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1

Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in Illinois: 2005  

E-print Network

Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in Illinois: 2005 Funded by the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) Coordinated by the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless Timothy P. Johnson Ingrid Graf Survey Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Chicago December 2005 #12;#12;Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

Illinois at Chicago, University of

2

Helping Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Access College Financial Aid  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unaccompanied homeless youth are young people who lack safe, stable housing and who are not in the care of a parent or guardian. They may have run away from home or been forced to leave by their parents. Unaccompanied youth live in a variety of temporary situations, including shelters, the homes of friends or relatives, cars, campgrounds, public…

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2007

2007-01-01

3

Unaccompanied, Unidentified and Uncounted: Developing Strategies to Meet the Needs of America's Homeless Youth. Issue Brief on the Education of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unaccompanied homeless youth appear to be one of the fastest growing and most vulnerable segments of the larger homeless population, but flawed information-gathering by government entities makes it impossible to be sure. This issue brief examines reasons why the plight of unaccompanied homeless youth is not fully captured through current models of…

Appleseed, 2012

2012-01-01

4

Immigration and Schools: Supporting Success for Undocumented Unaccompanied Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attending school and securing lawful status in the United States are two keys to safety and security for undocumented unaccompanied homeless youth. This brief is designed to provide young people, immigration attorneys and advocates, McKinney-Vento liaisons and educators with basic information to help them access these keys. After describing some…

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2010

2010-01-01

5

Increasing Access to Higher Education for Unaccompanied Youth: Information for Colleges and Universities. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each year, more than a million young people in the United States experience homelessness; some of these young people, known as unaccompanied homeless youth, will face the challenges of homelessness while living on their own without the support of a caring adult. Unaccompanied homeless youth face the same struggles as other young people: trying to…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

2010-01-01

6

Using What We Know: Supporting the Education of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unaccompanied youth are young people who lack safe, stable housing and who are not in the care of a parent or guardian. They may have run away from home or been forced to leave by their parents. Unaccompanied youth live in a variety of temporary situations, including shelters, the homes of friends or relatives, cars, campgrounds, public parks,…

Julianelle, Patricia

2008-01-01

7

2013-2014 Unaccompanied Youth and Homeless Verification The information requested on this form is needed to process your application for financial aid for the 2013-2014 academic year.  

E-print Network

2013-2014 Unaccompanied Youth and Homeless Verification The information requested on this form was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless at any time on or after July 1, 2012. "Homeless of these situations and fleeing an abusive parent you may be considered homeless even if your parent would otherwise

Taylor, Jerry

8

Who's There to Help? Assessment of Social Supports Received by Homeless and Unaccompanied Youth in High School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how urban, young adults assessed received social supports (Vaux, 1988) during homelessness in high school. According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness (2007), approximately 1 to 1.5 million youth under the age of 18 in America experience at least one incident of homelessness each…

Brase, Monica Kay

2011-01-01

9

Pathways to youth homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research documents high levels of psychopathology among homeless youth. Most research, however, has not distinguished between disorders that are present prior to homelessness and those that develop following homelessness. Hence whether psychological disorders are the cause or consequence of homelessness has not been established. The aim of this study is to investigate causal pathways to homelessness amongst currently homeless youth

Claudine Martijn; Louise Sharpe

2006-01-01

10

Educational Rights of Homeless Youth: Exploring Racial Dimensions of Homeless Educational Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research that addresses educational rights of unaccompanied homeless youth in grades 9-12 is limited. The McKinney-Vento Act was created to address the many needs of homeless individuals, including children and youth's right to an education. McKinney-Vento was created over twenty-years ago, and this research sought to examine the implementation of…

Aviles de Bradley, Ann Marie

2009-01-01

11

Youth Homelessness and Individualised Subjectivity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article aims to contribute to understandings of youth homelessness and subjectivity by analysing identity construction in terms of young people's negotiation of the structural and institutional environment of youth homelessness. I suggest that while existing literature on this topic concentrates mainly on micro-social encounters, the…

Farrugia, David

2011-01-01

12

Supporting Homeless Youth: Perspectives and Preferences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homelessness among adolescents and young adults is a growing concern in Canada and other countries, yet little is known about their support needs and support intervention preferences from the perspectives of homeless youth or youth at risk of homelessness. The authors assessed these needs and preferences through individual and group interviews with homeless adolescents and young adults (n = 35)

Miriam Stewart; Linda Reutter; Nicole Letourneau; Edward Makwarimba; Krista Hungler

2010-01-01

13

Comments of Kathi Sheffel Homeless Liaison, Fairfax County Public Schools Submitted to the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness Federal Strategic Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Strategies for preventing and ending youth homelessness Identifying and providing support for unaccompanied homeless youth requires a comprehensive strategy that examines and addresses: 1) how youth become homeless and on their own; 2) the unique basic and educational needs that they have; and 3) how to build a continuum of services to meet those needs so youth can sustain

Youth Workgroup

14

Life Experiences and Vulnerabilities of Homeless Women: A Comparison of Women Unaccompanied Versus Accompanied by Minor Children, and Correlates with Children's Emotional Distress  

Microsoft Academic Search

The histories and service needs of 2 groups of homeless women, those unaccompanied by minor children (n = 46) and those accompanied by minor children (n = 22), were compared, on the basis of their responses to a biennial survey of homeless people in a midsize city in the southeast United States. Mothers of children aged 2–10 also completed a

Timothy Page; Roger M. Nooe

2002-01-01

15

2013 -2014 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID  

E-print Network

2013 - 2014 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID: On your 2013-2014 Free time on or after July 1, 2012 you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless as determined by: · Your high school or school district homeless liaison

Nelson, Tim

16

2012 -2013 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID  

E-print Network

2012 - 2013 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID: On your 2012-2013 Free time on or after July 1, 2011 you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless as determined by: · Your high school or school district homeless liaison

Nelson, Tim

17

Daily Hassles and Coping Dispositions as Predictors of Psychological Adjustment: A Comparative Study of Young Unaccompanied Refugees and Youth in the Resettlement Country  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined daily hassles and coping dispositions in relation to life satisfaction and depressive symptoms among resettled unaccompanied refugees and other youth in the resettlement country. A total of 223 unaccompanied refugees ("M" = 20 years) was compared with 609 ethnic minority and 427 majority youth in Norway. Unaccompanied

Seglem, Karoline B.; Oppedal, Brit; Roysamb, Espen

2014-01-01

18

Homeless Youth: Characteristics, Contributing Factors, and Service Options  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distinguishing between causes and consequences of youth homelessness is often difficult. Characteristics may have existed prior to youths' leaving home, likely contributing to their running away, or may develop once the youths become immersed in “street culture.” Owing to these complexities, characteristics and contributing factors associated with youth homelessness often intersect. Homeless youths' diverse backgrounds and experiences, including difficult family

Sanna J. Thompson; Kimberly Bender; Liliane Windsor; Mary S. Cook; Travonne Williams

2010-01-01

19

An Ecological Systems Comparison Between Homeless Sexual Minority Youths and Homeless Heterosexual Youths.  

PubMed

This study examined risk and protective outcomes by comparing homeless sexual minority youths to heterosexual homeless youths regarding family, peer behaviors, school, mental health (suicide risk and depression), stigma, discrimination, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. Structured interviews (N = 147) were conducted with individuals ages 16-24 at three drop-in programs serving homeless youths in Toronto. Bivariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences between homeless sexual minorities (n=66) and their heterosexual counterparts (n=81) regarding all variables: family, peer behaviors, stigma, discrimination, mental health, substance use and sexual risk behaviors with the exception of school belonging. Specifically, homeless sexual minority youths fared more poorly (e.g. lower satisfaction with family communication, experienced more stigma, used more drugs and alcohol) than their heterosexual counterparts. Improving family communication may be a worthwhile intervention if the youths are still in contact with their families. Future research should focus on victimization in the context of multiple systems. PMID:23687399

Gattis, Maurice N

2013-01-01

20

Correlates of service utilization among homeless youth  

PubMed Central

Though few studies exist on service utilization among homeless youth in the U.S., services are important because without them, many of these young people may resort to delinquent strategies in order to meet their daily survival needs. The current study examines frequency and correlates of service utilization (i.e., shelters, food programs, street outreach, counseling, STI and HIV testing) among a sample of 249 homeless youth ages 14 to 21. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences in service usage by sex, age, and sexual orientation. Experiencing family physical and/or sexual abuse, being kicked out of the family home, spending more nights per week sleeping on the street, and having ever stayed in a group home facility were significant correlates of homeless youths’ service usage. PMID:24496226

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Akinyemi, Sarah L.; Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

2013-01-01

21

Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships Homeless Verification Form  

E-print Network

Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships 2013-2014 Homeless Verification Form According, did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? (Q55) If this is the case, you will need to submit a letter of confirmation

Li, X. Rong

22

Homeless youth's overwhelming health burden: A review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Homelessness has reached epidemic proportions in Canada. Canadian children and adolescents are the most vulnerable because youth comprise the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. A systematic literature review was undertaken using MEDLINE, Web of Science and the Homeless Hub (www.homelesshub.ca) to encompass the time frame from January 1990 to June 2009. The following terms were used as key words: ‘homelessness’, ‘homeless youth’, ‘poverty’, ‘street youth’ and ‘runaway’. The present review identified an intersection among education deficits, social service insufficiencies, and poor mental and physical health in homeless youth. Health care delivery to homeless youth was often nonanticipatory, inconsistent and perceived as discriminatory. However, street youth were identified as requiring health care for pregnancy, mental health concerns, sexually transmitted illnesses, respiratory conditions, substance abuse and a myriad of other illnesses. Plenty of work is still required to reduce health inequalities and improve the daily living conditions of Canadian youth living in poverty. PMID:22654549

Kulik, Dina M; Gaetz, Stephen; Crowe, Cathy; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth (Lee)

2011-01-01

23

Pregnancy among three national samples of runaway and homeless youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To compare estimates of the prevalence of pregnancy among runaway and homeless youth between the ages of 14 and 17 years in various settings with each other and with youth in the general population.Methods: Comparisons used three surveys of youth: (a) the first nationally representative survey of runaway and homeless youth residing in federally and nonfederally funded shelters, (b)

Jody M Greene; Christopher L Ringwalt

1998-01-01

24

Resilience and Suicidality among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homeless and street-involved youth are considered an extremely high risk group, with many studies highlighting trajectories characterized by abusive, neglectful, and unstable family histories, victimization and criminal involvement while on the streets, high rates of physical and mental illness, and extremely high rates of mortality. While there…

Cleverley, Kristin; Kidd, Sean A.

2011-01-01

25

Positive youth development: reducing the health risks of homeless youth.  

PubMed

This article outlines several preventive health strategies for reducing the health risks of homeless youth related to emotional distress, alcohol and other drug use/abuse, risky sex, and victimization, all of which are well documented as major health risks for homeless youth living on the street. These health risks interrupt normal adolescent development and are primary obstacles to exiting the street culture and lifestyle. Research indicates that risk exposures among adolescents can be moderated and/or buffered by a focus on individual strengths and environmental protective factors such as community support and mentoring. PMID:14734963

Taylor-Seehafer, Margaret A

2004-01-01

26

Outcomes for Adolescents Using Runaway and Homeless Youth Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this initial exploration was to identify relationships among outcomes and sociodemographic variables for runaway and homeless youths treated in community agencies. Outcome categories included clinical status, functioning, life satisfaction, and welfare and safety. Seventy youths were interviewed three months after discharge from three federally funded agencies serving runaway and homeless youth in the greater St. Louis area.

Sanna J. Thompson; David E. Pollio; Lynda Bitner

2000-01-01

27

Trading sex: Voluntary or coerced? The experiences of homeless youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the circumstances surrounding a homeless youth's “decision “ to trade sex for food, money, shelter, or drugs. Forty homeless youth in 4 Midwestern states participated in individual, in?depth qualitative interviews. Interviewers recruited youth through both service agencies and street outreach. The findings revealed that approximately one third of the sample had some experience with trading sex, whether

Kimberly A. Tyler; Katherine A. Johnson

2006-01-01

28

Cross-National Variations in Behavioral Profiles Among Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cross-national comparisons of homeless youth in Melbourne, Australia, and Los Angeles, CA, United States were conducted. Newly\\u000a (n = 427) and experienced (n = 864) homeless youth were recruited from each site. Compared to Australia, homeless youth in the United States were younger,\\u000a more likely to be in school or jail, demonstrated fewer sexual and substance use risk acts, fewer

Norweeta G. Milburn; Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus; Eric Rice; Shelley Mallet; Doreen Rosenthal

2006-01-01

29

Comparisons of Prevention Programs for Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

There are six HIV prevention programs for homeless youth whose efficacy has been or is currently being evaluated: STRIVE, the Community Reinforcement Approach, Strengths-Based Case Management, Ecologically-Based Family Therapy, Street Smart, and AESOP (street outreach access to resources). Programs vary in their underlying framework and theoretical models for understanding homelessness. All programs presume that the youths’ families lack the ability to support their adolescent child. Some programs deemphasize family involvement while others focus on rebuilding connections among family members. The programs either normalize current family conflicts or, alternatively, provide education about the importance of parental monitoring. All programs aim to reduce HIV-related sexual and drug use acts. A coping skills approach is common across programs: Problem-solving skills are specifically addressed in four of the six programs; alternatively, parents in other programs are encouraged to contingently reward their children. Each program also engineers ongoing social support for the families and the youth, either by providing access to needed resources or by substituting a new, supportive relationship for the existing family caretaker. All of the interventions provide access to health and mental health services as basic program resources. A comparison of HIV prevention programs for homeless youth identifies the robust components of each and suggests which programs providers may choose to replicate. PMID:19067164

Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

2014-01-01

30

Intervening with homeless youths: Direct practive without blaming the victim  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless adolescents present with an array of difficulties, being perhaps the neediest group of youths in the U.S. While policy and programmatic needs of this population are often discussed, their clinical needs can be overlooked for fear of “implied victin blaming”. This paper examines characteristics of homeless youths, diverse practice methods that have been applied to this population, and related

Laura R. Bronstein

1996-01-01

31

Social Networks of Homeless Youth in Emerging Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about the social networks of homeless youth in emerging adulthood despite the importance of this information for interventions to reduce health risks. This study examined the composition of social networks, and the risks and supports present within them, in a random sample of 349 homeless youth (33.4% female, 23.9% African…

Wenzel, Suzanne; Holloway, Ian; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Bowman, Richard; Tucker, Joan

2012-01-01

32

Substance Use and Health and Safety among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how substance use is associated with the health and safety of homeless youth using cross-sectional, self-report data from 285 homeless adolescents. Path models were used to examine concurrent relationships between youth's substance use and multiple aspects of their health and safety, including measures of psychological…

Rhule-Louie, Dana M.; Bowen, Sarah; Baer, John S.; Peterson, Peggy L.

2008-01-01

33

Utilizing technology for longitudinal communication with homeless youth.  

PubMed

The current study investigated forms of technology (phone calls, texts, email and Facebook) for maintaining contact with homeless youth over baseline, 1-week, 6-week, and 3-month follow-up interviews. The study combined quantitative tracking of youths' response patterns and open-ended interviews regarding youths' preferred methods of communication. Results indicate that maintaining communication with homeless youth requires persistence, including frequent contact attempts over several days. Cell phone contacts (calls or texts) were most successful in communicating with youth, with e-mail and Facebook messaging useful when phones were lost or stolen. Youth who maintained contact were strikingly similar to youth who discontinued contact. PMID:25321934

Bender, Kimberly; Begun, Stephanie; DePrince, Anne; Haffejee, Badiah; Kaufmann, Sarah

2014-10-01

34

Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

2009-01-01

35

Experiential Therapy with Homeless, Runaway and Street Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the services and activities of the Orion Center, a drop-in day-use facility for homeless and runaway youth in Seattle (Washington). Orion Center uses experiential therapy and adventure-based activities to develop trust, promote fun and relationship building, and facilitate growth and healing among this homeless population. A…

Kallander, Karin; Levings, Laura

36

Homeless Youth in Toronto Are Nutritionally Vulnerable1,2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was undertaken to characterize nutritional vulnerability among a sample of homeless youth in downtown Toronto. Interviews were conducted with 261 homeless youth (149 male, 112 female), recruited from drop-in centers and outdoor locations. Information about current living circumstances, nutrition and health- related behaviors, and 24-h dietary intake recalls were collected, and height, weight, triceps skinfold thickness, and mid-upper

Valerie Tarasuk; Naomi Dachner; Jinguang Li

37

Factors Associated with Homelessness of Adolescents under Supervision of the Youth Protection System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are two factors that limit our knowledge of the risk factors associated with homelessness among runaway adolescents, namely (1) the samples used are often composed of youth homeless service users and/or youths living on the streets (visible homelessness), whereas most adolescents in fact use ''private'' resources (hidden homelessness), and…

Robert, Marie; Pauze, R.; Fournier, L.

2005-01-01

38

Factors associated with homelessness of adolescents under supervision of the youth protection system  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are two factors that limit our knowledge of the risk factors associated with homelessness among runaway adolescents, namely (1) the samples used are often composed of youth homeless service users and\\/or youths living on the streets (visible homelessness), whereas most adolescents in fact use “private” resources (hidden homelessness), and (2) failure to use an adequate control group to identify

Marie Robert; Robert Pauzé; Louise Fournier

2005-01-01

39

Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen’s (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido’s (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care. PMID:22247795

Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

2012-01-01

40

Supporting Foster-Care, Homeless, and Other Disconnected Youth at CSU Times of Economic Downturn  

E-print Network

Supporting Foster-Care, Homeless, and Other Disconnected Youth at CSU Times of Economic Downturn are emancipated foster, homeless and other disconnected youth. A small, but growing population of students

Boone, Randall B.

41

Capacity for Survival: Exploring Strengths of Homeless Street Youth  

PubMed Central

The majority of research on homeless youth has focused on the multitude of problems faced by this vulnerable population. The current study, while acknowledging the hazards of life on the streets, seeks to explore the personal strengths and informal resources street youth rely on to navigate their environments. Qualitative data from seven focus groups conducted with street youth ages 18–24 were analyzed using content analysis. These data, rich with interactions among youth participants, highlight three important themes: developing “street smarts,” existence of personal strengths, and informal resources relied upon by youth to survive. Results provide valuable insights into the strengths of homeless youth that can be useful to providers in assessing street youths’ service needs and increasing the likelihood of long-term positive outcomes. PMID:19915687

Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.; McManus, Holly; Lantry, Janet; Flynn, Patrick M.

2009-01-01

42

Challenges to immunization: the experiences of homeless youth  

PubMed Central

Background Homelessness is a critical social issue, both a product of, and contributing to, poor mental and physical health. Over 150,000 young Canadians live on the streets. Homeless youth experience a high incidence of infectious diseases, many of which are vaccine preventable. Early departure from school and limited access to public health services makes them a particularly vulnerable high-risk group. This study explores challenges to obtaining essential vaccines experienced by homeless youth. Methods A qualitative research study to explore knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and experiences surrounding immunization of hard-to-reach homeless youth was designed. Participants were recruited for focus groups from Phoenix House and Shelter, a non-profit, community-based organization assisting homeless youth in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. An experienced facilitator guided the recorded discussions. Transcripts of audiotapes were analyzed using a constant comparative method until data revealed a set of exemplars and themes that best captured participants’ knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and experiences surrounding immunization and infectious diseases. Results Important themes emerged from our analysis. Considerable variability in knowledge about immunization and vaccine preventable diseases was found. The homeless youth in the study had limited awareness of meningitis in contrast to a greater knowledge about sexually transmitted infections and influenza, gained during the H1N1/09 public health campaign. They recognized their poverty as a risk for contracting infectious diseases, along with their inability to always employ known strategies to prevent infectious diseases, due to circumstances. They showed considerable insight into the detrimental effects of poor hygiene, sleeping locations and risk behaviour. Interviewed homeless youth regarded themselves as good compliers of health professional advice and offered valuable suggestions to improve immunization in their population. Conclusions To provide effective public health interventions, it is necessary to consider the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and experiences of hard to reach, high risk groups. Our study shows that homeless youth are interested and capable in discussing immunization. Active targeting of homeless youth for public health immunization programs is needed. Working collaboratively with non-profit organizations that assist homeless youth provides an opportunity to increase their knowledge of infectious risks and to improve immunization strategies in this vulnerable group. PMID:22568937

2012-01-01

43

Higher Education Act Reauthorization: Homeless and Foster Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth experiencing homelessness or in foster care face numerous barriers to higher education. Inadequate college readiness, the complexity of the financial aid process, and lack of housing and support services once enrolled in college make obtaining a college degree an often insurmountable challenge. Yet a college education offers these youth the…

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2008

2008-01-01

44

Brief report: youth pathways out of homelessness - preliminary findings.  

PubMed

While there exists an extensive body of knowledge regarding the risks associated with youth homelessness, very little work has addressed the process of exiting street contexts. This paper reports baseline findings from an ongoing longitudinal study assessing factors associated with a successful transition out of homelessness. Fifty-one formerly homeless youth who obtained stable housing in the past 2 months to 2 years participated in this study which took place in two Canadian urban centres. Findings include poorer functioning across all domains for youth residing in housing contexts without supports, a lack of relationship between psychological and behavioural aspects of community integration, and the central role of self-concept in mental health and quality of life. These findings suggest the need for ongoing support for youth exiting street spaces and social contexts, with attention to the importance of self-concept and psychological aspects of community integration. PMID:24215950

Kidd, Sean A; Karabanow, Jeff; Hughes, Jean; Frederick, Tyler

2013-12-01

45

The Mental and Physical Health of Homeless Youth: A Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth homelessness is a growing concern in the United States. Despite difficulties studying this population due to inconsistent definitions of what it means to be a youth and homeless, the current body of research indicates that abuse, family breakdown, and disruptive family relationships are common contributing factors to youth homelessness.…

Edidin, Jennifer P.; Ganim, Zoe; Hunter, Scott J.; Karnik, Niranjan S.

2012-01-01

46

Storying the street: transition narratives of homeless youth.  

PubMed

Toronto Youth Street Stories is an innovative, web-based storytelling project that was conducted with homeless youths in Toronto. As a collaborative knowledge dissemination initiative, the project engaged youthful participants, authors, community mentors, youth service agencies and university-based researchers. Over 50 youths were encouraged to express their personal perspectives through author-led, creative writing workshops, resulting in youth-created stories, poems and pictures about a wide array of feelings and experiences. Across the dozens of pieces of writing, there is evidence of a chronology of street life, or an "arc of experience", that ranges from living with abuse and despair, leaving home, living on the street, experiencing a crisis or turning point, accessing services and gradually moving away from street life toward self-sustaining independence and security. This arc of experience includes the stories of youth who have transitioned away from the street as well as those still facing homelessness. This paper describes this arc of experience and illustrates it with the subjective material generated by the youths' stories about their lives on the streets of Toronto. We conclude that this project provided an important, creative outlet for the youths, and increased understanding of the challenges, stigma and resilience of homeless youth. PMID:23674628

Ottaway, N; King, K; Erickson, P G

2009-06-01

47

Capacity for Survival: Exploring Strengths of Homeless Street Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The majority of research on homeless youth has focused on the multitude of problems faced by this vulnerable population. The\\u000a current study, while acknowledging the hazards of life on the streets, seeks to explore the personal strengths and informal\\u000a resources street youth rely on to navigate their environments. Qualitative data from seven focus groups conducted with street\\u000a youth ages 18–24

Kimberly Bender; Sanna J. Thompson; Holly McManus; Janet Lantry; Patrick M. Flynn

2007-01-01

48

Youth Substance Use in a Context of Family Homelessness  

PubMed Central

Objective This study examines the relationship between family processes and youth substance use debuts among a sample of youth residing in urban family homeless shelters. Method Data regarding shelter experiences, youth and family characteristics, and the use of three substances (i.e., cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana) were gathered from a sample of youth (11–14 years) and their respective parents residing in an urban family homeless shelter system. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the influences on youth substance use. Results Of the 198 youth included in the statistical analysis, 72% (n=143) reported no substance use debuts, while 18% (n=35) indicated one and 10% (n=20) indicated two to three substance use debuts. Within the final model, greater substance use debut was associated with being older (13–14 vs. 11–12; OR=7.5; 95% CI =1.8–30.9) and stressors exposure (OR=4.8; 95% CI =1.5–14.7). Furthermore, youth of adult caretakers that reported low levels of the three family processes considered were almost four and a half more likely (OR=4.4; 95% CI =1.2–16.5) to have made two to three substance use debuts. Conclusions Family processes may be a particularly important intervention target toward reducing the rate of substance use among youth residing in urban family homeless shelters. PMID:22888180

Beharie, Nisha; Olshtain-Mann, Orly; McKay, Mary M.; Goldstein, Leah; Cavaleri, Mary A.; LoIacono, Marni L.; Elwyn, Laura J.; Kalogerogiannis, Kosta; Torres, Ervin; Paulino, Angela; Lawrence, Rita

2011-01-01

49

Predictors of Substance Use Severity among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Problem This cross-sectional study identified a number of factors that were correlated with drug-use severity among homeless youth. Method To examine a commonly-used measure of substance-use severity, the TCU Drug Screen II, in a convenience sample of 156 homeless youth, ages 15–25 from a drop-in site in Santa Monica, California. Findings Higher drug-use severity scores were independently related to low levels of perceived health and maladaptive coping strategies. Conclusions The findings from this study are particularly relevant in that they support previous results showing that psychosocial variables are related to substance use behavior among young populations. PMID:21073596

Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Greengold, Barbara; Slagle, Alexandra; Marfisee, Mary; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Leake, Barbara

2010-01-01

50

Unaccompanied youth: school nurses caring for adolescent minors living without a parent or guardian.  

PubMed

There are many reasons that a child does not have a functional or legal guardian. The parent may be incarcerated, deceased, debilitated, deported, or have abandoned them. The teen may be a runaway or may have been exited from foster care. School nurses are challenged to find an adult who can legally consent to treatment when an unaccompanied minor needs health care. This article provides strategies for case management of these students. The school needs to be a stable and safe environment where the unaccompanied teen can thrive and succeed. PMID:24707658

Adams, Patricia M; Shineldecker, Susan C

2014-03-01

51

Physical and Mental Health Issues among Homeless Youth in British Columbia, Canada: Are they Different from Older Homeless Adults?  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Youth homelessness is on the rise in North America, yet this vulnerable population is rarely studied and compared with adults. This paper aimed to study the homeless youth and identify specific vulnerabilities, which rendered them different from the adult homeless population. It also aimed to describe the youth homeless population and their significant co-morbidities. Methods: Data was derived from the BC Health of the Homeless Study (BCHOHS), carried out in three cities in British Columbia, Canada: the large urban centre Vancouver (n=250); the mid-sized city and capital of the province Victoria (n=150). Measures included socio-demographic information, the Maudsley Addiction Profile (MAP), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) Plus. Results: Youth constituted 16.5% (n=82) of the homeless population. Compared to the adult homeless, the homeless youth were more often female (55%), were Aboriginal (47.6%), had greater substance abuse of alcohol (70.7%), amphetamines (8.5%) and cannabis (75.6%). A lower prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (0.2%) and psychotic disorders (13.4%) was also observed. The prevalence of traumatic experiences, other psychiatric disorders and physical illnesses were similar between the adult and homeless youth. Conclusion: Homeless youth have high rates of physical and psychiatric comorbidity, similar to the adult homeless, despite being 20 years younger. An urgent need for interventions that go beyond the standardized ones being offered to homeless populations as a whole, and to derive specific strategies that target this vulnerable population is required. PMID:25320613

Saddichha, Sahoo; Linden, Isabelle; Krausz, Michael Reinhardt

2014-01-01

52

Gender Differences in Traumatic Events and Rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the present report we describe patterns of traumatic events and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), both partial and full, among homeless youth and those at risk for homelessness, with an emphasis on gender differences. Participants were 85 homeless and at-risk youth (49% female) recruited from a drop-in center in New York City in 2000.…

Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Nish, David; Leonard, Noelle R.; Strauss, Shiela M.

2007-01-01

53

The Initiation of Homeless Youth into the Street Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homeless youth (HY) who lack employment in the formal economy typically turn to the street economy (e.g., prostitution, drug selling) for survival. Guided by the theory of social control, the present paper explores factors influencing HY's initiation into the street economy. Eighty HY (ages 15-23) were recruited from four community-based…

Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Gostnell, Karla; Smolenski, Carol; Willis, Brian; Nish, David; Nolan, Theresa C.; Tharaken, Maya; Ritchie, Amanda S.

2009-01-01

54

A Different Kind of Smart: A Study of the Educational Obstacles Confronting Homeless Youth in New England.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides information on obstacles facing homeless youth in school. Research occurred in four diverse New England cities. Researchers collected detailed case histories on youth age 10-15 years who were currently homeless or who had recently been homeless. Data came from staff of local youth agencies, government officials, and youths

Wilson, Melanie; Houghton, Alison

55

A Snapshot of Substance Abuse Among Homeless and Runaway Youth in Denver, Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on results of a one-day survey measuring rates of substance use and HIV risk behaviors among the homeless youth population of Denver, Colorado. On March 15, 2001, staff of Urban Peak, conducted a single-day survey of homeless and runaway youth in the Denver metropolitan region, going to locations known to be frequented by this population. All youth encountered

James M. Van Leeuwen; Christian Hopfer; Sabrina Hooks; Roxane White; Jerene Petersen; John Pirkopf

2004-01-01

56

Exploring Protective factors among homeless youth: the role of natural mentors.  

PubMed

This study explored the presence and characteristics of natural mentors among 197 homeless youth and the association between natural mentoring relationships and youth functioning. Few studies have explored protective factors in the lives of homeless youth and how these may buffer against poor health outcomes. Relationships with natural mentors have been shown to have protective effects on adolescent functioning among the general adolescent population, and, thus, warrant further investigation with homeless youth. Results from this study revealed that 73.6% of homeless youth have natural mentoring relationships, split between kin and non-kin relationships. Having a natural mentor was associated with higher satisfaction with social support and fewer risky sexual behaviors. Findings suggest that natural mentors may play a protective role in the lives of homeless youth and should be considered an important source of social support that may enhance youth resilience. PMID:25130229

Dang, Michelle T; Conger, Katherine J; Breslau, Joshua; Miller, Elizabeth

2014-08-01

57

Characteristics of Natural Mentoring Relationships from the Perspectives of Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

PROBLEM Homeless youth experience high risks for poor mental health outcomes. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the characteristics of natural mentoring relationships among homeless youth and to identify possible mechanisms that can enhance social support for this population. METHODS Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 homeless youth aged 14 to 21 who had natural mentors. The interviews focused on how youth met their natural mentors, the function of these relationships, and how natural mentoring relationships differed from other relationships in the youth’s social networks. FINDINGS Main themes that emerged from the interviews included parental absence, natural mentors as surrogate parents, and social support from mentors. CONCLUSIONS Findings suggest that social supports provided by mentors enhance youth’s adaptive functioning and may promote resilience, thus the use of natural mentors may be an important untapped asset in designing interventions to improve outcomes for homeless youth. PMID:24180604

Dang, Michelle T.; Miller, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

58

The Legal Rights and Educational Problems of Homeless Children and Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes the educational rights of homeless children and youth afforded by the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act. It also describes the educational problems they confront, including academic underachievement and poor school attendance. Factors that exacerbate these outcomes of homelessness are delineated: barriers to accessing schooling and appropriate services; multiple movements between schools; insensitivity of school personnel; barriers

Yvonne Rafferty

1995-01-01

59

The Legal Rights and Educational Problems of Homeless Children and Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes the educational rights of homeless children and youth afforded by the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and describes the educational problems they confront, including academic underachievement and poor school attendance. Factors exacerbating the outcomes of homelessness are outlined. (SLD)

Rafferty, Yvonne

1995-01-01

60

Educational Rights of Homeless Children and Youth: Legal and Community Advocacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many homeless children and youth have difficulty in school due to their loss of stable housing, and lack of consistent contact with family and friends. When a child becomes homeless, schools are federally mandated to identify these students and provide the same access to a free and appropriate education as their non-homeless counterparts. Within a…

de Bradley, Ann Aviles

2008-01-01

61

Educating Homeless Children and Youth: A Sample of Programs, Policies and Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report reviews a variety of approaches for working with homeless students. Information was gathered from state Coordinators of Education for Homeless Children and Youth, regional coordinators of homeless programs, and national and local organizations. The programs described are organized into five categories. The first concerns educating…

McCall, Kathleen P.

62

Protective Factors Associated with Fewer Multiple Problem Behaviors Among Homeless\\/Runaway Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although homeless youth exhibit numerous problem behaviors, protective factors that can be targeted and modified by prevention programs to decrease the likelihood of involvement in risky behaviors are less apparent. The current study tested a model of protective factors for multiple problem behavior in a sample of 474 homeless youth (42% girls; 83% minority) ages 12 to 24 years. Higher

Marguerita Lightfoot; Judith A. Stein; Heather Tevendale; Kathleen Preston

2011-01-01

63

The Power of the Drug, Nature of Support, and Their Impact on Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths' perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 drug-using homeless youth. The results provided insight into the

Angela L. Hudson; Adeline Nyamathi; Alexandra Slagle; Barbara Greengold; Deborah Koniak Griffin; Farinaz Khalilifard; Danny Gedzoff; Courtney Reid

2009-01-01

64

Factors Precipitating Suicidality among Homeless Youth: A Quantitative Follow-Up  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homeless youth are a population at a high risk for suicidal behavior. A previous exploratory study emphasized the importance of feeling trapped or helpless, which appeared to mediate the impact of other risk variables. Confirmatory work was needed to test this inductively derived model. Two hundred eight homeless youths completed surveys on the…

Kidd, Sean A.

2006-01-01

65

Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence Reported by Homeless Youth in Columbus, Ohio  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

No study to date has reported intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences among homeless youth. This study sought to uncover lifetime prevalence estimates of physical, sexual, and emotional IPV among a nonprobability sample of 180 homeless male and female youth in Columbus, Ohio. To that aim, self-reported IPV and the association between IPV and…

Slesnick, Natasha; Erdem, Gizem; Collins, Jennifer; Patton, Rikki; Buettner, Cynthia

2010-01-01

66

Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence Reported by Homeless Youth in Columbus, Ohio  

Microsoft Academic Search

No study to date has reported intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences among homeless youth. This study sought to uncover lifetime prevalence estimates of physical, sexual, and emotional IPV among a nonprobability sample of 180 homeless male and female youth in Columbus, Ohio. To that aim, self-reported IPV and the association between IPV and gender, race, age, and history of childhood

Natasha Slesnick; Gizem Erdem; Jennifer Collins; Rikki Patton; Cynthia Buettner

2010-01-01

67

A Qualitative Study of the Formation and Composition of Social Networks among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although social networks are essential for explaining protective and risk factors among homeless youth, little is known about the formation and composition of these groups. In this study, we utilized 19 in-depth interviews with homeless youth to investigate their social network formation, role relationships, housing status, and network member…

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

2011-01-01

68

Adult Support and Substance Use among Homeless Youths Who Attend High School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Despite high rates of substance use among homeless youths, little is known about the interaction of substance-use risk and protective factors. Further, limited research exists on substance use by school-attending homeless youths, as extant studies have relied on street- and shelter-based samples. Objective: The purpose of this study…

Ferguson, Kristin M.; Xie, Bin

2012-01-01

69

Homeless Youth: Drug Use Patterns and HIV Risk Profiles According to Peer Group Affiliation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research was conducted to identify subcultural peer groups within a homeless youth population and determine whether these groups differ with respect to drug use patterns and HIV risk. Using systematic sampling methods, 309 homeless youth (ages 13–23 years) were recruited from street and service sites. Drug use patterns and HIV risk profiles were found to vary according to group affiliation.

Michele D. Kipke; Susanne B. Montgomery; Thomas R. Simon; Jennifer B. Unger; Christine J. Johnson

1997-01-01

70

Homelessness, Children, and Youth: Research in the United States and Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This issue of American Behavioral Scientist makes available some of the most recent research on the growing social, economic, and human development impacts of homelessness on families—specifically, on the lives of children and youth. The seven studies from the United States and Canada compiled here provide important evidence-based insights to inform efforts aimed at combating homelessness among children and youth.

Darcy Varney; Willem van Vliet

2008-01-01

71

Homelessness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally investigates whether LGB youth with a history of homelessness report more subsequent psychological symptoms than non-homeless LGB youth and examines potential mediators of any such relationships. Of the 156 LGB youth interviewed (49% female; 78% non-White), 48% reported past homeless experiences. Homelessness was associated with subsequent symptoms of anxiety, depression, conduct problems, and substance abuse and to changes in symptoms over time even after controlling for childhood sexual abuse and early development of sexual orientation. Stressful life events, negative social relationships, and social support from friends mediated the relationships between homelessness and symptomatology. These findings suggest the need for interventions to reduce stress and enhance social support among LGB youth with a history of homelessness in order to reduce psychological symptoms. PMID:21656284

Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

2011-01-01

72

Substance use among runaway and homeless youth in three national samples.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: Standardized estimates of the prevalence of substance use by runaway and homeless youth between the ages of 12 and 21 in various settings were compared with each other and with estimates for youth in the general population. METHODS: Four surveys were used: (1) a nationally representative survey of runaway and homeless youth residing in federally and non-federally funded shelters; (2) a multicity survey of street youth; (3) a nationally representative household survey of youth with and without recent runaway and homeless experiences; and (4) a nationally representative household survey of youth whose previous runaway/homeless status was unknown. RESULTS: For almost every substance, substance use prevalence was highest among street youth. Shelter youth and household youth with recent runaway/homeless experiences reported similar rates. In the household surveys, substance use rates were lowest and were generally comparable. CONCLUSIONS: Many homeless and runaway youth use tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs at rates substantially higher than nonrunaway and nonhomeless youth, indicating a need for comprehensive and intensive substance abuse prevention and treatment services for these youth. PMID:9103102

Greene, J M; Ennett, S T; Ringwalt, C L

1997-01-01

73

Countervailing social network influences on problem behaviors among homeless youth.  

PubMed

The impact of countervailing social network influences (i.e., pro-social, anti-social or HIV risk peers) on problem behaviors (i.e., HIV drug risk, HIV sex risk or anti-social behaviors) among 696 homeless youth was assessed using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that older youth were less likely to report having pro-social peers and were more likely to have HIV risk and anti-social peers. A longer time homeless predicted fewer pro-social peers, more anti-social peers, and more HIV risk peers. Heterosexual youth reported fewer HIV risk peers and more pro-social peers. Youth recruited at agencies were more likely to report pro-social peers. Having pro-social peers predicted less HIV sex risk behavior and less anti-social behavior. Having HIV risk peers predicted all problem behavior outcomes. Anti-social peers predicted more anti-social behavior. Once the association between anti-social and HIV risk peers was accounted for independently, having anti-social peers did not independently predict sex or drug risk behaviors. PMID:18076981

Rice, Eric; Stein, Judith A; Milburn, Norweeta

2008-10-01

74

Social Networks of Homeless Youth in Emerging Adulthood  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the social networks of homeless youth in emerging adulthood despite the importance of this information for interventions to reduce health risks. This study examined the composition of social networks, and the risks and supports present within them, in a random sample of 349 homeless youth (33.4% female, 23.9% African American, 17.7% Hispanic) between the ages of 18 and 24. Social network members who were met on the street were among the most likely to be perceived as engaging in risky sex, as well as to engage in substance use with the youth. Youth were more likely to count on relatives and sex partners for support compared to other network members, but they also were more likely to use substances with sex partners and perceived them as engaging in risky sex. Interventions may need to recognize the importance of intimate relationships during the developmental stage of emerging adulthood by enhancing supportive bonds and reducing substance use and risky sex in these relationships. PMID:21863378

Wenzel, Suzanne; Holloway, Ian; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Bowman, Richard; Tucker, Joan

2011-01-01

75

Outcomes of a brief sexual health intervention for homeless youth.  

PubMed

Homeless youth face various health challenges. The effectiveness of a short intervention to promote sexual health in 572 homeless 16-23-year-olds (M = 19.467+1.89) was conducted using a quasi-experimental repeated measures design. Data collected at three time points (pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention and follow-up) via laptop computers were analyzed using multivariate general linear mixed models. A significant condition by time interaction was found for self-reported AIDS/STD knowledge; intervention participants had higher scores at first post-test. Females scored significantly higher on cognitive and behavioral outcomes while males reported significantly more sexual risk-taking behaviors. Findings support gender-specific interventions. PMID:17855465

Rew, Lynn; Fouladi, Rachel T; Land, Lee; Wong, Y Joel

2007-09-01

76

Factors associated with homelessness of adolescents under supervision of the youth protection system.  

PubMed

There are two factors that limit our knowledge of the risk factors associated with homelessness among runaway adolescents, namely (1) the samples used are often composed of youth homeless service users and/or youths living on the streets (visible homelessness), whereas most adolescents in fact use "private" resources (hidden homelessness), and (2) failure to use an adequate control group to identify risk factors associated specifically with homelessness. Our study compares the characteristics of two groups of youths under the supervision of the youth protection system, according to the presence or absence of periods of homelessness. The results throw light on the factors underlying the shift from "at risk" to "homeless", showing that youths with experience of homelessness are more likely to have been placed in substitute home environments, have experienced significant relationship difficulties with one of their parents (deterioration of the parent/youth relationship and parental abuse) and to have been diagnosed with behavioural disorders. The findings suggest that the decision to place young people under supervision is based more on the dynamic between risk factors rather than on the existence of behavioural problems. PMID:15878044

Robert, Marie; Pauzé, Robert; Fournier, Louise

2005-04-01

77

Prevalence and correlates of survival sex among runaway and homeless youth.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the prevalence and correlates of survival sex among runaway and homeless youths. METHODS: A nationally representative sample of shelter youths and a multicity sample of street youths were interviewed. RESULTS: Approximately 28% of street youths and 10% of shelter youths reported having participated in survival sex, which was associated with age, days away from home, victimization, criminal behaviors, substance use, suicide attempts, sexually transmitted disease, and pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Intensive and ongoing services are needed to provide resources and residential assistance to enable runaway and homeless youths to avoid survival sex, which is associated with many problem behaviors. PMID:10474560

Greene, J M; Ennett, S T; Ringwalt, C L

1999-01-01

78

Homeless Youths' HIV Risk Behaviors with Strangers: Investigating the Importance of Social Networks  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between homeless youths’ HIV risk behaviors with strangers and risk and protective characteristics of their social networks. Data were from the Social Network and Homeless Youth Project. A total of 249 youth aged 14–21 years were interviewed over 15 months in three Midwestern cities in the United States using a systematic sampling strategy. Multivariate results revealed that homeless youth with a greater average number of network members who engaged in more drug risk behaviors and who pressured them into precarious behaviors at least once were more likely to have participated in a greater number of HIV risk behaviors with strangers compared to homeless youth without such network characteristics. Additionally, 19–21 year olds, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered youth, and those who have run away from home more frequently, participated in more HIV risk behaviors with strangers than 14–18 year olds, heterosexual youth, and those who have run away less often. The final model explained 43 % of the variance in homeless youths’ HIV risk behaviors with strangers. It is important to identify network characteristics that are harmful to homeless youth because continued exposure to such networks and participation in dangerous behaviors may result in detrimental outcomes, including contraction of sexually transmitted infections and potentially HIV. PMID:23613136

2013-01-01

79

Who is Supporting Homeless Youth? Predictors of Support in Personal Networks  

PubMed Central

Homeless youth lack the traditional support networks of their housed peers, which increases their risk for poor health outcomes. Using a multilevel dyadic analytic approach, this study identified characteristics of social contacts, relationships, and social networks associated with the provision of tangible and emotional support to homeless youth (N = 419, M age = 20.09, SD = 2.80). Support providers were likely to be family members, sex-partners, or non-street based contacts. The provision of support was also associated with contacts’ employment and homelessness status, frequency of contact, shared risk behaviors, and the number of network members that were homeless and employed. The results provide insights into how homeless youth could be assisted to develop more supportive social networks. PMID:23204810

de la Haye, Kayla; Green, Harold D.; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Golinelli, Daniela; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.

2012-01-01

80

How Runaway and Homeless Youth Navigate Troubled Waters: The Role of Formal and Informal Helpers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most adolescents navigate the transition from adolescence to young adulthood with relative success. However, runaway and homeless youth experience formidable obstacles in their paths and engage in dangerous behaviors that threaten their well being and long-term prospects. This study is part of a larger exploratory research effort aimed at understanding how runaway and homeless adolescents navigate the troubled waters of

P. David Kurtz; Elizabeth W. Lindsey; Sara Jarvis; Larry Nackerud

2000-01-01

81

Dimensions and Correlates of Client Satisfaction: An Evaluation of a Shelter for Runaway and Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Client satisfaction surveys give clients a voice in the planning and management of services. While their use is quite widespread, they have hardly at all been used in the evaluation of shelters for homeless youths. In this article, the authors present findings of a client satisfaction survey conducted among residents of a shelter for homeless

Spiro, Shimon E.; Dekel, Rachel; Peled, Einat

2009-01-01

82

Internet and Social Media Use as a Resource Among Homeless Youth*  

PubMed Central

Little is known about internet and social media use among homeless youth. Consistent with typologies prevalent among housed youth, we found that homeless youth were using internet and social media for entertainment, sociability, and instrumental purposes. Using Haythornwaite’s (2001) premise that it is important to look at the types of ties accessed in understanding the impact of new media, we found that homeless youth were predominantly using e-mail to reach out to their parents, caseworkers, and potential employers, while, using social media to communicate with their peers. Using the “Social Capital” perspective, we found that youth who were connecting to maintained or bridging social ties were more likely to look for jobs and housing online than youth who did not. PMID:25328374

Rice, Eric; Barman-Adhikari, Anamika

2014-01-01

83

Homeless, Not Hopeless: Ensuring Educational Opportunity for America's Homeless Children and Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This position document is introduced by a fact sheet that lists the numbers of homeless people and the appropriations for various programs that assist homeless people. The executive summary discusses: (1) the plight of homeless children; (2) the passage of the McKinney Homeless Assistance Amendments of 1990 by the U.S. Congress; (3) services…

Johnson, Joseph F., Jr., Ed.; Wand, Barbara, Ed.

84

Homeless Children and Youth: A New American Dilemma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These 11 reports focus on policy responses to the needs of very young children who are part of a homeless family, and older young people who are homeless but on their own. The following chapters are included: (1) J. M. Molnar's introduction to the relationship between chronic poverty and homelessness; (2) "Beyond the Numbers: Homeless Families…

Kryder-Coe, Julee H., Ed.; And Others

85

A strengths based method for homeless youth: Effectiveness and fidelity of Houvast  

PubMed Central

Background While homelessness among youth is a serious problem, there is little information about evidence-based interventions for homeless youth. In cooperation with professionals and youths, Wolf (2012) developed Houvast (Dutch for ‘grip’): a strengths based method grounded in scientific and practice evidence. The main aim of Houvast is to improve the quality of life of homeless youths by focusing on their strengths, thus stimulating their capacity for autonomy and self-reliance. Method/Design The effectiveness and fidelity of Houvast will be tested in ten Dutch services for homeless youth which are randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 5), or a control group which provides care as usual (n = 5). Measurements of both objective and subjective quality of life and secondary outcomes (mental and physical health, substance use, coping, resilience, psychological needs, care needs, working relationship with the professional and attainment of personal goals) will be conducted among homeless youths (n = 251). Youths in both groups will be interviewed by means of a structured interview at baseline, at time of ending care or after having received care for six months (T1) and at nine months after baseline (T2). Model fidelity will be tested around T1. Discussion This study is unique as it includes a large number of homeless youths who are followed for a period of nine months, and because it focuses on a strengths based approach. If the Houvast method proves to be effective in improving quality of life it will be the first evidence-based intervention for homeless youth. Trail registration Netherlands Trail Register (NTR):NTR3254 PMID:23594410

2013-01-01

86

Unprotected Sex of Homeless Youth: Results from a Multilevel Analysis of Individual, Social Network, and Relationship Factors  

PubMed Central

Homeless youth have elevated risk of HIV through sexual behavior. This project investigates the multiple levels of influence on unprotected sex among homeless youth, including social network, individual, and partner level influences. Findings are based on analyses of an exploratory, semi-structured interview (n=40) and a structured personal network interview (n=240) with randomly selected homeless youth in Los Angeles. Previous social network studies of risky sex by homeless youth have collected limited social network data from non-random samples and have not distinguished sex partner influences from other network influences. The present analyses have identified significant associations with unprotected sex at multiple levels, including individual, partner, and, to a lesser extent, the social network. Analyses also distinguished between youth who wished they used condoms after having unprotected sex and youth who did not regret having unprotected sex. Implications for social network based HIV risk interventions with homeless youth are discussed. PMID:22610421

Kennedy, David P.; Tucker, Joan S.; Green, Harold D.; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett

2012-01-01

87

Out on the street: a public health and policy agenda for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth who are homeless.  

PubMed

A disproportionate number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth experience homelessness each year in the United States. LGBT youth who are homeless have particularly high rates of mental health and substance use problems, suicidal acts, violent victimization, and a range of HIV risk behaviors. Given the intense needs of LGBT youth experiencing homelessness, it is imperative to understand their unique experiences and develop responsive practices and policies. The range and severity of health risks vary across subgroups of all homeless LGBT youth, and because the population is nonhomogeneous, their particular needs must be identified and addressed. Thus, the purpose of this article is to review the causes of homelessness among LGBT youth, discuss the mental health and victimization risks faced by this population, address differences among homeless LGBT subgoups, and recommend effective interventions and best practices. The authors conclude by discussing promising future research and public policy directions. PMID:24826829

Keuroghlian, Alex S; Shtasel, Derri; Bassuk, Ellen L

2014-01-01

88

Increased Substance Use and Risky Sexual Behavior among Migratory Homeless Youth: Exploring the Role of Social Network Composition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Travelers are a migratory subgroup of homeless youth who may be especially prone to engaging in risky behavior. This study compared the substance use and sexual behavior of young homeless travelers and non-travelers to evaluate the extent and possible sources of travelers' increased risk. Data came from face-to-face interviews with 419 homeless

Martino, Steven C.; Tucker, Joan S.; Ryan, Gery; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Munjas, Brett

2011-01-01

89

The Educational Success of Homeless Youth in California: Challenges and Solutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The California Research Bureau (CRB), in participation with the California Council on Youth Relations (CCYR), and with support from The California Wellness Foundation, has been conducting a major research and policy initiative to bring attention to the issues facing homeless youth in California. These include lack of shelter and educational…

Julianelle, Patricia F.

2007-01-01

90

A Qualitative Study of Early Family Histories and Transitions of Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using intensive qualitative interviews with 40 homeless youth, this study examined their early family histories for abuse, neglect, and other family problems and the number and types of transitions that youth experienced. Multiple forms of child maltreatment, family alcoholism, drug use, and criminal activity characterized early family histories…

Tyler, Kimberly A.

2006-01-01

91

Youth with Disabilities Who Are Runaways and/or Homeless: Responding to the Need.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on two studies by the Bridges to Inclusion project concerning issues surrounding runaway and/or homeless youth with disabilities. The first study surveyed emergency adolescent shelter providers funded by the Family and Youth Service Bureau. Findings addressed types of disabilities frequently identified or suspected in…

Fesko, Sheila Lynch; Graham, Steven; Temelini, David

92

6- Homeless Youth in the United States: Recent Research Findings and Intervention Approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the authors cite research indicating that youth may be the single age group most at risk of becoming homeless, yet comparatively little research has been done in the past decade on this vulnerable population. Some important progress has been made, including longitudinal studies on youth \\

Paul A. Toro; Amy Dworsky; Patrick J. Fowler

93

The primary health care service experiences and needs of homeless youth: a narrative synthesis of current evidence.  

PubMed

Homeless youth are a growing, vulnerable population with specific primary health care (PHC) requirements. There are no systematic reviews of evidence to guide the delivery of PHC interventions to best address the needs of homeless youth in Australia. We present a narrative synthesis of peer reviewed research designed to determine: (1) the PHC services homeless youth access; (2) experiences of services, reported outcomes and barriers to use; and, (3) the PHC service needs of homeless youth. Findings show that homeless youth access a variety of services and delivery approaches. Increased PHC use is associated with youth who recognise they need help. Street-based clinic linked services and therapy and case management alongside improved housing can positively impact upon mental health and substance use outcomes. Barriers to service use include knowledge; provider attitudes, financial constraints and inappropriate environments. Findings support targetted, co-ordinated networks of PHC and housing services with nurses working alongside community workers. PMID:23721389

Dawson, Angela; Jackson, Debra

2013-04-01

94

Unprotected sex of homeless youth: results from a multilevel dyadic analysis of individual, social network, and relationship factors.  

PubMed

Homeless youth have elevated risk of HIV through sexual behavior. This project investigates the multiple levels of influence on unprotected sex among homeless youth, including social network, individual, and partner level influences. Findings are based on analyses of an exploratory, semi-structured interview (n = 40) and a structured personal network interview (n = 240) with randomly selected homeless youth in Los Angeles. Previous social network studies of risky sex by homeless youth have collected limited social network data from non-random samples and have not distinguished sex partner influences from other network influences. The present analyses have identified significant associations with unprotected sex at multiple levels, including individual, partner, and, to a lesser extent, the social network. Analyses also distinguished between youth who did or did not want to use condoms when they had unprotected sex. Implications for social network based HIV risk interventions with homeless youth are discussed. PMID:22610421

Kennedy, David P; Tucker, Joan S; Green, Harold D; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett

2012-10-01

95

Substance use predictors of victimization profiles among homeless youth: a latent class analysis.  

PubMed

Although a substantial body of literature demonstrates high prevalence of street victimization among homeless youth, few studies have investigated the existence of victimization classes that differ on the type and frequency of victimization experienced. Nor do we know how substance use patterns relate to victimization classes. Using latent class analysis (LCA), we examined the existence of victimization classes of homeless youth and investigated substance use predictors of class membership utilizing a large purposive sample (N=601) recruited from homeless youth-serving host agencies in three disparate regions of the U.S. Results of the LCA suggest the presence of three distinct victimization profiles - youth fit into a low-victimization class, a witness class, or a high-victimization class. These three victimization classes demonstrated differences in their substance use, including rates of substance abuse/dependence on alcohol and/or drugs. The presence of distinct victimization profiles suggests the need for screening and referral for differential services. PMID:24439621

Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna; Ferguson, Kristin; Langenderfer, Lisa

2014-02-01

96

A SNAPSHOT OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE AMONG HOMELESS AND RUNAWAY YOUTH IN  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT: We report on results of a one-day survey measuring rates of substance use and HIV risk behaviors among the homeless youth population of Denver, Colorado. On March 15, 2001, staff of Urban Peak, conducted a single-day survey of homeless and runaway youth in the Denver metropolitan region, going to locations known to be frequented by this population. All youth encountered were asked to fill out a brief survey asking about past nine month use of the following substances: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, hallucinogens, ecstasy and ketamine, and HIV risk behaviors. Chi-square analyses of the association of substance used and gender, age, living situation, and ethnicity were conducted. In addition, the use of any club drug was examined. One-hundred-eighty-six homeless or runaway youth were surveyed; 74 percent were between 16 and 25. Rates of use over the last nine months were as follows: alcohol, 69 percent; marijuana, 75 percent;

unknown authors

97

Falling through the Gaps: Homeless Children and Youth. Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In each state, between 41 percent and 91 percent of the homeless students identified by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) are not considered homeless by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Nationwide, as many as 715,238 homeless students fall into a bureaucratic gap between HUD and ED. This is because ED, HUD, and other…

Lovell, Phillip; DeBaun, Bill

2012-01-01

98

Substance abuse and high-risk needle-related behaviors among homeless youth in minneapolis: Implications for prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless and runaway youth face a variety of health, risks, including those related to substance abuse and use of unsterile\\u000a needles. During 1998–1999, we recruited 201 Minneapolis homeless youths aged 15–22 years; these youths were interviewed by\\u000a experienced street outreach workers from settings where street youth were known to congregate. Respondents spent a median\\u000a of 6 months in the previous

Alan R. Lifson; Linda L. Halcón

2001-01-01

99

Explaining homeless youths' criminal justice interactions: childhood trauma or surviving life on the streets?  

PubMed

Homeless youth are at increased risk for involvement in the criminal justice system. This study investigated childhood trauma as a risk factor for arrest or jail among a sample of youth seeking services at drop in, shelter, and transitional housing settings, while controlling for more established risk factors including: substance use, peer deviance, and engagement in survival behaviors. Standardized and researcher developed measures collected quantitative data through face-to-face interviews with youth (N = 202). Two sequential logic regression models identified significant predictors of arrest and jail, with a particular interest in the effects of childhood maltreatment. Youth with a history of physical abuse were nearly twice as likely to be arrested and to be jailed compared to non-abused youth, controlling for the significant influence of drug use and survival behaviors. These findings suggest the need for trauma screening and trauma-informed services for homeless youth at risk of illegal behavior. PMID:24337524

Yoder, Jamie Rae; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J; Ferguson, Kristin M; Haffejee, Badiah

2014-02-01

100

Runaway and Homeless Youth Grants: Improvements Needed in the Grant Award Process. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-335  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awards grants to provide shelter and services to runaway and homeless youth through the Basic Center, Transitional Living and Street Outreach Programs. In response to a mandate for a review of the grant award process for these programs in the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008 (Pub. L. No.…

Brown, Kay E.

2010-01-01

101

Personal Network Correlates of Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use Among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Background Youth who are homeless and on their own are among the most marginalized individuals in the United States and face multiple risks, including use of substances. This study investigates how the use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana among homeless youth may be influenced by characteristics of their social networks. Methods Homeless youth aged 13–24 were randomly sampled from 41 service and street sites in Los Angeles County (N = 419). Predictors of substance use were examined using linear regression analysis (for average number of drinks and average number of cigarettes per day) and negative binomal regression analysis (for frequency of past month marijuana use). Results Youth with more substance users in their networks reported greater alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana consumption regardless of whether these network members provided tangible or emotional support. Marijuana use was more frequent for youth who met more network members through homeless settings, but less frequent among those who met more network members through treatment or AA/NA. Greater alcohol use occurred among youth who met more network members through substance use-related activities. Youth having more adults in positions of responsibility in their networks consumed less alcohol, and those with more school attendees in their networks consumed less alcohol and cigarettes. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of social context in understanding substance use among homeless youth. Results also support the relevance of network-based interventions to change social context for substance using youth, in terms of both enhancing pro-social influences and reducing exposure to substance use. PMID:20656423

Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Green, Harold D.; Zhou, Annie

2013-01-01

102

TRANSITIONS INTO AND OUT OF HOMELESSNESS AMONG STREET-INVOLVED YOUTH IN A CANADIAN SETTING  

PubMed Central

The impact of transitions in housing status among street youth have not been well explored. This study uses a generalized linear mixed effects model to identify factors associated with transitions into and out of homelessness among a prospective cohort of 685 drug-using street-involved youth aged 14–26. In multivariate analysis, high intensity substance use, difficulty accessing addiction treatment, incarceration, sex work, and difficulty accessing housing (all p < 0.05) either significantly facilitated or hindered housing transitions. Findings highlight the importance of external structural factors in shaping youth’s housing status and point to opportunities to improve the housing stability of vulnerable youth. PMID:23838565

Cheng, Tessa; Wood, Evan; Feng, Cindy; Mathias, Steve; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas; DeBeck, Kora

2013-01-01

103

The Challenge of Pregnancy among Homeless Youth: Reclaiming a Lost Opportunity  

PubMed Central

Young, homeless women often become pregnant, but little is known about how street youth experience their pregnancies. We documented 26 pregnancy outcomes among 13 homeless women (ages 18–26) and eight homeless men through interviews and participant-observation. Eight pregnancies were voluntarily terminated, three were miscarried, and fifteen were carried to term. Regardless of pregnancy outcome, street youths’ narratives focused on ambivalence about parenting, traumatic childhood experiences, and current challenges. Despite significant obstacles, almost all were convinced of their personal capacity to change their lives. While most wanted to be parents, the majority lost custody of their newborns and consequently associated contact with medical and social services with punitive outcomes. Most of the youth who chose to terminate successfully sought safe medical care. We offer recommendations for changing the approach of services to take full advantage of pregnancy as a potential catalyst event for change in this highly vulnerable and underserved population. PMID:20453382

Smid, Marcela; Bourgois, Philippe; Auerswald, Colette L.

2011-01-01

104

Cell phone use among homeless youth: potential for new health interventions and research.  

PubMed

Cell phone use has become nearly ubiquitous among adolescents in the United States. Despite the potential for cell phones to facilitate intervention, research, and care for homeless youth, no data exists to date on cell phone use among this population. In 2009, a survey of cell phone use was conducted among a non-probability sample of 169 homeless youth in Los Angeles, CA. Levels of ownership and use, instrumental uses (connecting to case workers, employers) and patterns of connecting to various network types were assessed (family, home-based peers, street-based peers). Differences in socio-demographic characteristics and cell phone ownership were assessed via t test and chi-square statistics. Sixty-two percent of homeless youth own a cell phone; 40% have a working phone. Seventeen percent used their phone to call a case manager, 36% to call either a potential or current employer. Fifty-one percent of youth connected with home-based peers on the phone and 41% connected to parents. Cell phones present new opportunities for intervention research, connecting homeless youth to family and home-based peers who can be sources of social support in times of need. Moreover, cell phones provide researchers and providers with new avenues to maintain connections with these highly transient youth. PMID:22076445

Rice, Eric; Lee, Alex; Taitt, Sean

2011-12-01

105

Predictors of Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Newly Homeless Youth: A Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose To longitudinally examine the association between newly homeless youth individual factors (sociodemographic characteristics, depression, substance use) and structural factors, such as living situation (family, institution, non-family) with sexual risk behaviors. Methods A cohort of newly homeless youth from Los Angeles County (N=261; ages 12–20 years) were interviewed at baseline, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. At each assessment youth were asked about symptoms of depression (using the Brief Symptom Inventory), substance use, living situation, and sexual risk behaviors (number of sexual partners and condom use). Random effects models were used to determine the effects of predictors on the number of sexual partners and on condom use over time, by gender. Results At baseline, 77% of youth had been sexually active, increasing to 85% of youth at 24 months of follow-up. For predictors of multiple sexual partners, among male youth, these included living in non-family settings and using drugs; among females, living situation was not predictive of having multiple sexual partners but drug use was. For condom use, among females, living in a non-family setting and drug use decreased the odds of always using condoms; for males, no factors were found to be predictive of condom use. Conclusions Living with non-family members and drug use appear to be the most salient in explaining sexual risk among newly homeless youth. Our findings indicate that interventions aimed at reducing sexual risk behaviors, and thereby reducing STDs and HIV among newly homeless youth, need to help youth in finding housing associated with supervision and social support (family and institutional settings) as well as aim to reduce drug use. PMID:18346666

Solorio, M. Rosa; Rosenthal, Doreen; Milburn, Norweeta G.; Weiss, Robert E.; Batterham, Philip J.; Gandara, Marla; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

2008-01-01

106

Transitions into and out of homelessness among street-involved youth in a Canadian setting.  

PubMed

The impact of transitions in housing status among street youth have not been well explored. This study uses a generalized linear mixed effects model to identify factors associated with transitions into and out of homelessness among a prospective cohort of 685 drug-using street-involved youth aged 14-26. In multivariate analysis, high intensity substance use, difficulty accessing addiction treatment, incarceration, sex work, and difficulty accessing housing (all p<0.05) either significantly facilitated or hindered housing transitions. Findings highlight the importance of external structural factors in shaping youth's housing status and point to opportunities to improve the housing stability of vulnerable youth. PMID:23838565

Cheng, Tessa; Wood, Evan; Feng, Cindy; Mathias, Steve; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas; DeBeck, Kora

2013-09-01

107

Social Network and Individual Correlates of Sexual Risk Behavior Among Homeless MSM Youth  

PubMed Central

Purpose There is growing interest in network-based interventions to reduce HIV sexual risk behavior among both homeless youth and men who have sex with men (MSM). The goal of this study is to better understand the social network and individual correlates of sexual risk behavior among homeless MSM youth in order to inform these HIV prevention efforts. Methods A multi-stage sampling design was used to recruit a probability sample of 121 homeless MSM youth (ages 16–24) from shelters, drop-in centers, and street venues in Los Angeles County. Face-to-face interviews were conducted. Due to the different distributions of the three outcome variables, three distinct regression models were needed: ordinal logistic regression for unprotected sex; zero-truncated Poisson regression for number of sex partners; and logistic regression for any sex trade. Results Homeless MSM youth were less likely to engage in unprotected sex and had fewer sex partners if their networks included platonic ties to peers who regularly attended school, and had fewer sex partners if most of their network members were not heavy drinkers. Most other aspects of network composition were unrelated to sexual risk behavior. Individual predictors of sexual risk behavior included being older, Hispanic, lower education, depressive symptoms, less positive condom attitudes, and sleeping outdoors because of nowhere else to stay. Conclusions HIV prevention programs for homeless MSM youth may warrant a multi-pronged approach that helps these youth strengthen their ties to prosocial peers, develop more positive condom attitudes, and access needed mental health and housing services. PMID:22999840

Tucker, Joan S.; Hu, Jianhui; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Green, Harold D.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.

2012-01-01

108

Prep/Tech: Volume 1, No. 1, Youth on homelessness  

SciTech Connect

PREP/TECH is a skill development, academic enrichment program of U. of Toledo in Toledo OH and The Engineers Foundation of Ohio; it addresses the mathematics, science, language, and intellectual needs of about 100 African-American and Hispanic-American 7th, 8th, and 9th graders in Toledo. This summer, after 3 weeks of classes, the 80 students returned for a second 3 week session and were divided into two groups, one studying the growing problem of homelessness in America. This group researched and published a pamphlet on homelessness. This report is divided into: myths, causes, descriptions, and solutions. Finally, a brief account is given of the homelessness project.

NONE

1995-12-31

109

The power of the drug, nature of support, and their impact on homeless youth.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths' perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 drug-using homeless youth. The results provided insight into the lives of drug-using homeless youth. The most commonly used drugs were marijuana and alcohol. Reported reasons for drug use were parental drug use, low self-esteem, and harsh living conditions on the streets. Barriers to treatment were pleasurable enjoyment of the drug, physical dependence, and non-empathetic mental health providers. Strategies to prevent initiation and abuse of drugs were creative activities, such as art, sports, and music, and disdain for parental/family drug use and abuse. Comparative research is needed on specific personal factors that cause initiation and deterrence of drugs use/abuse among homeless youth. PMID:20155605

Hudson, Angela L; Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Greengold, Barbara; Griffin, Deborah Koniak; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Gedzoff, Danny; Reid, Courtney

2009-10-01

110

The Power of the Drug, Nature of Support, and their Impact on Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths’ perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 homeless drug-using youth. The results provided insight into the lives of drug-using homeless youth. Most commonly-used drugs were marijuana and alcohol. Reported reasons for drug use were parental drug use, low self-esteem, and harsh living conditions on the streets. Barriers to treatment were pleasurable enjoyment of the drug, physical dependence, and non-empathetic mental health providers. Strategies to prevent initiation and abuse of drugs were creative activities, such as art, sports, and music, and disdain for parental/family drug use and abuse. Comparative research is needed on specific personal factors that cause initiation and deterrence of drugs use/abuse among homeless youth. PMID:20155605

Hudson, Angela L.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Greengold, Barbara; Griffin, Deborah Koniak; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Gedzoff, Danny; Reid, Courtney

2010-01-01

111

Correlates of Engaging in Survival Sex among Homeless Youth and Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a sample of 1,625 homeless youth and young adults aged 10 to 25 from 28 different states in the United States, this study examines the correlates of having engaged in survival sex. Findings suggest that differences exist based on demographic variables (gender, age, race, and sexual orientation), lifetime drug use (inhalants, Valium™, crack cocaine, alcohol, Coricidin™, and morphine), recent

N. Eugene Walls; Stephanie Bell

2010-01-01

112

Factors Associated With Motivation to Change HIV Risk and Substance Use Behaviors Among Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to identify and compare variables associated with motivation to change alcohol, drug use, and HIV risk behaviors among a sample of homeless youths. More frequent alcohol use, older age, and childhood sexual abuse were associated with greater motivation to change alcohol use; higher reported negative consequences of substance use were associated with higher motivation to reduce illicit

Jennifer Collins; Natasha Slesnick

2011-01-01

113

Art Making as a Component and Facilitator of Resiliency with Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness among youth is a serious societal problem in the United States. Treatment efforts have approached the problem from a damage model that focuses on pathology and deficits instead of strengthening coping skills and resiliency. This study utilized both quantitative (N=212) and qualitative (n=3) measures to examine the function of…

Prescott, Margaret V.; Sekendur, Banu; Bailey, Bryce; Hoshino, Janice

2008-01-01

114

Position-Specific HIV Risk in a Large Network of Homeless Youths  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We examined interconnections among runaway and homeless youths (RHYs) and how aggregated network structure position was associated with HIV risk in this population. Methods. We collected individual and social network data from 136 RHYs. On the basis of these data, we generated a sociomatrix, accomplished network visualization with a “spring embedder,” and examined k-cores. We used multivariate logistic regression models to assess associations between peripheral and nonperipheral network position and recent unprotected sexual intercourse. Results. Small numbers of nominations at the individual level aggregated into a large social network with a visible core, periphery, and small clusters. Female youths were more likely to be in the core, as were youths who had been homeless for 2 years or more. Youths at the periphery were less likely to report unprotected intercourse and had been homeless for a shorter duration. Conclusions. HIV risk was a function of risk-taking youths' connections with one another and was associated with position in the overall network structure. Social network–based prevention programs, young women's housing and health programs, and housing-first programs for peripheral youths could be effective strategies for preventing HIV among this population. PMID:22095350

Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G.; Monro, William

2012-01-01

115

Health and access to care: perspectives of homeless youth in Baltimore City, U.S.A.  

PubMed

Homeless youth suffer from high rates of health problems, yet little is known about their perceptions of or context for their own health issues. In this study, a combination of qualitative techniques from participatory rural appraisal and rapid assessment procedures was used to investigate the perceptions of health needs of shelter-based youth in Baltimore, MD in the U.S.A. The most common youth-identified health problems included STDs, HIV/AIDS, pregnancy, depression, drug use and injuries. These correlate well with more objective health status data for the same youth. The youth spoke of environmental safety threats of violence and victimization by adults, as well as racism and sexism in their lives. Youth reported that trusted adult figures such as grandmothers are important sources of health advice. Many homeless youth from less than ideal family situations remain in contact with and continue to seek advice from parents and other family members. Health interventions with urban street youth need to acknowledge the primacy of the social context for these youth, as well as the reality of violence as a daily health threat. PMID:10075249

Ensign, J; Gittelsohn, J

1998-12-01

116

The Most Frequently Asked Questions on the Education Rights of Children and Youth in Homeless Situations. Revised  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides answers to frequently asked questions on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and the education rights of children and youth in homeless situations. The answers are general responses based on federal statutes, regulations, and guidance; relevant case law; and best practices from across the country. While the National…

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2009

2009-01-01

117

Suicidal Ideation among Homeless Youth: The Impact of Family Dysfunction, Morbidity and Deliberate Self-harm  

PubMed Central

Suicide research typically examines one of four fundamental risk factors (e.g. family dysfunction, family suicide history, poor health [mental and physical], and personal difficulty). Utilizing measures for each of these risk-factors, we develop and test a model that identifies risk factors for suicidal ideation among 428 homeless youth in eight Midwestern cities. Using structural equation modeling, results indicate that family dysfunction and family suicide history indirectly affect the ideation of homeless youth. Additionally, having met lifetime criteria for mental health diagnosis, such as substance use/abuse, post-traumatic stress disorder and major depression, our sample of youth are more likely to deliberately harm themselves before considering suicide. PMID:19539360

Jorgensen, Edan L.; Jorgensen, Stacia L.; Heard, Malcolm P.; Whitbeck, Les B.

2009-01-01

118

A Review of Services and Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth: Moving Forward  

PubMed Central

Research focused on the impact of community-based services and treatment interventions designed to intervene in the lives of runaway and homeless youth has increased in the last two decades in the U.S. and internationally. In light of the tremendous need for identifying effective strategies to end homelessness and its associated problems among youth, this paper summarizes and critiques the findings of the extant literature including U.S., international, and qualitative studies. Thirty-two papers met criteria for inclusion in the review. Among the conclusions are that comprehensive interventions which target the varied and interconnected needs of these youth and families may be worthy of more study than studies that isolate the intervention focus on one problem. Also, more research incorporating design strategies that increase the reliability and validity of study findings is needed. Other preliminary conclusions and future directions are offered. PMID:20161294

Slesnick, Natasha; Dashora, Pushpanjali; Letcher, Amber; Erdem, Gizem; Serovich, Julianne

2009-01-01

119

Risk\\/Protective Factors Associated with Substance Use Among Runaway\\/Homeless Youth Utilizing Emergency Shelter Services Nationwide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rates of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among runaway\\/homeless youth are substantially higher than found among American high school students. To understand the risk and protective factors associated with substance use, this study (1) assessed cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use among a national sample of runaway\\/homeless youth, (2) identified risk\\/protective factors associated with lifetime substance use, and (3) examined risk\\/protective

Sanna J. Thompson

2005-01-01

120

How to integrate digital media into a drop-in for homeless young people for deepening relationships between youth and adults  

E-print Network

How to integrate digital media into a drop-in for homeless young people for deepening relationships 2010 Keywords: Homeless youth Community drop-ins Digital media Curriculum design Life-skills training for homeless young people, aged 13­25. Motivated by the ordinariness of digital media and its importance

Anderson, Richard

121

Youth homelessness in San Francisco: A life cycle approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

HIV risk behaviors and seroprevalence are particularly high among street youth. Though many programs have been designed to serve them, street youth have low rates of service utilization. The aim of this street-based, ethnographic project was to study the social and cultural context of street life in this population. Data were collected by participant observation, exploratory interviews and semi-structured interviews.

Colette L. Auerswald; Stephen L. Eyre

2002-01-01

122

Making the Grade: Challenges and Successes in Providing Educational Opportunities for Children and Youth in Homeless Situations. Bridging the Gap between Home and School. A Position Document.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Profiles of the 1995-96 implementation of the Stewart B. McKinney Act's Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) Programs in 37 states are presented in this document. In these 37 states, at least 173,082 homeless children and youth were served through programs funded by the McKinney Act, and at least 465 local education agencies received…

National Association of State Coordinators for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth.

123

A Family Intervention to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior, Substance Use, and Delinquency Among Newly Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Purpose We evaluate the efficacy of a short family intervention in reducing sexual risk behavior, drug use, and delinquent behaviors among homeless youth. Methods A randomized controlled trial of 151 families with a homeless adolescent aged 12 to 17 years. Adolescents were recruited from diverse sites in southern California from March 2006 through June 2009 and assessed at recruitment (baseline), 3, 6, and 12 months later. Families were randomly assigned to an intervention condition with five weekly home-based intervention sessions or a control condition (standard care). Main outcome measures reflect self-reported sexual, substance use and delinquent behaviors over the last 90 days. Results Sexual risk (e.g., mean number of partners) (p < .001), alcohol use (p = .003), hard drug use (p < .001), and delinquent behaviors (p = .001) decreased significantly more over 12 months in the intervention condition compared to the control condition. Marijuana use, however, significantly increased in the intervention condition compared to the control condition (p < .001). Conclusion An intervention to re-engage families of homeless youth has significant benefits in reducing risk over 12 months. PMID:22443839

Milburn, Norweeta G.; Iribarren, Francisco Javier; Rice, Eric; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Solorio, Rosa; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Desmond, Katherine; Lee, Alex; Alexander, Kwame; Maresca, Katherine; Eastmen, Karen; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Duan, Naihua

2011-01-01

124

A cluster analysis of service utilization and incarceration among homeless youth  

PubMed Central

Our paper examines service usage (e.g., shelter) as well as a typology of individuals who are most likely to use groupings of services among 249 homeless youth. Our results revealed that the majority of homeless young people have used food programs (66%) and street outreach (65%) on at least one occasion within the past year. Cluster analysis of services revealed four distinct groups: (1) basic survival service use, characterized by above average shelter, food, and outreach service use, but below average on counseling, substance abuse/ mental health services, and incarceration; (2) multiple service use, which included above average use of all six services; (3) incarceration experience, characterized by above average incarceration experience, but below average use of all other five services; and (4) minimal service use, which included slightly above average use of counseling, but below average use of all other services. These findings have the potential to provide important information that may assist with targeting services to homeless youth. PMID:23017796

Kort-Butler, Lisa A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.

2012-01-01

125

Characteristics of Homeless Youth who Use Cocaine and Methamphetamine  

PubMed Central

This cross-sectional hepatitis health promotion study (N = 156) was designed to identify correlates of cocaine and methamphetamine use, among young, homeless persons living in Los Angeles County. Structured questionnaires were administered at baseline to assess sociodemographic characteristics, drug history and social support. Unadjusted analysis showed that older age, having a history of incarceration, injection drug use (IDU), 10 or more sexual partners and sex for money were associated with both cocaine and methamphetamine use. Logistic regression results showed that injection drug users had over 7 times greater odds of using each stimulant compared with non-users of injection drugs; those reporting at least 10 sexual partners and alcohol use in the past 6 months were more likely to use cocaine than their respective counterparts. African-Americans were also less likely than Whites to report cocaine use. Understanding of these relationships can guide interventions targeting the multiple challenges faced by this population. PMID:22494226

Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Greengold, Barbara; Leake, Barbara

2013-01-01

126

Surviving on the StreetThe Experiences of Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article documents the living conditions of a sample of adolescents (N = 390) who had left home and were living on the street in Toronto, Canada The majority of these youth had spenta considerable amount of time without adequate shelter, food, or income; furthermore, many were involved in a variety of illegal activities and had been incarcerated or suicidal

Bill McCarthy; John Hagan

1992-01-01

127

Engaging homeless youth in community-based participatory research: a case study from Skid Row, Los Angeles.  

PubMed

Growing evidence highlights the benefits to youth of involvement in community-based participatory research. Less attention has been paid, however, to the contributions youth can make to helping change health-promoting policy through such work. We describe a multi-method case study of a policy-focused community-based participatory research project in the Skid Row area of downtown Los Angeles, California, where a small group of homeless youth worked with adult mentors to develop and conduct a survey of 96 homeless youth and used the findings to help secure health-promoting policy change. We review the partnership's work at each stage of the policy-making process; its successes in changing policy regarding recreation, juvenile justice, and education; and the challenges encountered, especially with policy enforcement. We share lessons learned, including the importance of strong adult mentors and of policy environments conducive to sustainable, health-promoting change for marginalized youth. PMID:23384969

Garcia, Analilia P; Minkler, Meredith; Cardenas, Zelenne; Grills, Cheryl; Porter, Charles

2014-01-01

128

Online Social Networking Technologies, HIV Knowledge, and Sexual Risk and Testing Behaviors Among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

This study evaluates associations between online social networking and sexual health behaviors among homeless youth in Los Angeles. We analyzed survey data from 201 homeless youth accessing services at a Los Angeles agency. Multivariate (regression and logistic) models assessed whether use of (and topics discussed on) online social networking technologies affect HIV knowledge, sexual risk behaviors, and testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One set of results suggests that using online social networks for partner seeking (compared to not using the networks for seeking partners) is associated with increased sexual risk behaviors. Supporting data suggest that (1) using online social networks to talk about safe sex is associated with an increased likelihood of having met a recent sex partner online, and (2) having online sex partners and talking to friends on online social networks about drugs and partying is associated with increased exchange sex. However, results also suggest that online social network usage is associated with increased knowledge and HIV/STI prevention among homeless youth: (1) using online social networks to talk about love and safe sex is associated with increased knowledge about HIV, (2) using the networks to talk about love is associated with decreased exchange sex, and (3) merely being a member of an online social network is associated with increased likelihood of having previously tested for STIs. Taken together, this study suggests that online social networking and the topics discussed on these networks can potentially increase and decrease sexual risk behaviors depending on how the networks are used. Developing sexual health services and interventions on online social networks could reduce sexual risk behaviors. PMID:20848305

Rice, Eric

2010-01-01

129

To the streets and back again: research, social media, and homeless youth I captured this photo of a homeless youth in Toronto, Canada over the Christmas break in 2011.  

E-print Network

To the streets and back again: research, social media, and homeless youth I captured this photo through which to study her health needs (1). When we use the internet to improve communication in research from enhanced internet communication. Twitter expands my immediate social network, allowing me to post

Xia, Xuhua

130

Paternal and maternal influences on problem behaviors among homeless and runaway youth.  

PubMed

Using an Attachment Theory conceptual framework, associations were investigated among positive paternal and maternal relationships, and recent problem behaviors among 501 currently homeless and runaway adolescents (253 males, 248 females). Homeless and runaway youth commonly exhibit problem behaviors such as substance use, various forms of delinquency and risky sex behaviors, and report more emotional distress than typical adolescents. Furthermore, attachments to their families are often strained. In structural equation models, positive paternal relationships significantly predicted less substance use and less criminal behavior, whereas maternal relationships did not have a significant effect on or association with either behavior. Positive maternal relationships predicted less survival sex behavior. Separate gender analyses indicated that among the females, a longer time away from home was significantly associated with a poorer paternal relationship, and more substance use and criminal behavior. Paternal relations, a neglected area of research and often not addressed in attachment theory, should be investigated further. Attachments, particularly to fathers, were protective against many deleterious behaviors. Building on relatively positive relations and attachments may foster family reunifications and beneficial outcomes for at-risk youth. PMID:19290724

Stein, Judith A; Milburn, Norweeta G; Zane, Jazmin I; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

2009-01-01

131

The Mediating Roles of Stress and Maladaptive Behaviors on Self-Harm and Suicide Attempts among Runaway and Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Runaway and homeless youth often have a constellation of background behavioral, emotional, and familial problems that contribute to stress and maladaptive behaviors, which, in turn, can lead to self-harming and suicidal behaviors. The current study examined the roles of stress and maladaptive behaviors as mediators between demographic and…

Moskowitz, Amanda; Stein, Judith A.; Lightfoot, Marguerita

2013-01-01

132

Homeless Gay and Transgender Youth of Color in San Francisco: “No One Likes Street Kids”—Even in the Castro  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study, focused on five transgender and gay youth of color from San Francisco, explored how family problems, poverty, homophobia, and transphobia propelled them into homelessness and made gay-friendly spaces and resources especially meaningful to them. These young people describe seeking support in San Francisco's well-known gay enclave, the Castro District, to form community and find safety from a homophobic

Jen Reck

2009-01-01

133

Homeless Gay and Transgender Youth of Color in San Francisco: "No One Likes Street Kids"--Even in the Castro  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, focused on five transgender and gay youth of color from San Francisco, explored how family problems, poverty, homophobia, and transphobia propelled them into homelessness and made gay-friendly spaces and resources especially meaningful to them. These young people describe seeking support in San Francisco's well-known gay enclave, the…

Reck, Jen

2009-01-01

134

2013-2014 Documentation of Independent Student Status The information requested on this form is needed to process your application for financial aid for the 2013-2014 academic year.  

E-print Network

a copy of the approved petition for guardianship, court order, or other similar legal papers. HOMELESS OR UNACCOMPANIED YOUTH: Submit the Unaccompanied Youth and Homeless form, available at http://financialaid.missouri.edu/forms/files/unaccompanied-youth-and-homeless-verification-form-2013- 14.pdf with supporting documentation of being an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self

Taylor, Jerry

135

Decision Processes about Condom Use among Shelter-Homeless LGBT Youth in Manhattan  

PubMed Central

Health behavior interventions based on Theory of Planned Behavior address participants' personally-held beliefs, perceived social norms, and control over the behavior. New data are always needed to “member check” participants' decision processes and inform interventions. This qualitative study investigates decision processes around condom use among 81 homeless LGBT youth ages 18–26. Findings indicated considerable endorsement of the conventional policy of always using condoms, promulgated in HIV prevention education targeting this population. Although some participants reported risk behavior in contexts of sex work, survival sex, casual encounters, open relationships, and substance use, most were aware of these risks and consistently safe in those situations. Condoms use boundaries became vulnerable in states of emotional need and negative mood. The only effect participants acknowledged of homelessness on condom use was indirect, through negative mood states. The most prevalent context of condom non-use was with long-term primary partners, a potential area of vulnerability because, of 13 participants for HIV or HCV, nine mentioned how they had been infected, and all nine believed they had acquired it from a primary partner. Findings imply programs should emphasize HIV risk potential within long-term romantic partnerships and mental health services to remediate negative mood states. PMID:22693658

Ream, Geoffrey L.; Barnhart, Kate F.; Lotz, Kevin V.

2012-01-01

136

Realizing or relinquishing rights? Homeless youth, their life on the streets and their knowledge and experience of health and social services in Hillbrow, South Africa.  

PubMed

Poverty and youth unemployment are critical issues in South Africa with homeless persons begging at traffic light intersections in all major cities. Support services represent one way of empowering homeless youth. The study therefore examined the experiences of 10 homeless young adult males in Hillbrow, Johannesburg and whether they were aware of local health and social services. Qualitative interviews revealed that participants experienced poor health, addiction, physical violence, psychological trauma, and public hostility. Despite limited education, they were aware of and utilized local health and social services. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for social work. PMID:23701578

Mathebula, Sibusiso Donald; Ross, Eleanor

2013-01-01

137

Six- and Twelve-Month Outcomes among Homeless Youth Accessing Therapy and Case Management Services through an Urban Drop-in Center  

PubMed Central

Research Objective To evaluate the impact of case management and individual therapy offered through a drop-in center for homeless youth on substance use, mental health, housing, education, employment, and medical care utilization. Study Population All youth (n=172) between the ages of 14–24 who accessed treatment services through an urban, southwestern drop-in center were included. Data Source Semistructured and self-report questionnaires were administered to youth between October 2002 and April 2005. Study Design A repeated measures design was utilized. Youth were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months postbaseline. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to test the hypotheses. Principal Findings Statistically significant improvements were found in substance abuse, mental health, and percent days housed up to 12 months postbaseline. Decreased alcohol and drug use was associated with an increase in housing. However, most youth did not acquire permanent housing, and education, employment, and medical service utilization did not significantly change over time. Conclusions While treatment offered through drop-in centers for homeless youth can positively impact homeless youth, policy, funding, and service provision need greater focus, collaboration, and support if youth homelessness is to be successfully addressed. PMID:18211526

Slesnick, Natasha; Kang, Min Ju; Bonomi, Amy E; Prestopnik, Jillian L

2008-01-01

138

Proceedings of the International Conference on AIDS and Homeless Youth: An Agenda for the Future (1st, San Francisco, California, June 25, 1990).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This proceedings of the first international conference on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and homeless youth included over 125 delegates from 32 countries. There was strong consensus among delegates that street youth are often in high and multiple Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) risk situations, and programmatic responses are needed.…

Luna, G. Cajetan; And Others

139

Homeless Families, Children, and Youth in Stanislaus County--Problems and Solutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The homeless crisis in America is a complex issue with no "quick fixes." In Stanislaus County, California, it seems that there are many programs operating in isolation of one another. Approximately 5% of the county's population is homeless. Homeless persons have survival needs for food and clothing, hygiene, health care, affordable housing,…

Boley, Ellen

140

Increased substance use and risky sexual behavior among migratory homeless youth: exploring the role of social network composition.  

PubMed

Travelers are a migratory subgroup of homeless youth who may be especially prone to engaging in risky behavior. This study compared the substance use and sexual behavior of young homeless travelers and non-travelers to evaluate the extent and possible sources of travelers' increased risk. Data came from face-to-face interviews with 419 homeless youth (36.6% female, 34.0% white, 23.9% African American, and 20.0% Hispanic) between the ages of 13 and 24 years (M = 20.1 years, SD = 2.5) who were randomly sampled from 41 shelters, drop-in centers, and street sites in Los Angeles. Travelers were almost twice as likely as non-travelers to exhibit recent heavy drinking, 37% more likely to exhibit recent marijuana use, and five times as likely to have injected drugs. Travelers also had more recent sex partners and were more likely to report having casual or need-based sexual partners and combining sex with substance use. Mediation analyses suggest that travelers' deviant peer associations and disconnection to conventional individuals and institutions may drive their elevated substance use. Differences in sexual risk behaviors are likely attributable to demographic differences between the two groups. Overall, these differences between travelers and non-travelers suggest different service needs and the need for different service approaches. PMID:21400037

Martino, Steven C; Tucker, Joan S; Ryan, Gery; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Golinelli, Daniela; Munjas, Brett

2011-12-01

141

Increased Substance Use and Risky Sexual Behavior among Migratory Homeless Youth: Exploring the Role of Social Network Composition  

PubMed Central

Travelers are a migratory subgroup of homeless youth who may be especially prone to engaging in risky behavior. This study compared the substance use and sexual behavior of young homeless travelers and non-travelers to evaluate the extent and possible sources of travelers' increased risk. Data came from face-to-face interviews with 419 homeless youth (36.6% female, 34.0% white, 23.9% African American, and 20.0% Hispanic) between the ages of 13 and 24 years (M = 20.1 years, SD = 2.5) who were randomly sampled from 41 shelters, drop-in centers, and street sites in Los Angeles. Travelers were almost twice as likely as non-travelers to exhibit recent heavy drinking, 37% more likely to exhibit recent marijuana use, and five times as likely to have injected drugs. Travelers also had more recent sex partners and were more likely to report having casual or need-based sexual partners and combining sex with substance use. Mediation analyses suggest that travelers' deviant peer associations and disconnection to conventional individuals and institutions may drive their elevated substance use. Differences in sexual risk behaviors are likely attributable to demographic differences between the two groups. Overall, these differences between travelers and non-travelers suggest different service needs and the need for different service approaches. PMID:21400037

Martino, Steven C.; Tucker, Joan S.; Ryan, Gery; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Munjas, Brett

2011-01-01

142

Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth.Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F recruited online youth (OY) to participate in MySpace and Facebook communities where digital media was disseminated and discussed. The resulting social networks were assessed with respect to size, growth, density, relative centrality of positions and homophily of ties. Seven PL, 53 F2F and 103 OY created two large networks. After the first 50 F2F youth participated, online networks entered a rapid growth phase. OY were among the most central youth in these networks. Younger aged persons and females were disproportionately connected to like youth. The program appears highly acceptable to homeless youth. Social network analysis revealed which PL were the most critical to the program and which types of participants (younger youth and females) may require additional outreach efforts in the future. PMID:22247453

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Barman Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G.

2012-01-01

143

Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention.  

PubMed

The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth.Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F recruited online youth (OY) to participate in MySpace and Facebook communities where digital media was disseminated and discussed. The resulting social networks were assessed with respect to size, growth, density, relative centrality of positions and homophily of ties. Seven PL, 53 F2F and 103 OY created two large networks. After the first 50 F2F youth participated, online networks entered a rapid growth phase. OY were among the most central youth in these networks. Younger aged persons and females were disproportionately connected to like youth. The program appears highly acceptable to homeless youth. Social network analysis revealed which PL were the most critical to the program and which types of participants (younger youth and females) may require additional outreach efforts in the future. PMID:22247453

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Barman Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G

2012-04-01

144

To Use or Not to Use: A Stage-Based Approach to Understanding Condom Use Among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

This study used a stage-based approach to understand condom use behavior in a representative sample of 309 sexually active homeless youth recruited from shelters, drop-in centers, and street sites in Los Angeles County. Focusing on the youth’s most recent sexual event, the three stages of condom use examined were: (1) whether the partners decided prior to the event about using condoms; (2) whether a condom was available at the event; and (3) whether a condom was used at the event. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify attitudinal, relationship, and contextual correlates of each of these three stages. Deciding ahead of time about condom use was associated with being Hispanic, level of education, condom attitudes, and various relationship characteristics (e.g,. partner type, monogamy, relationship abuse), with the nature of these associations varying depending on the type of decision (i.e., deciding to use, deciding to not use). Condom availability was more likely to be reported by males, if the event was described as being special in some way, or if the event lacked privacy. Condom use was more likely among youth with more positive condom attitudes and among youth who decide ahead of time to use a condom, but less likely among those in monogamous relationships or when hard drugs were used prior to sex. Whether sexual intercourse is protected or unprotected is the end result of a series of decisions and actions by sexual partners. Results from this study illustrate how condom use can be better understood by unpacking the stages and identifying influential factors at each stage. Each stage may, in and of itself, be an important target for intervention with homeless youth. PMID:24099462

Tucker, Joan S.; Ober, Allison; Ryan, Gery; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Wenzel, Suzanne L.

2014-01-01

145

Invited commentary: seeking a coherent strategy in our response to homeless and street-involved youth: a historical review and suggested future directions.  

PubMed

This invited commentary seeks to encourage a critical dialogue about youth homelessness that might assist in re-energizing a field that seems increasingly stagnant with a research body focused primarily on analyses of risk, hopelessly inadequate policy frameworks in most cities, diminishing funds for services, and decreasing media attention. Reviewing major trends in research and public responses to youth homelessness in the past century, I propose that there exist three major culturally-bound dimensions from which we construct our understanding of and responses to youth homelessness. These dimensions, which are considered in a transactional framework, are the scope of responsibility, the location of moral responsibility, and the amount of agency attributed to the youth. In this review I highlight the manner in which our historically binary and uncritical understanding of these dimensional characterizations of youth homelessness has led to major lapses in the effectiveness of our collective efforts to address this problem. I highlight gaps in the existing body of research literature and provide this framework, arguing that a strategic and cohesive response is vital if we are to move from reiterations of risk and hackneyed calls for prevention strategies to the generation of meaningful solutions. PMID:22302217

Kidd, Sean

2012-05-01

146

How Runaway and Homeless Youth Navigate Troubled Waters: Personal Strengths and Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little attention has been paid to how runaway or homeless adolescents are able to make successful transitions into adulthood. This article reports on partial findings from an exploratory study of the research question, “How do formerly runaway and homeless adolescents navigate the troubled waters of leaving home, living in high-risk environments, and engaging in dangerous behaviors, to make successful developmental

Elizabeth W. Lindsey; P. David Kurtz; Sara Jarvis; Nancy R. Williams; Larry Nackerud

2000-01-01

147

A grounded theory study of substance use patterns among homeless youth.  

E-print Network

??A Grounded Theory Study of Substance Use Patterns among Homeless YouthrnrnPublication No.______________rnPhilisie Starling Washington, PhDrnThe University of Texas Medical Branch, 2009rnrnSupervisor: Carolyn Phillips, PhDrnrnThere are… (more)

Philisie Starling Washington

2009-01-01

148

The mediating roles of stress and maladaptive behaviors on self-harm and suicide attempts among runaway and homeless youth.  

PubMed

Runaway and homeless youth often have a constellation of background behavioral, emotional, and familial problems that contribute to stress and maladaptive behaviors, which, in turn, can lead to self-harming and suicidal behaviors. The current study examined the roles of stress and maladaptive behaviors as mediators between demographic and psychosocial background characteristics and self-injurious outcomes through the lens of the stress process paradigm. The model was tested in a sample of runaway and homeless youth from Los Angeles County (N = 474, age 12-24, 41 % female, 17 % White, 32.5 % African American, 21.5 % Hispanic/Latino). Background variables (gender, age, sexual minority status, parental drug use history, and emotional distress) predicted hypothesized mediators of maladaptive behaviors and recent stress. In turn, it was hypothesized that the mediators would predict self-harming behaviors and suicide attempts in the last 3 months. Females and LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) youth were more likely to have self-harmed and attempted suicide; younger participants reported more self-harming. The mediating constructs were associated more highly with self-harming than suicide attempts bivariately, although differences were modest. Maladaptive behaviors and recent stress were significant predictors of self-harm, whereas only recent stress was a significant predictor of suicide attempts. All background factors were significant predictors of recent stress. Older age, a history of parental drug use, and greater emotional distress predicted problem drug use. Males, younger participants, and participants with emotional distress reported more delinquent behaviors. Significant indirect effects on self-harming behaviors were mediated through stress and maladaptive behaviors. The hypothesized paradigm was useful in explaining the associations among background factors and self-injurious outcomes and the influence of mediating factors on these associations. PMID:22814639

Moskowitz, Amanda; Stein, Judith A; Lightfoot, Marguerita

2013-07-01

149

"We're Locking the Door": Family Histories in a Sample of Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is well known that the pathways to homelessness for young people are embedded in often ongoing negative childhood experiences. Many of these experiences are rooted in multiple and intersecting problems including, but not limited to: family conflict, abuse, addictions, and mental health issues. The authors draw upon qualitative interviews…

Alvi, Shahid; Scott, Hannah; Stanyon, Wendy

2010-01-01

150

Trials, Tribulations, and Occasional Jubilations while Conducting Research with Homeless Children, Youth, and Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A personal account of a program of research on homelessness and poverty spanning the past 20 years is provided, with a focus on the many methodological, practical, and ethical difficulties encountered. Interesting discoveries and enjoyable aspects of the research process are also presented. Several role conflicts that arose for the researcher in…

Toro, Paul A.

2006-01-01

151

Trials, Tribulations, and Occasional Jubilations While Conducting Research with Homeless Children, Youth, and Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

A personal account of a program of research on homelessness and poverty spanning the past 20 years is provided, with a focus on the many methodological, practical, and ethical difficulties encountered. Interesting discoveries and enjoyable aspects of the research process are also presented. Several role conflicts that arose for the researcher in this community-based work are also described, and the

Paul A. Toro

2006-01-01

152

Personality and Psychopathology in African Unaccompanied Refugee Minors: Repression, Resilience and Vulnerability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examining personality and psychopathological symptoms among unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs), we measured intra-individual dimensions (repression and correlates thereof) usually associated with resilience. Forty-one URMs completed the Weinberger Adjustment Inventory (WAI), assessing personality, and the Youth Self-Report (YSR), describing…

Huemer, Julia; Volkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Karnik, Niranjan; Denny, Katherine G.; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Mitterer, Michaela; Humphreys, Keith; Plattner, Belinda; Friedrich, Max; Shaw, Richard J.; Steiner, Hans

2013-01-01

153

Homeless Youths and Young Adults in Los Angeles: Prevalence of Mental Health Problems and the Relationship Between Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although understanding of the subsistence patterns, service utilization, and HIV-risk behaviors of homeless youths and young adults is increasing, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of mental health problems in this group or the relationships between mental health problems and substance use. This study measured symptoms of depression, low self-esteem, ADHD, suicidality, self-injurious behavior (SIB), and drug and alcohol

Jennifer B. Unger; Michele D. Kipke; Thomas R. Simon; Susanne B. Montgomery; Christine J. Johnson

1997-01-01

154

Gender differences in sexual behaviors and factors associated with nonuse of condoms among homeless and runaway youths.  

PubMed

Few studies have examined gender-specific factors associated with the nonuse of condoms among homeless and runaway youths (HRYs)-a population at high risk for HIV infection. In this article, we evaluate these factors and explore gender differences in background experiences, psychosocial functioning, and risk behaviors among HRYs from four U.S. metropolitan areas. Of 879 sexually active HRYs sampled, approximately 70% reported unprotected sexual intercourse during a 6-month period, and nearly a quarter reported never using condoms in the same period. Among males and females, having only one sex partner in the previous 6 months had the strongest association with nonuse of condoms. Among males, nonuse was also associated with having ever caused pregnancy, frequent marijuana use, prior physical victimization, and low self-control and sociability. Among females, nonuse was associated with knowledge of HIV status, prior sexual victimization, low social support, and infrequent marijuana use. These findings highlight the ongoing need for HIV prevention services for HRYs. Implications for the scope and content of these services are discussed. PMID:11220501

MacKellar, D A; Valleroy, L A; Hoffmann, J P; Glebatis, D; Lalota, M; McFarland, W; Westerholm, J; Janssen, R S

2000-12-01

155

Homeless Children: Addressing the Challenge in Rural Schools. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite stereotypes to the contrary, homelessness is as prevalent in rural as urban areas. This digest examines the implications of homelessness for rural children and youth and discusses possible actions by rural educators. An estimated half of the rural homeless are families with children. Compared to urban counterparts, rural homeless families…

Vissing, Yvonne M.

156

Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid 2014-2015 Texas Application for State Financial Aid (TASFA)  

E-print Network

districtliaison determinethat you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? Yes No 10. Did the director were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? Yes No 11. Did the director of a runaway of homeless was homeless or were self-supportingand atrisk of being homeless? Yes No If you answered"No" to all

Azevedo, Ricardo

157

OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 0102 Lee Building  

E-print Network

or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? If yes and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? If yes, please the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program determine that you were

Milchberg, Howard

158

Youth and Teens Page  

MedlinePLUS

... good on that opportunity, overcoming the struggles of homelessness and poverty to earn his […] The Night Ministry: a national leader in housing & street outreach for homeless youth September 16th, ...

159

Educating Homeless Children. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session (Phoenix, Arizona, September 5, 2000).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives, which was held in Phoenix, Arizona, focused on ensuring equal educational opportunities for homeless children. After an opening statement by the Honorable Matt Solomon, Subcommittee on Early…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

160

Service utilization among homeless and runaway youth in Los Angeles, California: rates and reasons 1 1 An incorrect version of the following article (De Rosa CJ, Montgomery SB, Kipke MD, Iverson E, Ma JL, Unger JB. Service utilization among homeless and runaway youth in Los Angeles, California: Rates and reasons. J Adolesc Health 1999;24:190–200.) was published in the March 1999 issue of this Journal. 2 2 Following is the corrected version of this article in its entirety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To describe the service utilization patterns of homeless and runaway youth in a “service-rich” area of Los Angeles, California; identify demographic and other correlates of utilization; and contextualize the findings with qualitative data.Method: During Phase 1 of this study, survey data were collected from an ethnically diverse sample of 296 youth aged 13–23 years, recruited from both service and

Christine J De Rosa; Susanne B Montgomery; Michele D Kipke; Ellen Iverson; Joanne L Ma; Jennifer B Unger

1999-01-01

161

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU ...Youth Program grant unless they are part of the law enforcement structure or the juvenile justice system. [54 FR 20855, May...

2013-10-01

162

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU ...Youth Program grant unless they are part of the law enforcement structure or the juvenile justice system. [54 FR 20855, May...

2011-10-01

163

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU ...Youth Program grant unless they are part of the law enforcement structure or the juvenile justice system. [54 FR 20855, May...

2010-10-01

164

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU ...Youth Program grant unless they are part of the law enforcement structure or the juvenile justice system. [54 FR 20855, May...

2012-10-01

165

Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children: Whose Perspective?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent years have seen increasing attention being paid to unaccompanied asylum-seeking children. This article provides an overview of research in the field and its implications for an understanding of these children as a particularly vulnerable category. The existing research focuses primarily on investigating the children's emotional well-being…

Wernesjo, Ulrika

2012-01-01

166

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed from 1998 to 2008 addressing this topic were reviewed. The literature had a considerable emphasis on the assessment of

Julia Huemer; Niranjan S Karnik; Sabine Voelkl-Kernstock; Elisabeth Granditsch; Kanita Dervic; Max H Friedrich; Hans Steiner

2009-01-01

167

INDEPENDENT STATUS APPEAL Academic Year 20142015 DIRECTIONS--If you do not meet the definition of an Independent student,  

E-print Network

to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by your high school district liaison or the director of an emergency shelter program on or after July 1, 2013. · You were determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth at risk of being homeless by the director of a runaway or homeless center/ shelter on or after July 1, 2013. If you

Amin, S. Massoud

168

INDEPENDENT STATUS APPEAL Academic Year 20122013 DIRECTIONS--If you do not meet the definition of an independent student,  

E-print Network

to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by your high school district liaison or the director of an emergency shelter program on or after July 1, 2011. · You were determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth at risk of being homeless by the director of a runaway or homeless center/ shelter on or after July 1, 2011

Blanchette, Robert A.

169

INDEPENDENT STATUS APPEAL Academic Year 20132014 DIRECTIONS--If you do not meet the definition of an Independent student,  

E-print Network

to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by your high school district liaison or the director of an emergency shelter program on or after July 1, 2012. · You were determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth at risk of being homeless by the director of a runaway or homeless center/ shelter on or after July 1, 2012. If you

Amin, S. Massoud

170

Division of Enrollment Management S107 Criser Hall Office for Student Financial Affairs PO Box 114025  

E-print Network

, 2012, my high school or school district homeless liaison determined I was an unaccompanied youth who was homeless. (Attach a photocopy of a letter from your school district certifying your homeless or at risk.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determined I was an unaccompanied youth who was homeless. (Attach

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

171

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU ...training. Costs for acquisition and renovation of existing structures may not normally exceed 15 percent of the grant award....

2012-10-01

172

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU ...training. Costs for acquisition and renovation of existing structures may not normally exceed 15 percent of the grant award....

2010-10-01

173

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU ...training. Costs for acquisition and renovation of existing structures may not normally exceed 15 percent of the grant award....

2013-10-01

174

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU ...training. Costs for acquisition and renovation of existing structures may not normally exceed 15 percent of the grant award....

2011-10-01

175

The Influence of Events During Youth and of Social Heritage Within the Homeless Support Service User Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is possible to draw links between the present situation of the people using homeless support services, their experiences during childhood and teenage years, and their original family context. The study takes into account the mobilisable resources of these people (their capital) in order to understand how, beyond life accidents, structural effects could be involved. The probability of having been

Jean-Marie Firdion

2006-01-01

176

Homelessness, poverty, and risks to health: beyond at risk categorizations of street children1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless and street children are commonly portrayed in the academic and welfare literature as a prime category of ‘children at risk’. They have attracted world?wide attention due to rising numbers in cities of the Western and developing world coupled with a discourse of childhood that ascribes risk to poor urban children unaccompanied by adults on the streets. This paper presents

2004-01-01

177

Educating Homeless Children and Adolescents: Evaluating Policy and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the more enigmatic issues of contemporary homelessness is that of schooling. This collection highlights issues related to the provision of an education to homeless children and youths. Background information is offered, with an analysis of educational policy relating to homeless children. Practical strategies and a review of successful…

Stronge, James H., Ed.

178

Homeless Young Adults and Behavioral HealthAn Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young adults (ages 18-24) are especially vulnerable to homelessness in the United States, and those experiencing homelessness exhibit high prevalence for many kinds of abuse and negative health outcomes. This article reviews common behavioral health issues facing homeless youth and assesses collective wisdom on effective treatments and services for this vulnerable population. On the whole, the research remains focused on

Suzanne Zerger; Aaron J. Strehlow; Adi V. Gundlapalli

2008-01-01

179

Education Rights of Homeless Students: A Guide for Advocates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is no question that students who are homeless, like all students, are entitled to be educated. A federal law, known as the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, requires states to provide homeless children and youth with the same access to free public education as is available to other students. The Act also requires states to eliminate…

Education Law Center, 2005

2005-01-01

180

Homeless Adolescents in the United States: An Overview for Pediatricians  

Microsoft Academic Search

An estimated 100 million children and adolescents are homeless in the world; about half of these are in the Western hemisphere. In the United States most homeless youth are adolescents who run away from home. Current estimates suggest that there are be- tween 1.3 and 1.5 million runaway and homeless adolescents at any given time in the United States. Families

Dilip R. Patel; Donald E. Greydanus

2002-01-01

181

Hearings on the Reauthorization of Title 3(b) of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988: Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth and Youth Gangs. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (Washington, D.C., July 18, 1991; Downey, California, August 2, 1991).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains witness testimonies from two Congressional hearings examining the reauthorization of Title 3(b) of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 relating to the drug abuse education and prevention for runaway and homeless youth and youth gangs. Opening statements are included from Representatives Martinez and Fawell. Witnesses providing…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

182

Legal Issues in Educating Homeless Children: Past Accomplishments and Future Challenges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1987 Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and amendments provide considerable protection for the education of homeless children and youth. They also provide formula grants to state education agencies to carry out the Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program. This article reviews major program components and critiques these…

Rafferty, Yvonne

1999-01-01

183

IT'S TOUGH TO BE A TEENAGER. IT'S EVEN TOUGHER TO BE A HOMELESS TEENAGER.  

E-print Network

&CULTURE IT'S TOUGH TO BE A TEENAGER. IT'S EVEN TOUGHER TO BE A HOMELESS TEENAGER. Hundreds of homeless youth roam the Valley's streets. The reasons for their dislocation vary from being the victim and director of ArtsWork. The play's the thing Innovative ASU ArtsWork partnership gives homeless youth a voice

Thorpe, Michael

184

Predictors of Social Network Composition among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research on the social support networks of homeless and runaway youth suggest the social networks of runaway youth are made up largely of transient deviant peer relationships. This paper examined social network characteristics of 428 homeless and runaway adolescents from small-to moderate-sized cities in four Midwestern states. We…

Johnson, K.D.; Whitbeck, L.B.; Hoyt, D.R.

2005-01-01

185

Predictors of social network composition among homeless and runaway adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research on the social support networks of homeless and runaway youth suggest the social networks of runaway youth are made up largely of transient deviant peer relationships. This paper examined social network characteristics of 428 homeless and runaway adolescents from small-to moderate-sized cities in four Midwestern states. We investigated size, homogeneity, and correlates of the composition of the instrumental

Kurt D. Johnson; Les B. Whitbeck; Dan R. Hoyt

2005-01-01

186

OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 0102 Lee Building  

E-print Network

. At any time on or after July 1, 2010, did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? If yes, please provide a letter of documentation were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? If yes, please provide a letter of documentation. Yes

Milchberg, Howard

187

Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships Lakefront Campus, 2000 Lakeshore Drive  

E-print Network

, see: http://www.ed.gov/programs/homeless/legislation.html What are HUD-funded Shelters? The U.S, LA 70148 FAX: (504) 280-3973 E-MAIL: PECFORM@UNO.EDU Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Verification an unaccompanied homeless youth after July 1, 2008 This means that, after July 1, 2008

Li, X. Rong

188

Factors Associated with Trauma Symptoms Among Runaway\\/Homeless Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Runaway\\/homeless youth often suffer from exposure to chronic family distress and confront numerous traumatic events that may produce symptoms of PTSD. This study evaluated runaway\\/homeless youth's PTSD symptoms and associated factors. Data were collected at youth emergency shelters. Ninety-eight percent of participants had elevated PTSD symptom scores. Although use of inhalants and LSD was associated with PTSD symptoms, only depression,

Sanna J. Thompson

2005-01-01

189

Social Networking Technology, Social Network Composition, and Reductions in Substance Use Among Homeless Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peer-based prevention programs for homeless youth are complicated by the potential for reinforcing high-risk behaviors among\\u000a participants. The goal of this study is to understand how homeless youth could be linked to positive peers in prevention programming\\u000a by understanding where in social and physical space positive peers for homeless youth are located, how these ties are associated\\u000a with substance use,

Eric Rice; Norweeta G. Milburn; William Monro

2011-01-01

190

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors  

PubMed Central

Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed from 1998 to 2008 addressing this topic were reviewed. The literature had a considerable emphasis on the assessment of PTSD symptoms. Results revealed higher levels of PTSD symptoms in comparison to the norm populations and accompanied refugee minors. In several studies, age and female gender predicted or influenced PTSD symptoms. The existing literature only permits limited conclusions on this very hard to reach population. Future research should include the analysis of long-term outcomes, stress management and a more thorough analysis of the whole range of psychopathology. Additionally, the development of culturally sensitive norms and standardized measures for diverse ethnic groups is of great importance. PMID:19341468

Huemer, Julia; Karnik, Niranjan S; Voelkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Dervic, Kanita; Friedrich, Max H; Steiner, Hans

2009-01-01

191

45 CFR 400.116 - Service for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Child Welfare Services § 400.116 Service for...unaccompanied minors with the same range of child welfare benefits and services available in foster care cases to other children in the State. Allowable benefits...

2010-10-01

192

45 CFR 400.116 - Service for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Child Welfare Services § 400.116 Service for...unaccompanied minors with the same range of child welfare benefits and services available in foster care cases to other children in the State. Allowable benefits...

2012-10-01

193

45 CFR 400.116 - Service for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Child Welfare Services § 400.116 Service for...unaccompanied minors with the same range of child welfare benefits and services available in foster care cases to other children in the State. Allowable benefits...

2011-10-01

194

45 CFR 400.116 - Service for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Child Welfare Services § 400.116 Service for...unaccompanied minors with the same range of child welfare benefits and services available in foster care cases to other children in the State. Allowable benefits...

2013-10-01

195

The Crisis in Homelessness: Effects on Children and Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the effects of homelessness on children and families. In their opening statements, Representatives George Miller and Dan Coats emphasize that homelessness threatens the physical health and safety of children, places them at risk of…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

196

Adapting a Family-Based HIV Prevention Program for Homeless Youth and Their Families: The HIV Prevention Outreach for Parents and Early Adolescents Family Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

As rates of HIV infection increase in adolescents, it is important to provide prevention programs targeting this population. Homeless adolescents living with their families in shelters are at greater risk of participating in risky sexual behavior and incurring negative health outcomes. A family-based HIV-prevention pilot study was conducted with eight homeless families in a New York City shelter to explore

Taiwanna Messam; Mary M. McKay; Kosta Kalogerogiannis; Stacey Alicea

2010-01-01

197

Homeless persons and health care.  

PubMed

Health care is generally unavailable for the homeless. This heterogeneous group of men and women, including long-term street dwellers, residents of shelters, the chronically mentally ill, the economically debased, and alienated youth, are subject to a broad range of acute and chronic diseases, intensified by unsuitable living conditions, stress, and sociopathic behavior. Trauma, pulmonary tuberculosis, infestations, and peripheral vascular disease are common problems among the homeless; incomplete and fragmentary medical care permits exacerbation of chronic disorders. Outreach programs imaginatively constructed by teams of physicians, nurses, and social workers can effectively reestablish and maintain health services for these disenfranchised persons. PMID:3511826

Brickner, P W; Scanlan, B C; Conanan, B; Elvy, A; McAdam, J; Scharer, L K; Vicic, W J

1986-03-01

198

The Effects of Lyric Analysis and Songwriting Music Therapy Techniques on Self-Esteem and Coping Skills Among Homeless Adolescents  

E-print Network

Homelessness is a troubling epidemic affecting a wide range of individuals, including youth and adolescents. The reasons for homelessness as well as manifestations of the condition are perpetuated by a cycle of abuse, delinquency, mental illness...

Jurgensmeier, Barbara

2012-12-31

199

Pregnancy and Mental Health of Young Homeless Women  

PubMed Central

Pregnancy rates among women in the U.S. who are homeless are much higher than rates among women who are housed (Greene & Ringwalt, 1998). Yet little research has addressed mental health, risk and resilience among young mothers who are homeless. This study utilizes a sample of women from the Midwest Longitudinal Study of Homeless Adolescents (MLSHA) to investigate pregnancy and motherhood over three years among unaccompanied homeless young mothers. Our data are supplemented by in-depth interviews with a subset of these women. Results show that almost half of sexually active young women (n = 222, µ age = 17.2) had been pregnant at baseline (46.4%), and among the longitudinal subsample of 171 women (µ age = 17.2), almost 70.0% had been pregnant by the end of the study. Among young mothers who are homeless, only half reported that they helped to care for their children consistently over time, and one-fifth of the women reported never seeing their children. Of the young women with children in their care at the last interview of the study (Wave 13), almost one-third met criteria for lifetime major depressive episode (MDE), lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and lifetime drug abuse, and one-half met criteria for lifetime antisocial personality disorder (APD). Twelve-month diagnoses are also reported. The impacts of homelessness on maternal and child outcomes are discussed, including the implications for practice, policy, and research. PMID:21486259

Crawford, Devan M.; Trotter, Emily C.; Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner; Whitbeck, Les B.

2012-01-01

200

The Legal Rights and Educational Needs of Homeless Children with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper highlights the educational rights and needs of homeless children under both the McKinney Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Act. Section 1 explains the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987, which included the Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program mandating a free, appropriate public education for all…

Rafferty, Yvonne

201

Homeless but Connected: The Role of Heterogeneous Social Network Ties and Social Networking Technology in the Mental Health Outcomes of Street-Living Youth  

PubMed Central

Although social integration tends to have positive effects on the mental health of housed adolescents, the role of homeless adolescents’ social networks is more ambiguous. Social network data were collected from 136 homeless adolescents in Hollywood, California to examine how network ties are associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Face-to-face relationships with street-based peers were a risk factor for both anxiety and depression, while contacting home-based friends through social networking technology was found to be protective for depression. Community-based and public agencies serving homeless adolescents should consider facilitating the maintenance of these protective relationships by providing internet access. PMID:22075769

Rice, Eric; Ray, Diana; Kurzban, Seth

2013-01-01

202

Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships Administration Building, Room 1005  

E-print Network

, see: http://www.ed.gov/programs/homeless/legislation.html What are HUD-funded Shelters? The U.S 70148-2050 Telephone: (504) 280-6603 FAX: (504) 280-3973 E-MAIL: FINAID@UNO.EDU Unaccompanied Homeless an unaccompanied homeless youth after July 1, 2008 This means that, after July 1, 2008

Li, X. Rong

203

Pregnancy and sexual health among homeless young injection drug users  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of prenatal care, and histories of sexual victimization are described. A total of

Dodi Hathazi; Stephen E. Lankenau; Bill Sanders; Jennifer Jackson Bloom

2009-01-01

204

Pregnancy and Sexual Health among Homeless Young Injection Drug Users  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of…

Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

2009-01-01

205

Personality and psychopathology in African unaccompanied refugee minors: repression, resilience and vulnerability.  

PubMed

Examining personality and psychopathological symptoms among unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs), we measured intra-individual dimensions (repression and correlates thereof) usually associated with resilience. Forty-one URMs completed the Weinberger Adjustment Inventory (WAI), assessing personality, and the Youth Self-Report (YSR), describing current symptoms. URMs endorsed high levels of Repressive Defensiveness, Denial of Distress, and Restraint; unexpectedly, URMs reported high Distress and reduced Happiness (WAI, p's < 0.05). Although YSR symptoms were below clinical cut points, there were notable correlations between Distress and Attention Problems, Self-destructive, and Aggressive Behavior (all on the YSR), correcting for multiple comparisons (p's < 0.004). URMs exposed to non-normative stressors reported non-symptomatic outcomes, and high levels of personality dimensions correlating with resilience. However, URMs also endorsed high Distress and low Happiness, calling their resilience into question. Positive correlations between WAI Distress and YSR symptom subscales suggest that URMs harbor vulnerabilities of clinical and forensic significance. PMID:22661148

Huemer, Julia; Völkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Karnik, Niranjan; Denny, Katherine G; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Mitterer, Michaela; Humphreys, Keith; Plattner, Belinda; Friedrich, Max; Shaw, Richard J; Steiner, Hans

2013-02-01

206

20132014 Texas Application for State Financial Aid 1 20132014Texas Application for State Financial Aid (TASFA)  

E-print Network

? Yes No 9. Did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? Yes No 10. Did the director of an emergency shelter program funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who

O'Toole, Alice J.

207

A Risk and Resilience Perspective on Unaccompanied Refugee Minors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the United States, unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) are a diverse and extremely vulnerable group served by social workers about whom there is little research. URMs enter the United States from many lands without parents or kin, often having experienced war and other traumatic events. Using a risk and resilience framework, we summarize the…

Carlson, Bonnie E.; Cacciatore, Joanne; Klimek, Barbara

2012-01-01

208

Runaway and Pregnant: Risk Factors Associated with Pregnancy in a National Sample of Runaway\\/Homeless Female Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Homeless youth are at particularly high risk for teen pregnancy; research indicates as many as 20% of homeless young women become pregnant. These pregnant and homeless teens lack financial resources and adequate health care, resulting in increased risk for low- birth-weight babies and high infant mortality. This study investigated individual and family-level predictors of teen pregnancy among a national

Sanna J. Thompson; Kimberly A. Bender; Carol M. Lewis; Rita Watkins

209

Homelessness in America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book about homelessness in the United States offers 16 chapters in three parts. Part 1, "History Definitions, and Causes," includes: (1) "Redefining the Cursed Word: A Historical Interpretation of American Homelessness" (Kim Hopper and Jim Baumohl); (2) "Homelessness: Definitions and Counts" (Martha R. Burt); (3) "The Causes of Homelessness"…

Baumohl, Jim, Ed.

210

Rent control and homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purposes of this paper are to produce more precise estimates of the effect of rent control on homelessness using microdata on housed and homeless households and to provide evidence concerning the mechanisms through which rent control might affect homelessness. Our results suggest that rent control does increase homelessness by decreasing the rental vacancy rate and increasing the rental price

Dirk W. Early; Edgar O. Olsen

1998-01-01

211

The Ecology of Homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article proposes an ecological model of homelessness drawn from a broad review of the research and practice literature. The spectrum of biopsychosocial risks associated with pathways into homelessness is reviewed, followed by examination of social and individual consequences resulting from periods of homelessness. The temporal dimensions of homelessness, including “first-time,” “episodic,” and “chronic,” are defined and discussed along with

Roger M. Nooe; David A. Patterson

2010-01-01

212

Suicidal Behavior Among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study considered risk factors associated with suicidal ideation and the likelihood of a suicide attempt in a sample of 297 homeless and runaway youth from four Midwestern states. It was hypothesized that sociodemographic characteristics, family factors, suicide exposure, street factors, externalizing behavior, and internalizing behavior would be related to suicidal ideation and to the likelihood of a suicide

Kevin A. Yoder; Dan R. Hoyt; Les B. Whitbeck

1998-01-01

213

Homeless adolescents: a descriptive study of similarities and differences between runaways and throwaways.  

PubMed

A sample of 43 homeless adolescents was categorized as being either runaways, throwaways, or societal rejects. Comparisons of these categories of homeless youths were completed to assess the descriptive utility of internal social control, strain, and psychopathological theory in making distinctions between various homeless adolescents. Descriptive data support the view that control and psychopathology perspectives provide some promise for understanding differing types of runaway adolescents. Sex differences between runaway and throwaway youths were explored. However, few sex X type of homeless adolescent interactions were observed. Implications for secondary prevention, based upon these data, are offered. PMID:4083132

Adams, G R; Gullotta, T; Clancy, M A

1985-01-01

214

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

2011-07-01

215

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

2013-07-01

216

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

2012-07-01

217

Navigating the Intersections of IDEA and McKinney-Vento: A Problem-Solving Process. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act is the main federal program concerning the education of children and youth experiencing homelessness. It provides federal funding to states, which then distribute the funds to their school districts through a competitive application process; the funds are used to ensure that children and youth

Julianelle, Patricia

2008-01-01

218

AIDS Knowledge and Educational Preferences of At-Risk Runaway\\/Homeless and Incarcerated Youth * * The research described in this article was supported by contract #89-97649 from the Office of AIDS, California Department of Health Services, to Harder+Kibbe Research, San Francisco, CA. The views expressed are the author's and do not represent those of the Office of AIDS. The contributions of the Office of AIDS, Paul Harder, the H+K research team, Carol Baker, University of Pittsburgh, and, most importantly, the youth interviewed are gratefully acknowledged  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adolescents need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to prevent HIV infection. This descriptive study examines the AIDS-related knowledge, informational sources, and educational preferences of two groups of at-risk youth: runaway\\/homeless and incarcerated teens. Although the youth interviewed generally exhibited moderately high AIDS-related knowledge, disturbing gaps were evidenced as well. Attributes predicting total AIDS Knowledge Scores were

Sandra Wexler

1997-01-01

219

Parenting while Being Homeless  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the dynamics of parenting while being in a homeless context. The mosaic of stressors involved in this homeless parenting process are explicated and discussed. In addition, resources and strategies that may support parenting are presented and discussed.

Swick, Kevin J.; Williams, Reginald; Fields, Evelyn

2014-01-01

220

Life Shocks and Homelessness  

PubMed Central

We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

2014-01-01

221

Life shocks and homelessness.  

PubMed

We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

2013-12-01

222

77 FR 58404 - Announcing the Award of Three Single-Source Program Expansion Supplement Grants to Unaccompanied...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Three Single-Source Program Expansion Supplement Grants to Unaccompanied Alien Children's...three single-source program expansion supplement grants from its Unaccompanied Alien...a single-source program expansion supplement grant to two current grantees,...

2012-09-20

223

HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT  

E-print Network

HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT H A W A I ` I 2 0 11 #12;State 2007 2,136 2,201 2,204 2,069 2) Hawai`i, Kaua`i and Maui Counties 2 HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT The 2011 Homeless Service of Hawai`i and the Homeless Programs Office of the Hawai`i State Department of Human Services (DHS

224

Educating Homeless Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past decade, the number of homeless children in America has more than doubled. Educators, however, are still legally obligated to enroll and support them, because of the passage of the "No Child Left Behind" Act of 2001, which reauthorized the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Although schools cannot solve homelessness, they can…

Berliner, BethAnn

2002-01-01

225

BRITISH HOMELESSNESS: THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the years many theories about homelessness have developed in the UK. The theories have both contributed to the understanding of homelessness and fuelled the homeless industry's push for more research. The research methods used and the outcomes of that research depend, to some degree, on the theoretical framework used. This paper argues that no single theoretical framework seems to

Megan Ravenhill

226

Pennsylvania's Rural Homeless Reality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Center for Rural Pennsylvania analyzed data from the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare concerning rural homelessness for fiscal years 1997 through 1999. Findings indicate that rural Pennsylvania has a homeless population and it is growing. In 1999, more than 21,700 clients received homeless assistance in rural areas, 44 percent of whom…

Center for Rural Pennsylvania, Harrisburg.

227

Teaching Our Homeless Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses some of the major concerns associated with the instructional process of our homeless children. The reader is provided with a brief overview of the prevalence of this population. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness the number of school children who are homeless is growing rapidly with 1.4 to 1.5 million…

Sheldon, George H.

2011-01-01

228

Japan's “New Homeless  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the mid-1990s, homelessness has become a major issue of public discussion in Japan, and is often viewed as a new social problem facing Japanese society. The issue of homelessness contrasts images of the absence of poverty and homelessness in postwar Japan, often explained based on the unique features of Japanese-style employment and welfare, containing poverty and unemployment. This paper

Aya Ezawa

2002-01-01

229

8- Rural Homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the 1998 Symposium on Homelessness Research, rural homelessness was not assigned as a paper topic in its own right. Due to its increasing significance, the authors prepared a paper on rural homelessness for the 2007 Symposium. Given the somewhat limited formal research available, the authors supplemented their literature review with information from government documents and technical assistance materials as

Marjorie Robertson; Nancy Fritz; Rebecca Noftsinger; Pamela Fischer

230

Homeless Families with Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies of homelessness have not adequately addressed the relationship between deteriorating living conditions of inner-city neighborhoods and family homelessness. Interviews with 50 families with children who were residents of homeless shelters in two large cities in New York reveal that substandard housing, unscrupulous landlords, and drug-related violence and crime in neighborhoods, as well as nonpayment of rent and domestic

Namkee G. Choi; Lidia J. Snyder

1999-01-01

231

Homelessness: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

The homelessness crisis in the United States has reached epidemic proportions as the diversity of the homeless population expands to the point where it resembles the general population. The deepest and most long-standing cause of homelessness is poverty, but there are other forces as well, including the severe shortage of affordable housing (particularly due to urban renewal); deep funding cuts

Jim Tull

1992-01-01

232

Sourcing homelessness: How journalists use sources to frame homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a content and qualitative analysis of quotations from sources in Canadian newspaper items on homelessness. Experts dominate as sources on homelessness. Homeless people are not completely deprived of a voice, but are limited to the devalued voice of experience. Quotes from homeless people themselves promote a narrative of homelessness that marginalizes the people who experience it and

Barbara Schneider

2012-01-01

233

Homeless In America, Homeless In California  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is generally believed that the increased incidence of homelessness in the United States has arisen from broad societal factors, such as changes in the institutionalization of the mentally ill, increases in drug addiction and alcohol usage, and so forth. This paper presents a comprehensive test of the alternate hypothesis that variations in homelessness arise from changed circumstances in the

John M. Quigley; Steven Raphael; Eugene Smolensky

2001-01-01

234

Southeast Asian Refugee Youth: An Annotated Bibliography. Southeast Asian Refugee Studies Occasional Papers. Number Six.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annotated bibliography comprises books and articles on Southeast Asian refugee youth. It is divided into the following cross-referenced sections: (1) Adaptation and Acculturation; (2) Education; (3) Physical and Mental Health; (4) Unaccompanied Minors and Amerasian Youth; (5) Courtship and Marriage; (6) General Topics; (7) Journalism; and (8)…

Hammond, Ruth E., Comp.; Hendricks, Glenn L., Comp.

235

Predictors of Change in Self-Reported Social Networks among Homeless Young People  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research investigates changes in social network size and composition of 351 homeless adolescents over 3 years. Findings show that network size decreases over time. Homeless youth with a conduct disorder begin street life with small networks that remain small over time. Caregiver abuse is associated with smaller emotional networks due to fewer…

Falci, Christina D.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.; Rose, Trina

2011-01-01

236

Homeless Adolescents: A Descriptive Study of Similarities and Differences between Runaways and Throwaways.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Categorized 43 homeless adolescents as being either runaways, throwaways, or societal rejects. Descriptive data support view that social control and psychopathology perspectives provide promise for understanding differing types of runaway adolescents. Sex differences between runaway and throwaway youths were observed; few sex x type of homeless

Adams, Gerald R.; And Others

1985-01-01

237

Poor Parenting and Antisocial Behavior among Homeless Young Adults: Links to Dating Violence Perpetration and Victimization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though research has examined risk factors associated with street victimization among homeless young people, little is known about dating violence experiences among this group. Given homeless youths' elevated rates of child maltreatment, it is likely that they are at high risk for dating violence. As such, the current study examined the association…

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

2012-01-01

238

Examining Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to School Social Work Practice with Homeless Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School social workers are at the forefront of serving homeless children and youths as they pursue education. Because of the negative impact homelessness can have on academic outcomes for children, understanding what factors are perceived to either hinder or facilitate practice and what factors might influence perceptions of practice with this…

Canfield, James P.

2014-01-01

239

The New Homelessness Revisited  

PubMed Central

The ‘new homelessness’ has drawn sustained attention from scholars over the past three decades. Definitional inconsistencies and data limitations rendered early work during this period largely speculative in nature. Thanks to conceptual, theoretical, and methodological progress, however, the research literature now provides a fuller understanding of homelessness. Contributions by sociologists and other social scientists since the mid-1990s differentiate among types of homelessness, provide credible demographic estimates, and show how being homeless affects a person's life chances and coping strategies. Agreement also exists about the main macro- and micro-level causes of homelessness. Active lines of inquiry examine public, media, and governmental responses to the problem as well as homeless people's efforts to mobilize on their own behalf. Despite the obstacles faced when studying a stigmatized population marked by high turnover and weak anchors to place, recent investigations have significantly influenced homelessness policy. A greater emphasis on prevention should further strengthen the research-policy nexus. PMID:24910495

Lee, Barrett A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Wright, James D.

2014-01-01

240

Educating Transient Youth: Influence of Residential Instability on Educational Resilience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homeless youth face many barriers that limit their ability to complete a high school diploma and transition to postsecondary education. The federal government passed the McKinney-Vento Act over 20 years ago to address issues of access to public education for homeless youth. The most recent reauthorization of the law expanded the definition of…

Hallett, Ronald Edward

2009-01-01

241

Street Kids--Homeless and Runaway Youth. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Children, Family, Drugs and Alcoholism of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate. One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This hearing was the second in a series examining the impact of homelessness and dislocation on young people in America. This session focused on the problems of homeless and runaway adolescents. Witnesses described the need for multiple services for this population, for effective provision of services, and for greater coordination and planning.…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

242

Providing care for children and adolescents facing homelessness and housing insecurity.  

PubMed

Child health and housing security are closely intertwined, and children without homes are more likely to suffer from chronic disease, hunger, and malnutrition than are children with homes. Homeless children and youth often have significant psychosocial development issues, and their education is frequently interrupted. Given the overall effects that homelessness can have on a child's health and potential, it is important for pediatricians to recognize the factors that lead to homelessness, understand the ways that homelessness and its causes can lead to poor health outcomes, and when possible, help children and families mitigate some of the effects of homelessness. Through practice change, partnership with community resources, awareness, and advocacy, pediatricians can help optimize the health and well-being of children affected by homelessness. PMID:23713108

2013-06-01

243

Runaway and Pregnant: Risk Factors Associated with Pregnancy in a National Sample of Runaway\\/Homeless Female Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeHomeless youth are at particularly high risk for teen pregnancy; research indicates as many as 20% of homeless young women become pregnant. These pregnant and homeless teens lack financial resources and adequate health care, resulting in increased risk for low–birth-weight babies and high infant mortality. This study investigated individual and family-level predictors of teen pregnancy among a national sample of

Sanna J. Thompson; Kimberly A. Bender; Carol M. Lewis; Rita Watkins

2008-01-01

244

76 FR 26302 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Reunification Procedures for Unaccompanied Alien...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families [OMB No. 0970-0278...Reunification Procedures for Unaccompanied Alien Children Description Following the passage of...107-296), the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of...

2011-05-06

245

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2011-10-01

246

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2010-10-01

247

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2013-10-01

248

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2012-10-01

249

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

... 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2014-10-01

250

Homelessness: A General Information Packet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet contains documents that provide general information about homelessness and the need for both Federal and local action to help the homeless people in America. Sections 1 and 2 contain the following articles released by the Homelessness Information Exchange: (1) "The Problem of Homelessness Nationwide"; and "Alternative Family Housing…

Homelessness Exchange, Washington, DC.

251

Homeless in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

The way public authorities presently define the homeless in the United States carries forward a complex historical legacy. The causal and moral assessments of the homeless, grounded in the work ethic of our capitalist society, have left behind four interpretations of the homeless as vagrant, deviant, sick or victim. Analysis of recent studies of the homeless, while uncovering the presence

Charles Hoch

1986-01-01

252

The Rights of Homeless Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet presents information concerning homelessness and the education of homeless children nationwide and in Illinois. Estimates of the number of homeless children vary widely. Reasons for homeless children's failure to attend school include school residency requirements, delays in transfer of documents, and lack of transportation. The…

Strong, Penny

253

Transitioning Our Shelters: Making Homeless Shelters Safe for Transgender People  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most homeless shelters in the United States are segregated by sex, with placement based on assumptions about a person's gender. As a result, transgender youth and adults, who identify as or express a gender different from their birth sex, can experience extreme difficulties in obtaining adequate and safe shelter. Many shelters are physically unsafe for transgender people, fail to provide

Lisa Mottet; John Ohle

2006-01-01

254

Homelessness in California  

E-print Network

among the poor--is forcing lower-income families to "buy down" as a result of higher housing prices--California. 2. Homeless persons--Housing--California. 3. Homeless persons--Services for--California. 4. Low-income housing-- California. 5. Housing policy--California. I. Raphael, Steven, 1968­. II. Smolensky, Eugene. III

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

255

TRANSITIONAL SETTLEMENTS Planning Homeless  

E-print Network

TRANSITIONAL SETTLEMENTS 1 Planning Homeless Settlement Communities Western Washington University- came clear that their presence among us was not the result of some aberration in the socio- economic the living conditions faced by our fellow citizens who live in Homeless camps, public resources are necessary

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

256

Life Shocks and Homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

We exploit an exogenous health shock—the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the causal effect of a life shock on homelessness. Using survey data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study that have been augmented with information from hospital medical records, we find that the health shock increases the likelihood of homelessness three years later,

Marah A. Curtis; Hope Corman; Kelly Noonan; Nancy Reichman

2011-01-01

257

Homeless Families and Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

ublic concern about homelessness in the United States has increased in recent years. A late 1995 Gallup poll found that 86% of Americans feel sympathy for the homeless, and 33% report that they feel more sympathy now than they did five years ago. According to the same poll, one reason for this apparent increase in sympathy is that 17% of

Eugene M. Lewit; Linda Schuurmann Baker; Linda Schuurmann

258

SPRING 2004 the Homeless  

E-print Network

TrumanScholarship,establishedbytheUnitedStatesCongressin1975asamemo- rialtoHarryS.Truman.Witha$26SPRING 2004 Hope for the Homeless U of M Alumni Making a Difference #12;Above: Spring and all its play key roles in getting homeless people back on track as Memphis and Shelby County push to end

Dasgupta, Dipankar

259

Homeless service Utilization report  

E-print Network

Utilization Report to present a data-based perspective on the state's homeless people. Since 2006, there has been a significant increase in funds and facilities for the homeless: 601 new units of transitional the state's current inventory to a total of 1,188 units and 785 beds. Moreover, 110 new beds on Maui and 24

260

Intellectual Disability and Homelessness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

2011-01-01

261

Onset of Conduct Disorder, Use of Delinquent Subsistence Strategies, and Street Victimization among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents in the Midwest  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the effects of childhood-onset conduct disorder on later antisocial behavior and street victimization among a group of homeless and runaway adolescents. Four hundred twenty-eight homeless and runaway youth were interviewed directly on the streets and in shelters from four Midwestern states. Key findings include the following.…

Chen, Xiaojin; Thrane, Lisa; Whitbeck, Les B.; Johnson, Kurt D.; Hoyt, Dan R.

2007-01-01

262

MSU Office of Financial Aid 252 Student Services, E. Lansing, MI 48824-1113 finaid@msu.edu (517) 353-5940 Quick facts about APPLYING FOR FINANCIAL AID  

E-print Network

is one of the following: · over 24 years of age · married · supporting one or more dependents · a veteran live · classified as an unaccompanied youth who is homeless. What happens after you apply

263

24 CFR 578.53 - Supportive services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...eligible costs are eligible to the same extent for program participants who are unaccompanied homeless youth; persons living with HIV/AIDS; and victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking. (d) Ineligible costs....

2013-04-01

264

Ethical Considerations for Research and Treatment With Runaway and Homeless Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethical considerations for working with runaway and homeless youth in research and treatment settings are presented. Issues of parents' and adolescents' consent for research and treatment are discussed, with particular attention given to the lack of explicit guidelines for working with abused and neglected youth. The principles of beneficence and justice are discussed as they apply to intervening with a

Melissa A. Meade; Natasha Slesnick

2002-01-01

265

Perpetrators of Early Physical and Sexual Abuse among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviews with 372 homeless and runaway adolescents found one-half reported being physically abused and almost one-third experienced sexual abuse. Females experienced significantly higher rates of sexual abuse. Sexual minority youth experienced more physical and sexual abuse compared to heterosexual youth. Nonfamily members most often perpetrated…

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Cauce, Ana Mari

2002-01-01

266

Maltreatment and Victimization in Homeless Adolescents: Out of the Frying Pan and into the Fire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness among adolescents is a growing concern, with 1 to 1.5 million youths in any given year spending some period of time in emergency shelters or on the streets. These vulnerable youth have been found to exhibit a host of emotional and behavioral problems including anxiety, depression, post-traumatic reactions, drug and alcohol abuse, and…

Cauce, Ana Mari; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Whitbeck, Les B.

2004-01-01

267

Onset of Conduct Disorder, Use of Delinquent Subsistence Strategies, and Street Victimization Among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents in the Midwest  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the effects of childhood-onset conduct disorder on later antisocial behavior and street victimization among a group of homeless and runaway adolescents. Four hundred twenty-eight homeless and runaway youth were interviewed directly on the streets and in shelters from four Midwestern states. Key findings include the following. First, compared with those who exhibit adolescent-onset conduct disorder, youth with

Xiaojin Chen; Lisa Thrane; Les B. Whitbeck; Kurt D. Johnson; Dan R. Hoyt

2007-01-01

268

Recognizing the Needs of the Homeless.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes reports and research on the homeless in the United States, presents findings of a survey of Red Cross chapters on services to the homeless, and describes programs for the homeless of selected Red Cross chapters. Section 1 discusses definitions of homelessness and methodologies used to count homeless people. The homeless are…

France, Joseph B.

269

Sustaining dignity? Food insecurity in homeless young people in urban Australia.  

PubMed

Issue addressed Food insecurity is recognised as an increasing problem in disadvantaged and marginalised groups. The aim of this study was to investigate issues associated with food insecurity and nutrition in young people experiencing, or at risk of, homelessness in metropolitan Australia. Methods Eight focus group discussions were conducted with 48 young people (aged between 15 and 25 years) in specialist homelessness services in central and south-western Sydney. Results Participants described daily experiences of food insecurity, persistent hunger and poverty. Structural barriers to food security and nutrition were identified and included poverty and reduced physical access to fresh foods. Participants also described a desire to save time, for convenience and to be socially connected. Despite the hardships and the chaos of youth homelessness, the groups were defined by their strength of character, resilience and hope for the future. Conclusion Homeless young people within central and south-western Sydney report varying degrees of food insecurity, despite being supported by specialist youth homelessness services. So what? A collaborative, multistrategic approach with youth participation is required to further enhance the capacity of youth services to improve food security, food access and the availability of nutritious foods for homeless young people. A greater focus on advocacy and policy action is also required to bring food security and nutrition to the forefront of national efforts to improve the health and welfare of disadvantaged groups. PMID:25131381

Crawford, Belinda; Yamazaki, Rowena; Franke, Elise; Amanatidis, Sue; Ravulo, Jioji; Steinbeck, Kate; Ritchie, Jan; Torvaldsen, Siranda

2014-09-01

270

SECTION A. Student information Name (last, first, middle initial) University ID  

E-print Network

, 2012 did you receive determination that your were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless? ................................................................... yes is homeless, please contact One Stop Student Services and request an appointment with the Independent Status

Amin, S. Massoud

271

SECTION A. Student information Name (last, first, middle initial) University ID  

E-print Network

, 2013 did you receive determination that your were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless? ................................................................... yes is homeless, please contact One Stop Student Services and request an appointment with the Independent Status

Amin, S. Massoud

272

SECTION A. Student information Name (last, first, middle initial) University ID  

E-print Network

, 2011, did you receive determination that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless? ................................................................... yes is homeless, please contact One Stop Student Services and request an appointment with the Independent Status

Blanchette, Robert A.

273

Student Financial Aid Office 103 Wilder Tower Memphis, TN 38152  

E-print Network

-funded Shelters? The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) administers funding for homeless.678.3590 Web: www.memphis.edu/financialaid Email: financialaid@memphis.edu 2014-2015 Unaccompanied Homeless Homeless Youth verification as a (check one): -Vento School District Liaison -funded shelter

Dasgupta, Dipankar

274

DEPENDENCY STATUS VERIFICATION Name ____________________________________ Student ID _________________  

E-print Network

to your current status. Based on your responses, additional information is now needed. Homelessness For each of the questions, the following definitions apply: HOMELESS means lacking fixed, regular your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who

Bieber, Michael

275

Student Financial Aid Office 103 Wilder Tower Memphis, TN 38152  

E-print Network

-funded Shelters? The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) administers funding for homeless.678.3590 Web: www.memphis.edu/financialaid Email: financialaid@memphis.edu 2013-2014 Unaccompanied Homeless Homeless Youth verification as a (check one): -Vento School District Liaison -funded shelter

Dasgupta, Dipankar

276

Families Experiencing Homelessness  

MedlinePLUS

... 4]Culhane, JF et al. (2003). Prevalence of child welfare services involvement among homeless and low-income mothers: A five year birth cohort study. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 30 (3). [5] Bassuk, EL ...

277

Alcoholism and homelessness.  

PubMed

A prospective study was carried out over a three-year period to assess the incidence of alcoholism and its effect on the homeless. Of 423 homeless people interviewed, 48.7 per cent were found to be alcoholics. Alcoholism was common in Celts and Roman Catholics but showed no correlation with educational achievement or school-leaving age. It was strongly associated with the use of casualty departments and criminal activity. PMID:2616506

Shanks, N

1989-10-22

278

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she will...

2010-07-01

279

Conduct disorder and HIV risk behaviors among runaway and homeless adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to assess the prevalence of conduct disorder (CD) among runaway and homeless adolescents and to investigate associations between CD and HIV risk behaviors. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children and a standardized HIV risk assessment questionnaire were administered to 219 runaway and homeless adolescents recruited from a drop-in center serving high-risk youth. One-half of the males

Robert E. Booth; Yiming Zhang

1997-01-01

280

Perpetrators of early physical and sexual abuse among homeless and runaway adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine abuse specific variables among homeless and runaway adolescents and to look at perpetrators of childhood abuse.Method: A total of 372 homeless and runaway adolescents were interviewed using a systematic sampling strategy in metropolitan Seattle. Young people were interviewed on the streets and in shelters by outreach workers in youth service agencies.Results: Approximately one-half of these young people

Kimberly A Tyler; Ana Mari Cauce

2002-01-01

281

Homeless Veterans Need your help!!  

E-print Network

Homeless Veterans Need your help!! "1-1-1" Event Please bring: 1 ­ Gently used item of MEN United Veterans who run a shelter for homeless veterans in Yaphank. Please go through your closets adopting-a-shelter or adopt-a-house where the homeless veterans live. For more details please go

Johnson, Peter D.

282

Civil society responses to homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores how faith-based organisations in South Africa respond to homelessness, using research performed in 2005 with 12 religious organisations that provide services to homeless people in Johannesburg and Pretoria. It describes the organisations' histories, funding schemes and relationships with other organisations, and considers the complexities of defining homelessness. The background to the study was broader and more in-depth

Diana Sanchez

2010-01-01

283

Community-Driven Homeless Housing  

E-print Network

that are at or below the poverty level. This portion of the population is at risk of becoming homeless becauseCommunity-Driven Homeless Housing Programs: Best Practices Report Prepared for City of Champaign Anne Householder Latonya Jones Maria Kaidas Rebecca Long Huong Phu #12;Homeless Housing Best Practices

Frank, Thomas D.

284

Pathways into homelessness: recently homeless adults problems and service use before and after becoming homeless in Amsterdam  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To improve homelessness prevention practice, we met with recently homeless adults, to explore their pathways into homelessness, problems and service use, before and after becoming homeless. METHODS: Recently homeless adults (last housing lost up to two years ago and legally staying in the Netherlands) were sampled in the streets, day centres and overnight shelters in Amsterdam. In April and

Igor R van Laere; Matty A de Wit; Niek S Klazinga

2009-01-01

285

Pathways into homelessness: recently homeless adults - problems and service use before and after becoming homeless in Amsterdam  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To improve homelessness prevention practice, we met with recently homeless adults, to explore their pathways into homelessness, problems and service use, before and after becoming homeless. METHODS: Recently homeless adults (last housing lost up to two years ago and legally staying in the Netherlands) were sampled in the streets, day centres and overnight shelters in Amsterdam. In April

Laere van I. R; Wit de M. A; N. S. Klazinga

2009-01-01

286

Confirming Eligibility for McKinney-Vento Services: Do's and Don'ts for Local Liaisons. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, schools must identify children and youth in homeless situations and provide appropriate services. One such service is immediate enrollment in school, even when students lack paperwork normally required for enrollment, such as school records, proof of guardianship, a birth certificate, immunization…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

2007-01-01

287

Confirming Eligibility for McKinney-Vento Services: Do's and Don'ts for School Districts. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, schools must identify children and youth in homeless situations and provide appropriate services. One such service is immediate enrollment in school, even when students lack paperwork normally required for enrollment, such as school records, proof of guardianship, a birth certificate, immunization…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

2007-01-01

288

Predictors of social network composition among homeless and runaway adolescents.  

PubMed

Recent research on the social support networks of homeless and runaway youth suggest the social networks of runaway youth are made up largely of transient deviant peer relationships. This paper examined social network characteristics of 428 homeless and runaway adolescents from small-to moderate-sized cities in four Midwestern states. We investigated size, homogeneity, and correlates of the composition of the instrumental and emotional support networks as reported by the adolescents. Results showed the networks are considerably heterogeneous, comprised of relationships from home and the street as well as family and non-related adults. Further, the composition of these networks is related to adolescent characteristics and experiences including sexual identity, abuse history, and street experience. PMID:15878045

Johnson, Kurt D; Whitbeck, Les B; Hoyt, Dan R

2005-04-01

289

Unaccompanied foreign minors and delinquency: A retrospective study of influence of psychosocial va riables 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study is, first, to describe the phenomenon of unaccompanied foreign minors in Spain, Italy, France and Germany. Some important elements -such as incidence, origin and relation to criminality - are thoroughly described. As a result, it is possible to begin to understand the psychosoc ial, legal and penal problems related to the phenomenon in the European

Estefanía Ocáriz; Fernando Bermejo

290

Singers' Recall for the Words and Melody of a New, Unaccompanied Song  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nature of the relationship between words and music in memory has been studied in a variety of ways, from investigations of listeners' recall for the words of songs stored in long-term memory to recall for novel information set to unfamiliar melodies. We asked singers to perform an unaccompanied song from memory following deliberate learning…

Ginsborg, Jane; Sloboda, John A.

2007-01-01

291

Music Listening Preferences in Early Life: Infants' Responses to Accompanied versus Unaccompanied Singing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated infant listening preferences for two versions of an unfamiliar Chinese children's song: unaccompanied (i.e., voice only) and accompanied (i.e., voice and instrumental accompaniment). Three groups of 5-, 8- and 11-month-old infants were tested using the Headturn Preference Procedure. A general linear model analysis of…

Ilari, Beatriz; Sundara, Megha

2009-01-01

292

Homelessness Is a Risk Factor for TB  

MedlinePLUS

... the United States, 1% of the population experiences homelessness in a given year, but 5.8% of persons ... healthcare agencies addressing the needs of persons experiencing homelessness. ... in number, the homeless population still represents an important ...

293

Internet Use, Social Networking, and Homeless Adolescents' HIV/AIDS Risk  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the association between sexual health and internet use, including social networking websites such as MySpace and Facebook, among a sample of homeless adolescents at high risk for contracting HIV/AIDS. Methods 201 homeless adolescents were surveyed in 2009 about their internet use. Multivariate logistic regression models assessed how patterns of use were associated with engaging in exchange sex (sex for money, drugs, housing), recent HIV testing, and online partner-seeking behaviors. Results 96.5% reported internet use. Most youth accessed the internet at public libraries or youth service agencies. Increased time online and recent engagement in exchange sex were both positively associated with online partner-seeking. Youth connected to family members online were less likely to practice exchange sex and more likely to report a recent HIV test. Youth connected to street-based peers online were more likely to practice exchange sex, while youth connected to home-based peers online were more likely to report a recent HIV test. Conclusions Although these data are preliminary, homeless youth need more access to the internet, as access facilitates connecting with family and home-based peers whose presence may reduce sexual risk-taking. Access, however, must be carefully monitored to prevent youth soliciting sex online. PMID:21094441

Rice, Eric; Monro, William; Adhikari, Anamika Barman; Young, Sean D.

2010-01-01

294

Health care of homeless veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important to understand the needs of those veterans who are homeless. We describe characteristics of homeless male veterans\\u000a and factors associated with needing VA benefits from a two-city, community survey of 531 homeless adults. Overall, 425 were\\u000a male, of whom 127 were veterans (29.9%). Significantly more veterans had a chronic medical condition and two or more mental\\u000a health

Thomas P. O’Toole; Alicia Conde-Martel; Jeanette L. Gibbon; Barbara H. Hanusa; Michael J. Fine

2003-01-01

295

Gender differences in Brazilian street youth’s family circumstances and experiences on the street  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: It has been proposed that homeless street girls are more likely to be from dysfunctional families and exhibit psychological distress than homeless street boys, reflecting cultural factors that result in differential norms for male and female behavior. The current analysis examined whether male and female street youth in a mid-sized Brazilian city differed in their family circumstances and day-to-day

Marcela Raffaelli; Silvia H Koller; Caroline T Reppold; Mateus B Kuschick; Fernanda M. B Krum; Denise R Bandeira; Carson Simões

2000-01-01

296

Poor parenting and antisocial behavior among homeless young adults: links to dating violence perpetration and victimization.  

PubMed

Though research has examined risk factors associated with street victimization among homeless young people, little is known about dating violence experiences among this group. Given homeless youths' elevated rates of child maltreatment, it is likely that they are at high risk for dating violence. As such, the current study examined the association between child maltreatment and parental warmth with dating violence perpetration and victimization through substance use and delinquency among a sample of 172 homeless males and females. Results from path analysis revealed that physical abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect were all significant correlates of both substance use and delinquency, whereas lack of parental warmth was only associated with substance use. Neglect and substance use had direct effects on dating violence and substance use and was found to mediate the relationship between physical abuse and dating violence. Finally, females, older youth, and non-Whites had significantly higher levels of dating violence compared with their counterparts. PMID:22080581

Tyler, Kimberly A; Melander, Lisa A

2012-05-01

297

The challenge of changing drug and sex risk behaviors of runaway and homeless adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess HIV-related drug and sex risk behaviors and evaluate factors associated with change in risk behaviors among runaway and homeless adolescents, 244 street youth were recruited from a community drop-in center serving high-risk youth.Method: Using a cross-sectional design, approximately half of study participants received training in a peer-based intervention that included principles derived from the health belief model,

Robert E. Booth; Yiming Zhang; Carol F. Kwiatkowski

1999-01-01

298

Faces of Homelessness: A Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A brief teacher's guide supplements a videotape of two 15-minute segments on homelessness. The stated objective of the video is to cover the issues of homelessness as they exist today and to dispel the stereotypes of homelessness leftover from earlier eras. A family which has found itself homeless is introduced and then aspects of the phenomenon…

Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Quincy.

299

Helping the Homeless in Your Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide for the public provides information on ways to address homelessness within the context of community development. The following articles issued by the Homelessness Information Exchange are included as Sections 1, 2, and 3: (1) "The Problem of Homelessness Nationwide"; (2) "Ways You Can Help the Homeless"; and (3) "Building a Coalition in…

Homelessness Exchange, Washington, DC.

300

The Homeless Mentally Ill: Myths and Realities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This literature review summarises the historical background of homelessness. It suggests that the current view of homeless people as chronic mentally ill is the latest phase in a series of the different ways in which society has perceived and labelled the homeless. We have argued that homelessness is a product of the lack of housing provision to the poorest section

Walid Abdul Hamid; Til Wykes; Stephen Stansfeld

1993-01-01

301

Can Better National Policy End Family Homelessness?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An understanding of the close link between federal policy and family homelessness is critical for ensuring that one day no child in the United States is homeless. This article discusses the nature of family homelessness, the national policy framework that exists to help vulnerable families, the homeless assistance system that federal policy has…

Roman, Nan

2010-01-01

302

Homeless Students: A Search for Understanding.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a qualitative research project examining homelessness's effects on children's schooling, highlighting a South Carolina intervention program's success. Research disclosed an informal homelessness "caste system," the political unpopularity of providing homeless services, homeless kids' high rates of academic failure and problem behaviors,…

Robertson, Donna Friedman

1998-01-01

303

Mental Disorders, Comorbidity, and Postrunaway Arrests Among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the associations between lifetime mental disorder, comorbidity, and self-reported postrunaway arrests among 428 (187 males, 241 females) homeless and runaway youth. The analysis examined the pattern of arrests across five lifetime mental disorders (alcohol abuse, drug abuse, conduct disorder, major depressive episode, and posttraumatic stress disorder). The adolescents, ranging from 16 to 19 years old, were interviewed

Xiaojin Chen; Lisa Thrane; Les B. Whitbeck; Kurt Johnson

2006-01-01

304

Predictors of self?reported sexually transmitted diseases among homeless and runaway adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Path analysis was used to investigate factors associated with self?reported sexually transmitted diseases among 569 homeless and runaway adolescents in four Midwestern states. Youth were interviewed by outreach workers directly on the streets, in shelters, and in drop?in centers. Results indicated that family abuse was positively related to substance use, affiliation with friends who sold sex, and time on own.

Kimberly A. Tyler; Les B. Whitbeck; Dan R. Hoyt; Kevin A. Yoder

2000-01-01

305

Comparing Suicide Attempters, Suicide Ideators, and Nonsuicidal Homeless and Runaway Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study considers variables that distinguish between attempters, ideators, and nonsuicidal youth in a sample of homeless and runaway adolescents. Analyses reveal five variables that best distinguish among the three groups: self-esteem, depression, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and having a friend who attempted suicide. Suggests that accumulation of…

Yoder, Kevin A.

1999-01-01

306

Mental Disorders, Comorbidity, and Postrunaway Arrests among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the associations between lifetime mental disorder, comorbidity, and self-reported postrunaway arrests among 428 (187 males, 241 females) homeless and runaway youth. The analysis examined the pattern of arrests across five lifetime mental disorders (alcohol abuse, drug abuse, conduct disorder, major depressive episode, and…

Chen, Xiaojin; Thrane, Lisa; Whitbeck, Les B.; Johnson, Kurt

2006-01-01

307

Foster Care Placement, Poor Parenting, and Negative Outcomes among Homeless Young Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although homeless youth with and without foster care histories both face adverse life circumstances, little is known about how these two groups compare in terms of their early histories and whether they face similar outcomes. As such, we compared those with and without a history of foster care placement to determine if the associations between a…

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

2010-01-01

308

The Characteristics and Mental Health of Homeless Adolescents: Age and Gender Differences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of 364 homeless adolescents was interviewed about residential and family histories. Results indicate the youth came from generally troubled backgrounds and had elevated rates of psychiatric disorders. Boys' histories typically included physical abuse and girls' histories were more often marked by sexual abuse. (Contains references.)…

Cauce, Ana Mari; Paradise, Matthew; Ginzler, Joshua Aaron; Embry, Lara; Morgan, Charles J.; Lohr, Yvette; Theofelis, Jim

2000-01-01

309

Brief Motivational Intervention With Homeless Adolescents: Evaluating Effects on Substance Use and Service Utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief motivational intervention with 117 homeless adolescents was evaluated using a randomized design and 3-month follow-up. The intervention was designed to raise youths' concerns about their substance use, support harm reduction, and encourage greater service utilization at a collaborating agency. The study was designed to strengthen initial promising results of an earlier study (P. L. Peterson, J. S. Baer,

John S. Baer; Sharon B. Garrett; Blair Beadnell; Elizabeth A. Wells; Peggy L. Peterson

2007-01-01

310

Dueling Legislation: The Impact of Incongruent Federal Statutes on Homeless and Other Special-Needs Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes points of incongruence between specific federal statutes designed to address educational needs of special-needs children and youth and their families. Coordination of legislation, policy, and programs addressing problems associated with poverty, homelessness, disabilities, and cultural diversity would greatly reduce fragmented and…

Williams, Brenda Toler; DeSander, Marguerita K.

1999-01-01

311

The Homeless in Contemporary Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book consists of 15 chapters on understanding and helping the homeless. The first seven chapters present the "new" homeless in historical context and describe this population and its situation. The remaining eight chapters discuss policy and program options of the government and other organizations in attempting to alleviate the problems of…

Bingham, Richard D.; And Others

312

Homeless identities: enacted and ascribed.  

PubMed

Homelessness has been a perennial concern for sociologists. It is a confronting phenomenon that can challenge western notions of home, a discrete family unit and the ascetics and order of public space. To be without a home and to reside in public places illustrates both an intriguing way of living and some fundamental inadequacies in the functioning of society. Much homelessness research has had the consequence of isolating the 'homeless person' as distinct category or indeed type of individual. They are ascribed with homeless identities. The homeless identity is not simply presented as one dimensional and defining, but this imposed and ill-fitting identity is rarely informed by a close and long-term engagement with the individuals it is supposed to say something about. Drawing on a recent Australian ethnographic study with people literally without shelter, this article aims to contribute to understandings of people who are homeless by outlining some nuanced and diverse aspects of their identities. It argues that people can and do express agency in the way they enact elements of the self, and the experience of homelessness is simultaneously important and unimportant to understand this. Further, the article suggests that what is presumably known about the homeless identity is influenced by day-to-day lives that are on public display. PMID:21899522

Parsell, Cameron

2011-09-01

313

Homelessness: The Politics of Accommodation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article considers the problem of poverty, with homelessness as the centerpiece. A survey of the problem and its roots and ancillary branches includes (1) a description of poverty in Boston (and America) from 1974 to 1991, its effects, its victims, and its predictable effects on the economy; (2) a description of displacement and of the homelessness that results from

Kip Tiernan

1992-01-01

314

Music Listening Preferences in Early Life: Infants' Responses to Accompanied Versus Unaccompanied Singing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated infant listening preferences for two versions of an unfamiliar Chinese children's song: unaccompanied (i.e., voice only) and accompanied (i.e., voice and instrumental accompaniment). Three groups of 5-, 8- and 11-month-old infants were tested using the Headturn Preference Procedure. A general linear model analysis of variance was carried out with gender and age as the between-subjects variables and

Beatriz Ilari; M. Sundara

2009-01-01

315

Medical Care for Street Youth in Salt Lake City: Project Update  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clinic designed to treat homeless street youth was opened in Salt Lake City in the spring of 1996. The data compiled after two years of operation indicates that 132 youths were seen with a total of 534 service encounters. Approximately 44% of the clients were women and the average age of the youths seen was 19.1 years, with ages

Amy Williams; Ben-David Barr; Cynthia B. Snider; Crispin Abbott

316

Mindfulness practice with urban youth: a nursing experience.  

PubMed

Contemporary care models and new knowledge in neuroscience and brain development are the foundation for including mindfulness in the delivery of holistic health care. Youth who experience persistent poverty or other chronic environmental stressors face serious challenges to health development. This article shares a nursing challenge in piloting a mindfulness program with urban youth who have experienced homelessness. PMID:24494387

Manzo, Joanne

2013-01-01

317

Hispanic Migrant Laborer Homelessness in Nebraska: Examining Agricultural Restructuring as One Path to Homelessness  

E-print Network

Research on homelessness in the U.S. has proliferated over the past decade. Although this research has great!y increased our knowledge of homelessness, few studies have explored the paths to homelessness in rural, agricultural ...

Gaber, Sharon Lord; Cantarero, Rodrigo

1997-04-01

318

IDEAReauthorized Statute PROCEDURAL SAFEGUARDS  

E-print Network

of Section 615(b)(2). [615(b)(2)(A)(i)] In the case of an unaccompanied homeless youth as defined in Section 725(6) of the McKinney- Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11434a(6)), the local education

319

Division of Enrollment Management S107 Criser Hall Office for Student Financial Affairs PO Box 114025  

E-print Network

the student · Attending graduate level program of study during the 2012-13 academic year · Veteran of U.S. Armed Forces (or will be a veteran as of June 30, 2013), or have attended a service academy and were-supporting unaccompanied youth who is homeless or at risk of homelessness (as certified by governmental or school agency

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

320

Division of Enrollment Management S107 Criser Hall Office for Student Financial Affairs PO Box 114025  

E-print Network

the student · Attending graduate level program of study during the 2013-14 academic year · Veteran of U.S. Armed Forces (or will be a veteran as of June 30, 2014), or have attended a service academy and were-supporting unaccompanied youth who is homeless or at risk of homelessness (as certified by governmental or school agency

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

321

Print Name UTD Student ID# Financial Statement for  

E-print Network

are eligible to complete a FAFSA if you are: A U.S. citizen a permanent resident with an Alien Registration by a court? Yes No 9. Did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? Yes No 10. Did the director of an emergency shelter program funded

O'Toole, Alice J.

322

Complete this form online, then print using the print button. WMU Student Financial Aid | 1903 W. Michigan Ave., Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5337 | (269) 387-6000  

E-print Network

on federal active duty with the U.S. Armed Forces or with the National Guard Reserves for purposes other than an adult. I am determined to be an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless on or after July 1 of the previous academic year. (For example, if you are enrolled

de Doncker, Elise

323

Concurrent Mental Health and Substance Use Problems among Street-Involved Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among marginalized populations, homeless adults are known to have elevated rates of mental health and substance use problems\\u000a compared to the general population, but less is known about their youthful homeless counterparts. While few studies currently\\u000a exist, what research has been conducted among street-involved youth has confirmed high rates of comorbidity among this population.\\u000a However, few of these studies explore

Maritt Kirst; Tyler Frederick; Patricia G. Erickson

324

Street youth, strain theory, and crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utilizing a sample of homeless street youth, the study examined a more complete model of the classic strain perspective whereby relative deprivation, monetary dissatisfaction, monetary goals, and objective structural factors lead to crime. It also explored the interactions between these factors and the conditioning effects of peers, beliefs, and attributions. The results revealed that relative deprivation, monetary dissatisfaction, monetary goals,

Stephen W. Baron

2006-01-01

325

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...  

...2014-07-01 false If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied...302-4.204 If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied...receive? If your spouse or domestic partner does not accompany you but travels...

2014-07-01

326

Impact of adulthood trauma on homeless mothers.  

PubMed

Using the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients (NSHAPC), we found that among homeless mothers (n = 588), those living without their children were more likely to: be older than 35 years, unmarried, have been incarcerated, have been homeless for at least 1 year, and to have used psychiatric medication. Many homeless mothers had histories of childhood trauma, but it was the accumulation of adulthood traumas that was associated with not living with one's children. Without mental health treatment, younger homeless mothers living with their children today may become the homeless mothers living without their children in the future. PMID:17143729

Zlotnick, Cheryl; Tam, Tammy; Bradley, Kimberly

2007-02-01

327

Overdose Deaths Among Homeless Persons  

MedlinePLUS

... Deaths Among Homeless Persons From Abuse to Addiction Dec 2012 NIDA in New Orleans—More Highlights from ... Bob Schuster Jan 2011 Remembering Dr. Bruce Rounsaville Dec 2010 HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse Oct 2010 ...

328

Temporary shelter for the homeless  

E-print Network

A one-person cardboard structure was designed to temporarily shelter the homeless during harsh weather conditions. The overall form is based on the folding Yoshimura pattern. It is collapsible, wind and water resistant, ...

Lin, Christine, 1982-

2005-01-01

329

Homeless, Not Hopeless. An Informational Guide for School Personnel: Understanding and Educating Homeless Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide explains how to educate homeless students within the public schools, focusing on the Saint Paul, Minnesota, public schools. Section 1 defines homelessness. Section 2 presents data on the increasing numbers of homeless students in the area. Section 3 describes common problems faced by homeless students, including family mobility,…

Seifert, Elli; Stauffer, Carol

330

Homelessness and the Homeless: Responses and Innovations. A Canadian Contribution to IYSH 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents descriptions of successful Canadian public and private programs to aid the homeless and alleviate homelessness as part of participation in the International Year of Shelter for the Homeless (IYSH). Part 1, "The International Year of Shelter for the Homeless," includes the following: (1) objectives; (2) global conditions of the…

Oberlander, H. Peter; Fallick, Arthur L.

331

Comparison of Homeless Veterans with Other Homeless Men in a Large Clinical Outreach Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper compares homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans from different eras in an effort to better understand the connection between military service and urban homelessness. Two research questions are addressed based on interviews with over 4,000 homeless men who enrolled in a national outreach program for persons suffering from serious mental illness: First, is there anything unique in the social

Richard Tessler; Robert Rosenheck; Gail Gamache

2002-01-01

332

2 Homeless service Utilization report The 2010 Homeless Service Utilization Report is the  

E-print Network

#12;2 Homeless service Utilization report The 2010 Homeless Service Utilization Report is the fifth in a series of reports prepared by the Center on the Family at the University of Hawai`i and the Homeless Programs Office of the Hawai`i State Department of Human Services (DHS). Since the first Homeless Service

Dong, Yingfei

333

Homeless children and education: an evaluation of the Stewart B. McKinney homeless assistance act  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children are the poorest group of Americans, and among those most devastated by poverty are homeless children. Numerous problems associate with homelessness for children, including academic problems: Homeless children tend to perform more poorly in school, repeat grades more often, and drop out of school more often than do other children. Risks at each stage of a homeless child's development

Heather Biggar

2001-01-01

334

Serving the Homeless: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Homeless ShelterServices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of homeless assistance services at the local level are tremendously difficult to ascertain. In this study, a four-month sample of homeless persons served by a local homeless shelter and case management program were contacted nine to eleven months after receiving services. The findings suggest that the program had some initial success in assisting the homeless clients to locate

George M. Glisson; Bruce A. Thyer; Robert L. Fischer

335

The Spatial Origins of the Homeless: How the Homeless Vary in Their Geographic Distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been no such study to date to investigate the residential origin of the varying categories of homeless. This study investigates the spatial distribution of residential origins of the varying categories of homeless and the factors that contribute to the vulnerability of individuals to become homeless. The study categorizes homeless people based on gender, family status, the occurrence of

Deden Rukmana

2006-01-01

336

Homelessness outcome reporting normative framework: systems-level evaluation of progress in ending homelessness.  

PubMed

Homelessness is a serious and growing issue. Evaluations of systemic-level changes are needed to determine progress in reducing or ending homelessness. The report card methodology is one means of systems-level assessment. Rather than solely establishing an enumeration, homelessness report cards can capture pertinent information about structural determinants of homelessness. This information can inform the development of evidence-based strategies aimed at ending (rather than managing) homelessness. To aid in the development of homelessness report card creation, a systems-level Homelessness Outcome Reporting Normative Framework (the HORN Framework) was developed. This article provides an overview of the framework and its application. PMID:22522143

Austen, Tyrone; Pauly, Bernie

2012-02-01

337

Homelessness in Cambridge: A Social Attitudes Survey  

E-print Network

`homeless'? The survey began with a simple thought exercise, but one that is highly revealing of the ways' homeless person: `a smelly man ... with a dog.' Numerous references were made to Big Issue vendors

Steiner, Ullrich

338

Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in  

E-print Network

Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in Tempe's Emerging Urban Setting David V. Summers of the Tempe First United Methodist Church, provides vital support services to homeless and working poor people

Zhang, Junshan

339

Homelessness: A Data-Driven Learning Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a learning guide that uses data to investigate the characteristics of the Washington DC, metropolitan area homeless population, and the relationship between homelessness and several measures of health.

Icpsr

340

Risk Factors for Homelessness among Women Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Background. Women veterans are three to four times more likely than non-veteran women to become homeless. However, their risk factors for homelessness have not been defined. Methods. Case-control study of non-institutionalized homeless women veterans (n533) and age-matched housed women veterans (n=165). Health, health care, and factors associated with homelessness were assessed using multiple logistic regression with a Monte Carlo algorithm

Donna L. Washington; Elizabeth M. Yano; James McGuire; Vivian Hines; Martin Lee; Lillian Gelberg

2010-01-01

341

Risk Factors for Homelessness among Women Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Women veterans are three to four times more likely than non-veteran women to become homeless. However, their risk factors for homelessness have not been defined. Methods. Case-control study of non-institutionalized homeless women veterans (n533) and age-matched housed women veterans (n=165). Health, health care, and factors associated with homelessness were assessed using multiple logistic regression with a Monte Carlo algorithm

MPH Elizabeth M. Yano MSPH Donna L. Washington; MSPH Lillian Gelberg

2010-01-01

342

Modeling minority stress effects on homelessness and health disparities among young men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Sexual minority youth are more likely to experience homelessness, and homeless sexual minority youth report greater risk for mental health and substance abuse symptoms than homeless heterosexual youth, yet few studies have assessed determinants that help explain the disparities. Minority stress theory proposes that physical and mental health disparities among sexual minority populations may be explained by the stress produced by living in heterosexist social environments characterized by stigma and discrimination directed toward sexual minority persons. We used data from a sample of 200 young men who have sex with men (YMSM) (38 % African American, 26.5 % Latino/Hispanic, 23.5 % White, 12 % multiracial/other) to develop an exploratory path model measuring the effects of experience and internalization of sexual orientation stigma on depression and substance use via being kicked out of home due to sexual orientation and current homelessness. Direct significant paths were found from experience of sexual orientation-related stigma to internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma, having been kicked out of one's home, experiencing homelessness during the past year, and major depressive symptoms during the past week. Having been kicked out of one's home had a direct significant effect on experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months and on daily marijuana use. Internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma and experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months partially mediated the direct effect of experience of sexual orientation-related stigma on major depressive symptoms. Our empirical testing of the effects of minority stress on health of YMSM advances minority stress theory as a framework for investigating health disparities among this population. PMID:24807702

Bruce, Douglas; Stall, Ron; Fata, Aimee; Campbell, Richard T

2014-06-01

343

Unraveling the Social Construction of Homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a historical and critical analysis of homelessness in the United States. It argues that societal understanding of homelessness stems from a process of social construction in which, over time, differing groups have framed the definition and debate. The main groups influencing interpretations of homelessness are those ascribing to individual and the structural interpretations of social problems. Individual

Courtney Cronley

2010-01-01

344

Homelessness and Its Effects on Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness influences every facet of children's lives, inhibiting their physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and behavioral development. Homeless women face such obstacles to healthy pregnancies as chemical abuse, chronic health problems, and lack of prenatal care. Homeless infants are more likely to have low birth weights and are at greater…

Hart-Shegos, Ellen

345

Homeless Young People and Technology: Ordinary  

E-print Network

consequences for the U.S. By one estimate, 3 million young people experience homelessness annu- ally; that is, about 1 percent of the U.S. population is both young and homeless at some point each year [1- munity of homeless young people in Seattle, Washington, allowing us to explore ordinary uses of digital

Anderson, Richard

346

The Invisible Homeless: A New Urban Ecology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contemporary homelessness is the result of increasing social and economic inequality faced by those in American society who are most vulnerable to individual, family, and economic instability. This case study of the homeless population of Los Angeles (California), based on two surveys conducted in 1984, views the homeless as a segment of the…

Ropers, Richard H.

347

Critical Homelessness: Expanding Narratives of Inclusive Democracy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experience (as opposed to the concept) of homelessness is hardly part of the academic discourse in education, cultural studies, or human development. One of the central goals of our special issue is to create a bridge between homelessness as a personal experience and homelessness as a public issue. Along with the personal experience that breaks free from the deficit-model

Susan Finley; Marcelo Diversi

2010-01-01

348

Education Research on Homeless and Housed Children Living in Poverty: Comments on Masten, Fantuzzo, Herbers, and Voight  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This commentary on articles by Masten, Fantuzzo, Herbers, and Voight (and their colleagues) summarizes the findings of each study and discusses their respective contributions. The author of this comment relates his own experiences in conducting similar research with homeless and other low-income youths and reports lessons he has learned that can…

Buckner, John C.

2012-01-01

349

Street careers: homelessness, drug use, and sex work among young men who have sex with men (YMSM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

“Hustling” or sex work is a common means of surviving on the streets and paying for drugs among homeless youth. In this article, we formulate the concepts of “street capital” and “street competencies” to describe how 10 young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in New York City accumulated various knowledge and skills throughout their childhood and adolescence, and

Stephen E. Lankenau; Michael C. Clatts; Dorinda Welle; Lloyd A. Goldsamt; Marya Viost Gwadz

2005-01-01

350

Meeting the health care needs of street-involved youth.  

PubMed

Health care providers who see homeless or street-involved youth can help to reduce the impact of many risk factors - physical, mental, emotional and social - pertaining to street culture. The present statement describes the types and scale of homelessness in Canada, and reviews reasons why youth turn to the street, risks of the 'street economy' and barriers to health care. Common physical and mental health problems are considered, along with legal and ethical issues that may affect care. Principles of care, including accessibility, confidentiality and harm reduction, and strategies to target and engage this population lead to recommendations for improving services, outcomes, advocacy and increased governmental support. PMID:24421703

Elliott, April S

2013-06-01

351

Meeting the health care needs of street-involved youth  

PubMed Central

Health care providers who see homeless or street-involved youth can help to reduce the impact of many risk factors – physical, mental, emotional and social – pertaining to street culture. The present statement describes the types and scale of homelessness in Canada, and reviews reasons why youth turn to the street, risks of the ‘street economy’ and barriers to health care. Common physical and mental health problems are considered, along with legal and ethical issues that may affect care. Principles of care, including accessibility, confidentiality and harm reduction, and strategies to target and engage this population lead to recommendations for improving services, outcomes, advocacy and increased governmental support. PMID:24421703

Elliott, April S

2013-01-01

352

Late-Onset PTSD in Unaccompanied Refugee Minors: Exploring the Predictive Utility of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following resettlement in Western countries, unaccompanied refugee minors (URM) are at risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear to what extent PTSD in this group may become manifest at later stages following resettlement and which factors are associated with late onset. We examined data from URM collected 1 (T1) and 2…

Smid, Geert E.; Lensvelt-Mulders, Gerty J. L. M.; Knipscheer, Jeroen W.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Kleber, Rolf J.

2011-01-01

353

Correlates of homeless episodes among indigenous people.  

PubMed

This study reports the correlates of homeless episodes among 873 Indigenous adults who are part of an ongoing longitudinal study on four reservations in the Northern Midwest and four Canadian First Nation reserves. Descriptive analyses depict differences between those who have and have not experienced an episode of homelessness in their lifetimes. Multivariate analyses assess factors associated with a history of homeless episodes at the time of their first interview and differentiate correlates of "near homelessness" (i.e., doubling up) and "homeless episodes" (periods of actual homelessness). Results show that individuals with a history of homeless episodes had significantly more individual and family health, mental health, and substance abuse problems. Periods of homelessness also were associated with financial problems. Among the female caretakers who experienced episodes of homelessness over the course of the study, the majority had been homeless at least once prior to the start of the study and approximately one-fifth met criteria for lifetime alcohol dependence, drug abuse, or major depression. Family adversity during childhood was also common for women experiencing homelessness during the study. PMID:21656303

Whitbeck, Les B; Crawford, Devan M; Sittner Hartshorn, Kelley J

2012-03-01

354

Michigan's Campaign to End Homelessness  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Michigan State Homeless Management Information System (MSHMIS) is a single database platform that provides an unduplicated count of homeless persons living in each region of Michigan. The system also measures patterns of service use and the effectiveness of the services delivered, providing the ability to assess progress across programs and regions. It was developed to improve consistency of reporting among Michigan’s Continuum of Care (CoC) network and includes information from all the service organizations in each region, a total of 524 organizations statewide.

Homelessness, Michiganâs C.

355

Gender Differences in the Residential Origins of the Homeless: Identification of Areas with High Risk of Homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article offers a gender perspective on homelessness concerning residential origins. Data were obtained through the 2005 homelessness survey in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The residential origins of homeless women are more widespread and less concentrated in the neighborhoods of high poverty than those of homeless men. Areas with lack of low-rent housing units are at greatest risk of generating homeless

Deden Rukmana

2010-01-01

356

Psychosocial issues in primary care of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth are at risk for a multitude of physical, emotional, and social health problems. During the past decade it has been well documented that these youth have higher-than-average rates of depression, suicide attempts, substance abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, school failure, family rejection, and homelessness. The focus of this article is to outline skills and strategies

Jennifer L. Kreiss; Diana L. Patterson

1997-01-01

357

Foster Care Placement, Poor Parenting, and Negative Outcomes Among Homeless Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although homeless youth with and without foster care histories both face adverse life circumstances, little is known about\\u000a how these two groups compare in terms of their early histories and whether they face similar outcomes. As such, we compared\\u000a those with and without a history of foster care placement to determine if the associations between a history of poor parenting

Kimberly A. TylerLisa; Lisa A. Melander

2010-01-01

358

Perceived relationship between military service and homelessness among homeless veterans with mental illness.  

PubMed

This study examined the perceived relationship between military service and the risk of homelessness after discharge and identified specific aspects of military service that homeless veterans experience as having increased their risk for becoming homeless. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 631 homeless veterans enrolled in the VA Therapeutic Employment Placement and Support Program from January 2001 through September 2003. Associations of sociodemographic characteristics, clinical status, and military service characteristics (independent variables) were examined in relation to perceptions of increased risk for homelessness and time to first episode of homelessness after leaving the military (two dependent variables), using analysis of variance, logistic regression, and multiple regression statistical analyses. Fewer than one third (31%) of the homeless veterans in this study reported that military service increased their risk for homelessness--either somewhat (18%) or very much (13%). Among those veterans who perceived military service as increasing their risk for becoming homeless, the three aspects of military service most commonly identified included a) substance abuse problems that began in the military (75%), b) inadequate preparation for civilian employment (68%), and c) loss of a structured lifestyle. The relatively small proportion of homeless veterans who attributed homelessness to their military service, coupled with the long 14-year average lag time between discharge and their first episode of homelessness, is consistent with epidemiological data suggesting that military service itself does not substantially increase the risk for becoming homeless among veterans. PMID:15457118

Mares, Alvin S; Rosenheck, Robert A

2004-10-01

359

Homelessness: a problem for primary care?  

PubMed

Homelessness is a social problem that affects all facets of contemporary society. This paper discusses the concept of homelessness in terms of its historical context and the dominance of the pervasive 'victim blaming' ideologies, which, together with the worldwide economic changes that have contributed to a fiscal crisis of the state, and the resultant policies and circumstances, have led to an increase in the number of 'new homeless' people. This paper attempts to challenge the dominant political discourse on homelessness. The widespread healthcare problems and heterogeneity of homeless people have a particular impact on health services, with many homeless people inappropriately accessing local accident and emergency (A&E) departments because of barriers inhibiting adequate access to primary care. A number of primary care schemes have been successfully implemented to enable the homeless to have better access to appropriate care. However, there is no consistency in the level of services around the United Kingdom (UK), and innovations in service are not widespread and by their nature they are ad hoc. Despite the successes of such schemes, many homeless people still access health care inappropriately. Until homeless people are fully integrated into primary care the situation will not change. The question remains, how can appropriate access be established? A start can be made by building on some of the positive work that is already being done in primary care, but in reality general practitioners (GPs) will be 'swimming against the tide' unless a more integrated policy approach is adopted to tackle homelessness. PMID:12939894

Riley, Anthony J; Harding, Geoffrey; Underwood, Martin R; Carter, Yvonne H

2003-06-01

360

Homelessness: a problem for primary care?  

PubMed Central

Homelessness is a social problem that affects all facets of contemporary society. This paper discusses the concept of homelessness in terms of its historical context and the dominance of the pervasive 'victim blaming' ideologies, which, together with the worldwide economic changes that have contributed to a fiscal crisis of the state, and the resultant policies and circumstances, have led to an increase in the number of 'new homeless' people. This paper attempts to challenge the dominant political discourse on homelessness. The widespread healthcare problems and heterogeneity of homeless people have a particular impact on health services, with many homeless people inappropriately accessing local accident and emergency (A&E) departments because of barriers inhibiting adequate access to primary care. A number of primary care schemes have been successfully implemented to enable the homeless to have better access to appropriate care. However, there is no consistency in the level of services around the United Kingdom (UK), and innovations in service are not widespread and by their nature they are ad hoc. Despite the successes of such schemes, many homeless people still access health care inappropriately. Until homeless people are fully integrated into primary care the situation will not change. The question remains, how can appropriate access be established? A start can be made by building on some of the positive work that is already being done in primary care, but in reality general practitioners (GPs) will be 'swimming against the tide' unless a more integrated policy approach is adopted to tackle homelessness. PMID:12939894

Riley, Anthony J; Harding, Geoffrey; Underwood, Martin R; Carter, Yvonne H

2003-01-01

361

Intonation in unaccompanied singing: accuracy, drift, and a model of reference pitch memory.  

PubMed

This paper presents a study on intonation and intonation drift in unaccompanied singing, and proposes a simple model of reference pitch memory that accounts for many of the effects observed. Singing experiments were conducted with 24 singers of varying ability under three conditions (Normal, Masked, Imagined). Over the duration of a recording, ?50?s, a median absolute intonation drift of 11 cents was observed. While smaller than the median note error (19 cents), drift was significant in 22% of recordings. Drift magnitude did not correlate with other measures of singing accuracy, singing experience, or the presence of conditions tested. Furthermore, it is shown that neither a static intonation memory model nor a memoryless interval-based intonation model can account for the accuracy and drift behavior observed. The proposed causal model provides a better explanation as it treats the reference pitch as a changing latent variable. PMID:24993224

Mauch, Matthias; Frieler, Klaus; Dixon, Simon

2014-07-01

362

Developing Programs for Homeless Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between 1992 and 2003, services for homeless veterans at the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System went from inappropriate utilization of hospital medical and psychiatric beds, to a continuum of residential treatment, transitional housing, and employment programs through arrangements with private agencies. The authors use elements of Hasenfeld and Brock's Political Economy Model (1991) to explain this transformation in

John Nakashima; Jim McGuire; Stephen Berman; William Daniels

2005-01-01

363

The Homeless. Opposing Viewpoints Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Books in the Opposing Viewpoints Series present debates about current issues that can be used to teach critical reading and thinking skills. The variety of opinions expressed in this collection of articles and book excerpts explore many aspects of the problem of homelessness. According to a 1994 report by the U..S. Conference of Mayors, the number…

Roleff, Tamara L., Ed.

364

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans  

MedlinePLUS

... and our national service provider community to help in the campaign to end veteran homelessness. The portal will help your business capitalize on our 23 years of experience and expertise, our vast community network, and our ... veterans. Veteran in crisis? Dial 1.877.424.3838 for 24/ ...

365

Onset of conduct disorder, use of delinquent subsistence strategies, and street victimization among homeless and runaway adolescents in the Midwest.  

PubMed

This study examines the effects of childhood-onset conduct disorder on later antisocial behavior and street victimization among a group of homeless and runaway adolescents. Four hundred twenty-eight homeless and runaway youth were interviewed directly on the streets and in shelters from four Midwestern states. Key findings include the following. First, compared with those who exhibit adolescent-onset conduct disorder, youth with childhood onset are more likely to engage in a series of antisocial behaviors such as use of sexual and nonsexual survival strategies. Second, youth with childhood-onset conduct disorder are more likely to experience violent victimization; this association, however, is mostly through an intervening process such as engagement in deviant survival strategies. PMID:17704461

Chen, Xiaojin; Thrane, Lisa; Whitbeck, Les B; Johnson, Kurt D; Hoyt, Dan R

2007-09-01

366

Universal Screening for Homelessness and Risk for Homelessness in the Veterans Health Administration  

PubMed Central

We examined data for all veterans who completed the Veterans Health Administration’s national homelessness screening instrument between October 1, 2012, and January 10, 2013. Among veterans who were not engaged with the US Department of Veterans Affairs homeless system and presented for primary care services, the prevalence of recent housing instability or homelessness was 0.9% and homelessness risk was 1.2%. Future research will refine outreach strategies, targeting of prevention resources, and development of novel interventions. PMID:24148032

Fargo, Jamison D.; Byrne, Thomas H.; Kane, Vincent R.; Culhane, Dennis P.

2013-01-01

367

Universal screening for homelessness and risk for homelessness in the Veterans Health Administration.  

PubMed

We examined data for all veterans who completed the Veterans Health Administration's national homelessness screening instrument between October 1, 2012, and January 10, 2013. Among veterans who were not engaged with the US Department of Veterans Affairs homeless system and presented for primary care services, the prevalence of recent housing instability or homelessness was 0.9% and homelessness risk was 1.2%. Future research will refine outreach strategies, targeting of prevention resources, and development of novel interventions. PMID:24148032

Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Fargo, Jamison D; Byrne, Thomas H; Kane, Vincent R; Culhane, Dennis P

2013-12-01

368

A TYPOLOGY OF DRUG-RELATED OFFENDING AMONG YOUNG HOMELESS INJECTION DRUG USERS  

PubMed Central

Research indicates a link between drug use and offending, particularly amongst high-risk individuals, such as homeless youth. The extent to which such youth interpret their offending as being related to their drug use, though, is understudied. This manuscript investigates the interpretations of drug-related offenses offered by 151 primarily white, male, homeless IDUs aged 16–29 years. Youth were asked specific questions about their drug-related offenses during in-depth interviews as part of a larger study investigating health risks surrounding drug injection between 2004 and 2006. The first section of the manuscript outlines offenses youth revealed committing either in pursuit of or after using a variety of substances. The second part of the manuscript examines the overall context (motivation, environment), and provides a seven-tiered typology of drug-related offending based on youth's interpretations, linking certain drugs to specific offenses within particular contexts. From here, some theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:21423855

Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Hathaz, Dodi S.

2011-01-01

369

Homelessness Outcome Reporting Normative Framework: Systems-Level Evaluation of Progress in Ending Homelessness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness is a serious and growing issue. Evaluations of systemic-level changes are needed to determine progress in reducing or ending homelessness. The report card methodology is one means of systems-level assessment. Rather than solely establishing an enumeration, homelessness report cards can capture pertinent information about structural…

Austen, Tyrone; Pauly, Bernie

2012-01-01

370

Homelessness and Trauma Go Hand-in-Hand”: Pathways to Homelessness among Women Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundVeterans comprise a disproportionate fraction of the nation’s homeless population, with women veterans up to four times more likely to be homeless than non-veteran women. This paper provides a grounded description of women veterans’ pathways into homelessness.

Alison B. Hamilton; Ines Poza; Donna L. Washington

2011-01-01

371

Vulnerability to Homelessness, Use of Services and Homelessness Prevention in Black and Minority Ethnic Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the high prominence of homelessness on the housing policy agenda and evidence that a disproportionate number of people affected by homelessness come from black and minority ethnic (BME) communities, little is known about patterns of access and use of homelessness services in these communities. This paper seeks to fill the gap, by drawing on qualitative and quantitative research recently

Gina Netto

2006-01-01

372

HOMELESS IN AMERICA, HOMELESS IN CALIFORNIA John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, and Eugene Smolensky*  

E-print Network

avail- ability can substantially reduce the incidence of homelessness in the United States. I* Abstract--It is generally believed that the increased incidence of home- lessness in the United States hasHOMELESS IN AMERICA, HOMELESS IN CALIFORNIA John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, and Eugene Smolensky

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

373

Violence within the lives of homeless people.  

E-print Network

??Narrative Literature Review Experience of victimisation and violence is prevalent within homeless people’s lives, and frequently begins in childhood through the experience of childhood abuse… (more)

Couldrey, Charlotte

2010-01-01

374

Youth on the Street: Abuse and Neglect in the Eighties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviews with 489 runaway and homeless youth (often victims of abuse and neglect) identified two groups: (1) "runners," who leave home intending not to return and (2) "in and outers," who run away as an impulsive temporary coping mechanism. Risk of engaging in illegal activity increased with distance and time away. (Author/VW)

Kufeldt, Kathleen; Nimmo, Margaret

1987-01-01

375

Notes from the field: hospitalizations for respiratory disease among unaccompanied children from Central America - multiple States, June-July 2014.  

PubMed

During October 2013-June 2014, approximately 54,000 unaccompanied children, mostly from the Central American countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, were identified attempting entry into the United States from Mexico, exceeding numbers reported in previous years. Once identified in the United States, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, an agency of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, processes the unaccompanied children and transfers them to the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), an office of the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ORR cares for the children in shelters until they can be released to a sponsor, typically a parent or relative, who can care for the child while their immigration case is processed. In June 2014, in response to the increased number of unaccompanied children, U.S. Customs and Border Protection expanded operations to accommodate children at a processing center in Nogales, Arizona. ORR, together with the U.S. Department of Defense, opened additional large temporary shelters for the children at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas; U.S. Army Garrison Ft. Sill, Oklahoma; and Naval Base Ventura County, California. PMID:25121713

Nyangoma, Edith N; Arriola, Carmen Sofia; Hagan, Jose; Socias, Christina; Tomczyk, Sara; Watkins, Louise Francois; Westercamp, Matthew; Kim, Curi

2014-08-15

376

Duration and structure of unaccompanied (dyadic) and accompanied (triadic) initial outpatient consultations in a specialist seizure clinic.  

PubMed

This study explores differences in the duration and structure of unaccompanied (dyadic) and accompanied (triadic) initial (diagnostic) outpatient consultations in a specialist seizure clinic. This is the first known study to explore this topic quantitatively by analyzing the discourse space taken up by the different participants in real clinical encounters. We did not observe significant differences between the duration of accompanied and unaccompanied interactions (p=0.589). Results suggest that patients occupy proportionally less discourse space (measured by the number of words produced) in accompanied interactions than in unaccompanied interactions (56.9% versus 28.3%, p ? 0.0001). In accompanied interactions, there is a weak negative correlation between the discourse space of patients and that of doctors (rs=-0.43, p=0.017) and a moderate to strong negative correlation with the discourse spaces of companions (rs=-0.64, p=0.001). These findings indicate that the presence of a companion may reduce opportunities for doctors to observe the interactional, linguistic, and topical features of seizure patient talk, whose differential diagnostic value has been described in a number of previous publications, or for patients to raise issues they want to talk about. PMID:23603035

Robson, Catherine; Drew, Paul; Reuber, Markus

2013-06-01

377

[Healthcare institutions for the homeless].  

PubMed

Samusocial is an organisation which provides emergency and longer-term medical respite beds in Paris. They offer, for a duration ranging from a few days to a few years, shelter for homeless people requiring medical care but which no longer merits hospitalisation. The nursing role consists in supporting as part of a multi-professional team these people whose self-esteem and body image have been damaged, to help them construct their life project. PMID:24881236

Pain, Marielle; Kusuamina, Laëticia; Kusuamina, Laëticia

2014-04-01

378

Sheltered versus nonsheltered homeless women  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To contrast sociodemographic characteristics, physical and mental health status, substance use, sexual behaviors, victimization,\\u000a and utilization of health services between homeless women residing in sheltered and nonsheltered environments.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. A structured scale was used to measure mental health status. Physical health status, substance use,\\u000a sexual behavior, history of adult victimization, and health services utilization were measured by

Adeline M. Nyamathi; Barbara Leake; Lillian Gelberg

2000-01-01

379

Gender Differences in Self-Reported Reasons for Homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate some of the ways in which the perceived pathways into homelessness are socially structured. We do this by examining the relative frequency of 11 different reasons homeless males and females cite for being homeless. Males were more likely to cite the following as their main reasons for homelessness: loss of a job,

Richard Tessler; Robert Rosenheck; Gail Gamache

2001-01-01

380

Barriers to Psychosocial Services Among Homeless Women Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Veterans make up a disproportionate fraction of the nation's homeless population, with women veterans up to 4 times more likely to be homeless than nonveteran women. This article provides a grounded description of barriers to psychosocial services among homeless women veterans. Three focus groups were held in Los Angeles, California, with a total of 29 homeless women veterans. These women

Alison B. Hamilton; Ines Poza; Vivian Hines; Donna L. Washington

2012-01-01

381

The determinants of homelessness and the targeting of housing assistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study combines data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation with the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients to estimate a conditional probability model of homelessness. The results suggest which factors are important predictors of homelessness and argue that gender, age, and race of the household head, are important determinants of whether a household is homeless.

Dirk W. Early

2004-01-01

382

An Examination of Criminal Behavior among the Homeless.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness is a significant social problem in the United States, with an estimated 2.5 million homeless people in this country today. While criminal activity may become a means for the homeless to obtain resources needed for basic survival, little is known about the level of criminal activity among the homeless or about the types of crimnal…

Solarz, Andrea

383

Homelessness in the United States: An Ecological Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an ecological perspective on homelessness that emphasizes the context in which homeless people live and the complex interactions between personal, social, economic, and service system resources that affect their well-being. The ecological perspective encourages researchers and program developers to assess the problems of homelessness at multiple levels of analysis, to view homelessness as a result of contextual

Paul A. Toro; Edison J. Trickett; David D. Wall; Deborah A. Salem

1991-01-01

384

Relationships Between Psychosocial Risks and Stress in Homeless Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless children are typically exposed to the worst environmental conditions associated with poverty. Despite recent attention to psychosocial risks associated with homelessness, limited attention has been paid to stress-related symptoms in homeless children. Better understanding of homeless children's experience of stress could point the way toward improvement of services for them. The purpose of the present exploratory study was to

Timothy F. Page; Roger M. Nooe

1999-01-01

385

Homelessness and Substance Use in Cook County  

E-print Network

and Substance Abuse State of Illinois by Timothy P. Johnson and Mark E. Barrett Survey Research Laboratory University of Illinois September 1991 #12;#12;Homelessness & Substance Abuse in Cook County i CONTENTS Page ....................................................................................................49 #12;Homelessness & Substance Abuse in Cook County ii CONTENTS--Continued Page REFERENCES

Illinois at Chicago, University of

386

Homeless Housing: HUD's Shelter Programs. Updated.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper briefly discusses new housing programs for the homeless sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the funding provided by the 100th Congress, and two additional HUD programs to aid the homeless. The following four programs are discussed: (1) the Emergency Shelter Program; (2) the Transitional Housing Program,…

Vanhorenbeck, Susan M.

387

Food insecurity among homeless and runaway adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of food insecurity and factors related to it among homeless and runaway adolescents. Design: Computer-assisted personal interviews were conducted with homeless and runaway adolescents directly on the streets and in shelters. Setting: Interviews were conducted in eight Midwest cities: Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Iowa City, Kansas City, Lincoln, Omaha,

Les B. Whitbeck; Xiaojin Chen; Kurt D. Johnson

2006-01-01

388

Correlates of Homeless Episodes among Indigenous People  

PubMed Central

This study reports the correlates of homeless episodes among 873 Indigenous adults who are part of an ongoing longitudinal study on four reservations in the Northern Midwest and four Canadian First Nation reserves. Descriptive analyses depict differences between those who have and have not experienced an episode of homelessness in their lifetimes. Multivariate analyses assess factors associated with a history of homeless episodes at the time of their first interview. Results show that individuals with a history of homeless episodes had significantly more individual and family health, mental health, and substance abuse problems. Periods of homelessness also were associated with financial problems. Among the female caretakers who experienced episodes of homelessness over the course of the study, the majority had been homeless at least once prior to the start of the study and approximately one–fifth met criteria for lifetime alcohol dependence, drug abuse, or major depression. Family adversity during childhood was also common for women experiencing homelessness during the study. PMID:21656303

Whitbeck, Les B.; Crawford, Devan M.; Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner

2011-01-01

389

The Impact of Homelessness on Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews and critiques community-based research on the effects of homelessness on children. Homeless children confront serious threats to their ability to succeed and their future well-being. Of particular concern are health problems, hunger, poor nutrition, developmental delays, anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, and educational underachievement. Factors that may mediate the observed outcomes include inadequate shelter conditions, instability in residences

Yvonne Rafferty; Marybeth Shinn

1991-01-01

390

Meeting the Educational Needs of Homeless Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (1987) provides considerable protection for homeless children's educational needs. States cannot create a separate education system for these kids, and must revise all restrictive policies, laws, and regulations. Educators should work to facilitate schooling continuity, minimize enrollment delays,…

Rafferty, Yvonne

1998-01-01

391

Housing Outcomes for Hospitalized Homeless Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines housing status at the time of hospital discharge in a national sample of 3,502 veterans who were homeless at admission to a Veterans Health Adminis- tration (VHA) medical center. A supplemental survey on homelessness was added to the annual VHA inpatient census over a 4-year period (1995 through 1998). Data from this survey were used to identify

Greg A. Greenberg; Jennifer Hoblyn; Catherine Seibyl; Robert A. Rosenheck

2006-01-01

392

Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

2012-01-01

393

Measuring pain in the context of homelessness  

PubMed Central

Purpose The primary objective of this study was to inform the development of measures of pain impact appropriate for all respondents, including homeless individuals, so that they can be used in clinical research and practice. The secondary objective was to increase understanding about the unique experience of homeless people with pain. Methods Seventeen homeless individuals with chronic health conditions (often associated with pain) participated in cognitive interviews to test the functioning of 56 pain measurement items and provided information about their experience living with and accessing treatment for pain. Results The most common problems identified with items were that they lacked clarity or were irrelevant in the context of homelessness. Items that were unclear, irrelevant and/or had other identified problems made it difficult for participants to respond. Participants also described multiple ways in which their pain was exacerbated by conditions of homelessness and identified barriers to accessing appropriate treatment. Conclusions Results suggested that the majority of items were problematic for the homeless and require substantial modifications to make the pain impact bank relevant to this population. Additional recommendations include involving homeless in future item bank development, conducting research on the topic of pain and homelessness, and using cognitive interviewing in other types of health disparities research. PMID:19582592

Matter, Rebecca; Kline, Susan; Cook, Karon F.; Amtmann, Dagmar

2009-01-01

394

Homelessness, Poverty, and Children's Literacy Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over 100 million families worldwide lack permanent housing or income sufficient to meet their basic needs. Some homeless children are able to succeed in school despite the many challenges they face, but others are not. Seventy-five percent of U.S. homeless children perform below grade level in reading, and schools and teachers may not be prepared…

Walker-Dalhouse, Doris; Risko, Victoria J.

2008-01-01

395

Preliminary Findings on Rural Homelessness in Ohio.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report is designed to present preliminary findings from the first comprehensive study of rural homelessness in the United States. The study was conducted during the first 6 months of 1990, and data were collected from interviews with 921 homeless adults in 21 randomly selected rural counties in Ohio. The sample counties represent 26% of the…

First, Richard J.; And Others

396

The New Poverty: Homeless Families in America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book discusses homeless families in the United States and advocates the efforts of residential educational and employment training centers--American Family Inns--which provide comprehensive services education, job training, and parenting and life skills to address the poverty-related conditions that contribute to homelessness. Chapters of the…

Nunez, Ralph da Costa

397

The Disadvantage of Homelessness in Children's Schooling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents findings of a study that investigated the extent to which homeless children in the United States receive the "free and appropriate education" to which they are entitled. Data were collected through several surveys conducted in two San Francisco Bay Area counties: (1) surveys of parents in homeless shelters with 313 school-age…

Shaver, Debra M.; Dornbusch, Sanford M.

398

Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

2012-01-01

399

Youth Participation in Youth Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Frequently, adults organize and implement youth projects without involving youth in the process. However, youth should be involved in problem identification and program design because they understand the needs of their peers and how to reach them effectively. This paper examines youth participation as a process for bringing about effective youth

Kothari, Roshani

400

Health interventions for people who are homeless.  

PubMed

Homelessness has serious implications for the health of individuals and populations. Primary health-care programmes specifically tailored to homeless individuals might be more effective than standard primary health care. Standard case management, assertive community treatment, and critical time intervention are effective models of mental health-care delivery. Housing First, with immediate provision of housing in independent units with support, improves outcomes for individuals with serious mental illnesses. Many different types of interventions, including case management, are effective in the reduction of substance misuse. Interventions that provide case management and supportive housing have the greatest effect when they target individuals who are the most intensive users of services. Medical respite programmes are an effective intervention for homeless patients leaving the hospital. Although the scientific literature provides guidance on interventions to improve the health of homeless individuals, health-care providers should also seek to address social policies and structural factors that result in homelessness. PMID:25390579

Hwang, Stephen W; Burns, Tom

2014-10-25

401

Social capital in the experience of homeless mothers  

E-print Network

Fall 2012 – Spring 2013 | 1 Social capital in the experience of homeless mothers D. Adam Nicholson Homelessness in the United States affects many different people. In 2012, of the estimated 633,782 people experiencing homelessness... in the United States (National Alliance to End Homelessness), an estimated 37.8% were homeless families. Of this group, an increasing number are women and children. These numbers may underestimate reality, as at any given moment it is nearly impossible...

Nicholson, Adam

2013-04-01

402

Understanding the experiences and emotional needs of unaccompanied asylum-seeking adolescents in the UK.  

PubMed

For adolescents who flee to the UK seeking asylum, the experience of leaving their home country puts them at risk of developing mental health problems. Although there is a research base exploring the mental health of asylum-seeking children and adolescents who arrive with their families, there is in contrast very little focusing on the mental health needs of children and adolescents who arrive in the UK alone. There has been ongoing debate about whether current theoretical models for understanding reactions to trauma and loss are helpful in supporting unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and adolescents with complex psychological and social issues as a result of fleeing their home countries. This article draws on young people's own understanding of their experiences of seeking asylum in the UK using a qualitative semi-structured interview. It attempts to develop a more contextually relevant understanding of their emotional reactions to adversity and to consider the sorts of support required. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to provide an in-depth understanding of six young asylum seekers' experiences, exploring themes of loss, negotiating a new life, psychological distress and the process of adjustment. Psychological interventions and future service provision for this group are discussed. PMID:21317184

Groark, Claire; Sclare, Irene; Raval, Hitesh

2011-07-01

403

Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among unaccompanied asylum-seeking adolescents in norway.  

PubMed

Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) are known to be subjected to several potentially traumatic life events, risking more mental health problems than other populations of same age. In this study, we aimed to explore the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity at an early stage after arrival to the host country. We performed structured clinical interviews (CIDI) with 160 male UASC from different countries (Afghanistan, Somalia, Iran), after four months in Norway. Most of the participants had experienced life threatening events (82%), physical abuse (78%), or loss of a close relative (78%) in their former life. Altogether 41.9% of the participants fulfilled diagnostic criteria for a current psychiatric disorder. The most prevalent diagnosis was PTSD (30, 6%), followed by MDD (9, 4%), Agoraphobia (4, 4%) and GAD (3, 8%). Implications of this vulnerability call for more mental health resources in the early stages of the asylum process. Increased awareness of psychiatric morbidity in UASC may improve the prognosis, give more appropriate care, and ease the integration process on all levels of society. PMID:25006343

Jakobsen, Marianne; Demott, Melinda A M; Heir, Trond

2014-01-01

404

Longitudinal follow-up of the mental health of unaccompanied refugee minors.  

PubMed

Despite growing numbers of unaccompanied refugee minors (UMs) in Europe, and evidence that this group is at risk of developing mental health problems, there still remain important knowledge gaps regarding the development of UMs' mental health during their trajectories in the host country and, in particular, the possible influencing role of traumatic experiences and daily stressors therein. This study therefore followed 103 UMs from the moment they arrived in Belgium until 18 months later. Traumatic experiences (SLE), mental health symptoms (HSCL-37A, RATS) and daily stressors (DSSYR) were measured at arrival in Belgium, after 6 and 18 months. UMs reported generally high scores on anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Linear mixed model analysis showed no significant differences in mental health scores over time, pointing towards the possible long-term persistence of mental health problems in this population. The number of traumatic experiences and the number of daily stressors leaded to a significant higher symptom level of depression (daily stressors), anxiety and PTSD (traumatic experiences and daily stressors). European migration policies need to reduce the impact of daily stressors on UMs' mental health by ameliorating the reception and care facilities for this group. Moreover, regular mental health screenings are needed, in combination with, if needed, adapted psychosocial and therapeutic care. PMID:23979476

Vervliet, Marianne; Lammertyn, Jan; Broekaert, Eric; Derluyn, Ilse

2014-05-01

405

Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders Among Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Adolescents in Norway  

PubMed Central

Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) are known to be subjected to several potentially traumatic life events, risking more mental health problems than other populations of same age. In this study, we aimed to explore the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity at an early stage after arrival to the host country. We performed structured clinical interviews (CIDI) with 160 male UASC from different countries (Afghanistan, Somalia, Iran), after four months in Norway. Most of the participants had experienced life threatening events (82%), physical abuse (78%), or loss of a close relative (78%) in their former life. Altogether 41.9% of the participants fulfilled diagnostic criteria for a current psychiatric disorder. The most prevalent diagnosis was PTSD (30, 6%), followed by MDD (9, 4%), Agoraphobia (4, 4%) and GAD (3, 8%). Implications of this vulnerability call for more mental health resources in the early stages of the asylum process. Increased awareness of psychiatric morbidity in UASC may improve the prognosis, give more appropriate care, and ease the integration process on all levels of society. PMID:25006343

Jakobsen, Marianne; Demott, Melinda A. M; Heir, Trond

2014-01-01

406

Sleeping Patterns of Afghan Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Adolescents: A Large Observational Study  

PubMed Central

Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) have experienced multiple traumas and are a high-risk group for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The effects of trauma are known to be associated with sleep problems; indeed sleeping problems are core features of PTSD. However, there has been no systematic research examining the sleep of this high risk group of children. This study presents the first evidence on the sleeping patterns of Afghan UASC living in the UK. A total of 222 male Afghan children, aged 13–18, were interviewed using validated self-report questionnaires measuring sleeping patterns and PTSD. Overall, UASC patterns for bed time and rise time appear acculturated to the country of asylum. Mean UASC sleep onset latency scores were approximately 20 minutes greater compared with normative scores, which may be a reflection of UASC pre-migration and post-migration experiences. As expected, UASC who screened above the clinical cut-off for PTSD reported significantly greater sleep onset latency, increased nightmares, and less total sleep time compared to the non-PTSD group. The results may be of particular interest to clinicians given that, compared to screening for PTSD, screening for sleep problems may be a less culturally disputed form of initial assessment indicating distress in UASC. Similarly, the field of UASC and refugee child interventions is largely focused on trauma, yet sleep may provide a novel avenue for equally or more effective treatment. PMID:23457517

Bronstein, Israel; Montgomery, Paul

2013-01-01

407

The effect of victimization, mental health, and protective factors on crime and illicit drug use among homeless young adults.  

PubMed

Although research has found high rates of child maltreatment, widespread victimization, and other negative outcomes among homeless youth and young adults, resiliency among this population has largely been understudied. Specifically, a gap remains in terms of how protective factors such as self-efficacy, low deviant beliefs, and religiosity operate among homeless youth and young adults. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between various forms of victimization, mental health, and protective factors with property and violent crime and illicit drug use among homeless young adults. Results from regression analyses indicate that running away from home more frequently, experiencing more physical victimization on the street, higher levels of self-efficacy, and more deviant beliefs were associated with greater property crime. Significant correlates of violent crime included being male, running away from home more frequently, greater sexual and physical victimization on the street, higher levels of self-efficacy, and more deviant beliefs. Finally, being male, running away more frequently from home, greater child physical abuse and partner victimization, and more deviant beliefs were all associated with greater illicit drug use. Self-efficacy was positively related to both property and violent crime, suggesting that it may not operate for homeless young adults in the same manner as it does for normative populations. PMID:24834752

Tyler, Kimberly A; Kort-Butler, Lisa A; Swendener, Alexis

2014-01-01

408

Comparing suicide attempters, suicide ideators, and nonsuicidal homeless and runaway adolescents.  

PubMed

This study considers variables that best distinguish among attempters, ideators, and nonsuicidal youth in a sample of 527 homeless and runaway adolescents from four Midwestern states. Univariate results indicate that attempters are significantly more likely than ideators and nonsuicidal youth to have experienced physical or sexual abuse by an adult caretaker, to have experienced sexual victimization while on their own, and to have a friend who attempted suicide. Multivariate analyses reveal five variables that best distinguish among the three groups: self-esteem, depression, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and having a friend who attempted suicide. Further analysis suggests that the accumulation of these risk factors greatly increases the chance that these youth will engage in suicidal behavior. PMID:10322618

Yoder, K A

1999-01-01

409

Street youth: adaptation and survival in the AIDS decade.  

PubMed

This article discusses adaptational and survival strategies of homeless youth and describes how pilot research, begun in 1982 on these strategies in the western United States, led to additional research and activity focused upon the related international street youth problem. The results of this research suggest that a critical relationship exists between survival strategies and the AIDS pandemic. The impact of this pandemic on street youth can be mitigated only by immediate and comprehensive preventive actions at both national and international levels. PMID:1772887

Luna, G C

1991-11-01

410

Mental disorder, subsistence strategies, and victimization among gay, lesbian, and bisexual homeless and runaway adolescents.  

PubMed

This study compares participation in deviant subsistence strategies, street victimization, and lifetime prevalence of five mental disorders (conduct disorder, major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, and drug abuse) among heterosexual males and females (n = 366) and gay, lesbian, and bisexual (n = 63) homeless and runaway adolescents from the first wave of a longitudinal study of homeless youth in four Midwestern states. The results indicate that gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents were more likely to have been physically and sexually abused by caretakers, we more likely to engage in risky survival strategies when on their own (including survival sex), were more likely to be physically and sexually victimized when on the streets, and were more likely to meet criteria for mental disorder than were their heterosexual counterparts. PMID:15765273

Whitbeck, Les B; Chen, Xiaojin; Hoyt, Dan R; Tyler, Kimberly A; Johnson, Kurt D

2004-11-01

411

Elderly Homeless Veterans in Los Angeles: Chronicity and precipitants of homelessness  

PubMed Central

We interviewed 33 chronically and 26 acutely homeless veterans aged 65 and over about their health and mental health, education and employment experience, social support, service needs and other precipitants of homelessness. Chronically homeless elderly veterans were more likely to have lower levels of education, had greater numbers and longer durations of prior homelessness, fewer social contacts providing instrumental support, and were more likely to report financial barriers to procuring housing. In response to open-ended questioning, elderly homeless veterans revealed how health and substance use issues interacted with loss of social support and eviction. The results suggest the importance of healthcare access and substance disorder treatment among elderly veterans and informs service delivery. Further research with larger samples is needed to confirm the characteristics and needs of the elderly homeless veteran population. PMID:24148059

van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

2013-01-01

412

Rev. 01/2013 Please type or print legibly in blue or black ink.  

E-print Network

services for purposes other than training. · You are a veteran of the United States Armed Services. · You, apartment number, city, state, ZIP) Phone number (include area code) SECTION B. Independent status guardianship. · You were determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by your high school district liaison

Rhode Island, University of

413

Rev. 01/2014 Please type or print legibly in blue or black ink.  

E-print Network

services for purposes other than training. · You are a veteran of the United States Armed Services. · You, apartment number, city, state, ZIP) Phone number (include area code) SECTION B. Independent status guardianship. · You were determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by your high school district liaison

Rhode Island, University of

414

Housing outcomes for hospitalized homeless veterans.  

PubMed

This study examines housing status at the time of hospital discharge in a national sample of 3,502 veterans who were homeless at admission to a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical center. A supplemental survey on homelessness was added to the annual VHA inpatient census over a 4-year period (1995 through 1998). Data from this survey were used to identify homeless veterans hospitalized on the final day of the fiscal year and to document their housing status at discharge. A signal detection technique, Receiver Operating Characteristic analysis, was used to identify predictors of housing status at discharge. At discharge, only 13% of the veterans in our analytic sample were literally homeless, 40% were doubled up, and 33% were transferred to another an institution; only 13% were living independently. Housing status at admission (specifically, staying with friends or family temporarily rather than literally homeless), treatment in a psychiatric or substance abuse program rather than a medical program, and a greater income level or access to VHA benefits were found to be associated with better housing outcomes. As one might expect, homelessness was infrequently resolved during an acute inpatient hospitalization, but few veterans returned to literal homelessness at the time of discharge. PMID:16702725

Greenberg, Greg A; Hoblyn, Jennifer; Seibyl, Catherine; Rosenheck, Robert A

2006-05-01

415

Forget Me Not, 2000. Help Homeless Kids Blossom: Kids' Day on Capitol Hill. Educational Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet presents educational materials to help teachers, students, and parents understand homelessness. Section 1, "America's Homeless Children: Educational Information for Students, Teachers, and Parents," discusses what it is like to be homeless, how many children are homeless, how homelessness is harmful, how children become homeless, and…

Better Homes Fund, Newton, MA.

416

34 CFR 300.19 - Homeless children.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Homeless children. 300.19 Section 300.19 Education Regulations of the Offices...REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES...

2010-07-01

417

Health care for homeless veterans. Final rule.  

PubMed

This final rule establishes regulations for contracting with community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The HCHV program assists certain homeless veterans in obtaining treatment from non-VA community-based providers. The final rule formalizes VA's policies and procedures in connection with this program and clarifies that veterans with substance use disorders may qualify for the program. PMID:21894657

2011-08-23

418

Use of psychiatric services by homeless veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients treated in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) emergency room were evaluated to delineate the differences in use\\u000a of services between homeless and domiciled veterans who have mental disorders. Data were obtained and compared on DSM-III-R\\u000a diagnoses, number of hospitalizations, lengths of stay, and outpatient visits in the preceding year. Homeless veterans with\\u000a mental disorders were significantly more likely

Jeffrey Stovall; Joseph A. Flaherty; Blake Bowden; Michael Schoeny

1997-01-01

419

Surviving on the Street: The Experiences of Homeless Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Documents living conditions of adolescents (n=390) who left home and were living in the streets of Toronto, Canada. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the most consistent predictions of hunger, criminal activity, and incarceration were the conditions of street life itself: lack of secure shelter and length of time on the street. (JBJ)

McCarthy, Bill; Hagan, John

1992-01-01

420

Sleep Disturbance in the Homeless Population: The Relationship between Homelessness, Sleep and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about how sleep disruption impacts physical health among the homeless. The association between homelessness, quality of sleep and physical health were investigated in the current study. Convenience sampling was used to select participants from a pool of people attending the programs of Ecclesia Ministries. Interviews were conducted with 32 persons from the Boston metropolitan area, of whom

Megan Elizabeth Corning

2010-01-01

421

Employment Difficulties Experienced by Employed Homeless People: Labor Market Factors That Contribute to and Maintain Homelessness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Labor market issues and challenges are primarily understood at an individual level, entrenched socially in policies and initiatives that seek to improve the workplace skills of people having difficulty attaching to the labor market, including people experiencing homelessness. In fact, the labor market is perceived to alleviate a person's situation of homelessness. In 2008 and 2009 qualitative data was collected

Micheal L. Shier; Marion E. Jones; John R. Graham

2012-01-01

422

77 FR 1971 - Supplemental Security Income and Homeless Individuals  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SSA-2011-0087] Supplemental Security Income and Homeless Individuals AGENCY: Social...needs of homeless Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients, particularly those...needs. The SSI program provides a minimum income level for aged, blind, or disabled...

2012-01-12

423

Sexual Maltreatment of Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Minors from the Horn of Africa: A Mixed Method Study Focusing on Vulnerability and Prevention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The study described in this paper sought to identify the social, cultural, and political factors that effect African unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors' (UASM) vulnerability to sexual maltreatment in England. It aimed to illuminate how child protection measures could be strengthened for this highly marginalized group. Methods: A mixed…

Lay, Margaret; Papadopoulos, Irena

2009-01-01

424

Landscapes on the Margins: Gender and homelessness in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This introductory article examines the issue of gendered homelessness and asks why so little academic feminist writing addresses this theme. The article begins with reference to a feminist novel—The Longings of Women by Marge Piercy—that does tackle this matter. The invisibility of the novel's homeless character is used as a way of introducing some distinctions between women's and men's homelessness.

FRAN KLODAWSKY

2006-01-01

425

A Taxonomy of Medical Comorbidity for Veterans Who are Homeless  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless veterans have numerous medical and behavioral health problems. Grouping homeless people based on comorbidity patterns may assist in determining severity of illness and triaging health care more effectively. We sought to determine if a finite number of profiles could be identified related to demographic characteristics, living situation, length of homelessness, and referral areas using interview data from 2,733 veterans

MPH Adam J. Gordon

2008-01-01

426

Exploring the Lived Experiences of Homeless Families with Young Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study researched the experiences of homeless families with young children between the ages of four and eight. Many families experience homelessness every year; therefore, it is important for early childhood educators to have an understanding of how homelessness affects families with young children so that educators can effectively serve the…

Hinton, Stephanie; Cassel, Darlinda

2013-01-01

427

Homeless Young People and Living with Personal Digital Artifacts  

E-print Network

Homeless Young People and Living with Personal Digital Artifacts Jill Palzkill Woelfer and David G}@uw.edu ABSTRACT This paper reports on an investigation of how homeless young people hold themselves in relation the ordinary and extraordinary circumstances of homelessness. The paper concludes with a discussion

Anderson, Richard

428

Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted!  

E-print Network

! Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted! Become a Shadow Count Decoy Shadow Count 2013 What: Monday Jan. 28th ­ 29th (overnight), the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS) will send hundreds of volunteers all across the city to count NYC's unsheltered homeless people

Qiu, Weigang

429

Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted!  

E-print Network

! Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted! Become a Shadow Count Decoy Shadow Count 2012 What: Monday Jan. 30th ­ 31st (overnight), the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS) will send hundreds of volunteers all across the city to count NYC's unsheltered homeless people

Qiu, Weigang

430

Designing for Homeless Young People: Precaution in Ubiquitous Computing  

E-print Network

Designing for Homeless Young People: Precaution in Ubiquitous Computing Abstract How should ubiquitous access to information through computing be shaped to improve the lives of homeless young people? Drawing on social and material considerations of homeless young people and service agencies, uncovered

Anderson, Richard

431

Reflections of a Homeless Population's Lived Experience With Substance Abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to describe a homeless population's lived experience with substance abuse. A retrospective descriptive design was used to collect data from a sample of 75 homeless adults participating in a community-based homeless recovery residential program. Each participant was interviewed concerning gender, age, marital status, race, religion, education, employment, substance abuse, family history, psychiatric history, and

John Lowe; Sandra Gibson

2011-01-01

432

Survey of Needs: Single Homeless Men. Denver Metro Area, 1993.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Adult Learning Source Homeless Program of the Colorado Department of Education conducted an educational needs assessment of single homeless men in the Denver metropolitan area. A questionnaire was developed with the input of social services workers and administered to 74 homeless men in the summer of 1993. Forty-one percent were White, 24…

Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

433

THE ECONOMICS OF HOMELESSNESS: THE EVIDENCE FROM NOR TH AMERICA  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT It is generally believed that the increased incidence of homelessness in the US has arisen from distribution. We utilize essentially all the systematic information available on homelessness in US urban areas of the variation in homelessness among US metropolitan housing markets. Furthermore, rather modest improvements

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

434

The 2009 Annual Homelessness Assessment Report to Congress  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is pleased to present the 2009 Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR), the fifth in a series of reports on homelessness in the United States. The reports respond to a series of Congressional directives calling for the collection and analysis of data on homelessness. The AHAR reports provide the latest counts of

Alvaro Cortes; Jill Khadduri; Larry Buron; Dennis P Culhane

2010-01-01

435

The Duration of Sheltered Homelessness in a Small City  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze the factors that influence the length of a completed spell of sheltered homelessness, using administrative data on individuals who stayed in a large regional homeless shelter. We develop a model of homelessness which provides the basis for inferences made from our estimated model. Our estimates provide some support for the predictions of the model and reveal a variety

Sam Allgood; Myra L. Moore; Ronald Warren Jr.

1997-01-01

436

Homelessness and Information Systems: Diverse Settings, Common Questions  

E-print Network

Homelessness and Information Systems: Diverse Settings, Common Questions David G. Hendry The Info pre- selected audience discussants will seed a participatory dialog con- cerning homelessness the welfare of homeless people and discuss the potential impacts of information systems on four dimensions

Anderson, Richard

437

Homeless Children in America: Challenges for the 1990s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1980s brought an unprecedented rise in the number of homeless families with children. That there may be as many as three million homeless persons in the United States, with families representing one-third of this population, indicates that homelessness is a social problem of catastrophic proportions. This paper finds that while Federal…

Rafferty, Yvonne

438

What Kind of School Board Member Would Help Homeless Children?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness is a growing problem in every part of the United States. Federal legislation requires state plans for educating homeless children, but will provide less than $23 per child. Summarizes some of the state plans and suggests steps school boards can take to provide homeless children with public education. (MLF)

Harrington-Lueker, Donna

1989-01-01

439

The Changing Character of Homelessness in the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes new form of homeless persons, a growing population of homeless individuals and families who are not mentally ill, not wanderers, and may be employed. Examines changing character of homelessness and makes recommendations for a public policy response to the problem. (Author/NB)

Axelson, Leland J.; Dail, Paula W.

1988-01-01

440

Crossing the Threshhold: Successful Learning Provision for Homeless People.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide tells the story of a successful collaboration between The City Literary Institute and homelessness agencies to create an arts-based learning program for homeless people in central London. It identifies guidelines and good practice to stimulate similar work in other locations with problems of homelessness and rough sleeping. The guide is…

Cameron, Helen; McKaig, Wendy; Taylor, Sue

441

Homeless Families Today: Our Challenge Tomorrow. A Regional Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to increase the knowledge base on the public policy issues pertaining to family homelessness, Columbia University and the Institute for Children & Poverty designed and implemented an extensive survey on the demographics of homeless families. Data on more than 140 variables were collected from 743 homeless heads-of-households in the spring…

Homes for the Homeless, Inc., New York, NY.

442

On the Edge of Homelessness: Rural Poverty and Housing Insecurity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses long-term field research, interviews, questionnaires, and public records in upstate New York to link the risk of rural homelessness to poverty trends. Recommends broadened definition of rural homelessness to include those at risk. Suggests homeless programs apply themselves to rural situations. (TES)

Fitchen, Janet M.

1992-01-01

443

Homeless Young People's Experiences with Information Systems: Life and Work  

E-print Network

,12,16]. For people and communities living under conditions of relative poverty or homelessness, what is it likeHomeless Young People's Experiences with Information Systems: Life and Work in a Community Seattle, WA 98195-2840 {woelfj, dhendry}@u.washington.edu ABSTRACT This paper explores how homeless young

Anderson, Richard

444

The Urban Homeless: A Portrait of Urban Dislocation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this decade, homelessness has been recognized as a serious and growing urban social problem. Using a new research approach to the study of undomiciled urban populations, we describe the social, economic, and demographic characteristics of the literally homeless population in Chicago. The homeless in the Chicago sample are unaffiliated persons living in extreme poverty, with high levels of physical

Peter H. Rossi; James D. Wright

1989-01-01

445

Food Security and Homelessness in the City of Anaheim  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary purpose of the City of Anaheim's 2007 Homeless Survey was to provide city staff with an opportunity to understand the characteristics of the City's homeless population. The purpose of this study was to determine whether food insecurity was associated with: (1) homelessness, (2) demographic characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity, (3) mental and physical illness, and (4)

Ann G. Ora; Michele Mouttapa; Jie Weiss; Penny Weissmuller

2008-01-01

446

A social comparison perspective of treatment seeking by the homeless  

Microsoft Academic Search

The homeless will readily list ailments they claim to have, yet they will also claim that such ailments are not a problem and do not warrant treatment. In an attempt to understand this apparentparadox, data from a sample of homeless individuals were re-analyzed from a social comparison perspective. It was hypothesized that increased entrenchment in homelessness (increased isolation from “nonhomeless”

Randall E. Osborne; John E. Karlin; Donald Baumann; Mary Osborne; Doyle Nelms

1993-01-01

447

Foster Care Placement, Poor Parenting, and Negative Outcomes Among Homeless Young Adults  

PubMed Central

Although homeless youth with and without foster care histories both face adverse life circumstances, little is known about how these two groups compare in terms of their early histories and whether they face similar outcomes. As such, we compared those with and without a history of foster care placement to determine if the associations between a history of poor parenting and negative outcomes including depression, delinquency, physical and sexual victimization, and substance use, are similar for these two groups. The sample consisted of 172 homeless young adults from the Midwestern United States. Multivariate results revealed that among those previously in foster care, a history of physical abuse and neglect were positively associated with more depressive symptoms whereas sexual abuse and neglect were related to delinquency and physical victimization. Additionally, lower caretaker monitoring was linked to greater delinquent participation. Among those without a history of foster care, physical abuse was related to more depressive symptoms whereas sexual abuse was positively correlated with delinquency, sexual victimization, and substance use. Furthermore, lower monitoring was related to more substance use. Our findings are discussed in terms of a social stress framework and we review the implications of foster care placement for homeless young adults. PMID:21243115

Melander, Lisa A.

2010-01-01

448

A Comparison of National Emergency Department Use by Homeless versus Non-Homeless People in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. A single-site study described differences between homeless and non-homeless patient utilization of the emergency department (ED). No prior study has examined ED use by the homeless on a national level. Objective.To analyze national ED utilization by homeless patients. Methods. Data were extracted from the 2005 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. SAS callable SUDAAN was used to produce national

Allison Tadros Gary Oates; MPA MSW Stephen M. Davis

2009-01-01

449

Self-Control, Social Consequences, and Criminal Behavior: Street Youth and the General Theory of Crime  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a sample of 400 homeless street youth, this article examines the role that self- control plays in the generation of crime and drug use as well as its link to negative social consequences. It also explores if these social consequences are themselves related to crime as predicted in strain and differential association theory, or if their impact is eliminated

Stephen W. Baron

2003-01-01

450

“Kids Need Structure”Negotiating Rules, Power, and Social Control in an Emergency Youth Shelter  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study illuminates aspects of social life within agencies designed to house homeless adolescents through research conducted at a live-in, emergency youth shelter. The shelter provides physical necessities, safety, life skills, and a “consistent” social environment through its operationas a quasi-total institution. Social life within the shelter is characterized by constant negotiation of the curricular imposition of “structure.” External boundaries

William T. Armaline

2005-01-01

451

75 FR 22164 - Urban Non-Urban Homeless Female Veterans and Homeless Veterans With Families' Reintegration Into...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training Urban Non-Urban Homeless Female Veterans and Homeless Veterans...transition into gainful employment. Section 2021 of Title...appropriate to provide job training, counseling...veterans into meaningful employment within the labor force...problems facing homeless Veterans. The full......

2010-04-27

452

Up the Down Staircase: A Look at Family Homelessness in New Jersey. A Report of Homes for the Homeless.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to the increasing numbers of homeless families, Homes for the Homeless surveyed families in emergency shelters in Newark (New Jersey) to gain some insights into the characteristics and circumstances of urban homeless families. Newark was chosen because it is a large urban center with a high concentration of welfare recipients that is…

Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

453

Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drug Use by Runaway Youths  

Microsoft Academic Search

While excellent adolescent alcohol and drug screening tools are available, there are relatively few, if any, psychometrically validated measures to use in the assessment of adolescent treatment outcome. This study conducted a test-retest exercise of the Form 90 Drug and Alcohol (Form 90 DnA) to determine the stability of adolescent responses when administering the day-by-day calendar\\/grid approach. Homeless youth (N

Natasha Slesnick; J. Scott Tonigan

2004-01-01

454

Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve, Highlights Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In December 1999, the department of Housing and Urban development released their "most comprehensive study ever of homelessness in America." The survey of the homeless and the social programs supporting them is offered online in three separate chunks. The Highlights Report offers a substantial review of both the data and analytic conclusions. One significant finding that seems to fly in the face of certain myths about homelessness: "when homeless people get housing assistance and needed services - such as health care, substance abuse treatment, mental health services, education and job training - 76% of those living in families and 60% of those living alone end their homeless status."

1999-01-01

455

Improving access to health care for homeless people.  

PubMed

Homeless people have the poorest health outcomes in our society and the number of people who are homeless is increasing. This article explores the effect that homelessness has on health, provides details of organisations that offer services to the homeless population of London, and highlights the role of nurses in advocating for improved services for homeless patients. The need to understand and address inequalities in access to health care is also discussed. An example of the authors' practice is provided in the form of a case study. PMID:25294486

Lamb, Venetia; Joels, Claire

2014-10-01

456

Homelessness in Chicago: Poverty and Pathology, Social Institutions and Social Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

All of the very poor have a certain potential for homelessness due to traditional economic reasons. This report on the homeless in Chicago (Illinois) presents an overview of a two-part project whose goals are to determine the following: (1) how to prevent homelessness; (2) how to relieve homelessness; and (3) how to reverse homelessness. The…

Sosin, Michael R.; And Others

457

A Qualitative Examination of Masculinity, Homelessness, and Social Class Among Men in a Transitional Shelter  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the intersection and meaning of homelessness, masculinity, and social class among 15 men who are homeless. Using Consensual Qualitative Research Methodology (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997), three major domains arose from the data: The Homeless Experience, Perceptions of Men and Masculinity, and Changing Social Status. Participants described (a) gaining empathy for the homeless after they became homeless;

William Ming Liu; Ren Stinson; Jovan Hernandez; Samuel Shepard; Sarah Haag

2009-01-01

458

Between Poverty and a Lifestyle: The Leisure Activities of Homeless People in Las Vegas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Housed people judge homeless people, and in particular their leisure activities, as indicators of whether that person has chosen a “homeless lifestyle” and therefore deserves homelessness. To achieve a more complex understanding of contemporary homelessness, the author conducted ethnographic fieldwork over ten months in Las Vegas, Nevada, interviewing and participant observing dozens of homeless men and women, including observations of

Kurt Borchard

2010-01-01

459

Health of homeless children and housed, poor children.  

PubMed

Homeless children in families are increasing in numbers across the country and have been noted to have frequent health problems. The health status of homeless children was assessed on multiple dimensions through parental report in a survey conducted with 196 homeless families in 10 shelters in Los Angeles and 194 housed poor families after March 1987 through January 1988. During the month before the survey, the homeless and housed poor children experienced high rates of illness symptoms, disability, and bed days. Homeless and housed poor children were frequently rated by their parents to be in fair or poor health (17% vs 13%, P = .14). Homeless children, however, were reported to have more behavior problems and school failure [30% vs 18%, P = .06] than housed poor children. Homeless children also had high rates of other health problems such as developmental delay (9%) and overweight (13%). The diets of homeless children were frequently imbalanced, dependent on food from "fast-food" restaurants, and characterized by repeated periods of deprivation. Family problems were more common among homeless families, especially among single-parent homeless families compared with single-parent housed families (spousal abuse, 68% vs 41%, P less than .01; parental drug and alcohol abuse, 60% vs 39%, P less than .01). It is concluded that homeless children have significant child behavior and developmental problems and disorders of nutrition and growth, which are associated with multiple risk factors in their environment. PMID:1701236

Wood, D L; Valdez, R B; Hayashi, T; Shen, A

1990-12-01

460

Homelessness and our most vulnerable patients.  

PubMed

The scope of homelessness among children is broad and growing, and its affect on physical and mental health is extensive. It may seem daunting for individual providers to make an impact on the challenges faced by these most vulnerable of patients. However, healthcare providers who care for homeless children can improve more than just their physical health by understanding barriers specific to this population, and addressing them through minor changes in standard practice; education of self, staff, and colleagues; and advocacy. By collaborating with parents and local agencies, clinicians can make tangible progress in improving the health of their homeless patients and can provide parents with the information and support they need to prioritize a child's health needs appropriately. Ultimately, providers should strive to make their practices a true medical home, as it may be the only home a child knows. PMID:19186593

Olszyk, Mark D; Goodell, Melly

2008-01-01

461

Homelessness and risk of end-stage renal disease.  

PubMed

To identify homeless people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who were at highest risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), we studied 982 homeless and 15,674 domiciled people with CKD receiving public health care. We developed four risk prediction models for the primary outcome of ESRD. Overall, 71 homeless and 888 domiciled people progressed to ESRD during follow-up (median: 6.6 years). Homeless people with CKD experienced significantly higher incidence rates of ESRD than poor but domiciled peers. Most homeless people who developed progressive CKD were readily identifiable well before ESRD using a prediction model with five common variables. We estimated that program following homeless people in the highest decile of ESRD risk would have captured 64-85% of those who eventually progressed to ESRD within five years. Thus, an approach targeting homeless people at high risk for ESRD appears feasible and could reduce substantial morbidity and costs incurred by this highly vulnerable group. PMID:25130236

Maziarz, Marlena; Chertow, Glenn M; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Hall, Yoshio N

2014-08-01

462

Collaborative initiative to help end chronic homelessness: introduction.  

PubMed

The Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness was a coordinated effort by the US Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Veterans Affairs (VA), and the US Interagency Council on Homelessness to house and provide comprehensive supportive services to individuals with serious psychiatric, substance use, health, and related disabilities who were experiencing long-term chronic homelessness. Eleven communities received 3-year grants from HHS and VA (2003-2006) and up to 5-year grants from HUD (2003-2008) to implement the initiative. This article provides background on chronic homelessness, describes the federal collaboration to comprehensively address chronic homelessness, and introduces the seven articles in this special issue that describe the findings and lessons learned from the participating communities in addressing chronic homelessness. Collectively, these articles offer insight into the challenges and benefits of providing housing and services to individuals experiencing chronic homelessness. PMID:19337841

Rickards, Lawrence D; McGraw, Sarah A; Araki, Lynnette; Casey, Roger J; High, Cynthia W; Hombs, Mary Ellen; Raysor, Robyn S

2010-04-01

463

Homeless women's experiences of service provider encounters.  

PubMed

Service providers are gatekeepers to health-sustaining services and resources, although little is known about service encounters from the perspective of homeless women. We conducted in-depth semistructured interviews with 15 homeless women to better understand their experiences of service encounters. Using a phenomenological method, 160 significant statements were extracted from participant transcripts; more positive than negative interactions were reported. The 10 themes that emerged fall along a dehumanizing/humanizing continuum primarily separated by the power participants experienced in the interaction and the trust they felt in the service provider. Implications for nursing practice and research are offered. PMID:24528122

Biederman, Donna J; Nichols, Tracy R

2014-01-01

464

Social and Structural Barriers to Housing Among Street-Involved Youth Who Use Illicit Drugs  

PubMed Central

In Canada, approximately 150,000 youth live on the street. Street-involvement and homelessness have been associated with various health risks, including increased substance use, blood-borne infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. We undertook a qualitative study to better understand the social and structural barriers street-involved youth who use illicit drugs encounter when seeking housing. We conducted 38 semi-structured interviews with street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada from May to October 2008. Interviewees were recruited from the At-risk Youth Study (ARYS) cohort, which follows youth aged 14 to 26 who have experience with illicit drug use. All interviews were thematically analyzed, with particular emphasis on participants' perspectives regarding their housing situation and their experiences seeking housing. Many street-involved youth reported feeling unsupported in their efforts to find housing. For the majority of youth, existing abstinence-focused shelters did not constitute a viable option and, as a result, many felt excluded from these facilities. Many youth identified inflexible shelter rules and a lack of privacy as outweighing the benefits of sleeping indoors. Single-room occupancy hotels (SROs) were reported to be the only affordable housing options, since many landlords would not to rent to youth on welfare. Many youth reported resisting moving to SROs as they viewed them as unsafe and as giving up hope for a return to mainstream society. The findings of the present study shed light on the social and structural barriers street-involved youth face in attaining housing and challenge the popular view of youth homelessness constituting a life-style choice. Our findings point to the need for housing strategies that include safe, low threshold, harm reduction focused housing options for youth who engage in illicit substance use. PMID:20102394

Krusi, Andrea; Fast, Danya; Small, Will; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

2009-01-01

465

78 FR 28949 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (Rehabilitation)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant...Director, VA's Homeless Providers Grant...Department of Veterans Affairs, 10770...associated with the homeless Veteran populations...

2013-05-16

466

38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.  

... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

2014-07-01

467

77 FR 52135 - Advisory Committee on Homeless Veterans, Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...providing assistance to homeless Veterans. The Committee will make recommendations...officials on services for homeless Veterans. The Committee will also receive...to VA's 5 Year Plan to End Homelessness for Veterans. On September 6, the...

2012-08-28

468

Youth Count: The Vermont Youth Report, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT report examines trends in the well-being of Vermont's youth. The report balances at-risk youth data with survey results related to "positive youth development," an approach that promotes beneficial attributes of youth and their communities. Following an introduction and discussion of positive youth development and youth well-being…

Farber, Wendy; Burgess, Beth

469

Education for Homeless Adults: The First Year.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Adult Education for the Homeless programs implemented by the states followed one of four approaches. The Development/Capacity-Building approach emphasized program structure and model-building. The Urban Focus approach was tailored to reach the maximum number of students. The Services to Women approach tried to meet women's special needs. A…

Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education and Literacy.

470

Homeless Women, Street Smarts, and Their Survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article highlights a dissertation study designed to examine how homeless women learned to survive in their daily lives. Their relationships contributed to many years of unsettling experiences and continuous transitional situations. Each woman followed a progression of sophisticated street smarts, but each eventually faced a devastating decision that served as the impetus for a learning experience that resulted in

Carole Pearce

2001-01-01

471

Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Homelessness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has confirmed the link between a number of psychosocial issues (including limited/lacking social networks, learned helplessness, substance abuse, and emotional problems) and homelessness. Research has further established that those psychosocial issues are interlinked by the common denominator of depression, the recognized cognitive…

Matuszowicz, P. F.

472

Stress and Coping in Homeless Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The possible moderating effects of social support and self-competence on the relationship between stressful life events and behavior problems were examined in 49 homeless children residing in shelters in New York City. The children's mothers were administered measures of their children's stressful life events, social support, and behavior problems; the children themselves were administered measures of their social support and

Robyn Wesler Landow; David S. Glenwick

1999-01-01

473

Evaluation of supportive services for homeless women  

E-print Network

Every evening over 20 women are bused to a basement of a schoolhouse, where they will spend the night and wake up at 5:00 a.m. to face the streets as a homeless woman. These women feel as if they are invisible and their ...

Mullins, Leslie Marie

2005-01-01

474

Homeless alcoholic women on skid row.  

PubMed

Studies of homeless alcoholic women remain rare. Women on Skid Row in New York City were sought out at the Women's Shelter for a study of homeless women alcoholics. The findings in this study of 31 homeless alcoholic women tend to confirm an earlier study by Garrett and Bahr in most respects. A major difference relates to the population's lack of homogeneity. A life-long pattern of marginality does not exist for most of the women. All judged to be alcoholic, some lived with their families, husbands, or a male partner prior to coming to the shelter. Almost a third lived alone. Sometimes the death of someone close or other crisis precipitated homelessness. In many instances there was no apparent crisis. For a substantial group of these women there did seem to be a long-standing pattern of instability and transient living in the two years preceding their move to the shelter. Public resources invested in shelter care are much needed either for individuals whose limited resources run out or where a crisis results in the loss of safe, adequate shelter. PMID:6085449

Corrigan, E M; Anderson, S C

1984-01-01

475

Comprehensive Planning To Address Homelessness. City Initiatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet contains documents that provide information about the planning and implementation of a comprehensive plan to address homelessness in cities throughout the U.S. Information on the following components of a comprehensive strategy are included: (1) "Task Forces"; (2) "Assessment Studies"; (3) "Emergency Services"; (4) "Transitional…

Zawisza, Kris

476

The impact of homelessness on children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews and critiques community-based re- search on the effects of homelessness on children. Home- less children confront serious threats to their ability to succeed and their future well-being. Of particular concern are health problems, hunger, poor nutrition, developmental delays, anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, and ed- ucational underachievement. Factors that may mediate the observed outcomes include inadequate shelter condi-

Yvonne Rafferty; Marybeth Shinn

1991-01-01

477

Helping the Homeless in School and Out  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

However much the recession might be receding, the effects remain deep and cruel to families living in poverty. Many have fallen through their communities' social safety nets. Today, families with young children comprise 41% of the nation's homeless population. According to the Institute of Children and Poverty, more than 1.35 million kids in the…

Holgersson-Shorter, Helena

2010-01-01

478

Exploring the individual and organizational effects of formerly homeless employee inclusion within North Carolina shelters.  

E-print Network

??This exploratory study examined the individual and organizational effects of formerly homeless employee inclusion on members of the homeless shelter community, including shelter directors, formerly… (more)

Barnes, Suzanne Mallard

2012-01-01

479

A Taxonomy of medical comorbidity for veterans who are homeless.  

PubMed

Homeless veterans have numerous medical and behavioral health problems. Grouping homeless people based on comorbidity patterns may assist in determining severity of illness and triaging health care more effectively. We sought to determine if a finite number of profiles could be identified related to demographic characteristics, living situation, length of homelessness, and referral areas using interview data from 2,733 veterans who were presently or recently homeless. We considered 12 disorders: eye problems, hypertension, cardiovascular problems, COPD/emphysema, tuberculosis, gastrointestinal problems, hepatic disease, neurologic disorders, orthopedic problems, skin problems, and trauma. Ratings were evaluated using cluster analysis. Comparison statistics were used to compare intercluster differences in demographics, homeless situation, and referral recommendations. A four-cluster solution is proposed: generalized illness, hepatic disease, lung disease, and neurologic disorder. Medical health problems are common and heterogeneous in homeless individuals. Classifications of these problems may be useful in planning treatment and predicting outcome. PMID:18677085

Goldstein, Gerald; Luther, James F; Jacoby, Aaron M; Haas, Gretchen L; Gordon, Adam J

2008-08-01

480

Voices from the street: exploring the realities of family homelessness.  

PubMed

Homelessness threatens the health and well-being of thousands of families in the United States, yet little is known about their specific needs and how current services address them. To fill this knowledge gap, we explored the experiences of homelessness families in Detroit, Michigan. We targeted homeless mothers and their caseworkers for study to see if the perceptions of needs and services were in alignment. Using focus groups and content analysis, we identified four overarching themes that illustrate homeless mothers' experience with homelessness. We then analyzed data from caseworkers to look specifically for similarities and differences in their perceptions. Key findings included reports of family histories of violence, poverty, social isolation, and a lack of informal support as contributing to homelessness. The differing perspectives of mothers and their caseworkers regarding how best to move forward highlight how current programs and services may not be meeting the needs of this growing and vulnerable cohort. PMID:25186947

Gültekin, Laura; Brush, Barbara L; Baiardi, Janet M; Kirk, Keri; VanMaldeghem, Kelley

2014-11-01

481

Youth: The Nation's Strength.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document presents a collection of selected reflections by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi on India's youth, their opportunities, and their future. Titles for the selections include: (1) Youth and Common Aspirations; (2) Youth and the Future; (3) Youth and Freedom; (4) Youth and the Questing Spirit; (5) Youth and Modernization; (6) Youth and…

Gandhi, Indira

482

The health encounter as a treatable moment for homeless substance-using adults: The role of homelessness, health seeking behavior, readiness for behavior change and motivation for treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Substance-using homeless persons frequent emergency departments and hospitals often. However, little is known about how homelessness affects when they seek care and their motivation for substance abuse treatment (SAT). We surveyed homeless (N=266) and non-homeless (N=104) substance-using adults sequentially admitted to an urban hospital medicine service, comparing demographics, readiness for change (URICA), and motivating reasons for SAT. Homeless respondents were

Thomas P. O'Toole; Robin A. Pollini; Daniel E. Ford; George Bigelow

2008-01-01

483

Perceived health status among the new urban homeless  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homelessness may be the leading social problem in the United States in the mid 1980s. While there may be anywhere from 250,000 to three million homeless persons, few empirically based published studies are available concerning the correlates of mental and physical health status among the homeless. Los Angeles, where the present study was conducted, has been designated by the U.S.

Richard H. Ropers; Richard Boyer

1987-01-01

484

HOMELESS SHELTER USE AND REINCARCERATION FOLLOWING PRISON RELEASE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: In the past two decades both the homeless and the prison populations have grown substantially. These two phenomena,may be interrelated insofar as the difficulties in reintegrating into the community,may increase the risk of homelessness for released prisoners, and homelessness may in turn increase the risk for subsequent reincarceration. This study examines,the incidence of shelter use and reincarceration among,a cohort

STEPHEN METRAUX; DENNIS P. CULHANE

2004-01-01

485

Perceived health status among the new urban homeless.  

PubMed

Homelessness may be the leading social problem in the United States in the mid 1980s. While there may be anywhere from 250,000 to three million homeless persons, few empirically based published studies are available concerning the correlates of mental and physical health status among the homeless. Los Angeles, where the present study was conducted, has been designated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to have one of the largest homeless populations (34,000-50,000) in the U.S. The current study is based on 269 in-depth interviews with homeless men and women in Los Angeles County, California. The homeless were found to be younger, better educated and disproportionately non-white compared to the profiles of the skidrow homeless of the past decades. Nearly half the men were veterans of military services, including 30% who were veterans of the Vietnam War. Respiratory infections and hypertension were the most prevalent health problems. The data suggest that a large segment of the homeless persons were depressed, 15.6% reported lifetime prevalence of hospitalization for emotional or nervous problems, and 12.6% reported hospitalization for substance abuse disorders. Multiple regression was utilized to test the validity of a perceived health status index as measured among the homeless and to identify the correlates of health. The health index reflect primarily an affliction by a chronic disease, the severity of an acute condition, the duration of depressed mood, and the alcoholism symptomatology. Length of unemployment, education, gender, and number of nights spent in a shelter were the best predictors of poor health in this population. Evidence from this study, as well as others, suggests that efforts should be made to avoid using the term homeless metaphorically. The causes of homelessness are multiple and complex and the resulting subgroups among the homeless population have different problems which require a variety of strategies to meet their needs. PMID:3603089

Ropers, R H; Boyer, R

1987-01-01

486

Meeting the Housing and Care Needs of Older Homeless Adults: A Permanent Supportive Housing Program Targeting Homeless Elders  

PubMed Central

The homeless population is aging faster than the general population in the United States. As this vulnerable population continues to age, addressing complex care and housing needs will become increasingly important. This article reviews the often-overlooked issue of homelessness among older adults, including their poor health status and unique care needs, the factors that contribute to homelessness in this population, and the costs of homelessness to the U.S. health care system. Permanent supportive housing programs are presented as a potential solution to elder homelessness, and Hearth, an outreach and permanent supportive housing model in Boston, is described. Finally, specific policy changes are presented that could promote access to housing among the growing older homeless population. PMID:24729832

Brown, Rebecca T.; Thomas, M. Lori; Cutler, Deborah F.; Hinderlie, Mark

2014-01-01

487

How Effective Homelessness Prevention Impacts the Length of Shelter Spells  

PubMed Central

Homelessness prevention programs intervene with households apparently in imminent danger of becoming homeless, and try to keep them housed. If they are at least partially successful, how do they change the average shelter spell of households actually becoming homeless? We use data from 2003 to 2008 for Homebase, a New York City homelessness prevention program that studies have found to be effective in reducing shelter entries. Homebase made no difference in average shelter spells at the community level. This result, like many results about shelter spell length, is not easy to reconcile with the idea that shelter spell length is a reflection of the seriousness of underlying problems. PMID:24610995

Goodman, Sarena; Messeri, Peter; O'Flaherty, Brendan

2014-01-01

488

Challenges Facing Service Providers in Educating Homeless Students.  

E-print Network

??This study was a qualitative, phenomenological inquiry into challenges experienced by service providers in educating homeless children. This study was conducted through semi-structured interviews with… (more)

Beck, Pamela Ann

2009-01-01

489

Latent Homeless Risk Profiles of a National Sample of Homeless Veterans and Their Relation to Program Referral and Admission Patterns  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We identified risk and need profiles of homeless veterans and examined the relation between profiles and referrals and admissions to Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) homeless service programs. Methods. We examined data from the VA’s new Homeless Operations Management and Evaluation System on 120?852 veterans from 142 sites nationally in 2011 and 2012 using latent class analyses based on 9 homeless risk factors. The final 4-class solution compared both referral and admission to VA homeless services. Results. We identified 4 latent classes: relatively few problems, dual diagnosis, poverty–substance abuse–incarceration, and disabling medical problems. Homeless veterans in the first group were more likely to be admitted to the VA’s permanent supportive housing program, whereas those in the second group were more likely to be admitted to more restrictive VA residential treatment. Homeless veterans in the third group were more likely to be admitted to the VA’s prisoner re-entry program, and those in the fourth group were more likely to be directed to VA medical services. Conclusions. The heterogeneous risk and need profiles of homeless veterans supported the diversity of VA homeless services and encouraged the development of specialized services to meet their diverse needs. PMID:24148048

Kasprow, Wesley J.; Rosenheck, Robert A.

2013-01-01

490

U.S. government announces new policy to address homelessness  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Integrating Services a Key to Homelessness Planhttp://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory?id=10985475Shelter residents, operators react to U.S. Homeless planhttp://www.joplinglobe.com/local/x383282834/Shelter-residents-operators-react-to-U-S-homeless-planObama builds on Bush success to help the homelesshttp://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/the-monitors-view/2010/0622/Obama-builds-on-Bush-success-to-help-the-homelessA 1% fix for homelessnesshttp://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/home/49752645-73/percent-homeless-housing-homelessness.html.cspUnited States Interagency Council on Homelessness http://www.usich.gov/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development: Homelessness Resource Exchangehttp://www.hudhre.info/Addressing the problems of the homeless population is a multi-faceted undertaking, and many different governmental agencies have tried novel approaches recently. For example, a coalition of groups in Seattle opened a residential facility several years ago where homeless persons who were dependent on alcohol could drink openly while living in the facility. This Tuesday, the White House made an announcement that a new effort called "Opening Doors" would be utilized to offer a new approach on the federal level to dealing with homelessness. The basic premise behind this approach is that better coordination among the "many agencies that try to help homeless people find employment and health care as well as stable places to live" is a crucial step to ending homelessness entirely. One of the key components of this plan is to also add housing vouchers for low-income families and affordable rental units in the short-term. The hope is that chronic homelessness (where people tend to cycle through shelters and hospitals) can be effectively alleviated with the implementation of this policy. The first link will take visitors to a story from ABC News about the recent announcement from the White House about this new plan. The second link will lead users to an article from the Joplin Globe which takes a look at reactions from residents and operators of homeless shelters in Joplin, MO. The third link will take users to an editorial from this Tuesday's Christian Science Monitor which discusses the work of the Bush administration on a similar plan to end chronic homelessness. Moving on, the fourth link leads to a thoughtful article from the Salt Lake Tribune which talks about the movement to encourage Utahns to pledge 1 percent of one year's income to generate an endowment to solve homelessness in the state. The fifth link will whisk users to the homepage of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness. Here visitors can learn about the details of this plan and consider statistics on homelessness. The last and final link leads to the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Homelessness Resource Exchange website. The site contains information for those people "assisting persons who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless."

Grinnell, Max

2010-06-25

491

Homeless veterans: perspectives on social services use.  

PubMed

This study analyzes the nature and scope of homelessness and issues related to social services use. Using focus group interviews, this exploratory study examined the expressed needs of homeless veterans and the obstacles encountered in obtaining health and human services. Types of problems and social services barriers were developed with exemplars from the interviews. These veterans self-reported a high incidence of health and mental health problems, limited resources, negative public perceptions and treatment, insensitive service providers, dehumanizing policies and procedures, and high levels of stress and frustration with the service delivery system. They encountered personal, situational, and bureaucratic barriers to obtaining services and were highly critical of service providers. These findings suggest a need for greater emphasis on advocacy-based case management services, affordable housing, employment opportunities, increased sensitivity in service delivery systems, and empowerment-centered practice. PMID:9009886

Applewhite, S L

1997-01-01

492

Utilisation by homeless people of acute hospital services in London.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES--To estimate the numbers and distribution of homeless people in London; to quantify the utilisation of acute inpatient services by homeless people in two health authorities; and to predict the total numbers of admissions in homeless people in district health authorities across London. DESIGN--Data were collected from various sources on the distribution of homeless people across London boroughs. All unplanned acute inpatient admissions during November 1990 to relevant hospitals were identified. SETTING--Bloomsbury and Paddington and North Kensington, two former inner London district health authorities. SUBJECTS--Homeless people in London residing in bed and breakfast and private sector leased accommodation, residing in hostels, and of no fixed abode. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number and cost of acute unplanned admissions in homeless people in two health authorities in November 1990; predicted number of such admissions each year in district health authorities in London. RESULTS--There were at least 60,000 homeless people in London in March 1990. The majority were housed in temporary accommodation (55,412). There were at least 3295 hostel dwellers and 651 people sleeping rough. Homeless people accounted for 105 (8%) of the 1256 acute unbooked admissions in residents of Bloomsbury and Paddington and North Kensington health authorities in November 1990. Considerable variations in the pattern of acute unplanned admissions in homeless people were observed in the two districts with respect to housing status and specialty of admission. The total number of acute unplanned admissions in homeless people across London each year was estimated at 7598, ranging from 38 in Bexley to 1515 in Parkside. CONCLUSIONS--The results have fundamental implications for resource allocation across London. Allocation must take better account of the heterogeneity, uneven distribution, and extra health needs of homeless people. PMID:1954419

Black, M E; Scheuer, M A; Victor, C; Benzeval, M; Gill, M; Judge, K

1991-01-01

493

Wellbeing for homeless people: a Salutogenic approach.  

PubMed

Homelessness affects considerable numbers in the UK and is caused by poverty and social exclusion. Much of the literature on housing and health is disease centric, where the experience of homelessness is described as traumatic, disempowering and socially isolating. Based on the Salutogenic approach, which calls for a positive orientation on health, the aim of this study was to explore the subjective lived experiences of wellbeing in the situated context of homeless people's lives. Nine in-depth qualitative interviews with temporarily housed adults (>25 years) in a socio-economically deprived region of North-west England were held. Accounts of renewed self-confidence, perceived resourcefulness and continual personal participation are said to be supporting wellbeing. A strong belief, or sense of coherence, in internal and external general resistance resources was a critical enabling factor for those living in temporary accommodation. Wellbeing was consistently linked with both social and formal activities; keeping occupied and having a strong sense of purpose were essential to wellbeing. In utilizing a Salutogenic approach we demonstrate how the 'context and meaning' of health actions can improve the understanding about the kinds of factors influencing wellbeing. PMID:22983692

Dunleavy, Andrew; Kennedy, Lynne Alexandra; Vaandrager, Lenneke

2014-03-01

494

Fostering youth engagement:  

E-print Network

Youth-adult partnerships are collaborations between adults and youth in the decision-making and planning processes. When adults enable youth to be a part of the decision-making and planning processes, youth voice, empowerment, and participation...

Maynard, Karen Kimberly

2009-05-15

495

Enabling Older Homeless Minority Women to Overcome Homelessness by Using a Life Management Enhancement Group Intervention  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the importance of a life management enhancement (LME) group intervention for older minority women in developing personal control and self-confidence in social relationships as they overcome homelessness. Women in the treatment group showed significantly greater personal control and higher levels of self-confidence following the six-week intervention than women in the control group. Increasing personal control and developing self-confidence in social relationships can help individuals achieve desired outcomes as a result of their actions, efforts, and abilities. These attributes can help women increase and sustain appropriate coping methods and overcome homelessness. PMID:19212866

Washington, Olivia G. M.; Moxley, David P.; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y.

2010-01-01

496

Understanding Youth  

E-print Network

This is as essential to personality development as is milk to the growing infant. Youth need to know that they are wanted and valued in spite of their shortcomings. In personality development, the adult volunteer must function for the group as a whole... as the ?hows.? ? Promote independence and individuality by planning activities that permit youth to work independently of parents and other adults. ? Provide questions that will lead to self- evaluation. ? Suggest reading materials at fourth-, fifth...

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10

497

Why Has the Social Work Profession Lost Sight of How to End Homelessness?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the subject of homeless from the perspective of researchers. The authors show that the prevailing model of social science inquiry tends to overlook the broader systemic causes of homelessness. As an alternative, the authors propose the use of participatory action research. Over time, this approach should bring together victims of homelessness with researchers of homelessness and efforts

John R. Belcher; Bruce R. Deforge; David A. Zanis

2005-01-01

498

Impaired Immune Function in a Homeless Population with Stress-Related Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Homeless people suffer high levels of psychological distress. The aim of the present work was to study the immune function in a group of homeless people with stress-related disorders and compare it with that of healthy non-homeless controls. Methods: We included in the study 40 homeless persons and 40 housed controls recruited from the population of Madrid and matched

Lorena Arranz; Aída de Vicente; Manuel Muñoz; Mónica De la Fuente

2009-01-01

499

The experience of homeless women: An exploration of housing histories and the meaning of home  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exploratory study with homeless women presented in this paper aims to highlight two shortcomings in the current literature on homelessness, which accompany the predominant conceptualisation of ‘home’ as a place of safety and security, and homelessness as a primarily structural issue characterised by ‘residential instability’. The first is the paucity of research on homeless women in their own right

Annabel Tomas; Helga Dittmar

1995-01-01

500

There is no Word for Cousin: Understanding Ghanaian Homelessness from an American Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper serves as an investigation into the Ghanaian society and culture in efforts to understand and explain notions of homelessness. Using my previous research on family homelessness in San Francisco, California as a general frame work and example of American homelessness, this paper juxtaposes the American concept of homelessness with the Ghanaian concept. Information gathered from institutions, people and

Kenneth Hutchinson

2003-01-01