the pre- and post-compression images to form a displacement map which is then differentiated to produce the final strain map. To achieve the best result in freehand elastography, the sonographer must compress and decompress the tissue uniformly in a specific direction with adequate compression. This can be a difficult task even for trained users. A small rotational or out-of-plane motion in the collected ultrasound frames can render them unusable for elastography. This has made freehand elastography highly qualitative and user-dependent. We tackle this issue by incorporating the extra information from a position sensor attached to the ultrasound transducer. Our aim is to show that the localization information of ultrasound images may be utilized to improve the quality and reliability of freehand elastography. For this purpose, we have developed a frame selection scheme that finds pairs of images with optimal compression and minimal lateral and out-of-plane displacement. Relying on the localization information, our algorithm merges multiple strain images computed from the selected frame pairs. This method is applicable to both 2D and 3D elastography. Our 3D elastography does not require for the transducer to be held still during the acquisition of each volume. Instead, the sonographer freely palpates the tissue

  14. Interventional ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, H.H.; Kristensen, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: Introduction to interventional ultrasound/handling of aspirated material/general principles of fine needle aspiration cytology/procedure and principles in ultrasonically guided puncture/puncture of focal liver lesions/intraoperative puncture of the liver guided by ultrasound/Interventional ultrasound in cancer therapy/Interventional echocardiography/Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: Are there any risks./Puncture of renal mass lesions/Intrauterine needle diagnosis/Percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  15. Characterization of Human Papillomavirus Type 154 and Tissue Tropism of Gammapapillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ure, Agustín Enrique; Forslund, Ola

    2014-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 154 (HPV154) was characterized from a wart on the crena ani of a three-year-old boy. It was previously designated as the putative HPV type FADI3 by sequencing of a subgenomic FAP amplicon. We obtained the complete genome by combined methods including rolling circle amplification (RCA), genome walking through an adapted method for detection of integrated papillomavirus sequences by ligation-mediated PCR (DIPS-PCR), long-range PCR, and finally by cloning of four overlapping amplicons. Phylogenetically, the HPV154 genome clustered together with members of the proposed species Gammapapillomavirus 11, and demonstrated the highest identity in L1 to HPV136 (68.6%). The HPV154 was detected in 3% (2/62) of forehead skin swabs from healthy children. In addition, the different detection sites of 62 gammapapillomaviruses were summarized in order to analyze their tissue tropism. Several of these HPV types have been detected from multiple sources such as skin, oral, nasal, and genital sites, suggesting that the gammapapillomaviruses are generalists with a broader tissue tropism than previously appreciated. The study expands current knowledge concerning genetic diversity and tropism among HPV types in the rapidly growing gammapapillomavirus genus. PMID:24551244

  16. Validation of four-dimensional ultrasound for targeting in minimally-invasive beating-heart surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Danielle F.; Wiles, Andrew D.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Chris; Gobbi, David G.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound is garnering significant interest as an imaging modality for surgical guidance, due to its affordability, real-time temporal resolution and ease of integration into the operating room. Minimally-invasive intracardiac surgery performed on the beating-heart prevents direct vision of the surgical target, and procedures such as mitral valve replacement and atrial septal defect closure would benefit from intraoperative ultrasound imaging. We propose that placing 4D ultrasound within an augmented reality environment, along with a patient-specific cardiac model and virtual representations of tracked surgical tools, will create a visually intuitive platform with sufficient image information to safely and accurately repair tissue within the beating heart. However, the quality of the imaging parameters, spatial calibration, temporal calibration and ECG-gating must be well characterized before any 4D ultrasound system can be used clinically to guide the treatment of moving structures. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive accuracy assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the performance of 4D ultrasound systems while imaging moving targets. We image a dynamic phantom that is comprised of a simple robot and a tracked phantom to which point-source, distance and spherical objects of known construction can be attached. We also follow our protocol to evaluate 4D ultrasound images generated in real-time by reconstructing ECG-gated 2D ultrasound images acquired from a tracked multiplanar transesophageal probe. Likewise, our evaluation framework allows any type of 4D ultrasound to be quantitatively assessed.

  17. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery of targeted echogenic liposomes in a novel ex vivo mouse aorta model

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E.; Caudell, Danielle N.; Sutton, Jonathan T.; Klegerman, Melvin E.; Vela, Deborah; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J.; Abruzzo, Todd; Cyr, Peppar E. P.; Geng, Yong-Jian; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether targeted, Rhodamine-labeled echogenic liposomes (Rh-ELIP) containing nanobubbles could be delivered to the arterial wall, and whether 1 MHz continuous wave ultrasound would enhance this delivery profile. Aortae excised from apolipoprotein-E-deficient (n = 8) and wild-type (n = 8) mice were mounted in a pulsatile flow system through which Rh-ELIP were delivered in a stream of bovine serum albumin. Half the aortae from each group were treated with 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound at 0.49 MPa peak-to-peak pressure, and half underwent sham exposure. Ultrasound parameters were chosen to promote stable cavitation and avoid inertial cavitation. A broadband hydrophone was used to monitor cavitation activity. After treatment, aortic sections were prepared for histology and analyzed by an individual blinded to treatment conditions. Delivery of Rh-ELIP to the vascular endothelium was observed, and subendothelial penetration of Rh-ELIP was present in five of five ultrasound-treated aortae and was absent in those not exposed to ultrasound. However, the degree of penetration in the ultrasound-exposed aortae was variable. There was no evidence of ultrasound-mediated tissue damage in any specimen. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery within the arterial wall was demonstrated in this novel model, which allows quantitative evaluation of therapeutic delivery. PMID:20202474

  18. Resolution and quantitative accuracy improvements in ultrasound transmission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevert, T. L.

    The type of ultrasound transmission imaging, referred to as ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT), reconstructs distributions of tissue speed of sound and sound attenuation properties from measurements of acoustic pulse time of flight (TCF) and energy received through tissue. Although clinical studies with experimental UCT scanners have demonstrated UCT is sensitive to certain tissue pathologies not easily detected with conventional ultrasound imaging, they have also shown UCT to suffer from artifacts due to physical differences between the acoustic beam and its ray model implicit in image reconstruction algorithms. Artifacts are expressed as large quantitative errors in attenuation images, and poor spatial resolution and size distortion (exaggerated size of high speed of sound regions) in speed of sound images. Methods are introduced and investigated which alleviate these problems in UCT imaging by providing improved measurements of pulse TCF and energy.

  19. Protein dynamics in whole body and in splanchnic and leg tissues in type I diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, K S; Ford, G C; Ekberg, K; Fernqvist-Forbes, E; Wahren, J

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of insulin's anticatabolic effect in humans, protein dynamics were evaluated in the whole-body, splanchnic, and leg tissues in six C-peptide-negative type I diabetic male patients in the insulin-deprived and insulin-treated states using two separate amino acid models (leucine and phenylalanine). L-(1-13C,15N)leucine, L-(ring-2H5)phenylalanine, and L-(ring-2H2) tyrosine were infused intravenously, and isotopic enrichments of [1-13C,15N]-leucine, (13C)leucine, (13C)ketoisocaproate, (2H5)phenylalanine, [2H4]tyrosine, (2H2)tyrosine, and 13CO2 were measured in arterial, hepatic vein, and femoral vein samples. Whole-body leucine flux, phenylalanine flux, and tyrosine flux were decreased (< 0.01) by insulin treatment, indicating an inhibition of protein breakdown. Moreover, insulin decreased (< 0.05) the rates of leucine oxidation and leucine transamination (P < 0.01), but the percent rate of ketoisocaproate oxidation was increased by insulin (P < 0.01). Insulin also reduced (< 0.01) whole-body protein synthesis estimated from both the leucine model (nonoxidative leucine disposal) and the phenylalanine model (disposal of phenylalanine not accounted by its conversion to tyrosine). Regional studies demonstrated that changes in whole body protein breakdown are accounted for by changes in both splanchnic and leg tissues. The changes in whole-body protein synthesis were not associated with changes in skeletal muscle (leg) protein synthesis but could be accounted for by the splanchnic region. We conclude that though insulin decreases whole-body protein breakdown in patients with type I diabetes by inhibition of protein breakdown in splanchnic and leg tissues, it selectively decreases protein synthesis in splanchnic tissues, which accounted for the observed decrease in whole-body protein synthesis. Insulin also augmented anabolism by decreasing leucine transamination. Images PMID:7769135

  20. Phased-array ultrasound technology enhances accuracy of dual frequency ultrasound measurements - towards improved ultrasound bone diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Linder, Hans; Malo, Markus K H; Liukkonen, Jukka; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Overlying soft tissues attenuate ultrasound backscattered from bone, complicating diagnostics of osteoporosis at the most important fracture sites. Dual-frequency ultrasound technique (DFUS) has been proposed to solve this problem through determination of thickness and composition of overlying soft tissue. This study applies DFUS technique for the first time with a phased-array transducer to investigate if the thickness of two interfering layers (oil and water) can be accurately determined in a variety of configurations. Results indicate that DFUS may be used with phased-array ultrasound systems, making them a suitable combination to consider in future development of clinical in vivo ultrasound methodologies. PMID:27187271

  1. Survey of current practice in clinical transvaginal ultrasound scanning in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Adam; Lees, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    During transvaginal ultrasound scanning, the fetus and other sensitive tissues are placed close to the transducer. Heating of these tissues occurs by direct conduction from the transducer and by absorption of ultrasound in the tissue. The extent of any heating will depend on the equipment and settings used, the duration of the scan, imaging modes and other aspects of scanning practice. To ensure that scans are performed with minimum risk, staff should have an appropriate knowledge of safety and follow guidelines issued by professional bodies. An online survey aiming to document current practice in transvaginal ultrasound in the UK was created and distributed to individuals performing this type of scanning. The survey posed questions about the respondents, the departments where scans were performed, the equipment used, knowledge of ultrasound safety, scanning practice and the frequency, duration and mode of transvaginal ultrasound scans for gynaecology, obstetrics and fertility applications. In all, 294 responses were obtained, mostly from sonographers (94%). From the analysis of the responses, it was clear that there was a good understanding of the general meaning of thermal and mechanical index and high awareness of guidelines issued by professional bodies. However, 40% of respondents stated that they rarely or never monitor Thermal or Mechanical indices during scanning. Scanning practice was consistent in terms of the duration of scans, scan protocols followed and use of imaging modes. The results highlight the importance of continued ultrasound safety training and promotion of safety guidelines to users. PMID:27433250

  2. Temporal Healing in Rat Achilles Tendon: Ultrasound Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Okotie, Gregory; Brounts, Sabrina H.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Vanderby, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether a new ultrasound-based technique correlates with mechanical and biological metrics that describe the tendon healing. Achilles tendons in 32 rats were unilaterally transected and allowed to heal without repair. At 7, 9, 14, or 29 days post-injury, tendons were collected and examined for healing via ultrasound image analysis, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with previous studies, we observe that the healing tendons are mechanically inferior (ultimate stress, ultimate load, and normalized stiffness) and biologically altered (cellular and ECM factors) compared to contralateral controls with an incomplete recovery over healing time. Unique to this study, we report: 1) Echo intensity (defined by gray-scale brightness in the ultrasound image) in the healing tissue is related to stress and normalized stiffness. 2) Elongation to failure is relatively constant so that tissue normalized stiffness is linearly correlated with ultimate stress. Together, 1 and 2 suggest a method to quantify mechanical compromise in healing tendons. 3) The amount and type of collagen in healing tendons associates with their strength and normalized stiffness as well as their ultrasound echo intensity. 4) A significant increase of periostin in the healing tissues suggests an important but unexplored role for this ECM protein in tendon healing. PMID:23149902

  3. A Protein Profile of Visceral Adipose Tissues Linked to Early Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Jin; Chae, Sehyun; Kim, Hokeun; Mun, Dong-Gi; Back, Seunghoon; Choi, Hye Yeon; Park, Kyong Soo; Hwang, Daehee; Choi, Sung Hee; Lee, Sang-Won

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is increasingly recognized as an endocrine organ playing important pathophysiological roles in metabolic abnormalities, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In particular, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), as opposed to subcutaneous adipose tissue, is closely linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and T2DM. Despite the importance of VAT, its molecular signatures related to the pathogenesis of T2DM have not been systematically explored. Here, we present comprehensive proteomic analysis of VATs in drug-naïve early T2DM patients and subjects with normal glucose tolerance. A total of 4,707 proteins were identified in LC-MS/MS experiments. Among them, 444 increased in abundance in T2DM and 328 decreased. They are involved in T2DM-related processes including inflammatory responses, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose metabolism. Of these proteins, we selected 11 VAT proteins that can represent alteration in early T2DM patients. Among them, up-regulation of FABP4, C1QA, S100A8, and SORBS1 and down-regulation of ACADL and PLIN4 were confirmed in VAT samples of independent early T2DM patients using Western blot. In summary, our profiling provided a comprehensive basis for understanding the link of a protein profile of VAT to early pathogenesis of T2DM. PMID:24403596

  4. Cancer Abolishes the Tissue Type-Specific Differences in the Phenotype of Energetic Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Acebo, Paloma; Giner, Daniel; Calvo, Piedad; Blanco-Rivero, Amaya; Ortega, Álvaro D; Fernández, Pedro L; Roncador, Giovanna; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Chamorro, Margarita; Cuezva, José M

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular bioenergetics has become a central issue of investigation in cancer biology. Recently, the metabolic activity of the cancer cell has been shown to correlate with a proteomic index that informs of the relative mitochondrial activity of the cell. Within this new field of investigation, we report herein the production and characterization of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against proteins of the “bioenergetic signature” of the cell. The use of recombinant proteins and antibodies against the mitochondrial β-F1-ATPase and Hsp60 proteins and the enzymes of the glycolytic pathway glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase M2 in quantitative assays provide, for the first time, the actual amount of these proteins in normal and tumor surgical specimens of breast, lung, and esophagus. The application of this methodology affords a straightforward proteomic signature that quantifies the variable energetic demand of human tissues. Furthermore, the results show an unanticipated finding: tumors from different tissues and/or histological types have the same proteomic signature of energetic metabolism. Therefore, the results indicate that cancer abolishes the tissue-specific differences in the bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria. Overall, the results support that energetic metabolism represents an additional hallmark of the phenotype of the cancer cell and a promising target for the treatment of diverse neoplasias. PMID:19701498

  5. THREE-DIMENSIONAL COUPLED-OBJECT SEGMENTATION USING SYMMETRY AND TISSUE TYPE INFORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Bahmanbijari, Payam; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic method for segmentation of brain structures using their symmetry and tissue type information. The proposed method generates segmented structures that have homogenous tissues. It benefits from general symmetry of the brain structures in the two hemispheres. It also benefits from the tissue regions generated by fuzzy c-means clustering. All in all, the proposed method can be described as a dynamic knowledge-based method that eliminates the need for statistical shape models of the structures while generating accurate segmentation results. The proposed approach is implemented in MATLAB and tested on the Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) datasets. To this end, it is applied to the segmentation of caudate and ventricles three-dimensionally in magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain. Impacts of each of the steps of the proposed approach are demonstrated through experiments. It is shown that the proposed method generates accurate segmentation results that are insensitive to initialization and parameter selection. The proposed method is compared to four previous methods illustrating advantages and limitations of each method. PMID:19932598

  6. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV: A Case With Histopathologic Findings in First-Trimester Placental Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B; Lund, Allan M

    2016-01-01

    A 30-yr-old woman presented with 2 consecutive miscarriages within 7 mo. Histopathologic examination of the placental tissue showed intracytoplasmic inclusion vacuoles with a strong reaction in Periodic acid-Schiff staining and a slightly pallor reaction in alcian blue staining. Additional molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made on histopathologic examination. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis and to offer prenatal genetic testing in future pregnancies. PMID:26166723

  7. Tissue Stretch Decreases Soluble TGF-β1 and Type-1 Procollagen in Mouse Subcutaneous Connective Tissue: Evidence From Ex Vivo and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Bouffard, Nicole A.; Cutroneo, Kenneth R.; Badger, Gary J.; White, Sheryl L.; Buttolph, Thomas R.; Ehrlich, H. Paul; Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie; Langevin, Helene M.

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) plays a key role in connective tissue remodeling, scarring, and fibrosis. The effects of mechanical forces on TGF-β1 and collagen deposition are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that brief (10 min) static tissue stretch attenuates TGF-β1-mediated new collagen deposition in response to injury. We used two different models: (1) an ex vivo model in which excised mouse subcutaneous tissue (N = 44 animals) was kept in organ culture for 4 days and either stretched (20% strain for 10 min 1 day after excision) or not stretched; culture media was assayed by ELISA for TGF-β1; (2) an in vivo model in which mice (N = 22 animals) underwent unilateral subcutaneous microsurgical injury on the back, then were randomized to stretch (20–30% strain for 10 min twice a day for 7 days) or no stretch; subcutaneous tissues of the back were immunohistochemically stained for Type-1 procollagen. In the ex vivo model, TGF-β1 protein was lower in stretched versus non-stretched tissue (repeated measures ANOVA, P < 0.01). In the in vivo model, microinjury resulted in a significant increase in Type-1 procollagen in the absence of stretch (P < 0.001), but not in the presence of stretch (P = 0.21). Thus, brief tissue stretch attenuated the increase in both soluble TGF-β1 (ex vivo) and Type-1 procollagen (in vivo) following tissue injury. These results have potential relevance to the mechanisms of treatments applying brief mechanical stretch to tissues (e.g., physical therapy, respiratory therapy, mechanical ventilation, massage, yoga, acupuncture). PMID:17654495

  8. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  9. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  10. Ultrasound techniques in the evaluation of the mediastinum, part I: endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and transcutaneous mediastinal ultrasound (TMUS), introduction into ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Jouke Tabe; Clementsen, Paul; Cui, Xin Wu; Borst, Mathias Maximilian; Jenssen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has gained importance in pulmonary medicine over the last decades including conventional transcutaneous ultrasound (TUS), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). Mediastinal lymph node staging affects the management of patients with both operable and inoperable lung cancer (e.g., surgery vs. combined chemoradiation therapy). Tissue sampling is often indicated for accurate nodal staging. Recent international lung cancer staging guidelines clearly state that endosonography (EUS and EBUS) should be the initial tissue sampling test over surgical staging. Mediastinal nodes can be sampled from the airways [EBUS combined with transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)] or the esophagus [EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA)]. EBUS and EUS have a complementary diagnostic yield and in combination virtually all mediastinal lymph nodes can be biopsied. Additionally endosonography has an excellent yield in assessing granulomas in patients suspected of sarcoidosis. The aim of this review, in two integrative parts, is to discuss the current role and future perspectives of all ultrasound techniques available for the evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and mediastinal staging of lung cancer. A specific emphasis will be on learning mediastinal endosonography. Part I is dealing with an introduction into ultrasound techniques, mediastinal lymph node anatomy and diagnostic reach of ultrasound techniques and part II with the clinical work up of neoplastic and inflammatory mediastinal lymphadenopathy using ultrasound techniques and how to learn mediastinal endosonography. PMID:26543620

  11. Porosity, Mineralization, Tissue Type and Morphology Interactions at the Human Tibial Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampson, Naomi A.

    Prior research has shown a relationship between tibia robustness (ratio of cross-sectional area to bone length) and stress fracture risk, with less robust bones having a higher risk, which may indicate a compensatory increase in elastic modulus to increase bending strength. Previous studies of human tibiae have shown higher ash content in slender bones. In this study, the relationships between variations in volumetric porosity, ash content, tissue mineral density, secondary bone tissue, and cross sectional geometry, were investigated in order to better understand the tissue level adaptations that may occur in the establishment of cross-sectional properties. In this research, significant differences were found between porosity, ash content, and tissue type around the cortex between robust and slender bones, suggesting that there was a level of co-adaption occurring. Variation in porosity correlated with robustness, and explained large parts of the variation in tissue mineral density. The nonlinear relationship between porosity and ash content may support that slender bones compensate for poor geometry by increasing ash content through reduced remodeling, while robust individuals increase porosity to decrease mass, but only to a point. These results suggest that tissue level organization plays a compensatory role in the establishment of adult bone mass, and may contribute to differences in bone aging between different bone phenotypes. The results suggest that slender individuals have significantly less remodeled bone, however the proportion of remodeled bone was not uniform around the tibia. In the complex results of the study of 38% vs. 66% sites the distal site was subject to higher strains than the 66% site, indicating both local and global regulators may be affecting overall remodeling rates and need to be teased apart in future studies. This research has broad clinical implications on the diagnosis and treatment of fragility fractures. The relationships that

  12. Real-time ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Unmin; Kim, Yongmin

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound elastography can provide tissue stiffness information that is complementary to the anatomy and blood flow information offered by conventional ultrasound machines, but it is computationally challenging due to many time-consuming modules and a large amount of data. To facilitate real-time implementations of ultrasound elastography, we have developed new methods that can significantly reduce the computational burden of common processing components in ultrasound elastography, such as the crosscorrelation analysis and spatial filtering applied to displacement and strain estimates. Using the new correlation-based search algorithm, the computational requirement of correlation-based search does not increase with the correlation window size. For typical parameters used in ultrasound elastography, the computation in correlation-based search can be reduced by a factor of more than 30. Median filtering is often performed to suppress the spike-like noise that results from correlation-based search. For fast median filtering, we have developed a method that efficiently finds a new median value utilizing the sort result of the previous pixel. With careful mapping of the new algorithms on digital signal processors, our work has led to development of a clinical ultrasound machine supporting real-time elastography. Our methods can help real-time implementations of various applications including ultrasound elastography, which could lead to increased use of ultrasound elastography in the clinic.

  13. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography.

    PubMed

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J G; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization. PMID:26459771

  14. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  15. [The activity of redox-regulatory systems in the tumor and its surrounding tissues in various histological types of tumor].

    PubMed

    Surikova, E I; Goroshinskaja, I A; Nerodo, G A; Frantsiyants, E M; Malejko, M L; Shalashnaja, E V; Kachesova, P; Nemashkalova, L A; Leonova, A V

    2016-01-01

    According to modern concepts cancer is a complex dynamic system having multiple relationships with both the immediate environment and with remote nonmalignant tissues and organs. Changes in the redox balance in them can result in disruption of the normal tissue control. Understanding of the biology of redox processes in a particular tumor and its surroundings, and of their functioning mechanisms is necessary for the development of new anti-cancer strategies based on the effects on the redox state of the tumor and surrounding tissue. Thus the aim of this work was to investigate activity of enzymatic systems influencing the redox state in the tumor tissue, peritumoral area and nonmalignant tissue (taken along the line of resection) for different histological types of tumors. The data obtained showed a similar level of reduced glutathione (GSH) in tumor tissues of gastric adenocarcinoma and vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, but its dynamics in the tissues surrounding the tumor was different. In contrast to the gastric adenocarcinoma the carcinoma of the vulva had a significant level of GSH and higher activity of glutathione dependent enzymes in the tumor tissue and its peritumoral area compared with the surrounding nonmalignant tissue. The results indicate that there are differences in the functioning of the redox regulatory systems in the tumor tissue and its surrounding tissues of various histological origin and localization, possibly due to different mechanisms involved in maintenance of the redox balance in the originally nonmalignant tissue. PMID:27143378

  16. Non-viral approaches for direct conversion into mesenchymal cell types: Potential application in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Seo; Kim, Seung Hyun L; Lee, Hwajin; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-05-01

    Acquiring adequate number of cells is one of the crucial factors to apply tissue engineering strategies in order to recover critical-sized defects. While the reprogramming technology used for inducing pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) opened up a direct path for generating pluripotent stem cells, a direct conversion strategy may provide another possibility to obtain desired cells for tissue engineering. In order to convert a somatic cell into any other cell type, diverse approaches have been investigated. Conspicuously, in contrast to traditional viral transduction method, non-viral delivery of conversion factors has the merit of lowering immune responses and provides safer genetic manipulation, thus revolutionizing the generation of directly converted cells and its application in therapeutics. In addition, applying various microenvironmental modulations have potential to ameliorate the conversion of somatic cells into different lineages. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in direct conversion technologies, specifically focusing on generating mesenchymal cell types. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 686-697, 2016. PMID:26729213

  17. A genotyping protocol for multiple tissue types from the polyploid tree species Sequoia sempervirens (Cupressaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Lakshmi; Dodd, Richard S.; O’Hara, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Identifying clonal lineages in asexually reproducing plants using microsatellite markers is complicated by the possibility of nonidentical genotypes from the same clonal lineage due to somatic mutations, null alleles, and scoring errors. We developed and tested a clonal identification protocol that is robust to these issues for the asexually reproducing hexaploid tree species coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens). Methods: Microsatellite data from four previously published and two newly developed primers were scored using a modified protocol, and clones were identified using Bruvo genetic distances. The effectiveness of this clonal identification protocol was assessed using simulations and by genotyping a test set of paired samples of different tissue types from the same trees. Results: Data from simulations showed that our protocol allowed us to accurately identify clonal lineages. Multiple test samples from the same trees were identified correctly, although certain tissue type pairs had larger genetic distances on average. Discussion: The methods described in this paper will allow for the accurate identification of coast redwood clones, facilitating future studies of the reproductive ecology of this species. The techniques used in this paper can be applied to studies of other clonal organisms as well. PMID:25798341

  18. Combined real-time ultrasound plane wave compounding and linear array optoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, Marc; Bost, Wolfgang; Tretbar, Steffen

    2015-07-01

    In optoacoustic imaging, the high optical contrast between different tissue types is combined with the high resolution and low scattering of ultrasound. Using adapted reconstruction algorithms, images of the distribution of light absorption in tissue can be obtained. Such as in any emerging modality, there is limited experience regarding the interpretation of optoacoustic images. For this reason, we developed a flexible hardware platform combining ultrasound imaging with optoacoustics. The system is based on the software processing of channel data and different types of reconstruction algorithms are implemented. It combines optoacoustic imaging based on linear arrays for detection with plane wave compounding ultrasound. Our system further includes a custom made probe based on a 7,5 MHz array, custom made fibre bundles for targeted light delivery and an acoustic coupling pad. The system was characterized on phantoms and first in-vivo datasets from subcutaneous vasculature were acquired.

  19. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  20. Hot topics in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound therapy and its integration with ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2005-09-01

    Since the development of biomedical ultrasound imaging from sonar after WWII, there has been a clear divide between ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound therapy. While imaging techniques are designed to cause as little change as possible in the tissues through which ultrasound propagates, ultrasound therapy typically relies upon heating or acoustic cavitation to produce a desirable therapeutic effect. Concerns over the increasingly high acoustic outputs of diagnostic ultrasound scanners prompted the adoption of the Mechanical Index (MI) and Thermal Index (TI) in the early 1990s. Therapeutic applications of ultrasound, meanwhile, have evolved from deep tissue heating in sports medicine to include targeted drug delivery, tumor and plaque ablation, cauterization via high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and accelerated dissolution of blood clots. The integration of ultrasonic imaging and therapy in one device is just beginning, but the promise of improved patient outcomes is balanced by regulatory and practical impediments.

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Valeno, Giovanni; Beatrice, Raffaele; Cinone, Nicoletta; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Panza, Francesco; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome. PMID:26266421

  2. Comparative lipoplasty analysis of in vivo-treated adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rohrich, R J; Morales, D E; Krueger, J E; Ansari, M; Ochoa, O; Robinson, J; Beran, S J

    2000-05-01

    A comparative histologic and chemical analysis was undertaken of adipose tissue treated in vivo with traditional, ultrasound-assisted, and external ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty. A series of six healthy women undergoing elective liposuction according to the superwet technique using a 1:1 infiltration ratio with the estimated quantity of fat to be removed was included in the study. Four separate regions on each patient were treated independently in vivo with traditional liposuction, internal ultrasound-assisted liposuction, or external ultrasound-assisted liposuction for 7 minutes. External massage was used as a control. Four separate specimens of adipose tissue from each patient were assessed for cellular disruption using blinded histologic evaluation. The remainder of tissue was centrifuged to separate the aqueous phase from the cellular components and then spectrophotometrically analyzed for creatinine kinase and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity as markers of cellular disruption. Histologic analysis confirmed 70 to 90 percent cellular disruption with internal ultrasound-assisted liposuction. Suction-assisted and external ultrasound-assisted liposuction showed 5 to 25 percent disruption, whereas massage controls showed only 5 percent. Only internal ultrasound-assisted liposuction showed 5 to 20 percent thermal liquefaction. Absorbance analysis showed creatine kinase activity (sigma units) greatest in ultrasound-exposed tissue. Both external and internal ultrasound-assisted liposuction gave creatine kinase levels 28 to 33 percent greater than suction-assisted liposuction, which varied only 10 percent from controls. Glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was 44 percent greater for internal ultrasound-assisted liposuction than that detected with suction-assisted liposuction. Glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity with external ultrasound-assisted liposuction and massage did not vary much from each other, at only 14 percent and 11 percent

  3. Propolis Modifies Collagen Types I and III Accumulation in the Matrix of Burnt Tissue.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawel; Wisowski, Grzegorz; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Klimek, Katarzyna; Olczyk, Monika; Kozma, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing represents an interactive process which requires highly organized activity of various cells, synthesizing cytokines, growth factors, and collagen. Collagen types I and III, serving as structural and regulatory molecules, play pivotal roles during wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare the propolis and silver sulfadiazine therapeutic efficacy throughout the quantitative and qualitative assessment of collagen types I and III accumulation in the matrix of burnt tissues. Burn wounds were inflicted on pigs, chosen for the evaluation of wound repair because of many similarities between pig and human skin. Isolated collagen types I and III were estimated by the surface plasmon resonance method with a subsequent collagenous quantification using electrophoretic and densitometric analyses. Propolis burn treatment led to enhanced collagens and its components expression, especially during the initial stage of the study. Less expressed changes were observed after silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) application. AgSD and, with a smaller intensity, propolis stimulated accumulation of collagenous degradation products. The assessed propolis therapeutic efficacy, throughout quantitatively and qualitatively analyses of collagen types I and III expression and degradation in wounds matrix, may indicate that apitherapeutic agent can generate favorable biochemical environment supporting reepithelization. PMID:23781260

  4. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Robin; Gebhard, Claudia; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Hoof, Ilka; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Chen, Yun; Zhao, Xiaobei; Schmidl, Christian; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ntini, Evgenia; Arner, Erik; Valen, Eivind; Li, Kang; Schwarzfischer, Lucia; Glatz, Dagmar; Raithel, Johanna; Lilje, Berit; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jørgensen, Mette; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Ishizu, Yuri; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Negishi, Yutaka; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Lassmann, Timo; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Kondo, Naoto; Kawai, Jun; Lennartsson, Andreas; Daub, Carsten O.; Heutink, Peter; Hume, David A.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Müller, Ferenc; Consortium, The Fantom; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Carninci, Piero; Rehli, Michael; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-03-01

    Enhancers control the correct temporal and cell-type-specific activation of gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes. Knowing their properties, regulatory activity and targets is crucial to understand the regulation of differentiation and homeostasis. Here we use the FANTOM5 panel of samples, covering the majority of human tissues and cell types, to produce an atlas of active, in vivo-transcribed enhancers. We show that enhancers share properties with CpG-poor messenger RNA promoters but produce bidirectional, exosome-sensitive, relatively short unspliced RNAs, the generation of which is strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, to identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to classify cell-type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of enhancer redundancy, which explains gene expression strength rather than expression patterns. The online FANTOM5 enhancer atlas represents a unique resource for studies on cell-type-specific enhancers and gene regulation.

  5. Type I Interferon Counters or Promotes Coxiella burnetii Replication Dependent on Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Jodi F; Robison, Amanda; Kimmel, Emily; Christensen, Kelly; Lucas, Erin; Ramstead, Andrew; Jutila, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen and the cause of Q fever. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is critical for host protection from infection, but a role for type I IFN in C. burnetii infection has not been determined. Type I IFN supports host protection from a related pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, and we hypothesized that it would be similarly protective in C. burnetii infection. In contrast to our prediction, IFN-α receptor-deficient (IFNAR(-/-)) mice were protected from C. burnetii-induced infection. Therefore, the role of type I IFN in C. burnetii infection was distinct from that in L. pneumophila Mice treated with a double-stranded-RNA mimetic were protected from C. burnetii-induced weight loss through an IFNAR-independent pathway. We next treated mice with recombinant IFN-α (rIFN-α). When rIFN-α was injected by the intraperitoneal route during infection, disease-induced weight loss was exacerbated. Mice that received rIFN-α by this route had dampened interleukin 1β (IL-1β) expression in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. However, when rIFN-α was delivered to the lung, bacterial replication was decreased in all tissues. Thus, the presence of type I IFN in the lung protected from infection, but when delivered to the periphery, type I IFN enhanced disease, potentially by dampening inflammatory cytokines. To better characterize the capacity for type I IFN induction by C. burnetii, we assessed expression of IFN-β transcripts by human macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from C. burnetii Understanding innate responses in C. burnetii infection will support the discovery of novel therapies that may be alternative or complementary to the current antibiotic treatment. PMID:27068091

  6. Connective tissue reflex massage for type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belen; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Quesada-Rubio, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (Leriche-Fontaine classification) were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30 min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P < .05) in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg) and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg). A significant difference (P < .05) was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P < .05) for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD. PMID:19933770

  7. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples. PMID:21501697

  8. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  9. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... germ cell neoplasms, sex-cord stromal tumors. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ... oviduct, ovary, ultrasound imaging of pelvic structures. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  10. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  11. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  12. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Performed Ultrasound is a painless method that uses sound waves to create images of the inside of the ... neck to help with the transmission of the sound waves. Next, the technician moves a wand, called a ...

  13. Pregnancy ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... findings that might indicate an increased risk for Down syndrome A pregnancy ultrasound may also be done in ... weeks of pregnancy to look for signs of Down syndrome or other problems in the developing baby. This ...

  14. [Periostal interposition in epiphysiolysis, diagnosed by ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Ostergård, L L; Gaster, P; Hjarbaek, J

    2000-06-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound is a rapidly expanding diagnostic field. High frequency transducers with high spacial resolution make it possible to demonstrate superficial soft tissue structures such as tendons, muscles, ligaments and even, under certain circumstances, fractures and periosteum. A case is presented where ultrasound clearly visualised periostal interposition in a distal tibial epiphysiolysis in an eight year-old boy, and some aspects of ultrasound in musculo-skeletal imaging are discussed. PMID:10895603

  15. [Interventional ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Sánchez, N; Fernández Canedo, I; Valdés Vilches, L; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    High-frequency ultrasound has become increasingly used in dermatology. This technique is accessible, non-invasive, and rapid and provides information in real time. Consequently, it has become of great diagnostic value in dermatology. However, high-frequency ultrasound also has a promising future as a complementary technique in interventional diagnostic procedures, even though its application in this field has been little studied by dermatologists. PMID:26895944

  16. Molecular composition of type VI collagen. Evidence for chain heterogeneity in mammalian tissues and cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kielty, C M; Boot-Handford, R P; Ayad, S; Shuttleworth, C A; Grant, M E

    1990-01-01

    The chain composition and relative abundance of type VI collagen synthesized by cells cultured from foetal bovine nuchal ligament and skin were compared with those of the type VI collagen present in these foetal tissues. Immunoprecipitation of intact collagen VI from medium and cell layers of nuchal ligament fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts at confluence revealed collagen type VI molecules with a chain composition consistent with an [alpha 1(VI)alpha 2(VI)alpha 3(VI)] monomeric assembly. Maintenance of cells in a post-confluent quiescent state promoted a marked phenotypic change in these ratios, with increased concentrations of assemblies composed of equimolar ratios of alpha 1(VI) and alpha 2(VI) chains detected in the medium of these cultures. Analysis of steady-state concentrations of mRNA for alpha 1(VI) and alpha 2(VI) chains revealed these species to be present in increased abundance at post-confluence in all the cultures, but no corresponding increase was observed in the alpha 3(VI) mRNA. In order to assess the physiological significance of these observations, the chain composition of the collagen VI content of the corresponding foetal tissues was assessed by Western blotting after extraction in guanidinium isothiocyanate under reducing conditions. Extracts of nuchal ligament revealed a collagen VI chain composition consistent with a heterotrimeric chain assembly. In contrast, the skin extracts revealed an abundance of alpha 1(VI) and alpha 2(VI) chains with only traces of the alpha 3(VI) chain detected. Increased equimolar concentrations of the alpha 1(VI)-chain and alpha 2(VI)-chain mRNAs in skin again reflected the increased concentrations of these polypeptide chains. Type VI collagen was present in greater abundance both in the nuchal ligament and in the corresponding nuchal-ligament fibroblast cultures. The results indicate that the chain composition of type VI collagen is subject to modulation at the level of transcription as a result of variations in

  17. The effects of twisting and type of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yoshihiko; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Katagiri, Seiji; Yamada, Yutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2003-10-01

    The effects of twisting and type (single- or double-lumen) of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up (US-guided OPU) were investigated in cattle. The first study using slaughterhouse ovaries revealed that twisting of the needle during follicle aspiration improved the oocyte recovery rate without deleterious effects on the attachment of cumulus layers. Vacuum pressure affected the oocyte recovery and cumulus attachment, regardless of the needle type. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment with an optimized vacuum pressure. In the second study, US-guided OPU was performed in live cows using two types of needles with a vacuum pressure of 75 mmHg. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment of the recovered oocytes. The results revealed that twisting of the needle is effective in follicle aspiration, and suggested that a single-lumen needle is as useful as a double-lumen needle for US-guided OPU in cattle. PMID:14600345

  18. A multi-tissue type genome-scale metabolic network for analysis of whole-body systems physiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions provide a biologically meaningful mechanistic basis for the genotype-phenotype relationship. The global human metabolic network, termed Recon 1, has recently been reconstructed allowing the systems analysis of human metabolic physiology and pathology. Utilizing high-throughput data, Recon 1 has recently been tailored to different cells and tissues, including the liver, kidney, brain, and alveolar macrophage. These models have shown utility in the study of systems medicine. However, no integrated analysis between human tissues has been done. Results To describe tissue-specific functions, Recon 1 was tailored to describe metabolism in three human cells: adipocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes. These cell-specific networks were manually curated and validated based on known cellular metabolic functions. To study intercellular interactions, a novel multi-tissue type modeling approach was developed to integrate the metabolic functions for the three cell types, and subsequently used to simulate known integrated metabolic cycles. In addition, the multi-tissue model was used to study diabetes: a pathology with systemic properties. High-throughput data was integrated with the network to determine differential metabolic activity between obese and type II obese gastric bypass patients in a whole-body context. Conclusion The multi-tissue type modeling approach presented provides a platform to study integrated metabolic states. As more cell and tissue-specific models are released, it is critical to develop a framework in which to study their interdependencies. PMID:22041191

  19. Distribution of a macaque immunosuppressive type D retrovirus in neural, lymphoid, and salivary tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, A A; Rodriguez, M H; Bush, C E; Munn, R J; Kwang, H S; Moore, P F; Osborn, K G; Marx, P A; Gardner, M B; Lowenstine, L J

    1988-01-01

    Simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California Primate Research Center is caused by a type D retrovirus designated SAIDS retrovirus serotype 1 (SRV-1). This syndrome is characterized by profound immunosuppression and death associated with opportunistic infections. Neurologic signs and lesions have not been described as part of this syndrome. The distribution of SRV-1 in the salivary glands, lymph nodes, spleens, thymuses, and brains of eight virus-infected rhesus macaques was examined by immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopy, in situ RNA hybridization, and Southern blot hybridization were also performed on selected tissues to detect viral particles, RNA, and DNA, respectively. In seven of eight SRV-1-infected animals, the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (gp20) of SRV-1 was present in three or more tissues, but never in the brain. In the remaining animal, no viral antigen was detected in any tissue. In this same group of animals, viral nucleic acid was detected in the lymph nodes of six of six animals by Southern blot hybridization, in the salivary glands of two of five animals by both Southern blot and in situ hybridizations, and, surprisingly, in the brains of three of three animals by Southern blot and of three of five animals by in situ hybridization, including the one animal in which viral gp20 was undetectable. None of these animals had neurologic signs or lesions. The detection of viral nucleic acid in the absence of viral antigen in the brain suggests latent SRV-1 infection of the central nervous system. Images PMID:3285033

  20. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a New C-type Lysozyme Gene from Yak Mammary Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming Feng; Hu, Ming Jun; Ren, Hong Hui; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Milk lysozyme is the ubiquitous enzyme in milk of mammals. In this study, the cDNA sequence of a new chicken-type (c-type) milk lysozyme gene (YML), was cloned from yak mammary gland tissue. A 444 bp open reading frames, which encodes 148 amino acids (16.54 kDa) with a signal peptide of 18 amino acids, was sequenced. Further analysis indicated that the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences identities between yak and cow milk lysozyme were 89.04% and 80.41%, respectively. Recombinant yak milk lysozyme (rYML) was produced by Escherichia coli BL21 and Pichia pastoris X33. The highest lysozyme activity was detected for heterologous protein rYML5 (M = 1,864.24 U/mg, SD = 25.75) which was expressed in P. pastoris with expression vector pPICZαA and it clearly inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Result of the YML gene expression using quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the YML gene was up-regulated to maximum at 30 day postpartum, that is, comparatively high YML can be found in initial milk production. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the amino acid sequence was similar to cow kidney lysozyme, which implied that the YML may have diverged from a different ancestor gene such as cow mammary glands. In our study, we suggest that YML be a new c-type lysozyme expressed in yak mammary glands that plays a role as host immunity. PMID:26580446

  1. Tissue sorbitol concentration can be altered by changing the type of dietary carbohydrate or copper status

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, T.; Lewis, C.G.; Fields, M. )

    1989-02-09

    This study was designed to determine whether rehabilitation of tissue sorbitol concentration occurs when rats consuming a high-fructose, low-copper diet are changed to diets containing starch or copper. Weanling male rats were provided with a diet which contained 62.7% fructose and 0.6 or 6.0 {mu}g Cu/g (F-Cu) for 4 weeks and then changed to either a fructose diet which contained 6.0 {mu}g Cu/g or a starch diet which contained either 0.6 or 6.0 {mu}g Cu/g for 2 weeks. Hepatic copper concentration of rats eating copper-deficient diets was about 30% of copper adequate rats regardless of the type of dietary carbohydrate. Pancreatic fructose, glucose and sorbitol concentrations were significantly lowered in rats changed to a starch diet. Kidney fructose and sorbitol concentrations were significantly lowered in rats changed to a starch diet. For all dietary groups, pancreatic and kidney sorbitol concentrations returned to normal after removal of rats from the F-Cu diet. In general, changing rats from a high-fructose, low-copper diet to a fructose diet with copper or a starch diet with or without copper improved the copper deficiency symptoms which changed in concert with tissue sorbitol levels.

  2. MERAV: a tool for comparing gene expression across human tissues and cell types.

    PubMed

    Shaul, Yoav D; Yuan, Bingbing; Thiru, Prathapan; Nutter-Upham, Andy; McCallum, Scott; Lanzkron, Carolyn; Bell, George W; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic transformation of normal cells into malignant, rapidly proliferating cells requires major alterations in cell physiology. For example, the transformed cells remodel their metabolic processes to supply the additional demand for cellular building blocks. We have recently demonstrated essential metabolic processes in tumor progression through the development of a methodological analysis of gene expression. Here, we present the Metabolic gEne RApid Visualizer (MERAV, http://merav.wi.mit.edu), a web-based tool that can query a database comprising ∼4300 microarrays, representing human gene expression in normal tissues, cancer cell lines and primary tumors. MERAV has been designed as a powerful tool for whole genome analysis which offers multiple advantages: one can search many genes in parallel; compare gene expression among different tissue types as well as between normal and cancer cells; download raw data; and generate heatmaps; and finally, use its internal statistical tool. Most importantly, MERAV has been designed as a unique tool for analyzing metabolic processes as it includes matrixes specifically focused on metabolic genes and is linked to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway search. PMID:26626150

  3. Prenatal Diagnosis of Lissencephaly Type 2 using Three-dimensional Ultrasound and Fetal MRI: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Tonni, Gabriele; Pattacini, Pierpaolo; Bonasoni, Maria Paola; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Lissencephaly is a genetic heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the classical triad: brain malformations, eye anomalies, and congenital muscular dystrophy. Prenatal diagnosis is feasible by demonstrating abnormal development of sulci and gyri. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may enhance detection of developmental cortical disorders as well as ocular anomalies. We describe a case of early diagnosis of lissencephaly type 2 detected at the time of routine second trimester scan by three-dimensional ultrasound and fetal MRI. Gross pathology confirmed the accuracy of the prenatal diagnosis while histology showed the typical feature of cobblestone cortex. As the disease is associated with poor perinatal prognosis, early and accurate prenatal diagnosis is important for genetic counseling and antenatal care. PMID:27088705

  4. Ultrasound elastography: principles, techniques, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dewall, Ryan J

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an emerging set of imaging modalities used to image tissue elasticity and are often referred to as virtual palpation. These techniques have proven effective in detecting and assessing many different pathologies, because tissue mechanical changes often correlate with tissue pathological changes. This article reviews the principles of ultrasound elastography, many of the ultrasound-based techniques, and popular clinical applications. Originally, elastography was a technique that imaged tissue strain by comparing pre- and postcompression ultrasound images. However, new techniques have been developed that use different excitation methods such as external vibration or acoustic radiation force. Some techniques track transient phenomena such as shear waves to quantitatively measure tissue elasticity. Clinical use of elastography is increasing, with applications including lesion detection and classification, fibrosis staging, treatment monitoring, vascular imaging, and musculoskeletal applications. PMID:23510006

  5. Corrosion and Adverse Local Tissue Reaction in One Type of Modular Neck Stem.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Elie; Ward, Daniel M; Robbins, Claire E; Nandi, Sumon; Bono, James V; Talmo, Carl T

    2015-10-01

    Modular neck stems allow for optimization of joint biomechanics by restoring anteversion, offset, and limb length. A potential disadvantage is the generation of metal ions from fretting and crevice corrosion. We identified 118 total hip arthroplasty implanted with one type of dual-modular femoral component. Thirty-six required revision due to adverse local tissue reaction. Multivariate analysis isolated females and low offset necks as risk factors for failure. Kaplan-Meir analysis revealed small stem sizes failed at a higher rate during early follow-up period. Although the cobalt/chrome levels were higher in the failed group, these tests had low diagnostic accuracy for ALTR, while MRI scan was more sensitive. We conclude that the complications related to the use of dual modular stems of this design outweigh the potential benefits. PMID:26027523

  6. Balloon Type Elasticity Sensing of Left Ventricular Tissue for Small Experimental Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashimori, Mitsuru; Ishii, Ryohei; Tadakuma, Kenjiro; Kaneko, Makoto; Tamaki, Syunsuke; Sakata, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    This paper describes an elasticity sensing system for a left ventricular tissue of small experimental animal. We first show the basic concept of the proposed method, where a ring shaped specimen is dilated by a balloon type probe with pressure based control and the elasticity is estimated by using the stress and strain information. We introduce the dual cylinder model for approximating the strengths of material of the specimen and the balloon. Based on this model, we can derive the Young's modulus of the specimen. After showing the developed experimental system, we show basic experiments using silicone specimens. We finally show a couple of experimental results using rat and mouse, where specimens with HFPEF (Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction) can be separated from normal specimens.

  7. Destruction of Tissue, Cells and Organelles in Type 1 Diabetic Rats Presented at Macromolecular Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Avramut, M. Cristina; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Pronk, Joachim W.; Dijk, Freark; Koster, Abraham J.; Visser, Jeroen T. J.; Faas, Frank G. A.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2013-01-01

    Finding alternatives for insulin therapy and making advances in etiology of type 1 diabetes benefits from a full structural and functional insight into Islets of Langerhans. Electron microscopy (EM) can visualize Islet morphology at the highest possible resolution, however, conventional EM only provides biased snapshots and lacks context. We developed and employed large scale EM and compiled a resource of complete cross sections of rat Islets during immuno-destruction to provide unbiased structural insight of thousands of cells at macromolecular resolution. The resource includes six datasets, totalling 25.000 micrographs, annotated for cellular and ultrastructural changes during autoimmune diabetes. Granulocytes are attracted to the endocrine tissue, followed by extravasation of a pleiotrophy of leukocytes. Subcellullar changes in beta cells include endoplasmic reticulum stress, insulin degranulation and glycogen accumulation. Rare findings include erythrocyte extravasation and nuclear actin-like fibers. While we focus on a rat model of autoimmune diabetes, our approach is general applicable. PMID:23652855

  8. Characterization of tissue plasminogen activator binding proteins isolated from endothelial cells and other cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, D.P.; Wood, L.L.; Moos, M. )

    1990-07-15

    Human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) was shown to bind specifically to human osteosarcoma cells (HOS), and human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A-431 cells). Crosslinking studies with DTSSP demonstrated high molecular weight complexes (130,000) between {sup 125}I-t-PA and cell membrane protein on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), HOS, and A-431 cells. A 48-65,000 molecular weight complex was demonstrated after crosslinking t-PA peptide (res. 7-20) to cells. Ligand blotting of cell lysates which had been passed over a t-PA affinity column revealed binding of t-PA to 54,000 and 95,000 molecular weight proteins. Several t-PA binding proteins were identified in immunopurified cell lysates, including tubulin beta chain, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and single chain urokinase.

  9. Systematic chromatin state comparison of epigenomes associated with diverse properties including sex and tissue type

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Angela; Kellis, Manolis

    2015-01-01

    Epigenomic data sets provide critical information about the dynamic role of chromatin states in gene regulation, but a key question of how chromatin state segmentations vary under different conditions across the genome has remained unaddressed. Here we present ChromDiff, a group-wise chromatin state comparison method that generates an information-theoretic representation of epigenomes and corrects for external covariate factors to better isolate relevant chromatin state changes. By applying ChromDiff to the 127 epigenomes from the Roadmap Epigenomics and ENCODE projects, we provide novel group-wise comparative analyses across sex, tissue type, state and developmental age. Remarkably, we find that distinct sets of epigenomic features are maximally discriminative for different group-wise comparisons, in each case revealing distinct enriched pathways, many of which do not show gene expression differences. Our methodology should be broadly applicable for epigenomic comparisons and provides a powerful new tool for studying chromatin state differences at the genome scale. PMID:26282110

  10. Enhanced ROS production and oxidative damage in subcutaneous white adipose tissue mitochondria in obese and type 2 diabetes subjects.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mrittika; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the insulin target tissues has been implicated in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. The study has examined the oxidative stress parameters in the mitochondria of subcutaneous white adipose tissue from obese and non-obese subjects with or without type 2 diabetes. An accumulation of protein carbonyls, fluorescent lipid peroxidation products, and malondialdehyde occurs in the adipose tissue mitochondria of obese type 2 diabetic, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese diabetic subjects with the maximum increase noticed in the obese type 2 diabetes patients and the minimum in non-obese type 2 diabetics. The mitochondria from obese type 2 diabetics, non-diabetic obese, and non-obese type 2 diabetics also produce significantly more reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro compared to those of controls, and apparently the mitochondrial ROS production rate in each group is proportional to the respective load of oxidative damage markers. Likewise, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase show decreased activities most markedly in obese type 2 diabetes subjects and to a lesser degree in non-obese type 2 diabetes or non-diabetic obese subjects in comparison to control. The results imply that mitochondrial dysfunction with enhanced ROS production may contribute to the metabolic abnormality of adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25312902

  11. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  12. The influence of breeding strategy, reproductive stage, and tissue type on transcript variability in fish.

    PubMed

    Dreier, David A; Loughery, Jennifer R; Denslow, Nancy D; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Characterizing factors that contribute to transcript variability is necessary before molecular endpoints are widely adopted as biomarkers for environmental monitoring programs and risk assessment. Here, we employed a meta-analysis approach to understand how reproductive stage, breeding strategy, and tissue type influence transcript variability in multiple fish species. Transcript abundance from the scientific literature was examined by method of quantification (qPCR or microarray), and the extracted data were used to calculate the coefficient of variation (CoV) for each transcript. Based on qPCR data, variability in the abundance of estrogen receptor 1 and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3b was dependent upon reproductive stage and/or breeding strategy in the female ovaries. The variability of other transcripts in the steroid biosynthesis pathway as well as other steroid receptors did not depend upon sex, breeding strategy, or reproductive stage. Variability estimates were used to determine sample size requirements for detecting specific critical effects in molecular endpoints. It was estimated that only 37.8% of published studies used in the qPCR meta-analysis had sufficient experimental power (0.8) to detect a 2-fold expression difference in a transcript. To build upon these analyses, microarray data were used to measure overall variability of the transcriptome, and it was determined that the vitellogenic reproductive stage had the lowest transcriptomic variability compared to other reproductive stages. This variability was lower in a single-spawning species (largemouth bass) compared to a multiple-spawner (fathead minnow). Following this, a meta-analysis of 777 microarrays for multiple fish species was performed to determine the influence of breeding strategy and tissue type on transcriptomic variability. In this analysis, single-spawning fish showed lower gonadal and hepatic transcriptome variability compared to multiple-spawning species. Thus, these species may

  13. Type I collagen degradation during tissue repair: comparison of mechanisms following fracture and acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Rachel; Gossiel, Fatma; Morton, Allison; Newman, Christopher; Eastell, Richard

    2014-12-01

    There is turnover of type I collagen during tissue repair. The degradation of type I collagen by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is reflected by serum ICTP and that by cathepsins by CTX-I. There is evidence for increases in ICTP after acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and in CTX-I during fracture repair. The involvement of the MMP pathway in fracture repair and cathepsins after myocardial infarction is unclear. We studied 74 men; 22 were admitted to the hospital on the day of their ACS (ST or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction) (mean age 56 years, range 39 to 82) and 9 attended hospital on the day of their tibial shaft fracture (mean age 33 years, range 21 to 79); we had 43 age-matched controls (mean age 54 years, range 20 to 82). Subjects with ACS and tibial shaft fracture were followed up for up to one year; control subjects were used to establish a reference interval. We measured serum ICTP by ELISA (reference interval 1.1 to 17.6 ng/mL) and CTX-I by chemiluminescence (reference interval 0.094 to 0.991 ng/mL). After ACS, the mean ICTP increased from 5.41 to 6.60 ng/mL within one day of admission (p<0.05); the mean CTX-I increased from 0.263 to 0.414 ng/mL (p<0.05). In two cases, the CTX increased to above the reference interval. After tibial shaft fracture, the mean ICTP increased from 5.51 to maximum of 8.71 ng/mL within 28 days of admission (p<0.01); the mean CTX increased from 0.200 to 0.374 ng/mL (p<0.001). In four cases, the CTX increased to above the reference interval. We conclude that the MMP and cathepsin pathways are both implicated in tissue repair in the bone and heart. This may have clinical implications; drugs that block either pathway (TIMPs, cathepsin K inhibitors) may affect the repair of both tissues. PMID:25193029

  14. Ultrasound microscope: the new field in ultrasound diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novyc'kyy, Victor V.; Lushchyk, Ulyana B.

    2001-06-01

    A device which is a new stage in the development of medical equipment has been developed. The device works as an ultrasound microscope in vivo and provides 4 up to 32 colored histological image. It gives possibility to estimate tissue acoustic density with the help of 4 up to 32 gradation coloring different tissues and enables tissue microcirculation visualization. With the help of the device a doctor can objectify fatty hepatitis and cirrhosis, edema of different organs and tissues as well as microcirculation in organs and tissues (e.g. muscles, myocard and bone system). New promising applications of ultrasound systems in diagnostics and for choosing individual treatment tactics, with pathogenesis being taken into account, may be developed with the help of the device.

  15. Decreased Expression Of apM1 in Omental and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Humans With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Beavers, Lisa S.; Conner, Laura J.; Corominola, Helena; Johnson, Dwayne; Hammond, Craig D.; Rafaeloff-Phail, Ronit; Seng, Thomas; Suter, Todd M.; Sluka, James P.; Ravussin, Eric; Gadski, Robert A.; Caro, Jose F.

    2000-01-01

    We have screened a subtracted cDNA library in order to identify differentially expressed genes in omental adipose tissue of human patients with Type 2 diabetes. One clone (#1738) showed a marked reduction in omental adipose tissue from patients with Type 2 diabetes. Sequencing and BLAST analysis revealed clone #1738 was the adipocyte-specific secreted protein gene apM1 (synonyms ACRP30, AdipoQ, GBP28). Consistent with the murine orthologue, apM1 mRNA was expressed in cultured human adipocytes and not in preadipocytes. Using RT-PCR we confirmed that apM1 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in omental adipose tissue of obese patients with Type 2 diabetes compared with lean and obese normoglycemic subjects. Although less pronounced, apM1 mRNA levels were reduced in subcutaneous adipose tissue of Type 2 diabetic patients. Whereas the biological function of apM1 is presently unknown, the tissue specific expression, structural similarities to TNFα and the dysregulated expression observed in obese Type 2 diabetic patients suggest that this factor may play a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. PMID:11469400

  16. In Vitro Effects of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation on the Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Alveolar Bone-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Tooth Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lim, KiTaek; Kim, Jangho; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound stimulation produces significant multifunctional effects that are directly relevant to alveolar bone formation, which is necessary for periodontal healing and regeneration. We focused to find out effects of specific duty cycles and the percentage of time that ultrasound is being generated over one on/off pulse period, under ultrasound stimulation. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound ((LIPUS) 1 MHz) with duty cycles of 20% and 50% was used in this study, and human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hABMSCs) were treated with an intensity of 50 mW/cm2 and exposure time of 10 min/day. hABMSCs exposed at duty cycles of 20% and 50% had similar cell viability (O.D.), which was higher (*P < 0.05) than that of control cells. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was significantly enhanced at 1 week with LIPUS treatment in osteogenic cultures as compared to control. Gene expressions showed significantly higher expression levels of CD29, CD44, COL1, and OCN in the hABMSCs under LIPUS treatment when compared to control after two weeks of treatment. The effects were partially controlled by LIPUS treatment, indicating that modulation of osteogenesis in hABMSCs was related to the specific stimulation. Furthermore, mineralized nodule formation was markedly increased after LIPUS treatment than that seen in untreated cells. Through simple staining methods such as Alizarin red and von Kossa staining, calcium deposits generated their highest levels at about 3 weeks. These results suggest that LIPUS could enhance the cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of hABMSCs, and could be part of effective treatment methods for clinical applications. PMID:24195067

  17. Impacts of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) on neuronal survival

    PubMed Central

    Chevilley, Arnaud; Lesept, Flavie; Lenoir, Sophie; Ali, Carine; Parcq, Jérôme; Vivien, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) a serine protease is constituted of five functional domains through which it interacts with different substrates, binding proteins, and receptors. In the last years, great interest has been given to the clinical relevance of targeting tPA in different diseases of the central nervous system, in particular stroke. Among its reported functions in the central nervous system, tPA displays both neurotrophic and neurotoxic effects. How can the protease mediate such opposite functions remain unclear but several hypotheses have been proposed. These include an influence of the degree of maturity and/or the type of neurons, of the level of tPA, of its origin (endogenous or exogenous) or of its form (single chain tPA versus two chain tPA). In this review, we will provide a synthetic snapshot of our current knowledge regarding the natural history of tPA and discuss how it sustains its pleiotropic functions with focus on excitotoxic/ischemic neuronal death and neuronal survival. PMID:26528141

  18. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Masson, C; Angles-Cano, E

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) by the fast-acting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was investigated in homogeneous (plasma) and heterogeneous (solid-phase fibrin) systems by using radioisotopic and spectrophotometric analysis. It is demonstrated that fibrin-bound t-PA is protected from inhibition by PAI-1, whereas t-PA in soluble phase is rapidly inhibited (K1 = 10(7) M-1.s-1) even in the presence of 2 microM-plasminogen. The inhibitor interferes with the binding of t-PA to fibrin in a competitive manner. As a consequence the Kd of t-PA for fibrin (1.2 +/- 0.4 nM) increases and the maximal velocity of plasminogen activation by fibrin-bound t-PA is not modified. From the plot of the apparent Kd versus the concentration of PAI-1 a Ki value of 1.3 +/- 0.3 nM was calculated. The quasi-similar values for the dissociation constants between fibrin and t-PA (Kd) and between PAI-1 and t-PA (Ki), as well as the competitive type of inhibition observed, indicate that the fibrinolytic activity of human plasma may be the result of an equilibrium distribution of t-PA between both the amount of fibrin generated and the concentration of circulating inhibitor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3146972

  19. Nonlinear effects in ultrasound fields of diagnostic-type transducers used for kidney stone propulsion: Characterization in water

    SciTech Connect

    Karzova, M.; Cunitz, B.; Kreider, W.; Bailey, M.; Yuldashev, P.; Andriyakhina, Y.; Sapozhnikov, O.; Khokhlova, V.

    2015-10-28

    Newer imaging and therapeutic ultrasound technologies require higher in situ pressure levels compared to conventional diagnostic values. One example is the recently developed use of focused ultrasonic radiation force to move kidney stones and residual fragments out of the urinary collecting system. A commercial diagnostic 2.3 MHz C5-2 array probe is used to deliver the acoustic pushing pulses. The probe comprises 128 elements equally spaced at the 55 mm long convex cylindrical surface with 38 mm radius of curvature. The efficacy of the treatment can be increased by using higher intensity at the focus to provide stronger pushing force; however, nonlinear acoustic saturation can be a limiting factor. In this work nonlinear propagation effects were analyzed for the C5-2 transducer using a combined measurement and modeling approach. Simulations were based on the 3D Westervelt equation; the boundary condition was set to match the focal geometry of the beam as measured at a low power output. Focal waveforms simulated for increased output power levels were compared with the fiber-optic hydrophone measurements and were found in good agreement. It was shown that saturation effects do limit the acoustic pressure in the focal region of the transducer. This work has application to standard diagnostic probes and imaging.

  20. Nonlinear Effects in Ultrasound Fields of Diagnostic-type Transducers Used for Kidney Stone Propulsion: Characterization in Water

    PubMed Central

    Karzova, M.; Cunitz, B.; Yuldashev, P.; Andriyakhina, Y.; Kreider, W.; Sapozhnikov, O.; Bailey, M.; Khokhlova, V.

    2016-01-01

    Newer imaging and therapeutic ultrasound technologies require higher in situ pressure levels compared to conventional diagnostic values. One example is the recently developed use of focused ultrasonic radiation force to move kidney stones and residual fragments out of the urinary collecting system. A commercial diagnostic 2.3 MHz C5-2 array probe is used to deliver the acoustic pushing pulses. The probe comprises 128 elements equally spaced at the 55 mm long convex cylindrical surface with 38 mm radius of curvature. The efficacy of the treatment can be increased by using higher transducer output to provide stronger pushing force; however, nonlinear acoustic saturation effect can be a limiting factor. In this work nonlinear propagation effects were analyzed for the C5-2 transducer using a combined measurement and modeling approach. Simulations were based on the 3D Westervelt equation; the boundary condition was set to match low power pressure beam scans. Focal waveforms simulated for increased output power levels were compared with the fiber-optic hydrophone measurements and were found in good agreement. It was shown that saturation effects do limit the acoustic pressure in the focal region of the transducer. This work has application to standard diagnostic probes and imaging. PMID:27087711

  1. Efficacy of transdermal magnesium ascorbyl phosphate delivery after ultrasound treatment with microbubbles in gel-type surrounding medium in mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Lu, Ying-Jui; Hung, Chi-Ray; Yang, Meng-Yu

    2016-04-01

    Liquid microemulsions appropriate for topical application were obtained by increasing their viscosity through the addition of thickening agents. The present study first assessed the usefulness of ultrasound (US) plus US contrast agent, microbubbles (MBs), in agarose gel for enhancing transdermal drug delivery. The effect of US plus MBs in agarose gel on the penetration of the skin by magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (MAP) was explored both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro experiments, the stability of MBs was investigated by examining the penetration of MAP by the model drug, Evans blue, in two media: an agarose phantom and pig skin. The penetration depth in the agarose phantom and pig skin increased by 40% and 195%, respectively, when treated with US plus MBs in 0.1% agarose solution combined with MAP (UMB1), and by 48% and 206%, respectively, when treated with US plus MBs in 0.15% agarose solution and MAP (UMB2). The skin-whitening effects in C57BL/6J mice in the UMB1 and UMB2 groups over a 4-week experimental period were significantly increased by 63% and 70%, respectively, in the fourth week. The findings of this study suggest that the survival of MBs with US is affected by the viscosity of the surrounding medium, and that in mice, treatment with US plus MBs in a suitable agarose gel can increase skin permeability and enhance transdermal MAP delivery. PMID:26838887

  2. Nonlinear effects in ultrasound fields of diagnostic-type transducers used for kidney stone propulsion: Characterization in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzova, M.; Cunitz, B.; Yuldashev, P.; Andriyakhina, Y.; Kreider, W.; Sapozhnikov, O.; Bailey, M.; Khokhlova, V.

    2015-10-01

    Newer imaging and therapeutic ultrasound technologies require higher in situ pressure levels compared to conventional diagnostic values. One example is the recently developed use of focused ultrasonic radiation force to move kidney stones and residual fragments out of the urinary collecting system. A commercial diagnostic 2.3 MHz C5-2 array probe is used to deliver the acoustic pushing pulses. The probe comprises 128 elements equally spaced at the 55 mm long convex cylindrical surface with 38 mm radius of curvature. The efficacy of the treatment can be increased by using higher intensity at the focus to provide stronger pushing force; however, nonlinear acoustic saturation can be a limiting factor. In this work nonlinear propagation effects were analyzed for the C5-2 transducer using a combined measurement and modeling approach. Simulations were based on the 3D Westervelt equation; the boundary condition was set to match the focal geometry of the beam as measured at a low power output. Focal waveforms simulated for increased output power levels were compared with the fiber-optic hydrophone measurements and were found in good agreement. It was shown that saturation effects do limit the acoustic pressure in the focal region of the transducer. This work has application to standard diagnostic probes and imaging.

  3. Effect of resonance frequency, power input, and saturation gas type on the oxidation efficiency of an ultrasound horn.

    PubMed

    Rooze, Joost; Rebrov, Evgeny V; Schouten, Jaap C; Keurentjes, Jos T F

    2011-01-01

    The sonochemical oxidation efficiency (η(ox)) of a commercial titanium alloy ultrasound horn has been measured using potassium iodide as a dosimeter at its main resonance frequency (20 kHz) and two higher resonance frequencies (41 and 62 kHz). Narrow power and frequency ranges have been chosen to minimise secondary effects such as changing bubble stability, and time available for radical diffusion from the bubble to the liquid. The oxidation efficiency, η(ox), is proportional to the frequency and to the power transmitted to the liquid (275 mL) in the applied power range (1-6 W) under argon. Luminol radical visualisation measurements show that the radical generation rate increases and a redistribution of radical producing zones is achieved at increasing frequency. Argon, helium, air, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide have been used as saturation gases in potassium iodide oxidation experiments. The highest η(ox) has been observed at 5 W under air at 62 kHz. The presence of carbon dioxide in air gives enhanced nucleation at 41 and 62 kHz and has a strong influence on η(ox). This is supported by the luminol images, the measured dependence of η(ox) on input power, and bubble images recorded under carbon dioxide. The results give insight into the interplay between saturation gas and frequency, nucleation, and their effect on η(ox). PMID:20573535

  4. Biomaterials/scaffolds. Design of bioactive, multiphasic PCL/collagen type I and type II-PCL-TCP/collagen composite scaffolds for functional tissue engineering of osteochondral repair tissue by using electrospinning and FDM techniques.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Detlef; Ekaputra, Andrew K; Lam, Christopher X F; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2007-01-01

    Current clinical therapies for traumatic or chronic injuries involving osteochondral tissue result in temporary pain reduction and filling of the defect but with biomechanically inferior repair tissue. Tissue engineering of osteochondral repair tissue using autologous cells and bioactive biomaterials has the potential to overcome the current limitations and results in native-like repair tissue with good integration capabilities. For this reason, we applied two modem biomaterial design techniques, namely, electrospinning and fused deposition modeling (FDM), to produce bioactive poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/collagen (PCL/Col) type I and type II-PCL-tri-calcium phosphate (TCP)/Col composites for precursor cell-based osteochondral repair. The application of these two design techniques (electrospinning and FDM) allowed us to specifically produce the a suitable three-dimensional (3D) environment for the cells to grow into a particular tissue (cartilage and bone) in vitro prior to in vivo implantation. We hypothesize that our new designed biomaterials, seeded with autologous bone marrow-derived precursor cells, in combination with bioreactor-stimulated cell-culture techniques can be used to produce clinically relevant osteochondral repair tissue. PMID:18085205

  5. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lundgren, Bo; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pedersen, Tina Bock; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fish to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fish species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments, a cod (Gadus morhua) was scanned with both a BK Medical ProFocus 2202 ultrasound scanner and a Toshiba Aquilion ONE computed tomography (CT) scanner. The US images of the fish were compared with US images created using the ultrasound simulation program Field II. The center frequency of the transducer is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fish converted to simulated scatter maps. The positions of the point scatterers were assumed to be uniformly distributed. The scatter amplitudes were generated with a new method based on the segmented CT data in Hounsfield Units and backscatter data for the different types of tissues from the literature. The simulated US images reproduce most of the important characteristics of the measured US image.

  6. Therapeutic potential of ultrasound microbubbles in gastrointestinal oncology: recent advances and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Haider, Yasser; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles were initially invented as contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. However, lately more and more therapeutic applications of microbubbles are emerging, mostly related to drug and gene delivery. Ultrasound is a safe and noninvasive therapeutic modality which has the unique ability to interact with microbubbles and release their payload in situ in addition to permeabilizing the target tissues. The combination of drug-loaded microbubbles and ultrasound has been used in preclinical studies on blood–brain barrier opening, drug and gene delivery to solid tumors, and ablation of blood vessels. This review covers the basic principles of ultrasound–microbubble interaction, the types of microbubbles and the effect they have on tissue, and the preclinical and clinical experience with this approach to date in the field of gastrointestinal oncology. PMID:26557894

  7. Ontology-aware classification of tissue and cell-type signals in gene expression profiles across platforms and technologies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-suk; Krishnan, Arjun; Zhu, Qian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Leveraging gene expression data through large-scale integrative analyses for multicellular organisms is challenging because most samples are not fully annotated to their tissue/cell-type of origin. A computational method to classify samples using their entire gene expression profiles is needed. Such a method must be applicable across thousands of independent studies, hundreds of gene expression technologies and hundreds of diverse human tissues and cell-types. Results: We present Unveiling RNA Sample Annotation (URSA) that leverages the complex tissue/cell-type relationships and simultaneously estimates the probabilities associated with hundreds of tissues/cell-types for any given gene expression profile. URSA provides accurate and intuitive probability values for expression profiles across independent studies and outperforms other methods, irrespective of data preprocessing techniques. Moreover, without re-training, URSA can be used to classify samples from diverse microarray platforms and even from next-generation sequencing technology. Finally, we provide a molecular interpretation for the tissue and cell-type models as the biological basis for URSA’s classifications. Availability and implementation: An interactive web interface for using URSA for gene expression analysis is available at: ursa.princeton.edu. The source code is available at https://bitbucket.org/youngl/ursa_backend. Contact: ogt@cs.princeton.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24037214

  8. Beneficial Autoimmunity at Body Surfaces – Immune Surveillance and Rapid Type 2 Immunity Regulate Tissue Homeostasis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalessandri, Tim; Strid, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells (ECs) line body surface tissues and provide a physicochemical barrier to the external environment. Frequent microbial and non-microbial challenges such as those imposed by mechanical disruption, injury or exposure to noxious environmental substances including chemicals, carcinogens, ultraviolet-irradiation, or toxins cause activation of ECs with release of cytokines and chemokines as well as alterations in the expression of cell-surface ligands. Such display of epithelial stress is rapidly sensed by tissue-resident immunocytes, which can directly interact with self-moieties on ECs and initiate both local and systemic immune responses. ECs are thus key drivers of immune surveillance at body surface tissues. However, ECs have a propensity to drive type 2 immunity (rather than type 1) upon non-invasive challenge or stress – a type of immunity whose regulation and function still remain enigmatic. Here, we review the induction and possible role of type 2 immunity in epithelial tissues and propose that rapid immune surveillance and type 2 immunity are key regulators of tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. PMID:25101088

  9. Phenotypical heterogeneity linked to adipose tissue dysfunction in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barchetta, Ilaria; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria; Di Martino, Michele; Cimini, Flavia Agata; Bertoccini, Laura; Polimeni, Licia; Catalano, Carlo; Fraioli, Antonio; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Morini, Sergio; Baroni, Marco Giorgio; Cavallo, Maria Gisella

    2016-10-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation leads to increased free fatty acid (FFA) efflux and ectopic fat deposition, but whether AT dysfunction drives selective fat accumulation in specific sites remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between AT dysfunction, hepatic/pancreatic fat fraction (HFF, PFF) and the associated metabolic phenotype in patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Sixty-five consecutive T2D patients were recruited at the Diabetes Centre of Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. The study population underwent clinical examination and blood sampling for routine biochemistry and calculation of insulin secretion [homoeostasis model assessment of insulin secretion (HOMA-β%)] and insulin-resistance [homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and adipose tissue insulin resistance (ADIPO-IR)] indexes. Subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral (VAT) AT area, HFF and PFF were determined by magnetic resonance. Some 55.4% of T2D patients had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); they were significantly younger and more insulin-resistant than non-NAFLD subjects. ADIPO-IR was the main determinant of HFF independently of age, sex, HOMA-IR, VAT, SAT and predicted severe NAFLD with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC)=0.796 (95% confidence interval: 0.65-0.94, P=0.001). PFF was independently associated with increased total adiposity but did not correlate with AT dysfunction, insulin resistance and secretion or NAFLD. The ADIPO-IR index was capable of predicting NAFLD independently of all confounders, whereas it did not seem to be related to intrapancreatic fat deposition; unlike HFF, higher PFF was not associated with relevant alterations in the metabolic profile. In conclusion, the presence and severity of AT dysfunction may drive ectopic fat accumulation towards specific targets, such as VAT and liver, therefore evaluation of AT dysfunction may contribute to the identification of different

  10. Ultrasound characterization of the infertile male testis with rf power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan A.; Silverman, Ronald H.; Rondeau, Mark; Coleman, D. J.; Schlegel, Peter

    2002-04-01

    Objective: To investigate and diagnose testicular pathology in patients with testicular dysfunction using the technique of ultrasound power spectrum analysis. Methods: Testicular ultrasound studies with power spectrum tissue characterization analysis were performed on men with testicular abnormalities as well as normal controls. Semen analysis, biopsy data, microscopic intra-operative findings and data pertaining to testicular function were collected for each surgically evaluated subject. Ultrasound data were analyzed for power spectrum characteristics of microscopic scatterer size and concentration within discrete areas of testicular tissue. Results: Patients with varicoceles and greater than 2x106 sperm/ml on semen analysis had larger average scatterer size (107.7 micrometers ) and lower scatterer concentration (-15.02 dB) than non-obstructed, azoospermic patients with varicoceles (92.4 micrometers and -11.41 dB, respectively). Subjects with obstructed azoospermia had slightly larger average tissue scatterer size (108.1 micrometers ) and lower concentration (-15.73 dB) while normal control data revealed intermediate values of size (102.3 micrometers ) and concentration (-13.1 dB) of scatterers. Spectral data from pure testicular seminoma lesions had the lowest average scatterer size (82.3 micrometers ) with low relative concentration (-14.7 dB). Summary: Ultrasound tissue characterization based on RF spectrum analysis may distinguish different types of testicular pathology including obstructed and non-obstructed azoospermia and tissue changes due to varicocele and tumor.

  11. [Quantitative ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Barkmann, R; Glüer, C-C

    2006-10-01

    Methods of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can be used to obtain knowledge about bone fragility. Comprehensive study results exist showing the power of QUS for the estimation of osteoporotic fracture risk. Nevertheless, the variety of technologies, devices, and variables as well as different degrees of validation of the single devices have to be taken into account. Using methods to simulate ultrasound propagation, the complex interaction between ultrasound and bone could be understood and the propagation could be visualized. Preceding widespread clinical use, it has to be clarified if patients with low QUS values will profit from therapy, as it has been shown for DXA. Moreover, the introduction of quality assurance measures is essential. The user should know the limitations of the methods and be able to interpret the results correctly. Applied in an adequate manner QUS methods could then, due to lower costs and absence of ionizing radiation, become important players in osteoporosis management. PMID:16896637

  12. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes. PMID:26195111

  13. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  14. Assessment of STR Typing Success Rate in Soft Tissues from Putrefied Bodies Based on a Quantitative Grading System for Putrefaction.

    PubMed

    Courts, Cornelius; Sauer, Eva; Hofmann, Yaiza; Madea, Burkhard; Schyma, Christian

    2015-07-01

    To date, there is no systematic investigation of the association of short tandem repeat (STR) typing success rate in soft tissues with different signs of putrefaction. Herein, putrefaction was rated using a newly developed 19-parameter system in soft tissues from a collective of 68 decaying bodies, and DNA yield was determined in 408 samples. DNA integrity was rated using a self-devised pentaplex PCR generating an "integrity score" (Si). STR typing success rate was then assessed for selected cases. DNA yield and Si differed significantly between tissues with kidney on average exhibiting the highest Si values. Statistical analysis revealed that nine parameters were significantly and positively correlated with Si . The observed values for each of these nine parameters were summed up to generate a putrefaction score (Sp) for each sample. Our results show that STR typing success rate can be predicted based on Sp before expensive multiplex STR profiling is performed. PMID:25808732

  15. Ultrasound: biological effects and industrial hygiene concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Wiernicki, C.; Karoly, W.J.

    1985-09-01

    Due to the increased use of high intensity ultrasonic devices, there is now a greater risk of worker exposure to ultrasonic radiation than there was in the past. Exposure to high power ultrasound may produce adverse biological effects. High power ultrasound, characterized by high intensity outputs at frequencies of 20-100 kHz, has a wide range of applications throughout industry. Future applications may involve equipment with higher energy outputs. Contact ultrasound, i.e., no air space between the energy source and the biological tissue, is significantly more hazardous than exposure to airborne ultrasound because air transmits less than one percent of the energy. This paper discusses biological effects associated with overexposure to ultrasound, exposure standards proposed for airborne and contact ultrasound industrial hygiene controls that can be employed to minimize exposure, and the instrumentation that is required for evaluating exposure.

  16. Ultrasound Based Method and Apparatus for Stone Detection and to Facilitate Clearance Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Michael (Inventor); Kucewicz, John (Inventor); Lu, Wei (Inventor); Sapozhnikov, Oleg (Inventor); Illian, Paul (Inventor); Shah, Anup (Inventor); Dunmire, Barbrina (Inventor); Owen, Neil (Inventor); Cunitz, Bryan (Inventor); Kaczkowski, Peter (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are methods and apparatus for detecting stones by ultrasound, in which the ultrasound reflections from a stone are preferentially selected and accentuated relative to the ultrasound reflections from blood or tissue. Also described herein are methods and apparatus for applying pushing ultrasound to in vivo stones or other objects, to facilitate the removal of such in vivo objects.

  17. Electrospun type 1 collagen matrices preserving native ultrastructure using benign binary solvent for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elamparithi, Anuradha; Punnoose, Alan M; Kuruvilla, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Electrospinning is a well-established technique that uses a high electric field to fabricate ultrafine fibrous scaffolds from both natural and synthetic polymers to mimic the cellular microenvironment. Collagen is one of the most preferred biopolymers, due to its widespread occurrence in nature and its biocompatibility. Electrospinning of collagen alone has been reported, with fluoroalcohols such as hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and trifluoroethanol (TFE), but the resultant collagen lost its characteristic ultrastructural integrity of D-periodicity 67 nm banding, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the fluoroalcohols used were toxic to the environment. In this study, we describe the use of glacial acetic acid and DMSO to dissolve collagen and generate electrospun nanofibers of collagen type 1, which is non-toxic and economical. TEM analysis revealed the characteristic feature of native collagen triple helical repeats, showing 67 nm D-periodicity banding pattern and confirming that the ultrastructural integrity of the collagen was maintained. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed fiber diameters in the range of 200-1100 nm. Biocompatibility of the three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds was established by MTT assays using rat skeletal myoblasts (L6 cell line) and confocal microscopic analysis of immunofluorescent-stained sections of collagen scaffolds for muscle-specific markers such as desmin and actin. Primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCM) seeded onto the collagen scaffolds were able to maintain their contractile function for a period of 17 days and also expressed higher levels of desmin when compared with 2D cultures. We report for the first time that collagen type 1 can be electrospun without blending with copolymers using the novel benign solvent combination, and the method can be potentially explored for applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25960178

  18. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is a neuroprotectant in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yepes, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine proteinase found not only in the intravascular space but also in a well-defined sub-set of neurons in the brain. tPA is rapidly released from neurons after either exposure to hypoxia or hypoglycemia in vitro, or the induction of cerebral ischemia in vivo. It has been proposed that tPA has a neurotoxic effect in the ischemic brain. However, recent evidence indicate that once released into the synaptic cleft tPA activates specific cell signaling pathways that promote the detection and adaptation to metabolic stress. More specifically, the non-proteolytic interaction of tPA with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family in dendritic spines activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway that adapts cellular processes to the availability of energy and metabolic resources. TPA-induced mTOR activation in neurons leads to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) accumulation, HIF-1α-induced expression and membrane recruitment of the neuronal transporter of glucose GLUT3, and GLUT3-mediated uptake of glucose. These and other data discussed in this Review suggest that the postulated neurotoxic effect of tPA needs to be reconsidered and instead indicate the emergence of a new paradigm: that tPA is an endogenous neuroprotectant in the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:26347605

  19. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue deoxygenation during exercise in type 1 diabetes patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Juha E; Koponen, Anne S; Pullinen, Katri; Hägglund, Harriet; Aho, Jyrki M; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Tikkanen, Heikki O

    2012-05-31

    We used near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate whether leg and arm skeletal muscle and cerebral deoxygenation differ during incremental cycling exercise in men with type 1 diabetes (T1D, n=10, mean±SD age 33±7 years) and healthy control men (matched by age, anthrometry, and self-reported physical activity, CON, n=10, 32±7 years) to seek an explanation for lower aerobic capacity (˙VO2peak) often reported in T1D. T1D had lower ˙VO2peak (35±4mlkg(-1)min(-1) vs. 43±8mlkg(-1)min(-1), P<0.01) and peak work rate (219±33W vs. 290±44W, P<0.001) than CON. Leg muscle deoxygenation (↑ [deoxyhemoglobin]; ↓ tissue saturation index) was greater in T1D than CON at a given absolute submaximal work rate, but not at peak exercise, while arm muscle and cerebral deoxygenation were similar. Thus, in T1D compared with CON, faster leg muscle deoxygenation suggests limited circulatory ability to increase O(2) delivery as a plausible explanation for lower ˙VO2peak and earlier fatigue in T1D. PMID:22538274

  20. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements for tissue-type discrimination during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsson, Johan; Eriksson, Ola; Blomstedt, Patric; Bergenheim, A. Tommy; Hariz, Marwan I.; Richter, Johan; Zsigmond, Peter; Wårdell, Karin

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a method for improving intracerebral guidance during functional neurosurgery has been investigated. An optical probe was developed for measurements during stereotactic and functional neurosurgery in man. The aim of the study was to investigate the spectral differences between white and grey matter and between white matter and functional targets. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements in ten patients were recorded at incremental steps towards and in three different functional targets (STN, GPi and Zi). The recorded spectra along the trajectory were sorted into white or grey matter, based on preoperative MRI images or the recorded spectral shape and intensity. The difference between tissue types was calculated as a quotient. Significant intensity differences between white and grey matter were found to be at least 14% (p < 0.05) and 20% (p < 0.0001) for MRI and spectral-sorted data respectively. The reflectance difference between white matter and the functional targets of GPi was higher than for STN and Zi. The results indicate that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has a potential to be developed to a suitable complement to other intracerebral guidance methods.

  1. Stage IV intramucosal gastric marginal zone B cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Masahiko; Sato, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Shouji; Sueki, Ryouta; Yamaguchi, Tatsuya; Uetake, Tomoyoshi; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Iwao, Noriaki; Kirito, Keita; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2013-04-01

    A 45-year-old woman with no symptoms underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. A discolored area was noted at the greater curvature of the gastric upper body. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated thickening of the second sonographic layer indicating that the depth of invasion was confined to the mucosa. A urea breath test and anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody test were negative. A computed tomography scan showed a consolidation at the right lung. Gastric biopsy and transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) demonstrated a monotonous proliferation of atypical small lymphocytes. A diagnosis of gastric marginal zone B cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type (MALT lymphoma) was made. The clinical stage was stage IV. A genetic analysis showed rearrangement of the joining region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene and identical clones in both lesions. An API2-MALT1 fusion gene was detected in the gastric lesion. After H. pylori eradication treatment, combination treatment with rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP) was performed; 6 months later an endoscopy revealed complete disappearance of the lesion. Multiple gastric biopsies showed no infiltrating atypical lymphocytes. Similarly, the lesion in the lung showed complete remission (CR) on CT and TBLB. This report shows that a gastric MALT lymphoma located in the mucosa and disseminated to the lung maintained CR by R-CHOP. PMID:26181449

  2. Soft tissue perineurioma and other unusual tumors in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Ströbel, Philipp; Thiha, Aung; Sohns, Jan Martin; Mühlfeld, Christian; Küffer, Stefan; Felmerer, Gunther; Stepniewski, Adam; Pauli, Silke; Agaimy, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Perineurioma is a rare benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor featuring perineurial differentiation. Perineurioma occurs sporadically with only one reported case in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). We present a 6.7-cm soft tissue perineurioma of the lower leg in a 51-year-old man with proven NF-1. The tumor displayed whorled and fascicular pattern with infiltrative margins and expressed EMA, GLUT-1, claudin-1, and CD34. Electron microscopy confirmed diagnosis. Furthermore, lipomatosis, cutaneous angiomatous nodules, vasculopathy, and iliac spine lesion consistent with non-ossifying fibroma were observed. Tumor DNA revealed no NF2 mutations or chromosomal aberrations but a germline NF1-deletion (c.449_502delTGTT) was detected in his blood sample. His brother displayed neurofibromas, duodenal ganglioneuroma and colonic juvenile polyp, and his mother a neurofibroma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, and jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST); both were affected by NF-1. In conclusion, perineurioma may rarely be NF-1 related and should be included in the spectrum of neoplasms occurring in this disorder. PMID:24294391

  3. Systemic Low-Frequency Oscillations in BOLD Signal Vary with Tissue Type

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yunjie; Hocke, Lia M.; Lindsey, Kimberly P.; Erdoğan, Sinem B.; Vitaliano, Gordana; Caine, Carolyn E.; Frederick, Blaise deB.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signals are widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as a proxy measure of brain activation. However, because these signals are blood-related, they are also influenced by other physiological processes. This is especially true in resting state fMRI, during which no experimental stimulation occurs. Previous studies have found that the amplitude of resting state BOLD is closely related to regional vascular density. In this study, we investigated how some of the temporal fluctuations of the BOLD signal also possibly relate to regional vascular density. We began by identifying the blood-bound systemic low-frequency oscillation (sLFO). We then assessed the distribution of all voxels based on their correlations with this sLFO. We found that sLFO signals are widely present in resting state BOLD signals and that the proportion of these sLFOs in each voxel correlates with different tissue types, which vary significantly in underlying vascular density. These results deepen our understanding of the BOLD signal and suggest new imaging biomarkers based on fMRI data, such as amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and sLFO, a combination of both, for assessing vascular density. PMID:27445680

  4. Early intracardiac thrombosis in preterm infants and thrombolysis with recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, F; Vagnarelli, F; Gargano, G; Roversi, M; Biagioni, O; Ranzi, A; Cavazzuti, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the incidence of catheter related thrombosis and to test the efficacy of recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in preterm infants.
STUDY DESIGN—From January 1995 to December 1998, echocardiography was performed in the first few days of life in 76 very low birthweight (⩽ 1500 g) infants out of a total of 147 having an umbilical catheter placed. When intracardiac thrombosis was diagnosed, rt-PA infusion was performed.
RESULTS—Four infants (5%) developed an intracardiac thrombosis during the first few days of life. In three of them, rt-PA at a dose of 0.4-0.5 mg/kg in a 20-30 minute bolus led to dissolution of the clot. One patient received a three hour infusion after the bolus, at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/h, with resolution of the thrombus. No systemic effects were observed after rt-PA infusion.
CONCLUSIONS—Early thrombosis may occur as a complication of umbilical catheterisation in preterm infants; early echocardiographic detection of this disorder allows complete, safe, and rapid lysis with rt-PA.

 PMID:11420328

  5. Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Regulates the Neuronal Uptake of Glucose in the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Wu, Jialing; Nicholson, Andrew D.; Echeverry, Ramiro; Haile, Woldeab B.; Catano, Marcela; An, Jie; Lee, Andrew K.; Duong, Duc; Dammer, Eric B.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Tong, Frank C.; Votaw, John R.; Medcalf, Robert; Yepes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The ability to sense and adapt to hypoxic conditions plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival. Hypoxia induces the release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from cerebral cortical neurons. We found that the release of neuronal tPA or treatment with recombinant tPA (rtPA) promotes cell survival in cerebral cortical neurons previously exposed to hypoxic conditions in vitro or experimental cerebral ischemia in vivo. Our studies using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry revealed that tPA activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway which adapts cellular processes to the availability of energy and metabolic resources. We found that mTOR activation leads to accumulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and induction and recruitment to the cell membrane of the HIF-1α-regulated neuronal transporter of glucose GLUT3. Accordingly, in vivo positron emission tomography studies with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose in mice overexpressing tPA in neurons show that neuronal tPA induces the uptake of glucose in the ischemic brain and that this effect is associated with decrease in the volume of the ischemic lesion and improved neurological outcome following the induction of ischemic stroke. Our data indicate that tPA activates a cell signaling pathway that allows neurons to sense and adapt to oxygen and glucose deprivation. PMID:22815500

  6. Low-frequency quantitative ultrasound imaging of cell death in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Papanicolau, Naum; Tadayyon, Hadi; Lee, Justin; Zubovits, Judit; Sadeghian, Alireza; Karshafian, Raffi; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Giles, Anoja; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Currently, no clinical imaging modality is used routinely to assess tumor response to cancer therapies within hours to days of the delivery of treatment. Here, the authors demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency to quantitatively detect changes in tumors in response to cancer therapies using preclinical mouse models.Methods: Conventional low-frequency and corresponding high-frequency ultrasound (ranging from 4 to 28 MHz) were used along with quantitative spectroscopic and signal envelope statistical analyses on data obtained from xenograft tumors treated with chemotherapy, x-ray radiation, as well as a novel vascular targeting microbubble therapy.Results: Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers indicated significant changes in cell-death associated parameters in responsive tumors. Specifically changes in the midband fit, spectral slope, and 0-MHz intercept biomarkers were investigated for different types of treatment and demonstrated cell-death related changes. The midband fit and 0-MHz intercept biomarker derived from low-frequency data demonstrated increases ranging approximately from 0 to 6 dBr and 0 to 8 dBr, respectively, depending on treatments administrated. These data paralleled results observed for high-frequency ultrasound data. Statistical analysis of ultrasound signal envelope was performed as an alternative method to obtain histogram-based biomarkers and provided confirmatory results. Histological analysis of tumor specimens indicated up to 61% cell death present in the tumors depending on treatments administered, consistent with quantitative ultrasound findings indicating cell death. Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers demonstrated a good correlation with histological morphological findings indicative of cell death (r{sup 2}= 0.71, 0.82; p < 0.001).Conclusions: In summary, the results provide preclinical evidence, for the first time, that quantitative ultrasound used at a clinically relevant frequency

  7. Effects of sitagliptin on coronary atherosclerosis evaluated using integrated backscatter intravascular ultrasound in patients with type 2 diabetes: rationale and design of the TRUST study.

    PubMed

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Kazuki; Koyama, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Hikita, Hiroyuki; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Miyazawa, Akiyoshi; Michishita, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are at high risk for developing coronary artery disease (CAD), even if they are treated with statins. Several studies have shown the beneficial effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the cardiovascular system in an animal model. However, recent clinical trials using DPP-4 inhibitors have shown that these inhibitors fail to reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Therefore, this study will be performed to evaluate the effects of sitagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, on coronary atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study will be a prospective, open-label, randomized multicenter trial performed in 6 centers in Japan. Stable CAD patients with type 2 diabetes who have undergone successful percutaneous coronary intervention under integrated backscatter (IB)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance will be studied. They will be randomly assigned to either the sitagliptin group or a control group. After 48 weeks' treatment, the IVUS examination will be repeated in the same coronary artery as at baseline. The primary end point will be the percentage change in plaque volume measured using grayscale IVUS from baseline to the 48-week follow-up. This study will be the first multicenter trial to evaluate the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor on coronary atherosclerosis evaluated using IB-IVUS, and the findings will clarify the anti-atherogenic effects of sitagliptin. PMID:25794984

  8. Comparison of rootMUSIC and discrete wavelet transform analysis of Doppler ultrasound blood flow waveforms to detect microvascular abnormalities in type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Christina Elizabeth; McCann, A J; Lockhart, C J; Hamilton, P K; McVeigh, G E; McGivern, R C

    2011-04-01

    The earliest signs of cardiovascular disease occur in microcirculations. Changes to mechanical and structural properties of these small resistive vessels alter the impedance to flow, subsequent reflected waves, and consequently, flow waveform morphology. In this paper, we compare two frequency analysis techniques: 1) rootMUSIC and 2) the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to extract features of flow velocity waveform morphology captured using Doppler ultrasound from the ophthalmic artery (OA) in 30 controls and 38 age and sex matched Type I diabetics. Conventional techniques for characterizing Doppler velocity waveforms, such as mean velocity, resistive index, and pulsatility index, revealed no significant differences between the groups. However, rootMUSIC and the DWT provided highly correlated results with the spectral content in bands 2-7 (30-0.8 Hz) significantly elevated in the diabetic group (p < 0.05). The spectral distinction between the groups may be attributable to manifestations of underlying pathophysiological processes in vascular impedance and consequent wave reflections, with bands 5 and 7 related to age. Spectral descriptors of OA blood velocity waveforms are better indicators of preclinical microvascular abnormalities in Type I diabetes than conventional measures. Although highly correlated DWT proved slightly more discriminatory than rootMUSIC and has the advantage of extending to subheart rate frequencies, which may be of interest. PMID:21138796

  9. Application of Ultrasound in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Carovac, Aladin; Smajlovic, Fahrudin; Junuzovic, Dzelaludin

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound device, essentially, consists of a transducer, transmitter pulse generator, compensating amplifiers, the control unit for focusing, digital processors and systems for display. It is used in cases of: abdominal, cardiac, maternity, gynecological, urological and cerebrovascular examination, breast examination, and small pieces of tissue as well as in pediatric and operational review. PMID:23408755

  10. Application of ultrasound in medicine.

    PubMed

    Carovac, Aladin; Smajlovic, Fahrudin; Junuzovic, Dzelaludin

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound device, essentially, consists of a transducer, transmitter pulse generator, compensating amplifiers, the control unit for focusing, digital processors and systems for display. It is used in cases of: abdominal, cardiac, maternity, gynecological, urological and cerebrovascular examination, breast examination, and small pieces of tissue as well as in pediatric and operational review. PMID:23408755

  11. Diagnostic ultrasound exposure in man.

    PubMed

    Gramiak, R

    1975-09-01

    In his review of the AAPM statement on ultrasound, the author feels that allowing "some" research or demonstration on normal persons in the face of cautionary statements on as yet unknown side effects is an inconsistent position. The use of videotapes and the development of simulators hacked by data banks are offered in place of tissue phantoms. PMID:1153790

  12. Mechanical and histological characterization of trachea tissue subjected to blast-type pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, B. J.; Bo, C.; Tucker, A. W.; Jardine, A. P.; Proud, W. G.; Williams, A.; Brown, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    Injuries to the respiratory system can be a component of polytrauma in blast-loading injuries. Tissues located at air-liquid interfaces, including such tissues in the respiratory system, are particularly vulnerable to damage by blast overpressures. There is a lack of information about the mechanical and cellular responses that contribute to the damage of this class of tissues subjected to the high strain rates associated with blast loading. Here, we describe the results of dynamic blast-like pressure loading tests at high strain rates on freshly harvested ex vivo trachea tissue specimens.

  13. Ultrasonic detection of photothermal interaction of lasers with tissue using a pulsed Doppler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Hao; Azeemi, Aamer; Hartley, Craig J.; Motamedi, Massoud; Bell, Brent A.; Rastegar, Sohi; Sheppard, L. C.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal therapy using various heating sources such as lasers or microwaves to destroy benign and malignant lesions has recently gained widespread acceptance. However, the accurate prediction of thermal damage in tissue according to theoretical or computer modeling is difficult and unreliable due to target variability with respect to physical properties, geometry, and blood perfusion. Thus, one of the major obstacles to application of thermal therapies has been the lack of a noninvasive, real-time method that could determine the extent and geometry of treated tissue. To evaluate the effects of laser heating on tissue, we have developed an analog-digital hybrid Doppler ultrasound system to measure the phase and amplitude of ultrasonic echoes returned from the heated tissue. The system consists of an eight-gate pulsed Doppler detector, a 16-channel 12-bit A/D converter, and a signal analysis and visualization software package. In vitro studies using canine liver showed two distinct types of modulation of the echoes along the ultrasound beam path during laser irradiation using an 810 nm diode laser. Type 1 signals showed a small and slow variation in amplitude and phase, and were attributed to tissue coagulation. Type 1 signals showed a small and slow variation in amplitude and phase, and were attributed to tissue coagulation. Type 2 signals showed large and rapid variations in amplitude and phase which usually appeared after tissue surface explosion and were indicative of tissue ablation. We hypothesize that the observed phase changes in type 1 signals are due to thermal effects within the tissue consistent with tissue expansion and contraction while the phase changes in type 2 signals are likely due to formation and motion of gas bubbles in the tissue. A further development of t