Science.gov

Sample records for ultrasound-guided steroid injection

  1. Long-term assessment of clinical outcomes of ultrasound-guided steroid injections in patients with piriformis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hee Seok; Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Eu Gene; Joe, Eu Gene; Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided steroid injections in patients with piriformis syndrome. Methods: Between January 2010 and October 2012, 63 patients (23 men and 40 women; average age, 63.2 years; range, 24 to 90 years) were diagnosed with piriformis syndrome based on clinical history, electromyography, and flexion-adduction-internal rotation test results. They were divided into two groups. The first group (37 subjects) received a US-guided steroid injection around the piriformis muscle. The second group (26 subjects) received both piriformis muscle and spinal epidural injections. The therapeutic effect was categorized as improvement, partial improvement, or failure depending on the degree of symptom alleviation one month after injection, based on a review of each patient’s medical records. Results: In the first group, 15 patients (40.5%) showed improvement, seven (18.9%) showed partial improvement, and 15 (40.5%) failed to respond to the initial treatment. In the second group, eight patients (30.8%) showed improvement, 11 (42.3%) showed partial improvement, and seven (26.9%) failed to respond to the initial treatment. A second piriformis injection was performed in four cases, after which two patients showed improvement within 3 years, but the other two showed no therapeutic effect. Conclusion: US-guided steroid injection may be an effective treatment option for patients with piriformis syndrome. PMID:25672769

  2. Ultrasound-guided aspiration and steroid injection of a posterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Giuseppe Maria; Guerrisi, Pietro; Lucignani, Giulia; Pasquali, Gaia; Drudi, Francesco Maria

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion cysts are benign masses that originate from mucinous degeneration of the connective tissues and are quite rare when arising from the knee joint. Symptoms are often represented by pain, joint tenderness, effusion and occasional swelling with a palpable mass in the popliteal region of the knee. Percutaneous aspiration followed by a corticosteroid injection of a ganglion cyst has either a diagnostic or therapeutic meaning and its guidance through ultrasound allows the operator to make more accurate the procedure, ensuring the correct placement of the needle inside the lesion. We report our experience in the treatment of a voluminous ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament performed through the ultrasound guidance in a symptomatic young patient. PMID:26261469

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Versus Fluoroscopy-Guided Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Unilateral Lower Lumbar Radicular Pain: Case-Controlled, Retrospective, Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Deok; Kim, Tai Kon; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, JaeKi; Koh, Sung Hoon; Park, Yongbum

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the article is to investigate the efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection (CESI) compared with fluoroscopy (FL)-guided CESI in patients with unilateral lower lumbar radicular pain. This case-controlled, retrospective, comparative study was done at the university hospital. A total of 110 patients treated with US- or FL-guided CESI were administered a mixture of 20 cc (0.5% lidocaine 18.0  mL + dexamethason 10  mg 2  mL). Outcome measurement was assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), verbal numeric pain scale (VNS) before injections and at 3, 6, and 12 months after the last injections. Successful outcome was defined as measured by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI. ODI and VNS showed improvement at 3, 6, and 12 months after the last injection in both groups. No statistical differences in ODI, VNS were observed between groups (P < 0.05). No significant differences in the proportion of patients with successful treatment were observed between the groups from the 3-month to 6-month to 12-month outcomes. US-guided CESI is deserving of consideration in conservative management of unilateral lower lumbar radicular pain. PMID:26683948

  4. Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Thrombin Injection for Endoleaks: An Alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Kasthuri, Ram. S.; Stivaros, Stavros M.; Gavan, Duncan

    2005-01-15

    Endoleaks are now well-recognized complications of endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and an incidence of up to 46% has been reported in the literature. These endoleaks can result in rupture of the aneurysmal sac with potentially serious consequences. A type 2 endoleak is the most common type with a feeding vessel reperfusing the aneurysm sac. Radiological treatment of such an endoleak usually involves coil or particle angioembolisation, but sometimes this can be difficult, especially if endovascular access to the feeding vessel is not straightforward. We describe and illustrate percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection in the treatment of a type 2 endoleak. In appropriate patients, this technique is simple to perform, and has low associated morbidity.

  5. Ultrasound-guided diagnosis and aspiration of subdeltoid abscess from heroin injection.

    PubMed

    Clauson, Amanda; Mailhot, Tom; Chilstrom, Mikaela Lynn

    2014-11-01

    A 49-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with shoulder pain after intramuscular injection of heroin into his right deltoid muscle. Point-of-care (POC) ultrasound identified a subdeltoid abscess, and ultrasound-guided aspiration of the fluid collection was performed. The patient was admitted and improved on antibiotics and made a complete recovery. POC ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration can assist in the diagnosis and treatment of deep musculoskeletal abscesses. PMID:25493124

  6. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  7. Successful Treatment of Genitofemoral Neuralgia Using Ultrasound Guided Injection: A Case Report and Short Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A young male patient developed chronic, severe, and disabling right sided groin pain following resection of his left testicular cancer. Since there is considerable overlap, ultrasound guided, selective diagnostic nerve blocks were done for ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, and genitofemoral nerves, to determine the involved nerve territory. It was revealed that genitofemoral neuralgia was the likely cause. As a therapeutic procedure, it was injected with local anesthetic and steroid using ultrasound guidance. The initial injection led to pain relief of 3 months. Subsequent blocks reinforced the existing analgesia and were sufficient to allow for maintenance with the use of analgesic medications. This case report describes the successful use of diagnostic selective nerve blocks for the assessment of groin pain, subsequent to which an ultrasound guided therapeutic injection of genitofemoral nerve led to long term pain relief. As a therapeutic procedure, genitofemoral nerve block is done in patients with genitofemoral neuralgia. Ultrasound allows for controlled administration and greatly enhances the technical ability to perform precise localization and injection. There are very few case reports of such a treatment in the published literature. Apart from the case report, we also highlight the relevant anatomy and a brief review of genitofemoral neuralgia and its treatment. PMID:24804105

  8. Transient Neuronal Injury Followed by Intravascular Injection During an Ultrasound Guided Stellate Ganglion Block

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Hariharan; Simhan, Swetha

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound guidance for pain interventions is becoming increasing recognized as a useful imaging tool. One of the common interventions where it is gaining wider acceptance is during the performance of a stellate ganglion block. The following is a unique report where intravascular and neuronal injury occurred during the performance of an ultrasound guided stellate ganglion block followed by dysphagia. 41 year old male, with a diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome, was referred to our clinic for further management. He underwent a diagnostic ultrasound guided stellate ganglion block after having tried conservative therapies. The stellate ganglion block provided him with complete pain relief for over five weeks. During a subsequent therapeutic stellate ganglion block, performed by an experienced pain medicine fellow with more than 50 ultrasound guided proceduresclinician, the patient developed a transient injury to the brachial plexus upon needle entry. Subsequent redirection and injection of an ml of injectate resulted in an intravascular injection producing tinnitus. After the tinnitus decreased, he underwent another stellate block using an out of plane approach without any further complications. Two days later, he reported chest and throat discomfort which resolved over the next few days possibly due to a retropharyngeal hematoma. He declined further interventions and was subsequently managed with 3 tablets of oxycodone a day. This report highlights the importance of vigilance and meticulous planning during the performance of ultrasound guided pain interventions. PMID:24244924

  9. Ultrasound-Guided 50% Ethyl Alcohol Injection for Patients With Malleolar and Olecranon Bursitis: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Seong; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effect of ultrasound-guided ethyl alcohol injection on malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. Methods Twenty-four patients received ultrasound-guided 50% diluted ethyl alcohol injection at the site of synovial proliferative bursitis after aspiration of the free fluid. Results Swelling and symptoms significantly decreased in 13 of the 24 patients without any complications. Eleven patients had partial improvement in swelling and symptoms. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided alcohol injection could be an alternative therapeutic option before surgery in patients with chronic intractable malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. PMID:27152282

  10. Ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of iliopsoas spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, L.M.; Perrone, N.; Lacelli, F.; Lentino, C.; Serafini, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) is a common treatment for iliopsoas muscle spasticity, but it is not easy to position the needle in this muscle without guidance. In this paper we describe an ultrasound-guided technique for the intramuscular injection of BTX-A to treat spasticity of the iliopsoas muscle. Its effectiveness was assessed in 10 patients. Method and materials The ultrasound-guided technique for BTX-A injection was used on 10 patients. The needle was inserted into the muscle belly at an angle of 45° along the longitudinal axis of the muscle when allowed by patient's condition. Results In all cases, the iliopsoas muscle was easily identified and both the iliac and psoas components were assessed. Introduction of the needle and drug injection were entirely carried out under ultrasonographic guidance. The procedure was successful in all patients, even in those with a high-grade spasticity, and general anesthesia was not required. Conclusions This ultrasound-guided technique allows accurate guidance for the injection of BTX-A, and it can be considered as an alternate supportive therapy in patients with spasticity and dystonia. PMID:23396653

  11. Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Amos; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.; Newman, Joel; Gomoll, Andreas; Jain, Nitin B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess short and longer-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis. Study Design A mixed prospective and retrospective study design Place and Duration of Study Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, between June 2011 and July 2012. Methodology Using medical records, we first retrospectively identified patients who had received ultrasound-guided injections of lidocaine and triamcinolone for adhesive capsulitis We then assessed short-term follow-up outcomes (within 3 months of procedure) using medical record review and phone interviews. Longer-term follow-up (at least 3 months from the procedure) outcomes were determined by mailings and phone calls. Average and worst shoulder pain scores were measured on a visual analog scale. Shoulder ROM was measured in forward flexion, isolated abduction, and external rotation. Results Patients presented an average of 5.1 (SD=4.1) months after onset of symptoms. Within three months of the injection, 55.9% (95% CI: 39.2%, 72.6%) of patients reported greater than 75% pain relief and 44.1% (95% CI: 27.4%, 60.8%) of patients reported greater than 75% ROM improvement. The percentage of patients who improved increased with increased duration of follow-up. At short-term follow-up (mean=2.1 months, SD=2.7), average pain decreased from 5.6 (SD=2.2) to 3.0 (SD=1.8) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased from 7.8 (SD=1.2) to 4.3 (SD=3.2) (p ≤ .001). At longer-term follow-up (mean =10.4 months, SD=3.7), average pain decreased to 1.9 (SD=1.9) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased to 2.9 (SD=2.3) (p ≤ .001). Conclusion A majority of patients had significant pain reduction and functional improvement after an ultrasound guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injection for adhesive capsulitis. Our patients experience the majority of their pain and functional relief within the first three months after an ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection with continued increase in relief in the longer-term.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection for the Treatment of Femoral Pseudoaneurysm in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Boubalos, Jason J; Connolly, Bairbre L; Amaral, Joao G; Temple, Michael J; Parra, Dimitri A

    2016-04-01

    Eight patients with nine femoral pseudoaneurysms were treated with 13 ultrasound-guided thrombin injections. Mean patient age was 3.3 years (range, 5 mo to 13.6 y), mean pseudoaneurysm diameter was 2.0 cm ± 0.6, and mean thrombin dose was 119 IU (500 IU/mL ± 116; 0.95 CI). Mean follow-up was 27 days (range, 7-120 d). Eight pseudoaneurysms were successfully treated, and one failed to close as a result of arterial wall disease. No complications were observed. The approach used at the authors' pediatric institution resulted in safe and effective treatment of femoral pseudoaneurysms. PMID:27013002

  13. Herpetic Brachial Plexopathy: Application of Brachial Plexus Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound-Guided Corticosteroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Gil; Chung, Sun G

    2016-05-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly known as shingles, is an infectious viral disease characterized by painful, unilateral skin blisters occurring in specific sensory dermatomes. Motor paresis is reported in 0.5% to 5% of patients. Although the mechanism of zoster paresis is still unclear, the virus can spread from the dorsal root ganglia to the anterior horn cell or anterior spinal nerve roots. It rarely involves the brachial plexus. We report a case of brachial plexitis following herpes zoster infection in which pathological lesions were diagnosed using brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging and treated with ultrasound-guided perineural corticosteroid injection. PMID:26829085

  14. Technique for ultrasound-guided intraarticular cervical articular process injection in the dog.

    PubMed

    Levy, Matthew; Gaschen, Lorrie; Rademacher, Nathalie; Bragulla, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided intraarticular injection of cervical articular process joints is a well-established procedure in both humans and horses for neck pain resulting from osteoarthritis, but the technique has not been described in dogs. Aims of this study were to describe the ultrasonographic anatomy and landmarks for cervical articular process joint injections in the dog, develop a technique for articular process joint injections using these landmarks, and determine the accuracy of injections and factors that may influence it. Eleven canine cadavers were used and bilateral joint spaces from C2-3 to C7-T1 were injected under ultrasound guidance with a blue radiopaque solution. A computed tomographic scan was acquired following each injection, and an injection score was assigned and compared with other patient-specific factors. Of the 132 injections performed, 110 (83.3%) were intraarticular, 20 (15.1%) were periarticular within 5 mm, and 2 (1.5%) were periarticular beyond 5 mm from the joint. There was no significant difference in mean scores between dogs. Only C2-3 had a significantly lower mean score than any other joint. There was no significant correlation between injection score and any other factors measured. The transverse processes of the cervical vertebrae served as excellent ultrasonographic landmarks for identifying the cervical articular process joints in dogs regardless of the size of the dog or location along the vertebrae. Accuracy of ultrasound-guided intraarticular process joint injection was 83% in dogs and similar to published techniques in horses. Further studies are needed to examine the safety and efficacy of this procedure in live animals. PMID:24506833

  15. Posttraumatic lingual artery pseudoaneurysm treated with ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection.

    PubMed

    Masella, Pamela C; Hanson, Megan M; Hall, Brian T; Verghese, John J; Kellicut, Dwight C

    2014-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the lingual artery are extremely rare and are commonly iatrogenic in nature or less frequently a result of blunt or penetrating trauma. Traditionally, these vascular abnormalities have been repaired with open or endovascular techniques. Although ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection has become a standard treatment for superficial pseudoaneurysms, there are no reports of this being used in the treatment of lingual artery pseudoaneurysms. We report the case of a 26-year-old man who suffered a penetrating head and neck injury after an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq who presented with persistent oropharyngeal swelling. Color-flow Doppler ultrasonography revealed the classic yin/yang sign of a pseudoaneurysm, and a computed tomography scan was obtained that revealed a right lingual artery pseudoaneurysm. With the lack of endovascular capabilities and the excessive risk of open surgery, thrombin was injected directly into the pseudoaneurysm under ultrasound guidance. A computed tomography scan and Doppler ultrasonography revealed complete resolution of the aneurysm. This article presents the first reported case in the English literature of a lingual artery aneurysm after penetrating trauma managed successfully with ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection. PMID:24365080

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Serratus Anterior Muscle Pain Syndrome: Description of Technique and Case Series.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Schaffer, Grisell; Nowakowsky, Michal; Eghtesadi, Marzieh; Cogan, Jennifer

    2015-09-15

    Chronic chest pain is a challenge, and serratus anterior muscle pain syndrome (SAMPS) is often overlooked. We have developed an ultrasound-guided technique for infiltrating local anesthetics and steroids in patients with SAMPS. In 8 patients, the duration of chronic pain was approximately 19 months. Three months after treatment, all patients had experienced a significant reduction in pain. Infiltration for SAMPS confirms the diagnosis and provides adequate pain relief. PMID:26361386

  17. DEVELOPING A TECHNIQUE FOR ULTRASOUND-GUIDED INJECTION OF THE ADULT CANINE HIP.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Chiara; Etienne, Anne-Laure; Busoni, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    An accurate method for guiding injections into the canine hip would facilitate diagnostic localization of lameness and targeted treatments. Ultrasound-guided hip injections are commonly used in humans and large animals. Aims of this prospective study were to describe ultrasound (US) anatomy of the adult canine hip and determine the feasibility and accuracy of intra-articular placement of injectate using US-guidance. Seven adult dogs were used to describe US anatomy, five dog cadavers were used to assess the feasibility of the injection technique and 11 dog cadavers were used to assess accuracy of injections. For the accuracy test, 22 joints were injected with iodinated contrast medium by three operators with different experience. With dogs in lateral recumbency, the hyperechoic femoral head surface was identified by following the femoral neck from the greater trochanter or the acetabular rim was localized by following caudally the ilium from the iliac wing. An anechoic gap between the femoral head and acetabular surface represented the joint. The capsule was visible as a triangular echoic structure and the femoral head articular cartilage appeared as an anechoic band. The needle was inserted axial to the greater trochanter and directed in a dorsolateral-ventromedial direction toward the joint space and then pushed through the capsule. Based on postinjection radiography, accuracy was 81.8% at first attempt and 100% at second attempt. This study indicated that US-guided injection is a feasible and accurate technique for injecting the adult canine hip. Future studies in live dogs are needed to assess safety and efficacy. PMID:25619481

  18. Interventional ultrasound: a critical overview on ultrasound-guided injections and biopsies.

    PubMed

    Epis, Oscar; Bruschi, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades ultrasound-guided procedures have become increasingly diffused in rheumatology, mainly thanks to the technical advances achieved in the ultrasound (US) field, combined with the greater availability, good portability and reduced cost of US devices, compared to other imaging techniques already used in rheumatology units. The direct visualisation of the tissue under analysis and the real-time imaging performance enabled by US-guidance account for an improved accuracy and directness in needle placement in a number of rheumatology interventions such as tendon and intra-articular injections. Compared with blind procedures, US-guided injections are more accurate and safe and they result in better clinical outcome in terms of joints improvement in function and decreased risk of damages caused by needle misplacement. The accuracy in needle placement of US-guided injections has proven to be important not only in common intra-articular injections, but especially in case of complex anatomical areas like the hip, facet and atlanto-occipital joints, where blinded injections are deemed poorly accurate and thus highly risky. Moreover US guidance can be successfully employed in more complex procedures such as synovial biopsy, portal establishment or arthroscopy, where US can also be combined with other imaging techniques. Overall the employment of US-guided procedures is considered to be safe and well-tolerated, and increases the accuracy and therapeutic effectiveness of the interventions performed. This may pave the way for a more widespread employment of US-guidance in rheumatology units, and new studies could further explore the therapeutic advantages of these procedures. PMID:24529311

  19. Infection related to ultrasound-guided single-injection peripheral nerve blockade: a decade of experience at toronto Western hospital.

    PubMed

    Alakkad, Husni; Naeeni, Amir; Chan, Vincent W S; Abbas, Sherif; Oh, Justin; Ami, Noam; Ng, Jessica; Gardam, Michael; Brull, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound guidance has revolutionized regional anesthesia practice. Ultrasound equipment disinfection techniques vary between institutions. To date, there are no large data set publications or evidence-based guidelines that describe risk-reduction techniques for infectious complications related to the use of ultrasound guidance for peripheral nerve blockade. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 7476 patients who received ultrasound-guided single-injection peripheral nerve blockade from October 2003 to August 2013 using our institution's low-level disinfection technique in combination with a sterile transparent film barrier dressing to cover the ultrasound transducer. No indications of block-related infection were found. We conclude that using a practical and efficient low-level disinfection technique and sterile barrier dressing results in an extremely low rate of block-related infection following ultrasound-guided single-injection peripheral nerve blockade. PMID:25469758

  20. Cognitive Task Analysis for Instruction in Single-Injection Ultrasound Guided-Regional Anesthesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gucev, Gligor V.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) is methodology for eliciting knowledge from subject matter experts. CTA has been used to capture the cognitive processes, decision-making, and judgments that underlie expert behaviors. A review of the literature revealed that CTA has not yet been used to capture the knowledge required to perform ultrasound guided

  1. ULTRASOUND-GUIDED INJECTIONS IN HORSES WITH CRANIOVENTRAL DISTENSION OF THE COXOFEMORAL JOINT CAPSULE: FEASIBILITY FOR A CRANIOVENTRAL APPROACH.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Mary Beth; Vaughan, Betsy; Katzman, Scott; Hersman, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Intrasynovial access to the equine coxofemoral joint (CFJ) is inherently challenging. Blind injection techniques rely upon inconsistently palpable landmarks, and ultrasound guidance requires expertise for needle placement into the coxofemoral articulation. Aspiration is recommended to confirm intrasynovial placement and avoid sciatic nerve anesthesia. The aim of this observational, descriptive, retrospective study was to evaluate the feasibility for an alternative ultrasound-guided approach in horses with cranioventral distention of the CFJ identified during pelvic ultrasound. Thirteen horses with cranioventral CFJ distention, including 12 with severe pathology, were recruited from 2009 to 2014. Seven were excluded as they were not injected or underwent ultrasound-guided injection using a dorsal approach. The remaining six horses underwent a total of nine injections into the cranioventral recess. With the exception of one foal, all were aged horses (15-29 years) of varying breeds and uses, with prominent lameness due to subluxation (three), luxation (two), and severe osteoarthritis (one). The cranioventral recess was imaged adjacent to the proximal femur using a low-frequency curvilinear transducer placed ventral to the cranial joint margins. Using aseptic technique, spinal needles were placed cranial to the transducer and advanced caudomedially into the distended cranioventral recess. Synovial fluid was retrieved in all cases with one needle placement. Findings indicated that, when distended, ultrasound-guided access to the cranioventral CFJ recess is a feasible alternative approach and may reduce the potential for extra-synovial placement. Distention in this sample of horses was accompanied by severe pathology, also supporting the use of this approach for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26748616

  2. FEASIBILITY FOR ULTRASOUND-GUIDED INJECTION OF THE COLLATERAL LIGAMENTS OF THE DISTAL INTERPHALANGEAL JOINT IN HORSES.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Danyse; Scott, Mike; Fischer, Carrie D; Bond, Stephanie L; Léguillette, Renaud

    2016-05-01

    Desmitis of the collateral ligament of the distal interphalangeal joint is a cause of lameness in performance horses. The objective of this prospective, experimental, ex vivo feasibility study was to evaluate the success of ultrasound-guided injection of the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint in the equine forelimb. Seventy-six ultrasound-guided dye injections of the collateral ligament of the distal interphalangeal joint were performed on horses' cadaver limbs. The hooves were sectioned transversely to verify the location of the dye relative to the collateral ligaments and surrounding structures. Evaluations of transverse sections were performed independently by two experienced observers. A scoring system was used to assess injection of the collateral ligament of the distal interphalangeal joint at the proximal, middle, and distal aspect over the length of the ligament. The collateral ligament was injected at any point in 97.4% of cases. The ligament was injected over the entire scored length in 43.2% of cases (32/74), over two scored length areas in 45.9% of cases (34/74), and in one area in 10.8% of cases (8/74). The distal interphalangeal joint and the common digital extensor tendon were also injected in 81.6% (62/76) and 43.4% (33/76) of the cases, respectively. Use of the ultrasound had a positive and negative predictive value of 98% and 9%, respectively. In this study, ultrasound guidance was useful for confirming injection of the collateral ligament of the distal interphalangeal joint but did not prevent injecting the distal interphalangeal joint and the common digital extensor tendon. PMID:26762837

  3. Ultrasonographic anatomy of the sacrococcygeal region and ultrasound-guided epidural injection at the sacrococcygeal space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gregori, T; Viscasillas, J; Benigni, L

    2014-07-19

    Sacrococcygeal epidural anaesthesia allows selective desensitisation of the sacral plexus. Ultrasound is used for guidance in human anaesthesia to facilitate sacrococcygeal epidural injections. The aims of this study were to describe the sonographic appearance of the sacrococcygeal region in dogs and a technique for performing epidural injection at this location under ultrasound guidance. In the preliminary part of the study four cadavers were used to describe the sonoanatomy of the sacrococcygeal space and to develop the ultrasound-guided puncture technique. In the second phase of the study this technique was repeated in four dogs under general anaesthesia. In all dogs the sacrococcygeal space appeared as a circular hypoechoic region, located caudal to the sacral caudal articular processes, delimited by bony hyperechoic structures such as body and arch of the first caudal vertebra. Ultrasound guidance allowed the operator to visualise and position the spinal needle into the sacrococcygeal epidural space. No complications were reported during this procedure. Preliminary results indicate that ultrasound-guided sacrococcygeal epidural anaesthesia may be considered as an alternative to a blind approach technique. PMID:24821855

  4. Cognitive task analysis for instruction in single-injection ultrasound guided-regional anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucev, Gligor V.

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) is methodology for eliciting knowledge from subject matter experts. CTA has been used to capture the cognitive processes, decision-making, and judgments that underlie expert behaviors. A review of the literature revealed that CTA has not yet been used to capture the knowledge required to perform ultrasound guided regional anesthesia (UGRA). The purpose of this study was to utilize CTA to extract knowledge from UGRA experts and to determine whether instruction based on CTA of UGRA will produce results superior to the results of traditional training. This study adds to the knowledge base of CTA in being the first one to effectively capture the expert knowledge of UGRA. The derived protocol was used in a randomized, double blinded experiment involving UGRA instruction to 39 novice learners. The results of this study strongly support the hypothesis that CTA-based instruction in UGRA is more effective than conventional clinical instruction, as measured by conceptual pre- and post-tests, performance of a simulated UGRA procedure, and time necessary for the task performance. This study adds to the number of studies that have proven the superiority of CTA-informed instruction. Finally, it produced several validated instruments that can be used in instructing and evaluating UGRA.

  5. Management of cesarean heterotopic pregnancy with transvaginal ultrasound-guided potassium chloride injection and gestational sac aspiration, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ugurlucan, Funda Gungor; Bastu, Ercan; Dogan, Murat; Kalelioglu, Ibrahim; Alanya, Sebnem; Has, Recep

    2012-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy is one of the rarest forms of ectopic pregnancy, located in the scar from a previous cesarean section. There are few reports of such pregnancies, and there is no consensus about the best management. Herein is reported a case of cesarean heterotopic pregnancy, diagnosed at 6 weeks' gestation and successfully treated via transvaginal ultrasound-guided potassium chloride injection and gestational sac aspiration, with preservation of the intrauterine pregnancy. PMID:22935313

  6. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-fei; Wang, Yi-ru; Huo, Hui-ping; Wang, Yue-xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration. PMID:26807123

  7. Single ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Louisa K.; Baltzer, Wendy I.; Nemanic, Sarah; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a single platelet-rich plasma injection for supraspinatus tendinopathy was assessed in 10 dogs. Subjective (owner-assessed) improvement in lameness and function were seen in 40% of dogs with improved tendon heterogeneity and echogenicity in 60%. There were no significant changes in gait reaction forces 6 wk after treatment. PMID:26246631

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Glue Injection as Alternative Treatment of Femoral Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cueneyt; Firat, Ali; Yildirim, Erkan; Kirbas, Ismail; Boyvat, Fatih

    2004-11-15

    The interventional angiographic techniques using the percutaneous femoral approach for endovascular revascularization are becoming increasingly more popular. These methods usually require larger sheaths, and most patients need postprocedural anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy. As a consequence, the interventional procedure is associated with a higher rate of complications at the arterial entry site compared to diagnostic angiography. The reported incidence of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm formation after coronary artery interventions ranges from 3.2% to 7.7%, and the rates noted after diagnostic angiography range from 0.2% to 1%. Peripheral pseudoaneurysms have traditionally been treated by surgical intervention, but nonsurgical alternatives, such as ultrasound (US)-guided compression, coil embolization, stent-graft placement, and percutaneous thrombin injection with or without balloon occlusion have also been documented. Of these alternatives, direct percutaneous embolization with embolic agents is the most popular method. The tissue adhesive n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) (Hystoacryl) (B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) is one of the most popular occluding agents for neurovascular interventions, and has been widely used for more than 20 years [5,6]. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and utility of direct percutaneous injection of NBCA for embolization of femoral pseudoaneurysms.

  9. Ultrasound-guided intracardial injection and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of single cells in mice as a paradigm for hematogenous metastases.

    PubMed

    Salamon, Johannes; Peldschus, Kersten

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important technique for noninvasive cell tracking in preclinical research. Following appropriate cell labeling MRI can be used to detect larger cell cohorts and also single cells in vivo in mice. Cell distribution to different organs such as brain, liver, spleen, and kidneys can be visualized, semi-quantified, and followed over time. Thus, the fate of single tumor cells and their eventual development to solid metastases could be investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells can be used as a paradigm for metastasizing tumor cells. We have demonstrated a strategy for magnetic and fluorescent co-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), ultrasound-guided intracardial cell injection with efficient systemic cell delivery, and high-resolution MRI for repetitive visualization of disseminated co-labeled MSC on a single-cell level in vivo in mice. Furthermore, the fluorescent labeling of cells enabled effective histopathological validation. PMID:24092442

  10. Ultrasound-guided intra-articular and rotator interval corticosteroid injections in adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: a double-blind, sham-controlled randomized study.

    PubMed

    Prestgaard, Tore; Wormgoor, Marjon E A; Haugen, Simen; Harstad, Herlof; Mowinckel, Petter; Brox, Jens Ivar

    2015-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. Previous studies have reported that intra-articular corticosteroid injections are of benefit compared with placebo up to 6 weeks. It has been suggested that the structures primarily involved in adhesive capsulitis are the capsule and the rotator interval. Systematic reviews have concluded that there is limited evidence of the treatment effectiveness of intra-articular corticosteroid injections and that high-quality primary research is required. The aim of this study was to compare ultrasound-guided intra-articular corticosteroid injection and combined intra-articular and rotator interval injection in a double-blind, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial. The main outcome measure was the group difference in change in shoulder pain (0-10) at 6 weeks. One hundred twenty-two patients were randomized (42 to intra-articular injection, 40 to combined intra-articular/interval injection, and 40 to sham injection). For both corticosteroid injection groups, there was a significant difference compared with sham injection at week 6. The mean group difference (adjusted for gender, age, dominant arm, and duration) in change in shoulder pain for the intra-articular vs sham injection was -1.7 (95% confidence interval, -2.7 to -0.6, P = 0.002) and -2.1 (95% confidence interval, -3.2 to -1.1, P = 0.0001) for the combined injection vs sham injection. The significant group differences were maintained at week 12 but not at week 26. Similar results were found for the secondary outcome measures (night pain, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index). Differences between the corticosteroid groups were not significant at any time. PMID:25919473

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Valeno, Giovanni; Beatrice, Raffaele; Cinone, Nicoletta; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Panza, Francesco; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome. PMID:26266421

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Valeno, Giovanni; Beatrice, Raffaele; Cinone, Nicoletta; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Panza, Francesco; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome. PMID:26266421

  13. Unusually Prolonged Motor and Sensory Block Following Single Injection Ultrasound-Guided Infraclavicular Block With Bupivacaine and Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Aghdashi, Mir Moussa; Dehghan, Kasra; Shokohi, Shahram; Shafagh, Shahrzad

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of unexpectedly prolonged motor and sensory block following a successful single injection ultrasound – guided infraclavicular block with bupivacaine (0.25%) and dexamethasone (8 mg). ultrasound guidance and safety measurement such as injection of the local anaesthetic at a slow rate and verifying that usual resistance was felt throughout the injection, has been applied. It took 42 hours for the block to go away. Although there was no evidence of neurologic injury but we should always be prepared to consider the possibility of nerve injury and take appropriate measures. PMID:24282779

  14. Treatment of liver cancer of middle and advanced stages using ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection combined with radiofrequency ablation: A clinical analysis

    PubMed Central

    SUN, XUE; LI, RU; ZHANG, BOTAO; YANG, YUEJIE; CUI, ZHIFEI

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is a malignancy of the digestive system and has a high morbidity and mortality rate. Local intervention has become a viable option in identifying liver treatment. The aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical effects of treating liver cancer in middle and advanced stages using ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) in tumors combined with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A total of 100 patients with stage III–IV liver cancers were selected to participate in the study. Patients were divided into groups. In group A, treatment was initiated with PEI and after 1–2 weeks RFA was applied while in group B treatment was initiated with RFA and after 1–2 weeks PEI was applied. Patients in group C received PEI and RFA simultaneously. The clinical effects in the 3 groups were compared after 6-month follow ups. The volume of tumor ablation necrosis in group A was significantly greater than that in the groups B and C, while the size was significantly smaller compared to groups B and C after ablation. For group A, the complete ablation rate was significantly higher than that in groups B and C, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Liver damage indices, including raising levels of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and total bilirubin, were significantly decreased in group A (P<0.05). The survival rate in group A was also significantly higher than in groups B and C (P<0.05). In conclusion, for patients with liver cancer in middle and advanced stages, the treatment method using PEI followed by RFA was more beneficial in terms of improving the tumor ablation rate, alleviating liver damages and increasing survival rates. PMID:26998128

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Myofascial Trigger Point Injection Into Brachialis Muscle for Rotator Cuff Disease Patients With Upper Arm Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Mi Ri; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Hyo Seon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain. Methods A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded clinical pilot trial was performed at university rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-one patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff disease suspected of having brachialis myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) were randomly allocated into two groups. Effect of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection (n=11) and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10) was compared by visual analog scale (VAS). Results US-guided trigger point injection of brachialis muscle resulted in excellent outcome compared to the oral NSAID group. Mean VAS scores decreased significantly after 2 weeks of treatment compared to the baseline in both groups (7.3 vs. 4.5 in the injection group and 7.4 vs. 5.9 in the oral group). The decrease of the VAS score caused by injection (ДVAS=-2.8) was significantly larger than caused by oral NSAID (ДVAS=-1.5) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with rotator cuff disease, US-guided trigger point injection of the brachialis muscle is safe and effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of pain is suspected to be originated from the muscle. PMID:25379497

  16. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion-clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder. PMID:26313499

  17. Epidural hematoma after routine epidural steroid injection

    PubMed Central

    Alkhudari, Azzam M.; Malk, Craig S.; Rahman, Abed; Penmetcha, Taruna; Torres, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are few reported cases of an epidural spinal hematoma following interventional pain procedures. Case Description: We report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma in a patient with no known risk factors (e.g. coagulopathy), who underwent an epidural steroid injection (ESI) in the same anatomic location as two previously successful ESI procedures. Conclusion: Early detection was the key to our case, and avoiding sedation allowed the patient to recognize the onset of a new neurological deficit, and lead to prompt diagnosis as well as surgical decompression of the resultant hematoma.

  18. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-06-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  19. Comparison between Steroid Injection and Stretching Exercise on the Scalene of Patients with Upper Extremity Paresthesia: Randomized Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Wook; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Park, Yongbum; Chang, Won Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the therapeutic effects on upper extremity paresthesia of intra-muscular steroid injections into the scalene muscle with those of stretching exercise only. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with upper extremity paresthesia who met the criteria were recruited to participate in this single-blind, crossover study. Fourteen of 20 patients were female. The average age was 45.0±10.5 years and duration of symptom was 12.2±8.7 months. Each participant completed one injection and daily exercise program for 2 weeks. After randomization, half of all patients received ultrasound-guided injection of scalene muscles before exercise, while the other was invested for the other patients. Results After two weeks, there was a significant decrease of the visual analog scale score of treatment effect compared with baseline in both groups (6.90 to 2.85 after injection and 5.65 to 4.05 after stretching exercise, p<0.01). However, injection resulted in greater improvements than stretching exercise (p<0.01). The number of patients with successful treatment, defined as >50% reduction in post-treatment visual analog scale, was 18 of 20 (90.0%) after injection, compared to 5 of 20 (25.0%) after stretching exercise. There were no cases of unintended brachial plexus block after injection. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided steroid injection or stretching exercise of scalene muscles led to reduced upper extremity paresthesia in patients who present with localized tenderness in the scalene muscle without electrodiagnostic test abnormalities, although injection treatment resulted in more improvements. The results suggest that symptoms relief might result from injection into the muscle alone not related to blockade of the brachial plexus. PMID:26847305

  20. Exserohilum Infections Associated with Contaminated Steroid Injections

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Jana M.; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Blau, Dianna M.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Drew, Clifton P.; Batten, Brigid C.; Bartlett, Jeanine H.; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Pham, Cau D.; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Patel, Mitesh; Liu, Lindy; Jones, Tara L.; Greer, Patricia W.; Montague, Jeltley L.; White, Elizabeth; Rollin, Dominique C.; Seales, Cynthia; Stewart, Donna; Deming, Mark V.; Brandt, Mary E.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2014-01-01

    September 2012 marked the beginning of the largest reported outbreak of infections associated with epidural and intra-articular injections. Contamination of methylprednisolone acetate with the black mold, Exserohilum rostratum, was the primary cause of the outbreak, with >13,000 persons exposed to the potentially contaminated drug, 741 confirmed drug-related infections, and 55 deaths. Fatal meningitis and localized epidural, paraspinal, and peripheral joint infections occurred. Tissues from 40 laboratory-confirmed cases representing these various clinical entities were evaluated by histopathological analysis, special stains, and IHC to characterize the pathological features and investigate the pathogenesis of infection, and to evaluate methods for detection of Exserohilum in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Fatal cases had necrosuppurative to granulomatous meningitis and vasculitis, with thrombi and abundant angioinvasive fungi, with extensive involvement of the basilar arterial circulation of the brain. IHC was a highly sensitive method for detection of fungus in FFPE tissues, demonstrating both hyphal forms and granular fungal antigens, and PCR identified Exserohilum in FFPE and fresh tissues. Our findings suggest a pathogenesis for meningitis involving fungal penetration into the cerebrospinal fluid at the injection site, with transport through cerebrospinal fluid to the basal cisterns and subsequent invasion of the basilar arteries. Further studies are needed to characterize Exserohilum and investigate the potential effects of underlying host factors and steroid administration on the pathogenesis of infection. PMID:23809916

  1. [Ultrasound guided interventional radiology].

    PubMed

    Cohen, M; Jacob, D

    2007-09-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable imaging technique for musculoskeletal pathology. It is increasingly used for image-guided procedures such as aspiration of superficial or deep collections, injection of drugs, or biopsies. Ultrasound guidance is an interesting alternative to procedures performed either blindly or under fluoroscopic or CT guidance. Advantages of US-guided procedures include the absence of ionizing radiation, real-time monitoring during needle placement, decreased risk of injury to neighboring structures (namely vessels and nerves), real time confirmation of procedure success (injection, drainage, biopsy). Minor inconveniences relate to the proper conditions for performance of ultrasound. Complications are rare and can be avoided by using proper sterile technique and evaluate for potential contra-indications to the procedure. As with any other image guided procedure, informed consent is required. PMID:17878866

  2. Ultrasound-guided retro-calcaneal bursa corticosteroid injection for refractory Achilles tendinitis in patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathy: efficacy and follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Puja; Aggarwal, Amita

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided corticosteroid injection has been shown to be safe and effective for varied causes of plantar fasciitis; however, its use for Achilles tendinitis is controversial. We studied the efficacy and changes in US findings at Achilles enthesitis after corticosteroid injection in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA). Patients with SpA with symptomatic Achilles enthesitis, refractory to 6 weeks of full-dose NSAIDs, were offered US-guided local corticosteroid injection. Injected entheses were examined by US (both B mode and power Doppler) at baseline and 6 weeks after injection. Standard OMERACT definitions were used to define enthesitis. Achilles tendon thickness >5.29 mm, 2 cm proximal to insertion in long axis, was considered thickened. Twenty-seven symptomatic Achilles tendons (in 18 patients) were injected with 20 mg methylprednisolone under US guidance baseline, and 6-week follow-up US features were compared. All patients reported improvement in pain (VAS) in the affected tendon after injection (p < 0.0001). Simultaneously, improvement in local inflammatory changes were noted, in the form of significant reduction in tendon thickness (p < 0.0001), vascularity (p < 0.0001), peritendinous oedema (p = 0.001), bursitis and bursal vascularity (p < 0.001 and < 0.0001, respectively). There was no change in bone erosions and enthesophyte. None of the patients had tendon rupture or other injection-related complications at 6 weeks of follow-up. US-guided local corticosteroid injection is an effective and safe modality for refractory Achilles enthesitis in patients with SpA and leads to reversion of acute changes at entheseal site. PMID:26894910

  3. Concomitant ultrasound-guided intra-gestational sac methotrexate-potassium chloride and systemic methotrexate injection in the recurrent cesarean scar pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hak; Kwon, Dae Hui; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Hong, Soon Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent ectopic pregnancy of cesarean scar is very rare and its therapeutic management is still not established. We reported the first case of recurrent cesarean scar pregnancy that was successfully treated with concomitant intra-gestational sac methotrexate-potassium chloride injection and systemic methotrexate injection. This case study provides physicians with a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment option for recurrent cesarean scar pregnancy. PMID:27200318

  4. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures in pain medicine: a review of anatomy, sonoanatomy, and procedures. Part IV: hip.

    PubMed

    Peng, Philip W H

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided injection in pain medicine is emerging as a popular technique for pain intervention. It can be applied for the intervention procedures in the hip region. The objectives of this review article were to review the relevant anatomy and sonoanatomy of the hip joint and the trochanteric bursae, to describe the techniques for ultrasound-guided injections, and to examine the efficacy and accuracy of such injections. PMID:23759705

  5. Personal experiences in direct ultrasound-guided injection of thrombin into the lumen of pseudoaneurysm as a method of treatment in case of iatrogenic femoral artery damage

    PubMed Central

    Słonina, Joanna; Obremska, Marta; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Agrawal, Anil; Malczewska, Joanna; Koźmińska, Urszula; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Pseudoaneurysms constitute a quite common complication of procedures requiring puncture of the common femoral artery. The risk factors of the condition include: obesity, arterial hypertension, sex (more prevalent in males) as well as antithrombotic therapy. Material/Methods: The US-guided injection of thrombin into the pseudoaneurysm lumen was performed in patients referred from the Department of Invasive Cardiology who had undergone coronarography or coronary angioplasty. Pseudoaneurysms constituted the complication of common femoral artery canulation. After setting the diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm by means of Doppler ultrasound, patients with large pseudoaneurysms of volume exceeding 10 mm were qualified for thrombin injection. Generally, 33 patients underwent the treatment. In 3 cases – due to the presence of multiocular pseudoaneurysm – thrombin was administered twice. Results: Taking into account the safety of the procedure, ultimately 33 patients were qualified for thrombin administration, in whom aneurism of diameter exceeding 10 mm was diagnosed. In 3 patients with aneurysm of less than 10mm, only a compression band was used prophylactically. In one case, because of a considerable oedema surrounding the tissue, as well as deep location of the aneurysm in the groin, thrombin treatment was not given due to technical reasons. In 30 cases, single administration of thrombin was effective and resulted in a complete thrombosis of the pseudoaneurism lumen within a couple of seconds following thrombin injection. In 3 patients with multicellular aneurysm, thrombin was given twice, resulting in a total obliteration of the pseudoaneurysm in two cases only. No complications were observed after the performed procedures. No recanalisation of pseudoaneurysms was demonstrated in follow-up examinations. Conclusions: 1. Direct thrombin injection into the pseudoaneurysm lumen can constitute an alternative method of treatment for open surgical techniques. 2. The procedure is highly effective, cheap and minimally invasive. PMID:22802774

  6. Refractory strictures despite steroid injection after esophageal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Noboru; Ishihara, Ryu; Uedo, Noriya; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Kanesaka, Takashi; Matsuura, Noriko; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Hamada, Kenta; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although steroid injection prevents stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), some patients require repeated sessions of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD). We investigated the risk for refractory stricture despite the administration of steroid injections to prevent stricture in patients undergoing esophageal ESD. Refractory stricture was defined as the requirement for more than three sessions of EBD to resolve the stricture. In addition, the safety of steroid injections was assessed based on the rate of complications. Patients and methods: We analyzed data from 127 consecutive patients who underwent esophageal ESD and had mucosal defects with a circumferential extent greater than three-quarters of the esophagus. To prevent stricture, steroid injection was performed. EBD was performed whenever a patient had symptoms of dysphagia. Results: The percentage of patients with a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was significantly higher in those with refractory stricture than in those without stricture (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, history of radiation therapy, tumor location, and tumor diameter showed that a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was an independent risk factor for refractory stricture (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.49 [95 %CI 1.91 – 15.84], P = 0.002). Major adverse events occurred in 3 patients (2.4 %): perforation during EBD in 2 patients and delayed perforation after EBD in 1 patient. The patient with delayed perforation underwent esophagectomy because of mediastinitis. Conclusions: A tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % is an independent risk factor for refractory stricture despite steroid injections. The development of more extensive interventions is warranted to prevent refractory stricture. PMID:27004256

  7. A case of sudden death after ultrasound-guided percutaneous alcohol injection of a paraganglioma mis-diagnosed as a peri-renal cyst.

    PubMed

    Andrello, L; Visonà, S D; Osculati, A

    2015-08-01

    Paragangliomas are cromaffin tumors arising from the neural crest cells of parasympathetic or sympathetic ganglia. They are known to be rare causes of sudden death. Here we present the autopsy findings, as well as microscopical and immunohistochemistry study, of a 48-years-old woman who died suddenly after a percutaneous alcohol injection of a peri-renal cyst previously diagnosed as a common complex cyst. She manifested a multiorgan failure, with acute heart failure, systemic and pulmonary vasoconstriction with hypoxia, metabolic acidosis (pH 6.974). It was therefore enacted resuscitation that was ineffective. The autopsy pointed out, close to the upper right renal pole, a cyst characterized by very friable walls and septa, with a thickness of approximately 0.5cm and containing about 75cm(3) of hemoserous fluid. Microscopically, through immunohistochemical examinations, the cyst showed the presence of chromaffin cells, containing enzymes involved in the synthesis of catecholamines, in particular noradrenalin. So, the cause of the death was ascertained in an multi-organ failure caused by a massive release of catecholamines (noradrenaline) from the cyst, identified post-mortem (on the basis of histologic and immunohistochemical examinations) in a noradrenalin-secreting paraganglioma, that remained silent until the cyst ablation. PMID:26055308

  8. Treatment of cervicogenic headache with cervical epidural steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eugene; Wang, Dajie

    2014-09-01

    Cervicogenic headache (CGH) is defined as referred pain from various cervical structures innervated by the upper three cervical spinal nerves. Such structures are potential pain generators, and include the atlanto-occipital joint, atlantoaxial joint, C2-3 zygapophysial joint, C2-3 intervertebral disc, cervical myofascial trigger points, as well as the cervical spinal nerves. Various interventional techniques, including cervical epidural steroid injection (CESI), have been proposed to treat this disorder. And while steroids administered by cervical epidural injection have been used in clinical practice to provide anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects that may alleviate pain in patients with CGH, the use of CESI in the diagnosis and treatment of CGH remains controversial. This article describes the neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and classification of CGH as well as a review of the available literature describing CESI as treatment for this debilitating condition. PMID:25091129

  9. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Oncologic Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the early 1990s, its application has been extended to various diseases. For pancreatic cancer, EUS-FNA can obtain specimens from the tumor itself with fewer complications than other methods. Interventional EUS enables various therapeutic options: local ablation, brachytherapy, placement of fiducial markers for radiotherapy, and direct injection of antitumor agents into cancer. This paper will focus on EUS-guided oncologic therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23533319

  10. Ultrasound guided synovial biopsy of the wrist.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, R M; van Dalen, A; Bijlsma, J W

    1997-01-01

    Seven patients (4 female and 3 male, mean age 46) with arthritis of the wrist (n = 7) without known etiology were evaluated. High-definition ultrasound equipment was used for localization of synovial hypertrophy, suitable for ultrasound guided biopsy without risk. A 18-gauge diameter Tru-cut biopsy needle was used in an automated gun. Two passes were performed with continuous guidance of the needle-tip. In all patients representative synovial tissue was obtained in adequate amount. No complications were encountered. Ultrasound guided biopsy is proposed as an effective technique which can be performed with low patient discomfort on an outpatient basis. PMID:9225877

  11. Steroids.

    PubMed

    Applezweig, N

    1969-05-17

    The structure, sources, synthesis, economics, and the present and future marketing of male and female sex steroids and corticoids are summarized. Physiologically, and historically in industry, steroids were made from cholesterol. Now most steroids are produced from diosgenin, an akaloid from the Mexican Dioscorea plant. Other sources are stigmasterol from soybeans, hecogenin from sissal waste, bile acids, and total synthesis. Unlike prices of corticoids which have been low for lack of patent protection, prices of sex steroids, especially oral contraceptives, have fallen only 50%, although doses have decreased 90%. There are 735 million women of fertile age, so prices could fall to an unlikely $1 per year without hurting sales. The major companies and subsidiaries, patent holders, and licencees of steroids in South America, U.S., Europe, Iron Curtain countries, Asia, and Africa were listed with their products. In the future oral contraceptives will be joined with minipills, injectables, once monthly pills, and steroid treatment of menopause. Postcoital pills and pills taken for delayed menses may be developed, but used clandestinely because of government and moral barriers. Corticoids are now used an analogs, with a growing market for topical ointments. Steroids will find uses in domestic animal estrus control, rat control, and insect hormones isolated from plant sources for insect control. PMID:12255132

  12. Double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: tips & tricks.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Viganò, Sara; Martini, Chiara; Aliprandi, Alberto; Randelli, Pietro; Serafini, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis is a very common disease and may result in a very painful shoulder. Aetiology of this disease is still poorly understood. When symptoms are mild, this disease may be treated conservatively. Several treatment options have been proposed. Among them, ultrasound-guided procedures have been recently described. All procedures use one or two needles to inject a fluid, to dissolve calcium and to aspirate it. In the present article, we review some tips and tricks that may be useful to improve performance of an ultrasound-guided double-needle procedure. PMID:22710923

  13. Ultrasound Guided Local Endovascular Coiling of an Iatrogenic Superficial Temporal Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James; Badjatiya, Anish; Manjila, Sunil; Reed, Steven; Geertman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the superficial temporal artery are rare and may be treated by manual compression, surgical intervention, coil embolization, or percutaneous thrombin injection. We present a novel technique of local ultrasound guided low-profile coil embolization of the superficial temporal artery with both satisfactory cosmetic and surgical results. PMID:27066441

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Intercostobrachial Nerve Block for Intercostobrachial Neuralgia in Breast Cancer Patients: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Wisotzky, Eric M; Saini, Vikramjeet; Kao, Cyrus

    2016-03-01

    This case series describes 3 cases in which ultrasound-guided intercostobrachial perineural injection was used for intercostobrachial neuralgia, a common cause of postmastectomy pain syndrome. All cases had undergone modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Two cases developed axillary and unilateral chest wall pain. The third case initially presented with axillary pain and lateral shoulder pain 1 year out from radical mastectomy. After a cervical epidural steroid injection, her lateral shoulder pain resolved, but she continued to have residual chest wall paresthesia. It was at this time, we decided to treat with an intercostobrachial nerve perineural injection. Injury to the intercostobrachial nerve is thought to be a common cause of postmastectomy pain. In our case series, all patients had pain relief after the intercostobrachial perineural injection. There is a relative dearth of published information on the treatment of postmastectomy pain and more specifically intercostobrachial neuralgia. We review the anatomy of the intercostobrachial nerve and its variants, etiologies of intercostobrachial neuralgia, and current indications and methods of an intercostobrachial perineural injection. PMID:26493855

  15. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Steroids KidsHealth > For Kids > Steroids Print A A A ... a good idea to avoid them. What Are Steroids? "Steroids" has more than one meaning. Your body ...

  16. Ultrasound-guided joint and soft tissue interventions.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta

    2014-06-01

    Minor procedures with an injection needle are frequently performed in orthopedic clinics. They may be of a diagnostic, diagnostic and therapeutic or purely therapeutic nature. Ultrasound guidance while inserting the needle allows for a safe medicine administration and evacuation of fluid contents. It improves the efficacy of such procedures by ensuring accurate needle insertion in the target site. Ultrasound-guided procedures reduce the duration of treatment (e.g. medicines reach the target site directly; all fluid collections are removed, even multilocular ones) and minimize pain (by the selection of optimal access sites omitting tendons, vessels and peripheral nerves). This paper presents the principles of performing ultrasound-guided interventions. A detailed description of such a technique is provided and the most commonly injected medicines as well as their adverse reactions and contraindications are discussed. Attention is also paid to image optimization and the role of procedure site selection with the exclusion of other pathologies in the puncture site (such as tumors, foreign bodies and vascular or nerve pathologies). What is more, the author also discusses the principles of needle length and thickness selection as well as the manners of its insertion in relation to the transducer. Moreover, the principles of aseptics that are mandatory during such interventions are also presented and the way to protect transducers from the effects of chemical disinfectants is discussed. Furthermore, the paper contains numerous photographs of performed interventions. It is addressed to clinical practitioners and its aim is to facilitate and improve the efficacy of the procedures which are commonly performed in orthopedics. Ultrasound guidance of joint and soft tissue interventions should become a gold standard in all orthopedic clinics. PMID:26672495

  17. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures for patients with chronic pelvic pain - a description of techniques and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Peng, Philip W H; Tumber, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain can present in various pain syndromes. In particular, interventional procedure plays an important diagnostic and therapeutic role in 3 types of pelvic pain syndromes: pudendal neuralgia, piriformis syndrome, and "border nerve" syndrome (ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, and genitofemoral nerve neuropathy). The objective of this review is to discuss the ultrasound-guided approach of the interventional procedures commonly used for these 3 specific chronic pelvic pain syndromes. Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon cause of buttock and leg pain. Some treatment options include the injection of the piriformis muscle with local anesthetic and steroids or the injection of botulinum toxin. Various techniques for piriformis muscle injection have been described. CT scan and EMG-guidance are not widely available to interventional physicians, while fluoroscopy exposes the performers to radiation risk. Ultrasound allows direct visualization and real-time injection of the piriformis muscle. Chronic neuropathic pain arising from the lesion or dysfunction of the ilioinguinal nerve, iliohypograstric nerve, and genitofemoral nerve can be diagnosed and treated by injection to the invloved nerves. However, the existing techniques are confusing and contradictory. Ultrasonography allows visualization of the nerves or the structures important in the identification of the nerves and provides the opportunities for real-time injections. Pudendal neuralgia commonly presents as chronic debilitating pain in the penis, scrotum, labia, perineum, or anorectal region. A pudendal nerve block is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of pudendal neuralgia. The pudendal nerve is located between the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments at the level of ischial spine. Ultrasonography, but not the conventional fluoroscopy, allows visualization of the nerve and the surrounding landmark structures. Ultrasound-guided techniques offer many advantages over the conventional techniques. The ultrasound machine is portable and is more readily available to the pain specialist. It prevents patients and healthcare professionals from the exposure to radiation during the procedure. Because it allows the visualization of a wide variety of tissues, it potentially improves the accuracy of the needle placement, as exemplified by various interventional procedures in the pelvic regions aforementioned. PMID:18354713

  18. The technique comparison of brachial plexus blocks by ultrasound guided with blocks by nerve stimulator guided

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Ying; Chen, Zhen-Qiang; Jia, Hai-Yan; Dai, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Brachial plexus perineural blocks provide specific analgesia for upper limb surgery. We present our experience with ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus perineural blocks for distal upper limb surgery. Although single-injection ultrasound-guided supraclavicular blocks have been reported, little is known about the advantages using this approach compared with nerve stimulator guided. Methods: There were 60 patients who underwent upper limb surgery for orthopedic trauma and received a supraclavicular brachial plexus anesthesia. 30 patients (U-group) were injected by an ultrasound-guided technique with the needle tip remaining under direct vision. 30 patients (NS-group) were inserted by nerve stimulator guided. Recorded the onset time, puncture times, pains cases with tourniquet in each group. Compared the difference between two groups. Results: In U-group, all cases had successful perineural injection. Most of them, effect of anesthesia was fast onset and needed insert only once. No pains were reported under using tourniquet. There were no vessel punctures or other direct procedure-related complications. In NS-group, most injections were successful, but slow onset and needed multiply insert needle. 5 patients said pains under using tourniquet when surgery started and had to add opioid by vein. One patients’ lung were puncture and result in pneumothorax. One patient’s was intravascular injection. Conclusions: Supraclavicular brachial plexus perineural insertion using ultrasound guidance is feasible and almost have no complications, deserves further study with a randomized controlled trial comparing this relatively new technique with only using nerve stimulator. PMID:26629206

  19. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block in pediatric patients -A report of four cases-

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun Woo; Kwon, Hee Uk; Roh, Jae Young; Heo, Youn Moo; Ahn, Sung-Min

    2010-01-01

    Supraclavicular brachial plexus blocks are not common in pediatric patients due to the risk of pneumothorax. Ultrasonography is an important tool for identifying nerves during regional anesthesia. Directly visualizing the target nerves and monitoring the distribution of the local anesthetic are potentially significant. In addition, ultrasound monitoring helps avoid complications, such as inadvertent intravascular injection or pneumothorax. This paper reports four cases of pediatric patients who received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper limb surgery. PMID:21286471

  20. [Ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block].

    PubMed

    Ota, Junichi; Hara, Kaoru

    2008-05-01

    Theoretically, sciatic nerve block can be used alone or in combination with lumbar plexus block or femoral nerve block for anesthesia and/or analgesia of lower limb surgery. However, clinical use of sciatic nerve block was limited by technical difficulties in performing the block since techniques used relies only on surface anatomical landmarks. Recent advances in ultrasound technology allow direct visualization of nerves and other surrounding structures and have increased the interest in performing many kinds of peripheral nerve blocks including sciatic nerve block. Preliminary data suggest that ultrasound-guided technique can help perform the sciatic nerve block more reliably and safely. In this article we describe the anatomy of the sciatic nerve, sonographic features, and technique of three major approaches including subgluteal, anterior, and popliteal approaches. The use of this technique for postoperative analgesia is also discussed. PMID:18516885

  1. Focused ultrasound guided relocation of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Abrol, Nitin; Kekre, Nitin S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Complete removal of all fragments is the goal of any intervention for urinary stones. This is more important in lower pole stones where gravity and spatial orientation of lower pole infundibulum may hinder spontaneous passage of fragments. Various adjuvant therapies (inversion, diuresis, percussion, oral citrate, etc.) are described to enhance stone-free rate but are not widely accepted. Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of fragments is a recently described technique aimed at improving results of intervention for stone disease. Purpose of this review is to discuss development of this technology and its potential clinical applications. Materials and Methods: Pubmed search was made using key words “Focused ultrasound” and “kidney stone”. All English language articles were reviewed by title. Relevant studies describing development and application of focused ultrasound in renal stones were selected for review. Results: Focused ultrasound has proven its efficacy in successfully relocating up to 8 mm stone fragments in vitro and in pigs. Relocation is independent of stone composition. The latest model allows imaging and therapy with a single handheld probe facilitating its use by single operator. The acoustic energy delivered by the new prototype is even less than that used for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Therapeutic exposure has not caused thermal injury in pig kidneys. Conclusion: Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of stones is feasible. Though it is safe in application in pigs, technology is awaiting approval for clinical testing in human beings. This technology has many potential clinical applications in the management of stone disease. PMID:25624572

  2. Ventral ultrasound-guided suprainguinal approach to block the femoral nerve in the dog.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Diego F; Laredo, Francisco G; Gil, Francisco; Belda, Eliseo; Soler, Marta; Agut, Amalia

    2012-06-01

    This prospective study assessed a ventral ultrasound-guided suprainguinal approach to block the femoral nerve (FN) in dogs. The anatomical features of the FN were evaluated in four canine cadavers. In another five cadavers, the FN was located by ultrasound-guidance and the accuracy of this technique was evaluated by injection of black ink and posterior evaluation of the degree of staining of the nerves. In five live dogs, the FN was blocked with 2% lidocaine. The distribution of lidocaine around the nerve and the presence of motor deficit were evaluated. The FN was easily located and accurately blocked in all cases. This new ultrasound-guided approach was reliable for blocking the FN and might be a suitable alternative to the traditional approaches described to block the FN in the dog. PMID:22015137

  3. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Suppression and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome as a Complication of Epidural Steroid Injections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections are well accepted as a treatment for radicular back pain in appropriate candidates. While overall incidence of systemic side effects has not been well established, at least five biochemically proven cases of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome have been reported as complications of epidural steroid treatment. We present an additional case of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome and adrenal suppression in a middle-aged woman who received three epidural steroid injections over a four-month period. We review this case in the context of previous cases and discuss diagnostic and management issues. PMID:23991341

  4. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine. PMID:25187175

  5. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  6. Steroid injections for shoulder disorders: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, G J; van der Windt, D A; Kleijnen, J; Koes, B W; Bouter, L M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with shoulder disorders are believed to benefit considerably from steroid injections. However, the controversy about their efficacy persists. AIM: The study was designed to assess the efficacy of steroid injections for shoulder disorders. METHOD: A systematic computerized literature search in Medline (Index Medicus 1/1966-10/1995) and Embase (Excerpta Medica 1/1984-10/1995) was conducted, supplemented with citation tracking of all relevant publications. Studies published before November 1995 were selected if steroid injections were randomly allocated to patients with shoulder disorders and when clinically relevant outcome measures were reported. Because the validity of study outcomes depends heavily on the strength of methodological quality, the methods were assessed systematically by two 'blinded' independent reviewers. This resulted in a method score (maximum 100 points) that was based on four categories: study population, interventions, measurement of effect, and data presentation and analysis. Confidence intervals for the differences between groups in success rates were calculated in order to summarize the efficacy of steroid injections. RESULTS: Only three out of the 16 studies scored more than 50 points, indicating a generally poor quality of methods. Most studies reported small sample sizes. The flaws most often found were incomparability of co-interventions and poor blinding of therapist. The methods assessment was frequently hampered by incomplete information about randomization, prognostic comparability, compliance, outcome measures included, blinding of patients and blinding of outcome measurement. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence in favour of the efficacy of steroid injections for shoulder disorders is scarce. The methods of most studies appear to be of poor quality. The few studies that appear to be credible do not provide conclusive evidence about which patients at what time in the course of shoulder disorders benefit most from steroid injections. PMID:8762750

  7. The Effect and Safety of Steroid Injection in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: With or Without Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung Hyuk; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Ho Jun; Nam, Ki Yeun; Kim, Hyojun; Kim, Seung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the long-term effect and safety of an epidural steroid injection in spinal stenosis patients, with or without local anesthetics. Methods Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with spinal stenosis were included and randomly divided into two groups. Translaminar epidural and selective nerve root spinal injection procedures were performed using steroids mixed with local anesthetics or normal saline. The effects of spinal injection procedures were measured with visual analogue scale (VAS) and functional rate index (FRI). These measurements were performed before injection, at 1 month after injection and at 3 months after injection. The occurrence of side effects was investigated each time. Results The VAS and FRI scores were significantly reduced in both the local anesthetics group and normal saline group at 1 and 3 months after the injection. However, there was no significant difference in VAS and FRI score reduction between the two groups each time. Side effects are not noted in both groups. Conclusion The spinal injection procedures using steroids mixed either with local anesthetics or normal saline have an effect in reducing pain and improving functional activities. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in relation to side effects and the long-term effects of pain and function. PMID:26949664

  8. The application of sonography in shoulder pain evaluation and injection treatment after stroke: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wu; Fu, Yu; Hai-xin, Song; Yan, Dong; Jian-hua, Li

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This review article is designed to expose the application of sonography in shoulder pain after stroke. [Methods] A range of databases was searched to identify articles that address sonography examination, with or without ultrasound guided corticosteroid injection for hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP). The electronic databases of PubMed, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Medline were searched. [Results] According to the articles identified in our databases research, sonographic technique has potential to provide objective measurements in patients with HSP. The main sonography finding of HSP included subacromial subdeltoid (SASD) bursal effusion, tendinosis of the supraspinatus and subscapularis tendon, long head of biceps tendon sheath effusion, and shoulder subluxation. Our analysis also revealed significantly decreased pain score (VAS) and increased passive external rotation degree in the steroid injection group than control group. [Conclusion] The sonography examination is useful for HSP assessment and ultrasound guided technique is recommended for HSP injection treatment. PMID:26504346

  9. The application of sonography in shoulder pain evaluation and injection treatment after stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wu; Fu, Yu; Hai-Xin, Song; Yan, Dong; Jian-Hua, Li

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This review article is designed to expose the application of sonography in shoulder pain after stroke. [Methods] A range of databases was searched to identify articles that address sonography examination, with or without ultrasound guided corticosteroid injection for hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP). The electronic databases of PubMed, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Medline were searched. [Results] According to the articles identified in our databases research, sonographic technique has potential to provide objective measurements in patients with HSP. The main sonography finding of HSP included subacromial subdeltoid (SASD) bursal effusion, tendinosis of the supraspinatus and subscapularis tendon, long head of biceps tendon sheath effusion, and shoulder subluxation. Our analysis also revealed significantly decreased pain score (VAS) and increased passive external rotation degree in the steroid injection group than control group. [Conclusion] The sonography examination is useful for HSP assessment and ultrasound guided technique is recommended for HSP injection treatment. PMID:26504346

  10. Musculoskeletal Sonopathology and Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Alan J. R.; Sites, Brian D.; Sites, Vincent R.; Naraghi, Ali M.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Singh, Mandeep; Antonakakis, John G.

    2010-01-01

    The use of real-time ultrasound guidance has revolutionized the practice of regional anesthesia. Ultrasound is rapidly becoming the technique of choice for nerve blockade due to increased success rates, faster onset, and potentially improved safety. In the course of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, unexpected pathology may be encountered. Such anomalous or pathological findings may alter the choice of nerve block and occasionally affect surgical management. This case series presents a variety of musculoskeletal conditions that may be encountered during ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia practice. PMID:22294960

  11. Prospective randomized comparison between ultrasound-guided saphenous nerve block within and distal to the adductor canal with low volume of local anesthetic

    PubMed Central

    Adoni, Areti; Paraskeuopoulos, Tilemachos; Saranteas, Theodosios; Sidiropoulou, Tatiana; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: The anatomic site and the volume of local anesthetic needed for an ultrasound-guided saphenous nerve block differ in the literature. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of two different ultrasound-guided low volume injections of local anesthetic on saphenous and vastus medialis nerves. Materials and Methods: Recruited patients (N = 48) scheduled for orthopedic surgery were randomized in two groups; Group distal adductor canal (DAC): Ultrasound-guided injection (5 ml of local anesthetic) distal to the inferior foramina of the adductor canal. Group adductor canal (AC): Ultrasound-guided injection (5 ml local anesthetic) within the adductor canal. Following the injection of local anesthetic, block progression was monitored in 5 min intervals for 15 min in the sartorial branches of the saphenous nerve and vastus medialis nerve. Results: Twenty two patients in each group completed the study. Complete block of the saphenous nerve was observed in 55% and 59% in Group AC and DAC, respectively (P = 0.88). The proportion of patients with vastus medialis weakness at 15 min in Group AC, 36%, was significantly higher than in Group DAC (0/22), (P = 0.021). Conclusions: Low volume of local anesthetic injected within the adductor canal or distally its inferior foramina leads to moderate success rate of the saphenous nerve block, while only the injection within the adductor canal may result in vastus medialis nerve motor block. PMID:25190947

  12. Comparison of short term results of single injection of autologous blood and steroid injection in tennis elbow: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been recently reported that local injection of autologous blood in tennis elbow offers a significant benefit by virtue of various growth factors contained therein. The objective of our study was assessment of efficacy of autologous blood injection versus local corticosteroid injection in the treatment of tennis elbow. Methods and trial design A single blinded, prospective parallel group trial was undertaken. 50 consecutive patients of untreated lateral epicondylitis were enrolled. Randomisation was done on alternate basis and two groups were constituted, first one receiving steroid injection and second one injection of autologous blood. Both groups were evaluated at 2 and 6 weeks for pain relief and stage of disease. Results Baseline evaluation showed no difference between the two groups (chi square test, P > 0.05). Between group analysis at 2 weeks showed no difference in pain relief and Nirschl stage (unpaired t test, P > 0.05). Evaluation at 6 weeks demonstrated a significant decrease in pain levels and stage of disease in blood group (unpaired t test, p < 0.05). Conclusions Autologous blood injection was more effective than steroid injection in the short term follow up in tennis elbow. PMID:23621906

  13. Ultrasound-guided interventional PDT of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chaoying; Yang, Dong; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Muyin; Chen, Ji; Lu, Guorong

    1996-09-01

    Thirty patients with advanced liver cancer were treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). These included 28 hepatocellular carcinoma and two adenocarcinoma, 19 primary tumors and 11 recurred follow other treatments. The diameter of tumors were 7-10cm in 13 cases and 10-16cm in 17 cases. In this study, an argon laser pumped dye laser system was used to give a CW laser beam at 630 nm which was split and coupled into there optical fibers. The patients were injected intravenously with photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative at a dose of 5mg/kg body weight 48 hours before PDT. Then the fibers were inserted into tumor by ultrasound- guided percutaneous puncture. The inserted irradiation points were spaced in entire tumor with the light release power 300mW and the irradiation time 12 minutes per point. Total 52 treatments were performed in 30 patients. Among them, 14 cases were treated only one time and 16 cases via 2-3 times. The follow-up was carried out in 25 cases for 12- 24 months. The results show that significant remission was 22 percent in those patients by only one treatment and 62 percent in those via 2 to 3 treatments. The shrink rate of tumor size was over 90 percent in five of six cases after treatment 3. The survival time has been over one year in 12 cases. No obvious change to be found for all patients in liver function test, renal function test and blood routine examination. The level of AFP indicated a descending trend after PDT. This work indicate that PDT is effective and safe for the treatment of large liver cancers including those recurred follow hepatic resection and those failed in hepatic artery infusion embolic chemotherapy.

  14. Ultrasound-guided peripheral and truncal blocks in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Delvi, Mohamed Bilal

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound has added a feather in the cap of the anesthesiologists as real-time nerve localization and drug deposition around the nerve structure under real-time guidance is now a reality, as the saying “seeing is believing” has been proven true with the advent of ultrasound in anesthesia. Pediatric patients are a unique group regarding their anatomical and physiological features in comparison with adults; regional blocks in adults with the anatomical landmark and surface marking are almost uniform across the adult population. The landmark technique in pediatric patients is not reliable in all patients due to the variability in the age and size; the advent of ultrasound in assisting nerve localization has changed the way regional blocks are achieved in children and the range of blocks performed on adults can now be performed on pediatric patients; with advances in the technology and dexterity of ultrasound equipment, the chances of success of blocks has increased with a smaller dose of the local anesthetic in comparison to the traditional methods. Anesthesiologists are now able to perform blocks with more accuracy and avoid complications like intravascular injection and injury to the pleura and peritoneum during routine practice with the assistance of high-frequency transducers and top of the range portable ultrasound machines; catheters can be inserted to provide a continuous analgesia in the postoperative period. This review article describes the common peripheral blocks in pediatric patients; the readers are encouraged to gain experience by attending workshops, hands-on practice under supervision, and conduct random controlled trials pertaining to ultrasound-guided blocks in the pediatric age group. The recent literature is encouraging and further research is promising; a wide range of blocks being described in detail by many prominent experts from all over the world. PMID:21804805

  15. Zoster sine herpete with thoracic motor paralysis temporally associated with thoracic epidural steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, John A; McAllister, Russell K; Armstrong, Christopher S; Puana, Rudolph

    2008-10-01

    Reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus can occur when the immune system is weakened leading to the typical presentation seen with herpes zoster or shingles. In a small percentage of these patients, motor paralysis can be seen in the affected myotomal distribution. Zoster sine herpete, or shingles without the typical vesicular rash, is an uncommon variant of zoster. Systemic steroids are known to weaken the immune response. Two previous case reports have implicated epidural steroid injections as a precipitating cause of zoster. We present a case of serologically verified zoster sine herpete producing an abdominal wall bulge, which occurred 1 wk after thoracic epidural steroid injection. Electromyography documented the presence of abdominal wall denervation. Given the low incidence of serologically proven zoster sine herpete--especially with thoracic motor paralysis--and the equally rarely documented incidence of zoster related to epidural steroids, we present what we believe to be the first reported case of zoster sine herpete with a neuropathic abdominal wall bulge occurring in close temporal association to receiving epidural steroids. PMID:18806512

  16. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration of an anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: description of technique and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Krill, Michael; Peck, Evan

    2014-12-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst is an infrequent but potentially clinically significant cause of knee pain. Although the cyst may be removed surgically, percutaneous ultrasound-guided anterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst aspiration and injection is feasible. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case description of the utilization of ultrasound guidance to perform this procedure with a successful clinical outcome. PMID:25088315

  17. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser-induced prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, Richard K.; Roth, Robert A.

    1991-07-01

    A transurethral ultrasound-guided Nd:YAG laser delivery system has been developed for use as an alternative approach to the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The TULIP system has been extensively tested in canine models and is currently undergoing FDA trials in humans.

  18. Ultrasound-guided interventional radiology in critical care.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Savvas; Talsky, Aaron; Khashoggi, Khalid; Venu, Vicnays

    2007-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided intervention is becoming an increasingly popular and valuable tool in the critical care setting. In general, image-guided procedures can expedite wait times and increase the accuracy, safety, and efficacy of many procedures commonly performed within intensive care units. In the intensive care unit setting, ultrasound has particular advantages over other imaging modalities such as computed tomography and fluoroscopy, including real-time visualization, portability permitting bedside procedures, and reduced exposure to nephrotoxic contrast agents. We review the technical and procedural aspects of a number of ultrasound-guided interventions appropriate for critical care patients. These include central venous catheter deployment, thoracentesis, paracentesis, and drainage of a wide variety of abscesses, and percutaneous nephrostomy, percutaneous cholecystectomy, and inferior vena cava filter placement. Although we believe ultrasound is significantly underutilized in critical care today, we anticipate that with the improvement of ultrasound technology and the innovation of new ultrasound-guided procedures, the role of ultrasound in the intensive care unit will continue to expand, with bedside ultrasound-guided interventions increasingly becoming the norm. PMID:17446778

  19. Intrathyroid Injection of Steroid in Benign Thyroid Swellings

    PubMed Central

    K B, Prashanth; H A, Manjunatha; K R, Sumanth; K M, Triveni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign thyroid swelling disorders are common conditions, frequently encountered in clinical practice. Though medical management has been useful in treating the hormonal variations, it has not been very significant in reducing the size of the swelling. Objective To study the efficacy of intra thyroid injection of triamcinolone in benign thyroid swelling disorders. Materials and Methods A total of 20 patients were selected for this study. All the patients with thyroid swellings, were evaluated with history and clinical examination followed by routine blood investigations, thyroid function tests (T3,T4,TSH), Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) and Ultrasonography (USG) of the neck. The treatment adopted in this study was intrathyroid injection of triamcinolone acetonide. Results In this study there were 20 patients, all were females in the age group of 17- 55 years. Four patients did not come for regular follow up, and hence were excluded. Sixteen patients were followed up regularly. Thirteen (81.25 %) patients showed excellent results with no visible swelling, confirmed sonologically. Two patients (12.5%) showed fair results with residual swellings, and one patient did not show any reduction in size of the swelling. Conclusion Intrathyroid injection of triamcinolone acetonide is a safe, minimally invasive technique in reducing the size of benign thyroid swellings with minimal or no side effects. PMID:26816923

  20. Basic dissecting techniques in ultrasound-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Pilecki, Zbigniew; Koczy, Bogdan; Mielnik, Michał; Pilecki, Grzegorz; Dzielicki, Józef; Jakubowski, Wiesław

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided surgery is an area of minimally-invasive surgery where surgical procedures are performed with the aid of ultrasound imaging throghout the operation. This requires the operator to posses a certain degree of experience in endoscopic procedures, and to be adeptly skillfull in conducting US examinations. It is combining and finely tuning together these two elements that allows to perform efficiently an ultrasound-guided surgical procedure. Accessing an affected site correctly is of utmost importance in surgery, being oftentimes decisive in terms of the procedure's final outcome. In ultrasound-guided procedures, the operative site is accessed percutaneously, with a single point incision, yet tissues situated deeper within are dissected with dissecting techniques in a fluid evironment, typical for this area of surgery. Dissecting techniques in ultrasound-guided surgery are currently divided into basic ones which employ either a hydrodissection needle, surgical instruments, electrosurgical instruments, a thread, or a combination thereof, and advanced ones where either a balloon, a hook dissection technique, or a hybrid one is used. Hydrodissection with a needle was devised based on the rule of complementarity, and is the most frequently applied technique in ultrasound-guided surgery. The immense possibilities that go along with this modality will be of huge benefit to any surgeon, regardless of their field. Dissection with a variety of surgical instruments and electrosurgery instruments is a standard practice in all surgery areas, yet the method of imaging we employ in ultrasound-guided surgery results in certain modifications of these techniques. It is, however, learning the thread technique that facilitates a precise and oftentimes extensive dissection. This technique is successfully applied for dissecting muscle, ligament, tendon, vascular and other structures. Having mastered dissecting techniques allows to perform any minimally-invasive procedure efficiently, be they ultrasound-guided, artroscopic, or endoscopic ones. Various surgical techniques are bridged, resulting in applying the so-called hybrid ones. Their strength lies in excellent imaging results allowing to conduct a surgical procedure both in a body cavity and within a parenchymal organ. PMID:26674391

  1. Basic dissecting techniques in ultrasound-guided surgery

    PubMed Central

    Koczy, Bogdan; Mielnik, Micha?; Pilecki, Grzegorz; Dzielicki, Jzef; Jakubowski, Wies?aw

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided surgery is an area of minimally-invasive surgery where surgical procedures are performed with the aid of ultrasound imaging throghout the operation. This requires the operator to posses a certain degree of experience in endoscopic procedures, and to be adeptly skillfull in conducting US examinations. It is combining and finely tuning together these two elements that allows to perform efficiently an ultrasound-guided surgical procedure. Accessing an affected site correctly is of utmost importance in surgery, being oftentimes decisive in terms of the procedure's final outcome. In ultrasound-guided procedures, the operative site is accessed percutaneously, with a single point incision, yet tissues situated deeper within are dissected with dissecting techniques in a fluid evironment, typical for this area of surgery. Dissecting techniques in ultrasound-guided surgery are currently divided into basic ones which employ either a hydrodissection needle, surgical instruments, electrosurgical instruments, a thread, or a combination thereof, and advanced ones where either a balloon, a hook dissection technique, or a hybrid one is used. Hydrodissection with a needle was devised based on the rule of complementarity, and is the most frequently applied technique in ultrasound-guided surgery. The immense possibilities that go along with this modality will be of huge benefit to any surgeon, regardless of their field. Dissection with a variety of surgical instruments and electrosurgery instruments is a standard practice in all surgery areas, yet the method of imaging we employ in ultrasound-guided surgery results in certain modifications of these techniques. It is, however, learning the thread technique that facilitates a precise and oftentimes extensive dissection. This technique is successfully applied for dissecting muscle, ligament, tendon, vascular and other structures. Having mastered dissecting techniques allows to perform any minimally-invasive procedure efficiently, be they ultrasound-guided, artroscopic, or endoscopic ones. Various surgical techniques are bridged, resulting in applying the so-called hybrid ones. Their strength lies in excellent imaging results allowing to conduct a surgical procedure both in a body cavity and within a parenchymal organ. PMID:26674391

  2. Application of Ultrasound-Guided Ilioinguinal/Iliohypogastric Nerve Block in Pediatric Same-Day Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Xu, Yucan; Wang, Zhongyu; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve block (IINB) in pediatric patients undergoing same-day inguinal region surgery. Ninety patients aged 4-6 years, ASA levels I-II, were randomly divided into three groups: U, T, or C (n = 30 each). After basic anesthesia, patients in group U underwent ultrasound-guided IINB, those in group T underwent traditional Schulte-Steinberg IINB, and those in group C (controls) received intravenous anesthesia (ketamine-propofol) only. Patients who remained sensitive to intraoperative stimuli received additional intravenous doses of 1 mg/kg ketamine. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and oxygen saturation (SPO2) were recorded upon entering the operating room (T0), at skin incision (T1), while pulling the hernia sac (T2), during skin closing (T3), and upon awakening (T4) at recovery. HR and MAP at T1, T2, and T4 were higher in group C than those in the other two groups, and recovery time in group C was significantly prolonged (P < 0.05). Group U required significantly lower quantities and frequency of ketamine injection, and pain scores in group U during awakening were lower than those in the other two groups (P < 0.05). Ultrasound-guided IINB provided an improved nerve block effect and postoperative analgesia, reduced the amount of local anesthetic required, facilitated more rapid postoperative recovery, and was a safe and effective method of anesthesia. PMID:26884660

  3. Comparative study of intralesional steroid injection and cryotherapy in alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Amirnia, Mehdi; Mahmoudi, Seyed-Sajjad; Karkon-Shayan, Farid; Alikhah, Hossein; Piri, Reza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Ranjkesh, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Alopecia areata (AA) is a common, non-scarring type of hair loss, affecting approximately 2.1% of the population, many modality of treatment recommended like steroid injection, topical Immunotherapy and several systemic therapies. The aim of this study was to compare intralesional steroid injection and cryotherapyoutcomes in AA. Materials and Methods: In an analytical-descriptive study, 120 AA patients treated with intralesionalsteroid injection and 120 AA patients treated with cryotherapy were randomly selected. These two groups matched for location, duration and size of lesion and also matched for age and gender. From March 2011 to September 2013, the effect and complications of the therapies after 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks were assessed and results were compared between the two groups. Results: Mean age of patients in steroid injection group was 30.2 ± 6.8 and in cryotherapy group was 31.8 ± 7.1. Sexual distribution in both groups was 56.7% and 43.3 % for male and female, respectively. Location of disease in 80% was in scalp and 20% was in face in both groups. The time of beginning response in steroid group was 4.13 ± 2.13 weeks and in cryotherapy group was 6.14 ± 0.29 weeks, difference between two groups was significant (P = 0.001). In term of clinical response at the end of study, in steroid group,20 patients (16.7%) no response, 32 patients (26.7%), moderate response and68 patients (56.7%) had a complete response, and also in cryotherapy group was, 52 patients (43.3%) no response, 40 patients (33.3%) moderate response and 28 patients (23.3%) had a complete response. There was significant different in complete response rate and steroid injection was more effective than cryotherapy(P < 0.05). Conclusion: As the cryotherapy isa considerable treatment of AA, alsothis study proposes intralesional injection of corticosteroid, as a replacement of AA therapy; particularly the short-term complications are not significantly different. PMID:26759508

  4. Nicolau Syndrome after intramuscular injection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)

    PubMed Central

    Dadaci, Mehmet; Altuntas, Zeynep; Ince, Bilsev; Bilgen, Fatma; Tufekci, Osman; Poyraz, Necdet

    2015-01-01

    Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection that leads to local ischemic necrosis of the skin and adipose tissue. In this paper, we discuss etiologies, risk factors, and treatment options for gluteal Nicolau syndrome referring to patients treated in our hospital. Our study includes 17 women who visited our clinic with symptoms of gluteal necrosis secondary to intramuscular injection. The following variables were taken into account: injection site, drug administered, frequency of injections, the person who administered the injections, needle size, and needle tip color. Magnetic resonance images obtained in the aftermath of intramuscular injection application were carefully analyzed for presence of necrosis, cyst formation and the thickness of the gluteal fat tissue layer. Drugs that had been received in intramuscular injection were exclusively non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Mean patient BMI was 41.8 (all patients were considered as obese), and mean gluteal fat thickness was 54 mm. Standard length of needles (3.8 cm) had been used in procedures. The wounds were treated with primary closure in 11 patients and with local flap therapy in 6 patients. The observed necrosis was a consequence of misplaced gluteal injection, where drugs were injected into the adipose tissue instead of the muscle due to the extreme thickness of the fat layer, on one hand, and the inappropriate length of standard needles, on the other hand. Intramuscular injection should be avoided in obese patients whenever possible if it is necessary, proper injection technique should be used. PMID:25725145

  5. Ultrasound-guided vs endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Masato; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kuraoka, Kensuke; Yukisawa, Seigo; Kasuga, Akiyoshi; Ozaka, Masato; Suzuki, Sho; Takano, Kouichi; Sugiyama, Yuko; Itoi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the effectiveness and safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic PC between February 2006 and September 2011 were selected for this retrospective study. FNA biopsy for pancreatic tumors had been performed percutaneously under extracorporeal ultrasound guidance until October 2009; then, beginning in November 2009, EUS-FNA has been performed. We reviewed the complete medical records of all patients who met the selection criteria for the following data: sex, age, location and size of the targeted tumor, histological and/or cytological findings, details of puncture procedures, time from day of puncture until day of definitive diagnosis, and details of severe adverse events. RESULTS: Of the 121 patients who met the selection criteria, 46 had a percutaneous biopsy (Group A) and 75 had an EUS-FNA biopsy (Group B). Adequate cytological specimens were obtained in 42 Group A patients (91.3%) and all 75 Group B patients (P = 0.0192), and histological specimens were obtained in 41 Group A patients (89.1%) and 65 Group B patients (86.7%). Diagnosis of malignancy by cytology was positive in 33 Group A patients (78.6%) and 72 Group B patients (94.6%) (P = 0.0079). Malignancy by both cytology and pathology was found in 43 Group A (93.5%) and 73 Group B (97.3%) patients. The mean period from the puncture until the cytological diagnosis in Group B was 1.7 d, which was significantly shorter than that in Group A (4.1 d) (P < 0.0001). Severe adverse events were experienced in two Group A patients (4.3%) and in one Group B patient (1.3%). CONCLUSION: EUS-FNA, as well as percutaneous needle aspiration, is an effective modality to obtain cytopathological confirmation in patients with advanced PC. PMID:23613631

  6. The minimum effective concentration (MEC90 ) of ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Fang, G; Wan, L; Mei, W; Yu, H H; Luo, A L

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimum effective concentration of ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Fifty-one patients undergoing arm surgery received double-injection ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block using ropivacaine 40 ml. The concentration of ropivacaine administered to each patient started at 0.225% and then depended on the response of the previous one, based on a biased coin design up-and-down sequential method. In case of failure, the ropivacaine concentration was increased by 0.025% w/v in the next subject. In the case of a successful block, the next patient was randomised to the same concentration or a concentration 0.025% w/v less. Success was defined as complete sensory blockade of the brachial plexus 30 min after the block together with pain-free surgery. The minimum effective ropivacaine concentration in 90% of subjects was 0.257% w/v (95% CI 0.241-0.280%). PMID:26945818

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  8. Ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus blockade with propofol-ketamine sedation.

    PubMed

    Toju, Kazuya; Hakozaki, Takahiro; Akatsu, Masahiko; Isosu, Tsuyoshi; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    We report the use of ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block in a patient with bilateral radius fractures. An axillary block was performed on the patient's right and a supraclavicular block on her left using an in-plane (long-axis) needle insertion technique. Into each side was injected 20 ml 0.5% ropivacaine, giving a total volume (dose) of 40 ml (200 mg). Provisions were made for rescue analgesia or unplanned conversion to general anesthesia during the operation, but these were not needed; furthermore, no perioperative complications were observed. General anesthesia has traditionally been used for simultaneous surgery involving the bilateral upper extremities because of concerns relating to local anesthetic toxicity, phrenic nerve blockade, and pneumothorax. The ultrasound-guided technique facilitates a reduction in the minimal effective volume of local anesthetic and can prevent potentially critical complications. Moreover, the technique can be performed within the recommended safe dose limits of the anesthetic, rendering it an important option for bilateral upper extremity surgery. PMID:21964729

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young Eun; Choi, Jung Hyun; Park, Hue Jung; Park, Ji Hye; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN), and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX(®), Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4-5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief. PMID:26761032

  10. Comparison of Two Different Doses of Single Bolus Steroid Injection to Prevent Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Rae; Won, Hoyoun; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jong-Youn; Sung, Jung-Hoon; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Steroids may play a role in preventing the early recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). However, optimal doses and route of steroid delivery have not yet been determined. This study evaluated the effect of two different doses of a single bolus injection of steroids on AF recurrence after RFCA. Materials and Methods Of 448 consecutive AF patients who underwent RFCA, a single steroid bolus was injected into 291 patients. A low-dose steroid group (n=113) received 100 mg of hydrocortisone and a moderate-dose steroid group (n=174) received 125 mg of methylprednisolone. We used propensity-score matching to select patients as follows: control (n=95), low-dose (n=95), and moderate-dose steroid groups (n=97). Results Pericarditis developed in 1 (1.1%) control patient, 2 (2.1%) low-dose patients and 0 moderate-dose patients. Maximum body temperature and C-reactive protein were significantly decreased in the moderate-dose steroid group compared to the other groups (p<0.01). The number of patients of early AF recurrence (?3 months) did not differ among three groups. Early recurrence was 24 (25%) in the control, 24 (25%) in the low-dose and 25 (26%) in the medium-dose groups (p=0.99). Compared with control group, low-dose or moderate-dose steroid treatment did not effectively decrease mid-term (3-12 months) AF recurrence [22 (23%) vs. 23 (24%) vs. 18 (19%); p=0.12]. Conclusion A single injection of moderate-dose steroid decreased inflammation. However, single bolus injections of low-dose or moderate-dose steroids were not effective in preventing immediate, early or midterm AF recurrence after RFCA. PMID:25683977

  11. New economic training model for installing ultrasound-guided drainages.

    PubMed

    Mohr, A; Jung, E M; Stroszczynski, C; Schacherer, D; Klebl, F

    2014-11-01

    Abscesses and circumscribed collections of fluid are frequently found as complications of infectious diseases or surgery. Drainage is often indicated. We have established a new, economic, easy-to-make model to learn and improve competence in installing ultrasound-guided drainage. Up to fifteen water balloons (size 30 - 50 mm) were placed in a plastic box which then was filled with instant custard powder mixed with water. Spiral computed tomography (CT) of this box was performed. Experienced (n = 8) and inexperienced examiners (n = 8) drained the balloons via a direct puncture technique using either ultrasound-guidance alone or volume navigation with image fusion (ultrasound and CT) with needle tracking. Trainees filled out a questionnaire (before and after training) asking for information on their experience in ultrasound, in installing drainages and evaluating the new model. The time needed for installing the drainage was measured. None of the participants had ever attended a course on drainage installation. Only a few of the experienced examiners (n = 3) would autonomously install a drainage into a fluid collection with a size exceeding 4 cm before training. After training all participants felt more confident in ultrasound and in installing drainages into abscesses or other fluid collections. Most of the participants rated additional volume navigation with image fusion as a helpful tool. Ultrasound-guided drainage of abscesses can be trained easily with this new and economic model. Students and physicians can improve their skills and gain confidence in performing ultrasound-guided interventions. PMID:25390212

  12. Efficacy and safety of steroid injections for shoulder and elbow tendonitis: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Gaujoux-Viala, C; Dougados, M; Gossec, L

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of steroid injections for patients with tendonitis of the shoulder or elbow. Methods: A systematic review of the literature using PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane library and manual searches was performed until April 2008. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reporting the efficacy on pain or functional disability, and/or the safety of steroid injections, versus placebo, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or physiotherapy in patients with tendonitis were selected. Pooled effect size (ES) was calculated by meta-analysis using the Mantel–Haenszel method. Results: In all, 20 RCTs were analysed (744 patients treated by injections and 987 patients treated by controls; 618 shoulders and 1113 elbows). The pooled analysis indicated only short-term effectiveness of steroids versus the pooled controls for pain and function (eg, pain at week 1–3 ES = 1.18 (95% CI 0.27 to 2.09), pain at week 4–8 ES = 1.30 (95% CI 0.55 to 2.04), pain at week 12–24 ES = −0.38 (95% CI −0.85 to 0.08) and pain at week 48 ES = 0.07 (95% CI −0.60 to 0.75)). Sensitivity analyses indicated similar results whatever the localisation, type of steroid and type of comparator except for NSAIDs: steroid injections were not significantly better than NSAIDs in the short-term. Steroid injections appeared more effective than pooled other treatments in acute or subacute tendonitis. The main side effects were transient pain after injection (10.7% of corticosteroid injections) and skin modification (4.0%). Conclusions: Steroid injections are well tolerated and more effective for tendonitis in the short-term than pooled other treatments, though similar to NSAIDs. No long-term benefit was shown. PMID:19054817

  13. Perspectives in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Aditya Ravindra; Karnik, Alpana Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is a safe, easily available, and cost-effective modality, which has the additional advantage of being real time for imaging and image-guided interventions of the musculoskeletal system. Musculoskeletal interventions are gaining popularity in sports and rehabilitation for rapid healing of muscle and tendon injuries in professional athletes, healing of chronic tendinopathies, aspiration of joint effusions, periarticular bursae and ganglia, and perineural injections in acute and chronic pain syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of the spectrum of musculoskeletal interventions that can be done under USG guidance both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26288519

  14. Intratympanic steroid injection for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in a patient on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui-Xin; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Hsin-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is being described with increasing incidence among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). There are no widely accepted guidelines in the medical literature for the appropriate management of this medical emergency. Administration of systemic steroids remains the mainstay of the management of SSNHL in conjunction with the supportive treatment, in this vulnerable group of patients, as well. However, encouraged by the evolving evidence on the efficacy of the intratympanic steroid injections (ITSI) in the treatment of SSNHL among patients without renal disease--we successfully treated SSNHL in an elderly diabetic with sepsis due to bilateral pneumonitis undergoing regular HD treatment with multiple ITSI and antibiotics resulting in complete recovery of hearing function within 3 months of onset of the first symptoms. PMID:23782854

  15. The risk of infection with HIV and hepatitis B in individuals who inject steroids in England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Crampin, A. C.; Lamagni, T. L.; Hope, V. D.; Newham, J. A.; Lewis, K. M.; Parry, J. V.; Gill, O. N.

    1998-01-01

    Data on injecting anabolic steroid users, within the national Unlinked Anonymous HIV Prevalence Monitoring Survey of injecting drug users (IDUs) were analysed to determine their risk of acquiring blood borne viruses. One hundred and forty-nine participants who had injected anabolic steroids in the previous month were identified from 1991-6, contributing 1.4% of all participation episodes in the survey. Rates of needle and syringe sharing by steroid users were low. Three of the 149 (2.0%) had anti-HBc and none had anti-HIV in their salivary specimens. The prevalence of anti-HBc in steroid injectors was significantly lower than in heroin injectors, 275/1509 (18%) (P < 0.001), or in amphetamine injectors, 28/239 (12%) (P < 0.001). The risk of blood borne virus transmission amongst these steroid injectors is low, probably due to hygienic use of injecting equipment and low levels of sharing. It is important to distinguish steroid injectors from other IDUs because they are a distinct group in terms of lifestyle and injecting practice. PMID:9825789

  16. Comparison of Transforaminal and Parasagittal Epidural Steroid Injections in Patients With Radicular Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Aryani, Mohamad Reza; Momenzadeh, Sirus; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Esmilijah, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESI), including transforaminal (TF) epidural injections and interlaminar (IL) epidural steroid injections are commonly performed procedures for the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. Parasagittal interlaminar (PIL) approach could enable higher ventral epidural spread, with fewer complications than TF. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effectiveness of PIL and TF ESI in relieving the pain and disability of patients with lumbosacral pain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 64 patients, aged between 18 to 75 years, with a diagnosis of low back pain and unilateral lumbosacral radicular pain. The patients were randomized to receive fluoroscopically guided epidural injection, through either the PIL or TF approach. Patients were evaluated for effective pain relief [numerical rating scale (NRS) < 3] by 0 - 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) and functional improvement by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Effective pain relief [numeric rating scale (NRS) < 3] was observed in 77.3% (95% CI: 67‒90.5%) of patients in PIL group and 74.2% (95% CI: 62.4 - 89.4%) of patients in the TF group (P = 0.34), at 4 weeks. Mean NRS score was not significantly different between the PIL group compared to the TF group, at 4 weeks (P = 0.19). Number of patients with improved disability (measured by ODI < 20%) was not significantly different in PIL group (78% of cases) compared to the TF group (76% of cases), at 4 weeks (P = 0.21). There were no adverse effects observed in any of our patients. Conclusions: The PIL epidural injection is as effective as TF epidural injection in improving pain and functional status, in patients with chronic lumbosacral low back pain, due to disc degeneration. PMID:26587400

  17. Intra-arterial injection of sclerosants: Report of three cases treated with systemic steroids.

    PubMed

    Parsi, Kurosh; Hannaford, Patricia

    2016-05-01

    Intra-arterial injection of sclerosants is a significant but uncommon complication of sclerotherapy that may result in extensive tissue necrosis and in rare cases digit or limb amputation. We have managed three cases in the past 10 years. One patient was referred for immediate treatment following intra-arterial injection of liquid polidocanol. The other two had undergone foam sclerotherapy with polidocanol and sodium tetradecyl sulphate, respectively. All patients were treated with a combination of oral steroids (prednisone 0.5-1 mg/kg) and systemic anticoagulants (enoxaparin 1.5 mg/kg daily subcutaneous injection). One case progressed to skin ulceration where prednisone was started five days after the adverse event and prematurely stopped after four weeks. The other cases did not progress to necrosis or other long-term sequelae. In these patients, prednisone was commenced immediately and slowly reduced over the following 12 weeks. The inflammation that follows ischemia plays a significant role in tissue necrosis and the immediate management of this adverse event may benefit from anti-inflammatory measures and in particular systemic steroid therapy unless contraindicated. PMID:25837790

  18. Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection for Painful Spasticity in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun; Chun, Seong Min; Park, Hee Won; Bang, Moon Suk

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old male with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). He could not maintain a standing position because of painful spasticity in his lower limbs. A magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography indicated chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy, explaining his chronic low back pain before the injury. For diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI) to the right L5 root was performed. After the intervention, the spasticity decreased and his ambulatory function improved. This case illustrates that lumbar radiculopathy concomitant with a cervical SCI can produce severe spasticity and it can be dramatically improved by ESI. PMID:26361605

  19. Evaluation of new approach to ultrasound guided stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Anju; Kaushik, Teshi; Kundu, Zile Singh; Wadhera, Sarthak; Wadhera, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound imaging is an ideal tool for stellate ganglion block (SGB) due to clarity, portability, lack of radiation, and low cost. Ultrasound guided anterior approach requires the application of pressure to the anterior neck and is associated with more risk of injury to inferior thyroid artery, vertebral artery, and esophagus. The lateral approach does not interfere with nerve or vascular structures. Blockade at the C6 vertebral level results in more successful sympathetic blockade of the head and neck with less sympathetic blockade of the upper extremity compared to sympathetic blockade at C7 vertebral level, which produces successful sympathetic blockade of upper extremity. This is helpful in patients of complex regional pain syndrome of the upper limb. Hence, we conducted a study using the lateral approach at C7 level. Materials and Methods: Ultrasound guided SGBs using lateral in-plane technique at C7 level were given in 20 patients suffering from chronic pain patients of upper extremity, head, and neck using 4 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and 1 ml of 40 mg triamcinolone. The patients were assessed for a numeric pain intensity score (NPIS), the rise in axillary temperature, the range of motion of joints of upper extremity, and resolution of edema at various time intervals up to 3 months. Results: NPIS showed a statistically significant decrease from baseline at 30 min, which was sustained till 3rd month. The rise in axillary temperature after the block was statistically significant, which was sustained till 2nd week. The edema score decreased significantly at all-time intervals (P ≤ 0.001). The restriction of motion in all joints of upper limb decreased from 13 to 3 patients. Conclusion: There is a significant variation in the anatomy of stellate ganglion at the level of C6 and C7. Ultrasound guided lateral approach increases the efficacy of SGB by deposition of drug subfascially with real-time imaging. PMID:27051366

  20. Feasibility of percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Seoyeoun; Jung, Sunyoung; Kim, Boeun; Jung, Joohyun; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Mincheol

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating hepatocellular disease versus biliary obstruction can be challenging in dogs presented for icterus. The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the feasibility of percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography in dogs. Ten normal dogs weighing 7.6-13.0 kg (median 9.8 kg) were recruited. All dogs were considered normal based on complete blood count, serum chemistry profile, ultrasound examination, and percutaneous radiographic cholecystography. Percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography was performed using 0.5 ml of commercially available contrast agent and two conventional ultrasound machines for simultaneous scanning at two different locations. Two observers independently evaluated the time to initial detection of contrast in the proximal duodenum and duration of contrast enhancement via visual monitoring. Dynamic contrast enhancement was calculated using time-intensity curves. Mean (± SD) and median (range) of time to initial detection were 8.60 s (± 3.35) and 8.0 s (2.0-11.0), respectively, and mean and median duration were 50.45 s (± 23.24) and 53.0 s (20.0 - 70.0), respectively. Mean, median, and range of peak intensity were 114.1 mean pixel value (MPV) (SD ± 30.7), 109.2 MPV, and 79.7-166.7, respectively, and mean, median, and range of time to peak intensity were 26.1 s (SD ± 7.1 s), 24.0 s, and 19.0-41.0 s, respectively. Findings indicated that percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography is a feasible technique for detecting and quantifying patency of the bile duct in normal dogs. Future studies are needed to assess the diagnostic utility of this technique for dogs with biliary obstruction. PMID:25403172

  1. Infection after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ju

    2015-05-01

    Infectious complications after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx) appear to be increasing, which reflects the high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Enterobacteriaceae. Identifying patients at high risk for antibiotic resistance with history taking is an important initial step. Targeted prophylaxis with a prebiopsy rectal swab culture or augmented antibiotic prophylaxis can be considered for patients at high risk of antibiotic resistance. If infectious complications are suspected, the presence of urosepsis should be evaluated and adequate antibiotic treatment should be started immediately. PMID:25964834

  2. Efficacy of Intra-articular Steroid Injection in Patients with Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Sun; Jang, Young Eun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2013-01-01

    Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) arises from morphological abnormalities between the proximal femur and acetabulum. Impingement caused by these morphologic abnormalities induces early degenerative changes in the hip joint. Furthermore, FAI patients complain of severe pain and limited range of motion in the hip, but a guideline for treatment of FAI has not yet been established. Medication, supportive physical treatment and surgical procedures have been used in the treatment of the FAI patients; however, the efficacies of these treatments have been limited. Here, we report the diagnosis and treatment for 3 cases of FAI patients. Intra-articular (IA) steroid injection of the hip joint was performed in all three patients. After IA injection, pain was reduced and function had improved for up to three months. PMID:23614077

  3. Phantom radiculitis effectively treated by fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    DeGregoris, Gerard; Diwan, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Lower back and extremity pain in the amputee patient can be challenging to classify and treat. Radicular compression in a patient with lower limb amputation may present as or be superimposed upon phantom limb pain, creating diagnostic difficulties. Both patients and physicians classically find it difficult to discern phantom sensation from phantom limb pain and stump pain; radicular compression is often not considered. Many studies have shown back pain to be a significant cause of pain in lower limb amputees, but sciatica has been rarely reported in amputees. We present a case of L4/5 radiculitis in an above-knee amputee presenting as phantom radiculitis. Our patient is a 67 year old gentleman with new onset 10/10 pain in a phantom extremity superimposed upon a 40 year history of previously stable phantom limb pain. MRI showed a central disc herniation at L4/5 with compression of the traversing left L4 nerve root. Two fluoroscopically guided left transforaminal epidural steroid injections at the level of the L4 and L5 spinal nerve roots totally alleviated his new onset pain. At one year post injection, his phantom radiculitis pain was completely gone, though his underlying phantom limb pain remained. Lumbar radiculitis in lower extremity amputee patients may be difficult to differentiate from baseline phantom limb pain. When conservative techniques fail, fluoroscopically guided spinal nerve injection may be valuable in determining the etiology of lower extremity pain. Our experience supports the notion that epidural steroid injections can effectively treat phantom lumbar radiculitis in lower extremity amputees. PMID:21102962

  4. Infectious disease, injection practices, and risky sexual behavior among anabolic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Ip, Eric J; Yadao, Michael A; Shah, Bijal M; Lau, Bonnie

    2016-03-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and other performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) are commonly misused to increase muscle size and strength, as well as improve physical appearance. Many AAS and certain PEDs are administered via injection and therefore pose a risk for transmission of infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Further, AAS users may be more likely to take part in high-risk sexual behaviors than non-AAS users. This review explores the prevalence of infectious diseases as well as risky injection practices and sexual behaviors of AAS users in the current literature. A comprehensive MEDLINE search (1984-17 April 2015) for English language reports was performed on AAS users. Ten studies analyzed the prevalence of HIV infection, 6 studies analyzed HBV infection, and 6 studies analyzed HCV infection; 20 studies analyzed injection practices and 7 studies analyzed high-risk sexual behaviors of AAS users. HIV, HBV, HCV, and SSTIs have been associated with AAS users. In particular, HIV infection seems much higher among homosexual male AAS users. AAS users also take part in high-risk injection practices but to a much lower extent than intravenous drug users. AAS users are also more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behaviors than the general population. Clinicians and health-policy leaders may utilize these findings to implement strategies to decrease the spread of infectious diseases. PMID:26422090

  5. A new ultrasound-guided pubic approach for proximal obturator nerve block: clinical study and cadaver evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Onishi, T; Furutani, K; Baba, H

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated an alternative technique for ultrasound-guided proximal level obturator nerve block that might facilitate needle visualisation using in-plane ultrasound guidance. Twenty patients undergoing transurethral bladder tumour resection requiring an obturator nerve block were enrolled into a prospective observational study. With the patient in the lithotomy position, the transducer was placed on the medial thigh along the extended line of the inguinal crease, and aimed cephalad to view a thick fascia between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles that contains the obturator nerve. A stimulating nerve block needle was inserted at the pubic region and advanced in-plane with the transducer in an anterior-to-posterior direction. Eight ml levobupivacaine 0.75% was injected within the fascia. The median (IQR [range]) duration for ultrasound identification of the target and injection were 8.5 (7-12 [5-24]) s and 62 (44.5-78.25 [39-383]) s, respectively. All blocks were successful. A cadaver evaluation demonstrated that the dye injected into the target fascia using our technique travelled retrogradely through the obturator canal, and surrounded the anterior and posterior branches of the obturator nerve both proximally and distally to the obturator canal. We believe that this is a promising new technique for ultrasound-guided proximal level obturator nerve block. PMID:26620274

  6. Prospective Randomized Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiation Therapy and Local Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

    SciTech Connect

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Canyilmaz, Fatih; Aynaci, Ozlem; Colak, Fatma; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Aynaci, Osman; Yoney, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for plantar fasciitis and to compare radiation therapy with local steroid injections. Methods and Materials: Between March 2013 and April 2014, 128 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomized to receive radiation therapy (total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy three times a week) or local corticosteroid injections a 1 ml injection of 40 mg methylprednisolone and 0.5 ml 1% lidocaine under the guidance of palpation. The results were measured using a visual analog scale, a modified von Pannewitz scale, and a 5-level function score. The fundamental phase of the study was 3 months, with a follow-up period of up to 6 months. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 12.5 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). For the radiation therapy patients, the median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 6.5-18.5 months), whereas in the palpation-guided (PG) steroid injection arm, it was 12.1 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). After 3 months, results in the radiation therapy arm were significantly superior to those in the PG steroid injection arm (visual analog scale, P<.001; modified von Pannewitz scale, P<.001; 5-level function score, P<.001). Requirements for a second treatment did not significantly differ between the 2 groups, but the time interval for the second treatment was significantly shorter in the PG steroid injection group (P=.045). Conclusion: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy compared to mean PG steroid injection on plantar fasciitis for at least 6 months after treatment.

  7. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Sofi, Khalid; Arab, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed intraoperative procedure. Traditionally, CVC placement is performed blindly using anatomic landmarks as a guide to vessel position. Real-time ultrasound provides the operator the benefit of visualizing the target vein and the surrounding anatomic structures prior to and during the catheter insertion, thereby minimizing complications and increasing speed of placement. A 22-year-old male underwent open reduction and internal fixation of acetabulum fracture in prone position. Excessive continuous bleeding intraoperatively warranted placement of CVC in right internal jugular vein (IJV), which was not possible in prone position without the help of ultrasound. Best view of right IJV was obtained and CVC was placed using real-time ultrasound without complications. Ultrasound-guided CVC placement can be done in atypical patient positions where traditional anatomic landmark technique has no role. Use of ultrasound not only increases the speed of placement but also reduces complications known with the traditional blind technique. PMID:20668564

  8. An ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography system: design and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Torosean, Sason; Davis, Scott C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrasound-guided fluorescence molecular tomography system is under development for in vivo quantification of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Aminolevulinic Acid - Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) of Basal Cell Carcinoma. The system is designed to combine fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with co-registered ultrasound images to quantify local fluorophore concentration. A single white light source is used to provide an estimate of the bulk optical properties of tissue. Optical data is obtained by sequential illumination of a 633nm laser source at 4 linear locations with parallel detection at 5 locations interspersed between the sources. Tissue regions from segmented ultrasound images, optical boundary data, white light-informed optical properties and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorophore concentration in these regions. Our system and methods allow interrogation of both superficial and deep tissue locations up to PpIX concentrations of 0.025ug/ml.

  9. Laparoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Milic, Andrea; Asch, Murray R. Hawrylyshyn, Peter A.; Allen, Lisa M.; Colgan, Terence J.; Kachura, John R.; Hayeems, Eran B.

    2006-08-15

    Four patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids measuring less than 6 cm underwent laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using multiprobe-array electrodes. Follow-up of the treated fibroids was performed with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and patients' symptoms were assessed by telephone interviews. The procedure was initially technically successful in 3 of the 4 patients and MRI studies at 1 month demonstrated complete fibroid ablation. Symptom improvement, including a decrease in menstrual bleeding and pain, was achieved in 2 patients at 3 months. At 7 months, 1 of these 2 patients experienced symptom worsening which correlated with recurrent fibroid on MRI. The third, initially technically successfully treated patient did not experience any symptom relief after the procedure and was ultimately diagnosed with adenomyosis. Our preliminary results suggest that RFA is a technically feasible treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids in appropriately selected patients.

  10. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser prostatectomy: initial Luebeck experince

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Stephen; Spitzenpfeil, Elisabeth; Knipper, Ansgar; Jocham, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    Transurethral ultrasound guided laser prostatectomy is one of the most promising alternative invasive treatment modalities for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The principle feature is an on- line 3-D controlling of Nd:YAG laser denaturation of the periurethral tissue. Necrotic tissue is not removed, but sloughs away with the urinary stream within weeks. The bleeding hazard during and after the operation is minimal. By leaving the bladder neck untouched, sexual function is not endangered. Thirty-one patients with symptomatic BPH were treated with the TULIP system and followed up for at least 12 weeks. Suprapubic bladder drainage had to be maintained for a mean time of 37 days. Conventional TURP was performed in four patients due to chronic infection, recurrent bleeding, and poor results. Our initial experience with the TULIP system shows it to be very efficient and safe. A longer follow up of a larger patient population is necessary to compare the therapeutic efficiency to conventional transurethral resection.

  11. Review of Ultrasound-Guided Radial Artery Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew G; Bardin, Amy J

    2016-03-01

    Radial artery catheters are commonly placed for continuous blood pressure monitoring, frequent arterial blood gas analysis, or frequent blood sampling for diagnostic testing. Radial artery cannulation can be challenging and ultrasound guidance has emerged as a valuable adjunct for the placement of radial artery catheters. The advantages of ultrasound guidance include: real-time visualization of landmarks, improved pre-procedure planning, reduction in complications, less time spent at the bedside, and improved first-attempt success rates. Disadvantages of ultrasound guidance include: equipment cost, equipment availability, limited availability of experts to train providers, and the cost of training providers. Ultrasound machines are readily available and widely utilized in many emergency departments, operating rooms, and ICUs. We will summarize the use of ultrasound guidance for the placement of radial artery catheters and describe the techniques used during ultrasound-guided arterial catheter placement. Training on the use of ultrasound should be encouraged for all practitioners who place radial artery catheters. PMID:26670469

  12. Application of ultrasound-guided subcostal transversus abdominis plane block in gastric cancer patients undergoing open gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Li, Longyun; Gao, Ming; Zhu, Zhihua; Chen, Peng; Yang, Li; Zhao, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Background: To observe intraoperative and postoperative analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided subcostal transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in gastric cancer patients undergoing open gastrectomy. Material and Methods: Forty patients with gastric cancer underwent open gastrectomy were randomly assigned into groups R and S. All patients received ultrasound-guided subcostal bilateral TAP under general anesthesia, and then were injected with 40 ml of 0.375% ropivacaine (group R) or equivalent amount of normal saline (group S). The surgery was performed in 30 min following the blocking. Intraoperatively, BIS value was maintained between 45 and 65. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia pump was properly connected after the operation. Intraoperative changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were observed and the dosage of sufentanil and alternative drugs was closely monitored during the surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores and related surgical complications were recorded at 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h following the operation. Results: The SBP, DBP and HR changes in the group R were significantly decreased compared with those in the group S (all P<0.01). In both groups, desirable analgesic effect was obtained. The VAS scores at postoperative 2, 4, 6 and 12 h after the surgery in the group R were significantly lower than those in the group S (all P<0.05). No TAP puncture-induced adverse reaction was observed in both groups. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided subcostal transversus abdominis plane block has the advantages of accurate localization and high success rate. Clinical application of this technique in open gastrectomy can significantly decrease intraoperative and postoperative dosage of analgesics and exert desirable analgesic effect. PMID:26550355

  13. 0.5% levobupivacaine versus 0.5% ropivacaine: Are they different in ultrasound-guided sciatic block?

    PubMed Central

    Pham Dang, Charles; Langlois, Cécile; Lambert, Chantal; Nguyen, Jean-Michel; Asehnoune, Karim; Lejus, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Context and Aims: Little is known about onset and duration of sciatic block after 0.5% levobupivacaine (Levo) versus 0.5% ropivacaine (Ropi) for ultrasound-guided technique. We assessed these parameters in the ultrasound-guided block, to know for the practice. Setting and Design: A comparative randomized double-blind study was conducted in the University Hospital. Materials and Methods: Were included 35 adults of ASA I-II, scheduled for foot surgery, presenting clear imaging of their sciatic nerve at mid-thigh. A volume of 20 mL of either 0.5% Levo or 0.5% Ropi were injected around the sciatic nerve at mid-thigh using ultrasound guidance (out of the plane) followed by placement of a catheter to use, if necessary, for perioperative analgesia. A femoral single shot block was systematically performed to block the saphenous nerve. The onset times until complete foot block (primary outcome) and the sensory and motor block duration (secondary outcome) were assessed using Wilcoxon test. Values were expressed as medians (1st-3rd quartile). Results: Except for two delayed sciatic blocks in each group, the onset time otherwise was 35 min (20-60) in Ropi versus 40 min (30-60) in Levo, P = 0.5. Sensory block lasted longer in Levo, 17 h (14-27) compared with 15 h (10-17) in Ropi, P = 0.04. No significant between-group difference was found with motor block durations, 15 h (12-18) in Levo and 15 h (12-16) in Ropi, P = 0.3. Conclusion: No difference of onset times was found in ultrasound-guided sciatic block whether using Levo or Ropi. Levo induced a longer-lasting sensory block. PMID:25558190

  14. Selective ultrasound guided pectoral nerve targeting in breast augmentation: How to spare the brachial plexus cords?

    PubMed

    Desroches, Jean; Grabs, Ursula; Grabs, Detlev

    2013-01-01

    Subpectoral breast augmentation surgery under regional anesthesia requires the selective neural blockade of the medial and lateral pectoral nerves to diminish postoperative pain syndromes. The purpose of this cadaver study is to demonstrate a reliable ultrasound guided approach to selectively target the pectoral nerves and their branches while sparing the brachial plexus cords. After evaluating the position and appearance of the pectoral nerves in 25 cadavers (50 sides), a portable ultrasound machine was used to guide the injection of 10 ml of 0.2% aqueous methylene blue solution in the pectoral region on both sides of three Thiel's embalmed cadavers using a single entry point-triple injection technique. This technique uses a medial to lateral approach with the entry point just medial to the pectoral minor muscle and three subsequent infiltrations: (1) deep lateral part of the pectoralis minor muscle, (2) between the pectoralis minor and major muscles, and (3) between the pectoralis major muscle and its posterior fascia under ultrasound visualization. Dissection demonstrates that the medial and lateral pectoral nerves were well stained while leaving the brachial plexus cords unstained. We show that 10 ml of an injected solution is sufficient to stain all the medial and lateral pectoral nerve branches without a proximal extension to the cords of the brachial plexus. PMID:22730005

  15. The Incidence of Lumbar Discectomy after Epidural Steroid Injections or Selective Nerve Root Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Mroz, Thomas; Lieberman, Isador

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the use of Central Epidural Steroid Injections (ESI) and Selective Nerve Root Blocks (SNRB) along with the crossover rate to lumbar discectomy in patients with a lumbar disc herniation using retrospective records database search. Butterman et al found a crossover rate for patients with symptomatic disc herniations treated with ESI of 54% (27/50), while Riew similarly found a 53% (29/55) crossover patients receiving SNRB. Methods The database was searched in a sequential Boolean style for patients with the diagnosis of a lumbar disc herniation (Displaced Lumbar Disc - 722.1) and a SNRB (64483) or ESI (62311) who subsequently underwent a Lumbar Discectomy (63030) over a three year time period from January 2004 through December 2006. Statistical analysis was preformed examining the impact of injection type, age, location, gender, and year. Results Of 482,893 patients with the diagnosis of a disc herniation, 27,799(5.76%) underwent a lumbar discectomy. The 29,941 patients who received at least one SNRB for a disc herniation, 10.80% later underwent a lumbar discectomy. The 41,420 patients who received at least one ESI for a disc herniation 9.34% later underwent a lumbar discectomy. There was a noted increase in injection procedures, particularly SNRB during the study with a greater than 50% increase. Conclusions Our examination found a much smaller, but similar crossover rate to surgery between both injection methods, which argues against one method being more effective than another in avoiding surgery. It is likely that patients are receiving these procedures more frequently during the course of conservative treatment for a disc herniation. Level of Evidence This was a Level III study. PMID:26056627

  16. Editorial Commentary: Big Data Suggest That Because of a Significant Increased Risk of Postoperative Infection, Steroid Injection Is Not Recommended After Ankle Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-02-01

    A recent study addressing infection rate after intra-articular steroid injection during ankle arthroscopy gives pause to this practice, with an odds ratio of 2.2 in the entire population that was injected with a steroid simultaneously with ankle arthroscopy compared with patients who did not receive an ankle injection. Big data, used in the study upon which the Editor comments here, suggest that because of a significant increased risk of postoperative infection, steroid injection is not recommended after ankle arthroscopy. PMID:26814397

  17. Percutaneous injection of acrylic glue into renal allograft pseudoaneurysm for control of intractable post-biopsy hematuria.

    PubMed

    Lal, A; Singhal, M; Ramachandran, R; Rathi, M; Jha, V; Khandelwal, N

    2014-03-01

    We report a 44-year-old male, renal allograft recipient of 1-year duration who had two episodes of steroid responsive acute rejection. He presented with graft dysfunction for which a graft biopsy was performed and was suggestive of mixed rejection. At 2 weeks post-biopsy, patient developed severe pain over the graft site with anuria and graft hydronephrosis (HDN). The HDN and anuria intermittently settled with the passage of blood clots per-urethra. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography was suggestive of pseudoaneurysm in the graft kidney. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound guided percutaneous cyanoacrylate glue injection into the pseudoaneurysm. PMID:24701048

  18. Percutaneous injection of acrylic glue into renal allograft pseudoaneurysm for control of intractable post-biopsy hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Lal, A.; Singhal, M.; Ramachandran, R.; Rathi, M.; Jha, V.; Khandelwal, N.

    2014-01-01

    We report a 44-year-old male, renal allograft recipient of 1-year duration who had two episodes of steroid responsive acute rejection. He presented with graft dysfunction for which a graft biopsy was performed and was suggestive of mixed rejection. At 2 weeks post-biopsy, patient developed severe pain over the graft site with anuria and graft hydronephrosis (HDN). The HDN and anuria intermittently settled with the passage of blood clots per-urethra. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography was suggestive of pseudoaneurysm in the graft kidney. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound guided percutaneous cyanoacrylate glue injection into the pseudoaneurysm. PMID:24701048

  19. Fluoroscopy-guided Intra-articular Sacroiliac Joint Steroid Injection for Sacroiliitis in Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P Ua; Dewar, N A; Tulloch-Reid, D

    2014-01-01

    Sacroiliitis, a condition commonly seen in Ankylosing Spondylitis, is well known to be one of the main pain generators of low back pain, which may result in difficulty with walking. A 20-year old male with history of ankylosing spondylitis presented to the University Hospital of the West Indies, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation clinic, with a two-year history of right buttock, low back and groin pain. Radiographic evaluation revealed increased sclerosis and erosive changes in bilateral sacroiliac joints, right greater than left. Right intra-articular sacroiliac joint steroid injection was administered under fluoroscopy guidance. Post-injection visual analogue pain scale (VAS) score with activity improved from 8 to 1 and Oswestry Disability Index improved from 40% moderate disability to 16% minimal disability. The patient's overall assessment was 95% perceived improvement in pain. This case report illustrates the effectiveness of intra-articular sacroiliac joint steroid injection in treating sacroiliitis in ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25303203

  20. Multiple epidural steroid injections and body mass index linked with occurrence of epidural lipomatosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural lipomatosis (EL) is an increase of adipose tissue, normally occurring in the epidural space, sufficient to distort the thecal sac and compress neural elements. There is a lack of knowledge of risk factors, impact on patient’s symptoms, and its possible association with epidural steroid injections. Methods History, physical examination, patient chart, and MRI were analyzed from 856 outpatients referred for epidural steroid injections. Seventy patients with signs of EL on MRI comprised the study group. Thirty-four randomly selected patients comprised the control group. The severity of EL was determined by the MRI assessment. The impact of EL was determined by the patient’s history and physical examination. Logistic regression was used to correlate the probability of developing EL with BMI and epidural steroid injections. Results EL was centered at L5 and S1 segments. The average BMI for patients with EL was significantly greater than that of control group (36.0 ± 0.9 vs. 29.2 ± 0.9, p <0.01). The probability of developing EL with increasing BMI was linear up to the BMI of 35 after which it plateaued. Triglycerides were significantly higher for the EL group as compared to controls (250 ± 30 vs. 186 ± 21 mg/dL p < 0.01). The odds of having EL were 60% after two epidural steroid injections, 90% after three epidural steroid injections and approached 100% with further injections, independent of BMI. Other risk factors considered included alcohol abuse, use of protease inhibitors, levels of stress, hypothyroidism and genetic predisposition. However there were insufficient quantities to determine statistical significance with a degree of confidence. The impact of EL on patient’s symptoms correlated with EL severity with Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.73 at p < 0.01 significance level. Conclusions The BMI and triglycerides levels were found to be significantly elevated for the EL group, pointing to an increased risk of EL occurrence in progressively more obese US population. The data also revealed a strong correlation between the number of subsequent epidural steroid injections and EL occurrence calling for caution with the use of corticosteroids. PMID:25183952

  1. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous neuroplasty of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve for the treatment of meralgia paresthetica: a case report and description of a new ultrasound-guided technique.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Sean W

    2011-01-01

    The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) can be visualized with ultrasound imaging using a high frequency linear transducer. The entrapment of the LFCN, often near the lateral aspect of the inguinal ligament, is accepted as an etiology of meralgia paresthetica (MP). This case report describes an ultrasound-guided, percutaneous technique that utilizes injected fluid to facilitate blunt dissection (or hydrodissection) to perform an external neuroplasty of the LFCN. This procedure resulted in immediate, long-term relief of pain associated with severe, chronic MP. This procedure may potentially represent an alternate treatment for patients with contraindications or partial contraindications to surgical neurolysis, nerve transection (usually described as being performed under general anesthesia), or corticosteroid injection, or in patients not responding to conservative treatment measures. PMID:21623291

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy using a 6-F cystotome and 12-cm covered metal stent

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Koichiro; Uno, Koji; Okada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Azumi; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: An iincreasing number of reports describe endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy for malignant biliary obstruction in patients with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failure. However, this procedure has not yet been standardized; as a result, the rate of adverse events, including bile leakage and stent migration, is relatively high. Here, we report our experience with four cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy performed according to our institutional procedure. PMID:27004245

  3. Comparison of Radiation Exposure during Fluoroscopy-Guided Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injections at Different Vertebral Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yun Mi; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Lee, Sheen-Woo; Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Sang Hoon; Shin, Myung Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate and compare radiation exposure during transforaminal fluoroscopy-guided epidural steroid injection (TFESI) at different vertebral levels. Materials and Methods Fluoroscopy-guided TFESI was performed in 181 patients. The patients were categorized into three groups according to the injected lumbosacral nerve level of L2-4, L5, or S1. Fluoroscopy time (FT) and dose area product (DAP) were recorded for all patients; correlations between FT and DAP were determined at each level, and both FT and DAP were compared between the different vertebral levels. Results The numbers of patients who received ESI at L2-4, L5, and S1 were 29, 123, and 29. Mean FT was 44 seconds at L2-4, 33.5 seconds at L5, and 37.7 seconds at S1. Mean DAP was 138.6 µGy·m2 at L2-4, 100.6 µGy·m2 at L5, and 72.1 µGy·m2 at S1. FT and DAP were positively correlated in each group (p values < 0.001). FT was significantly shorter at L5 than that at L2-4 (p = 0.004) but was not significantly different between S1 and L2-4 or L5 (p values = 0.286 and 0.532, respectively). DAP was significantly smaller at L5 and S1 than that at L2-4, but L5 and S1 were not significantly different. After correcting for FT, DAP was significantly smaller at S1 than that at either L2-4 or L5 (p values = 0.001 and 0.010). Conclusion The radiation dose was small during a single procedure of ESI and showed differences between different lumbosacral spine levels. PMID:25741198

  4. Factors Affecting Radiation Exposure during Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection: A Prospective Study in 759 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Shin, Joon-Ho; Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Guen Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate and compare radiation exposure and intervention time during lumbar epidural steroid injection (ESI) 1) under different practitioners and methods with continuous fluoroscopic monitoring, and 2) under one practitioner with different methods and monitoring. Materials and Methods We consecutively recruited 804 patients who underwent lumbar ESI and 759 patients who underwent 922 interventions were included for analysis in this investigation. Three different practitioners (a senior faculty member, junior faculty member, trainee) performed lumbar ESI using different methods (caudal, interlaminar, transforaminal). The senior faculty member performed lumbar ESI under two different methods of fluoroscopic monitoring (continuous [CM] and intermittent monitoring [IM]). The dose area product (DAP) fluoroscopy time, and intervention time during lumbar ESI were compared for 1) ESI methods and practitioners under CM, and 2) ESI methods and monitoring. Results With CM, interaction between the effects of the practitioner and the intervention on DAP was significant (p < 0.001), but not fluoroscopy time (p = 0.672) or intervention time (p = 0.852). The significant main effects included the practitioner and intervention on DAP, fluoroscopy time, and intervention time with CM (p < 0.001). DAPs and fluoroscopy time for caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal ESI were higher with CM than with IM (p < 0.001). Intervention time did not differ between CM and IM. Conclusion Radiation exposure is dependent on the practitioners and methods and within the established safety limits during lumbar ESIs under CM. With an experienced practitioner, IM leads to less radiation exposure than CM. PMID:27134528

  5. Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting with Intractable Headache after Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsoo

    2015-01-01

    Postdural punctural headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia is due to intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, and it is occasionally accompanied by an intracranial hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, an intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) presenting with an intractable headache after a cervical epidural steroid injection (ESI) has not been reported. A 39-year-old woman without any history of trauma underwent a cervical ESI for a herniated nucleus pulposus at the C5-6 level. One month later, she presented with a severe headache that was not relieved by analgesic medication, which changed in character from being positional to non-positional during the preceding month. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a CSDH along the left convexity. Emergency burr-hole drainage was performed and the headache abated. This report indicates that an intracranial CSDH should be considered a possible complication after ESI. In addition, the event of an intractable and changing PDPH after ESI suggests further evaluation for diagnosis of an intracranial hematoma. PMID:26361532

  6. Ultrasound-guided implantation techniques in treatment of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.S.; Torp-Pedersen, S.T.; Holm, H.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Percutaneous ultrasound-guided interstitial radiotherapy is an attractive and elegant technique for the administration of high-dose local radiotherapy to the prostate. The complications of seed implantation are those associated with the radiation rather than with the technique of implantation. However, radiotherapy has not provided impressive local control of the disease or prolonged survival. The poor disease control was not attributed to poor seed placement, but rather to the inadequacy of {sup 125}I in controlling the cancer. The essence of nonsurgical treatment for prostate cancer is the use of effective imaging. Experience in the field of minimally invasive surgery has shown that ultrasound is the ideal imaging system for targeting treatments because of its ease of use and the absence of adverse effects. As the newer techniques of implantation come to be accepted, it is hoped that the complications of rectal and bladder radiation injury will decrease and the therapeutic benefits increase. The clinical trials required to define the precise role of each of the modalities of treatment must take nodal staging into account and must be compared with the gold standard of radical prostatectomy in the treatment of early confined disease.

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Ankle Blocks: A Review of Current Practices.

    PubMed

    Falyar, Christian R

    2015-10-01

    Ankle blocks are routinely indicated for surgical anesthesia and postoperative analgesia of procedures involving the foot. Traditionally, ankle blocks have been performed by relying on landmark identification of nerves. The literature regarding the performance and efficacy of ankle blocks is inconsistent. This can be attributed to several variables, such as provider technique, differences in patient populations, and the type and volume of local anesthetics administered. As with other peripheral nerve blocks originally performed using landmark technique, ultrasound imaging is now being incorporated into these procedures. Ultrasound guidance provides the anesthetist with several advantages over landmark techniques. The ability to identify peripheral nerves, view needle movements in real-time, and observe the spread of local anesthetic has been shown to result in greater block efficacy, even with reduced volumes of local anesthetic. Additionally, ultrasound imaging gives the provider the option to perform regional anesthesia in specific patient populations not considered possible when using landmark technique. Despite the limited literature on ultrasound-guided ankle blocks, outcome metrics seem to be consistent with those of other peripheral nerve blocks performed using this technology. PMID:26638458

  8. Epidural steroid injections compared with gabapentin for lumbosacral radicular pain: multicenter randomized double blind comparative efficacy study

    PubMed Central

    Hanling, Steven; Bicket, Mark C; White, Ronald L; Veizi, Elias; Kurihara, Connie; Zhao, Zirong; Hayek, Salim; Guthmiller, Kevin B; Griffith, Scott R; Gordin, Vitaly; White, Mirinda Anderson; Vorobeychik, Yakov; Pasquina, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether an epidural steroid injection or gabapentin is a better treatment for lumbosacral radiculopathy. Design A multicenter randomized study conducted between 2011 and 2014. Computer generated randomization was stratified by site. Patients and evaluating physicians were blinded to treatment outcomes. Settings Eight military, Veterans Administration, and civilian hospitals. Participants 145 people with lumbosacral radicular pain secondary to herniated disc or spinal stenosis for less than four years in duration and in whom leg pain is as severe or more severe than back pain. Interventions Participants received either epidural steroid injection plus placebo pills or sham injection plus gabapentin. Main outcome measures Average leg pain one and three months after the injection on a 0-10 numerical rating scale. A positive outcome was defined as a ≥2 point decrease in leg pain coupled with a positive global perceived effect. All patients had one month follow-up visits; patients whose condition improved remained blinded for their three month visit. Results There were no significant differences for the primary outcome measure at one month (mean pain score 3.3 (SD 2.6) and mean change from baseline −2.2 (SD 2.4) in epidural steroid injection group versus 3.7 (SD 2.6) and −1.7 (SD 2.6) in gabapentin group; adjusted difference 0.4, 95% confidence interval −0.3 to 1.2; P=0.25) and three months (mean pain score 3.4 (SD 2.7) and mean change from baseline −2.0 (SD 2.6) versus 3.7 (SD 2.8) and −1.6 (SD 2.7), respectively; adjusted difference 0.3, −0.5 to 1.2; P=0.43). Among secondary outcomes, one month after treatment those who received epidural steroid injection had greater reductions in worst leg pain (−3.0, SD 2.8) than those treated with gabapentin (−2.0, SD 2.9; P=0.04) and were more likely to experience a positive successful outcome (66% v 46%; number needed to treat=5.0, 95% confidence interval 2.8 to 27.0; P=0.02). At three months, there were no significant differences between treatments. Conclusions Although epidural steroid injection might provide greater benefit than gabapentin for some outcome measures, the differences are modest and are transient for most people. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01495923. PMID:25883095

  9. Quinolone Prophylaxis in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy: An Eight-Year Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Bing-Juin; Pu, Yeong Shiau; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Liu, Shih-Ping; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Chiang, I-Ni; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of prophylaxis with pipemidic acid and levofloxacin in transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUSP-Bx). From January 2002 to December 2004, patients receiving oral pipemidic acid 500 mg twice daily for three days with or without a preoperative intravenous cefazolin 1 gm injection comprised group A. Between January 2005 and December 2009, patients receiving oral levofloxacin 500 mg one hour before biopsy comprised group B. We calculated the annual febrile urinary tract infection (fUTI) rates. Patients' characteristics, including age, prophylactic antibiotics, biopsy core numbers, pathologic results, PSA, and the spectrums and susceptibility of pathogens, were also evaluated. A total of 1313 (35.5%) patients belonged to group A, while 2381 (64.5%) patients belonged to group B. Seventy-three patients experienced postoperative infectious complications. There was a significant difference in the fUTI rate between groups A and B (3.7% versus 1.0%, P < 0.001). The yearly fUTI rates varied from 0.6 to 3.9% between 2002 and 2009. Of the 73 patients with fUTI, those receiving levofloxacin prophylaxis were more likely to harbor fluoroquinolone-resistant pathogens (P < 0.001). E. coli was the most common pathogen in both groups. Levofloxacin remains effective and appears superior to pipemidic acid based prophylaxis. PMID:24453852

  10. Ultrasound-guided axillary plexus block in a child with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Englbrecht, J S; Langer, M; Hahnenkamp, K; Ellger, B

    2010-11-01

    We report the use of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block in a child with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa needing surgical treatment of the right hand. The regional anaesthesia was used in association with sedation/ anaesthesia. This technique is suitable for these difficult patients because it can minimise the risk of new bullae formation due to palpation of landmarks or unintentional intra- or subcutaneous injections. Initial anaesthesia/sedation was provided with sevoflurane until intravenous access was obtained, following which intravenous propofol infusion with ketamine boluses without any invasive airway management was continued for performance of the block and the procedure. This management plan provided good surgical conditions, early postoperative analgesia, minimised stress for the patient and avoided the need to manipulate the airway with instruments and the associated risk of mucosal bullae. The classification and breadth of clinical manifestation of epidermolysis bullosa is complex and briefly summarised. The anaesthetist should clarify the details of a particular patient's form of epidermolysis bullosa, especially in terms of mucosal involvement, as this may greatly influence planning for a procedure. PMID:21226445

  11. White light-informed optical properties improve ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography of photoactive protoporphyrin IX

    PubMed Central

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Subsurface fluorescence imaging is desirable for medical applications, including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX)-based skin tumor diagnosis, surgical guidance, and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy. While tissue optical properties and heterogeneities make true subsurface fluorescence mapping an ill-posed problem, ultrasound-guided fluorescence-tomography (USFT) provides regional fluorescence mapping. Here USFT is implemented with spectroscopic decoupling of fluorescence signals (auto-fluorescence, PpIX, photoproducts), and white light spectroscopy-determined bulk optical properties. Segmented US images provide a priori spatial information for fluorescence reconstruction using region-based, diffuse FT. The method was tested in simulations, tissue homogeneous and inclusion phantoms, and an injected-inclusion animal model. Reconstructed fluorescence yield was linear with PpIX concentration, including the lowest concentration used, 0.025  μg/ml. White light spectroscopy informed optical properties, which improved fluorescence reconstruction accuracy compared to the use of fixed, literature-based optical properties, reduced reconstruction error and reconstructed fluorescence standard deviation by factors of 8.9 and 2.0, respectively. Recovered contrast-to-background error was 25% and 74% for inclusion phantoms without and with a 2-mm skin-like layer, respectively. Preliminary mouse-model imaging demonstrated system feasibility for subsurface fluorescence measurement in vivo. These data suggest that this implementation of USFT is capable of regional PpIX mapping in human skin tumors during photodynamic therapy, to be used in dosimetric evaluations. PMID:23584445

  12. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Hydrodissection of a Symptomatic Sural Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Fader, Ryan R; Mitchell, Justin J; Chadayammuri, Vivek P; Hill, John; Wolcott, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic neuromas of the sural nerve are a rare but significant cause of pain and debilitation in athletes. Presentation is usually in the form of chronic pain and dysesthesias or paresthesias of the lateral foot and ankle. Treatment traditionally ranges from conservative measures, such as removing all external compressive forces, to administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin B6, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, or topical anesthetics. This article reports a case of sural nerve entrapment in a 34-year-old male triathlete with a history of recurrent training-induced right-sided gastrocnemius strains. The patient presented with numbness in the right lateral foot and ankle that had persisted for 3 months, after he was treated unsuccessfully with extensive nonoperative measures, including anti-inflammatory drugs, activity modification, and a dedicated physical therapy program of stretching and strengthening. Orthopedic assessment showed worsening pain with forced passive dorsiflexion and manual pressure applied over the distal aspect of the gastrocnemius. Plain radiographs showed normal findings, but in-office ultrasound imaging showed evidence of sural nerve entrapment with edema and neuromatous scar formation in the absence of gastrocnemius or soleus pathology. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided hydrodissection of the sural nerve at the area of symptomatic neuroma and neural edema was performed the same day. The patient had complete relief of symptoms and full return to the preinjury level of participation in competitive sports. This case report shows that hydrodissection, when performed by an experienced physician, can be an effective, minimally invasive technique for neurolysis in the setting of sural nerve entrapment, resulting in improvement in clinical symptoms. PMID:26558670

  13. Unnecessary multiple epidural steroid injections delay surgery for massive lumbar disc: Case discussion and review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injections (ESI) in the lumbar spine are not effective over the long-term for resolving “surgical” lesions. Here, we present a patient with a massive L2–L3 lumbar disk herniation whose surgery was delayed for 4 months by multiple unnecessary ESI, resulting in a cauda equina syndrome. Methods: A 54-year-old male acutely developed increased low back and radiating left leg pain in October of 2014. In December of 2014, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed a massive central/left sided disk herniation at the L2–L3 level resulting in marked thecal sac and left L2 foraminal and L3 lateral recess root compression. Despite the marked degree of neural compression, pain management treated him with 3 ESI over the next 3 months. Results: At the end of April of 2015, he presented to spine surgeon with a cauda equina syndrome. When the new MRI scan confirmed the previously documented massive central-left sided L2–L3 disk herniation, the patient emergently underwent an L1–L3 laminectomy with central-left sided L2–L3 lateral/foraminal diskectomy. Postoperatively, the patient was neurologically intact. Conclusions: Pain specialists performed multiple unnecessary lumbar ESI critically delaying spinal surgery for 4 months in this patient with a massive lumbar disk herniation who ultimately developed a cauda equina syndrome. Unfortunately, pain specialists (e.g., radiologists, anesthesiologists, and physiatrists), not specifically trained to perform neurological examinations or spinal surgery, are increasingly mismanaging spinal disease with ESI/variants. It is time for spine surgeons to speak out against this, and “take back” the care of patients with spinal surgical disease. PMID:26425398

  14. Effect of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy: multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Tore K; Romner, Bertil; Wilsgaard, Tom; Twisk, Jos; Anke, Audny; Nygaard, Øystein; Hasvold, Toralf; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy in the short (6 weeks), intermediate (12 weeks), and long term (52 weeks). Design Multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial. Setting Outpatient multidisciplinary back clinics of five Norwegian hospitals. Participants Between October 2005 and February 2009, 461 patients assessed for inclusion (presenting with lumbar radiculopathy >12 weeks). 328 patients excluded for cauda equina syndrome, severe paresis, severe pain, previous spinal injection or surgery, deformity, pregnancy, ongoing breast feeding, warfarin therapy, ongoing treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, body mass index >30, poorly controlled psychiatric conditions with possible secondary gain, and severe comorbidity. Interventions Subcutaneous sham injections of 2 mL 0.9% saline, caudal epidural injections of 30 mL 0.9% saline, and caudal epidural injections of 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide in 29 mL 0.9% saline. Participants received two injections with a two week interval. Main outcome measures Primary: Oswestry disability index scores. Secondary: European quality of life measure, visual analogue scale scores for low back pain and for leg pain. Results Power calculations required the inclusion of 41 patients per group. We did not allocate 17 of 133 eligible patients because their symptoms improved before randomisation. All groups improved after the interventions, but we found no statistical or clinical differences between the groups over time. For the sham group (n=40), estimated change in the Oswestry disability index from the adjusted baseline value was −4.7 (95% confidence intervals −0.6 to −8.8) at 6 weeks, −11.4 (−6.3 to −14.5) at 12 weeks, and −14.3 (−10.0 to −18.7) at 52 weeks. For the epidural saline intervention group (n=39) compared with the sham group, differences in primary outcome were −0.5 (−6.3 to 5.4) at 6 weeks, 1.4 (−4.5 to 7.2) at 12 weeks, and −1.9 (−8.0 to 4.3) at 52 weeks; for the epidural steroid group (n=37), corresponding differences were −2.9 (−8.7 to 3.0), 4.0 (−1.9 to 9.9), and 1.9 (−4.2 to 8.0). Analysis adjusted for duration of leg pain, back pain, and sick leave did not change this trend. Conclusions Caudal epidural steroid or saline injections are not recommended for chronic lumbar radiculopathy. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN No 12574253. PMID:21914755

  15. Comparative Study of: Non-Invasive Conservative Treatments with Local Steroid Injection in the Management of Planter Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Iraqi, Aftab Ahmed; Narula, Kusum; Katyal, Rashmi; Saxena, Mridul Shanker

    2014-01-01

    Background: Planter Fasciitis is an annoying and painful condition that limits function. There is pain and tenderness in the sole of the foot, mostly under the heel, with standing or walking and is considered a self limiting condition. Symptoms resolve in 80% to 90% of cases within ten months. However, this long interval is frustrating for both patients and clinicians. Aim: This study was undertaken to compare the two different modalities of non operative treatment: Non- invasive conservative methods: NSAID’s, Soft Insoles, Stretching, Ultrasound therapy and Contrast baths versus local Steroid injection therapy. Materials and Methods: Patients by random sampling were divided in two groups. Group A as: Conservative group and Group B as Local Steroid Injections group, 100 patients in each. Patients were assessed as per Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at the start of treatment and then after 4 wk and 8 wk duration on follow up. Statistical analysis used: SPSS for Windows (version 10.0) by the Chi-Square test. Results: The difference in the distribution of subjects belonging to either of the treatment modalities regarding the treatment outcome at four and eight week was found to be statistically insignificant. Conclusion: As both treatment modalities are at par on comparison of their treatment outcome it is better to go for conservative approach because this can save the patients from the complications of steroid therapy. PMID:25386470

  16. Intrathecal opioid versus ultrasound guided fascia iliaca plane block for analgesia after primary hip arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomised, blinded, noninferiority controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hip replacement surgery is increasingly common due to an ageing population, and rising levels of obesity. The provision of excellent pain relief with minimal side effects is important in order to facilitate patient mobilisation and rehabilitation. Spinal opioids provide excellent analgesia but are associated with adverse effects. The fascia-iliaca block is an alternative technique which provides analgesia to the nerves innervating the hip. The success of fascia iliaca blocks has been demonstrated to be superior when using ultrasound compared to landmark techniques. However, the clinical benefit of this improvement has yet to be investigated. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block with spinal morphine for hip replacement surgery. Methods/Design This study is a randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled, noninferiority trial. Patients scheduled to undergo unilateral primary hip arthroplasty will receive a study information sheet and consent will be obtained in keeping with the Declaration of Helsinki. Patients will be randomised to receive either; (i) Ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block using levobupivacaine, plus spinal anaesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine containing no morphine, or (ii) sham ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block performed with sterile saline, and spinal anaesthesia containing hyperbaric bupivacaine and 0.1 mg of spinal morphine. A total of 108 patients will be recruited. Primary outcome is post-operative morphine consumption in a 24 hour period. Secondary outcomes include; pain scores at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours, episodes of respiratory depression, hypotension, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, sedation, time to first mobilisation and patient satisfaction. Conclusions There are no studies to date comparing ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block with spinal morphine for pain control after hip arthroplasty. If the ultrasound guided fascia iliaca block provides pain relief which is not inferior to spinal morphine, then morphine could be removed from the spinal injection. This could reduce side effects and improve patient safety. Trial registration This study has been approved by the West of Scotland Research Ethics Committee 4 (reference no. 10/S0704/43) and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (reference no. NCT01217294). PMID:21338492

  17. Diagnostic Yield of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background: New transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) technologies have been developed, but their clinical effectiveness and determinants of diagnostic yield have not been quantified. Prospective data are needed to determine risk-adjusted diagnostic yield. Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing TBNA of mediastinal lymph nodes in the American College of Chest Physicians Quality Improvement Registry, Evaluation, and Education (AQuIRE) multicenter database and recorded clinical, procedural, and provider information. All clinical decisions, including type of TBNA used (conventional vs endobronchial ultrasound-guided), were made by the attending bronchoscopist. The primary outcome was obtaining a specific diagnosis. Results: We enrolled 891 patients at six hospitals. Most procedures (95%) were performed with ultrasound guidance. A specific diagnosis was made in 447 cases. Unadjusted diagnostic yields were 37% to 54% for different hospitals, with significant between-hospital heterogeneity (P = .0001). Diagnostic yield was associated with annual hospital TBNA volume (OR, 1.003; 95% CI, 1.000-1.006; P = .037), smoking (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.02-2.34; P = .042), biopsy of more than two sites (OR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.38-0.85; P = .015), lymph node size (reference > 1-2 cm, ≤ 1 cm: OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.34-0.77; P = .003; > 2-3 cm: OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.61-3.85; P < .001; and > 3 cm: OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 2.17-6.00; P < .001), and positive PET scan (OR, 3.12; 95% CI, 1.39-7.01; P = .018). Biopsy was performed on more and smaller nodes at high-volume hospitals (P < .0001). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first bronchoscopy study of risk-adjusted diagnostic yields on a hospital-level basis. High-volume hospitals were associated with high diagnostic yields. This study also demonstrates the value of procedural registries as a quality improvement tool. A larger number and variety of participating hospitals is needed to verify these results and to further investigate other determinants of diagnostic yield. PMID:21659432

  18. [Role of ultrasound guided puncture in the management of ovarian cysts].

    PubMed

    Mathevet, P; Dargent, D

    2001-11-01

    Ultrasound guided aspiration of ovarian cysts should be performed in well defined indications and under precise and strict modalities. Preoperative evaluation should include vaginal sonography and serum levels of CA125 and CA 19/9. Ultrasound guided aspiration is allowed only in cases of sonographically benign cyst: unilateral unilocular homogenous anechogenic cyst less than 7 cm, and serum levels of CA125 and CA 19/9 less than 35 Ul/ml. The technique of ultrasound guided aspiration is similar to the one used for oocytes recovery in in vitro fertilization treatments. It is mandatory to perform a macroscopic, cytologic and biologic (with concentrations of estradiol, CA125 and CA 19/9) evaluation of cyst fluid. Patients should be told that in case of abnormalities of cyst fluid, a laparoscopy has to be performed immediately or as soon as possible, and that there is a risk of recurrence of the ovarian lesion. PMID:11917376

  19. Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection for Lumbosacral Radiculopathy: Preganglionic versus Conventional Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Choi, Ja-Young; Yeom, Jin-Sup; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Sang-Ki; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Kim, Choonghyo; Kwack, Kyu Sung; Kwon, Jong Won; Moon, Sung Gyu; Jun, Woo Sun

    2006-01-01

    Objective The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) with using a preganglionic approach for treating lumbar radiculopathy when the nerve root compression was located at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. Materials and Methods The medical records of the patients who received conventional TFESI at our department from June 2003 to May 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. TFESI was performed in a total of 13 cases at the level of the exiting nerve root, in which the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (the conventional TFESI group). Since June 2004, we have performed TFESI with using a preganglionic approach at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc (for example, at the neural foramen of L4-5 for the L5 nerve root) if the nerve root compression was at the level of the supra-adjacent intervertebral disc. Using the inclusion criteria described above, 20 of these patients were also consecutively enrolled in our study (the preganglionic TFESI group). The treatment outcome was assessed using a 5-point patient satisfaction scale and by using a VAS (visual assessment scale). A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction scale score of 3 (very good) or 4 (excellent), and a reduction on the VAS score of > 50% two weeks after performing TFESI. Logistic regression analysis was also performed. Results Of the 13 patients in the conventional TFESI group, nine showed satisfactory improvement two weeks after TFESI (69.2%). However, in the preganglionic TFESI group, 18 of the 20 patients (90%) showed satisfactory improvement. The difference between the two approaches in terms of TFESI effectiveness was of borderline significance (p = 0.056; odds ratio: 10.483). Conclusion We conclude that preganglionic TFESI has the better therapeutic effect on radiculopathy caused by nerve root compression at the level of the supra-adjacent disc than does conventional TFESI, and the diffence between the two treatments had borderline statistical significance. PMID:16799275

  20. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah; Given, Mark F.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrade puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.

  1. Intracellular aggregation of multimodal silica nanoparticles for ultrasound-guided stem cell implantation.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Khademi, Christine; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2013-03-20

    The promises of cardiac stem cell therapy have yet to be fully realized, in part because of poor survival and engraftment efficacy of implanted cells. Cells die after implantation owing to ischemia, inflammation, immune response, as well as mis-injection or implantation into fibrotic tissue. Imaging tools can help implant cells in areas of the heart most receptive to stem cell therapy and monitor the efficacy of treatment by reporting the viability, location, and number of implanted stem cells. We describe a multimodal, silica-based nanoparticle that can be used for cell sorting (fluorescence), real-time guided cell implantation ultrasound, and high-resolution, long-term monitoring by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The nanoparticle agent increased the ultrasound and MRI contrast of labeled human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) 700 and 200% versus unlabeled cells, respectively, and allowed cell imaging in animal models for 13 days after implantation. The agent had no significant impact on hMSC cell metabolic activity, proliferation, or pluripotency, and it increased the production of many paracrine factors implicated in cardiac repair. Electron microscopy and ultrasound imaging suggest that the mechanism of action is in vivo aggregation of the 300-nm silica nanoparticles into larger silica frameworks that amplify the ultrasound backscatter. The detection limit in cardiac tissue was 250,000 hMSCs via MRI and 70,000 via ultrasound. This ultrasound-guided cell delivery and multimodal optical/ultrasound/MRI intracardiac cell-tracking platform could improve cell therapy in the clinic by minimizing misdelivery or implantation into fibrotic tissue. PMID:23515077

  2. Intracellular Aggregation of Multimodal Silica Nanoparticles for Ultrasound-Guided Stem Cell Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Khademi, Christine; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-01-01

    The promises of cardiac stem cell therapy have yet to be fully realized, in part because of poor survival and engraftment efficacy of implanted cells. Cells die after implantation owing to ischemia, inflammation, immune response, as well as mis-injection or implantation into fibrotic tissue. Imaging tools can help implant cells in areas of the heart most receptive to stem cell therapy and monitor the efficacy of treatment by reporting the viability, location, and number of implanted stem cells. We describe a multimodal, silica-based nanoparticle that can be used for cell sorting (fluorescence), real-time guided cell implantation ultrasound, and high-resolution, long-term monitoring by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The nanoparticle agent increased the ultrasound and MRI contrast of labeled human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) 700 and 200% versus unlabeled cells, respectively, and allowed cell imaging in animal models for 13 days after implantation. The agent had no significant impact on hMSC cell metabolic activity, proliferation, or pluripotency, and it increased the production of many paracrine factors implicated in cardiac repair. Electron microscopy and ultrasound imaging suggest that the mechanism of action is in vivo aggregation of the 300-nm silica nanoparticles into larger silica frameworks that amplify the ultrasound backscatter. The detection limit in cardiac tissue was 250,000 hMSCs via MRI and 70,000 via ultrasound. This ultrasound-guided cell delivery and multimodal optical/ultrasound/MRI intra-cardiac cell-tracking platform could improve cell therapy in the clinic by minimizing misdelivery or implantation into fibrotic tissue. PMID:23515077

  3. Respiratory failure with hilar mass: Role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in the medical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Chichra, Astha; Lama, Kimmoi Wong; Koenig, Seth J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old man on chronic steroid therapy, who developed a rapidly progressive right upper lobe infiltrate/mass that extended into the right hilum. Respiratory failure necessitated endotracheal intubation. Broad spectrum antibiotics were initiated without clinical improvement and because of his immunosuppressive therapy opportunistic pathogens were considered. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) was performed in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) with rapid onsite evaluation. Specimens obtained from the right hilar mass revealed organisms suspicious for cryptococcal infection, subsequently confirmed via a culture. No complications occurred during the EBUS procedure despite the patient requiring vasopressor support and 100% inspired oxygen. Little data exists regarding the use of EBUS in patients admitted to the MICU with respiratory failure of unknown etiology and mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy. This case illustrates the potential safe use of EBUS-TBNA in patients presenting with respiratory failure, with a mediastinal or hilar mass and suspected infectious etiology. PMID:25814808

  4. PLUS: open-source toolkit for ultrasound-guided intervention systems.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Andras; Heffter, Tamas; Rankin, Adam; Pinter, Csaba; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-10-01

    A variety of advanced image analysis methods have been under the development for ultrasound-guided interventions. Unfortunately, the transition from an image analysis algorithm to clinical feasibility trials as part of an intervention system requires integration of many components, such as imaging and tracking devices, data processing algorithms, and visualization software. The objective of our paper is to provide a freely available open-source software platform-PLUS: Public software Library for Ultrasound-to facilitate rapid prototyping of ultrasound-guided intervention systems for translational clinical research. PLUS provides a variety of methods for interventional tool pose and ultrasound image acquisition from a wide range of tracking and imaging devices, spatial and temporal calibration, volume reconstruction, simulated image generation, and recording and live streaming of the acquired data. This paper introduces PLUS, explains its functionality and architecture, and presents typical uses and performance in ultrasound-guided intervention systems. PLUS fulfills the essential requirements for the development of ultrasound-guided intervention systems and it aspires to become a widely used translational research prototyping platform. PLUS is freely available as open source software under BSD license and can be downloaded from http://www.plustoolkit.org. PMID:24833412

  5. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are…

  6. PLUS: open-source toolkit for ultrasound-guided intervention systems

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, Andras; Heffter, Tamas; Rankin, Adam; Pinter, Csaba; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A variety of advanced image analysis methods have been under development for ultrasound-guided interventions. Unfortunately, the transition from an image analysis algorithm to clinical feasibility trials as part of an intervention system requires integration of many components, such as imaging and tracking devices, data processing algorithms, and visualization software. The objective of our work is to provide a freely available open-source software platform – PLUS: Public software Library for Ultrasound – to facilitate rapid prototyping of ultrasound-guided intervention systems for translational clinical research. PLUS provides a variety of methods for interventional tool pose and ultrasound image acquisition from a wide range of tracking and imaging devices, spatial and temporal calibration, volume reconstruction, simulated image generation, and recording and live streaming of the acquired data. This paper introduces PLUS, explains its functionality and architecture, and presents typical uses and performance in ultrasound-guided intervention systems. PLUS fulfills the essential requirements for the development of ultrasound-guided intervention systems and it aspires to become a widely used translational research prototyping platform. PLUS is freely available as open source under BSD license, the code and documentation are available at http://www.plustoolkit.org. PMID:24833412

  7. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, rika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are

  8. Effectiveness of splinting and splinting plus local steroid injection in severe carpal tunnel syndrome: A Randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khosrawi, Saeid; Emadi, Masoud; Mahmoodian, Amir Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Study aimed to compare the effectiveness of two commonly used conservative treatments, splinting and local steroid injection in improving clinical and nerve conduction findings of the patients with severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and Methods: In this randomized control clinical trial, the patients with severe CTS selected and randomized in two interventional groups. Group A was prescribed to use full time neutral wrist splint and group B was injected with 40 mg Depo-Medrol and prescribed to use the full time neutral wrist splint for 12 weeks. Clinical and nerve conduction findings of the patients was evaluated at baseline, 4 and 12 weeks after interventions. Results: Twenty-two and 21 patients were allocated in group A and B, respectively. Mean of clinical symptoms and functional status scores, nerve conduction variables and patients’ satisfaction score were not significant between group at baseline and 4 and 12 weeks after intervention. Within the group comparison, there was significant improvement in the patients’ satisfaction, clinical and nerve conduction items between the baseline level and 4 weeks after intervention and between the baseline and 12 weeks after intervention (P < 0.01). The difference was significant for functional status score between 4 and 12 weeks after intervention in group B (P = 0.02). Conclusion: considering some findings regarding the superior effect of splinting plus local steroid injection on functional status scale and median nerve distal motor latency, it seems that using combination therapy could be more effective for long-term period specially in the field of functional improvement of CTS. PMID:26962518

  9. Unilateral Ultrasound-Guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block After Nephrectomy; Postoperative Pain and Use of Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Azawi, Nessn H.; Mosholt, Karina Sif Sondergaard; Fode, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain has a wide spectrum of effects on the body and inadequately controlled postoperative pain may have harmful physiologic and psychological consequences and increase morbidity. In addition, opioid anesthetic agents in high doses can blunt endocrine and metabolic responses following surgery and are associated with side effects including dizziness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and respiratory depression. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate if unilateral ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plane block (TAP-block) could reduce pain and postoperative use of patient requested analgesics following nephrectomy compared to local injection of the same ropivacaine dose in the surgical wound. Patients and Methods Retrospective chart reviews were performed in 42 consecutive patients who received TAP-block in conjunction with nephrectomy from November 2013 to August 2014 (group A). For comparison, data were used from 40 other nephrectomy patients registered as part of a previous study (group B). In this group the patients had received local ropivacaine injection in the surgical wound. On univariate analyses, the groups were compared by t-test and the Fisher exact test. Multivariate analyses were conducted by multiple linear regression. Results Mean surgical time was 162 minutes in group A and 92 minutes in group B (P < 0.0001). The means of visual analogue scale (VAS) were 3.05 and 1.55 in A and B groups, respectively (P = 0.001). The means of morphine consumption were 5.2 mg and 5.9 mg in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.58); while the means of sufentanil use were 9.8 μg and 6.0 μg in groups A and B, respectively (P = 0.06). When controlling for age, tumor size and American society of anesthesiologists classification (ASA) score on multivariate analysis, TAP-block was associated with a significant increase in VAS (+1.4 [95% CI, 0.6 - 2.3], P = 0.001) and sufentanil use (+6.2 μg [95% CI, 2.3 - 10.2], P = 0.003). There was no difference in morphine use on multivariate analysis (P = 0.99). Conclusions TAP-block in conjunction with laparoscopic nephrectomy did not reduce pain or opioid consumption. On the contrary, it seemed to prolong surgical time.

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: A case study and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Armellini, Elia; Crin, Stefano F; Ballar, Marco; Pallio, Socrate; Occhipinti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Here we offer a review of the literature regarding endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours and describe the case of a cystic tumour completely ablated after a multisession procedure. A total of 35 PubMed indexed cases of treated functioning and non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours resulted from our search, 29 of which are well-documented and summarised. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation appears as a local, minimally invasive treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, suitable for selected patients. This technique appears feasible, relatively safe and efficient, especially when applied to symptom relief in functioning tumours, aiming at loss of endocrine secretion. For non-functioning tumours, where the goal is complete tissue ablation, eus guided ethanol ablation can provide good results for patients who are unfit for surgery or for those who refuse surgical resection. Its role in fit for surgery patients requires assessment through further studies. PMID:26862370

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Neonatal Pyometrocolpos Under Local Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Algin, Oktay; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Kilic, Nizamettin

    2011-02-15

    Hydrometrocolpos is an uncommon congenital disorder with cystic dilatation of the vagina and uterus that occurs as a result of accumulated secretions from the reproductive tract due to distal genital tract obstruction. Secondary infection may also occur, resulting in pyometrocolpos, a potentially lethal disease. Immediate drainage of the cystic mass in patients determined to have pyometrocolpos is required to prevent or treat uropathy and septicemia until definitive corrective surgery can be performed. We report an unusual cause of obstructive uropathy in three infants: pyometrocolpos due to lower genital tract atresia. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of the pyometrocolpos resulted in dramatically improved clinical and laboratory findings in these patients. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage under local anesthesia is a simple, minimally invasive, safe, and effective procedure that facilitates later successful corrective surgery and avoids the need for more complex drainage procedures.

  12. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block--evidence based medicine and future trends].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Komatsu, Toru

    2008-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block has been gaining popularity in the community of anesthesiologists. Despite its well-known clinical benefits, inconsistent success in block has been one of the major limita- tions of conventional peripheral nerve block. Recent development in ultrasound technology enables us to see nerves, needles and surrounding structures in real-time. We expect that ultrasound imaging may overcome the shortcoming of conventional technique. In this article, we introduce some evidences that support the clinical benefits of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block, including performance time, quality, onset and duration of sensory blockade, cost analysis and patient satisfaction. However, ultrasound-guidance may be even more dangerous without appropriate imaging of target nerve and surrounding structures, accurate localization of needle tip and assessment of local anesthetic spread around the target nerve. These problems will be solved by future guidelines, teaching program and further advancement in ultrasound technology. PMID:18516880

  13. Intrapulmonary schwannoma diagnosed with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Shinkai, Masaharu; Shinoda, Masahiro; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for further examination of a lung tumor. CT of the chest revealed a round, well-defined 2.4-cm nodule in S2, adjacent to right superior lobe bronchus. Endobronchial ultrasonography showed a well-defined, hypoechoic tumor with echogenic capsule and posterior acoustic enhancement. Diagnosis of schwannoma was confirmed from the specimen obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. She underwent tumorectomy due to the possibility of obstructive pneumonia. Pathology diagnosis from the surgical specimen was also schwannoma. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration and findings with endobronchial ultrasonography might be helpful in the diagnosis of intrapulmonary schwannoma. PMID:24907227

  14. Clinical Trial of Subcutaneous Steroid Injection in Patients with Migraine Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhah, Karim; Ghandehari, Kavian; Jouybari, Ali Ghabeli; Mirzaei, Mohammad Mousavi; Ghandehari, Kosar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurologic literature on therapeutic effect of subcutaneous corticosteroids in patients with migrainous chronic daily headache is scarce. The aim of this research is to assess the therapeutic effects of this management in such patients. Methods: Consecutive patients with migrainous chronic daily headache enrolled a prospective before-after therapeutic study during 2010-2013. Methylprednisolone 40 mg was divided into four subcutaneous injection doses. Two injections were administered in the right and left suboccipital area (exactly at retromastoid cervicocranial junction) and the other two injections in the lower medial frontal area (exactly at medial right and left eyebrows). A daily headache diary was filled out by the patients before and one month after the intervention. The severity of pain was classified based on a pain intensity instrument using numeric rating scale from 0-10 point scale. Paired t-test and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: 504 patients (378 females, 126 males) with migrainous chronic daily headache were enrolled in the study. Dramatic, significant, moderate, mild, or no improvements respectively constituted 28.6%, 33.3%, 23.8%, and 14.3% of the post treatment courses. Therapeutic effect of intervention on mean pain scores was significant; t=7.38, df=20, P=0.000. Two cases developed subcutaneous fat atrophy in frontal injection site and three cases experienced syncope during injection. Conclusion: Subcutaneous corticosteroids could be used as an adjunct therapy in patients with migrainous chronic daily headache. PMID:26722139

  15. Role of ultrasound-guided percutaneous antegrade pyelography in malignant obstructive uropathy: A Nigerian experience

    PubMed Central

    Balogun, Babajide Olawale; Owolabi, James Idowu; Saliu, Abdulwaid Niran; Bankole, Michael Akintayo

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrostomy of the renal pelvis is a technique that is widely acceptable especially when contrast media is introduced in the procedure of antegrade pyelography. It is a relatively safe procedure that effectively improves renal function in obstructed kidneys. It can be performed in most cases as an alternative to retrograde pyelography. We present our experience and its role in obstructive uropathy due to malignancy. PMID:26229234

  16. Enterococcus faecalis Septicemia and Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Virji, Ayaz; Minces, Lucio R.; Abbass, Zargham

    2015-01-01

    Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUS) has rarely been associated with disseminated infection, yet the occurrence appears to be increasing. Resistance to fluoroquinolones, the most commonly used prophylaxis, is one of the likely causes, with Escherichia coli being the most commonly reported cause of these infections. Herein we present what is, to our knowledge, the first case of Enterococcus faecalis septicemia and vertebral osteomyelitis after TRUS. Previously reported cases of this condition are referenced also. PMID:26682075

  17. Sudden appearance of free fluid during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Rimba?, Mihai; Deaconu, Marian; Croitoru, Alexandru; Haidar, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    During endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of a pancreatic malignancy, a small quantity of free fluid, not seen before, suddenly appeared in the view, and time was spent ruling out ongoing hemorrhage. However, during follow-up, the patient gradually developed peritoneal signs and was referred for surgery. The images presented elucidate the diagnosis and raise the question of a theoretical change in diagnostic and therapeutic approach. PMID:26879168

  18. Development of a Mobile Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Nerve Block and Catheter Service

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Christina L.; Torrillo, Toni M.; Anderson, Michael R.; Morrison, R. Sean; Todd, Knox H.; Rosenblatt, Meg A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound guidance is associated with improved efficiency and success of peripheral nerve blockade and a decreased incidence of vascular puncture, making these interventions safer. Patients with peripheral nerve blocks report decreased pain and increased satisfaction scores. We present the development of a mobile ultrasound-guided block service that allows for the safe and efficient placement of nerve blocks and perineural catheters at the nontraditional location of the patient’s bedside and in the emergency department. PMID:21795490

  19. Bedside ultrasound-guided percutaneous cystostomy in an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Yiu Shiobhon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Khoo, Jennifer Lai San

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of an infant born at 39 weeks of gestation who was in the neonatal intensive care unit for postoperative management of congenital heart disease and underwent bedside ultrasound-guided percutaneous cystostomy to treat an iatrogenic urethral injury. The procedure was uneventful, successful, and no complications were noted. This case demonstrates that this procedure is safe and minimally invasive. Indications, contraindications, techniques, potential complications, and the safety of performing this procedure in a bedside setting are discussed. PMID:25754366

  20. Value of artisanal simulators to train veterinary students in performing invasive ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Hage, Maria Cristina F N S; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-03-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are recommended for this practice. The present study aimed to create a model that can be made "at home" at low cost for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis training and to gather feedback about this model through questionnaires given to the participants. Eighteen professionals and thirty-six students were introduced to the simulator in pairs. After the simulation training session, participants filled out the questionnaire. Participants considered the model strong in the following areas: visualization of the pericardium, the heart, fluid in the pericardium, and fluid decrease during fictitious pericardiocentesis and its realism. They considered the model weak or moderate in the following areas: visualization of the surrounding tissues, difficulty of pericardial puncture, and visualization of the catheter. The professionals classified the realism of the experimental heart as moderate, whereas the undergraduate students classified it as strong. All participants believed that the experimental model could be useful in preparing for a future real situation. This model fulfills the need for a practical, realistic, and cost-effective model for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis training. PMID:26873896

  1. Usefulness of Ultrasound-Guided Lower Extremity Nerve Blockade in Surgery for Patellar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Kang, Chan; Yeon, Kyu-Ung; Kang, Dong-Hun; Park, Il-Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound-guided nerve blockade in patellar fracture surgery. Materials and Methods Twenty-three patients who underwent metal fixation under ultrasound-guided lower extremity blockade after diagnosis of patellar fracture from July 2011 to June 2012 were enrolled in this study. Under ultrasound guidance, femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, obturator nerve, and sciatic nerve blockades were performed. For evaluation of anesthesia, interference with overall surgery, such as intraoperative knee pain and tourniquet pain, was checked. Individual anesthetic complications, satisfaction with nerve blocks, and choice of future anesthesia method were investigated. Results Nineteen patients underwent surgery without any pain and 4 patients with mild pain. Satisfaction was excellent in 17 patients, good in 5, and unsatisfactory in 1. No complications such as infection or nerve injury occurred. In terms of selection of future anesthesia, 22 patients chose a nerve blockade of the lower extremity under ultrasound guidance, and one chose general anesthesia. Conclusions Overall, ultrasound-guided nerve block of the lower extremity for patellar fracture surgery showed satisfactory results. Therefore, it could be a useful method to prevent complications associated with general or spinal anesthesia. PMID:26060610

  2. [A New Teaching Model for Practicing Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia Techniques].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Maiko; Inomata, Shinichi; Fujikura, Ai; Ogawa, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    We developed a simulator using "slime" composed of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and borax to evaluate this new ultrasound-guided nerve block training model. Seventeen subjects used the training model in the present study. They had no previous experience in performing ultrasound-guided nerve block. A plastic case measuring 25 x 18 x 12 cm was filled with 8 cm of slime. Three pieces of gauze were placed between the slime layers at 2 cm intervals. An in-plane approach was used to visualize the needle for the nerve block, and the amount of time required to stop the needle on the second gauze was measured 5 times for each subject. Significant differences were observed between the times for the first experiment and those for the third experiment to the fifth experiment In the fourth and fifth experiments, all subjects visualized the nerve block needle clearly above the target layer and were able to stop the needle at the target layer. The present simulation using our proposed ultrasound-guided nerve block training model was useful in terms of the amount of time required to perform the procedure and as well as in terms of its safety. PMID:26437564

  3. Hand-assisted laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of liver tumors: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Machi, Junji; Oishi, Andrew J; Mossing, Allan J; Furumoto, Nancy L; Oishi, Robert H

    2002-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation has been performed for liver tumors by percutaneous, laparoscopic, or open surgical approaches. Each approach has specific advantages and disadvantages. Herein we describe a new technique for hand-assisted laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency thermal ablation of liver tumors. A hand-access device is placed at the right or central portion of the abdomen, in addition to standard trocars. A conventional intraoperative ultrasound probe, with an ultrasound guidance system attached, is inserted into the peritoneal cavity together with the surgeon's hand. After pneumoperitoneum is established, an electrode-cannula for thermal ablation is introduced subcostally or intercostally, and advanced into a liver tumor under direct guidance by intraoperative ultrasound. We have used this technique in eight patients with unresectable liver tumors. Precise guidance of the cannula into tumors was possible. All tumors were well ablated. The postoperative recovery of patients was of shorter duration compared with that of an open surgical approach. A hand-assisted laparoscopic ultrasound-guided method has advantages of both laparoscopic and open surgical approaches for radiofrequency thermal ablation treatment of liver tumors. Accurate cannula insertion is possible with the ultrasound guidance system. The hand-assisted laparoscopic approach can become an additional useful technique, particularly as a valuable alternative to an open surgical method, for performing radiofrequency thermal ablation. PMID:12080255

  4. Ultrasound-guided technology versus neurostimulation for sciatic nerver block: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiuhong; Zhao, Xiang; Xu, Jin; Liu, Zhengmei; Li, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sciatic nerve block is widely used for anesthesia and analgesia in lower limb surgery, traditional method used for sciatic nerve block is nerve stimulation guidance. Whether the use of ultrasound-guided technology can increases the success rate of sciatic nerve block and provide other benefits are not defined. This meta-analysis was aimed to clarify this issue. Method: We searched Pubmed, the Cochrane library and Google Scholar. A total of 10 RCTs met our inclusion criteria. The patients included underwent ultrasound-guided or nerve stimulation guidance for sciatic nerve block. We compared the success rate, vascular puncture, the time of procedure and Success rate of catheter placement. Results: Ultrasound-guided technology, compared with nerve stimulation for sciatic nerve block, provided higher success rate. [RR = 1.22 95% CI: 1.04-1.42, P = 0.01], Ultrasound guidance also reduce the risk of vascular puncture. [RR = 0.13 95% CI: 0.02-0.97, P = 0.05]. However, the success rate of catheter placement [RR = 1.1095% CI: 0.93-1.29, P = 0.27] and the time of performing sciatica never block [RR = -0.17 95% CI: -1.61-1.27, P = 0.82] did not differ significantly. Conclusions: Compared to traditional nerve stimulation guidance, ultrasound guidance for sciatic nerve may improve the success rate of block and reduce the risk of vascular puncture. PMID:25784997

  5. Inhaled Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications > Long-Term Control Medications > Inhaled Steroids Inhaled Steroids What are some common inhaled steroids? How are ... more about steroids? What are some common inhaled steroids? Common inhaled steroids include: Asmanex ® (mometasone) Alvesco ® (ciclesonide) ...

  6. Correlation between Rotator Cuff Tears and Repeated Subacromial Steroid Injections: A Case-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, M; Singh, B; Nicolaou, N; Ravikumar, KJ

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Concern exists regarding potential damage to the rotator cuff from repeated corticosteroid injections into the subacromial space. PATIENTS AND METHODS In this retrospective, case-controlled study, 230 consecutive patients presenting to three orthopaedic units with subacromial impingement and investigated as an end-point with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder were divided into groups having received less than three or three or more subacromial injections of corticosteroids. RESULTS With no significant difference in age and sex distribution, analysis by MRI showed no significant difference between the two groups in the incidence of rotator cuff tear (P < 1.0). CONCLUSIONS This suggests that corticosteroid use in patients with subacromial impingement should not be considered a causative factor in rotator cuff tears. PMID:19409148

  7. Sentinel lymph node biopsy revisited: ultrasound-guided photoacoustic detection of micrometastases using molecularly targeted plasmonic nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Geoffrey P.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2014-01-01

    Metastases rather than primary tumors are responsible for killing most cancer patients. Cancer cells often invade regional lymph nodes (LN) before colonizing other parts of the body. However, due to the low sensitivity and specificity of current imaging methods to detect localized nodal spread, an invasive surgical procedure - sentinel lymph node biopsy - is generally employed to identify metastatic cancer cells. Here we introduce a new approach for more sensitive in vivo detection of lymph node micrometastases, based on the use of ultrasound-guided spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging of molecularly-activated plasmonic nanosensors (MAPS). Using a metastatic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma, we showed that MAPS targeted to the EGFR shifted their optical absorption spectrum to the red-near-infrared region after specific interactions with nodal metastatic cells, enabling their non-invasive detection by sPA. Notably, LN metastases as small as 50 μm were detected at centimeter-depth range with high sensitivity and specificity. Large sPA signals appeared in metastatic LN within 30 minutes of MAPS injection, in support of the clinical utility of this method. Our findings offer a rapid and effective tool to non-invasively identify micrometastases as an alternate to sentinal node biopsy analysis. PMID:25106426

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Diagnosis and Treatment of Morton's Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Ata, Ayse Merve; Onat, Sule Sahin; Ozcakar, Levent

    2016-02-01

    Morton's neuroma is the fibrous enlargement of the interdigital nerve branches, usually in the second and third interspace between the metatarsal heads where the lateral and medial plantar nerves often join. Specific symptoms are dull or sharp pain, numbness and/or tingling in the third and fourth digits, burning sensation, cramping, and a feeling of "walking on a stone" around the metatarsal heads. Numerous clinical tests for Morton's neuroma have been described, such as thumb index finger squeeze, and Mulder's click and foot squeeze tests. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging can be used for confirmation, especially for differential diagnosis, exact localization, and number of neuromas. Further, performing dynamic imaging during the aforementioned tests is paramount and can readily be carried out with ultrasound. The treatment mainly comprises footwear modifications, radiofrequency ablation, physical therapy, local (corticosteroid and anesthetic) injections into the affected webspace, and surgery. Again the use of real-time ultrasound guidance during such interventions is noteworthy. PMID:26815264

  9. Epidural injections with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hai; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Yang, Yong; Li, Dong; Li, Jinjun; Su, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural injections of anesthetic with or without steroids are widely used for treating lumbar spinal stenosis, a common cause of chronic low back pain, but there is a lack of rigorous data comparing the effectiveness of epidural injections of anesthetic with and without steroids. This meta-analysis presents a current, comprehensive picture of how epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids compare with those using local anesthetic alone. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception through February 5, 2015. Weight mean difference, risk ratio, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A random effects model or fixed effects model was used to pool the estimates, according to the heterogeneity between the included studies. Results We included 13 randomized controlled trials, involving 1,465 patients. Significant pain relief (≥50%) was demonstrated in 53.7% of patients administered with epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids (group 1) and in 56.4% of those administered with local anesthetic alone (group 2). Patients showed a reduction in numeric rating scale pain score of 3.7 and 3.6 in the two groups, respectively. Significant functional improvement was achieved in 65.2% of patients in group 1 and 63.1% of patients in group 2, with Oswestry Disability Index reductions of 13.8 and 14.5 points, respectively. The overall number of injections per year was 3.2±1.3 and 3.4±1.2 with average total relief per year of 29.3±19.7 and 33.8±19.3 weeks, respectively. The opioid intakes decreased from baseline by 12.4 and 7.8 mg, respectively. Among the outcomes listed, only total relief time differed significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Both epidural injections with steroids or with local anesthetic alone provide significant pain relief and functional improvement in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis, and the inclusion of steroids confers no advantage compared to local anesthetic alone. PMID:26316704

  10. Anesthesia Experience for Open Gastrostomy With Ultrasound-Guided Unilateral Subcostal Transversus Abdominis Plane Block in a High Risk Elderly Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ae Ryoung; Choe, Yun Suk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many papers have reported that TAP block provides effective postoperative analgesia, but the sole use of TAP block for surgical anesthesia has been rarely reported. Case Presentation: Therefore, we presented an 80-year-old male undergoing ultrasound-guided unilateral subcostal TAP block providing surgical anesthesia for open gastrostomy. Left subcostal TAP block was performed using the method described by Hebbard with the M-Turbo ultrasound system and a linear probe placing immediately inferior and parallel to the costal margin. Using a 100 -mm long, 23 G short-bevel needle in-plane technique, 20 mL of 0.25% levobupivacaine was injected on the TAP. A sensory block from T7 to T11 was established and the satisfaction score was 7 - 8. Conclusions: Open gastrostomy was successfully performed under subcostal TAP block with small dose fentanyl supplementation. The subcostal TAP block is considered a useful anesthetic choice in surgery for high risk patients. PMID:26478861

  11. Should routine MRI of the lumbar spine be required prior to lumbar epidural steroid injection for sciatica pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: We describe three patients who received lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESI) for lumbosacral radicular pain that resulted in worsening of their symptoms. The procedures were performed following a review of remote diagnostic imaging studies. These cases demonstrate the lack of consensus in pain management domains for how to approach the workup and treatment of persistent/chronic low back pain, with a noted fragmentation in pain management strategies and applied therapies. Case Description: We present three patients; two female patients (37 and 38 years old) undergoing LESI for remotely diagnosed disc herniations, and one 61-year-old male receiving an LESI for a presumed, unverified lumbar intervertebral disc disorder. Following a worsening of symptoms after LESI, neurosurgical consultations ultimately determined the presence of, respectively, an epidural hematoma, a neurilemoma, and a lung cancer metastasis to the sacrum as the source of symptoms, instead of being due to the intervertebral disc pathology. Conclusions: We would like to emphasize several principles in the diagnosis and use of imaging of the lumbosacral region prior to undertaking invasive neuraxial procedures. PMID:25883840

  12. Intrarectal Lidocaine-Diltiazem-Meperidine Gel for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: TRUS-guided needle biopsy of the prostate gland is the current standard method used for diagnosis of prostate cancer. Pain control during this procedure is through the use of i.v. sedation or local anaesthetic (LA), depending on clinician preference. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intrarectal lidocaine, lidocaine-diltiazem and lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel for anesthetizing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blind clinical trial, 100 consecutive patients were divided into three groups. The patients received one of the gels before transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy: group A, intrarectal and perianal lidocaine, gel 1 g; group B, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + perianal diltiazem, 1 g; group C, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + meperidine, 25 mg, and perianal diltiazem, 1 g. Visual analog pain scale was used to estimate pain during probe insertion and biopsy. Heart rate and blood pressure during probe insertion and biopsy were recorded too. Results: The mean of visual analog pain scale was 4.5 in group A, 3.5 in group B, and 2.0 in group C during probe insertion (P value = 0.01). The mean of visual analog pain scale was 5.1 in group A, 3.5 group B, and 2.5 in group C during biopsy (P value = 0.001). The groups were comparable for patients' age, weight, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate size (P > 0.05). No side effects of meperidine and lidocaine including drowsiness, dizziness, tinnitus and light-headedness or requiring assistance for activity were noted. Conclusions: Lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel provides significantly better pain control than lidocaine-diltiazem gel and lidocaine gel alone during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy and probe insertion. This mixture gel is safe, easy to administer and well accepted by patients. PMID:26161317

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded study. Forty-four patients with CTS were randomized into intervention or control groups. Patients in the intervention group were treated with PRF and night splint, and the control group was prescribed night splint alone. Primary outcome was the onset time of significant pain relief assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), and secondary outcomes included evaluation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) results, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. All outcome measurements were performed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty-six patients completed the study. The onset time of pain relief in the intervention group was significantly shorter (median onset time of 2 days vs. 14 days; hazard ratio = 7.37; 95% CI, 3.04–17.87) compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Significant improvement in VAS and BCTQ scores (p < 0.05) was detected in the intervention group at all follow-up periods compared to the controls (except for the severity subscale of BCTQ at week 1). Ultrasound-guided PRF treatment resulted in a lower VAS score and stronger finger pinch compared to the control group over the entire study. Conclusions Our study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF serves as a better approach for pain relief in patients with CTS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02217293 PMID:26067628

  14. Effectiveness of single-session ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple breast cysts

    PubMed Central

    Özgen, Ali

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of single-session ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple breast cysts. METHODS From January 2002 to January 2014, 35 simple breast cysts (mean volume, 8.2 mL; range, 4–33 mL) in 28 females (mean age, 39 years) were evaluated. In a single session, all cysts were aspirated using 20G needles, refilled with 99% ethanol (90% of the volume of the aspirated fluid), and reaspirated completely after 10 minutes of exposure under ultrasound guidance. Follow-up ultrasonography examinations were performed at one week, one month, three months, and six months for all patients and 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months for available patients. Follow-up duration varied between 6 and 24 months (mean, 15 months). RESULTS The technical success rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy was 97%. The needle tip was dislocated and ethanol was given into the breast parenchyma in one patient (3%). One cyst (3%) was reaspirated at the first week follow-up due to intracystic hemorrhage. Of the 34 cysts treated, 25 (74%) completely responded to therapy and were no longer detectable on follow-up examinations. Eight cysts (24%) significantly decreased in size and then completely disappeared at six months. At the end of the follow-up period, the clinical success rate reached 100%, and none of the cysts were visible. Except mild to moderate sensation of burning or pain which disappeared or subsided significantly in a couple of minutes, no other complications were observed in patients. CONCLUSION Ultrasound-guided ethanol sclerotherapy is a fast, safe, and highly effective method in the treatment of simple breast cysts. PMID:27087190

  15. Resolution of pancreatico-pleural fistula with endoscopic ultrasound-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Houlihan, M.D.; Bowyer, B.A.; Barclay, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatico-pleural fistula is an uncommon cause of recurrent pleural effusion. Delayed diagnosis may occur if fluid amylase level is not obtained early in the clinical course. As most cases of pancreatico-pleural effusion are due to chronic pancreatitis, endoscopic therapy may be effective if pancreatic fluid secretion can be diverted to a more physiologic pathway. However, when severe pancreatitis leads to disconnection of the pancreatic duct, it precludes conventional endoscopic treatment via transpapillary stenting of the pancreatic duct. We describe a patient with a chronic, refractory pancreatico-pleural fistula arising from chronic pancreatitis with a disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome, which resolved following endoscopic ultrasound-guided therapy. PMID:26029626

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Serratus Anterior Plane Block in Breast Reconstruction Surgery.

    PubMed

    Khemka, Rakhi; Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Ahmed, Rosina; Datta, Taniya; Agarwal, Sanjit

    2016-05-01

    Pecs block and its variations have been used for various breast surgeries. We describe 2 cases of mastectomy and breast reconstruction by latissimus dorsi (LD) flap where regional analgesia was provided by a combination of ultrasound-guided Pecs-I block and serratus anterior plane block, a recently described technique in which local anesthetic is deposited in the plane between the LD and serratus anterior muscle. This resulted in excellent intraoperative and postoperative analgesia and a minimum of systemic analgesics. The described technique is safe to administer and provides good analgesia for breast reconstruction surgery by LD flap. PMID:26934607

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Pain Interventions - A Review of Techniques for Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Soneji, Neilesh

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound has emerged to become a commonly used modality in the performance of chronic pain interventions. It allows direct visualization of tissue structure while allowing real time guidance of needle placement and medication administration. Ultrasound is a relatively affordable imaging tool and does not subject the practitioner or patient to radiation exposure. This review focuses on the anatomy and sonoanatomy of peripheral non-axial structures commonly involved in chronic pain conditions including the stellate ganglion, suprascapular, ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves. Additionally, the review discusses ultrasound guided intervention techniques applicable to these structures. PMID:23614071

  18. Ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy for benign non-thyroid cystic mass in the neck

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Surgical excision has traditionally been the treatment of choice for benign non-thyroid cystic neck masses, including lymphatic malformation, ranula, branchial cleft cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst, and parathyroid cyst. However, there is a tendency toward recurrence after surgery, and surgery may be accompanied by complications, including nerve injuries, vascular injuries, and scar formation. Ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy using various agents has been challenged and successfully applied as an alternative treatment for benign non-thyroid cystic neck masses. This report reviews the available sclerosing agents and describes the applications of sclerotherapy to the treatment of benign cystic masses in the neck. PMID:24936500

  19. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Sampling in Gastroenterology: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Technical Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, C.

    2013-01-01

    At present, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines on endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling are almost complete and express state of the art developments. However, future developments are anticipated. This editorial focuses on a few recently published papers with some additional information and on two important additional techniques, elastography and contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), which are mentioned, but not explained in detail in the current ESGE guidelines. Elastography and CEUS might be of importance in the near future to improve the biopsy techniques. PMID:24949378

  20. Ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block catheter experience in 2 neonates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mark E; Haynes, Brittany

    2015-09-01

    The study objective is to describe our experience with placement and management of thoracic paravertebral block catheters in 2 neonates. The design is retrospective chart review of 2 consecutive newborns undergoing repair of tracheoesophageal fistula. Ultrasound-guided oblique intercostal approach for catheter placement and infusions of dilute ropivicaine for 4-5 days. The measurements are postoperative narcotics and sedatives administered. The main results are neither infant required continuous infusions of sedatives or narcotics. Thoracic paravertebral block catheter infusions for neonatal thoracotomy and chest tube placement may eliminate the need for continuous narcotic infusions and may avoid the need for narcotic and benzodiazepine taper or weaning. PMID:26164309

  1. Follicular steroid hormones as markers of oocyte quality and oocyte development potential

    PubMed Central

    Carpintero, Nayara Lpez; Surez, Onica Armijo; Mangas, Carmen Cuadrado; Varea, Carolina Gonzlez; Rioja, Rubn Gmez

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Various components of follicular fluid are suggested as biochemical predictors of oocyte quality. Previous studies of follicular steroid hormone levels have shown disparate results when related with fertilization outcomes. AIM: The objective of the study was to relate the levels of steroid hormones of each individual follicle with oocyte maturation, fertilization results, embryo quality, and pregnancy rates. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Prospective cohort study in a university hospital. METHODS: In 31 patients, who underwent intracytoplasmic sperm injection, it was performed an ultrasound guided aspiration of follicular fluid of the first two mature follicles from each ovary. Follicular levels of estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Generalized estimating equation model. RESULTS: In follicular fluids with mature oocyte presence, in normal as well as in failed fertilization, there was a positive correlation between follicular testosterone and progesterone (r = 0.794, P = 0.0001 and r = 0.829, P = 0.0001). Progesterone levels were higher in cases of normal fertilization compared to failed fertilization (P = 0.003). B quality embryos came from oocytes immersed in follicular fluids with higher estradiol values and higher estradiol/progesterone and estradiol/testosterone ratios than those of C quality (P = 0.01; P = 0.0009; P = 0.001). Estradiol levels were higher in patients who achieved pregnancy (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: The analysis of follicular hormone composition could be considered as an additional tool in oocyte selection. PMID:25395744

  2. Steroid Treatments Equally Effective Against Sudden Deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters June 6, 2011 Steroid Treatments Equally Effective Against Sudden Deafness Injecting steroids into the middle ear ... stories In this Edition Steroid Treatments Equally Effective Against Sudden Deafness Trial Restores Movement to Paralyzed Man’s ...

  3. Cognitive Task Analysis for Instruction in Single-Injection Ultrasound Guided-Regional Anesthesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gucev, Gligor V.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) is methodology for eliciting knowledge from subject matter experts. CTA has been used to capture the cognitive processes, decision-making, and judgments that underlie expert behaviors. A review of the literature revealed that CTA has not yet been used to capture the knowledge required to perform ultrasound guided…

  4. Ultrasound-guided atlanto-occipital puncture for cerebrospinal fluid analysis on the standing horse.

    PubMed

    Depecker, M; Bizon-Mercier, C; Couroucé-Malblanc, A

    2014-01-11

    The atlanto-occipital site (AO) is convenient for retrieving an adequate volume and quality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the diagnosis of neurological disease in horses. However, general anaesthesia is not always possible for horses displaying severe neurological signs, or for economical reasons. The objectives of the present work were to determine the feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided CSF puncture at the AO site on the standing horse. Seven horses (six healthy and one mildly ataxic) were sedated with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg bodyweight intravenously or 0.04 mg/kg bodyweight intramuscularly) and detomidine (0.01 mg/kg bodyweight intravenously), and placed in stocks or in a recovery stall with the head kept on a headstand. Puncture was performed by ultrasonographic guidance with a parasagittal technique, as previously described, using a 20 g, 3.5 inch spinal needle. In all horses, no adverse reaction was observed when crossing the dura mater and 20 ml of CSF was rapidly retrieved without any blood contamination. Ultrasound-guided CSF puncture can be performed easily at the AO site on a healthy standing horse. Regarding the potential risk of this procedure, safety measures and close observation are essential. Further studies on a larger amount of ataxic horses are also required before considering this technique as an alternative option for CSF puncture. PMID:24225443

  5. Efficacy of Ablation Therapy for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism by Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Thermoablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfeng; Qian, Linxue; Zu, Yuan; Wei, Ying; Hu, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the value of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave thermoablation to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). One hundred and thirty-eight parathyroid glands from 56 patients with SHPT were ablated in this study. All the parathyroid glands were evaluated by real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound before, during and after ablation. Changes in serum parathyroid hormone (sPTH) levels were measured before treatment and at 1 h, 1 wk, 1 mo and 6 mo after thermoablation treatment. All 56 cases had a 1-mo follow-up, and 34 cases had a 6-mo follow-up. The sPTH level of the 54 cases 1 mo after ablation was significantly lower than that before (p < 0.05). In the 34 cases that had a 6-mo follow-up, the sPTH levels were also significantly lower at 6 mo after ablation than before (p < 0.05). Bone pain in patients improved post-operatively (p < 0.05), but itchiness and insomnia did not improve (p > 0.05). Ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave thermoablation is a feasible and effective non-surgical alternative treatment for SHPT patients. PMID:26944529

  6. Feasibility of eye-tracking technology to quantify expertise in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, T Kyle; Kim, T Edward; Kou, Alex; Shum, Cynthia; Mariano, Edward R; Howard, Steven K

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) requires an advanced procedural skill set that incorporates both sonographic knowledge of relevant anatomy as well as technical proficiency in needle manipulation in order to achieve a successful outcome. Understanding how to differentiate a novice from an expert in UGRA using a quantifiable tool may be useful for comparing educational interventions that could improve the rate at which one develops expertise. Exploring the gaze pattern of individuals performing a task has been used to evaluate expertise in many different disciplines, including medicine. However, the use of eye-tracking technology has not been previously applied to UGRA. The purpose of this preliminary study is to establish the feasibility of applying such technology as a measurement tool for comparing procedural expertise in UGRA. eye-tracking data were collected from one expert and one novice utilizing Tobii Glasses 2 while performing a simulated ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block in a gel phantom model. Area of interest fixations were recorded and heat maps of gaze fixations were created. Results suggest a potential application of eye-tracking technology in the assessment of UGRA learning and performance. PMID:26980475

  7. Ultrasound-guided Continuous Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Using a Nerve Stimulating Catheter: EpiStim® Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Kyoung; Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Se Hee; Yeo, Gwi Eun

    2015-01-01

    Brachial plexus block (BPB) under ultrasound guidance has come to be widely used. However, nerve injury has been reported following ultrasound-guided BPB. We hypothesized that BPB under ultrasound guidance in conjunction with real-time electrical nerve stimulation would help us prevent nerve injury and do more successful procedure. Here, we report the successful induction and maintenance of ultrasound-guided BPB and the achievement of good peri- and postoperative pain control using a conductive catheter, the EpiStim®. PMID:26495085

  8. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia in a pediatric patient with acute intermittent porphyria: literature review and case report.

    PubMed

    Olutunmbi, Yetunde; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Galvez, Jorge A; Simpao, Allan F

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia techniques placed under general anesthesia have not been reported in pediatric patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). A 9-year-old male with AIP presented for right inguinal herniorraphy. Family history included one relative's death after anesthesia. Preoperative preparation included reviewing medications safe for AIP patients, minimizing known AIP triggers (fasting, stress) and ensuring access to rescue medications. Intraoperative management included a propofol induction with the patient's mother present in the operating room. We performed an ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block under general anesthesia. The surgery proceeded without complications and the patient did not demonstrate signs of an AIP crisis. PMID:25137868

  9. Effect of Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection: Analysis According to the Neck Pain Patterns and MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Won; Lim, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Won Il; Lee, Eun Kyung; Chang, Choo Hoon; Yang, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely accepted that cervical interlaminar steroid injection (CIESI) is more effective in treating radicular pain than axial neck pain, but without direct comparison. And the differences of effect after CIESI according to MRI findings are inconsistent. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the therapeutic response of CIESI according to pain sites, durations, MRI findings, and other predictive factors altogether, unlike previous studies, which evaluated them separately. Methods The medical records of 128 patients who received fluoroscopy guided CIESI were analyzed. We evaluated the therapeutic response (more than a 50% reduction on the visual analog scale [VAS] by their second visit) after CIESI by (1) pain site; neck pain without radicular pain/radicular pain with or without neck pain, (2) pain duration; acute/chronic (more than 6 month), and (3) findings of MRI; herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD)/spinal stenosis, respectively and altogether. Results Eighty-eight patients (68%) responded to CIESI, and there were no significant differences in demographic data, initial VAS score, or laboratory findings. And there were no significant differences in the response rate relating to pain site, pain duration, or MRI findings, respectively. In additional analysis, acute radicular pain with HIVD patients showed significantly better response than chronic neck pain with spinal stenosis (P = 0.04). Conclusions We cannot find any sole predictive factor of therapeutic response to the CIESI. But the patients having acute radicular pain with HIVD showed the best response, and those having other chronic neck pain showed the worst response to CIESI. PMID:27103964

  10. No difference in pain reduction after epidural steroid injections in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Francis; Namdari, Bahram; Dupler, Suzanne; Kovac, Mario Farias; Makarova, Natalya; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Diabetes affects peripheral and central neurons causing paresthesia, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and spontaneous pain. However, the effect of diabetes on response to epidural steroid injection (ESI) remains unknown. We hypothesized that diabetic patients receiving ESI will have different pain scores compared to nondiabetic patients. We tested a secondary hypothesis that pain reduction differs at different levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) for patients with diabetes. Material and Methods: Data from 284 consecutive patients given ESIs for radiculopathy were obtained via a manual review of electronic medical records. We initially compared diabetic and nondiabetic groups with respect to balance on baseline demographic and morphometric characteristics. Next, a linear regression model was developed to evaluate the association between existing diabetes and postinjection reduction in pain scores. And finally, we univariably characterized the association between HbA1c and pain reduction. Results: After exclusion of nine patients, 275 patients were analysed, including 55 (20%) who were diabetic. Pain reduction after ESI was comparable in diabetic and nondiabetic patients (Wald test P = 0.61). The degree of pain reduction generally decreased with the level of HbA1c until reaching HbA1c levels of approximately 7.5%, after which point it stayed fairly constant. Conclusion: There was no difference in pain reduction after ESIs comparing diabetic with nondiabetic patients; however, for diabetic patients, pain reduction may decrease with uncontrolled diabetes determined by high HbA1c values, thus suggesting pain physicians to take an active role in guiding their patients to have their blood glucose levels better regulated to improve outcomes of their ESIs. PMID:27006548

  11. Ultrasonographic percutaneous anatomy of the atlanto-occipital region and indirect ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture in the dog and the cat.

    PubMed

    Etienne, A-L; Audigié, F; Peeters, D; Gabriel, A; Busoni, V

    2015-04-01

    Cisternal puncture in dogs and cats is commonly carried out. This article describes the percutaneous ultrasound anatomy of the cisternal region in the dog and the cat and an indirect technique for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. Ultrasound images obtained ex vivo and in vivo were compared with anatomic sections and used to identify the landmarks for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. The ultrasound-guided procedure was established in cadavers and then applied in vivo in seven dogs and two cats. The anatomic landmarks for the ultrasound-guided puncture are the cisterna magna, the spinal cord, the two occipital condyles on transverse images, the external occipital crest and the dorsal arch of the first cervical vertebra on longitudinal images. Using these ultrasound anatomic landmarks, an indirect ultrasound-guided technique for cisternal puncture is applicable in the dog and the cat. PMID:24712312

  12. Lack of Sex Difference in Minimum Local Analgesic Concentration of Ropivacaine for Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Qingqing; Yang, Yanqing; Liu, Qin; Peng, Zhiyou; Feng, Zhiying

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex differences, which may be an important variable for determining anesthetic requirements, have not been well investigated in the aspect of local anesthetic. This investigation aimed to compare the minimum local analgesic concentration (MLAC) of ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCB) between men and women. Material/Method Patients aged 18–45 years undergoing elective forearm, wrist, or hand surgeries under US-SCB were divided into 2 groups according to sex. The initial concentration was 0.375% ropivacaine 20 mL and the concentration for the next patient was determined by the up-down technique at 0.025% intervals. Success was defined as the absence of any pain in response to a pinprick in the region of all 4 terminal nerves and the skin incision within 45 min. The primary outcome was the MLAC of ropivacaine, which was estimated by the Dixon and Massey method. The analgesia duration, which was defined as the time from the end of the US-SCB injection to the time of feeling discomfort and need for additional analgesics, was observed for each patient. Results The MLAC of ropivacaine 20 mL for US-SCB was 0.2675% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2512–0.2838%) in men and 0.2675% (95% CI, 0.2524–0.2826%) in women. There was no significant difference in MLAC or the analgesia duration between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions We found no significant sex-related differences in MLAC or analgesia duration of ropivacaine for US-SCB. PMID:26556653

  13. Ultrasound-guided RNA interference targeting HIF-1 alpha improves the effects of transarterial chemoembolization in rat liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Shi; Zhao, Qing; Qian, Sheng; Li, Hai-Liang; Guo, Chen-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Rong; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether ultrasound-guided RNA interference (RNAi) targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) can enhance the efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in treating hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and methods Rats with orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma were randomized to four groups and treated as follows: 1) control; 2) siHIF-1α; 3) TACE; 4) siHIF-1α+TACE. Lentivirus (4×108 transfection units) with or without small interfering RNA (siRNA) expression in 0.6 mL transduction reagent was injected into tumors using a standard 1 mL syringe under ultrasonic guidance. In the siHIF-1α+TACE and siHIF-1α groups, rats received siRNA-expressing lentivirus; the rats in the TACE and control groups received lentivirus without siRNA. TACE was performed by placing a microcatheter into the gastroduodenal artery. Results The median survival time, body weight, and tumor volume of the siHIF-1α+TACE group were better than those of the TACE, siHIF-1α, and control groups. A comparative analysis of the different treatment groups demonstrated that HIF-1α RNAi could downregulate the levels of HIF-1α and VEGF, inhibit tumor angiogenesis, and lessen metastases; all of these effects were enhanced by TACE. Conclusion HIF-1α RNAi, which was administered in vivo in liver tumors under ultrasound guidance, improved the efficacy of TACE in treating hepatocellular carcinoma in an animal model. PMID:26664137

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Application via the Pterygopalatine Fossa: A Practical Approach to Treat Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Nader, Antoun; Bendok, Bernard R; Prine, Jeremy J; Kendall, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacological therapy is the primary treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia associated pain, ineffective analgesia and dose limiting side effects often prompt patients to seek alternative pharmacological solutions such as interventional nerve blockade. Blockade of the Gasserian ganglion or its branches is an effective analgesic procedure for trigeminal neuralgia, traditionally performed using fluoroscopy or CT imaging. Ultrasonography allows point of care and real time visualization of needle placement within the surrounding anatomical structures. The use of ultrasonography with pulsed radiofrequency therapy for trigeminal neuralgia has not been reported. Our case is a 66-year-old male suffering from trigeminal neuralgia for 4 years that was refractory to pharmacologic therapy. Neurological examination was normal with no sensory deficit. Imaging showed no vascular compression or mass involving the trigeminal nerve. A diagnostic ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa with 4 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% and 4 mg dexamethasone provided immediate pain relief (100%) with sustained analgesia >50% at 2 weeks. Pain relief was not sustained at one month, with return to pretreatment symptoms. A series of injections were performed with similar intermittent analgesic effectiveness. The decision was made that the patient was a suitable candidate for pulsed radiofrequency application in the pterygopalatine fossa. We successfully used an alternative approach through the pterygopalatine fossa to treat trigeminal neuralgia using ultrasound guidance in an office setting. Our case demonstrates the utility of ultrasound-guidance pulsed radiofrequency treatment in the pterygopalatine fossa as a potential alternative to other percutaneous techniques for patients with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26000688

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Removal of Wooden Foreign Bodies in the Extremities with Hydro-Dissection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Son, Eun Seok; Chung, Eun Chul; Rho, Myung Ho; Lee, Sun Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective We described the technique of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous removal of the foreign bodies (FB) with hydro-dissection in the radiologic department and presented video files of several cases. Materials and Methods Four patients referred to the radiology department for US evaluation and US-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs in the upper and lower extremities between November, 2006 and November, 2013 were included in this study. The procedures started with US evaluation for the exact location and shape of the FB. A 5 mm-sized skin incision was made at the site of the nearest point from the FB where no passing arteries or tendons were present. We adopted a hydrodissection technique to separate the FB from adjacent tissue using a 2% lidocaine solution. Injected anesthetics detached the FBs from surrounding tissue and thereby facilitated removal. After the tip of the mosquito forceps reached the FB, the wooden FBs were removed. Results The mean time required for the entire procedure was approximately 20 minutes. There were no significant complications during the US-guided removal or long-term complications after the procedure. All 4 FBs were successfully removed from the soft tissue under US guidance. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs with hydro-dissection in the radiology department is a less invasive and safe method over surgical removal in the operating room. Additionally, the use of a guide wire and serial dilator may help minimize soft tissue injury and facilitate the introduction of forceps. PMID:26576123

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). Results: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). Conclusion: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate. PMID:24949394

  17. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous antegrade hydropropulsion to relieve ureteral obstruction in a pet guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Eshar, David; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Chalmers, Heather J.

    2013-01-01

    Severe hydroureter and hydronephrosis secondary to ureteral obstruction by calculus were present in a guinea pig. A palliative ultrasound-guided percutaneous antegrade hydropropulsion was performed under general anesthesia to relieve the ureteral obstruction and the associated clinical signs. We describe the technique and the considerations for its potential application in similar cases. PMID:24293674

  18. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous antegrade hydropropulsion to relieve ureteral obstruction in a pet guinea pig (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Eshar, David; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Chalmers, Heather J

    2013-12-01

    Severe hydroureter and hydronephrosis secondary to ureteral obstruction by calculus were present in a guinea pig. A palliative ultrasound-guided percutaneous antegrade hydropropulsion was performed under general anesthesia to relieve the ureteral obstruction and the associated clinical signs. We describe the technique and the considerations for its potential application in similar cases. PMID:24293674

  19. Learning Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion Skills through an Edutainment Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Ni, Dong; Pang, Wai-Man; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is essential in many of minimally invasive surgeries or procedures, such as biopsy, drug delivery, spinal anaesthesia, etc. Accurate and safe needle insertion is a difficult task due to the high requirement of hand-eye coordination skills. Many proposed virtual reality (VR) based training systems put their emphasis on realistic simulation instead of pedagogical efficiency. The lack of schematic training scenario leads to boredom of repetitive operations. To solve this, we present our novel training system with the integration of game elements in order to retain the trainees' enthusiasm. Task-oriented scenarios, time attack scenarios and performance evaluation are introduced. Besides, some state-of-art technologies are also presented, including ultrasound simulation, needle haptic rendering as well as a mass-spring-based needle-tissue interaction simulation. These works are shown to be effective to keep the trainees up with learning.

  20. Ultrasound-guided Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Block in Meralgia Paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Eun; Lee, Sang Gon; Kim, Eun Ju; Min, Byung Woo; Ban, Jong Suk; Lee, Ji Hyang

    2011-06-01

    Meralgia paresthetica is a rarely encountered sensory mononeuropathy characterized by paresthesia, pain or sensory impairment along the distribution of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) caused by entrapment or compression of the nerve as it crossed the anterior superior iliac spine and runs beneath the inguinal ligament. There is great variability regarding the area where the nerve pierces the inguinal ligament, which makes it difficult to perform blind anesthetic blocks. Ultrasound has developed into a powerful tool for the visualization of peripheral nerves including very small nerves such as accessory and sural nerves. The LFCN can be located successfully, and local anesthetic solution distribution around the nerve can be observed with ultrasound guidance. Our successfully performed ultrasound-guided blockade of the LFCN in meralgia paresthetica suggests that this technique is a safe way to increase the success rate. PMID:21716611

  1. Pancreatic metastases from ovarian carcinoma--diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Hadzri, M Hasmoni; Rosemi, Salleh

    2012-04-01

    Pancreatic metastases are very uncommon and originate most commonly from lung, colon, breast and kidney cancer. Ovarian adenocarcinoma has been reported as a primary site of pancreatic metastasis, but its diagnosis has rarely being reported by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). We report a case of multiple metastases to the pancreas from ovarian carcinoma occurring four years after original resection of the primary tumour. Our patient presented with severe epigastric pain which was initially treated as acute pancreatitis. Further imaging modalities showed multiple large pseudocystic lesions in the pancreatic head and body. Subsequent EUS-FNA confirmed that the lesions were metastatic disease from an advanced ovarian carcinoma. She underwent palliative chemotherapy and the pancreatic lesion showed receding size. PMID:22822646

  2. Urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy for acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Miyata, Takeshi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Yoshikawa, Tomoe; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-04-28

    Acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis (AOSC) due to biliary lithiasis is a life-threatening condition that requires urgent biliary decompression. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is the current gold standard for biliary decompression, it can sometimes be difficult because of failed biliary cannulation. In this retrospective case series, we describe three cases of successful biliary drainage with recovery from septic shock after urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) was performed for AOSC due to biliary lithiasis. In all three cases, technical success in inserting the stents was achieved and the patients completely recovered from AOSC with sepsis in a few days after EUS-CDS. There were no procedure-related complications. When initial ERCP fails, EUS-CDS can be an effective life-saving endoscopic biliary decompression procedure that shortens the procedure time and prevents post-ERCP pancreatitis, particularly in patients with AOSC-induced sepsis. PMID:27122677

  3. Ultrasound-guided central cluster approach for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Hong Soon; Park, Seol Ju; Suh, Young Je

    2015-01-01

    There are many different approaches to ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCBPB), and each has a different success rate and complications. The most commonly performed US-SCBPB is the corner pocket approach in which the needle is advanced very close to the subclavian artery and pleura. Therefore, it may be associated with a risk of subclavian artery puncture or pneumothorax. We advanced the needle into the central part of the neural cluster after penetrating the sheath of the brachial plexus in US-SCBPB. We refer to this new method as the "central cluster approach." In this approach, the needle does not have to advance close to the subclavian artery or pleura. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of the central cluster approach in US-SCBPB. PMID:26634085

  4. Ultrasound-guided Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Block in Meralgia Paresthetica

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Eun Ju; Min, Byung Woo; Ban, Jong Suk; Lee, Ji Hyang

    2011-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica is a rarely encountered sensory mononeuropathy characterized by paresthesia, pain or sensory impairment along the distribution of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) caused by entrapment or compression of the nerve as it crossed the anterior superior iliac spine and runs beneath the inguinal ligament. There is great variability regarding the area where the nerve pierces the inguinal ligament, which makes it difficult to perform blind anesthetic blocks. Ultrasound has developed into a powerful tool for the visualization of peripheral nerves including very small nerves such as accessory and sural nerves. The LFCN can be located successfully, and local anesthetic solution distribution around the nerve can be observed with ultrasound guidance. Our successfully performed ultrasound-guided blockade of the LFCN in meralgia paresthetica suggests that this technique is a safe way to increase the success rate. PMID:21716611

  5. Evaluation of the eZono 4000 with eZGuide for ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff; Latmore, Malikah; Levine, Daniel M

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures are increasingly common in a variety of acute care settings, such as the operating room, critical care unit and emergency room. However, accurate judgment of needle tip position using traditional ultrasound technology is frequently difficult, and serious injury can result from inadvertently advancing beyond or through the target. Needle navigation is a recent innovation that allows the clinician to visualize the needle position and trajectory in real time as it approaches the target. A novel ultrasound machine has recently been introduced that is portable and designed for procedural guidance. The eZono 4000™ features an innovative needle navigation technology that is simple to use and permits the use of a wide range of commercially available needles, avoiding the inconvenience and cost of proprietary equipment. This article discusses this new ultrasound machine in the context of other currently available ultrasound machines featuring needle navigation. PMID:25543816

  6. Peripheral pulmonary carcinoid tumor diagnosed by endobronchial-ultrasound-guided bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ayaka; Akamatsu, Hiroaki; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    A 45-year-old Japanese woman complained of uncontrolled hypertension and face swelling. She was diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome with secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed a 2 × 2 cm mass in her left lung, with high standardized maximum uptake value. She underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial ultrasound via a guide-sheath. Surgical resection of her left upper lung was performed, and pathological examination showed a typical carcinoid tumor. After lung resection, she recovered from her subjective symptoms. Diagnosis of peripheral carcinoid tumor of the lung is generally difficult. Here, we introduce a case of peripheral pulmonary carcinoid tumor diagnosed by endobronchial-ultrasound-guided bronchoscopy. PMID:26839693

  7. The utility of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis and pleural biopsy in undiagnosed pleural exudates.

    PubMed

    Koegelenberg, Coenraad Frederik N; Irusen, Elvis Malcom; von Groote-Bidlingmaier, Florian; Bruwer, Johannes Willem; Batubara, Enas Mansour A; Diacon, Andreas Henri

    2015-10-01

    We assessed the utility of ultrasound to guide the selection of closed pleural biopsy technique and site and to assess the respective contributions of repeat thoracentesis and closed pleural biopsy in 100 consecutive patients with undiagnosed pleural exudates. Thoracentesis was more likely to be diagnostic in TB than malignancy (77.8% vs 31.0%, p<0.001). The addition of ultrasound-guided biopsy increased the combined yield for all diagnoses from 48.0% to 90.0% (p<0.001), for malignancy from 31.0% to 89.7% (p<0.001) and for TB from 77.8% to 88.9% (p=0.688). Our findings suggest that this minimally invasive approach has a high diagnostic yield. PMID:25997433

  8. Metastases to the Pancreas Encountered on Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided, Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Pang, Judy C; Roh, Michael H

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic lesions in the pancreas are very uncommon and may be difficult to differentiate from the more commonly encountered primary neoplasms derived from the exocrine and endocrine pancreas because of the significant overlap in clinical presentation, imaging, and cytologic features. Metastasis to the pancreas may occur years after treatment of the primary neoplasm and is often not considered on initial evaluation because of the rarity of such events. The possibility of a metastasis to the pancreas should be entertained in patients with any prior history of malignancy because a proper diagnosis is essential in identifying surgical candidates, or avoiding potentially unnecessary surgery and facilitating triage to more appropriate nonoperative therapy. Herein, we describe intrapancreatic metastases secondary to renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and lung carcinoma, as documented by cytologic examination of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the pancreatic masses. PMID:26414469

  9. Urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy for acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis-induced sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Miyata, Takeshi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Yoshikawa, Tomoe; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis (AOSC) due to biliary lithiasis is a life-threatening condition that requires urgent biliary decompression. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is the current gold standard for biliary decompression, it can sometimes be difficult because of failed biliary cannulation. In this retrospective case series, we describe three cases of successful biliary drainage with recovery from septic shock after urgent endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) was performed for AOSC due to biliary lithiasis. In all three cases, technical success in inserting the stents was achieved and the patients completely recovered from AOSC with sepsis in a few days after EUS-CDS. There were no procedure-related complications. When initial ERCP fails, EUS-CDS can be an effective life-saving endoscopic biliary decompression procedure that shortens the procedure time and prevents post-ERCP pancreatitis, particularly in patients with AOSC-induced sepsis. PMID:27122677

  10. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: how to do.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Silvestri, Enzo; Serafini, Giovanni; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Mauri, Giovanni; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand. PMID:24813531

  11. Three partial-task simulators for teaching ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Andrew D; Popovic, Jovan; Albert, David B; Altman, Robert A; Marshall, Mitchell H; Sommer, Richard M; Cuff, Germaine

    2012-01-01

    Simulation-based training is becoming an accepted tool for educating physicians before direct patient care. As ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) becomes a popular method for performing regional blocks, there is a need for learning the technical skills associated with the technique. Although simulator models do exist for learning UGRA, they either contain food and are therefore perishable or are not anatomically based. We developed 3 sonoanatomically based partial-task simulators for learning UGRA: an upper body torso for learning UGRA interscalene and infraclavicular nerve blocks, a femoral manikin for learning UGRA femoral nerve blocks, and a leg model for learning UGRA sciatic nerve blocks in the subgluteal and popliteal areas. PMID:22189577

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia for Pediatric Burn Reconstructive Surgery: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Shank, Erik S; Martyn, Jeevendra A; Donelan, Mathias B; Perrone, Anthony; Firth, Paul G; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients face multiple reconstructive surgeries to reestablish function and aesthetics postburn injury. Often, the site of the harvested graft for these reconstructions is reported to be the most painful part of the procedure and a common reason for deferring these reconstructive procedures. This study in pediatric burn patients undergoing reconstructive procedures examined the analgesia response to local anesthetic infiltration versus either a single ultrasound-guided regional nerve block of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) or a fascia iliaca compartment block with catheter placement and continuous infusion. Nineteen patients were randomized to one of three groups (infiltration, single-shot nerve block, or compartment block with catheter) and received intraoperative analgesia intervention. Postoperatively, visual analog scale pain scores were recorded-for pain at the donor site-every 4 hours while awake-for 48 hours. This nonparametric data was analyzed using a two-way ANOVA, Friedman's test, and Kruskal-Wallis test, with significance determined at P < 0.05. The analysis demonstrated that the patients in the regional anesthesia groups were significantly more comfortable over the 48 hour hospital course than the patients in the control group. The patients receiving a single-shot block of the LFCN were more comfortable on postoperative day (POD) 0 while the catheter patients were more comfortable on POD 1 and POD 2. There was not a statistically significant difference in opioid requirements in any group. Regional anesthetic block of the LFCN, with or without catheter placement, provides an improved postoperative experience for the pediatric patient undergoing reconstructive surgery with lateral/anterolateral skin graft versus local anesthesia infiltration of donor site. For optimal comfort throughout the postoperative period, an ultrasound-guided block with continuous catheter may be beneficial. PMID:25412051

  13. Intra-articular hip injections for lateral hip pain

    PubMed Central

    Bessette, Matthew C.; Olsen, Joshua R.; Mann, Tobias R.; Giordano, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Occult intra-articular hip pathology is commonly found in patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and may be a possible pain generator in patients with recalcitrant lateral hip pain. We investigated the effect of intra-articular hip injections in patients with recalcitrant lateral hip pain. Between September 2012 and May 2013, patients over the age of 18 with a history lateral hip pain who had received prior treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy and peritrochanteric corticostroid injections were enrolled. Treatment consisted of an ultrasound guided intra-articular corticosteroid injection followed by a course of directed physical therapy and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication. Patients performed GaitRite analysis at baseline and 12 weeks following the injection. In addition, the Modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), Hip Outcome Scores (HOS), Short Form 36 (SF-36) and a visual analogue pain score (VAS) were collected at baseline, 1, 6 and 12 weeks.A total of 16 patients were studied. Patients experienced significant improvements from their baseline mHHS at 1 and 12 weeks (P = 0.03, P = 0.04). The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was exceeded at multiple timepoints on various clinical outcome surveys. Velocity and stride length were not significantly improved at 12 weeks. Intra-articular hip injections may decrease pain and improve function in patients with recalcitrant lateral hip pain, and occult intra-articular hip pathology should be considered in the etiology of lateral hip pain. Though low enrollment numbers left this study underpowered, MCID comparisons demonstrated potential benefit from this treatment. PMID:27011805

  14. Randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness study comparing pulsed radiofrequency to steroid injections for occipital neuralgia or migraine with occipital nerve tenderness

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Steven P.; Peterlin, B. Lee; Fulton, Larry; Neely, Edward T.; Kurihara, Connie; Gupta, Anita; Mali, Jimmy; Fu, Diana C.; Jacobs, Michael B.; Plunkett, Anthony R.; Verdun, Aubrey J.; Stojanovic, Milan P.; Hanling, Steven; Constantinescu, Octav; White, Ronald L.; McLean, Brian C.; Pasquina, Paul F.; Zhao, Zirong

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia (ON) is characterized by lancinating pain and tenderness overlying the occipital nerves. Both steroid injections and pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) are used to treat ON, but few clinical trials have evaluated efficacy, and no study has compared treatments. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness study in 81 participants with ON or migraine with occipital nerve tenderness whose aim was to determine which treatment is superior. Forty-two participants were randomized to receive local anesthetic and saline, and three 120 second cycles of PRF per targeted nerve, and 39 were randomized to receive local anesthetic mixed with deposteroid and 3 rounds of sham PRF. Patients, treating physicians, and evaluators were blinded to interventions. The PRF group experienced a greater reduction in the primary outcome measure, average occipital pain at 6 weeks (mean change from baseline −2.743 ± 2.487 vs −1.377 ± 1.970; P <0.001), than the steroid group, which persisted through the 6-month follow-up. Comparable benefits favoring PRF were obtained for worst occipital pain through 3 months (mean change from baseline−1.925 ± 3.204 vs−0.541 ± 2.644; P = 0.043), and average overall headache pain through 6 weeks (mean change from baseline −2.738 ± 2.753 vs −1.120 ± 2.1; P = 0.037). Adverse events were similar between groups, and few significant differences were noted for nonpain outcomes. We conclude that although PRF can provide greater pain relief for ON and migraine with occipital nerve tenderness than steroid injections, the superior analgesia may not be accompanied by comparable improvement on other outcome measures. PMID:26447705

  15. Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Medications > Quick-Relief Medications > Oral Steroids Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups) How are steroid pills and ... Want to learn more about steroids? How are steroid pills and syrups used? Steroid pills and syrups ...

  16. Diagnostic utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy for glomus tumor of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Shin; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Chinen, Kenji; Murakami, Takahiro; Kunishima, Fumihito

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was referred for further investigation of a gastric submucosal tumor on the greater curvature of the antrum. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a hypoechoic solid mass, which was primarily connected to the muscular layer of the stomach. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. The pathological examination showed proliferation of oval-shaped cells with nest formation, which stained strongly positive for muscle actin, and negative for c-kit, CD34, CD56, desmin, S-100, chromogranin, and neuron-specific enolase. Therefore, we performed laparoscopy and endoscopy cooperative surgery based on the preoperative diagnosis of glomus tumor of the stomach. The final histological diagnosis confirmed the preoperative diagnosis. Although preoperative diagnosis of glomus tumor of the stomach is difficult with conventional images and endoscopic biopsy, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy is an essential tool to gain histological evidence of glomus tumor of the stomach for early diagnosis. PMID:26078584

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia in a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD)-Deficient Geriatric Trauma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Födinger, Agnes M.; Kammerlander, Christian; Luger, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic enzymatic disorder causing hemolytic anemia. Exposure to drugs is considered to be the most common cause of acute hemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency. Experience with regional anesthesia, in particular peripheral nerve blocks, is rarely described in patients with G6PD deficiency, but is of great clinical interest. For this reason, we now report on the successful management of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block in a patient with geriatric G6PD deficiency. Case report: A female, 75-year-old geriatric trauma patient with G6PD deficiency and a fracture of the left forearm, was scheduled for osteosynthesis of the left forearm. For surgery regional anesthesia with ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block with 30 mL bupivacaine 0.5% was established. Surgical operation und postoperative course were uneventful and with no signs of hemolysis. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block with bupivacaine was a safe and effective technique in this patient with G6PD deficiency. Peripheral nerve block is a major analgesic approach and of great value for anesthesiologists and surgeons, especially in our aging and multimorbid society. PMID:23569708

  18. Preoperative Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Ovarian Lesions- Is It a Rapid and Effective Diagnostic Modality?

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Saikat; Chaudhuri, Snehamay; Paul, Prabir Chandra; Khandakar, Binny; Mandal, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The deep seated ovarian lesions unapproachable by unguided aspiration cytology were easily done under ultrasound guidance. It gave a before hand cytological diagnosis of the lesion to the surgeon determining the modality of treatment for the patient. Aim To find the diagnostic accuracy of the method of ultrasound guided cytological assessment of ovarian lesion. Materials and Methods The study was conducted as a prospective observational study over a period of one year, in hospital setting, where ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration had been used to aspirate ovarian lesions, giving a rapid cytological diagnosis. In 43 sample cases, aspiration of fluid done from ovarian lesions were followed by cyto-centrifugation and staining by May-Grunwald-Giemsa (MGG) and Papanicolaou (Pap) stain providing a cytological opinion regarding benign/malignant nature of the lesion and further categorization. Later the cytological diagnosis was compared with final histopathological diagnosis, taking it as a gold standard. Results The overall sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound guided aspiration and cytological analysis were high, 96%, 76.92% and 89.47% respectively as calculated by comparing the cytological diagnosis with histological diagnosis, taking it as gold standard. Conclusion This method has evolved as a highly sensitive, rapid, simple and effective modality for screening and as well as accurate preoperative diagnosis of ovarian lesions. PMID:27134878

  19. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraman, Rajagopalan; Abhinaya, Ranganathan Jothi; Sakthivel, Ayyanar; Sivarajan, Govindarajan

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Transversus abdominis plane block (TAP block) is a novel procedure to provide postoperative analgesia following inguinal hernia surgery. The utilization of ultrasound has greatly augmented the success rate of this block and additionally avoiding complications. The aim of our study was to gauge the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided TAP block in patients undergoing unilateral inguinal hernia repair. Materials and methods Sixty patients scheduled for elective inguinal hernia repair were selected for the study. At the end of the surgical procedure, they were randomly divided into two groups. Ultrasound-guided TAP block was performed with 20 mL of ropivacaine 0.2% (group A) or normal saline (group B). Visual analog scale (VAS) scores were used to assess pain. Paracetamol was given if VAS > 3 and tramadol was used when VAS > 6. Patients were monitored for VAS scores and total analgesic consumption for the 24-hour period. Results The TAP block with ropivacaine (group A) reduced VAS scores at 4, 6, and 12 hours. There was no distinction in VAS scores at 0, 2, and 24 hours between the two groups. The duration of analgesia for TAP block with ropivacaine lasted for 390 minutes. Total analgesics consumption was also significantly reduced in group A than group B. No complication was reported to TAP block in both the groups. Conclusion The ultrasound-guided TAP block provides good postoperative analgesia, reduces analgesic requirements, and provides good VAS scores with fewer complications following inguinal hernia surgery. PMID:26848274

  20. Ultrasound-guided vascular catheterization in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Di Bello, Antonio; Valastro, Carmela; Freggi, Daniela; Saponaro, Vittorio; Grimaldi, Domenico

    2010-09-01

    In this study, the authors describe a simple, nontraumatic procedure for ultrasound-guided placement and maintenance ofjugular and cephalic vein catheterization. The ultrasound scans were performed with a GE Logiq 400 machine connected to a multifrequency (7-11 MHz) linear-array transducer. To find the cephalic vein, longitudinal and transverse color-Doppler ultrasonographic scans were made of the dorsal surface of the flipper. To find the jugular vein, scans of the midline of the lateral surface of the neck were performed. Once the vein had been located, a 16- to 22-gauge 51-mm needle catheter was inserted into the skin beneath the ultrasound probe, inclined at 15-25 degrees to the skin surface. The successful insertion of the catheter inside the vein was monitored by ultrasound. The authors believe that the procedure described offers a good option for fashioning a simple, nontraumatic, and durable vascular access in sea turtles compared with previously described techniques. Caretta caretta, cephalic vein, jugular vein, ultrasonography, vascular catheterization. PMID:20945652

  1. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided obturator nerve block in transurethral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thallaj, Ahmed; Rabah, Dany

    2011-01-01

    Background: During transurethral resection surgery (TUR), accidental stimulation of the obturator nerve can cause violent adductor contraction, leading to serious intraoperative complications. General anesthesia with muscle relaxation is currently the preferred technique for TUR surgery. Spinal anesthesia combined with obturator nerve block has also been used for TUR surgery in geriatric population. Blind, anatomical methods for identifying the obturator nerve are often unsatisfactory. Therefore, we conducted this prospective study to validate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided obturator nerve block (USONB) during TUR procedures. Methods: Eighteen male patients undergoing TURP surgery under spinal anesthesia were included in the study. Bilateral USONB with maximum 20 ml of 1% lidocaine per patient was performed. An independent observer was present to monitor any adduction movements during the operation and to record patient and surgeon satisfactions. Results: In all patients, obturator nerve was visualized from the first attempt, requiring an average of 4.3 min for blocking of each side. USONB was successful (97.2%) in preventing an adductor spasm in all except one patient. Patient’s and surgeon’s satisfaction were appropriate. In all patients, adductor muscle strength recovered fully within 2 h following the surgical procedure. Conclusions: USONB is safe and effective during TUR surgery. It provides optimal intra-and postoperative conditions. PMID:21655015

  2. 3-D ultrasound-guided robotic needle steering in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Adebar, Troy K; Fletcher, Ashley E; Okamura, Allison M

    2014-12-01

    Robotic needle steering systems have the potential to greatly improve medical interventions, but they require new methods for medical image guidance. Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound is a widely available, low-cost imaging modality that may be used to provide real-time feedback to needle steering robots. Unfortunately, the poor visibility of steerable needles in standard grayscale ultrasound makes automatic segmentation of the needles impractical. A new imaging approach is proposed, in which high-frequency vibration of a steerable needle makes it visible in ultrasound Doppler images. Experiments demonstrate that segmentation from this Doppler data is accurate to within 1-2 mm. An image-guided control algorithm that incorporates the segmentation data as feedback is also described. In experimental tests in ex vivo bovine liver tissue, a robotic needle steering system implementing this control scheme was able to consistently steer a needle tip to a simulated target with an average error of 1.57 mm. Implementation of 3-D ultrasound-guided needle steering in biological tissue represents a significant step toward the clinical application of robotic needle steering. PMID:25014948

  3. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors: How We Do It Safely and Completely

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong; Heo, Suk Hee; Hong, Jun Hyung; Lim, Hyo Soon; Seon, Hyun Ju; Hur, Young Hoe; Park, Chang Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become one of the most promising local cancer therapies for both resectable and nonresectable hepatic tumors. Although RF ablation is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of liver tumors, the outcome of treatment can be closely related to the location and shape of the tumors. There may be difficulties with RF ablation of tumors that are adjacent to large vessels or extrahepatic heat-vulnerable organs and tumors in the caudate lobe, possibly resulting in major complications or treatment failure. Thus, a number of strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges, which include artificial ascites, needle track ablation, fusion imaging guidance, parallel targeting, bypass targeting, etc. Operators need to use the right strategy in the right situation to avoid the possibility of complications and incomplete thermal tissue destruction; with the right strategy, RF ablation can be performed successfully, even for hepatic tumors in high-risk locations. This article offers technical strategies that can be used to effectively perform RF ablation as well as to minimize possible complications related to the procedure with representative cases and schematic illustrations. PMID:26576111

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience

    PubMed Central

    Tyberg, Amy; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Sanchez-Ocaña, Ramon; Peñas, Irene; de la Serna, Carlos; Shah, Janak; Binmoeller, Kenneth; Gaidhane, Monica; Grimm, Ian; Baron, Todd; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical gastrojejunostomy and enteral self-expanding metal stents are efficacious for the management of gastric outlet obstruction but limited by high complication rates and short-term efficacy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy (EUS-GJ) is a novel alternative option. Patients and methods: Patients who underwent EUS-GJ between March 2014 and September 2015 as part of a prospective multicenter registry at four academic centers in two countries were included. Technical success was defined as successful placement of a gastrojejunal lumen-apposing metal stent. Clinical success was defined as the ability of the patient to tolerate an oral diet. Post-procedural adverse events were recorded. Results: The study included 26 patients, of whom 11 (42 %) were male. Technical success was achieved in 24 patients (92 %). Clinical success was achieved in 22 patients (85 %). Of the 4 patients in whom clinical success was not achieved, 2 had persistent nausea and vomiting despite a patent EUS-GJ and required enteral feeding for nutrition, 1 died before the initiation of an oral diet, and 1 underwent surgery for suspected perforation. Adverse events, including peritonitis, bleeding, and surgery, occurred in 3 patients (11.5 %). Conclusion: EUS-GJ is an emerging procedure that has efficacy and safety comparable with those of current therapies and should hold a place as a new minimally invasive option for patients with gastric outlet obstruction. Clinical trial identification number: NCT01522573 PMID:27004243

  6. First Experience of Ultrasound-guided Percutaneous Ablation for Recurrent Hepatoblastoma after Liver Resection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoxian; Zhou, Luyao; Huang, Guangliang; Zhong, Zhihai; Jiang, Chunlin; Shan, Quanyuan; Xu, Ming; Kuang, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to summarize the first experience with ultrasound-guided percutaneous ablation treatment (PAT) for recurrent hepatoblastoma (HB) after liver resection in children. From August 2013 to October 2014, PAT was used to treat 5 children with a total of 8 recurrent HB (mean size, 1.4 ± 0.8 cm; size range, 0.7–3.1 cm), including 4 patients with 7 tumors in the liver and 1 patient with 1 tumor in the lung. Technical success was achieved in all patients (5/5, 100%). The complete ablation rate after the first ablation session was 80% (4/5) on a patient-by-patient basis and 87.5% (7/8) on a tumor-by-tumor basis. Only 1 patient developed a fever with temperature >39 °C; it lasted 4 days after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and was resolved by conservative therapy. During the follow-up period, new intrahepatic recurrences after PAT were detected in two patients. One died due to tumor progression 4 months after ablation. The median overall survival time after PAT was 13.8 months. PAT is a safe and promising therapy for children with recurrent HB after liver resection, and further investigation in large-scale randomized clinical trials is required to determine its role in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26578035

  7. Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of the Prostate: Is the Information Accessible, Usable, Reliable and Readable?

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Ciaran E.; Nason, Gregory J.; Kelly, Michael E.; McMahon, Colm; Cantwell, Colin P.; Quinlan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the accessibility, usability, reliability and readability of Internet information regarding transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy of the prostate. Materials and Methods The terms “prostate biopsy”, “TRUS biopsy” and “transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate” were separately entered into the each of the top 5 most accessed Internet search engines. Websites were evaluated for accessibility, usability and reliability using the LIDA tool – a validated tool for the assessment of health related websites. Website readability was assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score and the Flesch Kincaid Grade Level. Results Following the application of exclusion criteria, 82 unique websites were analyzed. There was a significant difference in scores depending on authorship categories (p ≤ 0.001), with health related charity websites scoring highest (mean 122.29 ± 13.98) and non-academic affiliated institution websites scoring lowest (mean 87 ± 19.76). The presence of advertisements on a website was associated with a lower mean overall LIDA tool score (p = 0.024). Only a single website adhered to the National Institutes for Health recommendations on readability. Conclusions This study demonstrates variability in the quality of information available to Internet users regarding TRUS biopsies. Collaboration of website design and clinical acumen are necessary to develop appropriate websites for patient benefit. PMID:26195961

  8. Ultrasound Guided Low Approach Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Upper Limb Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Kyung; Sung, Min Ha; Suh, Hae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background The interscalene brachial plexus block is widely used for pain control and anesthetic purposes during shoulder arthroscopic surgeries and surgeries of the upper extremities. However, it is known that interscalene brachial plexus block is not appropriate for upper limb surgeries because it does not affect the lower trunk (C8-T1, ulnar nerve) of the brachial plexus. Methods A low approach, ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (LISB) was performed on twenty-eight patients undergoing surgery of the upper extremities. The patients were assessed five minutes and fifteen minutes after the block for the degree of block in each nerve and muscle as well as for any complications. Results At five minutes and fifteen minutes after the performance of the block, the degree of the block in the ulnar nerve was found to be 2.8 ± 2.6 and 1.1 ± 1.8, respectively, based on a ten-point scale. Motor block occurred in the median nerve after fifteen minutes in 26 of the 28 patients (92.8%), and in all of the other three nerves in all 28 patients. None of the patients received additional analgesics, and none experienced complications. Conclusions The present study confirmed the achievement of an appropriate sensory and motor block in the upper extremities, including the ulnar nerve, fifteen minutes after LISB, with no complications. PMID:26839666

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for the diagnosis of kidney lesions: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Moura, Renata Nobre; Artifon, Everson

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, treatment of renal lesions is indicated based only on imaging features. Although controversy exists about tissue sampling from small renal masses, renal biopsy is indicated in some cases. In this review, we discuss the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and summarize the recent advances in this field, providing recommendations for the practicing clinician. The use of EUS-FNA appears to be a safe and feasible means of confirming or excluding malignancy. EUS allows assessment and biopsy of masses or lesions within both kidneys and related complications are rare. The main advantages of EUS-FNA are that it can be done as an outpatient procedure, with good results, minimal morbidity and a short hospital stay. Nevertheless, EUS-FNA of renal masses should be indicated only in selected cases, in which there is potential to decrease unnecessary treatment of small renal masses and to best select tumors for active surveillance and minimally invasive ablative therapies. Additionally, some renal lesions may be ineligible for EUS-guided biopsy because of anatomical limitations. EUS-FNA renal biopsy will probably be best applied to central anterior renal masses, while tumors on the posterior aspect of the kidney, percutaneous access will probably be superior. PMID:25789096

  10. A cMUT probe for ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Dominique; Coutier, Caroline; Legros, Mathieu; Bouakaz, Ayache; Certon, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted therapy represents a promising strategy in the arsenal of modern therapy. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology could overcome some difficulties encountered by traditional piezoelectric transducers. In this study, we report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of an ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound (USgFUS) cMUT probe dedicated to preclinical evaluation of targeted therapy (hyperthermia, thermosensitive liposomes activation, and sonoporation) at low frequency (1 MHz) with simultaneous ultrasonic imaging and guidance (15 to 20 MHz). The probe embeds two types of cMUT arrays to perform the modalities of targeted therapy and imaging respectively. The wafer-bonding process flow employed for the manufacturing of the cMUTs is reported. One of its main features is the possibility of implementing two different gap heights on the same wafer. All the design and characterization steps of the devices are described and discussed, starting from the array design up to the first in vitro measurements: optical (microscopy) and electrical (impedance) measurements, arrays' electroacoustic responses, focused pressure field mapping (maximum peak-to-peak pressure = 2.5 MPa), and the first B-scan image of a wire-target phantom. PMID:26067049

  11. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lung cancer staging: early experience in Brazil*,**

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Jacomelli, Márcia; Demarzo, Sérgio Eduardo; Palomino, Addy Lidvina Mejia; Rodrigues, Ascédio José; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo Manoel; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive, safe and accurate method for collecting samples from mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This study focused on the initial results obtained with EBUS-TBNA for lung cancer and lymph node staging at three teaching hospitals in Brazil. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with lung cancer and submitted to EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging. The EBUS-TBNA procedures, which involved the use of an EBUS scope, an ultrasound processor, and a compatible, disposable 22 G needle, were performed while the patients were under general anesthesia. Results: Between January of 2011 and January of 2014, 149 patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for lymph node staging. The mean age was 66 ± 12 years, and 58% were male. A total of 407 lymph nodes were sampled by EBUS-TBNA. The most common types of lung neoplasm were adenocarcinoma (in 67%) and squamous cell carcinoma (in 24%). For lung cancer staging, EBUS-TBNA was found to have a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 85%. Conclusions: We found EBUS-TBNA to be a safe and accurate method for lymph node staging in lung cancer patients. PMID:25750671

  12. ULTRASOUND GUIDED FOAM SCLEROTHERAPY - THE SIMPLEST, LEAST INVASIVE, AND CHEAPEST METHOD FOR VARICOSE VEIN TREATMENT.

    PubMed

    Krnić, Anton

    2015-06-01

    The aim is to present our experience and observations regarding varicose vein treatment by means of ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS). The study included 81 patients, 54 with insufficient main stem superficial veins in one limb and 27 with both limbs affected. Great saphenous vein insufficiency was diagnosed in 68, small saphenous insufficiency in 18, anterior accessory saphenous vein insufficiency in 11, and Giacomini vein insufficiency in 3 limbs. Seven limbs had combined insufficiency of great saphenous vein and small saphenous vein, and 1 limb had combined insufficiency of Giacomini vein and small saphenous vein. UGFS was employed to treat main stem vein reflux and their tributaries. Within a month after treatment, all main stem veins were occluded and only small corrections were performed occasionally to treat residual varices. Regarding side effects, skin darkening and hard lumps at the sites of varicose veins were most commonly observed. We also recorded several episodes of thrombophlebitis. Few patients experienced dry cough, visual disturbances and headache following the treatment. After six months, repeat UGFS of main stem veins had to be performed in few patients. Very few patients expressed dissatisfaction a year after treatment, mainly because of residual skin darkening. In conclusion, UGFS proved to be the simplest, quickest and cheapest method of varicose vein treatment. According to our experience, it yielded satisfactory functional and cosmetic results. Side effects do occur, but are acceptable, in particular at long term. PMID:26415309

  13. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures. PMID:24035622

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: The wet suction technique

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nicolas A.; Berzosa, Manuel; Wallace, Michael B.; Raijman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become a fundamental tool in obtaining cytopathological diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. When sampling solid lesions of the pancreas, the endosonographer can use two suction techniques to enhance tissue acquisition; the dry and the wet suction techniques. The standard dry suction technique relies on applying negative pressure suction on the proximal end of the needle after the stylet is removed with a pre-vacuum syringe. The wet suction technique relies on pre-flushing the needle with saline to replace the column of air with fluid followed by aspiration the proximal end by using a prefilled syringe with saline. A new modified wet suction technique (hybrid suction technique) relies on preloading the needle with saline, but having continuous negative pressure with a pre-vacuum syringe to avoid manual intermittent suction. Tissue acquisition can be enhanced by applying fluid dynamic principles to the current aspiration techniques, such as the column of water used in the needle of the wet technique. In this review, we will focus on EUS-FNA using the wet suction technique for sampling of pancreatic solid lesions. PMID:26879162

  15. [The role of ultrasound-guided puncture in the evaluation of liquid tumors of the ovary].

    PubMed

    de Meeus, J B; Magnin, G; Bounaud, M P; Babin, M

    1993-03-01

    Twenty percent of liquid tumors of the ovary are persistent functional cysts. Laboratory tests of the cystic fluid should make it possible to distinguish between functional cysts and organic cysts. In 170 patients derived from a multicenter study and presenting with a liquid tumor of the ovary (including 9% of cancers), samples of the cystic fluid and serum were taken from the patient and the ACE, CA 125, CA 19-9 markers, estradiol and Progesterone were assayed. The results of these assays were subjected to computerized analysis and compared with the pathological findings. The assays were able to discriminate between organic cysts and functional cyst with 93% of sensitivity and 95% specificity. The insufficient reliability of this evaluation justified a second study (in progress) which is limited to the study of pure fluid tumors with thin walls, no partitions, no vegetations and measuring less than 8 cm in diameter in which the incidence of cancers is very low. This study should fine tune the initial findings and result in a sensitivity approaching 100 percent. If this hypothesis is confirmed, it should be possible to include ultrasound-guided puncture carried out under closely defined conditions in the therapeutic decision trees for liquid cysts of the ovary. PMID:8493442

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors: How We Do It Safely and Completely.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Hong, Jun Hyung; Lim, Hyo Soon; Seon, Hyun Ju; Hur, Young Hoe; Park, Chang Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become one of the most promising local cancer therapies for both resectable and nonresectable hepatic tumors. Although RF ablation is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of liver tumors, the outcome of treatment can be closely related to the location and shape of the tumors. There may be difficulties with RF ablation of tumors that are adjacent to large vessels or extrahepatic heat-vulnerable organs and tumors in the caudate lobe, possibly resulting in major complications or treatment failure. Thus, a number of strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges, which include artificial ascites, needle track ablation, fusion imaging guidance, parallel targeting, bypass targeting, etc. Operators need to use the right strategy in the right situation to avoid the possibility of complications and incomplete thermal tissue destruction; with the right strategy, RF ablation can be performed successfully, even for hepatic tumors in high-risk locations. This article offers technical strategies that can be used to effectively perform RF ablation as well as to minimize possible complications related to the procedure with representative cases and schematic illustrations. PMID:26576111

  17. Factors Influencing the Diagnostic Yield of Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Marcus P; Jimenez, Carlos A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Sarkiss, Mona; Lei, Xiudong; Rice, David; Eapen, Georgie A

    2010-07-01

    We describe the diagnostic performance of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in a heterogeneous population of patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy secondary to suspected cancer (lung and nonlung) or recurrence after cancer therapy in a large academic cancer institute. A review was done of all patients referred for real-time EBUS-TBNA over an 18-month period at our institution. Cytological analysis of EBUS-TBNA aspirates was compared with a reference standard of definitive pathologic tissue diagnosis or a composite of ≥6 months' clinical follow-up with radiographic imaging. Adequate tissue was obtained in 225/236 procedures (95.3%) and a reference standard was available in 214. The overall diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA in those procedures with a reference standard was 87.4%. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-TBNA for malignancy was 86.1%, 100% and 92.9%, respectively. The sampling accuracy of EBUS-TBNA decreased with lymph node size ≤5 mm and with paratracheal location. Other factors, such as airway distortion and calcification, are also associated with less accurate EBUS-TBNA results. In a diverse population of patients with suspected cancer or recurrence, EBUS-TBNA is minimally invasive and highly accurate. Factors such as lymph node size and location influence the result of EBUS-TBNA. PMID:23168884

  18. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of pulmonary artery tumors: A systematic review (with video).

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Modi, Kush; Kumar, Abhishek; Dhillon, Samjot Singh

    2015-01-01

    Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS) was originally introduced as a diagnostic and staging tool for lung cancer and subsequently utilized for diagnosis of other malignant and benign mediastinal diseases such as melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoidosis. More recently, CP-EBUS has been successfully used for the visualization and diagnosis of pulmonary emboli and other vascular lesions including primary and metastatic pulmonary artery (PA) tumors. In this review, we will underline the role of EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial tumors such as sarcomas and tumor emboli. We will concisely discuss the clinical applications of EBUS-TBNA and the types of pulmonary arterial tumors and their different diagnostic modalities. We searched the Cochrane Library and PubMed from 2004 to 2014 to provide the most comprehensive review. Only 10 cases of EBUS-TBNA for intravascular lesions were identified in the literature. Although many cases of EBUS and EUS-guided transvascular tumor biopsies were described in the literature, there were no reported cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for intravascular tumor biopsies. Except for one paper, all cases were published as case reports. PMID:26374576

  19. A serious game for learning ultrasound-guided needle placement skills.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle placement is a key step in a lot of radiological intervention procedures such as biopsy, local anesthesia and fluid drainage. To help training future intervention radiologists, we develop a serious game to teach the skills involved. We introduce novel techniques for realistic simulation and integrate game elements for active and effective learning. This game is designed in the context of needle placement training based on the some essential characteristics of serious games. Training scenarios are interactively generated via a block-based construction scheme. A novel example-based texture synthesis technique is proposed to simulate corresponding ultrasound images. Game levels are defined based on the difficulties of the generated scenarios. Interactive recommendation of desirable insertion paths is provided during the training as an adaptation mechanism. We also develop a fast physics-based approach to reproduce the shadowing effect of needles in ultrasound images. Game elements such as time-attack tasks, hints and performance evaluation tools are also integrated in our system. Extensive experiments are performed to validate its feasibility for training. PMID:22711779

  20. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of pulmonary artery tumors: A systematic review (with video)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kassem; Modi, Kush; Kumar, Abhishek; Dhillon, Samjot Singh

    2015-01-01

    Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS) was originally introduced as a diagnostic and staging tool for lung cancer and subsequently utilized for diagnosis of other malignant and benign mediastinal diseases such as melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoidosis. More recently, CP-EBUS has been successfully used for the visualization and diagnosis of pulmonary emboli and other vascular lesions including primary and metastatic pulmonary artery (PA) tumors. In this review, we will underline the role of EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial tumors such as sarcomas and tumor emboli. We will concisely discuss the clinical applications of EBUS-TBNA and the types of pulmonary arterial tumors and their different diagnostic modalities. We searched the Cochrane Library and PubMed from 2004 to 2014 to provide the most comprehensive review. Only 10 cases of EBUS-TBNA for intravascular lesions were identified in the literature. Although many cases of EBUS and EUS-guided transvascular tumor biopsies were described in the literature, there were no reported cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for intravascular tumor biopsies. Except for one paper, all cases were published as case reports. PMID:26374576

  1. Current status and clinical applicability of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi; Jacomelli, Márcia; Rodrigues, Ascédio José; Canzian, Mauro; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has played a key role in the diagnosis of mediastinal, paratracheal, and peribronchial lesions, as well as in lymph node staging for lung cancer. Despite its minimally invasive character, EBUS-TBNA has demonstrated a diagnostic yield comparable with that of established surgical methods. It has therefore gained credibility and has become a routine procedure at various referral centers. A successful EBUS-TBNA procedure requires careful planning, which includes a thorough review of the radiological imaging and special care during specimen collection and preparation, as well as technical expertise, experience with the procedure itself, and knowledge of the potential complications inherent to the procedure. The most common indications for EBUS-TBNA include lymph node staging for lung cancer and the diagnostic investigation of mediastinal/hilar masses and lymph node enlargement. Recently, tumor biomarkers in malignant samples collected during the EBUS-TBNA procedure have begun to be identified, and this molecular analysis has proven to be absolutely feasible. The EBUS-TBNA procedure has yet to be included on the Brazilian Medical Association list of medical procedures approved for reimbursement. The EBUS-TBNA procedure has shown to be a safe and accurate tool for lung cancer staging/restaging, as well as for the diagnosis of mediastinal, paratracheal, and peribronchial lesions/lymph node enlargement PMID:23670509

  2. Are complications of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies of the prostate gland increasing?

    PubMed

    Dodds, Peter R; Boucher, Jonathan D; Shield, Dennis E; Bernie, Jonathan E; Batter, Stephen J; Serels, Scott R; Dodds, Jon H

    2011-09-01

    Although transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies (TRUSB) of the prostate gland are generally considered to be low-risk procedures, a study from Canada reported that there had been a significant increase in the percentage of hospital admissions following TRUSBs between 1996 and 2005 (1.0% to 4.1%). The authors speculated that the increase may be secondary to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant enteric bacteria or the result of an increasing number of cores taken with each TRUSB. In a chart review, we retrospectively evaluated complications from 2,080 consecutive TRUSBs performed by one urology group in Connecticut between January 2003 and August 2010. We identified seven patients (0.34%) who were admitted to an acute-care hospital for infectious complications and three patients (0.14%) who were admitted for bleeding. The risk of serious infections and bleeding did not significantly rise during the study period despite a significant increase in the mean number of biopsy cores taken. PMID:21980673

  3. Diagnostic yield of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for mediastinal staging in lung cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bussy, Sebastián; Labarca, Gonzalo; Canals, Sofia; Caviedes, Iván; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive diagnostic test with a high diagnostic yield for suspicious central pulmonary lesions and for mediastinal lymph node staging. The main objective of this study was to describe the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with suspected lung cancer. METHODS: Prospective study of patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis. Patients ≥ 18 years of age were recruited between July of 2010 and August of 2013. We recorded demographic variables, radiological characteristics provided by axial CT of the chest, location of the lesion in the mediastinum as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification, and definitive diagnostic result (EBUS with a diagnostic biopsy or a definitive diagnostic method). RESULTS: Our analysis included 354 biopsies, from 145 patients. Of those 145 patients, 54.48% were male. The mean age was 63.75 years. The mean lymph node size was 15.03 mm, and 90 lymph nodes were smaller than 10.0 mm. The EBUS-TBNA method showed a sensitivity of 91.17%, a specificity of 100.0%, and a negative predictive value of 92.9%. The most common histological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: EBUS-TBNA is a diagnostic tool that yields satisfactory results in the staging of neoplastic mediastinal lesions. PMID:26176519

  4. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous sclerotherapy of simple renal cysts with n-butyl cyanoacrylate and iodized oil mixture as an outpatient procedure

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tamer A.; Abdelaal, Mohamed A.; Enite, Ashraf; Badran, Yasser A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous sclerotherapy of symptomatic simple renal cysts with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and iodized oil mixture as an outpatient single session procedure. Materials and Methods: A total of ninety two patients with 100 symptomatic simple renal cysts (larger than 5 cm) were treated by ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous aspiration and injection of NBCA and iodized oil mixture. The patients (68 men and 24 women, mean age, 42.4 ± 10.5 years) were treated with as out-patients. The volume of the treated cysts was calculated with periodic noncontrast enhanced CT examinations 3, 6 and 9, months after the procedure. The procedure was considered successful at follow-up CT when there was total ablation or greater than 80% reduction of size with resolution of symptoms, respectively. Failure was defined as less than 80% reduction and/or persistent symptoms. Results: The sclerotherapy was technically successful in all patients. The diameter of the cysts ranged between 5.5 and 13.5 cm (mean, 8.8 ± 1.4 cm), and 1.5 and 3.8 cm (mean, 2.1 ± 0.4 cm) before and after sclerotherapy, respectively (P < 0.001). Average diameter reduction was 83.7% during the follow-up period. The mean follow- up lasted 7.1 months (3–11 months). Flank pain resolved in 86 of 92 symptomatic patients (93.48%). In six patients, the symptoms decreased slightly. The procedure was successful in 98 of 100 cysts (98%), demonstrated by follow-up CT. The only two failed cyst was larger than 10 cm in diameter and don’t required any further treatment. We did not observe any procedure related complications. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided percutaneous sclerotherapy with NBCA and iodized oil mixture for management of symptomatic simple renal cysts was found to be a real time, effective, safe, well tolerated, alternative and simple technique that can be carried out by urologists as an outpatient procedure. PMID:26834402

  5. Analysis of Efficacy Differences between Caudal and Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in Chronic Lumbar Axial Discogenic Pain: Local Anesthetic Alone vs. Local Combined with Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Boswell, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Comparative assessment of randomized controlled trials of caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in chronic lumbar discogenic pain. Objective: To assess the comparative efficacy of caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches of epidural injections in managing axial or discogenic low back pain. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections are commonly performed utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach to treat chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain, which is pain exclusive of that associated with a herniated intervertebral disc, or that is due to degeneration of the zygapophyseal joints, or due to dysfunction of the sacroiliac joints, respectively. The literature on the efficacy of epidural injections in managing chronic axial lumbar pain of presumed discogenic origin is limited. Methods: The present analysis is based on 2 randomized controlled trials of chronic axial low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain, utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach, with a total of 240 patients studied, and a 24-month follow-up. Patients were assigned to receive either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic with a steroid in each 60 patient group. Results: The primary outcome measure was significant improvement, defined as pain relief and functional status improvement of at least 50% from baseline, which was reported at 24-month follow-ups in 72% who received local anesthetic only with a lumbar interlaminar approach and 54% who received local anesthetic only with a caudal approach. In patients receiving local anesthetic with a steroid, the response rate was 67% for those who had a lumbar interlaminar approach and 68% for those who had a caudal approach at 12 months. The response was significantly better in the lumbar interlaminar group who received local anesthetic only, 77% versus 56% at 12 months and 72% versus 54% at 24 months. Conclusion: This assessment shows that in patients with axial or discogenic pain in the lumbar spine after excluding facet joint and SI Joint pain, epidural injections of local anesthetic by the caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach may be effective in managing chronic low back pain with a potential superiority for a lumbar interlaminar approach over a caudal approach. PMID:25678838

  6. A Triple-Masked, Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus and Distal Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia for Outpatient Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Nicholas C. K.; Mercer, Deana; Soneru, Codruta; Dillow, Jennifer; Jaime, Francisco; Petersen, Timothy R.; Mariano, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. For hand surgery, brachial plexus blocks provide effective anesthesia but produce undesirable numbness. We hypothesized that distal peripheral nerve blocks will better preserve motor function while providing effective anesthesia. Methods. Adult subjects who were scheduled for elective ambulatory hand surgery under regional anesthesia and sedation were recruited and randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block or distal block of the ulnar and median nerves. Each subject received 15 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine at the assigned location with 15 mL of normal saline injected in the alternate block location. The primary outcome (change in baseline grip strength measured by a hydraulic dynamometer) was tested before the block and prior to discharge. Subject satisfaction data were collected the day after surgery. Results. Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) strength loss in the distal group was 21.4% (14.3, 47.8%), while all subjects in the supraclavicular group lost 100% of their preoperative strength, P = 0.001. Subjects in the distal group reported greater satisfaction with their block procedures on the day after surgery, P = 0.012. Conclusion. Distal nerve blocks better preserve motor function without negatively affecting quality of anesthesia, leading to increased patient satisfaction, when compared to brachial plexus block. PMID:24839439

  7. Epidural injection with or without steroid in managing chronic low back and lower extremity pain: ameta-analysis of ten randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Jinshuai; Zhang, Long; Li, Mengya; Tian, Yiren; Zheng, Wang; Chen, Jia; Huang, Teng; Li, Xicheng; Tian, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic low back and lower extremity pain is mainly caused by lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and radiculitis. Various surgery and nonsurgical modalities, including epidural injections, have been used to treat LDH or radiculitis. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis to assess the effects of the two interventions in managing various chronic low and lower extremity pain. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which compared the effect of local anesthetic with or without steroids. The outcomes included pain relief, functional improvement, opioid intake, and therapeutic procedural characteristics. Pooled estimates were calculated using a random-effects or fixed-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity between the included studies. Results: 10 RCTs (involving 1111 patients) were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that 41.7% of patients who received local anesthetic with steroid (group 1) and 40.2% of patients who received local anesthetic alone (group 2) had significant improvement in pain relief. And the Numeric Rating Scale pain scales were significantly reduced by 4.09 scores (95% CI: -4.26, -3.91), and 4.12 (95% CI: -4.35, -3.89) scores, respectively. Similarly, 39.8% of patients in group 1 and 40.7% of patients in group 2 achieved significantly improved functional status. The Oswestry Disability Index in the two groups were reduced by 14.5 (95% CI: -15.24, -13.75) and 12.37 (95% CI: -16.13, -8.62), respectively. The average procedures per year in group 1 was 3.68 ± 1.17 and 3.68 ± 1.26 in group 2 with an average total relief per year of 31.67 ± 13.17 weeks and 32.64 ± 13.92 weeks, respectively. The opioid intake decreased from baseline by 8.81 mg (95% CI: -12.24, -5.38) and 16.92 mg (95% CI: -22.71, -11.12) in the two groups, respectively. Conclusion: This meta-analysis confirms that epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids have beneficial but similar effects in the treatment of patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain. PMID:26309483

  8. Biological characteristics of HCC by ultrasound-guided aspiration biopsy and its clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Wu; Lin, Xue-Ying; He, Yi-Mi; Gao, Shang-Da; Lin, Xiao-Dong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To probe the pathological biological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by the ultrasound-guided aspiration biopsy and assess the clinical application value of this method. METHODS: The biopsy and DNA analysis by flow cytometry (FCM) were taken in 46 cases with HCC nodules, including 26 cases and 20 cases with nodules ≤ 3 cm and > 3 cm in diameters respectively, and 12 cases with intrahepatic benign hyperplastic nodules. They were taken in 22 cases of 46 cases with HCC before and after the therapy. Fine-needles and automatic histological incised biopsy needles were used. The fresh biopsy tissue was produced into the single cell suspension, which was sent for DNA detection and ratio analysis of cell period. The ratio of each DNA period of cell proliferation of each group was calculated and compared with each other. The DNA aneuploid (AN) and apoptosis cell peak were observed and their percentages were calculated. RESULTS: The ratios of S and G2/M periods of DNA, which reflect cell hyperproliferation, in the group with HCC tumors > 3 cm in diameter were markedly higher than those of the group with HCC nodules ≤ 3 cm in diameter and the group with the benign hyperplastic nodules (P < 0.01 except A:B of S period, P < 0.05). The ratios of the middle group were also apparently higher than those of the latter group (P < 0.01). The ratio of DNA AN of 46 cases with HCC nodules was 34.8% (16/46). None of the cases with the intrahepatic hyperplastic nodules appeared AN. The DNA AN appeared more apparently with the growth of the tumors. The AN ratio of the group with tumors > 3 cm in diameter was 55% (11/20), markedly higher than that of the group with tumors ≤ 3 cm in diameter which was 19.2% (5/26) (P < 0.01). The FCM DNA analysis of 22 specimens of hepatic carcinoma tissue before therapy showed that the aneuploid peaks appeared in 5 cases (22.7%). The ratio of G1 period rose after therapy while the S period and G2/M ratios fell (P < 0.01). The aneuploid peak disappeared in the 5 cases after the therapy, while the apoptosis peaks in 12 cases (54.5%) appeared. CONCLUSION: Addition to supply the information of the pathological morphology of the tumor, the ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration tissue could be sent for FCM DNA analysis to comprehend its pathological biological characteristics. This can not only provide the clinic the reliable information about the occurrence, development, diagnosis, curative effect and prognosis of tumors but also supply biological information for clinic to choose therapeutic schemes. PMID:12717834

  9. Exuberant local tissue reaction to intramuscular injection of nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin)--a steroid compound in a sesame seed oil base--mimicking soft tissue malignant tumors: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khankhanian, N K; Hammers, Y A; Kowalski, P

    1992-12-01

    We present an unusual pseudotumor that formed in reaction to self-administered intramuscular injections of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin) in a young soldier. The histopathologic features which closely mimicked several malignant neoplasms could have led to an incorrect diagnosis of malignancy and unnecessary extensive surgery. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been previously reported. PMID:1470383

  10. Sonoanatomical Change of Phrenic Nerve According to Posture During Ultrasound-Guided Stellate Ganglion Block

    PubMed Central

    Joeng, Eui Soo; Jeong, Young Cheol; Park, Bum Jun; Kang, Seok; Yang, Seung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk of phrenic nerve injury during ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (US-SGB) according to sonoanatomy of the phrenic nerve, and determine a safer posture for needle insertion by assessing its relationship with surrounding structure according to positional change. Methods Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were recruited and underwent ultrasound in two postures, i.e., supine position with the neck extension and head rotation, and lateral decubitus position. The transducer was placed at the anterior tubercle of the C6 level to identify phrenic nerve. The cross-sectional area (CSA), depth from skin, distance between phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle of C6 transverse process, and the angle formed by anterior tubercle, posterior tubercle and phrenic nerve were measured. Results The phrenic nerve was clearly identified in the intermuscular fascia layer between the anterior scalene and sternocleidomastoid muscles. The distance between the phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle was 10.33±3.20 mm with the supine position and 9.20±3.31 mm with the lateral decubitus position, respectively. The mean CSA and skin depth of phrenic nerve were not statistically different between the two positions. The angle with the supine position was 48.37°±27.43°, and 58.89°±30.02° with the lateral decubitus position. The difference of angle between the two positions was statistically significant. Conclusion Ultrasound is a useful tool for assessing the phrenic nerve and its anatomical relation with other cervical structures. In addition, lateral decubitus position seems to be safer by providing wider angle for needle insertion than the supine position in US-SGB. PMID:27152274

  11. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  12. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the suspicion of pancreatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metastases to the pancreas are rare, and usually mistaken for primary pancreatic cancers. This study aimed to describe the histology results of solid pancreatic tumours obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Methods In a retrospective review, patients with pancreatic solid tumours and history of previous extrapancreatic cancer underwent EUS-FNA from January/1997 to December/2010. Most patients were followed-up until death and some of them were still alive at the end of the study. The performance of EUS-FNA for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was analyzed. Symptoms, time frame between primary tumour diagnosis and the finding of metastases, and survival after diagnosis were also analyzed. Results 37 patients underwent EUS-FNA for probable pancreas metastases. Most cases (65%) presented with symptoms, especially upper abdominal pain (46%). Median time between detection of the first tumour and the finding of pancreatic metastases was 36 months. Metastases were confirmed in 32 (1.6%) cases, 30 of them by EUS-FNA, and 2 by surgery. Other 5 cases were non-metastatic. Most metastases were from lymphoma, colon, lung, and kidney. Twelve (32%) patients were submitted to surgery. Median survival after diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 9 months, with no difference of survival between surgical and non-surgical cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of EUS-FNA with histology analysis of the specimens for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases were, respectively, 93.8%, 60%, 93.8%, 60% and 89%. Conclusion EUS-FNA with histology of the specimens is a sensitive and accurate method for definitive diagnosis of metastatic disease in patients with a previous history of extrapancreatic malignancies. PMID:23578194

  13. Endobronchial ultrasound elastography: a new method in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background TBNA through the flexible bronchoscope is a 37-year-old technology that utilizes a TBNA needle to puncture the bronchial wall and obtain specimens of peribronchial and mediastinal lesions through the flexible bronchoscope for the diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases in the mediastinum and lung. Methods Since 2002, the Olympus Company developed the first generation ultrasound equipment for use in the airway, initially utilizing an ultrasound probe introduced through the working channel followed by incoroporation of a fixed linear ultrasound array at the distal tip of the bronchoscope. This new bronchoscope equipped with a convex type ultrasound probe on the tip was subsequently introduced into clinical practice. The convex probe (CP)-EBUS allows real-time endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. EBUS-TBNA is a minimally invasive procedure performed under local anesthesia that has been shown to have a high sensitivity and diagnostic yield for lymph node staging of lung cancer. Results In 10 years of EBUS development, the Olympus Company developed the second generation EBUS bronchoscope (BF-UC260FW) with the ultrasound image processor (EU-M1), and in 2013 introduced a new ultrasound image processor (EU-M2) into clinical practice. FUJI company has also developed a curvilinear array endobronchial ultrasound bronchoscope (EB-530 US) that makes it easier for the operator to master the operation of the ultrasonic bronchoscope. Also, the new thin convex probe endobronchial ultrasound bronchoscope (TCP-EBUS) is able to visualize one to three bifurcations distal to the current CP-EBUS. Conclusions The emergence of EBUS-TBNA has also been accompanied by innovation in EBUS instruments. EBUS elastography is, then, a new technique for describing the compliance of structures during EBUS, which may be of use in the determination of metastasis to the mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This article describes these new EBUS techniques and reviews the relevant literature. PMID:26807274

  14. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole Ma; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-02-10

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing "blind" surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant breast tumours in the search for better oncological and cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26862490

  15. Real-time ultrasound-guided PCNL using a novel SonixGPS needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; Dalin, He; He, Hui

    2014-08-01

    SonixGPS is a successful ultrasound guidance position system. It helps to improve accuracy in performing complex puncture operations. This study firstly used SonixGPS to perform kidney calyx access in PCNL to investigate its effectiveness and safety. This was a prospectively randomized controlled study performed from September 2011 to October 2012. A total of 97 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups using random number generated from SAS software. 47 Patients were enrolled in conventional ultrasound-guided (US-guided) group and 50 patients were classified into SonixGPS-guided group. Nine patients were lost during follow-up. Hence, a total of 88 patients were qualified and analyzed. Preoperative examinations included urine analysis, urine culture, kidney function, coagulation profile and routine analysis of blood. Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis. The intraoperative findings, including blood loss, operating time, time to successful puncture, the number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay were recorded. The stone clearance rate and complications were analyzed. The present study showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data, preoperative markers, stone clearance rate and the stone composition. However, the time to successful puncture, the number of trials for successful puncture, operating time and hospital length of stay were significantly decreased in the SonixGPS-guided group. Furthermore, the hemoglobin decrease was also obviously lower in the SonixGPS group than that in conventional US-guided group. SonixGPS needle tacking system guided PCNL is safe and effective in treating upper urinary tract stones. This novel technology makes puncturing more accuracy and can significantly decrease the incidence of relative hemorrhage and accelerate recovery. PMID:24965272

  16. Ultrasound guided electrocoagulation in patients with chronic non‐insertional Achilles tendinopathy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Boesen, M Ilum; Torp‐Pedersen, S; Koenig, M Juhl; Christensen, R; Langberg, H; Hölmich, P; Nielsen, M Bachmann; Bliddal, H

    2006-01-01

    Background High resolution colour Doppler ultrasound shows intratendinous Doppler activity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment of this neovascularisation with sclerosing therapy seems to relieve the pain. However, the procedure often has to be repeated. Objective To investigate the effect of electrocoagulation of the neovessels on tendon pain and tendon vascularity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Methods Colour Doppler ultrasound guided electrocoagulation was used on vessels in the ventral portion of the Achilles tendon in 11 patients (seven men, four women, mean age 41 years) with painful chronic mid‐portion Achilles tendinosis. A unipolar coagulation device was used. Results One patient dropped out after two months (dissatisfied with the results). The remaining 10 patients (91%) were satisfied. These 10 patients were still satisfied at six months of follow up and had returned to their previous level of activity. All 10 patients were “cured” after one treatment. The patient who dropped out received two treatments because of lack of progress. There was significantly reduced pain (Likert pain scale, 0–10) during activity, from a median of 7 (range 4 to 10) at baseline to 0 (0 to 8) at six months' follow up (p<0.005); and at rest, from 1.5 (1 to 5) to 0 (0 to 8) (p = 0.005). In all patients, vascularisation was unchanged at the six months follow up, with no significant change in semiquantitative or quantitative colour scoring. Conclusions Coagulation in the area with vessels entering the tendon appears to be effective treatment for painful chronic mid‐tendinous Achilles tendinopathy. No effect on the intratendinous Doppler activity could be detected, suggesting that the effect is independent of changes in blood flow. Localisation of hyperaemia appears to be the key to the pathology and for targeting the treatment. One explanation could be that the effect is obtained by destruction of nerves accompanying the vessels. PMID:16807305

  17. Diagnostic value of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in various lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortakoylu, Mediha Gonenc; Iliaz, Sinem; Bahadir, Ayse; Aslan, Asuman; Iliaz, Raim; Ozgul, Mehmet Akif; Urer, Halide Nur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a new method for the diagnosis and staging of lung disease, and its use is increasing worldwide. It has been used as a means of diagnosing lung cancer in its initial stages, and there are data supporting its use for the diagnosis of benign lung disease. The aim of this study was to share our experience with EBUS-TBNA and discuss its diagnostic value. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the results related to 159 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA at our pulmonary medicine clinic between 2010 and 2013. We recorded the location and size of lymph nodes seen during EBUS. Lymph nodes that appeared to be affected on EBUS were sampled at least twice. We recorded the diagnostic results of EBUS-TBNA and (for cases in which EBUS-TBNA yielded an inconclusive diagnosis) the final diagnoses after further investigation and follow-up. Results: We evaluated 159 patients, of whom 89 (56%) were male and 70 (44%) were female. The mean age was 54.6 ± 14.2 years among the male patients and 51.9 ± 11.3 years among the female patients. Of the 159 patients evaluated, 115 (84%) were correctly diagnosed by EBUS. The diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-TBNA was 83% for benign granulomatous diseases and 77% for malignant diseases. Conclusions: The diagnostic value of EBUS-TBNA is also high for benign pathologies, such as sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. In patients with mediastinal disorders, the use of EBUS-TBNA should be encouraged, primarily because it markedly reduces the need for mediastinoscopy. PMID:26578131

  18. Ultrasound-guided procedures in medical education: a fresh look at cadavers.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Riley; Means, Russel; Robertson, Jeffrey; Rappaport, Douglas; Schmier, Charles; Jones, Travis; Stolz, Lori Ann; Kaplan, Stephen Jerome; Adamas-Rappaport, William Joaquin; Amini, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Demand for bedside ultrasound in medicine has created a need for earlier exposure to ultrasound education during the clinical years of undergraduate medical education. Although bedside ultrasound is often used for invasive medical procedures, there is no standardized educational model for procedural skills that can provide the learner a real-life simulated experience. The objective of our study was to describe a unique fresh cadaver preparation model, and to determine the impact of a procedure-focused ultrasound training session. This study was a cross-sectional study at an urban academic medical center. A sixteen-item questionnaire was administered at the beginning and end of the session. Fifty-five third year medical students participated in this 1-day event during their surgical clerkship. Students were trained to perform the following ultrasound-guided procedures: internal jugular vein cannulation, femoral vein cannulation femoral artery cannulation and pericardiocentesis. Preparation of the fresh cadaver is easily replicated and requires minor manipulation of cadaver vessels and pericardial space. Fifty-five medical students in their third year participated in this study. All of the medical students agreed that US could help increase their confidence in performing procedures in the future. Eighty percent (95 % CI 70-91 %) of students felt that there was a benefit of learning ultrasound-based anatomy in addition to traditional methods. Student confidence was self-rated on a five-point Likert scale. Student confidence increased with statistical significance in all of the skills taught. The most dramatic increase was noted in central venous line placement, which improved from 1.95 (SD = 0.11) to 4.2 (SD = 0.09) (p < 0.001). The use of fresh cadavers for procedure-focused US education is a realistic method that improves the confidence of third year medical students in performing complex but critical procedures. PMID:26276229

  19. Local anesthesia type affects cancer detection rate in transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, Mustafa Zafer; Kandirali, Engin; Colakerol, Aykut; Tuken, Murat; Semercioz, Atilla

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Studies about the anesthesia techniques during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx) are usually focused on pain relief. Although patients' tolerance is an important issue in TRUS-Bx, cancer detection rate (CDR) must not be ignored. In this study, we compared the impact of intrarectal lidocaine gel anesthesia (IRLA) and periprostatic nerve blockade (PNB) techniques on CDR. Materials and Methods: A total of 422 patients underwent 10 core-TRUS-Bx because of elevated serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (>2.5ng/mL) and/or suspicious digital rectal examination findings. Patients were divided into two groups according to the applied anesthesia technique: IRLA group and PNB group. Age, serum PSA level, prostate volume, visual analogue scale (VAS) score and CDR were recorded and compared statistically with chi square and unpaired t-tests. Results: Of the patients 126/422 (29.9%) underwent TRUS-Bx by using IRLA whereas 296/422 (70.1 %) by PNB technique. The mean, age, serum PSA level and prostate volume were similar between the two groups. CDR was 19.8% and 25.4% in IRLA and PNB groups, respectively (p=0.001). The mean VAS score of the PNB group (1.84±0.89) was significantly lower than that for IRLA group (3.62±1.06) (p=0.001). Conclusions: Our results revealed that PNB is superior to IRLA in terms of CDR. Further studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:26689511

  20. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole MA; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing “blind” surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant breast tumours in the search for better oncological and cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26862490

  1. Ultrasound-guided aspiration cytology of retroperitoneal masses with histopathological corroboration: A study of 71 cases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Indranil; Bhowmik, Sourav; Sinha, Mamata Guha Mallick; Bera, Pranati

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of retroperitoneal lesions is one of the most difficult areas in surgical pathology. Both primary and metastatic tumors can grow silently in retroperitoneum before the appearance of clinical signs and symptoms. Guided aspiration cytology has shown a promising role in diagnosis of lesions in this region. Aims: This study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses and to study the spectrum of retroperitoneal lesions in a rural tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This study was done on 71 patients presenting with retroperitoneal masses over a period of 20 months in a tertiary care hospital. Ultrasound-guided FNAC was done and the smears were stained by MGG and H and E stains. Histopathological corroboration could be done on all neoplastic lesions along with some non-neoplastic lesions. Results: Out of 71 cases, 48 cases (67.6%) were found to be neoplastic. Malignant tumors (35 cases) were more common than benign ones (13 cases). Malignant lesions were predominantly composed of lesions of lymph node (17 cases i.e. 48.57%) followed by sarcomas (5 cases) and germ cell tumors. Some uncommon retroperitoneal lesions like adrenal myelolipoma, renal angiomyolipoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and adrenocortical carcinoma were found in our study. Guided FNAC could diagnose all the malignant lesions with 100% accuracy except in 2 cases of poorly differentiated carcinoma which came out to be non-Hodgkin lymphoma on subsequent biopsies. Conclusion: Guided FNAC is an inexpensive, rapid and reliable method for diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses. PMID:25190978

  2. Epidural Steroid Injections Are Associated with Less Improvement in the Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A subgroup analysis of the SPORT

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kris; Kepler, Christopher; Hilibrand, Alan; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon; Tosteson, Tor; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd; Weinstein, James

    2013-01-01

    Summary of Background Data Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common incidental finding among adults over the age of 60, The use of ESI in these patients is common, although there is little evidence in the literature to demonstrate the long-term benefit of ESI in the treatment of lumbar stenosis. Objective The hypothesis of this study was that patients who received epidural steroid injections (ESI) during initial treatment as part of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) would have improved clinical outcomes and a lower rate of crossover to surgery compared to patients who did not receive ESI. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who received epidural steroid injections within the first three months of enrollment in SPORT (ESI) were compared to patients who did not receive epidural injections during the first three months of the study (No ESI). Results There were 69 ESI patients and 207 No-ESI patients. There were no significant differences in demographic factors, baseline clinical outcome scores, or operative details although there was a significant increase in baseline preference for nonsurgical treatment among ESI patients (62% vs. 33%, p <0.001). There was an average 26 minute increase in operative time and an increased length of stay by 0.9 days among the ESI patients who ultimately underwent surgical treatment. Averaged over four years, there was significantly less improvement in SF36 PF among surgically treated ESI patients (ESI 14.8 vs. No-ESI 22.5, p=0.025). In addition, there was also significantly less improvement among the nonsurgically treated patients in SF36 BP (ESI 7.3 vs. No-ESI 16.7, p=0.007) and SF36 PF (ESI 5.5 vs. No-ESI 15.2, p=0.009). Of the patients assigned to surgical treatment, there was a significantly increased crossover to nonsurgical treatment among patients who received an ESI (ESI 33% vs. No ESI 11%, p=0.012). Of the patients assigned to non-operative treatment, there was a significantly increased crossover to surgical treatment in the ESI patients (ESI 58% vs. No ESI 32%, p=0.003). Conclusion Despite equivalent baseline status, ESI were associated with significantly less improvement at four years among all patients with spinal stenosis in SPORT. Furthermore, ESI were associated with longer duration of surgery and longer hospital stay. There was no improvement in outcome with ESI whether patients were treated surgically or nonsurgically. PMID:23238485

  3. Comparison of the efficacy of saline, local anesthetics, and steroids in epidural and facet joint injections for the management of spinal pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Nampiaparampil, Devi E.; Manchikanti, Kavita N.; Falco, Frank J.E.; Singh, Vijay; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Kaye, Alan D.; Sehgal, Nalini; Soin, Amol; Simopoulos, Thomas T.; Bakshi, Sanjay; Gharibo, Christopher G.; Gilligan, Christopher J.; Hirsch, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of epidural and facet joint injections has been assessed utilizing multiple solutions including saline, local anesthetic, steroids, and others. The responses to these various solutions have been variable and have not been systematically assessed with long-term follow-ups. Methods: Randomized trials utilizing a true active control design were included. The primary outcome measure was pain relief and the secondary outcome measure was functional improvement. The quality of each individual article was assessed by Cochrane review criteria, as well as the criteria developed by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) for assessing interventional techniques. An evidence analysis was conducted based on the qualitative level of evidence (Level I to IV). Results: A total of 31 trials met the inclusion criteria. There was Level I evidence that local anesthetic with steroids was effective in managing chronic spinal pain based on multiple high-quality randomized controlled trials. The evidence also showed that local anesthetic with steroids and local anesthetic alone were equally effective except in disc herniation, where the superiority of local anesthetic with steroids was demonstrated over local anesthetic alone. Conclusion: This systematic review showed equal efficacy for local anesthetic with steroids and local anesthetic alone in multiple spinal conditions except for disc herniation where the superiority of local anesthetic with steroids was seen over local anesthetic alone. PMID:26005584

  4. Estimated Deaths and Illnesses Averted During Fungal Meningitis Outbreak Associated with Contaminated Steroid Injections, United States, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Derado, Gordana; Wise, Matthew; Harris, Julie R.; Chiller, Tom; Meltzer, Martin I.; Park, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    During 2012–2013, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and partners responded to a multistate outbreak of fungal infections linked to methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) injections produced by a compounding pharmacy. We evaluated the effects of public health actions on the scope of this outbreak. A comparison of 60-day case-fatality rates and clinical characteristics of patients given a diagnosis on or before October 4, the date the outbreak was widely publicized, with those of patients given a diagnosis after October 4 showed that an estimated 3,150 MPA injections, 153 cases of meningitis or stroke, and 124 deaths were averted. Compared with diagnosis after October 4, diagnosis on or before October 4 was significantly associated with a higher 60-day case-fatality rate (28% vs. 5%; p<0.0001). Aggressive public health action resulted in a substantially reduced estimated number of persons affected by this outbreak and improved survival of affected patients. PMID:25989264

  5. Estimated deaths and illnesses averted during fungal meningitis outbreak associated with contaminated steroid injections, United States, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel M; Derado, Gordana; Wise, Matthew; Harris, Julie R; Chiller, Tom; Meltzer, Martin I; Park, Benjamin J

    2015-06-01

    During 2012-2013, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and partners responded to a multistate outbreak of fungal infections linked to methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) injections produced by a compounding pharmacy. We evaluated the effects of public health actions on the scope of this outbreak. A comparison of 60-day case-fatality rates and clinical characteristics of patients given a diagnosis on or before October 4, the date the outbreak was widely publicized, with those of patients given a diagnosis after October 4 showed that an estimated 3,150 MPA injections, 153 cases of meningitis or stroke, and 124 deaths were averted. Compared with diagnosis after October 4, diagnosis on or before October 4 was significantly associated with a higher 60-day case-fatality rate (28% vs. 5%; p<0.0001). Aggressive public health action resulted in a substantially reduced estimated number of persons affected by this outbreak and improved survival of affected patients. PMID:25989264

  6. The Effectiveness of Transforaminal Versus Caudal Routes for Epidural Steroid Injections in Managing Lumbosacral Radicular Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hengxing; Lu, Lu; Li, Xueying; Jia, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Yao, Xue; Wu, Qiuli; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-05-01

    Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is one of the most commonly used treatments for radiculopathy. Previous studies have described the effectiveness of ESI in the management of radiculopathy. However, controversy exists regarding the route that is most beneficial and effective with respect to the administration of epidural steroids, as both transforaminal (TF) and caudal (C) routes are commonly used.This analysis reviewed studies comparing the effectiveness of TF-ESIs with that of C-ESIs in the treatment of radiculopathy as a means of providing pain relief and improving functionality. This meta-analysis was performed to guide clinical decision-making.The study was a systematic review of comparative studies.A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases for trials written in English. The randomized trials and observational studies that met our inclusion criteria were subsequently included. Two reviewers, respectively, extracted data and estimated the risk of bias. All statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.3.Six prospective and 2 retrospective studies involving 664 patients were included. Statistical analysis was performed utilizing only the 6 prospective studies. Although slight pain and functional improvements were noted in the TF-ESI groups compared with the C-ESI groups, these improvements were neither clinically nor statistically significant.The limitations of this meta-analysis resulted primarily from the weaknesses of the comparative studies and the relative paucity of patients included in each study.Both the TF and C approaches are effective in reducing pain and improving functional scores, and they demonstrated similar efficacies in the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. PMID:27149443

  7. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided biopsy to diagnose large posterior mediastinal parathyroid adenoma prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Buderi, Silviu Ioan; Saleh, Hesham Zayed; Theologou, Thomas; Shackcloth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman was referred with hypercalcaemia and found to have a four cm retrotracheal mass on CT. The patient also suffered from neurofibromatosis and a recently diagnosed gastric mass. Tc99 sestamibi scintigraphy revealed an area of intense uptake in the right upper mediastinum. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) was used to confirm the diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma and thoracoscopic resection was subsequently performed. EBUS-TBNA biopsy can be a helpful diagnostic tool to confirm diagnosis of mediastinal parathyroid masses in patients with atypical or complex clinical presentations. PMID:24825549

  8. Comparative efficacy of ultrasound-guided and stimulating popliteal-sciatic perineural catheters for postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Loland, Vanessa J.; Sandhu, NavParkash S.; Bishop, Michael L.; Lee, Daniel K.; Schwartz, Alexandra K.; Girard, Paul J.; Ferguson, Eliza J.; Ilfeld, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Perineural catheter insertion using ultrasound guidance alone is a relatively new approach. Previous studies have shown that ultrasound-guided catheters take less time to place with high placement success rates, but the analgesic efficacy compared with the established stimulating catheter technique remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that popliteal-sciatic perineural catheter insertion relying exclusively on ultrasound guidance results in superior postoperative analgesia compared with stimulating catheters. Methods Preoperatively, subjects receiving a popliteal-sciatic perineural catheter for foot or ankle surgery were assigned randomly to either ultrasound guidance (bolus via needle with non-stimulating catheter insertion) or electrical stimulation (bolus via catheter). We used 1.5% mepivacaine 40 mL for the primary surgical nerve block and 0.2% ropivacaine (basal 8 mL·hr−1; bolus 4 mL; 30 min lockout) was infused postoperatively. The primary outcome was average surgical pain on postoperative day one. Results Forty of the 80 subjects enrolled were randomized to each treatment group. One of 40 subjects (2.5%) in the ultrasound group failed catheter placement per protocol vs nine of 40 (22.5%) in the stimulating catheter group (P = 0.014). The difference in procedural duration (mean [95% confidence interval (CI)]) was −6.48 (−9.90 - −3.05) min, with ultrasound requiring 7.0 (4.0-14.1) min vs stimulation requiring 11.0 (5.0-30.0) min (P < 0.001). The average pain scores of subjects who provided data on postoperative day one were somewhat higher for the 33 ultrasound subjects than for the 26 stimulation subjects (5.0 [1.0-7.8] vs 3.0 [0.0-6.5], respectively; P = 0.032), a difference (mean [95%CI]) of 1.37 (0.03-2.71). Conclusion For popliteal-sciatic perineural catheters, ultrasound guidance takes less time and results in fewer placement failures compared with stimulating catheters. However, analgesia may be mildly improved with successfully placed stimulating catheters. Clinical trial registration number NCT00876681. PMID:20700680

  9. An optical tracker based robot registration and servoing method for ultrasound guided percutaneous renal access

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robot-assisted needle steering facilitates the percutaneous renal access (PRA) for their accuracy and consistency over manual operation. However, inaccurate image-robot correspondence and uncertainties in robot parameters make the needle track deviate from the intrarenal target. This paper aims to simplify the image-tracker-robot registration procedure and improves the accuracy of needle alignment for robot assisted ultrasound-guided PRA. Methods First, a semi-automatic rigid registration is used for the alignment of the preoperative MR volume and the intraoperative orthogonal US slices. Passive markers are mounted both on US probe and robot end-effector, the planned puncture path is transferred from the MR volume frame into optical tracker frame. Tracker-robot correspondence and robot calibration are performed iteratively using a simplified scheme, both position and orientation information are incorporated to estimate the transformation matrix, only several key structural robot parameters and joint zero-positions are calibrated for simplicity in solving the inverse kinematic. Furthermore, an optical tracker feedback control is designed for compensating inaccuracies in robot parameters and tracker-robot correspondence, and improving the accuracy of needle alignment. The intervention procedure was implemented by a telemanipulated 5R1P robot, two experiments were conducted to validate the efficiency of robot-tracker registration method and the optical tracker feedback control, robot assisted needle insertion experiment was conducted on kidney phantom to evaluate the system performance. Results The relative positioning accuracy of needle alignment is 0.24 ± 0.08 mm, the directional accuracy is 6.78 ± 1.65 × 10-4rad; the needle-target distance of needle insertion is 2.15 ± 0. 17 mm. The optical tracker feedback control method performs stable against wide range of angular disturbance over (0 ~ 0.4) radians, and the length disturbance over (0 ~ 100) mm. Conclusions The proposed optical tracker based robot registration and servoing method is capable of accurate three dimension needle operation for PRA procedure with improved precision and shortened time. PMID:23705678

  10. Performance characteristic of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration is unaffected by pancreatic mass size

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Kim, Hwasoon; Reddy, Kartika; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Despite a well-established tool for diagnosis of pancreatic masses, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) studies have shown suboptimal diagnostic performance at divergent mass sizes. Since the impact of gold standard follow-up and presence of on-site evaluation on this observation is unknown, we aimed to study the performance characteristics of EUS-FNA under these strict conditions. Patients and methods: EUS-FNA results from pancreatic mass lesions performed between July 2000 and March 2013 were evaluated. All patients with histological follow-up were then stratified into four groups: Group A ( ≤ 10 mm), Group B (11 – 20 mm), Group C (21 – 40 mm), and Group D (> 40 mm). Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy were calculated for each group and compared. Results: A total of 612 /3832 (16 %) patients with pancreatic masses who underwent EUS-FNA had histology confirmation. Of these, 81 were excluded due to unavailable lesion size, while the rest formed the study cohort. Mean age (SD) was 65.8 years (9.3) with 51.2 % female. The mean number of passes for the entire cohort was 2.9 (SD 1.9; range 1 – 12); patients in group D had a significantly higher number of passes for on-site diagnosis (P = 0.0124). There was no significant difference between the groups for sensitivity (P = 0.1134) or diagnostic accuracy (P = 0.2111). Proportional trend analysis revealed no significant correlation between size and sensitivity (P = 0.6192). The size of lesion measured by EUS was not associated with sensitivity or specificity after adjusting for age, sex, and pancreatic location. Conclusion: In the presence of rapid on-site cytopathology and when final histology is taken as the gold standard, pancreatic mass size does not affect the performance characteristics of EUS-FNA. PMID:27092323

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for suspected malignancies adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gambitta, Pietro; Armellino, Antonio; Forti, Edoardo; Vertemati, Maurizio; Colombo, Paola Enrica; Aseni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in association with a multidisciplinary team evaluation for the detection of gastrointestinal malignancies. METHODS: A cohort of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract received EUS-FNA after a standardized multidisciplinary team evaluation (MTE) and were divided into 4 groups according to their specific malignant risk score (MRS). Patients with a MRS of 0 (without detectable risk of malignancy) received only EUS without FNA. For patients with a MRS score ranging from 1 (low risk) - through 2 (intermediate risk) - to 3 (high risk), EUS-FNA cytology of the lesion was planned for a different time and was prioritized for those patients at higher risk for cancer. The accuracy, efficiency and quality assessment for the early detection of patients with potentially curable malignant lesions were evaluated for the whole cohort and in the different classes of MRSs. The time to definitive cytological diagnosis (TDCD), accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the rate of inconclusive tests were calculated for all patients and for each MRS group. RESULTS: A total of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions were evaluated by EUS-FNA. In 515 patients of 616 with true malignant lesions the tumor was diagnosed by EUS-FNA; 421 patients with resectable lesions received early surgical treatment, and 94 patients received chemo-radiotherapy. The overall diagnostic accuracy for the 1019 lesions in which a final diagnosis was obtained by EUS-FNA was 0.95. When patients were stratified by MTE into 4 classes of MRSs, a higher rate of patients in the group with higher cancer risk (MRS-3) received early treatment and EUS-FNA showed the highest level of accuracy (1.0). TDCD was also shorter in the MRS-3 group. The number of patients who received surgical treatment or chemo-radiotherapy was significantly higher in the MRS-3 patient group (36.3% in MRS-3, 10.7% in MRS-2, and 3.5% in MRS-1). CONCLUSION: EUS-FNA can effectively detect a curable malignant lesions at an earlier time and at a higher rate in patients with a higher cancer risk that were evaluated using MTE. PMID:25024614

  12. Clinical impact of preoperative endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Hideharu; Hara, Kazuo; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Yutaka; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To reveal the impact of preoperative endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 242 patients who underwent surgery for PDAC at our institution between January 1996 and July 2012. Among them, there were three patients with R2 resection and 30 patients with a follow-up period of less than 1 year, who were excluded because they did not meet the conditions for evaluating recurrence. Consequently, 209 patients were enrolled in the present study. The patients were divided into two groups: 126 patients who underwent preoperative EUS-FNA (FNA group) and 83 patients who did not (non-FNA group) undergo preoperative EUS-FNA. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between FNA and non-FNA groups except mean age (66.6 ± 8.9 years vs. 63.5 ± 8.9 years, respectively, P = 0.02) and the administration rate of gemcitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy (42.9% vs. 18.1%, P < 0.01). Sampling adequacy of preoperative EUS-FNA was 99.2% (125/126) and sensitivity for diagnosis was 92.9% (117/126). The rate of complications related to EUS-FNA was 1.6% (2/126); two patients experienced reduction in hemoglobin (≥2.0 g/dL). These two patients did not have any apparent bleeding and could be managed conservatively. No severe complications were seen. We evaluated long-term outcomes of preoperative EUS-FNA, especially disease-free survival, needle-track seeding and recurrence. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated no significant difference in disease-free survival between the two groups (P = 0.12). The site of recurrence was not significantly different between groups. Needle-track seeding was not observed in this study. Multivariate analysis of recurrence factors showed that preoperative EUS-FNA did not affect postoperative recurrence. Conclusion: Preoperative EUS-FNA for PDAC was shown to be a safe procedure with high diagnostic ability, and not a risk factor for postoperative recurrence. PMID:27080607

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary intervention in patients with surgically altered anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Siripun, Aroon; Sripongpun, Pimsiri; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) in patients with surgically altered anatomies. METHODS: We performed a search of the MEDLINE database for studies published between 2001 to July 2014 reporting on EUS-BD in patients with surgically altered anatomy using the terms “EUS drainage” and “altered anatomy”. All relevant articles were accessed in full text. A manual search of the reference lists of relevant retrieved articles was also performed. Only full-text English papers were included. Data regarding age, gender, diagnosis, method of EUS-BD and intervention, type of altered anatomy, technical success, clinical success, and complications were extracted and collected. Anatomic alterations were categorized as: group 1, Billroth I; group 2, Billroth II; group 4, Roux-en-Y with gastric bypass; and group 3, all other types. RESULTS: Twenty three articles identified in the literature search, three reports were from the same group with different numbers of cases. In total, 101 cases of EUS-BD in patients with altered anatomy were identified. Twenty-seven cases had no information and were excluded. Seventy four cases were included for analysis. Data of EUS-BD in patients categorized as group 1, 2 and 4 were limited with 2, 3 and 6 cases with EUS-BD done respectively. Thirty four cases with EUS-BD were reported in group 3. The pooled technical success, clinical success, and complication rates of all reports with available data were 89.18%, 91.07% and 17.5%, respectively. The results are similar to the reported outcomes of EUS-BD in general, however, with limited data of EUS-BD in patients with altered anatomy rendered it difficult to draw a firm conclusion. CONCLUSION: EUS-BD may be an option for patients with altered anatomy after a failed endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiography in centers with expertise in EUS-BD procedures in a research setting. PMID:25789101

  14. FaceTime(®) for teaching ultrasound-guided anesthetic procedures in remote place.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Tetsuya; Iketani, Yasuhiro; Nagamine, Yusuke; Goto, Takahisa

    2014-04-01

    In isolated area in Japan, only one anesthesiologist must often do new anesthetic techniques such as ultrasound-guided procedures without receiving any teaching. One solution to this problem may involve teleanesthesia, by which experienced anesthesiologists teach novices in remote places, by utilizing information communication technologies. FaceTime™ (Apple, USA), which provides 120p of the resolution and 30 frames per second (fps) is an application of free visual communications using iPod Touch™, iPhone™ or iPad™ (Apple, USA). We investigated the delay time, the loss of the frames and the picture quality of iPad (as the device in the teaching site) in combination with iPod Touch, iPhone4 or iPhone5 (as the device in the isolated site) during FaceTime. At the operating rooms in Sado General Hospital (SGH) located in Sado Island (population; approximately 60,000), Japan, an anesthesiologist prepared 3 mobile devices (iPod Touch, iPhone4 or iPhone5). He called the other anesthesiologist at Yokohama City University Hospital (YCUH; approximately 300 km apart) by FaceTime using 1 of 3 mobile devices. The anesthesiologist at YCUH received the FaceTime call using iPad. After the connection was established, the display of the same cervical ultrasound image at SGH was sent to YCUH to evaluate the distinctness visually. Then we measured the delay time of every second (n = 60) and the loss of the frames (total frames = 30 fps × 60 s = 1,800) in each device for a minute. P < 0.01 was statistically significant. The quality of the pictures on the iPad display sent from iPhone5 was distinctly the best visually. The delay time of iPhone5 was significantly longer than the others (iPod Touch; 0.14 ± 0.02 s, iPhone4; 0.13 ± 0.02 s, iPhone5; 0.19 ± 0.03 s), but clinically acceptable. The loss of the frames of iPhone5 (20; 1.1%) was significantly less than the others (iPhone4; 900, 50.0%, iPod Touch; 902, 50.1%). To teach anesthetic techniques in remote place by FaceTime, iPhone5 as the devise in isolate site was optimum compared with iPod Touch and iPhone4. PMID:24222344

  15. The potential contributing effect of ketorolac and fluoxetine to a spinal epidural hematoma following a cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection: a case report and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chien, George C Chang; McCormick, Zack; Araujo, Marco; Candido, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are commonly performed as one part of a multi-modal analgesic regimen in the management of upper extremity radicular pain. Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare complication with a reported incidence ranging from 1.38 in 10,000 to 1 in 190,000 epidurals. Current American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA), American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), and the International Spine Intervention Society (ISIS) recommendations are that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not need to be withheld prior to epidural anesthesia. We report a case wherein intramuscular ketorolac and oral fluoxetine contributed to a SEH and tetraplegia following a cervical interlaminar (ESI). A 66 year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency and neck pain radiating into her right upper extremity presented for evaluation and was deemed an appropriate CESI candidate. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multi-level neuroforaminal stenosis and degenerative intervertebral discs. Utilizing a loss of resistance to saline technique, an 18-gauge Tuohy-type needle entered the epidural space at C6-7. After negative aspiration, 4 mL of saline with 80 mg of methyl-prednisolone was injected. Immediately thereafter, the patient reported significant spasmodic-type localized neck pain with no neurologic status changes. A decision was made to administer 30 mg intramuscular ketorolac as treatment for the spasmodic-type pain. En route home, she developed a sudden onset of acute tetraplegia. She was brought to the emergency department for evaluation including platelet and coagulation studies which were normal. MRI demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from C5 to T7. She underwent a bilateral C5-T6 laminectomy with epidural hematoma evacuation and was discharged to an acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Chronic renal insufficiency, spinal stenosis, female gender, and increasing age have been identified as risk factors for SEH following epidural anesthesia. In the present case, it is postulated that after the spinal vascular system was penetrated, hemostasis was compromised by the combined antiplatelet effects of ketorolac, fluoxetine, fish oil, and vitamin E. Although generally well tolerated, the role of ketorolac, a potent anti-platelet medication used for pain relief in the peri-neuraxial intervention period, should be seriously scrutinized when other analgesic options are readily available. Although the increased risk of bleeding for the alternative medications are minimal, they are nevertheless well documented. Additionally, their additive impairment on hemostasis has not been well characterized. Withholding NSAIDs, fluoxetine, fish oil, and vitamin E in the peri-procedural period is relatively low risk and should be considered for all patients with multiple risk factors for SEH. PMID:24850120

  16. Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    Anabolic steroids are man-made substances related to male sex hormones. Doctors use anabolic steroids to treat some hormone problems in men, delayed ... some diseases. Bodybuilders and athletes often use anabolic steroids to build muscles and improve athletic performance. Using ...

  17. Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicating Liver Cirrhosis: Utility of Repeat Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy after Unsuccessful First Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Caturelli, Eugenio; Biasini, Elisabetta; Bartolucci, Francesca; Facciorusso, Domenico; Decembrino, Francesco; Attino, Vito; Bisceglia, Michele

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a second ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules thought to be hepatocellular carcinoma when the original biopsy has failed to provide a reliable diagnosis. Methods: Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules that were subsequently diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma. Each biopsy involved a single puncture with a 20 G cutting needle, which yielded pathologic material used both for cytologic and histologic studies. In 23 cases (mean diameter of nodules 48 mm) the biopsy furnished exclusively necrotic material (non-diagnostic subgroup); in the other 14 cases (mean diameter 26 mm) the biopsy yielded no neoplastic elements (false-negative subgroup). All 37 nodules were subjected to repeat biopsies performed in the same manner. Results: The repeat biopsies provided a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in six of the 23 patients from the non-diagnostic subgroup and in seven of the 14 in the false-negative subgroup. Overall, repeat biopsy produced a diagnostic gain of 35.1%. Conclusion: The chance of success with repeat biopsy of hepatocellular carcinoma is limited and may depend to some extent on the characteristics of the lesions (i.e., areas of necrosis in large nodules, well-differentiated cellular populations in small ones)

  18. Real time ultrasound-guided percutaneous tracheostomy: Is it a better option than bronchoscopic guided percutaneous tracheostomy?

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Parli Raghavan; Vijay, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy (USPCT) and bronchoscopic guided percutaneous tracheostomy (BPCT) and the incidence of complications in critically ill, obese patients. Methods Seventy four consecutive patients were included in a prospective study and randomly divided into USPCT and BPCT. Incidence of complications, ease and efficacy were compared in obese USPCT (n = 38)and BPCT (n = 36). Results are expressed as the median (25th–75th percentile) or number (percentage). Results The median times for tracheostomy were 12 min (9–14) in USPCT patients and 18 min (12–21.5) in BPCT (p = 0.05). The overall complication rate was higher in BPCT than USPCT patient group (75% vs. 321%, p < 0.05). Most complications were minor (hypotension, desaturation, tracheal cuff puncture and minor bleeding) and of higher number in the BPCT. Ultrasound-guided PCT was possible in all enrolled patients and there were no surgical conversions or deaths. Conclusions This study demonstrated that real US-guided PCT is a favourable alternative to BPCT with a low complication rate and ease, thus proving more efficacious. A US examination provides information on cervical anatomy, vasculature etc. and hence modifies and guides choice of the PCT puncture site. PMID:25859079

  19. Evaluation of ultrasound-guided extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Hyer, Christopher F; Vancourt, Robert; Block, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Thirty patients (39 heels) were evaluated to determine the success of ultrasound-guided ESWT for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. All patients had been diagnosed and treated for plantar fasciitis for greater than 6 months and had failed at least 3 conservative treatment modalities. Each patient received 3800 shockwaves into the treated heel using the Dornier Epos Ultra ESWT machine. The average postoperative follow-up was 124 days (range, 33 to 255). Written subjective surveys evaluated pre- and posttreatment pain levels using a visual analog scoring system. The mean pretreatment score was 8.51 (range, 5 to 10), which improved to a mean follow-up score of 3.75 (range, 0 to 10). This represents an improvement in the mean VAS of 4.76, which is statistically significant ( P = .0002). Twenty-five of 30 patients reported some degree of improvement, with 5 experiencing no change. These early results indicate ultrasound-guided ESWT may be a useful tool in the treatment armamentarium for chronic plantar fasciitis. PMID:15768363

  20. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in the diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bulakci, Mesut; Ilhan, Mehmet; Bademler, Suleyman; Yilmaz, Erdem; Gulluoglu, Mine; Bayraktar, Adem; Asik, Murat; Guloglu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data, laboratory results, imaging findings, and histopathological features of 28 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy from a hepatic lesion and were diagnosed with alveolar echinococcosis. Results: Among 28 patients included in the study, 16 were females and 12 were males. The mean age of the studied population was 53 ± 16 years, and the age range was 18–79 years. The most common presenting symptom was abdominal pain, which was observed in 14 patients. A total of 36 lesions were detected in the patients’ livers, out of which 7 had a cystic appearance. Hepatic vascular involvement, bile duct involvement, and other organ involvement were depicted in 14, 5, and 7 patients, respectively. The average number of cores taken from the lesions was 2.7, ranging between 2 and 5. In histopathological evaluation, PAS+ parasitic membrane structures were visualized on a necrotic background in all cases. Regarding seven patients, who were operated, the pathological findings of preoperative percutaneous biopsies were in perfect agreement with the pathological examinations after surgical resections. None of the patients developed major complications after biopsy. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy is a minimally invasive, reliable, and effective diagnostic tool for the definitive diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis. PMID:27101838

  1. Feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided nerve block for management of limb injuries by emergency care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Bhoi, Sanjeev; Sinha, Tej P; Rodha, Mahaveer; Bhasin, Amit; Ramchandani, Radhakrishna; Galwankar, Sagar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients require procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) for the treatment of acute traumatic injuries. PSA has complications. Ultrasound (US) guided peripheral nerve block is a safe alternative. Aim: Ultrasound guided nerve blocks for management of traumatic limb emergencies in Emergency Department (ED). Setting and Design: Prospective observational study conducted in ED. Materials and Methods: Patients above five years requiring analgesia for management of limb emergencies were recruited. Emergency Physicians trained in US guided nerve blocks performed the procedure. Statistical analysis: Effectiveness of pain control, using visual analogue scale was assessed at baseline and at 15 and 60 minutes after the procedure. Paired t test was used for comparison. Results: Fifty US guided nerve blocks were sciatic- 4 (8%), femoral-7 (14%), brachial- 29 (58%), median -6 (12%), and radial 2 (4%) nerves. No patients required rescue PSA. Initial median VAS score was 9 (Inter Quartile Range [IQR] 7-10) and at 1 hour was 2(IQR 0-4). Median reduction in VAS score was 7.44 (IQR 8-10(75%), 1-2(25%) (P=0.0001). Median procedure time was 9 minutes (IQR 3, 12 minutes) and median time to reduction of pain was 5 minutes (IQR 1,15 minutes). No immediate or late complications noticed at 3 months. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks can be safely and effectively performed for upper and lower limb emergencies by emergency physicians with adequate training. PMID:22416151

  2. Ultrasound-guided medial mid-thigh approach to sciatic nerve block with a patient in a supine position.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Yoshimune; Kashiwagi, Masanori; Nagatsuka, Yukio; Miwa, Sakurako

    2011-08-01

    We report the use of a 'medial mid-thigh approach (medial approach),' a new approach for performing ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve blockade (SNB) with patients in a supine position. Fifty-four patients undergoing knee surgery under general anesthesia and a combined femoral nerve block (FNB) and SNB were included in the study. After FNB, an ultrasound-guided medial approach was used to perform the SNB. The patient was placed in a supine position, and the hip and knee joints were flexed with the leg rotating externally. A linear ultrasound transducer was positioned perpendicular to the skin at the level of the upper mid-thigh. The sciatic nerve was identified in all patients using ultrasound imaging, and the distance to the nerve was 3.0-5.5cm. A combined ultrasound- and nerve stimulator-guided SNB was then performed, and 0.375% ropivacaine was administered. The block was successful in all patients, and the mean duration of the sensory and motor blockade was 11.9 and 8.2h, respectively. In this study, the medial approach was highly successful and easy to perform. As performing a simultaneous FNB and SNB with patients in a supine position has several potential advantages, future studies should compare this approach with other more proximal approaches for performing SNB. PMID:21671142

  3. Ultrasound Guided Direct Percutaneous Nephrostomy (PCN) Tube Placement: Stepwise Report of a New Technique with Its Safety and Efficacy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Bijit; Gupta, Sandeep; Singh, Akoijam Kaku; Sinam, Rajendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Ultrasound guided Percutaneous Nephrostomy (PCN) tube placement: evaluation, safety and efficacy review. Settings and Design: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted at Department of Urology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal. Materials and Methods: The total number of 176 patients with grade I-IV hydronephrosis requiring PCN tube placement were included in the study. Scientific, operational and accessory steps of the technique and its related safety and efficacy pre-procedural, intra-procedural and post-procedural parameters were carefully and meticulously recorded. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analyses was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 16.0) for Windows. Results: The average length of the procedure was 9.07±2.79 (6-15) minutes. Severe procedure related pain (VAS score 8-10) was observed only in 18 patients (10.23%). Nephrostomy tube placement was successful in 96.60% of cases and only 9.66% required more than a single attempt of puncture. In this study, impacted ureteric calculus was found to be most common indication of PCN tube placement. Conclusions: Ultrasound guided direct PCN tube placement is a reliable, easy and cost effective technique. This procedure is particularly suitable for developing countries like India, where the majority of the patients belongs to the low socio-economical status and health care system lacks adequate infrastructural facility at most places. PMID:24701490

  4. Dexamethasone or Dexmedetomidine as Local Anesthetic Adjuvants for Ultrasound-guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Blocks with Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myeong Jong; Koo, Dae Jeong; Choi, Yu Sun; Lee, Kyu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone or dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine on the onset and duration of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blocks (BPB). Methods Fifty-one ASA physical status I-II patients with elective forearm and hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus blocks were randomly allocated to receive 20 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 2 ml of isotonic saline (C group, n = 17), 20 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 2 ml (10 mg) of dexamethasone (D group, n = 17) or 20 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 2 ml (100 µg) of dexmedetomidine (DM group, n = 17). A nerve stimulation technique with ultrasound was used in all patients. The onset time and duration of sensory blocks were assessed. Results The duration of the sensory block was extended in group D and group DX compared with group C (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between group D and group DX. However, there were no significant differences in onset time in all three groups. Conclusions Dexamethasone 10 mg and dexmedetomidine 100 µg were equally effective in extending the duration of ropivacaine in ultrasound-guided axillary BPB with nerve stimulation. However, neither drug has significantly effects the onset time. PMID:26839668

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Miniscalpel-Needle Release versus Dry Needling for Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yongjun; Shi, Dongping; Wu, Xiaotong; Gu, Minghong; Ai, Zisheng; Tang, Kun; Ye, Le; Wang, Xiangrui

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare ultrasound-guided miniscalpel-needle (UG-MSN) release versus ultrasound-guided dry needling (UG-DN) for chronic neck pain. Methods. A total of 169 patients with chronic neck pain were randomized to receive either UG-MSN release or UG-DN. Before treatment and at 3 and 6 months posttreatment, pain was measured using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS). Neck function was examined using the neck disability index. Health-related quality of life was examined using the physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) of the SF-36 health status scale. Results. Patients in the UG-MSN release had greater improvement on the VAS (by 2 points at 3 months and 0.9 points at 6 months) versus in the UG-DN arm; (both P < 0.0001). Patients receiving UG-MSN release also showed significantly lower scores on the adjusted neck disability index, as well as significantly lower PCS. No severe complications were observed. Conclusion. UG-MSN release was superior to UG-DN in reducing pain intensity and neck disability in patients with chronic neck pain and was not associated with severe complications. The procedural aspects in the two arms were identical; however, we did not verify the blinding success. As such, the results need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:25386218

  6. Implementing a Program for Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Venous Access: Training, Policy and Procedure Development, Protocol Use, Competency, and Skill Tracking.

    PubMed

    Laksonen, Richard P; Gasiewicz, Nanci K

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral intravenous (IV) access provides a means to administer medications, IV fluids, and blood products and allows for the sampling of blood for analysis. The traditional approach to obtaining peripheral IV access relies on vessel visualization in the arm and/or palpation of the blood vessel beneath the skin. However, the general population is aging, obesity is commonplace, and IV drug abuse is widespread, making peripheral IV access difficult. Use of ultrasound-guided peripheral IV access fills a practice gap in safe patient care between traditional peripheral IV access methods of vein visualization and/or palpation and ultrasound-guided central venous access. PMID:26596664

  7. Steroidal Saponins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, N. P.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. B.; Mandal, D.

    The medicinal activities of plants are generally due to the secondary metabolites (1) which often occur as glycosides of steroids, terpenoids, phenols etc. Saponins are a group of naturally occurring plant glycosides, characterized by their strong foam-forming properties in aqueous solution. The cardiac glycosides also possess this, property but are classified separately because of their specific biological activity. Unlike the cardiac glycosides, saponins generally do not affect the heart. These are classified as steroid or triterpenoid saponins depending on the nature of the aglycone. Steroidal glycosides are naturally occurring sugar conjugates of C27 steroidal compounds. The aglycone of a steroid saponin is usually a spirostanol or a furostanol. The glycone parts of these compounds are mostly oligosaccharides, arranged either in a linear or branched fashion, attached to hydroxyl groups through an acetal linkage (2, 3). Another class of saponins, the basic steroid saponins, contain nitrogen analogues of steroid sapogenins as aglycones.

  8. Percutaneous Adhesiolysis Versus Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Chronic Radicular Pain Caused by Lumbar Foraminal Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongbum; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Jae Ki; Nam, Hee-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of percutaneous adhesiolysis (PA) compared to fluoroscopy (FL)-guided transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) in patients with radicular pain caused by lumbar foraminal spinal stenosis (LFSS) by assessing pain relief and functional improvement at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. Methods This retrospective study included 45 patients who underwent PA or FL-guided TFSEI for radicular pain caused by LFSS of at least 3 months' duration. Outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Verbal Numeric Pain Scale (VNS) before the procedure and at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. A successful outcome was defined by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI score. Results ODI and VNS scores improved 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure in both groups. Statistically significant differences between groups were observed in ODI and VNS at 12 weeks (p<0.05). The proportion of patients with successful outcomes was significantly different between the two groups only at the 12-week time point. Conclusion Our study suggests that PA is effective for pain reduction and functional improvement in patients with chronic radicular pain caused by LFSS. Therefore, PA can be considered for patients with previous ineffective responses to conservative treatment. Although PA seems to be more effective than TFEFI according to the results of our study, in order to fully elucidate the difference in effectiveness, a prospective study with a larger sample size is necessary. PMID:26798608

  9. Reducing Postoperative Opioid Consumption by Adding an Ultrasound-Guided Rectus Sheath Block to Multimodal Analgesia for Abdominal Cancer Surgery With Midline Incision

    PubMed Central

    Bashandy, Ghada Mohammad Nabih; Elkholy, Abeer Hassan Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many multimodal analgesia techniques have been tried to provide adequate analgesia for midline incisions extending above and below the umbilicus aiming at limiting the perioperative use of morphine thus limiting side effects. Ultrasound (US) guidance made the anesthesiologist reconsider old techniques for wider clinical use. The rectus sheath block (RSB) is a useful technique under-utilized in the adult population. Objectives: Our study examined the efficacy of a preemptive single-injection rectus sheath block in providing better early postoperative pain scores compared to general anesthesia alone. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients were recruited in this randomized controlled trial. These patients were divided into two groups: RSB group had an RSB after induction of anesthesia and before surgical incision, and GA (general anesthesia) group had general anesthesia alone. Both groups were compared for verbal analogue scale (VAS) score, opioid consumption and hemodynamic variables in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). Analgesic requirements in surgical wards were recorded in postoperative days (POD) 0, 1 and 2. Results: The median VAS score was significantly lower in RSB group compared with GA group in all 5 time points in the PACU (P ˂ 0.05). Also PACU morphine consumption was lower in RSB group than GA group patients (95% confidence interval [CI] of the difference in means between groups, −4.59 to −2.23 mg). Morphine consumption was also less in the first 2 postoperative days (POD0 and POD1). Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block is an easy technique to learn. This technique, when it is used with general anesthesia, will be more effective in reducing pain scores and opioid consumption compared with general anesthesia alone. PMID:25289373

  10. Genomic Characterisation of Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts Generated from Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Tracy L.; Marini, Kieren D.; Rossello, Fernando J.; Jayasekara, Samantha N.; Russell, Prudence A.; Prodanovic, Zdenka; Kumar, Beena; Ganju, Vinod; Alamgeer, Muhammad; Irving, Louis B.; Steinfort, Daniel P.; Peacock, Craig D.; Cain, Jason E.; Szczepny, Anette; Watkins, D. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models generated from surgical specimens are gaining popularity as preclinical models of cancer. However, establishment of PDX lines from small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients is difficult due to very limited amount of available biopsy material. We asked whether SCLC cells obtained from endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) could generate PDX lines that maintained the phenotypic and genetic characteristics of the primary tumor. Following successful EBUS-TBNA sampling for diagnostic purposes, we obtained an extra sample for cytologic analysis and implantation into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Animals were monitored for engraftment for up to 6 months. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis, and targeted next-generation re-sequencing, were then performed in both the primary sample and the derivative PDX line. A total of 12 patients were enrolled in the study. EBUS-TBNA aspirates yielded large numbers of viable tumor cells sufficient to inject between 18,750 and 1,487,000 cells per flank, and to yield microgram quantities of high-quality DNA. Of these, samples from 10 patients generated xenografts (engraftment rate 83%) with a mean latency of 104 days (range 63–188). All but one maintained a typical SCLC phenotype that closely matched the original sample. Identical mutations that are characteristic of SCLC were identified in both the primary sample and xenograft line. EBUS-TBNA has the potential to be a powerful tool in the development of new targeting strategies for SCLC patients by providing large numbers of viable tumor cells suitable for both xenografting and complex genomic analysis. PMID:25191746

  11. Steroid osteopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients receiving steroids or having disease processes which increase natural steroid production often demonstrate ''the classic x-ray changes'' of avascular necrosis of bone. Bone scintigraphy in these patients most frequently demonstrates an increased radionuclide localization. The literature suggests that the increased activity is related to healing of the avascular process. In a recent study of Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD), 37 of the children had multiple studies and increased activity within the epiphysis during revascularization was extremely rare. Not only are the scintigraphic findings in steroid osteopathy dissimilar to that in healing LCPD, but the time interval for healing is much to short for that of a vascular necrosis and no patients demonstrated an avascular phase on bone scintigraphy. Of 15 children with renal transplants on steroid therapy, 9 demonstrated x-ray and clinical findings of osteopathy. In 8 of 9 instances, bone scintigraphy showed increased localization of radionuclide in the affected bone. Improvement or a return to normal occurred in those patients in whom steroids were discontinued. The following is a proposed mechanism for steroid osteopathy. Steroids affect the osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity of bone and weaken its internal structure. Ordinary stress produces microtrabecular fractures. Fractures characteristically stimulate reactive hyperemia and increase bone metabolism. The result is increased bone radiopharmaceutical localization. The importance of recognizing this concept is that steroid osteopathy is preventable by reducing the administered steroid dose. As opposed to avascular necrosis, bone changes are reversible.

  12. [Ultrasound-guided Sciatic Nerve Block (Pulsed Radiofrequency) for Intractable Cancer Pain Caused by Sacral Bone Metastasis].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Hyoda, Akira; Kuwamura, Ayumu; Kido, Haruki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of successful pulsed radiofrequency stimulation of the sciatic nerve for intractable cancer pain caused by sacral bone metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer. A 57-year-old man who suffered from intractable left femoral pain was diagnosed with cancer metastasis to the sacral bone and lumbar spine. Oral oxycodone relieved the pain at rest but he could not walk or remain sitting due to the pain during exercise. Oxycodone rescue or increase did not relieve the pain, but induced drowsiness. Given that sciatic nerve block with mepivacaine was effective, we performed pulsed radiofrequency with ultrasound guidance twice. Pulsed radiofrequency relieved the left femoral pain and he could sit for hours and walk uneventfully. Our finding suggest that ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency of the sciatic nerve effectively relieves intractable left femoral pain caused by sacral bone metastasis. PMID:26437562

  13. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve for treatment of intractable orchalgia

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Romdhane, Kamel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic orchalgia is a frustrating clinical problem for both the patient and the physician. We present a 17-year-old boy with a bilateral idiopathic chronic intractable orchalgia with failed conservative treatment. For 2 years, he suffered from severe attacks of scrotal pain that affected his daily activities and caused frequent absence from school. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRF) of the genital branches of the genitofemoral nerve performed after local anesthetic nerve block confirmed the diagnosis and yielded 6 weeks of symptom relief. Seven-month follow-up revealed complete satisfactory analgesia. The use of PRF is an effective and non-invasive approach to treat intractable chronic orchalgia. PMID:24843352

  14. Tension pneumothorax as a severe complication of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration of mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Gnass, Maciej; Szlubowski, Artur; Gil, Tomasz; Kocoń, Piotr; Ziętkiewicz, Mirosław; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kużdżał, Jarosław

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a case report of a patient suffering from bullous emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who was diagnosed with tension pneumothorax after undergoing endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Tension pneumothorax is a severe but rare complication of EBUS-TBNA. It can result from lung injury caused by the biopsy needle or, in patients suffering from bullous emphysema, from spontaneous rupture of an emphysematous bulla resulting from increased pressure in the chest cavity during cough caused by bronchofiberoscope insertion. The authors emphasize that patients should be carefully monitored after the biopsy, and, in the case of complications, provided with treatment immediately in proper hospital conditions. Patients burdened with a high risk of complications should be identified before the procedure and monitored with extreme care after its completion. PMID:26855656

  15. Tension pneumothorax as a severe complication of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration of mediastinal lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Szlubowski, Artur; Gil, Tomasz; Kocoń, Piotr; Ziętkiewicz, Mirosław; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kużdżał, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a case report of a patient suffering from bullous emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who was diagnosed with tension pneumothorax after undergoing endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Tension pneumothorax is a severe but rare complication of EBUS-TBNA. It can result from lung injury caused by the biopsy needle or, in patients suffering from bullous emphysema, from spontaneous rupture of an emphysematous bulla resulting from increased pressure in the chest cavity during cough caused by bronchofiberoscope insertion. The authors emphasize that patients should be carefully monitored after the biopsy, and, in the case of complications, provided with treatment immediately in proper hospital conditions. Patients burdened with a high risk of complications should be identified before the procedure and monitored with extreme care after its completion. PMID:26855656

  16. Cell-block procedure in endoscopic ultrasound-guided-fine-needle-aspiration of gastrointestinal solid neoplastic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Todaro, Paolo; Caruso, Rosario Alberto; Tuccari, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we have analyzed the clinical applications of endoscopic ultrasound-guided-fine-needle-aspiration (EUS-FNA) and the methodological aspects obtained by cell-block procedure (CBP) in the diagnostic approach to the gastrointestinal neoplastic pathology. CBP showed numerous advantages in comparison to the cytologic routine smears; in particular, better preservation of cell architecture, achievement of routine haematoxylin-eosin staining equivalent to histological slides and possibility to perform immunohistochemistry or molecular analyses represented the most evident reasons to choose this method. Moreover, by this approach, the differential diagnosis of solid gastrointestinal neoplasias may be more easily achieved and the background of contaminant non-neoplastic gastrointestinal avoided. Finally, biological samples collected by EUS-FNA CBP-assisted should be investigated in order to identify and quantify further potential molecular markers. PMID:26322154

  17. Perisciatic Ultrasound-Guided Infiltration for Treatment of Deep Gluteal Syndrome: Description of Technique and Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Julio; García, Nicolás; Rafols, Claudio; Pérez, Marcelo; Verdugo, Marco A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a perisciatic ultrasound-guided infiltration technique for treatment of deep gluteal syndrome and to report its preliminary clinical results. A mixture of saline (20 mL), a local anesthetic (4 mL), and a corticosteroid solution (1 mL) was infiltrated in the perisciatic region between the gluteus maximus and pelvitrochanteric muscles. Relative pain relief was achieved in 73.7% of the patients, with average preprocedural and postprocedural visual analog scale scores of 8.3 and 2.8, respectively. Fifty percent of patients reported recurrence of discomfort, and the average duration of the therapeutic effect in these patients was 5.3 weeks. PMID:26446817

  18. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Laser Ablation with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography for Hyperfunctioning Parathyroid Adenoma: A Preliminary Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tianan; Chen, Fen; Zhou, Xiang; Hu, Ying; Zhao, Qiyu

    2015-01-01

    The study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of ultrasound-guided percutaneous laser ablation (pLA) as a nonsurgical treatment for primary parathyroid adenoma. Surgery was contraindicated in, or refused by, the included patients. No lesion enhancement on contrast-enhanced ultrasound immediately after pLA was considered “complete ablation.” Nodule size, serum calcium, and parathyroid hormone level were compared before and after pLA. Complete ablation was achieved in all 21 patients with 1 (n = 20) or 2 (n = 1) sessions. Nodule volume decreased from 0.93 ± 0.58 mL at baseline to 0.53 ± 0.38 and 0.48 ± 0.34 mL at 6 and 12 months after pLA (P < 0.05). At 1 day, 6 months, and 12 months after pLA, serum PTH decreased from 15.23 ± 3.00 pmol/L at baseline to 7.41 ± 2.79, 6.95 ± 1.78, and 6.90 ± 1.46 pmol/L, serum calcium decreased from 3.77 ± 0.77 mmol/L at baseline to 2.50 ± 0.72, 2.41 ± 0.37, and 2.28 ± 0.26 mmol/L, respectively (P < 0.05). At 12 months, treatment success (normalization of PTH and serum calcium) was achieved in 81%. No serious complications were observed. Ultrasound-guided pLA with contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a viable alternative to surgery for primary parathyroid adenoma. PMID:26788059

  19. A Descriptive Comparison of Ultrasound Guided Central Venous Cannulation of the Internal Jugular to Landmark Based Subclavian Vein Cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Theodoro, Daniel; Bausano, Brian; Lewis, Lawrence; Evanoff, Bradley; Kollef, Marin

    2013-01-01

    The safest site for central venous cannulation (CVC) remains debated. Many emergency medicine physicians advocate the ultrasound guided internal jugular approach (USIJ) because of data supporting its efficiency. However, a number of physicians prefer, and are most comfortable with, the subclavian vein approach. The purpose of this study was to describe adverse event rates among operators using the USIJ approach and the landmark subclavian vein approach without ultrasound (SC). Methods This was a prospective observational trial of patients undergoing CVC of the subclavian or internal jugular veins in the Emergency Department (ED). Physicians performing the procedures did not undergo standardized training in either technique. The primary outcome was a composite of adverse events defined as hematoma, arterial cannulation, pneumothorax, and failure to cannulate. Physicians recorded the anatomical site of cannulation, ultrasound assistance, indications and acute complications. Variables of interest were collected from the pharmacy and ED record. Physician experience was based on a self-reported survey. We followed outcomes of central line insertion until device removal or patient discharge. Results Physicians attempted 236 USIJ and 132 SC cannulations on 333 patients. The overall adverse event rate was 22% with failure to cannulate being the most common. Adverse events occurred in 19% of USIJ attempts compared to 29% of non-ultrasound guided subclavian attempts. Among highly experienced operators CVCs placed at the subclavian site resulted in more adverse events than those performed using USIJ (RR=1.89, 95%CI 1.05 to 3.39). Conclusions While limited by observational design, our results suggest that the USIJ technique may result in fewer adverse events compared to the landmark SC approach. PMID:20370781

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Renal Biopsy in 295 Children and Adolescents: Role of Ultrasound and Analysis of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Mareike; Kramarczyk, Annette; Taylan, Christina; Maintz, David; Hoppe, Bernd; Koerber, Friederike

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is a decisive diagnostic procedure for children and adolescents with renal diseases. Aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the complication rates of percutaneous kidney biopsies and their therapeutic consequences to assess the role of ultrasound-guidance including Doppler ultrasound examinations in preparation, execution and follow-up care and to present a recommended protocol. Patients and Methods Institutional review board approved this retrospective study; informed consent was waived. Between 1997 and 2011 a total of 438 ultrasound-guided biopsies were performed in 295 patients, 169 of the biopsies were performed on kidney transplants. Average age of patients was 10.2+/−5.2 years (range of 15 days until age of 23). Before and post biopsy ultrasound examination including Doppler examination was carried out. Biopsy itself was ultrasound monitored. Complications were analysed with regard to age of patient, kidney transplants, year of occurrence, number of punctures, performing physician and time interval of occurrence to develop an optimized protocol for ultrasound-guidance. Results In 99% of cases successful PRB were performed, i.e. enough kidney parenchyma for histological analysis was obtained. No lethal or major complication that required surgical intervention occurred. Eighteen relevant complications were observed (complication rate: 4.1%). Except in one case in which additional MRI diagnostic was necessary, ultrasound examination after 4 hours post biopsy or even earlier when symptoms occurred, was able to detect complications and determine indications for intervention. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided PRB is an established and effective method in children and adolescents, but shows a certain rate of complications and therefore should not be indicated without diligence. Ultrasound including Doppler ultrasound is a valuable tool in preparation, guidance of biopsy, detection of complications and in follow-up care. Ultrasound examinations (including Doppler) pre-, during and 4 hours post kidney biopsy and, depending from case, a few days until weeks after biopsy is recommended. PMID:25489731

  1. Ultrasound-guided bilateral greater occipital nerve block for the treatment of post-dural puncture headache

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Fethi; Binici, Orhan; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Karabakan, Guldane

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is one of the complications frequently observed after spinal or epidural anesthesia with dural penetration. For PDPH patients who do not respond to conservative medical treatment, alternative treatments such as bilateral occipital nerve block should be considered.In this study the efficacy of bilateral occipital nerve block was retrospectively evaluated in patients with post-dural puncture headache. Methods: Ultrasound-guided bilateral occipital nerve block was administrated in 21 patients who developed PDPH after spinal anesthesia, but did not respond to conservative medical treatment within 48 hours between January 2012 and February 2014. The study was conducted at Erzincan University Faculty of Medicine Gazi Mengucek Education and Research Hospital Results: Mean Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores at 10 minutes and 6, 10, 15 and 24 hours after the block were significantly improved compared to the patients with a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6 as well as patients with a pre-block VAS score between 7 and 9 (p<0.01). After 24 hours of the block applied, VAS pain score dropped to 1 for all 12 patients who had a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6. Whereas, VAS score decreased to 2 at 24 hours after the block in only one of the patients with a pre-block VAS between 7 and 9. For the patients with a pre-block VAS score between 7 and 9, there was no significant improvement in the mean VAS score 24 hours after the block. Conclusions: For patients with PDPH and a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6 who do not respond to conservative medical treatment, an ultrasound-guided bilateral occipital nerve block may be effective. PMID:25878625

  2. Percutaneous Repair of Radial Artery Pseudoaneurysm in a Hemodialysis Patient Using Sonographically Guided Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Corso, Rocco Rampoldi, Antonio; Vercelli, Ruggero; Leni, Davide; Vanzulli, Angelo

    2006-02-15

    We report a case of a radial artery pseudoaneurysm complicating an incorrect puncture of a Brescia-Cimino hemodialysis fistula that was treated with percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection. The pseudoaneurysm recurred after the initial successful thrombin injection. With a second injection we obtained permanent pseudoaneurysm occlusion. Our case illustrates that this procedure is an effective treatment in this type of arteriovenous fistula complication. We compare this case with the only similar one we could find in the literature.

  3. Aberrant intrathecal pump refill: ultrasound-guided aspiration of a substantial quantity of subcutaneous hydromorphone.

    PubMed

    Peccora, Christian D; Ross, Edgar L; Hanna, George M

    2013-01-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery systems are an effective and increasingly common pain treatment modality for certain patient populations. Pumps are surgically inserted in a subcutaneous abdominal pocket and refilled with highly concentrated medication at regular intervals. Inadvertent injection of medication outside the pump is a known complication of the refill procedure. We describe the injection of hydromorphone into the pump's surrounding subcutaneous pocket, subsequent opioid overdose, and the novel application of ultrasound to visualize and aspirate the subcutaneous drug. Ultrasonography can be used as an effective modality for rapid diagnosis and treatment of an accidental pocket fill. PMID:24121607

  4. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection of a Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Simultaneous Venous Balloon Occlusion of a Communicating Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Mittleider, Derek Cicuto, Kenneth; Dykes, Thomas

    2008-07-15

    An 82-year-old woman developed acute occlusion of her right coronary artery. She underwent percutaneous coronary stent placement and aortic balloon pump installation. In the postprocedural period, she developed a common femoral artery pseudoaneurysm (PSA) that communicated with the common femoral vein via an arteriovenous fistula (AVF). After unsuccessful ultrasound-guided compression, ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of the PSA was performed, with simultaneous balloon occlusion of the common femoral vein at the level of the AVF. There was complete thrombosis of the PSA and AVF.

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block versus Continuous Wound Infusion for Post-Caesarean Analgesia: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chandon, Michel; Bonnet, Agnès; Burg, Yannick; Barnichon, Carole; DesMesnards-Smaja, Véronique; Sitbon, Brigitte; Foiret, Christine; Dreyfus, Jean-François; Rahmani, Jamil; Laloë, Pierre-Antoine; Fischler, Marc; Le Guen, Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided Transversus Abdominis Plane (TAP) block versus Continuous Wound Infusion (CWI) with levobupivacaine after caesarean delivery. Methods We recruited parturients undergoing elective caesareans for this multicenter study. Following written informed consent, they received a spinal anaesthetic without intrathecal morphine for their caesarean section. The postoperative analgesia was randomized to either a bilateral ultrasound guided TAP block (levobupivicaine = 150 mg) or a CWI through an elastomeric pump for 48 hours (levobupivacaine = 150 mg the first day and 12.5 mg/h thereafter). Every woman received regular analgesics along with oral morphine if required. The primary outcome was comparison of the 48-hour area under the curve (AUC) pain scores. Secondary outcomes included morphine consumption, adverse events, and persistent pain one month postoperatively. Results Recruitment of 120 women was planned but the study was prematurely terminated due to the occurrence of generalized seizures in one patient of the TAP group. By then, 36 patients with TAP and 29 with CWI had completed the study. AUC of pain at rest and during mobilization were not significantly different: 50 [22.5–80] in TAP versus 50 [27.5–130] in CWI (P = 0.4) and 190 [130–240] versus 160 [112.5–247.5] (P = 0.5), respectively. Morphine consumption (0 [0–20] mg in the TAP group and 10 [0–32.5] mg in the CWI group (P = 0.09)) and persistent pain at one month were similar in both groups (respectively 29.6% and 26.6% (P = 0.73)). Conclusion In cases of morphine-free spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery, no difference between TAP block and CWI for postoperative analgesia was suggested. TAP block may induce seizures in this specific context. Consequently, such a technique after a caesarean section cannot be recommended. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01151943 PMID:25093663

  6. Complications of transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy: a single center experience with 2049 patients

    PubMed Central

    Efesoy, Ozan; Bozlu, Murat; Çayan, Selahittin; Akbay, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Currently, transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) systematic prostate biopsy is the standard procedure in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Although TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is a safe method, it is an invasive procedure that is not free from complications. In this prospective study we evaluated the complications of a TRUS-guided 12-core prostate biopsy. Material and methods: The study included 2049 patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The indications for the prostate biopsy were abnormal digital rectal examination findings and/or an elevated serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (greater than 4 ng/mL). The participants received prophylactic oral ciprofloxacin (500 mg) the night before and the morning of the biopsy, followed by 500 mg orally twice daily for 2 days. To prevent development of voiding disorders, the patients also received oral alpha blockers for 30 days starting the day before the procedure. A Fleet enema was self-administered the night before the procedure for rectal cleansing. The complications were assessed both 10 days and 1 month after the biopsy. Results: The mean age, serum total PSA level and prostate volume of the patients were 65.4±9.6 years, 18.6±22.4 ng/mL and 51.3±22.4 cc, respectively. From these 2.042 biopsies, 596 cases (29.1%) were histopathologically diagnosed as prostate adenocarcinoma. Minor complications, such as hematuria (66.3%), hematospermia (38.8%), rectal bleeding (28.4%), mild to moderate degrees of vasovagal episodes (7.7%), and genitourinary tract infection (6.1%) were noted frequently. Major complications were rare and included urosepsis (0.5%), rectal bleeding requiring intervention (0.3%), acute urinary retention (0.3%), hematuria necessitating transfusion (0.05%), Fournier’s gangrene (0.05%), and myocardial infarction (0.05%). Conclusion: TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is safe for diagnosing prostate cancer with few major but frequent minor complications. However, patients should be informed and followed-up after biopsy regarding possible complications. PMID:26328070

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Out-of-Plane vs. In-Plane Interscalene Catheters: A Randomized, Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Eric S.; Gandhi, Kishor; Baratta, Jaime L.; Torjman, Marc; Epstein, Richard H.; Chung, Jaeyoon; Vaghari, Benjamin A.; Beausang, David; Bojaxhi, Elird; Grady, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous interscalene blocks provide excellent analgesia after shoulder surgery. Although the safety of the ultrasound-guided in-plane approach has been touted, technical and patient factors can limit this approach. We developed a caudad-to-cephalad out-of-plane approach and hypothesized that it would decrease pain ratings due to better catheter alignment with the brachial plexus compared to the in-plane technique in a randomized, controlled study. Objectives: To compare an out-of-plane interscalene catheter technique to the in-plane technique in a randomized clinical trial. Patients and Methods: Eighty-four patients undergoing open shoulder surgery were randomized to either the in-plane or out-of-plane ultrasound-guided continuous interscalene technique. The primary outcome was VAS pain rating at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included pain ratings in the recovery room and at 48 hours, morphine consumption, the incidence of catheter dislodgments, procedure time, and block difficulty. Procedural data and all pain ratings were collected by blinded observers. Results: There were no differences in the primary outcome of median VAS pain rating at 24 hours between the out-of-plane and in-plane groups (1.50; IQR, [0 - 4.38] vs. 1.25; IQR, [0 - 3.75]; P = 0.57). There were also no differences, respectively, between out-of-plane and in-plane median PACU pain ratings (1.0; IQR, [0 - 3.5] vs. 0.25; IQR, [0 - 2.5]; P = 0.08) and median 48-hour pain ratings (1.25; IQR, [1.25 - 2.63] vs. 0.50; IQR, [0 - 1.88]; P = 0.30). There were no differences in any other secondary endpoint. Conclusions: Our out-of-plane technique did not provide superior analgesia to the in-plane technique. It did not increase the number of complications. Our technique is an acceptable alternative in situations where the in-plane technique is difficult to perform. PMID:26705526

  8. Evaluation of diagnostic utility, safety considerations, and effect on fertility of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovarian biopsy in mares.

    PubMed

    Diel de Amorim, Mariana; Nairn, Dawne; Manning, Steve; Dedden, Ilse; Ripley, Elinorah; Nielsen, Kayla; Card, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided biopsies of corpora lutea have been previously used for research purposes in the mare and cow. However, the health effects and fertility after transvaginal luteal biopsies (TVLB) or transvaginal ovarian biopsies (TVOB) obtained for diagnostic purposes in cases of suspected ovarian tumors have not been previously evaluated in the horse. The aim of this study was to determine the effects on health and fertility of TVLB and TVOB in mares; 53 mares were included in the study (11 control non-biopsied mares, 37 TVLB mares biopsied on one or more of the following Days 8, 10, 12, 15, 21, and 5 TVOB mares with ovarian abnormalities), resulting in a total of 108 TVLB and TVOB cycles and 183 procedures. Mares were divided into Groups 1 to 3 by the number of TVLB per estrous cycle (mare in Group 1 had 1 TVLB procedure, mares in Group 2 had 2 TVLB procedures, and mares in Group 3 had 3 TVLB procedures). Group 4 comprised TVOB mare cycles with ovarian abnormalities (n = 5). Mares were examined to determine day of ovulation (Day 0) and the presence of a corpora lutea using transrectal ultrasonography. Mares were sedated, and an ultrasound-guided transvaginal biopsy was performed of luteal or ovarian tissue. Health effects of TVLB or TVOB were assessed by daily rectal temperatures, appetite, and general demeanor for 72 hours post-procedure, and 3 mares were examined at necropsy. Fertility was not significantly different in control and TVLB Groups 1 to 3 (P = 0.7648) and in the first or subsequent cycles where the ovulation was from an ovary that had a previous TVLB (P = 0.7147). A TVLB on Day 8 post-ovulation may induce an early return to estrus. In conclusion, the TVLB or TVOB procedure had no effect on health and fertility in this study if the procedure was correctly performed with good technique. Because of the low number of cycles (n = 37), the fertility data should be interpreted with caution. The TVOB may be applied in the diagnosis of mares with ovarian abnormalities, and no adverse health effects were associated with TVOB of mares with granulosa theca cell tumor. PMID:26719038

  9. Management of pudendal neuralgia using ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency: a report of two cases and discussion of pudendal nerve block techniques.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Park, Jeong-Ki; Hong, Hyon-Joo

    2016-04-01

    Pudendal neuralgia is characterized by chronic pain or discomfort in the area innervated by the pudendal nerve, with no obvious cause. A successful pudendal nerve block is crucial for the diagnosis of pudendal neuralgia. Blind or fluoroscopy-guided pudendal nerve blocks have been conventionally used for diagnosis and treatment; however, ultrasound-guided pudendal nerve blocks were also reported recently. With regard to the achievement of long-term effects, although pulsed radiofrequency performed under fluoroscopic guidance has been reported, that performed under ultrasound guidance is not well reported. This report describes two cases of pudendal neuralgia that were successfully managed using ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency and presents a literature review of pudendal nerve block techniques. However, in the management of chronic neuropathic pain, physicians should keep in mind that the placebo effect related to invasive approaches must not be neglected. PMID:26699147

  10. A rare case of mediastinal metastasis of ovarian carcinoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)

    PubMed Central

    Camunha, Marco; Binato, Marcelo; Saieg, Mauro; Marioni, Fabio; Rossini, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has become a minimally invasive tool with excellent diagnostic accuracy and low risk of complications in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases, including lung cancers and primary mediastinal lesions. Occasionally, EBUS-TBNA may be useful in identifying thoracic metastasis from distant tumors. Here we report an interesting and rare case of mediastinal metastasis of ovarian carcinoma diagnosed by EBUS-TBNA. PMID:26623131

  11. Comparison of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with bupivacaine and ropivacaine as adjuncts for postoperative analgesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomies

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shradha; Palta, Sanjeev; Saroa, Richa; Prasad, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a popular technique for post-operative analgesia in abdominal surgeries. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relative efficacy of bupivacaine versus ropivacaine for post-operative analgesia using ultrasound-guided TAP block in laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Methods: Sixty adults undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised to receive ultrasound-guided TAP block at the end of the surgical procedure with either 0.25% bupivacaine (Group I, n = 30) or 0.375% ropivacaine (Group II, n = 30). All patients were assessed for post-operative pain and rescue analgesic consumption at 10 min, 30 min, 1 h, 4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h time points. Means for normally distributed data were compared using Student's t-test, and proportions were compared using Chi-square or Fisher's exact test whichever was applicable. Results: Patients receiving ultrasound-guided TAP block with ropivacaine (Group II) had significantly lower pain scores when compared to patients who received the block with bupivacaine (Group I) at 10 min, 30 min and 1 h. However, both the drugs were equivalent for post-operative analgesia and 24 h cumulative rescue analgesic requirement (median [interquartile range]) (75.00 [75.00–75.00] in Group I vs. 75.00 [75.00–93.75] in Group II, P = 0.366). Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided TAP block with ropivacaine provides effective analgesia in the immediate post-operative period up to 1 h as compared to bupivacaine. However, both the drugs are similar in terms of 24 h cumulative rescue analgesic requirement. PMID:27141110

  12. A Pilot Study of Ultrasound-Guided Cryoablation of Invasive Ductal Carcinomas up to 15 mm With MRI Follow-Up and Subsequent Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Poplack, Steven P.; Levine, Gary M.; Henry, Lisa; Wells, Wendy A.; Heinemann, F. Scott; Hanna, Cheryl M.; Deneen, Daniel R.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Barth, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided cryoablation in treating small invasive ductal carcinoma and to assess the role of contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI in determining the outcome of cryoablation. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Twenty consecutive participants with invasive ductal carcinomas up to 15 mm, with limited or no ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), underwent ultrasound-guided cryoablation. Preablation mammography, ultrasound, and CE-MRI were performed to assess eligibility. Clinical status was evaluated at 1 day, 7–10 days, and 2 weeks after ablation. CE-MRI was performed 25–40 days after ablation, followed by surgical resection within 5 days. RESULTS Ultrasound-guided cryoablation was uniformly technically successful, and postablation clinical status was good to excellent in all participants. Cryoablation was not clinically successful in 15% (three of 20 patients). Three participants had residual cancer at the periphery of the cryoablation site. Two participants had viable nonmalignant tissue within the central zone of cryoablation-induced necrosis. Postablation CE-MRI had a sensitivity of 0% (0/3) and specificity of 88% (15/17). The predictive value of negative findings on CE-MRI was 83% (15/18). Correlations between cancer characteristics, cryoablation procedural variables, postablation CE-MRI findings, and surgical specimen features were not statistically significant. There were also no significant differences in participants with or without residual cancer. CONCLUSION In our pilot experience, ultrasound-guided cryoablation of invasive ductal carcinomas up to 15 mm has a clinical failure rate of 15% but is technically feasible and well tolerated by patients. The majority of cryoablation failures are manifest as DCIS outside the cryoablation field. Postablation CE-MRI does not reliably predict cryoablation outcome. PMID:25905948

  13. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided cumulus oocyte complexes aspiration and in vitro embryo production in suckled beef and lactating dairy cattle on pasture-based management conditions.

    PubMed

    Ratto, M H; Peralta, O A; Mogollon, G; Strobel, P; Correa, J

    2011-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the use of repeated transvaginal ultrasound-guided cumulus oocyte complex (COC) aspiration on COC recovery rate, in vitro embryo production (IVP) and subsequent pregnancy rates in Holstein Friesian (HF) and Aberdeen Angus (AA) cows (Experiment 1), and in pregnant and non-pregnant Holstein Friesian cows (Experiment 2). Cycling, non-pregnant HF (n=17) and AA (n=32) cows with 40-70 days postpartum, between 3 and 5 years of age were used in the Experiment 1. All cows were submitted to repeated transvaginal ultrasound-guided COC aspiration twice a week for 5-7 weeks. Cumulus ooctye complexes (COC) were in vitro matured, fertilized and cultured for 8 days. An overall of 100 and 350 embryos from HF and AA cows respectively were cryopreserved using a conventional slow freezing (Experiment 1). A total of 81 and 285 frozen-thawed embryos from HF and AA cows respectively were transferred to recipient cows. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed at 60 and 150 days of gestation using transrectal ultrasonography. In Experiment 2, cycling non-pregnant (n=9) and pregnant (n=8) HF cows were submitted to repeated ultrasound-guided COC aspiration and COC were in vitro matured, fertilized and cultured as in Experiment 1, except that embryos were cryopreserved but not thawed and transferred as described for Experiment 1. The results of this study indicate that COC recovery rate and blastocyts production are affected by the breed of the donor cow. The quality of blastocyts produced from both breed did not differ in terms of pregnancy and calving rates (Experiment 1). The physiologic state of pregnancy did not affect COC recovery rate and blastocysts production per donor/session (Experiment 2). The use of ultrasound-guided COC aspiration and IVP could be a powerful technique to improve the genetic of beef and dairy cattle managed under pasture-based conditions management in the southern Chile. PMID:22030337

  14. A rare case of mediastinal metastasis of ovarian carcinoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA).

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Augusto; Camunha, Marco; Binato, Marcelo; Saieg, Mauro; Marioni, Fabio; Rossini, Lucio

    2015-10-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has become a minimally invasive tool with excellent diagnostic accuracy and low risk of complications in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases, including lung cancers and primary mediastinal lesions. Occasionally, EBUS-TBNA may be useful in identifying thoracic metastasis from distant tumors. Here we report an interesting and rare case of mediastinal metastasis of ovarian carcinoma diagnosed by EBUS-TBNA. PMID:26623131

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Treatment beyond Drainage: Hemostasis, Anastomosis, and Others

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the 1990s, it has evolved from a primarily diagnostic modality into an instrument that can be used in various therapeutic interventions. EUS-guided fine-needle injection was initially described for celiac plexus neurolysis. By using the fundamentals of this method, drainage techniques emerged for the biliary and pancreatic ducts, fluid collections, and abscesses. More recently, EUS has been used for ablative techniques and injection therapies for patients with for gastrointestinal malignancies. As the search for minimally invasive techniques continued, EUS-guided hemostasis methods have also been described. The technical advances in EUS-guided therapies may appear to be limitless; however, in many instances, these procedures have been described only in small case series. More data are required to determine the efficacy and safety of these techniques, and new accessories will be needed to facilitate their implementation into practice. PMID:25325004

  16. Multiparameter evaluation of in vivo gene delivery using ultrasound-guided, microbubble-enhanced sonoporation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Galina; Wong, Andrew W; Bez, Maxim; Yang, Fang; Tam, Sarah; Even, Lisa; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Ben-David, Shiran; Tawackoli, Wafa; Pelled, Gadi; Ferrara, Katherine W; Gazit, Dan

    2016-02-10

    More than 1800 gene therapy clinical trials worldwide have targeted a wide range of conditions including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and monogenic diseases. Biological (i.e. viral), chemical, and physical approaches have been developed to deliver nucleic acids into cells. Although viral vectors offer the greatest efficiency, they also raise major safety concerns including carcinogenesis and immunogenicity. The goal of microbubble-mediated sonoporation is to enhance the uptake of drugs and nucleic acids. Insonation of microbubbles is thought to facilitate two mechanisms for enhanced uptake: first, deflection of the cell membrane inducing endocytotic uptake, and second, microbubble jetting inducing the formation of pores in the cell membrane. We hypothesized that ultrasound could be used to guide local microbubble-enhanced sonoporation of plasmid DNA. With the aim of optimizing delivery efficiency, we used nonlinear ultrasound and bioluminescence imaging to optimize the acoustic pressure, microbubble concentration, treatment duration, DNA dosage, and number of treatments required for in vivo Luciferase gene expression in a mouse thigh muscle model. We found that mice injected with 50μg luciferase plasmid DNA and 5×10(5) microbubbles followed by ultrasound treatment at 1.4MHz, 200kPa, 100-cycle pulse length, and 540 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) for 2min exhibited superior transgene expression compared to all other treatment groups. The bioluminescent signal measured for these mice on Day 4 post-treatment was 100-fold higher (p<0.0001, n=5 or 6) than the signals for controls treated with DNA injection alone, DNA and microbubble injection, or DNA injection and ultrasound treatment. Our results indicate that these conditions result in efficient gene delivery and prolonged gene expression (up to 21days) with no evidence of tissue damage or off-target delivery. We believe that these promising results bear great promise for the development of microbubble-enhanced sonoporation-induced gene therapies. PMID:26682505

  17. Ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia for a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system undergoing cesarean delivery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, LinLi; Ni, Juan; Wu, Lan; Luo, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with preexisting diseases is challenging and individualized approaches need to be determined based on patients’ complications. We report here a case of ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia in combination with low-dose ketamine during cesarean delivery on a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system and airway problems. The ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia was performed in the L1–L2 space, followed by an intravenous administration of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) for sedation and analgesia. Satisfactory anesthesia was provided to the patient and spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the surgery. The mother and the baby were discharged 5 days after surgery, no complications were reported for either of them. Our work demonstrated that an ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia combined with low-dose ketamine can be used to successfully maintain spontaneous ventilation and provide effective analgesia during surgery and reduce the risk of postoperative anesthesia-related pulmonary infection. PMID:25999759

  18. Recurrence of renal cell carcinoma diagnosed using contralateral adrenal biopsy with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    TANIMOTO, AZUSA; TAKEUCHI, SHINJI; YAEGASHI, HIROSHI; KOTANI, HIROSHI; KITAI, HIDENORI; NANJO, SHIGEKI; EBI, HIROMICHI; YAMASHITA, KANAME; MOURI, HISATSUGU; OHTSUBO, KOUSHIRO; IKEDA, HIROKO; YANO, SEIJI

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old female in whom a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lesion was resected 19 years previously presented to our hospital with cognitive dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed nodules in the brain, lung, adrenal gland and a pelvic osteolytic lesion. To identify the primary cancer site, the present study performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of the left adrenal lesion. Consequently, the pathological findings of the tissue obtained by EUS-FNA were similar to those of the previous nephrectomy specimen, revealing that the adrenal lesion was the recurrence of RCC. The majority of the metastatic lesions in the patient were reduced in size by the multiple kinase inhibitor, pazopanib. Contralateral adrenal metastasis of RCC is rare and the use of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions remains to be elucidated. This is a rare case of adrenal lesion, diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Therefore, EUS-FNA is considered to be a useful diagnostic modality of adrenal metastases from unidentified primary tumor types. PMID:27073657

  19. Two-step reconstruction method using global optimization and conjugate gradient for ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Zhu, Quing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a promising method for characterizing malignant and benign lesions in the female breast. We introduce a new two-step algorithm for DOT inversion in which the optical parameters are estimated with the global optimization method, genetic algorithm. The estimation result is applied as an initial guess to the conjugate gradient (CG) optimization method to obtain the absorption and scattering distributions simultaneously. Simulations and phantom experiments have shown that the maximum absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are reconstructed with less than 10% and 25% errors, respectively. This is in contrast with the CG method alone, which generates about 20% error for the absorption coefficient and does not accurately recover the scattering distribution. A new measure of scattering contrast has been introduced to characterize benign and malignant breast lesions. The results of 16 clinical cases reconstructed with the two-step method demonstrates that, on average, the absorption coefficient and scattering contrast of malignant lesions are about 1.8 and 3.32 times higher than the benign cases, respectively.

  20. Unplanned pregnancy after ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of uterine fibroids: A follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bing-Song, Zhang; Jing, Zhang; Zhi-Yu, Han; Chang-Tao, Xu; Rui-Fang, Xu; Xiu-Mei, Li; Hui, Liu

    2016-01-01

    A follow-up study was performed with 169 women of childbearing age who underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (UPMWA) therapy for symptomatic uterine fibroids in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from June 2007 to December 2014. This study aimed to observe the incidence of unplanned pregnancies in these women after UPMWA treatment in order to evaluate its effect on natural conception. Ten unplanned pregnancies in nine women were occurred. Of the nine patients, six did not want the pregnancy and chose for induced abortion to end the pregnancy at an early stage. Three chose to continue with the pregnancy and gave birth to a healthy term infant delivered by cesarean section (of these three patients, two had been previously diagnosed as infertility). None of the patients had any serious obstetric complications. After UPMWA treatment for uterine fibroids, patients may conceive naturally, the impact of the procedure on fertility and pregnancy outcomes is worthy of further prospective study in larger sample. PMID:26733265

  1. Multicentric solid pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Megumi; Fukuda, Toshikatsu; Nakahara, Masahiro; Amano, Mio; Takei, Daisuke; Kawashima, Masumi; Sumi, Yusuke; Amano, Hironobu; Yonehara, Shuji; Hanada, Keiji; Noriyuki, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare tumor. This neoplasm usually arises as a single mass; multicentricity is exceptionally rare. We report the preoperative diagnosis of multicentric SPNs by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A 32-year-old woman presented to the hospital with a pancreatic tumor that was detected on abdominal echography. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a 5-mm low-density mass in the body of the pancreas and a 10-mm mass in the tail of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also revealed two tumors in the body and tail of the pancreas. On endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), two indistinct and heterogeneous echogenic masses were found, and EUS-FNA was performed for each of these tumors. Cytological analysis revealed that the two masses were highly cellular with papillary groups of small, uniform, oval cells surrounding a fibrovascular core. Immunohistochemistry was positive for α-1 antitrypsin, vimentin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), CD10, and progesterone receptor. These features confirmed the preoperative diagnosis of multicentric SPNs. The patient underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was multicentric SPNs. During 2 years of follow-up, she has not developed any recurrence. PMID:26943434

  2. Assessment of Postoperative Analgesia after Application of Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia for Surgery in a Swine Femoral Fracture Model

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Joseph M; Settle, Timothy L; Bodo, Michael; Lombardini, Eric; Kent, Michael L; Upp, Justin; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    Management of pain in research swine used for studies involving painful procedures is a considerable challenge. Here we assessed whether a regional anesthesia method is effective for pain control of hindlimb injuries in pigs used for research in bone fracture healing. For this randomized controlled study, we administered regional anesthesia before an experimental femoral injury was produced. Using ultrasound guidance, we placed sterile infusion catheters near the sciatic and femoral nerves and administered local anesthetic (bupivacaine) for the first 24 h after surgery. We evaluated various behavioral and physiologic parameters to test the hypothesis that this regional anesthesia would provide superior analgesia compared with systemic analgesia alone. We also collected blood samples to evaluate serum levels of cortisol and fentanyl postoperatively. At the end of the study period, we collected sciatic and femoral nerves and surrounding soft tissues for histopathologic evaluation. Treatment pigs had lower subjective pain scores than did control animals. Control pigs had a longer time to first feed consumption and required additional analgesia earlier in the postoperative period than did treatment pigs. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia is a viable and effective adjunct to systemic analgesics for providing pain control in swine with experimental femoral fractures. PMID:23849409

  3. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mankikar, Maitreyi Gajanan; Sardesai, Shalini Pravin; Ghodki, Poonam Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a fascial plane block providing post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing surgery with infra-umbilical incisions. We evaluated analgesic efficacy of TAP block with ropivacaine for 24 h after caesarean section through a Pfannenstiel incision. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia were randomised to undergo TAP block with ropivacaine (n = 30) versus control group (n = 30) with normal saline, in addition to standard analgesia with intravenous paracetamol and tramadol. At the end of the surgery, ultrasound-guided TAP plane block was given bilaterally using ropivacaine or normal saline (15 ml on either side). Each patient was assessed post-operatively by a blinded investigator at regular intervals up to 24 h for visual analogue score (VAS) and requirement of analgesia. SPSS version 18.0 software was used. Demographic data were analysed using Student's t-test and the other parameters using paired t-test. Results: TAP block with ropivacaine compared with normal saline reduced post-operative VAS at 24 h (P = 0.004918). Time for rescue analgesia in the study group was prolonged from 4.1 to 9.53 h (P = 0.01631). Mean requirement of tramadol in the first 24 h was reduced in the study group. Conclusion: US guided TAP block after caesarean section reduces the analgesic requirement in the first 24 h. PMID:27141108

  4. Ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of gynaecological diseases: A review of safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian; Zhang, Wenyi; Orsi, Franco; Chen, Wenzhi; Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-05-01

    As a non-surgical treatment, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has received increasing interest for the treatment of gynaecological diseases over the last 10 years. Many studies have shown that HIFU is safe and effective in treating patients with uterine fibroids, adenomyosis, cervicitis or vulvar diseases. Both magnetic resonance imaging-guided HIFU (MRgHIFU) and ultrasound-guided HIFU (USgHIFU) can offer gynaecologists non-invasive techniques to treat patients with uterine benign diseases. Focused ultrasound therapy can also be used effectively to treat cervicitis and vulvar diseases. As gynaecologists gain more experience with this technology, the rate of severe adverse effects has been lowered with the development of this non-invasive technique. In this paper we review the literature available regarding the utilisation of magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound/MRgHIFU or USgHIFU and new findings from our group in the treatment of gynaecological diseases: uterine fibroids, adenomyosis, cervicitis, vulvar diseases, caesarean scar pregnancies, and abdominal wall endometriosis. PMID:25609456

  5. Unplanned pregnancy after ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of uterine fibroids: A follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Bing-song, Zhang; Jing, Zhang; Zhi-yu, Han; Chang-tao, Xu; Rui-fang, Xu; Xiu-mei, Li; Hui, Liu

    2016-01-01

    A follow-up study was performed with 169 women of childbearing age who underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (UPMWA) therapy for symptomatic uterine fibroids in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from June 2007 to December 2014. This study aimed to observe the incidence of unplanned pregnancies in these women after UPMWA treatment in order to evaluate its effect on natural conception. Ten unplanned pregnancies in nine women were occurred. Of the nine patients, six did not want the pregnancy and chose for induced abortion to end the pregnancy at an early stage. Three chose to continue with the pregnancy and gave birth to a healthy term infant delivered by cesarean section (of these three patients, two had been previously diagnosed as infertility). None of the patients had any serious obstetric complications. After UPMWA treatment for uterine fibroids, patients may conceive naturally, the impact of the procedure on fertility and pregnancy outcomes is worthy of further prospective study in larger sample. PMID:26733265

  6. Visualization of molecular composition and functionality of cancer cells using nanoparticle-augmented ultrasound-guided photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Kim, Seungsoo; Karpiouk, Andrei; Joshi, Pratixa P.; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of molecular signatures of tumors in addition to their anatomy and morphology is desired for effective diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Development of in vivo imaging techniques that can identify and monitor molecular composition of tumors remains an important challenge in pre-clinical research and medical practice. Here we present a molecular photoacoustic imaging technique that can visualize the presence and activity of an important cancer biomarker – epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), utilizing the effect of plasmon resonance coupling between molecular targeted gold nanoparticles. Specifically, spectral analysis of photoacoustic images revealed profound changes in the optical absorption of systemically delivered EGFR-targeted gold nanospheres due to their molecular interactions with tumor cells overexpressing EGFR. In contrast, no changes in optical properties and, therefore, photoacoustic signal, were observed after systemic delivery of non-targeted gold nanoparticles to the tumors. The results indicate that multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging augmented with molecularly targeted gold nanoparticles has the ability to monitor molecular specific interactions between nanoparticles and cell-surface receptors, allowing visualization of the presence and functional activity of tumor cells. Furthermore, the approach can be used for other cancer cell-surface receptors such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Therefore, ultrasound-guided molecular photoacoustic imaging can potentially aid in tumor diagnosis, selection of customized patient-specific treatment, and monitor the therapeutic progression and outcome in vivo. PMID:25893171

  7. Comparison of needle aspiration and vacuum-assisted biopsy in the ultrasound-guided drainage of lactational breast abscesses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare needle aspiration and vacuum-assistedbiopsy in the ultrasound-guided treatment of lactational breast abscesses. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2014, a total of 74 patients presented withlactational breast abscesses. Thirty of these patients underwent treatment with antibioticsalone, while the remaining 44 lactating women with breast abscesses were treated withneedle aspiration (n=25) or vacuum-assisted biopsy (n=19). Age, duration of lactation, abscess diameter, pus culture results, the number of interventions, the healing time, and the cure rate were reviewed and compared between these two groups. The Student’s t test and the chi-square test were used to compare the variables. Results: No significant difference was found in the cure rate between the needle aspirationgroup (22/25, 88%) and the vacuum-assisted biopsy group (18/19, 94.7%) (P=0.441). However, the mean healing time was significantly shorter in the vacuum-assisted biopsy group (6.7 days) than in the needle aspiration group (9.0 days) (P=0.001). Conclusion: Vacuum-assisted biopsy is a viable option for the management of lactational breast abscesses and was found to lead to a shorter healing time than needle aspiration. However, further study is necessary to establish the clinical efficacy of vacuum-assisted biopsy in the management of lactational breast abscesses. PMID:26753603

  8. Steroids (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Steroids KidsHealth > For Parents > Steroids Print A A A ... your child isn't at risk. What Are Steroids? Drugs commonly referred to as "steroids" are classified ...

  9. Anatomic variation of subclavian artery visualized on ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Santvana; Yadav, Naveen; Prasad, Arunima; Banerjee, Sumantra Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasonography for performance of nerve and plexus blocks has made the process simpler and safer. However, at times, variant anatomy of the visualized structures can lead to failure of blocks or complications such as intravascular injections. This is especially true in case of novice operators. We report a case of a variant branch of subclavian artery, possibly the dorsal scapular artery passing through the brachial plexus nerve bundles in the supraclavicular area. Since this variation in anatomy was visualized in the scout scan prior to the performance of the block, it was possible to avoid any accidental puncture. Hence, a thorough knowledge of the ultrasound anatomy is important in order to identify various aberrations and variations. It is also prudent to perform a preliminary scan, prior to performance of the block to localize the target area and avoid any inadvertent complications. PMID:25143765

  10. Comparison of two techniques for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade in cats.

    PubMed

    Ansón, Agustina; Laredo, Francisco G; Gil, Francisco; Soler, Marta; Belda, Eliseo; Ayala, Maria D; Agut, Amalia

    2015-06-01

    Axillary blockade of the brachial plexus (BP) is advocated in humans and dogs for surgical procedures carried out on the foot, carpus and elbow as it provides complete analgesia distally from above the elbow joint. The aim of this study was to develop an ultrasound (US)-guided approach to block the BP in cats. Two groups of 12 feline cadavers each were used to compare two different techniques to block the BP at the axillary level. The reliability of the techniques was assessed by anatomical and computed tomography (CT) studies. Cadavers of the first group were positioned in dorsal recumbency with the forelimb to be blocked adducted (thoracic limbs flexed and orientated caudally) (FAD technique). The second group was positioned in dorsal recumbency with the forelimb abducted 90° (FAB technique). The accuracy of the techniques was determined by US after injecting 1 ml blue ink along the BP nerves, and by CT after injecting 1 ml of an iodinated contrast medium. The anatomical and CT studies confirmed the accuracy of the US location of the BP nerves. Staining of the axillaris, musculocutaneous, radialis, medianus and ulnaris nerves was observed in 100% of cats using the FAB technique and in 66% of the cats using the FAD technique. Rate of complications was higher in the FAD technique. In conclusion, a US-guided axillary approach to the BP by the use of a FAB technique is a safe and feasible procedure to block the BP in the cat. Further studies are needed to ascertain whether the technique can be applied in a clinical setting. PMID:25193280

  11. Ultrasound-guided block of sciatic and femoral nerves: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Waag, Sonja; Stoffel, Michael H; Spadavecchia, Claudia; Eichenberger, Urs; Rohrbach, Helene

    2014-04-01

    The sheep is a popular animal model for human biomechanical research involving invasive surgery on the hind limb. These painful procedures can only be ethically justified with the application of adequate analgesia protocols. Regional anaesthesia as an adjunct to general anaesthesia may markedly improve well-being of these experimental animals during the postoperative period due to a higher analgesic efficacy when compared with systemic drugs, and may therefore reduce stress and consequently the severity of such studies. As a first step 14 sheep cadavers were used to establish a new technique for the peripheral blockade of the sciatic and the femoral nerves under sonographic guidance and to evaluate the success rate by determination of the colorization of both nerves after an injection of 0.5?mL of a 0.1% methylene blue solution. First, both nerves were visualized sonographically. Then, methylene blue solution was injected and subsequently the length of colorization was measured by gross anatomical dissection of the target nerves. Twenty-four sciatic nerves were identified sonographically in 12 out of 13 cadavers. In one animal, the nerve could not be ascertained unequivocally and, consequently, nerve colorization failed. Twenty femoral nerves were located by ultrasound in 10 out of 13 cadavers. In three cadavers, signs of autolysis impeded the scan. This study provides a detailed anatomical description of the localization of the sciatic and the femoral nerves and presents an effective and safe yet simple and rapid technique for performing peripheral nerve blocks with a high success rate. PMID:24464921

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided vascular therapy: is it safe and effective?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J-M; Giacino, C; Pioche, M; Vanbiervliet, G; Brardjanian, S; Ah-Soune, P; Vitton, V; Grimaud, J-C; Barthet, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent developments in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) have enabled new approaches to the management of refractory gastrointestinal bleeding, including EUS-guided sclerotherapy and vessel embolization. Few cases have been reported in the literature. Eight patients were admitted for severe, refractory gastrointestinal bleeding, seven of whom were actively bleeding. Causes of bleeding were gastric varices secondary to portal hypertension (n = 3); gastroduodenal artery aneurysm or fundal aneurysmal arterial malformation (n = 3); and Dieulafoy's ulcer (n = 2); the latter five patients having arterial bleeding. During the procedures, the bleeding vessel was punctured with a 19-gauge needle then injected with a sclerosing agent (cyanoacrylate glue [n = 6] or polidocanol 2 % [n = 2]) under Doppler control. The median follow-up time was 9 months (3 - 18 months). In all 10 endoscopic procedures were performed. The procedure was successful at the first attempt in seven out of eight patients (87.5 %). No clinical complications were observed, although in one case there was diffusion of cyanoacrylate in the hepatic artery. The seven successful cases all showed immediate and complete disappearance of the Doppler flow signal at the end of the procedure. This retrospective study highlights the utility of EUS-guided vascular therapy. However, more large randomized studies should be conducted to confirm these results. PMID:22389233

  13. Real-Time Automatic Artery Segmentation, Reconstruction and Registration for Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anaesthesia of the Femoral Nerve.

    PubMed

    Smistad, Erik; Lindseth, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to create an assistant for ultrasound- guided femoral nerve block. By segmenting and visualizing the important structures such as the femoral artery, we hope to improve the success of these procedures. This article is the first step towards this goal and presents novel real-time methods for identifying and reconstructing the femoral artery, and registering a model of the surrounding anatomy to the ultrasound images. The femoral artery is modelled as an ellipse. The artery is first detected by a novel algorithm which initializes the artery tracking. This algorithm is completely automatic and requires no user interaction. Artery tracking is achieved with a Kalman filter. The 3D artery is reconstructed in real-time with a novel algorithm and a tracked ultrasound probe. A mesh model of the surrounding anatomy was created from a CT dataset. Registration of this model is achieved by landmark registration using the centerpoints from the artery tracking and the femoral artery centerline of the model. The artery detection method was able to automatically detect the femoral artery and initialize the tracking in all 48 ultrasound sequences. The tracking algorithm achieved an average dice similarity coefficient of 0.91, absolute distance of 0.33 mm, and Hausdorff distance 1.05 mm. The mean registration error was 2.7 mm, while the average maximum error was 12.4 mm. The average runtime was measured to be 38, 8, 46 and 0.2 milliseconds for the artery detection, tracking, reconstruction and registration methods respectively. PMID:26513782

  14. Risk factors for aggressive nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and the role of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Ende, Alexander R.; Sedarat, Alireza; Shah, Pari; Jhala, Nirag; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Metz, David C.; Kochman, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NF-pNETs) are increasingly being diagnosed but management, especially of small tumors, remains a clinical dilemma. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is now routinely used for diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) but has not been well studied as a tool for identifying aggressive disease. Materials and Methods: A systematic search of the cytology database identified all patients at our center who underwent EUS-FNA from 1999 through 2011 and were diagnosed with NF-pNET. Results: A total of 50 patients were identified. Though patients with metastatic disease had a mean tumor size of 40 mm compared to 25 mm in patients without metastatic disease (P = 0.04), we also identified several patients with tumors <20 mm who presented with metastatic disease. Furthermore, we found no statistically significant difference in metastatic disease between tumors <20 mm and >20 mm (P = 0.13). Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, we found that using a cutoff point of 20 mm only led to a sensitivity of 85% in screening for metastases, while lowering the cutoff point to 18 mm allowed for a sensitivity of 95%. Conclusion: Currently, guidelines suggest that only patients with tumors greater than 20 mm undergo surgical resection, as tumors less than this size are thought to have low risk of metastases. Our analysis suggests that these recommendations could lead to undertreating patients with small tumors. Tumor size alone may be inadequate as a marker for aggressive NF-pNETs. Given this, other risk factors for aggressive pNETs should be studied to help identify the patients most likely to benefit from surgery. PMID:26879167

  15. Out-of-plane ultrasound-guided paravertebral blocks improve analgesic outcomes in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Amlong, Corey; Guy, Moltu; Schroeder, Kristopher M; Donnelly, Melanie J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Paravertebral blocks (PVBs) are a method of limiting postoperative pain for patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). We began providing ultrasound-guided PVBs for patients undergoing VATS in the spring of 2011, using an out-of-plane approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate this practice change. Methods Following institutional review board approval, we reviewed the charts of 114 patients undergoing VATS by one surgeon at our institution between January 2011 and July 2012. Of the 78 eligible patients, 49 patients received a PVB prior to surgery. We evaluated opioids administered in the perioperative period, pain scores, and side effects from pain medications. Results Patients who received a preoperative PVB required fewer narcotics intraoperatively and during their hospital stay (P=0.001 and 0.011, respectively). Pain scores on initial assessment and in recovery were lower in patients who received a PVB (P=0.005), as were dynamic and resting pain scores at 24 hours after surgery (P=0.003 and P<0.001, respectively). Patients receiving a PVB had fewer episodes of treated nausea both in the postanesthesia care unit (P=0.004) and for the first 24 hours after surgery (P=0.001). These patients also spent less time in recovery (P=0.025) than the patients who did not receive a block. Conclusion The current study suggests improved outcomes in patients who underwent VATS with a preoperative PVB. All variables showed a trend toward improved results in patients who obtained a preoperative PVB. PMID:26730208

  16. Does onsite cytotechnology evaluation improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Alsohaibani, Fahad; Girgis, Safwat; Sandha, Gurpal Singh

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred modality for the cytological diagnosis of various cancers. Onsite cytopathology interpretation is not available in most centres. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the the adequacy of tissue sampling assessed by an onsite cytotechnologist improves the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA. METHODS: The present study is a retrospective review of all patients undergoing solid mass EUS-FNA between September 2005 and August 2007. Patients in group I (September 2005 to August 2006) had cytology slides prepared by an endoscopy nurse. Patients in group II (September 2006 to August 2007) had cytology slides prepared, stained and assessed for adequacy of tissue sampling by a cytotechnologist in the endoscopy suite. The final cytopathological diagnosis (definitely positive, definitely negative or inconclusive) was compared between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 49 EUS-FNA procedures were performed in 47 patients in group I and 60 EUS-FNA procedures in 55 patients in group II. Pancreatic masses were the most common target site in both groups. The total number of needle passes was 105 in group I (mean 2.14 passes per patient; range one to five needle passes) and 158 in group II (mean 2.63 passes per patient; range one to four needle passes). The difference in the number of needle passes was not statistically significant between groups. The final diagnosis was definite in 53% in group I compared with 77% in group II (P=0.01). The percentage of inconclusive diagnoses was 47% in group I and 23% in group II (P=0.001). CONCLUSION: Onsite cytotechnologist interpretation of adequacy of tissue sampling significantly improves the diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA. This appears to be independent of the total number of needle passes undertaken for tissue sampling. PMID:19172205

  17. Needle localization using a moving stylet/catheter in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Despite the wide range and long history of ultrasound guided needle insertions, an unresolved issue in many cases is clear needle visibility. A well-known ad hoc technique to detect the needle is to move the stylet and look for changes in the needle appearance. We present a new method to automatically locate a moving stylet/catheter within a stationary cannula using motion detection. We then use this information to detect the needle trajectory and the tip. The differences between the current frame and the previous frame are detected and localized, to minimize the influence of tissue global motions. A polynomial fit based on the detected needle axis determines the estimated stylet shaft trajectory, and the extent of the differences along the needle axis represents the tip. Over a few periodic movements of the stylet including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, a combination of polynomial fits determines the needle trajectory and the last detected point represents the needle tip. Experiments are conducted in water bath and bovine muscle tissue for several stylet/catheter materials. Results show that a plastic stylet has the best needle shaft and tip localization accuracy in the water bath with RMSE = 0:16 mm and RMSE = 0:51 mm, respectively. In the bovine tissue, the needle tip was best localized with the plastic catheter with RMSE = 0:33 mm. The stylet tip localization was most accurate with the steel stylet, with RMSE = 2:81 mm and the shaft was best localized with the plastic catheter, with RMSE = 0:32 mm.

  18. Ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound in an in vivo porcine liver model

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Starr, Frank; Paun, Marla; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy for noninvasive tissue ablation has been recently gaining momentum. In HIFU, ultrasound energy from an extracorporeal source is focused within the body to ablate tissue at the focus while leaving the surrounding organs and tissues unaffected. Most HIFU therapies are designed to use heating effects resulting from the absorption of ultrasound by tissue to create a thermally coagulated treatment volume. Although this approach is often successful, it has its limitations, such as the heat sink effect caused by the presence of a large blood vessel near the treatment area or heating of the ribs in the transcostal applications. HIFU-induced bubbles provide an alternative means to destroy the target tissue by mechanical disruption or, at its extreme, local fractionation of tissue within the focal region. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a recently developed approach to HIFU-induced ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation in an in vivo pig model. In this approach, termed boiling histotripsy, a millimeter-sized boiling bubble is generated by ultrasound and further interacts with the ultrasound field to fractionate porcine liver tissue into subcellular debris without inducing further thermal effects. Tissue selectivity, demonstrated by boiling histotripsy, allows for the treatment of tissue immediately adjacent to major blood vessels and other connective tissue structures. Furthermore, boiling histotripsy would benefit the clinical applications, in which it is important to accelerate resorption or passage of the ablated tissue volume, diminish pressure on the surrounding organs that causes discomfort, or insert openings between tissues. PMID:24843132

  19. The emerging role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core biopsy for the evaluation of solid pancreatic masses.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, M; Koduru, P; Lanke, G; Bruno, M; Maitra, A; Giovannini, M

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal cancer with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection is the only curative treatment but only 20% are eligible for resection at the time of diagnosis. Early detection of cancer is of paramount importance in the management. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred modality for obtaining tissue diagnosis of pancreatic masses. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA may be limited by several factors like availability of onsite cytopathology, adequacy of tissue core for histology, location of the mass, presence of underlying chronic pancreatitis, and experience of the endoscopist. Modern oncology is focusing on personalizing treatment based on tissue analysis of genetic aberrations and molecular biomarkers which are now available. Core tissue also aids in the diagnosis of disease entities like lymphoma, metastatic tumors, neuroendocrine tumors and autoimmune pancreatitis whose diagnosis rely on preserved tissue architecture and immunohistochemistry. Making accurate diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses is critical to avoid unnecessary resections in patients with benign lesions like focal lesions of chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis which mimic cancer. To overcome the limitations of FNA and to obtain adequate core tissue, a Tru-Cut biopsy needle was developed which met with variable success due to stiffness, cumbersome operation and technical failure using it in the duodenum/pancreatic head. More recently fine needle biopsy needles, with reverse bevel technology have become available in different sizes (19, 22, 25-gauge). The aim of this article was to review the emerging role of core biopsy needles in acquiring tissue in solid pancreatic masses and discuss its potential role in personalized medicine. PMID:25675155

  20. Comparison of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration and Video-Assisted Mediastinoscopy for Mediastinal Staging of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiahui; Guan, Wenbin; Han, Fengfeng; Guo, Xuejun; Jin, Zhichao

    2015-10-01

    Video-assisted mediastinoscopy (VAM) and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) are the two most commonly used invasive methods for mediastinal staging of lung cancer. The objective of this review is to assess and compare the overall diagnostic values of VAM and EBUS-TBNA. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies that evaluated EBUS-TBNA or VAM accuracy. Quantitative meta-analysis was used to pool sensitivity and specificity, and study quality was evaluated. Meta-regression was applied to indirectly compare EBUS-TBNA and VAM after adjusting quality score, study design, and station number. A total of ten studies with 999 EBUS-TBNA patients and seven studies with 915 VAM patients were included. Since the pooled specificity was 100% for both modalities, sensitivity was mainly analyzed. The pooled sensitivities for EBUS-TBNA and VAM were 0.84 (95% CI 0.79-0.88) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.82-0.90), respectively. Subgroup analyses of quality score, study design, station number and rapid on-site cytologic evaluation showed no significant influence on the overall sensitivity of the two modalities. After adjusting quality score, study design, and station number, the pooled sensitivities of VAM and EBUS-TBNA were not significantly different. However, more procedural complications and fewer false negatives (FN) were found with VAM than EBUS-TBNA. VAM and EBUS exhibited equally high diagnostic accuracy for mediastinal staging of lung cancer. Due to lower morbidity with EBUS-TBNA and fewer FN with VAM, EBUS-TBNA should be performed first, followed by VAM in the case of a negative needle result. PMID:26186887

  1. Accuracy assessment of an automatic image-based PET/CT registration for ultrasound-guided biopsies and ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoury, Samuel; Wood, Bradford J.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Dalal, Sandeep; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    The multimodal fusion of spatially tracked real-time ultrasound (US) with a prior CT scan has demonstrated clinical utility, accuracy, and positive impact upon clinical outcomes when used for guidance during biopsy and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, the combination of CT-guided procedures with positron emission tomography (PET) may not only enhance navigation, but add valuable information regarding the specific location and volume of the targeted masses which may be invisible on CT and US. The accuracy of this fusion depends on reliable, reproducible registration methods between PET and CT. This can avoid extensive manual efforts to correct registration which can be long and tedious in an interventional setting. In this paper, we present a registration workflow for PET/CT/US fusion by analyzing various image metrics based on normalized mutual information and cross-correlation, using both rigid and affine transformations to automatically align PET and CT. Registration is performed between the CT component of the prior PET-CT and the intra-procedural CT scan used for navigation to maximize image congruence. We evaluate the accuracy of the PET/CT registration by computing fiducial and target registration errors using anatomical landmarks and lesion locations respectively. We also report differences to gold-standard manual alignment as well as the root mean square errors for CT/US fusion. Ten patients with prior PET/CT who underwent ablation or biopsy procedures were selected for this study. Studies show that optimal results were obtained using a crosscorrelation based rigid registration with a landmark localization error of 1.1 +/- 0.7 mm using a discrete graphminimizing scheme. We demonstrate the feasibility of automated fusion of PET/CT and its suitability for multi-modality ultrasound guided navigation procedures.

  2. Comparison of 22G reverse-beveled versus standard needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of solid pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Alatawi, Abdullah; Beuvon, Frdric; Grabar, Sophie; Leblanc, Sarah; Chaussade, Stanislas; Terris, Benoit; Barret, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) using standard needles has a high diagnostic value in the evaluation of solid pancreatic masses. Fenestrated needles have been developed to improve the quality of EUS-guided tissue sampling by providing core biopsies (FNB). Methods Patients with solid pancreatic masses of >2?cm were prospectively included in our study and randomized to receive EUS sampling, using either a standard 22G FNA or a 22G Procore FNB needle. The main study endpoint was the number of needle passes required to obtain a diagnosis in more than 90% of cases. Results We included 100 patients (male?=?63, female?=?37; mean age?=?68.4 years) in our study. We found that 88% of the lesions were malignant, with a mean size of 32?mm. A sample adequate for diagnosis was obtained in more than 90% of cases after the second needle pass in the FNB group, versus the third needle pass in the FNA group. Slide cellularity and presence of tissue microfragments were significantly higher in the FNB group. Sensitivity for the diagnosis of malignancy was 88.4% versus 97.8% for the EUS-FNA and EUS-FNB group, respectively, while specificity for both techniques was 100%. No complications were recorded. Conclusions Although the accuracy of both needle types for proving malignancy was similar, a lower number of passes was required with the FNB needles to achieve the same contributive sample rate as with the FNA needles. FNB also improved the histopathological quality of specimens, suggesting an overall superiority of FNB sampling. PMID:26279842

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  4. Ultrasound-guided anaesthetic blockade of the pelvic limb in calves.

    PubMed

    Re, Michela; Blanco-Murcia, Javier; Villaescusa Fernández, Alejandra; De Gaspar Simón, Ignacio; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to describe a suitable acoustic window to facilitate access to the sciatic and femoral nerves in calves and to study the effects of their blockade with local anaesthetics. The neuroanatomical and ultrasound (US) study was performed on the cadavers of 10 calves, and the effects of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine (0.2 mL/kg) were determined in five healthy calves. The sciatic nerve in the cadavers was easily visualised as a hyperechoic band distal to the femoral greater trochanter and caudal to the femoral shaft. The femoral nerve in the cadavers was not easily identified, and was visualised as a hyperechoic oval structure situated immediately medial to the psoas major muscle and lateral to the femoral artery. The sciatic nerve was stained by methylene blue, injected under US guidance, in 9/10 cases, and the femoral nerve was stained in 6/10 cases. Sciatic nerve blockade under US guidance produced adduction of the limb with metatarsophalangeal joint flexion, while the femoral nerve blockade produced reduced weight bearing. The sciatic nerve blockade produced a reduced response to the noxious stimulus, mainly in the phalanges, proximal and distal metatarsus, tarsus and tibia and, following the femoral nerve blockade, in the medial subarea of the femur. However, femoral nerve blockade produced a more variable degree of blockade. In conclusion, US -guided anaesthetic blockade of the sciatic nerve in calves may be considered for surgery in the distal pelvic limb, although further studies are necessary to determine its clinical application. PMID:24797105

  5. The impact of local anesthetic distribution on block onset in Ultrasound-guided interscalene block

    PubMed Central

    Lang, R Scott; Kentor, Michael L; Vallejo, Manuel; Bigeleisen, Paul; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent investigations of local anesthetic distribution in the lower extremity have revealed that completely surrounding the sciatic nerve with local anesthetic provides the advantage of more rapid and complete anesthesia in the territory served by the nerve. We hypothesized that a pattern of distribution which entirely envelops the targeted nerve roots during interscalene block would provide similar benefits of more rapid anesthesia onset. Methods During interscalene block guided by ultrasound with nerve-stimulator confirmation, the pattern of local anesthetic distribution was recorded and later classified as complete or incomplete envelopment of the visible nerve elements in 50 patients undergoing ambulatory shoulder arthroscopic surgery. The pattern was then compared to the extent of block set-up at predetermined intervals, as well as to postoperative pain levels and block duration. Results 22 patients (44%) had complete envelopment of the nerves in the plane of injection during ultrasound imaging of the interscalene block. There was no difference in the fraction of blocks that were fully set-up at 10 minutes with regards to complete or incomplete envelopment of the nerves by local anesthetic. All of the patients had complete set-up of the block by 20 minutes. In addition, the postoperative pain levels and duration of block did not vary among the two groups with complete versus incomplete local anesthetic distribution around the nerves. Conclusion The presence or absence of complete envelopment of the nerve elements in the interscalene groove by local anesthetic did not determine the likelihood of complete block effect at predetermined time intervals after the procedure. PMID:22845687

  6. Improved perioperative analgesia with ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve or transversus abdominis plane block for open inguinal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiang; Wu, Tao; Terry, Marisa J.; Eldrige, Jason S.; Tong, Qiang; Erwin, Patricia J.; Wang, Zhen; Qu, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric (II/IH) nerve and transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been increasingly utilized in patients for perioperative analgesia. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical efficacy of ultrasound-guided II/IH nerve or TAP blocks for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing open inguinal surgery. [Subjects and Methods] A systematic search was conducted of 7 databases from the inception to March 5, 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the clinical efficacy of ultrasound-guided vs. landmark-based techniques to perform II/IH nerve and TAP blocks in patients with open inguinal surgery were included. We constructed random effects models to pool the standardized mean difference (SMD) for continuous outcomes and the odds ratio (OR) for dichotomized outcomes. [Results] Ultrasound-guided II/IH nerve or TAP blocks were associated with a reduced use of intraoperative additional analgesia and a significant reduction of pain scores during day-stay. The use of rescue drugs was also significantly lower in the ultrasound-guided group. [Conclusion] The use of ultrasound-guidance to perform an II/IH nerve or a TAP block was associated with improved perioperative analgesia in patients following open inguinal surgery compared to landmark-based methods. PMID:27134411

  7. Routine use of ultrasound guided tandem placement in intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer – a South Indian institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intracavitary brachytherapy necessitates the insertion of a tandem applicator through the cervical os into the uterine cavity. Blind insertion of the tandem may result in suboptimal tandem placement. This decreases the control of the tumor locally and may result in uterine perforation. Although routine real time ultrasound guided tandem placement has shown better results, it is seldom practised. The aim of this work is to evaluate the role of routine real-time intraoperative trans-abdominal ultrasound guided tandem placement in intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. Material and methods This is a prospective single institutional study conducted from April 2013 to May 2015. A total of 96 patients of locally advanced cervical cancer were treated with routine ultrasound guided brachytherapy amounting to a total of 282 intracavitary applications. Results In 78 of the study patients, the cervical os could be easily identified visually, which was then confirmed with ultrasound guidance. In another 12 patients, though the os could be identified visually, uterine sounding was only possible under ultrasound guidance. In another 4 patients, the cervical os could not be identified visually as the cervix was flushed with vagina and ultrasound guidance was necessary for accurate os identification. In 2 of the study patients, intraoperative ultrasound helped in identifying the patients suitable for interstitial brachytherapy rather than intracavitary brachytherapy. Out of the 96 study patients, the length of the uterine canal changed in 15 patients during the subsequent brachytherapy application. Conclusions This procedure is strongly advocated for proper placement of the tandem applicator and to avoid perforations. It is an accurate, fast, easily available, and cost-effective method. Hence, it can be incorporated in intracavitary applications for cervical cancers even in the developing countries where cost, accessibility, and time are important issues. PMID:26622240

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Small Vessel Cannulation: Long-Axis Approach Is Equivalent to Short-Axis in Novice Sonographers Experienced with Landmark-Based Cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Catherine S.; Liao, Michael M.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Douglass, Erica; DiGeronimo, Margaret; Christensen, Eric; Hopkins, Emily; Bender, Brooke; Kendall, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our primary objective was to describe the time to vessel penetration and difficulty of long-axis and short-axis approaches for ultrasound-guided small vessel penetration in novice sonographers experienced with landmark-based small vessel penetration. Methods This was a prospective, observational study of experienced certified emergency nurses attempting ultrasound-guided small vessel cannulation on a vascular access phantom. We conducted a standardized training, practice, and experiment session for each participant. Five long-axis and five short-axis approaches were attempted in alternating sequence. The primary outcome was time to vessel penetration. Secondary outcomes were number of skin penetrations and number of catheter redirections. We compared long-axis and short-axis approaches using multivariable regression adjusting for repeated measures, vessel depth, and vessel caliber. Results Each of 10 novice sonographers made 10 attempts for a total of 100 attempts. Median time to vessel penetration in the long-axis and short-axis was 11 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7–12) and 10 (95% CI 6–13) seconds, respectively. Skin penetrations and catheter redirections were equivalent and near optimal between approaches. The median caliber of cannulated vessels in the long-axis and short-axis was 4.6 (95% CI 4.1–5.5) and 5.6 (95% CI 5.1–6.2) millimeters, respectively. Both axes had equal success rates of 100% for all 50 attempts. In multivariable regression analysis, long-axis attempts were 32% (95% CI 11%–48%; p=0.009) faster than short-axis attempts. Conclusion Novice sonographers, highly proficient with peripheral IV cannulation, can perform after instruction ultrasound-guided small vessel penetration successfully with similar time to vessel penetration in either the long-axis or short-axis approach on phantom models. PMID:25493126

  9. In-line positioning of ultrasound images using wireless remote display system with tablet computer facilitates ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Mizutani, Koh; Funai, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures may be easier to perform when the operator's eye axis, needle puncture site, and ultrasound image display form a straight line in the puncture direction. However, such methods have not been well tested in clinical settings because that arrangement is often impossible due to limited space in the operating room. We developed a wireless remote display system for ultrasound devices using a tablet computer (iPad Mini), which allows easy display of images at nearly any location chosen by the operator. We hypothesized that the in-line layout of ultrasound images provided by this system would allow for secure and quick catheterization of the radial artery. We enrolled first-year medical interns (n = 20) who had no prior experience with ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization to perform that using a short-axis out-of-plane approach with two different methods. With the conventional method, only the ultrasound machine placed at the side of the head of the patient across the targeted forearm was utilized. With the tablet method, the ultrasound images were displayed on an iPad Mini positioned on the arm in alignment with the operator's eye axis and needle puncture direction. The success rate and time required for catheterization were compared between the two methods. Success rate was significantly higher (100 vs. 70 %, P = 0.02) and catheterization time significantly shorter (28.5 ± 7.5 vs. 68.2 ± 14.3 s, P < 0.001) with the tablet method as compared to the conventional method. An ergonomic straight arrangement of the image display is crucial for successful and quick completion of ultrasound-guided arterial catheterization. The present remote display system is a practical method for providing such an arrangement. PMID:25869898

  10. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. Methods A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. Results When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Conclusion Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this case was the SUS. PMID:27096678

  11. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath catheters: A feasible and effective, opioid-sparing, post-operative pain management technique: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Sumitra; Mapari, Amol; Paliwal, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia, though the gold standard of post-operative pain management for laparotomies, is associated with limitations and is contraindicated in many patients. Opioid-based pain management, which is an alternative to epidural, has been implicated in post-operative nausea, vomiting, and ileus. We report successful management of post operative pain with ultrasound guided rectus sheath (RS) catheters. RS block is a promising alternative in scenarios were epidural is contraindicated, has failed or in case of unexpected change in the surgical plan. PMID:25788745

  12. Addition of fentanyl to the ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block does not improve analgesia following cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LI-ZHONG; LIU, XIA; ZHANG, YING-FA; HU, XIAO-XIA; ZHANG, XIAO-MING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the addition of fentanyl to the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block procedure may improve analgesic duration following cesarean delivery. A total of 147 nulliparous women with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II, scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia, were enrolled in the present study. All patients underwent cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia with 10 mg bupivacaine and 10 µg fentanyl, after which the patients underwent an ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block with either 0.375% ropivacaine (group TR; n=48), 0.375% ropivacaine and 50 µg subcutaneous fentanyl (group TRSF; n=49), or a mixture of 0.375% ropivacaine and 50 µg fentanyl (2.5 µg/ml; group TRF; n=50) per side. The TAP block formed part of a multimodal analgesic regimen comprising patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous fentanyl, and regular treatment with diclofenac and paracetamol. The TAP block was performed in the midaxillary line using an in-plane technique. The primary outcome was the time to the first PCA, whereas secondary outcomes were the cumulative and interval PCA consumptions, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores at rest and during movement, side effects assessed at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h postoperatively, and patient satisfaction with postoperative analgesia. No significant differences were observed in the median time to the first PCA among the three groups (P=0.640), which were 150 min (70–720 min) in group TR, 165 min (90–670 min) in group TRSF, and 190 min (70–680 min) in group TRF. Fentanyl consumption, VAS pain scores, side effects and patient satisfaction were similar among the three groups; however, the demand for fentanyl was significantly decreased in the TRSF and TRF groups at 2 h postoperatively (P=0.001 and 0.002, respectively), as compared with group TR. No complications attributed to the TAP block were detected. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that the addition of 2.5 µg/ml fentanyl to the TAP block procedure was unable to improve analgesia following cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. PMID:27073462

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy for diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions (ENES): a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kongkam, Pradermchai; Pittayanon, Rapat; Sampatanukul, Pichet; Angsuwatcharakon, Phonthep; Aniwan, Satimai; Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Sriuranpong, Virote; Navicharern, Patpong; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Kullavanijaya, Pinit; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (EUS-nCLE) has been shown to aid in the diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions. This is a pilot project to study its findings in patients with solid pancreatic lesions (SPLs) with a prospective single-blinded study design. Methods: Patients with SPLs undergoing trans-gastric EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) from July 2013 to March 2014 were prospectively enrolled. The nCLE diagnoses were compared with the final diagnoses. Researchers learned about the EUS-nCLE findings from previously published studies and applied it to diagnose SPLs. In the meantime, the findings were recorded. Results: In total, 22 patients were recruited (mean age 62.7 years, SD 13.8 years; 14 men and eight women). The mean maximal tumor diameter was 36.0 mm (SD 10.9 mm). EUS-nCLE yielded satisfactory images in all patients during the first EUS procedure and diagnosed benign and malignant SPLs in 3 and 19 patients, respectively. Final diagnoses of malignant SPLs were made in 19 patients. Benign SPLs were eventually diagnosed in three patients, with confirmed the cytology and disease stability during the 12-month follow-up period. At the end of the project, based on the results of this current study, EUS-nCLE findings for malignant SPLs were dark clumping with or without dilated vessels (> 40 μm). There were two criteria for diagnosing benign lesions which were white fibrous bands and normal acini cells. The accuracy rate of EUS-nCLE was 90.9 % (20/22). One falsely diagnosed malignant SPL was an inflammatory mass from a recent acute pancreatitis. Another one with a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor presenting with a symptomatic pseudocyst was incorrectly diagnosed as an inflammatory mass. This was likely from sampling error of the EUS-nCLE probe in an inflammatory area. Only one patient had post EUS-FNA bleeding but did not require a blood transfusion. The inter-observer agreement among three blinded endoscopists was almost perfect (Kappa 0.82). Conclusion: EUS-nCLE is a promising technique for the diagnosis of SPLs with good inter-observer agreement. Study registration‎: TCTR20140402001 PMID:26793780

  14. Oncological safety of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic liver resection for colorectal metastases: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Langella, Serena; Russolillo, Nadia; D'Eletto, Marco; Forchino, Fabio; Lo Tesoriere, Roberto; Ferrero, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic liver surgery has gained widespread acceptance and nowadays it is suggested even for malignant disease. Although the benefits on short-term outcomes have been proven, data on oncological safety are still lacking. The aim of this study is to assess oncologic results after ultrasound-guided laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) or open liver resection (OLR) for colorectal metastases. 37 consecutive patients undergoing LLR between 01/2004 and 03/2014 were matched at a ratio of 1:1 with 37 OLR. Matching criteria were male sex, number and diameter of liver metastases, segment location, synchronous presentation, site and stage of primary tumor, positive lymph nodes of the primary, and concomitant extrahepatic disease. Demographic characteristics were similar among groups. Parenchymal transection time was longer in the LLR group (68 ± 38.2 SD vs 40 ± 33.7 SD, p = 0.01). Mortality was nil in LLR and OLR. Overall morbidity was significantly lower in LLR (13.5 vs 37.8%, p = 0.02), although severe complications were similar among the two groups. Patients undergoing LLR were discharged earlier (5 ± 2.3 SD vs 8 ± 6.6 SD days, p < 0.001). The median margin width was 5 (0-40) mm in LLR vs 8 (0-25) mm in OLR, p = 0.897. R1 resection was recorded in four LLR and three OLR (p = 1). Overall recurrences were similar among groups. Eight patients with hepatic or extrahepatic recurrence among LLR underwent surgery vs four of OLR (p = 0.03). After a median follow-up of 35.7 months in LLR and 47.9 months in OLR, 3-year overall survival was 91.8% LLR and 74.8% OLR (p = 0.14). 3-year disease-free survival was 69.1% LLR and 65.9% OLR (p = 0.53). Multivariate analysis showed that postoperative complications [HR 3.42 (95% CI 1.32-8.89)] and multiple metastases [HR 3.84 (95% CI 1.34-10.83)] were independent predictors of worse survival (p = 0.01). Ultrasound-LLR for colorectal hepatic metastases is safe, ensuring oncologic outcomes comparable to OLR. PMID:26220046

  15. Drug Facts: Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... continue to abuse steroids despite physical problems, high costs to buy the drugs, and negative effects on their relationships. These behaviors reflect steroids' addictive potential. Research has further found that some steroid users turn ...

  16. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  17. Utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided-fine-needle aspiration and additional value of cell block in the diagnosis of mediastinal granulomatous lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Shaesta Naseem; Raddaoui, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine-needle aspiration is a minimally invasive technique for diagnosis of mediastinal lesions. Although most studies have reported the utility of EBUS-FNA in malignancy, its use has been extended to the benign conditions as well. Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic yield and cytologic accuracy of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine-needle aspiration (EBUS-FNA) in cases of clinically and radiologically suspected granulomatous diseases. Patients and Method: From May 2010 to April 2015, 43 of 115 patients who underwent EBUS-FNA at one center for radiologically and clinically suspicious granulomatous lesions, and with no definite histological diagnosis, were included in this retrospective study. Results: When the histological diagnosis was taken as the gold standard, the sensitivity of EBUS-FNA was 85% and specificity was 100% with the positive predictive value of 100. The combined diagnostic sensitivity of EBUS-FNA and transbronchial lung biopsy was 100%. In 4 cases, cell block provided an exclusive morphological diagnosis of sarcoidosis which was noncontributory by EBUS-FNA. Conclusion: Our study supports the use of EBUS-FNA, by virtue of being a safe, minimally invasive, and an outpatient procedure, in the diagnosis of granulomatous mediastinal lymphadenopathy, thereby obviating more invasive testing in a significant number of patients. Also, cell block provides additional data in the diagnosis in these benign mediastinal diseases. PMID:26445590

  18. Efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided continuous hyperthermic intraperitoneal perfusion chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant ascites: a midterm study of 36 patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yinbing; Pan, Mingxin; Cui, Shuzhong; Ba, Mingchen; Chen, Zulong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided continuous hyperthermic intraperitoneal perfusion chemotherapy (CHIPC) for the treatment of malignant ascites (MA). Methods Between July 2011 and June 2013, 36 MA patients were prospectively and consecutively hospitalized for three cycles of elective CHIPC under ultrasound guidance, maintained at a constant flow rate of 400–600 mL/min normal saline containing 5-fluorouracil plus mitomycin or carboplatin and at a constant temperature of 43°C±0.2°C, for 90 minutes. Main outcome measures were ascites resolution, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and serum tumor biomarkers at 2 weeks after the last cycle of CHIPC. All the patients underwent uneventful CHIPC as scheduled, and vital signs remained stable over CHIPC. Results At 2 weeks after the last cycle of CHIPC, MA completely and partially resolved in 26 (72.2%) patients and eight (22.2%) patients, respectively; mean KPS score increased from pretreatment 61±9 to posttreatment 76±9 (P<0.001), and serum carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigens 12-5 and 19-9 significantly decreased (all P<0.01). Conclusion The current study indicated that ultrasound-guided CHIPC is an effective and safe palliative treatment modality for MA with respect to MA resolution, patient’s general well-being, and systemic disease control. The long-term benefit of CHIPC on overall survival remains to be investigated in MA patients. PMID:26855589

  19. Adolescent Steroid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    The study focused on non-medical steroid use by adolescents according to data obtained from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, professional literature, 30 key informants knowledgeable in steroid issues, and 72 current or former steroid users. The findings indicated: (1) over 250,000 adolescents, primarily males, used or have used steroids, and…

  20. [A Case of Intra-abdominal Paragonimiasis Mimicking Metastasis of Lung Cancer Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine Needle Aspiration].

    PubMed

    Oh, Cho Rong; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Kwang Hyuck

    2015-07-01

    Paragonimiasis has been continuously decreasing in Korea. However, it still occurs by ingesting raw or incompletely cooked fresh water crab or crayfish. The diagnosis of paragonimiasis is challenging because of its rarity. It may be confused with other inflammatory disease or carcinomatosis. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has lower risk of complications such as bleeding, perforation than percutaneous fine needle aspiration. EUS-FNA is more accurate and popular method to find mucosal or submucosal tumors and the lesions of several organs. Benign and malignant tumors, infectious diseases have been diagnosed by EUS-FNA, but there was no report describing the use of EUS-FNA for diagnosing paragonimiasis. Herein, we present a 47-year-old male patient with paragonimiasis diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Imaging studies revealed mass lesions in the lung and peritoneal cavity, which was eventually confirmed as paragonimiasis using EUS-FNA. PMID:26194128

  1. Ultrasound-guided trans-hepatic embolization of a renal artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with acquired solitary kidney and with chronic renal failure secondary to phenacetin abuse.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Emiliana; Serra, Carla; Di Felice, Antonio; Mandreoli, Marcora; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the right renal artery underwent treatment with percutaneous approach. No complications were observed. Based on the experience described in this report, a percutaneous ultrasound guided approach can be proposed in selected patients. Renal insufficiency and allergic reactions are potential contraindications to angiography with conventional ionic iodinated contrast dye in patients who need endovascular stent-graft placement. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided endovascular procedures may provide an alternative to overcome these limitations. We report an endovascular renal artery repair in a solitary kidney patient with an asymptomatic infrarenal aortic aneurysm and renal insufficiency due to phenacetin abuse. The precise placement of the stent-graft was performed with CEUS and intraprocedural angiographic fluoroscopy without the use of any nephrotoxic contrast dye. During follow-up, CEUS was used to exclude endoleaks, stent-graft failure or malposition. PMID:24616752

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Transcutaneous Needle Biopsy of the Base of the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth From a Submental Approach.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jason M; Conrad, Rachel D; Cannon, Trinitia Y; Alleman, Anthony M

    2016-05-01

    Limited data exist regarding the feasibility of ultrasound-guided transcutaneous biopsy of the base of the tongue and floor of the mouth. This retrospective study reviewed 8 cases with lesions in the base of the tongue or floor of the mouth that were biopsied by fine-needle aspiration. Core biopsy was also needed in 1 case. All biopsies were technically successful, and all yielded squamous cell carcinoma. One biopsy yielded a false-positive result, as subsequent resection yielded high-grade dysplasia with no invasion. The other biopsy results were considered true-positive based on subsequent pathologic examinations (2 cases) or clinical/imaging follow-up (5 cases). There were no significant complications associated with the biopsies. PMID:27036167

  3. [Transvaginal ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for residual potentially malignant ovarian tumors in cases with severe peritoneal adhesion and frozen pelvis requiring polysurgery].

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Rie; Nishizawa, Minako; Tasaka, Reiko; Mita, Ikuko; Tokuyama, Osamu; Miyama, Masato; Kawamura, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    A multiparous woman in her 40s had advanced peritoneal adhesions and frozen pelvis from 3 previous surgeries. Endometrial ovarian cysts also remained. After the last surgery, imaging showed cysts with a septum and enhanced moieties in the Douglas pouch. Highly invasive surgery was anticipated, and the patient underwent a transvaginal ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy(TVCNB, 16-gauge needle)with full awareness of the risks involved. The histopathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. We inserted a ureteral stent and performed an S-shaped colon resection and standard ovarian cancer surgery after preoperative chemotherapy. TVCNB in this case was less invasive and easier to perform than other exploratory procedures, and has a low risk of iatrogenic intraperitoneal dissemination even if the tumor is malignant. Chemotherapy can be administered before surgery if malignancy is detected. In summary, TVCNB is a useful alternative method for conducting exploratory operations. PMID:25981664

  4. Use of a novel covered self-expandable metal stent with an anti-migration system for endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of a pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Ávila, Félix Ignacio; Villalobos-Garita, Álvaro; Ramírez-Luna, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    The development of pseudocysts in patients with chronic pancreatitis has been reported in 23%-60% of cases and drainage is indicated when they become symptomatic. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage with the placement of plastic or metallic stents to create a cystogastric anastomosis has been shown to be a reliable and efficacious maneuver. Metallic stent use appears to be a safe and effective alternative that shortens the length of time of the procedure and maintains a greater diameter in the cystogastric communication. However, important migration rates have been reported. The use of new metallic stents that are specially designed to prevent migration represents a promising development in the treatment of these group of patients that appears to be safe and effective for pseudocyst drainage and could importantly reduce migration rates, while at the same time having the advantage of a single step procedure and a larger fistula diameter in the endoscopic cystogastric anastomosis. PMID:23772268

  5. Utility of microbiological testing of thoracic lymph nodes sampled by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Rebecca M; Arnaout, Ramy; Koziel, Henry; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan; Kirby, James E

    2016-02-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) represents a minimally invasive technique to sample peribronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes for diagnosis of cancer, lymphoma, or sarcoidosis. However, the value of EBUS-TBNA in diagnosis of respiratory infections has not been well explored. Here, microbiologic testing data for EBUS-TBNA samples collected from 82 patients over a 30-month period were retrospectively reviewed. No organisms were identified on Gram, acid-fast, or fungal stains. Bacterial cultures were positive in 52% of samples; however, all but 1 culture were considered contaminants. Mycobacterial cultures yielded Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare not identified in a concurrent bronchoalveolar lavage sample in 1 patient. Fungal cultures were negative. Overall, routine microbiologic tests on EBUS-TBNA samples do not appear sufficiently sensitive to rule out infectious causes of adenopathy. High clinical suspicion for infection may require modification of sampling techniques or more sensitive detection methods. PMID:26602949

  6. Disseminated histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent haweli dweller: A diagnosis and follow-up by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Sharma, Malay; Tomar, Veerottam

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is nowadays widespread minimally invasive procedure for diagnosing a large number of benign as well as malignant lesions. We report a case of a 62-year-old immunocompetent elderly male, who presented with high-grade fever, hepatosplenomegaly and mediastinal and intra-abdominal lymph nodes. He was residing in an old haweli with bats infestation. EUS-FNA of the subcarinal and the preaortic lymph node clinched the diagnosis. A rapid on-site evaluation of the cytology material revealed organisms conforming to the morphology of Histoplasma capsulatum. The patient was immediately started on amphotericin B and itraconazole and responded well. In this case, we found the role of EUS-FNA not only in diagnosis, but also in the follow-up of the patient. PMID:26229257

  7. Focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative parathormone monitoring: The value of PTH assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration washout

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Fatih; Arpaci, Dilek; Cakmak, Guldeniz Karadeniz; Emre, Ali Ugur; Elri, Tarik; Ilikhan, Sevil Uygun; Bahadir, Burak; Bayraktaoglu, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate identification of hyperfunctioning parathyroid (HP) gland is the only issue for definitive surgical treatment in primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Various imaging and operative techniques have been proposed to confirm the localization of the diseased gland. Nevertheless, none of these methods proved to be the gold standard. The presented study aimed to assess the value of parathyroid hormone assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA)-PTH washout fluid to verify the correct localisation for focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative PTH monitoring. Material and Methods The retrospective analysis of 57 patients with pHPT who underwent FNA-PTH was conducted from a prospective database. Biochemical assessment together with radiological (ultrasonography) and nuclear (MIBI scan) imaging was reviewed. Associations between FNA-PTH washout values and localization technics were evaluated and compared in terms of operative findings. Results Focused parathyroidectomy without intraoperative PTH monitoring was performed to 45 patients with high FNA-PTH values. The median largest diameter of the target parathyroid lesion identified by ultrasonography was 13 mm (range, 6 to 36). The median serum PTH level was 190 pg/mL (range, 78 to 1709; reference range, 15 to 65) whereas the median washout PTH was 2500 pg/mL (range, 480 to 3389). According to operative findings high FNA-PTH levels correctly identified parathyroid adenoma in 40 cases (89% of sensitivity and 100% of specificity and positive predictive value) whereas MIBI scan localized the lesion in 36 of these cases (80% of sensitivity). Conclusions The higher level of PTH in preoperative ultrasound guided FNA washout is a considerable data to predict the correct localization of HP, particularly in circumstances of greater values than the serum PTH level. However, although its specificity is high, in cases of coexisting nodular thyroid disease, associated additional HP might be missed at focused parathyroidectomy without PTH monitoring, leading to recurrent disease. PMID:26955476

  8. Comparison of Pregnancy Outcome between Ultrasound- Guided Tubal Recanalization and Office-Based Microhysteroscopic Ostial Dilatation in Patients with Proximal Blocked Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Seyam, Emaduldin Mostafa; Hassan, Momen Mohamed; Tawfeek Mohamed Sayed Gad, Mohamed; Mahmoud, Hazem Salah; Ibrahim, Mostafa Gamal

    2016-01-01

    Background The current research to the best of my knowledge is the first to compare the pregnancy outcome between ultrasound-guided tubal recanalization (UGTR) using a special fallopian tubal catheter, and office-based micrhysteroscopic ostial dilatation (MHOD) using the same tubal catherter in infertile women with previously diagnosed bilateral proximal tubal obstruction (PTO). Materials and Methods This prospective study reported the pregnancy outcomes for 200 women in private infertility care center in Arafa hospital in Fayoum and in El Minya University Hospital in the period between January 2010 and October 2013 treated as outpatients for their bilateral PTO after the routine hysterosalpingography (HSG). A Cook’s catheter, special fallopian tubal catheter, were used to recanalize the blocked tubes in 100 women (group A) under UGTR, and the same Cook’s tubal catheter was used through 2mm microhysteroscope to cannulate both ostia using MHOD in another 100 women (group B). Pregnancy outcome was determined after the procedures for a 12-month period follow-up. Results The number of the recanalization of PTO was not significantly different between two groups. As of the 200 blocked fallopian tubes in group A, 140 tubes (70%) were successfully recanalized by passing the ultrasound-guided special cannula, while 150 tubes (75%) were successfully recanalized in group B, using the same tubal catheter through a 2mm microhysteroscope. The cumulative pregnancy rate after the two procedures was not statistically different between two groups. It was 25.9% in group A, while it was 26.3% in group B, after a 12-month period follow-up. Conclusion UGTR is highly recommended as the first step to manage infertile women due to PTO, as it is easier procedure; however, there is possible to obtain nearly similar results after MHOD. PMID:26985337

  9. Gym and tonic: a profile of 100 male steroid users.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, N A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify unsupervised anabolic steroid regimens used by athletes. METHODS: 100 athletes attending four gymnasia were surveyed using an anonymous self administered questionnaire. RESULTS: Anabolic steroid doses ranged from 250 to 3200 mg per week and users combined different drugs to achieve these doses. Injectable and oral preparations were used in cycles lasting four to 12 weeks. Eighty six per cent of users admitted to the regular use of drugs other than steroids for various reasons, including additional anabolic effects, the minimisation of steroid related side effects, and withdrawal symptoms. Acne, striae, and gynaecomastia were the most commonly reported subjective side effects. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple steroids are combined in megadoses and self administered in a cyclical fashion. Polypharmacy is practised by over 80% of steroid users. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy along with acne, striae, and gynaecomastia are frequent physical signs associated with steroid use. Images Figure 2 PMID:9132214

  10. [Pancreatic tail pseudoaneurysm: percutaneous treatment by thrombin injection].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Jiménez, M; Moreno Sánchez, T; Moreno Rodríguez, F; Guillén Rico, M

    2014-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms secondary to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis are a relatively common and potentially serious complication. Endovascular techniques are the most currently accepted techniques, given the higher morbidity-mortality of surgery. The thrombosis of the pseudoaneurysm using an ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection is emerging as a useful option in those cases in which endovascular embolisation is not possible. We present the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the transverse pancreatic artery secondary to chronic pancreatitis, and successfully treated by administering percutaneous thrombin. PMID:21944714

  11. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided treatment of shoulder tendon calcifications: Clinical and radiological follow-up at 6 months☆

    PubMed Central

    De Conti, G.; Marchioro, U.; Dorigo, A.; Boscolo, N.; Vio, S.; Trevisan, M.; Meneghini, A.; Baldo, V.; Angelini, F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is a common condition characterized by chronic pain and/or very painful acute episodes. Different treatments are used during painful flare-up, but they are often ineffective. US-guided percutaneous needle aspiration/lavage is proving to be an effective means for eliminating these calcifications. Materials and methods We treated 123 consecutive patients (mean age 48 years) with calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Fifty-five patients had persistent symptoms requiring 2 or more treatments with lavage and intrabursal steroid infiltration. Before and after treatment, US studies were done independently by 2 radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal ultrasound. Results were concordant in over 90% of the cases. Constant Shoulder Scores were calculated before and 6 months after treatment. At 6 months, MRI was performed to identify impingement and/or bursitis. Results Post-treatment Constant scores were significantly improved in all 68 patients treated once (Group 1: mean scores 28.6 vs. 81.4) and in 52 of the 55 treated twice or more (Group 2: mean scores 34.1 vs. 71.1) (p < 0.0001 in both cases). Pretreatment Constant scores were similar in patients with and without shoulder impingement on MRI (31.2 vs. 30.9, respectively), but after treatment the impingement group’s scores were significantly higher (82.2 vs. 73.3, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions US-guided percutaneous needle aspiration/lavage is an effective and economic treatment for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Pretreatment MRI should be done to check for impingement since it is often associated with an incomplete response to the first treatment. PMID:23396318

  12. A randomised cross-over comparison of the transverse and longitudinal techniques for ultrasound-guided identification of the cricothyroid membrane in morbidly obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, M S; Teoh, W H; Rudolph, S S; Hesselfeldt, R; Børglum, J; Tvede, M F

    2016-06-01

    We compared the transverse and longitudinal approaches to ultrasound-guided identification of the cricothyroid membrane, to determine which was faster and more successful. Forty-two anaesthetists received a one-hour structured training programme consisting of e-learning, a lecture and hands-on training, and then applied both techniques in a randomised, cross-over sequence to obese females with body mass index 39.0 - 43.9 kg.m(-2) . The mean (SD) time to identify the cricothyroid membrane was 24.0 (12.4) s using the transverse technique compared with 37.6 (17.9) s for the longitudinal technique (p = 0.0003). Successful identification of the cricothyroid membrane was achieved by 38 (90%) anaesthetists using either technique. All anaesthetists were successful in identifying the cricothyroid membrane with at least one of the techniques. We advocate the learning and application of these two techniques for identification of the cricothyroid membrane before starting anaesthesia in difficult patients, especially when anatomical landmarks are impalpable. Further use in emergency situations is feasible, if clinicians have experience and the ultrasound machine is readily available. PMID:27037981

  13. Rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for the diagnosis of hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongbo; Liu, Sujing; Guo, Jun; Li, Bobo; Li, Wanhu; Lu, Zuowei; Sun, Jujie; Zhang, Baijiang; Yu, Jinming

    2016-02-28

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and the interpretation of its results. Based on the criterion of using ROSE or not, 236 patients with known or suspected lung cancer undergoing EBUS-TBNA were allocated into the ROSE group (122 patients with 252 lymph nodes) and non-ROSE group (114 patients with 260 lymph nodes). In the ROSE group, the percentages of the suspicious specimens on cytology and non-diagnostic specimens on pathology were both significantly lower than that in the non-ROSE group (8.7% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.038; and 0.9% vs. 4.4%, p = 0.018, respectively), and 13 out of 22 suspicious lesions on ROSE were confirmed with definite diagnoses on TBNA pathology. The diagnostic yield stratified by pathology was significantly higher in the ROSE group than that in the non-ROSE group (90.5% vs. 81.2%, p = 0.003). These results suggest that ROSE during EBUS-TBNA allows for a low rate of suspicious results and therefore improves the diagnostic yield stratified by pathology when sampling hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients with lung cancer. PMID:26656954

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy with a lumen-apposing, self-expandable fully covered metal stent for palliative biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    French, Joshua Blake; Coe, Adam Wesley; Pawa, Rishi

    2016-04-01

    In addition to the poor prognosis associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, it can also lead to several other conditions including obstructive jaundice that can affect a patient's quality of life. This is a major concern in non-operative patients where palliation is considered the main therapeutic goal. Traditionally, there are several ways to pursue palliative biliary drainage including endoscopic methods, a variety of surgical procedures, and percutaneous techniques. Generally, endoscopic methods such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with transpapillary stent placement are considered first-line therapies. Unfortunately, ERCP is not always possible due to several potential reasons. Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary puncture has been well described for several years, there are limitations to its usefulness in biliary drainage, in part due to complication concerns. However, more recently a lumen-apposing, self-expandable fully covered metal stent has been employed for such situations. We describe two cases in which this type of stent was used in patients for palliative biliary drainage in pancreatic adenocarcinoma where standard ERCP was not feasible. In both cases, stent deployment was successful without immediate complications related to the procedure or the stent. Furthermore, the main goal of these therapies was palliation and in both cases the patient chose this procedure for quality of life reasons. In the future, randomized trials are needed to better define the long-term effectiveness and safety of these stents compared to more standard therapies. PMID:26956721

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignant lesions: a systematic review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongtao; Li, Lianyong; Qu, Changmin; Liang, Shuwen; Zeng, Bolun; Luo, Zhiwen

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy (EUS-FNB) has been used as an effective method of diagnosing pancreatic malignant lesions. It has the advantage of providing well preserved tissue for histologic grading and subsequent molecular biological analysis. In order to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB for pancreatic malignant lesions, studies assessing EUS-FNB to diagnose solid pancreatic masses were selected via Medline. Sixteen articles published between 2005 and 2015, covering 828 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for EUS-FNB differentiating malignant from benign solid pancreatic masses were: sensitivity 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.87); specificity 0.98 (95% CI, 0.93–1.00); positive likelihood ratio 8.0 (95% CI 4.5–14.4); negative likelihood ratio 0.17 (95% CI 0.10–0.26); and DOR 64 (95% CI 30.4–134.8). The area under the sROC curve was 0.96. Subgroup analysis did not identify other factors that could substantially affect the diagnostic accuracy, such as the study design, location of study, number of centers, location of lesion, whether or not a cytopathologist was present, and so on. EUS-FNB is a reliable diagnostic tool for solid pancreatic masses and should be especially considered for pathology where histologic morphology is preferred for diagnosis. PMID:26960914

  16. Assessment of Factors Affecting the Usefulness and Diagnostic Yield of Core Biopsy Needles with a Side Hole in Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tadahisa; Okumura, Fumihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Nishie, Hirotada; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Anbe, Kaiki; Ozeki, Takanori; Kachi, Kenta; Fukusada, Shigeki; Suzuki, Yuta; Sano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A barbed puncture needle with a side hole was recently developed to improve sample quality and quantity in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we retrospectively assessed the usefulness of this puncture needle. Methods Factors affecting diagnostic yield, safety, and diagnostic accuracy were investigated in 76 patients who consecutively underwent EUS-FNA for neoplastic lesions at our hospital between January and December 2013. Results The procedure was successful in all cases; the rates of sample collection and determination of the correct diagnosis were 92.1% and 89.5%, respectively. The mean number of needle passes required for diagnosis was 1.1. Complications included mild intraluminal bleeding in two patients (2.6%). Multivariate analysis revealed that lesion size (≤20 mm) was significantly associated with a decreased chance of determining the correct diagnosis. Conclusions Core biopsy needles with a side hole are safe and provide a satisfactory diagnostic yield. However, the side hole may potentially reduce the rate of making the correct diagnosis in small lesions. PMID:25963081

  17. Thrombin Injection for Treatment of Brachial Artery Pseudoaneurysm at the Site of a Hemodialysis Fistula: Report of Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W.I.; Abraham, Robert J.

    2000-09-15

    We report two patients with arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas that were complicated by brachial artery pseudoaneurysms. Each pseudoanerysm was percutaneously thrombosed with an injection of thrombin, using techniques to prevent escape of thrombin into the native brachial artery. In one patient, an angioplasty balloon was inflated across the neck of the aneurysm during thrombin injection. In the second patient, thrombin was injected during ultrasound-guided compression of the neck of the pseudoaneurysm. Complete thrombosis of each pseudoaneurysm was achieved within 30 sec. No ischemic or embolic events occurred. This technique may be useful in treating pseudoaneurysms of smaller peripheral arteries.

  18. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Aneurysm Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Zielinski, Maciej; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Piekarek, Alina; Majewski, Waclaw

    2010-06-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) are rare and are often caused by trauma. Treatment options vary and include surgery, ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection, and endovascular procedures such as stent-graft placement, coil embolization, and glue injection. We report a 70-year-old male who presented to the hospital after a road accident with a posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm that was treated by endovascular thrombin embolization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of inferior gluteal artery false aneurysm treated by this method.

  19. Traumatic axillary artery pseudoaneurysm treated with intravascular balloon occlusion and percutaneous thrombin injection

    PubMed Central

    Carratola, Maria; Parikh, Priti; Tchorz, Kathryn; Kauffman, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Axillary artery pseudoaneurysms are relatively rare, with few reported cases found in the literature. Furthermore, treatment with percutaneous thrombin injection has not yet been reported. We report the case of a 59-year-old man with a large (10 cm) post-traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the left axillary artery found five weeks after a motorcycle crash. The patient sustained multiple injuries, including fractures of the left scapula and clavicle. Edema was observed at the time of diagnosis. Arteriography with successful ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection was undertaken. The patient experienced no complications after the procedure. PMID:27141239

  20. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection to Complete SMA Pseudoaneurysm Exclusion After Failing of Endograft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Szopinski, Piotr Ciostek, Piotr; Pleban, Eliza; Iwanowski, Jaroslaw; Krol, Malgorzata Serafin-; Marianowska, Agnieszka; Noszczyk, Wojciech

    2005-05-15

    Visceral aneurysms are potentially life-threatening vascular lesions. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysms are a rare but well-recognized complication of chronic pancreatitis. Open surgical repair of such an aneurysm, especially in patients after previous surgical treatment, might be dangerous and risky. Stent graft implantation makes SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion possible and therefore avoids a major abdominal operation. Percutaneous direct thrombin injection is also one of the methods of treating aneurysms in this area. We report a first case of percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection to complete SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion after an unsuccessful endograft placement. Six-month follow-up did not demonstrate any signs of aneurysm recurrence.

  1. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment. PMID:26125159

  2. [Steroid-induced myopathy].

    PubMed

    Polunina, A G; Isaev, F V; Dem'ianova, M A

    2012-01-01

    Physiological effects of glucocorticoids include the inhibition of protein synthesis and the increase in catabolic processes in muscles. Consequently, a long-term intake of steroids in high doses causes myopathy. Myopathic effects of glucocorticoids are observed during systemic as well as inhallatory use. Most frequently, steroid myopathy manifests as the weakness and hypotrophy of lower limbs muscles, weakness of respiratory muscles, dysphonia. Prevention and treatment of steroid myopathy include limitation of indications for long-term usage of glucocorticoids, alternating regimens of treatment, adequate physical activity. The current data demonstrate the efficacy of vitamin D and amino acids mixtures in the prevention and treatment of steroid myopathy. PMID:23250613

  3. Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging for the selective detection of EGFR-expressing breast cancer and lymph node metastases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meihua; Kim, Hoe Suk; Jin, Tiefeng; Yi, Ann; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the use of ultrasound (US)-guided photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and anti-EGFR antibody-conjugated gold nanorods (anti-EGFR-GNs) to non-invasively detect EGFR-expressing primary tumor masses and regional lymph node (LN) metastases in breast tumor mice generated by injecting MCF-7 (EGFR-negative) or MDA-MB-231 (EGFR-positive) human breast cells using a preclinical Vevo 2100 LAZR Imaging system. Anti-EGFR-GNs provided a significant enhancement in the PA signal in MDA-MB-231 tumor and the axillary LN metastases relative to MCF-7 tumor and non-LN metastases. We demonstrated that US-guided PAI using anti-EGFR-GNs is highly sensitive for the selective visualization of EGFR-expressing breast primary tumors as well as LN micrometastases. PMID:27231631

  4. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer. PMID:23529644

  5. Evolving Role of Ultrasound in Therapeutic Injections of the Upper Extremity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David J; Scully, William F; Rawlings, John M

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound machines are creating more refined pictures and becoming more user-friendly and readily accessible. As a result, ultrasound is being increasingly used for therapeutic purposes. One example involves the use of ultrasound guidance in musculoskeletal interventional procedures, such as joint injections, tendon sheath injections, and peripheral nerve blocks. Technical considerations and therapeutic results have been described for multiple locations about the upper extremities, with varying levels of success. The implementation of ultrasound-guided injections in the orthopedist's clinic has therapeutic, financial, and provider role implications. Given these potential benefits, orthopedic providers, both in practice and residency, would benefit from increased exposure and education in ultrasound use. Ultrasound provides the benefit of real-time, dynamic imaging without the radiation exposure of fluoroscopy, and ultrasound-guided injections can be performed in the office, as opposed to the operating room, which is frequently required when using fluoroscopy. A basic knowledge of the principles and terms used in ultrasound is required. With these simple principles, a practitioner can review techniques for specific areas of the musculoskeletal system and begin using ultrasound to guide injections. Many locations for diagnostic and/or therapeutic injections in the upper extremities have improved accuracy and benefit with the use of ultrasound vs blind techniques, although a few have not been shown to have a significant difference in the literature. The educational and professional implications can be significant, but these potential benefits need to be carefully weighed against costs by each orthopedic practice. PMID:26558666

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Bradley W; Harvey, Harold A; Dye, Charles E; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T

    2014-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided inoculation of transmissible venereal tumor in the colon: A large animal model for colon neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Manoop S.; Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Suzuki, Rei; Shetty, Anil; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Nau, William; Stafford, Roger Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background: To develop and evaluate the feasibility of emerging interventions, animal models with accurate anatomical environment are required. Objectives: We aimed to establish a clinically relevant colorectal tumor model with canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) utilizing endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) imaging guidance. Design: Survival study using a canine model. Setting: Endoscopic animal research laboratory at a tertiary cancer center. Materials and Methods: This study involved five canines. Interventions: A colorectal tumor model was established and evaluated in five canines under cyclosporine immune suppression. Under endoscopic imaging guidance, saline was injected into the submucosal layer forming a bleb. Subsequently, CTVT was inoculated into the bleb under EUS guidance. Endoscopy was the primary method of assessing tumor growth. Tumors developed in 60-130 days. Upon detection of lesions >1 cm, the animals were euthanized and the tumors were harvested for histopathological characterization. Main outcome measurements: Success rate of tumor growth. The presence or absence of vasculature inside tumors. Results: Colorectal tumor successfully developed in three out of the five animals (60%). Among the ones with tumor growth, average inoculated CTVT volume, incubation time, and tumor size was 1.8 cc, 65.7 days, and 2.0 cm, respectively. The two animals without tumor growth were observed for >100 days. In all the tumors, vascular structure was characterized with CD31 imunohistochemical stain. Limitations: Small number of animals. Conclusion: We succeeded in creating a new colorectal tumor canine model with CTVT utilizing EUS. PMID:27080606

  8. Efficacy of two-time prophylactic intravenous administration of tazobactam/piperacillin for transrectal ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Hiroaki; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Miyagi, Tohru; Nakashima, Takao; Shimamura, Masayoshi; Namiki, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Background Prevalence of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli has been recently increasing worldwide. We analyzed the incidence and characteristics of acute bacterial prostatitis after transrectal ultrasound-guided needle prostate biopsy (TRUSP-Bx) with prophylactic tazobactam/piperacillin (TAZ/PIPC) treatment as an alternative regimen. Methods A total of 391 patients who underwent TRUSP-Bx were included in the study. All patients received intravenous TAZ/PIPC (4.5 g) 30 minutes before and 6 hours after TRUSP-Bx. Results Acute bacterial prostatitis developed in six patients (1.5%); the frequency of its occurrence was significantly higher in patients in whom rectal disinfection was not performed (P < 0.05). These six patients developed clinical symptoms of acute bacterial prostatitis a median of 24 hours after the biopsy. Escherichia coli was isolated in urine or blood bacterial cultures in four cases, and Klebsiella pneumoniae in two cases. All of the isolated organisms showed excellent sensitivity to TAZ/PIPC. Conclusions The incidence rate of acute prostatitis with prophylactic TAZ/PIPC was consistent with those reported previously with FQ-based regimens, despite the favorable sensitivity of isolated organisms. Two-time regimen of TAZ/PIPC may not always prevent the post-TRUSP-Bx infection, possibly due to the pharmacokinetic characteristics of TAZ/PIPC. However, if each case was considered individually to select the best setting and frequency of dosage of TAZ/PIPC, this can be an optimal prophylaxis in the era of widespread FQ-resistant microorganisms. PMID:26473153

  9. Modelling and characterisation of a ultrasound-actuated needle for improved visibility in ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Y; Hilgers, A; Sadiq, M; Cochran, S; Corner, G; Huang, Z

    2016-07-01

    Clear needle visualisation is recognised as an unmet need for ultrasound guided percutaneous needle procedures including regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy. With inadequate needle visibility, these procedures may result in serious complications or a failed operation. This paper reports analysis of the modal behaviour of a previously proposed ultrasound-actuated needle configuration, which may overcome this problem by improving needle visibility in colour Doppler imaging. It uses a piezoelectric transducer to actuate longitudinal resonant modes in needles (outer diameter 0.8-1.2mm, length>65mm). The factors that affect the needle's vibration mode are identified, including the needle length, the transducer's resonance frequency and the gripping position. Their effects are investigated using finite element modelling, with the conclusions validated experimentally. The actuated needle was inserted into porcine tissue up to 30mm depth and its visibility was observed under colour Doppler imaging. The piezoelectric transducer is able to generate longitudinal vibration with peak-to-peak amplitude up to 4μm at the needle tip with an actuating voltage of 20Vpp. Actuated in longitudinal vibration modes (distal mode at 27.6kHz and transducer mode at 42.2kHz) with a drive amplitude of 12-14Vpp, a 120mm needle is delineated as a coloured line in colour Doppler images, with both needle tip and shaft visualised. The improved needle visibility is maintained while the needle is advanced into the tissue, thus allowing tracking of the needle position in real time. Moreover, the needle tip is highlighted by strong coloured artefacts around the actuated needle generated by its flexural vibration. A limitation of the technique is that the transducer mode requires needles of specific lengths so that the needle's resonance frequency matches the transducer. This may restrict the choice of needle lengths in clinical applications. PMID:27022669

  10. Systematic Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Mediastinal Staging Versus Positron Emission Tomography for Comprehensive Mediastinal Staging in NSCLC Before Radical Radiotherapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steinfort, Daniel P.; Siva, Shankar; Leong, Tracy L.; Rose, Morgan; Herath, Dishan; Antippa, Phillip; Ball, David L.; Irving, Louis B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite known limitations of positron emission tomography (PET) for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiation treatment fields are generally based on PET-identified disease extent. However, no studies have examined the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT on a per-node basis in patients being considered for curative-intent radiotherapy in NSCLC. In a prospective trial, patients with NSCLC being considered for definitive thoracic radiotherapy (± systemic chemotherapy) underwent minimally invasive systematic mediastinal evaluation with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) following noninvasive staging with integrated PET-CT. Thirty patients underwent EBUS-TBNA, with TBNA performed from a mean 2.5 lymph node (LN) stations per patient (median 3, range 1–5). Discordant findings between PET-CT and EBUS-TBNA were observed in 10 patients (33%, 95% CI 19%–51%). PET-occult LN metastases were demonstrated by EBUS in 4 patients, whereas a lesser extent of mediastinal involvement, compared with FDG-PET, was demonstrated by EBUS in 6 patients, including 2 patients downstaged from cN3 to pN2. LNs upstaged by EBUS were significantly smaller than nodes downstaged by EBUS, 7.5 mm (range 7–9) versus 12 mm (range 6–21), P = 0.005. A significant proportion of patients considered for definitive radiotherapy (+/-chemotherapy) undergoing systematic mediastinal evaluation with EBUS-TBNA in this study have an extent of mediastinal NSCLC involvement discordant with that indicated by PET-CT. Systematic EBUS-TBNA may aid in defining the extent of mediastinal involvement in NSCLC patients undergoing radiotherapy. Systematic EBUS-TBNA has the potential to contribute significantly to radiotherapy planning and delivery, by either identifying occult nodal metastases, or demonstrating FDG-avid LNs to be disease-free. PMID:26937894

  11. Analgesia and Respiratory Function after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy in Patients receiving Ultrasound-Guided Bilateral Oblique Subcostal Transversus Abdominis Plane Block: A Randomized Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Basaran, Betul; Basaran, Ahmet; Kozanhan, Betul; Kasdogan, Ela; Eryilmaz, Mehmet Ali; Ozmen, Sadik

    2015-01-01

    Background Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been shown to ameliorate postoperative pain after abdominal surgery. Postoperative pain-associated respiratory compromise has been the subject of several studies. Herein, we evaluate the effect of oblique subcostal TAP (OSTAP) block on postoperative pain and respiratory functions during the first 24 postoperative hours. Material/Methods In this double-blind, randomized study, 76 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to either the OSTAP group (n=38) or control group (n=38). Bilateral ultrasound-guided OSTAP blocks were performed with 20 ml 0.25% bupivacaine after induction of general anesthesia. Both the OSTAP and control groups were treated with paracetamol, tenoxicam, and tramadol as required for postoperative analgesia. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores (while moving and at rest), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), arterial blood gas variables, and opioid consumption were assessed during first 24 h. Results VAS pain scores at rest and while moving were significantly lower in the OSTAP group on arrival to PACU and at 2 h postoperatively. The total postoperative tramadol requirement was significantly reduced at 0–2 h and 2–24 h in the OSTAP group. Postoperative deterioration in FEV1 and FVC was significantly less in the OSTAP group when compared to the control group (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). There were no between-group differences in arterial blood gas variables. Conclusions After laparoscopic cholecystectomy, OSTAP block can provide significant improvement in respiratory function and better pain relief with lower opioid requirement. PMID:25948166

  12. The use of prophylactic single-dose fosfomycin in patients who undergo transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: A prospective, randomized, and controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Volkan; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Yonguc, Tarik; Sen, Pinar; Polat, Salih; Degirmenci, Tansu; Bolat, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to demonstrate the efficacy, safety, and convenient use of fosfomycin trometamol in the preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis (PAP) of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate (TRUSBP) in this prospective, randomized study. Methods: Between May 2014 and May 2015, a total of 300 patients who underwent TRUSBP were examined prospectively. Patients were randomized into two groups: group 1 consisted of 150 patients who were administered a single dose of 3 g oral fosfomycin as a PAP the night before the procedure; group 2 consisted of 150 patients who were administered 500 mg oral ciprofloxacin 60 min before the procedure as a PAP. Post-procedural febrile and afebrile infectious complications and pathological characteristics of the two groups were compared prospectively. Results: The mean age of the patients was 63.5±0.6 years in group 1 and 62.9±0.6 years in group 2. A total of two patients (1.3%) in group 1 and nine patients (6.0%) in group 2 experienced afebrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Afebrile UTI rate was significantly higher in group 2 (1.3% s. 6.0%, p=0,032). Febrile UTI was detected in two patients in group 2 and one patient in group 1. Urine cultures revealed 35.7% fluoroquinolone resistance. As a limitation, although the sample size was appropriate due to the power calculation, we believe that comprehensive studies including larger patient cohorts are needed to support our findings. Conclusions: Due to its ease-of-use with only a single dose and lower rates of infectious complications (resistant and febrile UTIs), fosfomycin trometamol is a strong alternative for antibiotic prophylaxis in TRUSBP. PMID:26788236

  13. The Effect of Radiotherapy on Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy and the Ultrasound Characteristics of Neck Lymph Nodes in Oral Cancer Patients after Primary Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wu-Chia; Cheng, Po-Wen; Wang, Chi-Te; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Chang, Yih-Leong; Liao, Li-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (USgFNA) and sonographic characteristics in the assessment of cervical lymph nodes (LNs) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients after primary treatment. Materials and Methods 88 treated OSCC patients underwent 111 USgFNAs of the neck LNs after US evaluation. Among them, 48 USgFNAs were performed on 40 patients following RT and 63 USgFNAs on 48 patients without previous RT. The results of USgFNA and the US characteristics were compared between these two groups. Results USgFNA had a sensitivity of 88.0%, specificity of 91.4%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 88.0%, negative predictive value (NPV) of 91.4% and accuracy of 90.0% in patients without previous RT, and a sensitivity of 97.1%, specificity of 83.3%, PPV of 94.3%, NPV of 90.9% and accuracy of 93.5% in those with previous neck RT. The ranges of the short-axis and long-axis length were 13.3 ± 8.0 mm (mean ± SD) versus 17.8 ± 9.1 mm, and 18.6 ± 9.0 mm versus 24.4 ± 10.9 mm for recurrent LNs from patients with, versus without, previous RT (both ps < 0.05), respectively. 76.5% (26/34) of the recurrent nodes after RT and 48% (12/25) of the recurrent nodes without previous RT exhibited an irregular margin (p < 0.05). Additionally, irradiated recurrent LNs had a significantly decreased percentage of discernable calcification compared with non-irradiated recurrent nodes (48% versus 20.6%, p < 0.05). Conclusions RT had influence on sonographic characteristics but no influence on USgFNA in diagnosing recurrent LNs in treated OSCC patients. PMID:26954569

  14. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  15. Evaluation of endoscopic cytological diagnosis of unresectable pancreatic cancer prior to and after the introduction of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    USHIJIMA, TOMOYUKI; OKABE, YOSHINOBU; ISHIDA, YUSUKE; SUGIYAMA, GEN; SASAKI, YU; KURAOKA, KEI; YASUMOTO, MAKIKO; TAIRA, TOMOKI; NAITO, YOSHIKI; NAKAYAMA, MASAMICHI; TSURUTA, OSAMU; SATA, MICHIO

    2014-01-01

    With the advances in the multidisciplinary treatment of pancreatic cancer (PC) over the last few years, it is crucial to obtain a histopathological diagnosis prior to treatment. Histopathological diagnosis for unresectable PC is currently performed with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in combination with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). We retrospectively assessed the results of these two methods and investigated diagnostic performance according to the location of the lesion and the complications. This study was conducted on a series of 263 consecutive cases of unresectable PC diagnosed with endoscopic cytology. Up to 2006, ERCP-guided cytology (group A) was performed as the first choice for the diagnosis of PC. EUS-FNA was introduced in 2007 and became the first choice thereafter (group B), except in cases with obstructive jaundice, in which ERCP-guided cytology during endoscopic biliary stenting (EBS) remains the first choice. There were statistically significant differences in the overall cancer-positive rate between groups A and B (60.4 vs. 75.3%, P=0.01). The cancer-positive rate in the pancreatic body and tail was significantly higher in group B (59.5 vs. 83.3%, P=0.005), whereas there were no significant differences regarding cancer of the pancreatic head. The complication rate was 4.95% in group A and 3.09% in group B (P=0.448). The endoscopic cytology cancer-positive rate in unresectable PC cases was increased as a result of the introduction of EUS-FNA. In conclusion, we recommend performing EUS-FNA in combination with ERCP-guided cytology in cases with a lesion in the pancreatic head that requires EBS. PMID:24940503

  16. Performance Accuracy of Hand-on-needle versus Hand-on-syringe Technique for Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia Simulation for Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian; Herring, Andrew; Stone, Michael; Nagdev, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks (UGNB) are increasingly used in emergency care. The hand-on-syringe (HS) needle technique is ideally suited to the emergency department setting because it allows a single operator to perform the block without assistance. The HS technique is assumed to provide less exact needle control than the alternative two-operator hand-on-needle (HN) technique; however this assumption has never been directly tested. The primary objective of this study was to compare accuracy of needle targeting under ultrasound guidance by emergency medicine (EM) residents using HN and HS techniques on a standardized gelatinous simulation model. Methods This prospective, randomized study evaluated task performance. We compared needle targeting accuracy using the HN and HS techniques. Each participant performed a set of structured needling maneuvers (both simple and difficult) on a standardized partial-task simulator. We evaluated time to task completion, needle visualization during advancement, and accuracy of needle tip at targeting. Resident technique preference was assessed using a post-task survey. Results We evaluated 60 tasks performed by 10 EM residents. There was no significant difference in time to complete the simple model (HN vs. HS, 18 seconds vs. 18 seconds, p=0.93), time to complete the difficult model (HN vs. HS, 56 seconds vs. 50 seconds, p=0.63), needle visualization, or needle tip targeting accuracy. Most residents (60%) preferred the HS technique. Conclusion For EM residents learning UGNBs, the HN technique was not associated with superior needle control. Our results suggest that the single-operator HS technique provides equivalent needle control when compared to the two-operator HN technique. PMID:25247033

  17. Effect of ketamine as an adjuvant in ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blind randomized clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Lashgarinia, Mohammadreza; Naghibi, Khosro; Honarmand, Azim; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Khazaei, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is one of the most effective anesthetic procedures in operations for the upper extremity. Ketamine has been reported to enhance the analgesic effects of local anesthetics. We have conducted this study to assess whether coadministration of ketamine can prolong the local analgesic effect of lidocaine in the supraclavicular brachial plexus block for patients undergoing elective upper extremity surgery. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients undergoing elective surgery of the elbow, forearm, wrist or hand were randomly allocated in two groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 (ketamine group) received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% plus 2 mg/kg ketamine, Group 2 (control group) received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% and saline. The outcome measures included severity of pain by using visual analog scale (VAS, 0 = no pain 10 cm = the most severe pain), time of first request for analgesia, and total dose of postoperative opioid administration. The data was analyzed using the χ2 test, student's t-test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Multivariate analysis tests. Results: Patients in the control group had a higher VAS than patients who received ketamine, at all time points during the first 24 hours after surgery (all P < 0.05). The time of first request for analgesia in the ketamine group was significantly more than in the control group (8.93 ± 1.0 vs. 7.30 ± 1.9, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The addition of ketamine to lidocaine in the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block could decrease the postoperative pain and need for analgesic. Therefore, it could be considered as an option in the brachial plexus block to enhance the analgesic action of lidocaine. PMID:25538918

  18. Diagnostic Value of Convex Probe Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration in Mediastinal Tuberculous Lymphadenitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Yuqing; Liu, Chao; Peng, Wenjia

    2015-01-01

    Background Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has been widely used in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathies. Here, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the diagnostic value of EBUS-TBNA in mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenopathy (TBLA). Material/Methods PubMed, EMBASE, and Sinoced were systematically searched for articles published in English or Chinese that reported the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA in mediastinal TBLA. The quality of studies was assessed using the QualSyst tool. Using 95% confidence intervals (CI), the diagnostic yields of EBUS-TBNA were calculated for the individual studies, and the results were then pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity and publication bias were also assessed. Results A total of 14 studies, consisting of 684 patients with mediastinal TBLA, were finally included. The pooled diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal TBLA was 80% (95% CI: 74–86%). Significant heterogeneity (I2=77.9%) and significant publication bias were detected (Begg’s test p=0.05 and Egger’s test p=0.02). From subgroup analyses, significant differences in the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA were associated with Asian vs. European (UK) studies, retrospective vs. prospective studies, those employing rapid on-site cytological evaluation vs. not, those employing different anesthetic types, and those employing smear vs. culture. However, microbiological examination and the number of lymph node passes did not have a significant effect on the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA. Fifteen minor complications for EBUS-TBNA were reported. Conclusions EBUS-TBNA appears to be an efficacious and safe procedure and should be used as an initial diagnostic tool for mediastinal TBLA. PMID:26177653

  19. Rapid on-site evaluation with dynamic telecytopathology for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of head and neck nonthyroid lesions

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Kamal K.; Xu, Weisheng; Wang, Dongliang; Swarnkar, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) at the time of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (USGFNA) of head and neck lesion is essential for obtaining adequate samples and providing the preliminary diagnosis. We summarize our experience with ROSE of USGFNA on head and neck nonthyroid lesions using telecytopathology. Materials and Methods: Real-time images of Diff-Quik stained cytology smears were obtained at ultrasound suite with an Olympus DP-70 digital camera attached to an Olympus CX41 microscope, and transmitted via ethernet by a cytotechnologist to a cytopathologist in cytopathology laboratory who rendered a preliminary diagnosis. Live communication was conducted with Vocera voice communication system. The ultrasound suite was located on different floor from the cytopathology laboratory. Accuracy of ROSE via telecytopathology was compared with an equal number of cases that received ROSE, prior to introduction of telecytopathology, via conventional microscopy. Results: Rapid on-site evaluation was performed on a total of 116 USGFNA of head and neck nonthyroid lesions. The telecytopathology system and conventional microscopy was used to evaluate equal number of cases (58 each). Preliminary diagnoses of benign, atypical/suspicious for malignancy, and positive for malignancy were 72.4%, 17.2% and 10.3% for telecytopathology, and 69.0%, 10.3% and 20.7% for conventional microscopy. None of the cases were deemed unsatisfactory. The overall concordance between the preliminary and final diagnoses was 94.8% for telecytopathology and 98.3% for conventional microscopy and was not statistically significant (P = 0.309). The causes of discordant preliminary and final diagnoses were mainly attributed to availability of cell block and Papanicolaou-stained slides for review or flow cytometry results for lymphoma cases at the time of final sign out. Conclusions: Telecytopathology is comparable with conventional microscopy in ROSE of USGFNA of head and neck nonthyroid lesions. PMID:26110087

  20. Is ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of adequate value in detecting breast cancer patients with three or more positive axillary lymph nodes?

    PubMed

    Kramer, G M; Leenders, M W H; Schijf, L J; Go, H L S; van der Ploeg, T; van den Tol, M P; Schreurs, W H

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of the sonographically most suspicious axillary lymph node (US/FNAC) to select early breast cancer patients with three or more tumour-positive axillary lymph nodes. Between 2004 and 2014, a total of 2130 patients with histologically proven early breast cancer were evaluated and treated in the Noordwest Clinics Alkmaar. US/FNAC was performed preoperatively in all these patients. We analysed the results of US/FNAC retrospectively. Pathological axillary node status (sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary lymph node dissection) was used as reference standard. A total of 634 (29.8 %) of 2130 patients had axillary lymph node metastases on final histology. 248 node positive patients (11.6 %) had three or more positive lymph nodes. The accuracy of US/FNAC to detect three or more positive lymph nodes was 89.8 %, sensitivity was 44.8 %, specificity was 95.7 %, PPV was 58.1 %, and NPV was 92.9 %. This study shows a more than adequate accuracy of preoperative US/FNAC to detect three or more positive lymph nodes (89.8 %). However, when US/FNAC was chosen as the only axillary staging method, 6.4 % of all patients (false negative group) would have been undertreated and 3.8 % of all patients (false positive group) would have been overtreated according to the ACOSOG Z0011 criteria. PMID:26995283

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided deep and large biopsy for diagnosis of gastric infiltrating tumors with negative malignant endoscopy biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin-Xin; Pan, Hang-Hai; Usman, Ali; Ji, Feng; Jin, Xi; Zhong, Wei-Xiang; Chen, Hong-Tan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic yield and safety of a deep and large biopsy technique under the guidance of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for diagnosis of gastric infiltrating tumors with negative malignant endoscopy biopsies. METHODS: From January 2009 to March 2014, 36 patients in whom gastric infiltrating tumors had been diagnosed by EUS received negative results for malignancy after endoscopic biopsies. The deep and large biopsy technique combined bite-on-bite technique with or without endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) to obtain submucosal tissue from lesions. EUS was used to select the appropriate biopsy sites. If the lesion protruded into the cavity, EMR was performed for removal of the overlying mucosa and then bite-on-bite technique was conducted in the resected area to obtain submucosal tissue. If the lesion appeared to be flat or was difficult to lift by injection, the bite-on-bite technique was directly used. RESULTS: Twenty-eight of the 36 patients were treated by EMR followed by bite-on-bite technique, while 8 patients only underwent bite-on-bite technique. Histological results showed 23 of the 36 lesions were poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, 2 diffuse large B cell lymphomas, 4 mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-type lymphomas, and 7 undiagnosed. The deep and large biopsy technique provided a definitive and conclusive diagnosis in 29 (80.6%) of the 36 patients. The 12 gastric linitis plastica and 6 lymphoma patients received chemotherapy and avoided surgery. Minor oozing of blood in 2 mucosal resection wounds was managed by argon plasma coagulation and in 5 cases after deep biopsies by epinephrine (0.001%). Neither severe hemorrhage nor perforation occurred in any patient. CONCLUSION: The deep and large biopsy technique is superior to ordinary endoscopic biopsy for achieving an accurate diagnosis of gastric infiltrating tumors. This procedure guided by EUS is an effective and safe diagnostic method for gastric infiltrating tumors in which endoscopic biopsy results were negative for malignancy. PMID:25834327

  2. Anabolic steroid abuse.

    PubMed

    Landry, G L; Primos, W A

    1990-01-01

    Anabolic steroids are capable of increasing strength and muscle bulk in certain individuals when combined with a proper diet and an intense training program. Any steroid that is anabolic is also androgenic. Anabolic steroids are fraught with numerous side effects, a few of which are potentially life threatening, and some of which are permanent. Most of the side effects are mild and reversible. Use of anabolic steroids in sports is as much a moral issue as a medical one. Drug testing has not been a very successful means to eradicate abuse in the sporting arena. Education alone is probably not the answer to stopping anabolic steroid abuse but is an essential first step in combating this problem. Use of anabolic steroids in athletes is a form of cheating, and use will likely continue, especially if the rewards for success in sports remain so high. Physicians should avoid condemning individuals who choose to use anabolic steroids and encourage discussion of use with their health providers. PMID:2264527

  3. Tendo Achillis pain: steroids and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Read, M T; Motto, S G

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study is presented of 83 athletes with tendo Achillis pain (TAP) treated conservatively over a 12-year period from 1976 to 1988. Local steroid injections did not contribute to an earlier return to sport, though many individuals were improved symptomatically. Local steroids were not found to have a deleterious effect on outcome. Steroids were used most frequently in the chronic cases that presented late and had been treated previously: this group had most recurrences and surgical intervention. One case of Achilles rupture (3%) occurred in the group treated with steroids. Early presentation for treatment led to an earlier return to sport and avoidance of recurrences. Recurrences were most frequent in athletes with bilateral Achilles tendinopathy. The tendo Achillis lesion may range from peritendinitis through a mixed lesion of the tendon and paratenon, to complete rupture. The management depends upon accurate diagnosis, its chronicity and the age and aspirations of the patient. Steroids are safe to use and further prospective trials should note presentation time and disease staging accurately. PMID:1600448

  4. Clinical Predictors of Long-term Success in Ultrasound-guided High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Treatment for Adenomyosis: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yang; Wang, Yuexiang; Li, Qiuyang; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The long-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) ablation treatment for adenomyosis and the relevant factors affecting the durability of symptom relief were assessed in this study.A total of 230 women with adenomyosis who were treated with USgHIFU ablation between January 2007 and December 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) was performed immediately after the treatment to evaluate the ablation effect, and the nonperfused volume (NPV) ratio was then calculated. Regular follow-up was conducted and the visual analog scale (VAS) score was used to assess the changes in dysmenorrhea. The effect of treatment was evaluated after an average follow-up length of 3 months and the factors affecting clinical success and symptom relapse were identified.Of the 230 treated patients, 208 (90.4%) were followed up regularly, with a median follow-up length of 40 months (range, 18-94 months). Mean value of the NPV ratio calculated immediately after the treatment was 57.4 ± 24.4%. Varying degrees of symptomatic relief of dysmenorrhea based on the VAS scores were observed in 173 (83.2%) patients and 71.0% of the patients were asymptomatic during follow-up. Women with higher NPV ratio (OR = 0.964, 95% CI = 0.947-0.982, P = 0.000) and older age (OR = 0.342, 95% CI = 0.143-0.819, P = 0.016) were more likely to achieve clinical success. Dysmenorrhea recurred in 45 (26%) out of 173 cases; the median recurrence time was 12 months after treatment. The lower BMI (OR = 1.221, 95% CI = 1.079-1.381, P = 0.001) and the higher acoustic power (OR = 0.992, 95% CI = 0.986-0.998, P = 0.007) were associated with less risk of relapse. Twelve of the 14 patients who were retreated by USgHIFU ablation after experiencing dysmenorrhea recurrence achieved clinical success.USgHIFU ablation is an effective uterus-conserving treatment for symptomatic adenomyosis with an acceptable long-term success rate. Higher chance of clinical success can be achieved in patients with larger NPV ratio and older age, whereas higher BMI and lower acoustic power may result in a higher chance of recurrence. These factors are helpful in selecting suitable patients for USgHIFU and in predicting the durability of symptom relief. PMID:26817877

  5. Prospective international multicenter study on endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage for patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Kunda, Rastislav; El Zein, Mohamad H.; Teoh, Anthony Y.; Marson, Fernando P.; Fabbri, Carlo; Tarantino, Ilaria; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Modayil, Rani J.; Stavropoulos, Stavros N.; Peñas, Irene; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Kumbhari, Vivek; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shah, Raj; Kalloo, Anthony N.; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Artifon, Everson L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as an alternative to traditional radiologic and surgical drainage procedures after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, prospective multicenter data are lacking. The aims of this study were to prospectively assess the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of EUS-BD in patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at 12 tertiary centers (5 US, 5 European, 1 Asian, 1 South American) with malignant distal biliary obstruction and failed ERCP underwent EUS-BD. Technical success was defined as successful stent placement in the desired position. Clinical success was defined as a reduction in bilirubin by 50 % at 2 weeks or to below 3 mg/dL at 4 weeks. Adverse events were prospectively tracked and graded according to the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) lexicon’s severity grading system. Overall survival and duration of stent patency were calculated using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients (mean age 66 years, female 45 %, pancreatic cancer 55 %) underwent EUS-BD. Stent placement (technical success) was achieved in 92 (95.8 %) patients (metallic stent 84, plastic stent 8). Mean procedure time was 40 minutes. Clinical success was achieved in 86 (89.5 %) patients. A total of 10 (10.5 %) adverse events occurred: pneumoperitoneum (n = 2), sheared wire (n = 1), bleeding (n = 1), bile leak (n = 3), cholangitis (n = 2), and unintentional perforation (n = 1); 4 graded as mild, 4 moderate, 1 severe, and 1 fatal (due to perforation). A total of 38 (44 %) patients died of disease progression during the study period. The median patient survival was 167 days (95 %CI 112 – 221) days. The 6-month stent patency rate was 95 % (95 %CI 94.94 – 95.06 %) and the 1-year stent patency was 86 % (95 %CI 85.74 – 86.26 %). Conclusion: This study on EUS-BD demonstrates excellent efficacy and safety of EUS-BD when performed by experts. Study registration: NCT01889953 PMID:27092334

  6. Pharmacology of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Kicman, A T

    2008-01-01

    Athletes and bodybuilders have recognized for several decades that the use of anabolic steroids can promote muscle growth and strength but it is only relatively recently that these agents are being revisited for clinical purposes. Anabolic steroids are being considered for the treatment of cachexia associated with chronic disease states, and to address loss of muscle mass in the elderly, but nevertheless their efficacy still needs to be demonstrated in terms of improved physical function and quality of life. In sport, these agents are performance enhancers, this being particularly apparent in women, although there is a high risk of virilization despite the favourable myotrophic–androgenic dissociation that many xenobiotic steroids confer. Modulation of androgen receptor expression appears to be key to partial dissociation, with consideration of both intracellular steroid metabolism and the topology of the bound androgen receptor interacting with co-activators. An anticatabolic effect, by interfering with glucocorticoid receptor expression, remains an attractive hypothesis. Behavioural changes by non-genomic and genomic pathways probably help motivate training. Anabolic steroids continue to be the most common adverse finding in sport and, although apparently rare, designer steroids have been synthesized in an attempt to circumvent the dope test. Doping with anabolic steroids can result in damage to health, as recorded meticulously in the former German Democratic Republic. Even so, it is important not to exaggerate the medical risks associated with their administration for sporting or bodybuilding purposes but to emphasize to users that an attitude of personal invulnerability to their adverse effects is certainly misguided. PMID:18500378

  7. Ultrasound guided spine needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Mousavi, Parvin; Gill, Sean; Fichtinger, Gabor; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    An ultrasound (US) guided, CT augmented, spine needle insertion navigational system is introduced. The system consists of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor, an US machine, and a preoperative CT volume of the patient anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) US volume is reconstructed intraoperatively from a set of two-dimensional (2D) freehand US slices, and is coregistered with the preoperative CT. This allows the preoperative CT volume to be used in the intraoperative clinical coordinate. The spatial relationship between the patient anatomy, surgical tools, and the US transducer are tracked using the EM sensor, and are displayed with respect to the CT volume. The pose of the US transducer is used to interpolate the CT volume, providing the physician with a 2D "x-ray vision" to guide the needle insertion. Many of the system software components are GPU-accelerated, allowing real-time performance of the guidance system in a clinical setting.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image ... based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a ...

  10. Anabolic steroid boosts weight.

    PubMed

    1996-09-01

    A randomized study of nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin) showed that the anabolic steroid can increase weight in people with HIV infections. The group receiving nandrolone experienced a greater increase both in fat-free mass and body cell mass (although the latter measure did not reach statistical significance) than those on placebo. Deca-Durabolin had little to do with two occurrences of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in the study group, but until further studies are completed, caution is advised when using this steroid in patients with KS. A new study comparing nandrolone to growth hormone in patients with wasting is slated to begin in the next 3 or 4 months. PMID:11363845

  11. Cardiac effects of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Payne, J R; Kotwinski, P J; Montgomery, H E

    2004-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse in athletes has been associated with a wide range of adverse conditions, including hypogonadism, testicular atrophy, impaired spermatogenesis, gynaecomastia, and psychiatric disturbance. But what effect does steroid abuse have on the cardiovascular system? PMID:15084526

  12. Steroids. A Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of School Health Education and Services.

    This guide provides information on steroid use as well as prevention and intervention strategies. It is intended to serve as a supplement to drug abuse education and prevention programs in elementary and secondary schools and as the basis for local curriculum development and instructional activities. The following topics are covered: (1) history…

  13. Anabolic Steroids...What's the Hype?...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Gregory L.; Wagner, Lauris L.

    This pamphlet uses a question-and-answer format to examine the use and abuse of anabolic steroids. It begins by explaining that all steroids are not anabolic steroids and that anabolic steroids are those used specifically to build muscles quickly. Medical uses of anabolic steroids are reviewed; how people get steroids, how they take them, and…

  14. Anabolic Steroids...What's the Hype?...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Gregory L.; Wagner, Lauris L.

    This pamphlet uses a question-and-answer format to examine the use and abuse of anabolic steroids. It begins by explaining that all steroids are not anabolic steroids and that anabolic steroids are those used specifically to build muscles quickly. Medical uses of anabolic steroids are reviewed; how people get steroids, how they take them, and

  15. Nonprescription Steroids on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Christen L.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Patapis, Nicholas S.; Festinger, David S.; Forman, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree to which anabolic-androgenic steroids are proffered for sale over the Internet and how they are characterized on popular websites. Searches for specific steroid product labels (e.g., Dianabol) between March and June, 2006 revealed that approximately half of the websites advocated their “safe” use, and roughly one-third offered to sell them without prescriptions. The websites frequently presented misinformation about steroids and minimized their dangers. Less than 5% of the websites presented accurate health risk information about steroids or provided information to abusers seeking to discontinue their steroid use. Implications for education, prevention, treatment and policy are discussed. PMID:22080724

  16. Results of a phase II trial of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive implantation of the prostate for definitive management of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A. . E-mail: clawton@radonc.mcw.edu; DeSilvio, Michelle; Lee, W. Robert; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Gillin, Michael; Morton, Gerard; Pisansky, Thomas; Sandler, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive {sup 125}I implantation of the prostate for organ-confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined, adenocarcinoma of the prostate with clinical Stage T1b, T1c, or T2a, no nodal or metastatic disease, prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/mL, and Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive {sup 125}I permanent seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 27 institutions accrued a total of 101 patients to this protocol, with no institution accruing >8 patients. Six patients were ineligible, leaving 95 properly entered as eligible in the study. The median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 0.4-6.5 years). At 5 years, 5 patients had local failure, 1 had evidence of distant failure, and 6 (6%) had biochemical failure. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 96.7%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Eight patients had a maximal acute toxicity level of 3, and no patient had Grade 4 or 5 acute toxicity. During follow-up, 2 patients had maximal Grade 3 toxicity, both related to bladder issues, and no patient experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of this clinical protocol (a multi-institutional trial of brachytherapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate) have demonstrated that this type of trial can be successfully completed through Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Biochemical disease-free survival was comparable with other brachytherapy published series and with the results after surgery and external beam radiotherapy.

  17. Long-Term Results of a Phase II Trial of Ultrasound-Guided Radioactive Implantation of the Prostate for Definitive Management of Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate (RTOG 98-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Hunt, Daniel; Lee, W. Robert; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Gillin, Michael; Morton, Gerard; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Sandler, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive I{sup 125} implantation of the prostate for organ confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate clinical stage T1b, T1c, or T2a; no nodal or metastatic disease; prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/ml; and a Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive I{sup 125} seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 101 patients from 27 institutions were accrued to this protocol; by design, no single institution accrued more than 8 patients. There were 94 eligible patients. The median follow up was 8.1 years (range, 0.1-9.2 years). After 8 years, 8 patients had protocol-defined biochemical (prostate-specific antigen) failure (cumulative incidence, 8.0%); 5 patients had local failure (cumulative incidence, 5.5%); and 1 patient had distant failure (cumulative incidence, 1.1%; this patient also had biochemical failure and died of causes not related to prostate cancer). The 8-year overall survival rate was 88%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Three patients had maximum late toxicities of Grade 3, all of which were genitourinary. No Grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: The long-term results of this clinical trial have demonstrated that this kind of trial can be successfully completed through the RTOG and that results in terms of biochemical failure and toxicity compare very favorably with other brachytherapy published series as well as surgical and external beam radiotherapy series. In addition, the prospective, multicenter design highlights the probable generalizability of the outcomes.

  18. A systematic review of ultrasound-guided FNA of lesions in the head and neck—focusing on operator, sample inadequacy and presence of on-spot cytology service

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, A; Burnside, G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this review is to perform a systematic review of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) services for head and neck lesions with assessment of inadequacy rates and related variables such as the presence of immediate cytological assessment. A computer-based systematic search of articles in English language was performed using MEDLINE (1950 to date) from National Health Service evidence healthcare database and PubMed. Full texts of all relevant articles were obtained and scrutinized independently by two authors according to the stated inclusion and exclusion criteria. The primary search identified 932 articles, but only 78 met all the study criteria. The overall inadequacy rate was 9.3%, 16 studies had on-site evaluation by a cytopathologist/specialist clinician with a rate of 6.0%. In seven studies, a cytotechnician was available to either assess the sample or prepare the slides with an average inadequacy rate of 11.4%. In 1 study, the assessment was unclear, but the inadequacy rate for the remaining 54 studies, without immediate assessment, was 10.3%. The rate for the cytopathologist/specialist clinicians was significantly different to no on-site assessment but this was not found for assessment by cytotechnicians. The review suggests that the best results are obtained with a cytopathologist-led FNA service, where the pathologist reviews the specimen immediately, in relation to the clinical context, thereby deciding on adequacy and need for further biopsies. A systematic review looking at ultrasound-guided FNA of head and neck lesions has not been published previously. PMID:25247346

  19. The effect of steroids on Dupuytren's disease: role of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Meek, R M D; McLellan, S; Reilly, J; Crossan, J F

    2002-06-01

    This study compared the rates of proliferation and apoptosis of cells within nodules of Dupuytren's disease and nodules from patients that had been injected preoperatively with steroid (Depo-Medrone). It also compared the effects of steroids in apoptosis in cultured Dupuytren's cells and control fibroblasts from palmar fascia and fascia lata. Steroids reduced the rate of fibroblast proliferation and increased the rate of apoptosis of both fibroblasts and inflammatory cells in Dupuytren's tissue. Steroids also produced apoptosis of cultured Dupuytren's cells but not of palmar fascia and fascia lata cells. PMID:12074617

  20. Steroid Receptor-Associated Immunophilins: A Gateway to Steroid Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, Thomas; Cluning, Carmel; Ward, Bryan K

    2015-01-01

    The steroid receptor-associated immunophilins FKBP51, FKBP52, CyP40 and PP5 have specific roles in steroid receptor function that impact steroid hormone-binding affinity, nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and transcriptional activation of target genes in a tissue-specific manner. Aberrant expression of these functionally unique immunophilins has the potential to cause steroid-based diseases, including breast and prostate cancer, diabetes and related metabolic disorders, male and female infertility and major depressive disorders. This review addresses the function of these proteins as co-chaperones in steroid receptor-Hsp90 complexes and extensively covers current knowledge of the link between the steroid receptor-associated immunophilins and human disease. An improved understanding of their mechanisms of action has revealed opportunities for molecular therapies to enhance or inhibit cellular processes under immunophilin control that contribute both to human health and disease. PMID:26224894

  1. Steroid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Vihma, Veera

    2015-11-01

    Tissue-specific expression of steroidogenic enzymes allows the modulation of active steroid levels in a local manner. Thus, the measurement of local steroid concentrations, rather than the circulating levels, has been recognized as a more accurate indicator of the steroid action within a specific tissue. Adipose tissue, one of the largest endocrine tissues in the human body, has been established as an important site for steroid storage and metabolism. Locally produced steroids, through the enzymatic conversion from steroid precursors delivered to adipose tissue, have been proven to either functionally regulate adipose tissue metabolism, or quantitatively contribute to the whole body's steroid levels. Most recently, it has been suggested that adipose tissue may contain the steroidogenic machinery necessary for the initiation of steroid biosynthesis de novo from cholesterol. This review summarizes the evidence indicating the presence of the entire steroidogenic apparatus in adipose tissue and discusses the potential roles of local steroid products in modulating adipose tissue activity and other metabolic parameters. PMID:25846979

  2. Steroid Administration is Effective to Prevent Strictures After Endoscopic Esophageal Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjin; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal stricture is a severe adverse event after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Steroid administration is a new method to prevent stricture formation. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of steroid administration to prevent esophageal stricture after circumferential ESD. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Database, and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Studies on steroid administration + endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) versus EBD alone for esophageal stricture were included and pooled analyzed in random-effects models. Besides, subgroup analysis and network analysis were performed to define the influence of ESD type and steroid administration method. Twelve studies involving 513 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that steroid administration significantly achieved a lower stricture rate (risk ratio [RR], 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20–0.81) and less required EBD sessions (mean difference [MD], −4.33; 95% CI, −6.10 to −2.57) than control. Subgroup analysis indicated that steroid was effective after both semi- and complete circumferential ESD. Network meta-analysis showed that compared with oral steroid, local injected steroid had a similar effect to prevent stricture (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.48–2.85), whereas a better effect to reduce required EBD sessions (MD, 7.77; 95%CI, 0.26–15.3). Additional steroid administration is effective to reduce the stricture rate and required EBD sessions. And local injected steroid was superior to oral steroid in EBD reduction, whereas due to the varied method and dose of steroid administration, the finding needs to be clarified in the future. PMID:26426665

  3. Preoperative and therapeutic local anesthetics and steroids.

    PubMed

    Shavelson, D

    1992-04-01

    In a recent survey that the author conducted among podiatrists, the typical therapeutic injection for inflammatory lesions consisted of 2.25 or 2.5 mL of 1% lidocaine or plain bupivicaine (or, rarely, with epinephrine 1:200,000), 0.5 mL of hexadrol, and 0.25 mL of an insoluble cortisone such as triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog). It is clear that variation exists and that each doctor has his or her own "cocktail" for therapeusis. The author finds that 1% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:200,000 therapeutic injections alone have a profound clinical effect when used in concert with biomechanic control. These injections are given as a series once a week and then the interphase is stretched out as needed. Because no steroids are used, there is no limit to the number of injections, and so, for chronic entities such as metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint osteoarthritis, the author has been giving certain patients 6 to 10 therapeutic injections a year for 15 to 18 years, while controlling pain. Because all "cocktails" usually contain some amount of local anesthetic, maybe the podiatric community is using added medications such as steroids unnecessarily. Steroids mask poor diagnostic and technical skills and also infections. Clinicians also should spend time controlling the pedal sympathetics through "chemical sympathectomy." This posterior tibial nerve and artery therapeutic block was developed by Dr. Marvin Steinberg in the 1940s. Treatments are given in 1-week intervals with the first treatment giving 3 to 5 days' relief, the second 5 to 7 days, the third 7 to 10 days, and then 2- and 4-week intervals. Eventually, a comfortable interphase is selected, if necessary. In order for the blocks to work in summation, a vasoconstrictor such as epinephrine is mandatory. Lidocaine is the active ingredient of chemical sympathectomy; it blocks the artery and nerve, including the posterior tibial sympathetics. The posterior tibial sympathetics control 85% of the sympathetics to the foot, including all four muscle layers and the vital structures of the sole of the foot. Epinephrine works at the vasovasorum, nervonervorum, vasonervorum, and nervovasorum to maintain the active medication longer and make the block more effective. This chemical sympathectomy works even better than a lumbar paravertebral sympathectomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1586907

  4. About Steroids (Inhaled and Oral Corticosteroids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications > Long-Term Control Medications > About Steroids About Steroids (Inhaled and Oral Corticosteroids) What are corticosteroids (‘steroids’) ... considerations when your dosage changes? What are corticosteroids (‘steroids’)? Corticosteroids (steroids) are medicines that are used to ...

  5. Crystallization of steroids in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkura, S. Narayana; Devanarayanan, S.

    1991-03-01

    The crystal growth and characterization of certain steriods, viz., cholesterol, cholesteryl acetate, β-sitosterol, progesterone and testosterone, in a silica gel medium is discussed. The present study shows that the single test tube diffusion method can be used to grow crystals of steroids in a silica gel medium by the reduction of steroid solubility.

  6. Roles of Steroids in Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inability of nematodes to biosynthesize steroids de novo and the resulting dependence of parasitic nematodes upon their hosts have enhanced the importance of elucidating the metabolism of sterols and the hormonal and other functions of steroids in nematodes. Biochemical research has revealed th...

  7. Sex steroids in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, A; Stefanelli, M; Cola, S; Falaschi, P

    2011-01-01

    A sexual dysmorphism in the immune response has been described and females display an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. Experimental data show that sex steroids influence immune cell development and have immunomodulatory effects. The distribution, the action (genomic and nongenomic), the sex and tissue-depending expression pattern of estrogen, progesterone and androgen receptors and their functional disruptions in corresponding receptor knockout animals will be discussed, pointing out the difference among sex steroid hormones. Recent advances indicate an immunomodulatory role of sex steroids in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. The outcomes of the clinical trials will help to find the best use of sex steroids in combination with current therapeutic drugs in autoimmune diseases. Sex steroid receptor modulating drugs will provide new therapeutic approaches in these pathologies. PMID:21463254

  8. Physiological responses and characteristics of sperm collected after electroejaculation or transrectal ultrasound-guided massage of the accessory sex glands in anesthetized mouflons (Ovis musimon) and Iberian ibexes (Capra pyrenaica).

    PubMed

    Ungerfeld, Rodolfo; López-Sebastián, Antonio; Esteso, Milagros; Pradiee, Jorgea; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo; Castaño, Cristina; Labrador, Beatriz; Santiago-Moreno, Julián

    2015-10-15

    The objective was to characterize the stress response and the seminal parameters obtained with electroejaculation (EE) or transrectal ultrasound-guided massage of the accessory sex glands (TUMASG) in two captive but nondomestic ruminants, the mouflons and the Iberian ibex under general anesthesia. In mouflons, the physiological responses (heart and respiratory rate, rectal temperature, cortisol, creatine kinase, potassium and glucose concentrations) changed similarly with both procedures. The TUMASG procedure was faster than EE in mouflons (21.7 ± 1.4 vs. 12.4 ± 1.2 minutes, P < 0.01). In ibexes, respiratory rate, cortisol and creatine kinase concentration changes were greater with EE than with TUMASG (final respiratory rate: 62.7 ± 5.5 vs. 38.1 ± 5.6 breaths/min [P < 0.05]; final cortisol: 51.4 ± 5.1 vs. 25.3 ± 5.6 ng/mL [P < 0.001]; and final creatine kinase: 300.9 ± 99.9 vs. 87.1 ± 16.9 U/L [P < 0.001]). Electroejaculation provided better results in some sperm parameters (mouflons: sperm score: 3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.2 [P < 0.01]; total number of sperm ejaculated: 982.4 ± 299 vs. 710.0 ± 542.2 [P < 0.05]; ibexes: sperm with progressive motility: 47.7 ± 6.2 vs. 20.5 ± 8.3 [P < 0.05]). The transrectal ultrasound-guided massage of the accessory sex glands appears to be an alternative technique to collect sperm from wild ruminants, reducing the need for electrical stimuli and thus decreasing the undesired responses of EE in the more sensitive species. On the other hand, better fresh sperm may be collected with EE. However, TUMASG provides practical advantages in animal welfare, firstly in these wild species more sensible to stress management and capture myopathy. PMID:26174035

  9. Anabolic Steroid Use: Federal Efforts to Prevent and Reduce Anabolic Steroid Abuse among Teenagers. Report to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives. GAO-08-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Government Accountability Office, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The abuse of anabolic steroids by teenagers--that is, their use without a prescription--is a health concern. Anabolic steroids are synthetic forms of the hormone testosterone that can be taken orally, injected, or rubbed on the skin. Although a 2006 survey funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) found that less than 3 percent of 12th…

  10. Topical Steroid-Damaged Skin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Anil; Roga, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Topical steroids, commonly used for a wide range of skin disorders, are associated with side effects both systemic and cutaneous. This article aims at bringing awareness among practitioners, about the cutaneous side effects of easily available, over the counter, topical steroids. This makes it important for us as dermatologists to weigh the usefulness of topical steroids versus their side effects, and to make an informed decision regarding their use in each individual based on other factors such as age, site involved and type of skin disorder. PMID:25284849

  11. Respiratory Cytology-Current Trends Including Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy and Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy: Analysis of Data From a 2013 Supplemental Survey of Participants in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Nongynecologic Cytology.

    PubMed

    Sturgis, Charles D; Marshall, Carrie B; Barkan, Guliz A; Booth, Christine N; Kurtycz, Daniel F I; Souers, Rhona J; Keylock, Joren B; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Russell, Donna K; Moriarty, Ann T; Doyle, Mary A; Thomas, Nicole; Yildiz-Aktas, Isil Z; Collins, Brian T; Laucirica, Rodolfo; Crothers, Barbara A

    2016-01-01

    Context .- Nongynecologic cytology (NGC) practices are expanding in relationship to historical gynecologic cytology screening programs. Bronchopulmonary cytology is experiencing an evolution regarding new procedural types. The College of American Pathologists (CAP) tracks practice patterns in NGC by developing questionnaires, surveying participants, and analyzing respondent data. Objective .- To analyze responses to a 2013 CAP supplemental survey from the Interlaboratoy Comparison Program on bronchopulmonary NGC. Design .- The "NGC 2013 Supplemental Questionnaire: Demographics in Performance and Reporting of Respiratory Cytology" was mailed to 2074 laboratories. Results .- The survey response rate was 42% (880 of 2074) with 90% of respondents (788 of 880) indicating that their laboratories evaluated cytology bronchopulmonary specimens. More than 95% of respondents indicated interpreting bronchial washings (765 of 787) and bronchial brushings (757 of 787). A minority of laboratories (43%, 340 of 787) dealt with endobronchial ultrasound-guided samples, and an even smaller fraction of laboratories (14%, 110 of 787) saw cases from electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy. Intraprocedural adequacy assessments by pathologists (and less often by cytotechnologists or pathologists-in-training) were routinely performed in percutaneous transthoracic aspiration cases (74%, 413 of 560) with less involvement for other case types. Most laboratories reported that newly diagnosed primary pulmonary adenocarcinomas were triaged for molecular testing of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase. Conclusions .- The parameters examined in this 2013 survey provide a snapshot of current pulmonary cytopathology practice and may be used as benchmarks in the future. PMID:26717056

  12. The Effects of Combination Perianal-Intrarectal Lidocaine-Prilocaine Cream and Periprostatic Nerve Block for Pain Control during Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of the Prostate: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Dong Hoon; Cho, Min Chul; Park, Hyoung Keun; Lee, Hae Won

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Prostate biopsy for diagnosing cancer can be painful. The efficacy and safety of combination perianal-intrarectal lidocaine-prilocaine (PILP) cream and periprostatic nerve block were compared with nerve block alone during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx). Materials and Methods From October 2007 to August 2009, 74 men undergoing a transrectal prostate biopsy were randomized into two groups. In group 1, 36 patients received a combination of PILP cream and a periprostatic nerve block; and in group 2, 38 patients received lubricant jelly and a periprostatic nerve block. Thirty minutes later, the TRUS-Bx was performed. Pain was evaluated by a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS) after the biopsy. Results Patients in group 1 showed a significantly lower VAS score than patients in group 2 (mean score 2.22±0.89 vs. 3.02±1.15, p<0.001). In addition, there was a difference in the number of patients that had a pain score of three or more, 44% in group 1, and 65% in group 2. The overall complication rate was similar in both groups (p=0.45). Conclusions A combination of PILP cream and periprostatic nerve block reduced pain compared to the periprostatic nerve block alone. This safe, simple technique can be considered prior to TRUS-Bx to reduce patient discomfort. PMID:20664778

  13. Steroids in Athletics: One University's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Mike

    1990-01-01

    Presents an account of one university's experience in conducting an investigation into possible steroid use by student athletes and the development of a program to deal with the problem. Discusses why athletes use steroids and how steroids are taken. Concludes it is likely many steroid-related deaths of athletes go undetected. (Author/ABL)

  14. Steroids in Central Retinal Vein Occlusion: Is There a Role in Current Treatment Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Mohammed; Souka, Ahmed A. R.

    2015-01-01

    With the current widespread use of anti-VEGFs in the treatment of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), the role for steroids has become greatly diminished. Recent large scale randomized control trials (RCTs) have established the efficacy and safety of anti-VEGFs in the treatment of CRVO. Steroids are known to cause elevations in intraocular pressure as well as increase the risk of cataract formation. With that in mind many ophthalmologists are injecting steroids less frequently. This paper aims to review some of the data pertaining to the use of steroids either as a first line monotherapy, adjunct therapy, or an alternative therapy to help answer the question: Is there currently any role for steroids in the management of CRVO? PMID:26635973

  15. Hydromorphone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Hydromorphone injection is used to relieve pain. Hydromorphone injection is in a class of medications called opiate (narcotic) analgesics. ... Hydromorphone injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject under the skin, into a vein, or into a muscle. ...

  16. Animal study assessing safety of an acoustic coupling fluid that holds the potential to avoid surgically induced artifacts in 3D ultrasound guided operations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of ultrasound in brain tumor surgery is common. The difference in attenuation between brain and isotonic saline may cause artifacts that degrade the ultrasound images, potentially affecting resection grades and safety. Our research group has developed an acoustic coupling fluid that attenuates ultrasound energy like the normal brain. We aimed to test in animals if the newly developed acoustic coupling fluid may have harmful effects. Methods Eight rats were included for intraparenchymal injection into the brain, and if no adverse reactions were detected, 6 pigs were to be included with injection of the coupling fluid into the subarachnoid space. Animal behavior, EEG registrations, histopathology and immunohistochemistry were used in assessment. Results In total, 14 animals were included, 8 rats and 6 pigs. We did not detect any clinical adverse effects, seizure activity on EEG or histopathological signs of tissue damage. Conclusion The novel acoustic coupling fluid intended for brain tumor surgery appears safe in rats and pigs under the tested circumstances. PMID:24666721

  17. Are Steroids Worth the Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... body hair. Testosterone levels can also affect how aggressive a person is. Athletes sometimes take anabolic steroids ... balding or hair loss weight gain mood swings aggression problems sleeping high blood pressure greater chance of ...

  18. Anabolic steroids and Norwegian weightlifters.

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, S.

    1982-01-01

    The mean bodyweight, in kilograms, and mean weightlifting result, in points, for the ten best weightlifters at the annual Norwegian championships 1962-82 have been studied. During the 21 years, the mean bodyweight for these ten increased by 18 kg, probably due to the effect of androgens. The weightlifting results improved rapidly from 1968 onwards, probably reflecting an increasingly widespread use of anabolic steroids by Norwegian weightlifters. In 1977 doping tests were introduced, and from then on, rate of improvement has increased much more slowly. The annual sale of anabolic steroids 1963-81 and testosterone 1974-81, in Norway have been recorded. The sale of anabolic steroids increased irregularly until 1974-75, and has since shown a 42% decrease. The sale of testosterone 1974-81 showed a slight reduction, thus giving no support to the suggestion that doping tests for anabolic steroids would lead to a transfer to testosterone abuse. PMID:7139228

  19. Steroid Assays in Paediatric Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274330

  20. Industrial and Compendial Steroid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görög, Sándor

    The aim of this section is to give an overview of the requirements of steroid analysis in pharmaceutical industry and to cover the methodological aspects of these requirements with regard to quality control of bulk steroid drugs and drug formulations. Although this is an important area, the challenges here are not comparable with those in biological-clinical steroid analysis, which was the sole topic of the first edition of this book. This is reflected by the much smaller number of research publications dealing with this pharmaceutical area of steroid analyses. Only a few (more or less obsolete) books are available (Görög and Szász, 1978; Görög, 1983, 1989). The newer developments in this area are summarised in a comprehensive review (Görög, 2004), on which this chapter is based.

  1. Clinical Inquiry: Do corticosteroid injections improve carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms?

    PubMed

    Lyon, Corey; Syfert, Jonathan; Nashelsky, Joan

    2016-02-01

    Yes. Injected corticosteroids reduce symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) more effectively than placebo or systemic steroids, but no better than anti-inflammatory medication and splinting, from one to 12 weeks after therapy. PMID:26977464

  2. Steroid metabolism with intestinal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Groh, H; Schade, K; Hörhold-Schubert, C

    1993-01-01

    As a result of the metabolic activities of numerous anaerobic microorganisms with sterols, bile acids and steroid hormones as substrates in connection with the enterohepatic circulation of these compounds, the intestine may be considered as an "endocrine" active site or organ. The review summarizes transformations of steroids by anaerobic intestinal bacteria, the physiological and supposed pathophysiological meaning thereof. The aim is to recommend further investigation in this field with respect to both the elucidation of the reactions and biological responses. PMID:8478793

  3. Neuroactive steroids and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Roglio, Ilaria; Giatti, Silvia; Pesaresi, Marzia; Bianchi, Roberto; Cavaletti, Guido; Lauria, Giuseppe; Garcia-Segura, Luis-Miguel; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2008-03-01

    Peripheral neuropathy, either inherited or acquired, represents a very common disorder for which effective clinical treatments are not available yet. Observations here summarized indicate that neuroactive steroids, such as progesterone, testosterone and their reduced metabolites, might represent a promising therapeutic option. Peripheral nerves are able to synthesize and metabolize neuroactive steroids and are a target for these molecules, since they express classical and non-classical steroid receptors. Neuroactive steroids modulate the expression of key transcription factors for Schwann cell function, regulate Schwann cell proliferation and promote the expression of myelin proteins involved in the maintenance of myelin multilamellar structure, such as myelin protein zero and peripheral myelin protein 22. These actions may result in the protection and regeneration of peripheral nerves affected by different forms of pathological alterations. Indeed, neuroactive steroids are able to counteract biochemical, morphological and functional alterations of peripheral nerves in different experimental models of neuropathy, including the alterations caused by aging, diabetic neuropathy and physical injury. Therefore, neuroactive steroids, pharmacological agents able to increase their local synthesis and synthetic ligands for their receptors have a promising potential for the treatment of different forms of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:17543391

  4. Real-time ultrasound-guided comparison of adductor canal block and psoas compartment block combined with sciatic nerve block in laparoscopic knee surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Messeha, Medhat M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar plexus block, combined with a sciatic nerve block, is an effective locoregional anesthetic technique for analgesia and anesthesia of the lower extremity. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results outcome of the adductor canal block versus the psoas compartment block combined with sciatic nerve block using real time ultrasound guidance in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic knee surgeries. Patients and Methods: Ninety patients who were undergoing elective laparoscopic knee surgeries were randomly allocated to receive a sciatic nerve block in addition to lumbar plexus block using either an adductor canal block (ACB) or a posterior psoas compartment approach (PCB) using 25 ml of bupivacine 0.5% with adrenaline 1:400,000 injection over 2-3 minutes while observing the distribution of the local anesthetic in real time. Successful nerve block was defined as a complete loss of pinprick sensation in the region that is supplied by the three nerves along with adequate motor block, 30 minutes after injection. The degree of motor block was evaluated 30 minutes after the block procedure. The results of the present study showed that the real time ultrasound guidance of PCB is more effective than ACB approach. Although the sensory blockade of the femoral nerve achieved equally by both techniques, the LFC and OBT nerves were faster and more effectively blocked with PCB technique. Also PCB group showed significant complete sensory block without need for general anesthesia, significant decrease in the post-operative VAS and significant increase time of first analgesic requirement as compared to the ACB group. Result and Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that blockade of lumber plexus by psoas compartment block is more effective in complete sensory block without general anesthesia supplementation in addition to decrease post-operative analgesic requirement than adductor canal block. PMID:27212766

  5. Myeloid regeneration after whole body irradiation, autologous bone marrow transplantation, and treatment with an anabolic steroid.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, C M; Ambrus, J L

    1975-01-01

    Stumptail monkeys (Macaca speciosa) received lethal whole body radiation. Autologous bone marrow injection resulted in survival of the majority of the animals. Treatment with Deca-Durabolin, an anabolic steroid, caused more rapid recovery of colony-forming cell numbers in the bone marrow than in control animals. Both the Deca-Durabolin-treated and control groups were given autologous bone marrow transplantation. Anabolic steroid effect on transplanted bone marrow colonyforming cells may explain the increased rate of leukopoietic regeneration in anabolic steroid-treated animals as compared to controls. PMID:124758

  6. Pamidronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: cancer chemotherapy medications; oral steroids such as dexamethasone (Decadron, ...

  7. Intradiscal steroids. A prospective double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J W; McMillin, J N; Emery, S F; Kimmich, S J

    1992-06-01

    A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was performed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of intradiscal steroid injections. Criteria for entrance were one-level internal disc disruption or nonsequestered nuclear prolapse with or without sciatica and a positive pain response on awake discography. Exclusion criteria were multilevel disease, central or lateral stenosis, prior lumbar surgery, or medical disease requiring systemic steroids. A total of 25 patients were randomly assigned to Treatment Group A (methylprednisolone, Depo-Medrol 80 mg/ml, The Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, Michigan) or Treatment Group B (bupivacaine, Marcaine .5% 1.5 ml, Sanofi Winthrop Pharmaceuticals, New York, New York). Fourteen patients received Depo-Medrol, with 21% showing subjective improvement and 79% no improvement; 0% were clinically worse. Eleven patients received intradiscal Marcaine, with 9% showing clinical improvement and 91% no improvement; 0% were clinically worse. To quantify clinical response, a pain diagram grid score, a visual analog scale, and the Oswestry Pain Questionnaire were used before injection and 10-14 days after injection. No statistically significant benefit was identified in the use of intradiscal steroids. PMID:1385902

  8. The Nicolas Andry award. The pathogenesis and prevention of steroid-induced osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, G J; Cui, Q; Balian, G

    2000-01-01

    The effects of steroids on a cloned pluripotential cell from bone marrow stroma were examined in vitro in culture and in vivo after the cells were transfected with a traceable gene and transplanted into host mice. Bipedal chickens were treated with steroids to establish a model for osteonecrosis. The effects of a lipid lowering agent, lovastatin, on the prevention of steroid induced adipogenesis in vitro in cell culture, and on adipogenesis and osteonecrosis in vivo in chickens, were evaluated. On treatment with dexamethasone, cloned pluripotential cells began to differentiate into adipocytes and expressed a fat specific gene, whereas the expression of Type I collagen and osteocalcin messenger ribonucleic acid decreased. Addition of lovastatin in culture inhibited steroid induced fat gene expression and counteracted the inhibitory effect of steroids on osteoblastic gene expression. Cloned pluripotential cells were transduced with a traceable retrovirus vector encoding the beta-galactosidase and neomycin resistance genes. The transfected cells were administered to mice either by tail vein or by direct intramedullary injection. Half of the animals in each group were treated with steroids. Histologic sections showed the appearance of transplanted cells in the marrow. Analysis of marrow blowouts by flow cytometry revealed that steroid treatment produced adipogenesis in transplanted cells. Evidence of osteonecrosis was observed in steroid treated chickens, whereas sections from animals treated with steroids and lovastatin showed less adipogenesis and no bone death. The results indicate that steroid induced adipogenesis in the marrow may contribute to osteonecrosis and that lovastatin may be helpful in preventing the development of steroid induced osteonecrosis. PMID:10660725

  9. Femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis model.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Akira; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Saito, Masazumi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Hayashi, Shigeki; Ishida, Masashi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis rabbit model by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Steroid-induced osteonecrosis was produced by single intramuscular injection of methylprednisolone in 15 rabbits. Eight rabbits underwent PEMF stimulation (PEMF group) and seven did not (control group). DCE-MRI was performed before PEMF stimulation, immediately before steroid administration, and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after steroid administration. Regions of interest were set in the bilateral proximal femora. Enhancement ratio (ER), initial slope (IS), and area under the curve (AUC) were analyzed. ER, IS, and AUC in the control group significantly decreased after steroid administration compared with before administration (P<0.05). In PEMF group, IS significantly decreased; however, ER and AUC showed no significant differences after steroid administration compared with before. ER and IS in PEMF group were higher than in control group until 10th day, and AUC was higher until 5th day after steroid administration (P<0.05). PEMF stimulation restrains the decrease in blood flow after steroid administration. PMID:25808585

  10. Comparison of oocyte developmental competence and follicular steroid content of nulliparous heifers and cows at different stages of lactation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Z; Inbar, G; Arav, A

    2008-05-01

    Reduced reproductive performance and lower conception rates of lactating cows are closely associated with genetic progress for high milk production. In contrast, the fertility of nulliparous Holstein heifers has remained fairly stable over the years and appears to be markedly higher than that of mature lactating cows. Possible differences in oocyte quality and follicular steroid levels, which could be associated with the low fertility of high-lactating cows, were examined in 13-month-old heifers, cows around the time of first AI (60-95 d post-partum, yielding 49+/-2.4 kg/d) and cows at mid-lactation (120-225 d post-partum, yielding 37+/-2.1 kg/d). Estrus was synchronized by two doses of PGF2alpha and follicles (5-8 mm) were aspirated on days 4, 8, 11 and 15 of the cycle by an ultrasound-guided procedure. Oocytes were morphologically examined, matured in vitro, chemically activated and cultured for 8d. Cleavage rate and the proportion of developing parthenogenetic blastocysts were determined on days 3 and 8 post-activation, respectively. On day 17, heifers and cows received additional PGF2alpha and follicular fluids from preovulatory follicles were collected on day 19 perior to the expected estrus. Follicular-fluid volumes were similar in cows and heifers, as were estradiol, progesterone and androstenedione concentrations in the follicular fluid. Percentages of high-grade oocytes, proportions of cleaved oocytes and developed blastocysts did not differ between the groups. Results suggest that the fertility gap between nulliparous heifers and high-lactating cows is not directly related to steroid content in the preovulatory follicular fluid or oocyte developmental competence. PMID:18359068

  11. Spread patterns and effectiveness for surgery after ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in adult day-case patients scheduled for umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Manassero, Alberto; Bossolasco, Matteo; Meineri, Maurizio; Ugues, Susanna; Liarou, Chrysoula; Bertolaccini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: We conducted a prospective study to examine the local anesthetic (LA) spread and the effectiveness for surgical anesthesia of ultrasound (US)-guided rectus sheath block (RSB) in adult patients undergoing umbilical hernia repair. Material and Methods: Thirty patients received at T-10 level a bilateral US-guided injection of 20 mL levobupivacaine 0.375% + epinephrine 5 μg/mL behind the rectus muscle to detach it from its sheath. Anesthetic spread into the rectus sheath was evaluated ultrasonographically at T-9 and T-11 levels and scored from 0 to 4. The RSB was defined effective for surgical anesthesia if it was able to guarantee an anesthetic level sufficient for surgery without any mepivacaine supplementation. Results: Overall, the block was effective for surgical anesthesia in 53.3% of patients (95% confidence interval, ±17.8). In the remaining patients, anesthesia supplementation was needed at cutaneous incision, whereas manipulation of the muscle and fascial planes was painless. No patients required general anesthesia. LA spreads as advocated (to T-9 and to T-11 bilaterally = spread score 4) in 8/30 patients (26.6%); in these cases, the block was 75% effective for surgery. The anesthetic spread was most negatively influenced by increased body mass index. Postoperative analgesia was excellent in 97% of patients. Conclusion: Use of RSB as an anesthetic management of umbilical herniorrhaphy is recommended only with anesthetic supplementation at the incision site. PMID:26330714

  12. Lipoic acid prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bang-Bao; Li, Kang-Hua

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate in vivo effects of lipoic acid (LA) in preventing steroid-induced osteonecrosis and the possible pathway in a rabbit model. Sixty rabbits were divided into 2 groups: rabbits were intraperitoneally injected with LA aqueous solution at 36 mg/kg of body weight per day for 4 weeks in Group A and rabbits were injected with physiologic saline (PS) as a control in Group B. At 2 weeks after starting treatment, they were intramuscularly injected once with 20 mg/kg of methylprednisolone acetate (MPSL). The femora were histopathologically examined for the presence of osteonecrosis. The plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), glutathione (GSH), endothelin (ET) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were assayed at 2 weeks after the injection of MPSL. The incidence of osteonecrosis was significantly higher in Group B (73.1%) than in Group A (20.8%). The GSH level was higher in Group A than in Group B after the LA injection. The plasma MDA and ET levels were lower in Group A than in Group B at 2 weeks after the MPSL administration. Lipoic acid can prevent the development of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits. Inhibited oxidative stress and amendment of vascular endothelial dysfunction is a possible mechanism for this effect. PMID:21431293

  13. [Mass spectrometry for steroid assays].

    PubMed

    Dufour-Rainfray, Diane; Moal, Valérie; Cloix, Lucie; Mathieu, Elisabeth; Gauchez, Anne-Sophie; Brossaud, Julie; Corcuff, Jean-Benoît; Fraissinet, François; Collet, Christine; Boux de Casson, Florence; Guilloteau, Denis; Emond, Patrick; Reynier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormone measurement, first developed with radioimmunoassay, is now becoming easier with the use of automated platforms of immunoassay. However, some hormones remain uneasily detectable because of their low blood concentration, their structural homology or the presence of interferences. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) can be considered as an alternative to immunoassays. This approach allows the simultaneous determination of several parameters thanks to its selectivity led by the detector mass spectrometer and the separate dimension of chromatography liquid. In addition, recourse to UHPLC (ultra high performance liquid chromatography) allows improving selectivity and sensitivity while limiting the samples volumes. The "ready-to-use" kits are now available and added to the "homemade" techniques developed by laboratories, thus giving opportunity for measurement of a wide steroid panel with only one sample. Finally, mass spectrometry methods, including a prior extraction step, allow the use of varied biological fluids (blood, urine, saliva…). Also, several clinical indications could gain from mass spectrometry, especially when hormone levels are low, when several steroids have to be identified, when the sample volume is low. However, this technology represents an important financial investment and in-depth staff training. In addition, some steroids are not easily quantifiable by mass spectrometry. It is likely by immunoassay and mass spectrometry, well-matched technologies, that we could answer the best to clinical questions about steroids. PMID:25582724

  14. Steroidal Saponins in Oat Bran.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junli; Wang, Pei; Wu, Wenbin; Zhao, Yantao; Idehen, Emmanuel; Sang, Shengmin

    2016-02-24

    Saponins are one type of widespread defense compound in the plant kingdom and have been exploited for the production of lead compounds with diverse pharmacological properties in drug discovery. Oats contain two unique steroidal saponins, avenacoside A, 1, and avenacoside B, 2. However, the chemical composition, the levels of these saponins in commercial oat products, and their health effects are still largely unknown. In this study, we directly purified 5 steroidal saponins (1-5) from a methanol extract of oat bran, characterized their structures by analyzing their MS and NMR spectra, and also tentatively identified 11 steroidal saponins (6-16) on the basis of their tandem mass spectra (MS(n), n = 2-3). Among the five purified saponins, 5 is a new compound and 4 is purified from oats for the first time. Using HPLC-MS techniques, a complete profile of oat steroidal saponins was determined, and the contents of the two primary steroidal saponins, 1 and 2, were quantitated in 15 different commercial oat products. The total levels of these two saponins vary from 49.6 to 443.0 mg/kg, and oat bran or oatmeal has higher levels of these two saponins than cold oat cereal. Furthermore, our results on the inhibitory effects of 1 and 2 against the growth of human colon cancer cells HCT-116 and HT-29 showed that both had weak activity, with 2 being more active than 1. PMID:26852819

  15. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romidepsin injection is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL; a group of cancers of the immune system ... one other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications ...

  16. Ondansetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zofran® Injection ... Ondansetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy and surgery. Ondansetron is in a ... medications: or any of the ingredients in ondansetron injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ...

  17. An inside perspective on anabolic steroid abuse

    PubMed Central

    Schaive, Chad; Kohler, Tobias S.

    2016-01-01

    Steroid abuse is common across gyms across the world. This unique article features an inside perspective/opinion in a question and answer format from a former steroid user/high level body builder. PMID:27141450

  18. Hypochlorite Oxidation of Select Androgenic Steroids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their s...

  19. An inside perspective on anabolic steroid abuse.

    PubMed

    Schaive, Chad; Kohler, Tobias S

    2016-04-01

    Steroid abuse is common across gyms across the world. This unique article features an inside perspective/opinion in a question and answer format from a former steroid user/high level body builder. PMID:27141450

  20. Adolescents and Steroids: A User Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids ("steroids") are synthetic derivatives of the natural male hormone testosterone. They were first used non-medically by elite athletes seeking to improve performance. More recently, however, steroid use has filtered down to high school and junior high school levels. The purpose of this study was to describe adolescent…

  1. Steroids for Treating Cancer (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Steroids for Treating Cancer KidsHealth > For Parents > Steroids for Treating Cancer Print A A A Text ... tratamiento del cáncer When you hear the word "steroid" you may immediately think of muscle-bound body ...

  2. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Boniva® Injection ... Ibandronate injection is used to treat osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become thin and weak and break ... Ibandronate injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be injected into a vein by a doctor or nurse in ...

  3. Pitavastatin may reduce risk of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits: a preliminary histological study.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kenjiro; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Jingushi, Seiya; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2008-05-01

    Several animal and human studies suggest pharmacological approaches may prevent steroid-induced osteonecrosis (ON). We asked whether the newly developed 3-hydroxymethyl-3-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, pitavastatin, could prevent steroid-induced ON in rabbits. We injected 65 adult male Japanese white rabbits once with 20 mg/kg of methylprednisolone acetate into the right gluteus medius muscle. The rabbits were divided into two groups; one group of 35 rabbits received pitavastatins (PS), and the other group of 30 rabbits received no prophylaxis (CTR). Hematological examinations were performed just before the steroid injection (0 weeks) and at 1 and 2 weeks after steroid injection; both the femora and the humeri were histologically examined 2 weeks postinjection. The incidence of histologic changes consistent with early ON in the PS group (13 of 35; 37%) was lower in comparison to the CTR group (21 of 30; 70%). The size of the bone marrow fat cells in the PS group (56.6 +/- 10 microm) was smaller than those in the CTR group (60 +/- 4 microm). The data suggest pitavastatin has the potential to lower the incidence of steroid-induced ON in rabbits. PMID:18350345

  4. Perioral dermatitis -- the role of nasal steroids.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Lígia; Morais, Paulo

    2012-06-01

    We present two patients with allergic rhinitis who developed perioral dermatitis (PD) after initiating intranasal steroid spray. Both patients had been previously misdiagnosed as having contact or seborrheic dermatitis, and therefore inappropriately and unsuccessfully treated with topical steroids. Physicians should be aware of this potential side effect of intranasal steroids to avoid incorrect therapeutic measures. In the setting of nasal steroids use, PD probably is an under-reported and commonly misdiagnosed condition that should be thought when a patient treated with nasal steroids present with small erythematous papules, papulovesicles, and papulopustules occurring against a background of redness, beginning in the nasolabial areas and spreading rapidly to the perioral zone. PMID:21995785

  5. Effect of the time of day and queue position in the endoscopic schedule on the performance characteristics of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for diagnosing pancreatic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Korenblit, Jason; Tholey, Danielle M.; Tolin, Joanna; Loren, David; Kowalski, Thomas; Adler, Douglas G.; Davolos, Julie; Siddiqui, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Recent reports have indicated that the time of day may impact the detection rate of abnormal cytology on gynecologic cytology samples. The aim of this study was to determine if procedure time or queue position affected the performance characteristics of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosing solid pancreatic malignancies. Patients and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study evaluating patients with solid pancreatic lesions in whom EUS-FNA was performed. Three timing variables were evaluated as surrogate markers for endoscopist fatigue: Procedure start times, morning versus afternoon procedures, and endoscopy queue position. Statistical analyses were performed to determine whether the timing variables predicted performance characteristics of EUS-FNA. Results: We identified 609 patients (mean age: 65.8 years, 52.1% males) with solid pancreatic lesions who underwent EUS-FNA. The sensitivity of EUS-FNA was 100% for procedures that started at 7 AM while cases that started at 4 PM had a sensitivity of 81%. Using start time on a continuous scale, each elapsed hour was associated with a 1.9% decrease in EUS-FNA sensitivity (P = 0.003). Similarly, a 10% reduction in EUS-FNA sensitivity was detected between morning and afternoon procedures (92% vs. 82% respectively, P = 0.0006). A linear regression comparing the procedure start time and diagnostic accuracy revealed a decrease of approximately 1.7% in procedure accuracy for every hour later a procedure was started. A 16% reduction in EUS-FNA accuracy was detected between morning and afternoon procedures (100% vs. 84% respectively, P = 0.0009). When the queue position was assessed, a 2.4% reduction in accuracy was noted for each increase in the queue position (P = 0.013). Conclusion: Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA for solid pancreatic lesions decline with progressively later EUS starting times and increasing numbers of procedures before a given EUS, potentially from endoscopist fatigue and cytotechnologist fatigue. PMID:27080605

  6. Steroid catabolism in marine and freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    James, Margaret O

    2011-11-01

    Steroids play important roles in regulating many physiological functions in marine and freshwater fish. Levels of active steroid in blood and tissues are determined by the balance between synthetic and catabolic processes. This review examines what is known about pathways of catabolism of steroids, primarily sex steroids, in marine and freshwater fish. Cytochrome P450 (P450) isoforms present in hepatic microsomes catalyze steroid hydroxylation to metabolites with lower or no activity at estrogen or androgen receptors. Important pathways of steroid catabolism to readily excreted metabolites are glucuronidation and sulfonation of hydroxyl groups. Estradiol, testosterone, DHEA and hydroxylated metabolites of these and other steroids readily form glucuronide and sulfate conjugates in those fish species where these pathways have been examined. Little is known, however, of the structure and function of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes involved in steroid conjugation in fish. Glucuronide and sulfate conjugates of steroids may be transported into and out of cells by organic anion transporter proteins and multi-drug resistance proteins, and there is growing evidence that these proteins play important roles in steroid conjugate transport and elimination. Induction or inhibition of any of these pathways by environmental chemicals can result in alteration of the natural balance of steroid hormones and could lead to disruption of the endocrine system. Recent studies in this area are presented, with particular focus on phase II (conjugative) pathways. PMID:20955793

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Re, Michela; Blanco, Javier; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2016-03-01

    Superficial nerves can be visualized through ultrasonography in the cattle and facilitate local anesthetic disposition around nerve structures. Expected advantages include a higher successful rate of nerve block improving the degree and duration of the block. Among others, conduction nerves of clinical interest in cattle include the paravertebral nerves, nerves of the epidural space, the brachial plexus, and the sciatic and femoral nerves, and nerves of the head. PMID:26922116

  8. Ultrasound-guided biopsy and drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, R.C.; Wellauer, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the ultrasound (US) biopsy techniques, cytology, histology, and physics. The emphasis is on use of US guidance, as the authors find that virtually all lesions are visible at US scanning and they thus save valuable time on the computer tomographic scanner. The authors present in great detail their considerable work in designing needles that are readily visible at US scanning and can also collect good cytologic and histologic material. Biopsy techniques are discussed separately for each organ system. The accuracy of these techniques in over 3,000 of the author's cases is presented.

  9. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access].

    PubMed

    Fuzier, Régis; Rougé, Pierre; Pierre, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    International guidelines advocate the use of first-line ultrasound for central venous catheter, particularly for the internal jugular vein. The role of ultrasound in peripheral venous access remains questionable. In some specific situations, such as pediatrics, obesity and patients with poor venous network, problems to cannulate peripheral vein may occur. Success rate of peripheral intravenous access increases with the diameter of the vein and for a depth of the vein between 0.3 and 1.5cm. The type of puncture (long-axis or short-axis) and the type of catheters have little influence on the success rate. Specific considerations have to be taken concerning infection control. PMID:26632089

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Parth J.; Majithia, Raj; Diehl, David L.; Baron, Todd H.

    2015-01-01

    Liver biopsy remains the cornerstone in the diagnosis and management of liver disorders. Results of liver biopsy can often drive therapeutic decision-making. Unfortunately, studies have shown conventional biopsy techniques to carry significant sampling variability that can potentially impact patient care. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is gaining traction as an alternative method of biopsy. For parenchymal disease, it can decrease sampling variability. It offers a more targeted approach for focal lesions. Its diagnostic yield and limited adverse event profile make it a promising approach for liver biopsy. PMID:26020041

  11. Steroidal glycosides from Reineckia carnea.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dongdong; He, Hao; Li, Yuze; Yang, Xinjie; Deng, Chong; Tang, Zhishu; Cui, Jiucheng; Yue, Zhenggang

    2015-09-01

    Three new steroidal glycosides (1-3) and a novel natural product 4 firstly obtained from a plant source, together with two known steroidal glycosides (5-6) have been isolated from the whole plant of Reineckia carnea. Their structures were determined by physicochemical properties and spectroscopic methods, and their cytotoxic activities against human 1299 tumor cells were evaluated by the MTT method. Compounds 4, 5 and 6 exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 50.3 μmol·L(-1), 67.2 μmol·L(-1) and 61.8 μmol·L(-1), while compounds 1, 2, and 3 showed no cytotoxicity with the cells. PMID:26186990

  12. Peramivir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Peramivir injection is used to treat some types of influenza infection ('flu') in people who have had symptoms of ... flu for no longer than 2 days. Peramivir injection is in a class of medications called neuraminidase ...

  13. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Omalizumab injection is used to decrease the number of asthma attacks (sudden episodes of wheezing, shortness of breath, and ... other forms of hives or allergic conditions. Omalizumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal ...

  14. Pegloticase Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Pegloticase injection is used to treat ongoing gout (sudden, severe pain, redness, and swelling in one or more joints ... or did not respond to other medications. Pegloticase injection is in a class of medications called PEGylated ...

  15. Romiplostim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romiplostim injection is used to increase the number of platelets (cells that help the blood to clot) in order ... low number of platelets in the blood). Romiplostim injection should only be used in people who cannot ...

  16. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may ... to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection ...

  17. Palonosetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Palonosetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting that may occur within 24 hours after receiving ... occur several days after receiving certain chemotherapy medications. Palonosetron injection is in a class of medications called ...

  18. Posaconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Posaconazole injection is used to prevent fungal infections in people with a weakened ability to fight infection. Posaconazole injection is in a class of medications called azole antifungals. It works by slowing the growth of fungi that cause infection.

  19. Evolocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the body normally) or in people with cardiovascular disease to further decrease the amount of low-density ... evolocumab injection is used to treat HeFH or cardiovascular disease, it is usually injected every 2 weeks or ...

  20. Ipilimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ipilimumab injection is used to treat melanoma (a type of skin cancer) that cannot be treated with ... has spread to other parts of the body. Ipilimumab injection is in a class of medications called ...

  1. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  2. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and may make it more difficult to read, drive, or perform other daily activities). Pegaptanib injection is ... vision blurred vision floaters in the eye seeing flashes of light swelling of the eyelid Pegaptanib injection ...

  3. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  4. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  5. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  6. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  7. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... auto-injection device (Evzio) are used along with emergency medical treatment to reverse the life-threatening effects ... use naloxone injection, and what to do until emergency medical help arrives. Your doctor or pharmacist will ...

  8. Liraglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use ... Liraglutide injection (Saxenda) is not used to treat type 2 diabetes. Liraglutide injection is in a class of medications ...

  9. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  10. Alternative for carpal tunnel injection: palmar injection site (Rankin's zone).

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Violeta; Kassim, Sekinat; Bibi, Omar; Desir, Woodley; Ortega, Gezzer; Rankin, E Anthony; Marfo, Kojo; Paul, Henry

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates an alternative approach for steroid injection into the carpal canal through a palmar site and its exposure of vital wrist structures to potential injury. The Rankin's zone entry site is more distally located than conventional sites. This cadaveric study investigated 28 wrists from 26 cadavers. Red latex dye was injected as a localizing aid. Layered dissections were performed to localize the needle tip with respect to vital wrist structures. Calipers measured the distance from the needle to nerves. Twenty-three of the 28 injections using this approach demonstrated dye solely within the carpal tunnel. One median nerve was punctured. The mean distance from the median nerve was 5.76 ± 2.9 mm and 18.27 ± 5.27 mm from the palmar cutaneous branch. This study suggests that the Rankin's zone approach might be utilized with diminished frequency of neural puncture. PMID:25830255

  11. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is usually used in men with prostate cancer. If used by pregnant women, cabazitaxel injection can cause harm to the fetus. Women who are or may become pregnant or are breast-feeding should not receive cabazitaxel injection. If you receive ...

  12. Modulation of Xenobiotic Receptors by Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Robbins, Delira; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate the expression of their target genes. NRs play important roles in many human diseases, including metabolic diseases and cancer, and are therefore a key class of therapeutic targets. Steroids play important roles in regulating nuclear receptors; in addition to being ligands of steroid receptors, steroids (and their metabolites) also regulate other NRs, such as the pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor (termed xenobiotic receptors), which participate in steroid metabolism. Xenobiotic receptors have promiscuous ligand-binding properties, and their structurally diverse ligands include steroids and their metabolites. Therefore, steroids, their metabolism and metabolites, xenobiotic receptors, steroid receptors, and the respective signaling pathways they regulate have functional interactions. This review discusses these functional interactions and their implications for activities mediated by steroid receptors and xenobiotic receptors, focusing on steroids that modulate pathways involving the pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor. The emphasis of the review is on structure-function studies of xenobiotic receptors bound to steroid ligands. PMID:23884115

  13. Needle placement for piriformis injection using 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Clendenen, Steven R; Candler, Shawn A; Osborne, Michael D; Palmer, Scott C; Duench, Stephanie; Glynn, Laura; Ghazi, Salim M

    2013-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a pain syndrome originating in the buttock and is attributed to 6% - 8% of patients referred for the treatment of back and leg pain. The treatment for piriformis syndrome using fluoroscopy, computed tomography (CT), electromyography (EMG), and ultrasound (US) has become standard practice. The treatment of Piriformis Syndrome has evolved to include fluoroscopy and EMG with CT guidance. We present a case study of 5 successful piriformis injections using 3-D computer-assisted electromagnet needle tracking coupled with ultrasound. A 6-degree of freedom electromagnetic position tracker was attached to the ultrasound probe that allowed the system to detect the position and orientation of the probe in the magnetic field. The tracked ultrasound probe was used to find the posterior superior iliac spine. Subsequently, 3 points were captured to register the ultrasound image with the CT or magnetic resonance image scan. Moreover, after the registration was obtained, the navigation system visualized the tracked needle relative to the CT scan in real-time using 2 orthogonal multi-planar reconstructions centered at the tracked needle tip. Conversely, a recent study revealed that fluoroscopically guided injections had 30% accuracy compared to ultrasound guided injections, which tripled the accuracy percentage. This novel technique exhibited an accurate needle guidance injection precision of 98% while advancing to the piriformis muscle and avoiding the sciatic nerve. The mean (± SD) procedure time was 19.08 (± 4.9) minutes. This technique allows for electromagnetic instrument tip tracking with real-time 3-D guidance to the selected target. As with any new technique, a learning curve is expected; however, this technique could offer an alternative, minimizing radiation exposure. PMID:23703429

  14. Injectable depot corticosteroid therapy in hay fever.

    PubMed

    Kronholm, A

    1979-01-01

    Forty-two patients with stable hay fever were treated with injections of long-acting corticosteroids. They were randomly assigned to either 2 ml of betamethasone dipropionate + betamethasone phosphate (Diprospan) or 2 ml of methylprednisolone acetate (Depomedrol). Eye and nose symptoms were evaluated according to a four-step scale of weekly intervals. Both steroids were highly efficacious in reducing the symptoms with maximal effect one week after injection and slow diminution during subsequent weeks. However, Diprospan showed a significantly better effect than Depomedrol on all symptoms. It is concluded that depot injectable formulations of corticosteroids are a useful therapeutical alternative in hay fever. PMID:385402

  15. Oxidative stress and vascular permeability in steroid-induced osteonecrosis model.

    PubMed

    Ichiseki, Toru; Matsumoto, Tadami; Nishino, Mitsuru; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Katsuda, Shogo

    2004-01-01

    We focused on the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of steroid-induced osteonecrosis (ON) and the possibility of preventing this condition by antioxidant administration. Methylprednisolone 4 mg/kg was injected only once into Japanese white rabbits. The involvement of oxidative stress and the presence/absence of bone circulatory impairment were investigated in groups of 10 rabbits killed at 3, 5, and 14 days each and in 10 rabbits administered the antioxidant glutathione. Reduced blood glutathione and lipid peroxide levels were determined biochemically, and the presence/absence of advanced glycation end-product expression was determined immunohistochemically. Vascular permeability in bone was confirmed by finding albumin leakage into the stroma. These blood biochemical and immunohistochemical studies clarified that the oxidative stress in this model developed 3-5 days after steroid administration. Elevated vascular permeability was observed in the 5- and 14-day groups. Hence, circulatory disturbance in bone was noted 5 days after steroid administration, coinciding with the onset of oxidative stress. The rate of ON development, which was 70% in the steroid-alone 14-day group, was significantly reduced to 0% in the steroid + antioxidant group. These results suggest the involvement of oxidative stress and vascular permeability in this steroid-induced ON model and the possibility of its prevention by suppression of oxidative stress. PMID:15449127

  16. A review of steroids from Sarcophyton species.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Muhammad Sulaiman; Al-Footy, Khalid O; Ayyad, Seif-Eldin N; Al-Lihaibi, Sultan S; Alarif, Walied M

    2016-04-01

    This review reports the structural diversity of steroids from Sarcophyton species based on literature from the beginning of marine steroid research until now. There are 65 compounds studied from eight species. Most of them are polyhydroxy-type steroids of C-27-C-31 carbon skeleton. Their biological activities are highly diverse ranging from cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic to antiosteoporosis properties. PMID:26299957

  17. Birdsong and the neural production of steroids

    PubMed Central

    Remage-Healey, Luke; London, Sarah E.; Schinger, Barney A.

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain circuits involved in singing and audition (the ‘song system’) in songbirds exhibit a remarkable capacity to synthesize and respond to steroid hormones. This review considers how local brain steroid production impacts the development, sexual differentiation, and activity of song system circuitry. The songbird forebrain contains all of the enzymes necessary for the de novo synthesis of steroids - including neuroestrogens - from cholesterol. Steroid production enzymes are found in neuronal cell bodies, but they are also expressed in pre-synaptic terminals in the song system, indicating a novel mode of brain steroid delivery to local circuits. The song system expresses nuclear hormone receptors, consistent with local action of brain-derived steroids. Local steroid production also occurs in brain regions that do not express nuclear hormone receptors, suggesting a non-classical mode-of-action. Recent evidence indicates that local steroid levels can change rapidly within the forebrain, in a manner similar to traditional neuromodulators. Lastly, we consider growing evidence for modulatory interactions between brain-derived steroids and neurotransmitter/neuropeptide networks within the song system. Songbirds have therefore emerged as a rich and powerful model system to explore the neural and neurochemical regulation of social behavior. PMID:19589382

  18. Steroid metabolism by monkey and human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalakshmi, M.; Sehgal, A.; Pruthi, J.S.; Anand-Kumar, T.C.

    1983-05-01

    Freshly ejaculated spermatozoa from monkey and human were washed and incubated with tritium labelled androgens or estradiol to study the pattern of spermatozoa steroid metabolism. When equal concentrations of steroid substrates were used for incubation, monkey and human spermatozoa showed very similar pattern of steroid conversion. Spermatozoa from both species converted testosterone mainly to androstenedione, but reverse conversion of androstenedione to testosterone was negligible. Estradiol-17 beta was converted mainly to estrone. The close similarity between the spermatozoa of monkey and men in their steroid metabolic pattern indicates that the rhesus monkey could be an useful animal model to study the effect of drugs on the metabolic pattern of human spermatozoa.

  19. Steroid influences on GABAergic neurotransmission: A behavioral and biochemical approach

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Steroid influences on GABAergic neurotransmission are varied and complex. However, there has been little investigation into the behavioral relevance of steroid effects on GABA. GABA had been implicated in the control of lordosis, a steroid dependent posture exhibited by sexually receptive female rats, but with conflicting results. This data demonstrated that GABA plays a dual role in the regulation of lordosis; stimulation of GABAergic transmission in the medial hypothalamus enhances lordosis whereas stimulation of GABA in the preoptic area inhibits lordosis. In separate experiments it was determined that progesterone enhances binding of the GABA{sub A} agonist, muscimol, in an in vitro exchange assay utilizing synaptic membranes prepared from the hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats. Scatchard analysis revealed a difference in affinity of the GABA{sub A} receptor between ovariectomized, receptive and post receptive females. In the preoptic area there was a significant decrease in the binding of {sup 3}H-muscimol in receptive females versus post-receptive and ovariectomized rats. In other behavioral experiments, the influence of estrogen and progesterone on GABA-induced analgesia was assessed. Intrathecal infusion of a low dose of muscimol at the lumbar level of the spinal cord did not alter nociceptive thresholds in ovariectomized rats. However, when intact females were administered the same dose of muscimol, they exhibited differential responses over the estrous cycle. Females in estrus were analgesic after muscimol, whereas diestrus females did not differ from ovariectomized controls. Ovariectomized rats injected s.c. with progesterone (2mg) exhibited a pronounced analgesia after intrathecal muscimol beginning 15 minutes after steroid treatment, whereas similar treatment with estrogen (10ug) was without effect.

  20. Classification of three steroids as schedule III anabolic steroids under the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-12-01

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Deputy Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies the following three steroids as "anabolic steroids" under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA): Boldione, desoxymethyltestosterone, and 19-nor-4,9(10)-androstadienedione. These steroids and their salts, esters, and ethers are schedule III controlled substances subject to the regulatory control provisions of the CSA. PMID:20169675