Sample records for unaccompanied homeless youth

  1. Helping Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Access College Financial Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Unaccompanied homeless youth are young people who lack safe, stable housing and who are not in the care of a parent or guardian. They may have run away from home or been forced to leave by their parents. Unaccompanied youth live in a variety of temporary situations, including shelters, the homes of friends or relatives, cars, campgrounds, public…

  2. Unaccompanied Homeless Youth: Intersections of Homelessness, School Experiences and Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviles de Bradley, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    School districts are faced with the challenge of how best to serve the needs of a growing homeless student population. As the numbers of homeless children and youth continue to rise, it is imperative for educators and others to understand the experiences of unaccompanied homeless youth. A qualitative research project was undertaken to obtain the…

  3. Immigration and Schools: Supporting Success for Undocumented Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Attending school and securing lawful status in the United States are two keys to safety and security for undocumented unaccompanied homeless youth. This brief is designed to provide young people, immigration attorneys and advocates, McKinney-Vento liaisons and educators with basic information to help them access these keys. After describing some…

  4. Using What We Know: Supporting the Education of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julianelle, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Unaccompanied youth are young people who lack safe, stable housing and who are not in the care of a parent or guardian. They may have run away from home or been forced to leave by their parents. Unaccompanied youth live in a variety of temporary situations, including shelters, the homes of friends or relatives, cars, campgrounds, public parks,…

  5. Homeless Youth: A Concept Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philisie Starling Washington

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. A variety of terms have been used to describe the homeless youth population. Purpose. The purpose of this article is to analyze the conceptual meanings of the term homeless youths by examining the evolution of the concept and its related terms in the current literature. Method. Online databases from 1990–2010 were analyzed using the Rodgers evolutionary approach. Results. The

  6. Immediate Enrollment under McKinney-Vento: How Local Liaisons Can Keep Homeless Students Safe. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Children and youth in homeless situations, particularly unaccompanied youth and survivors of domestic violence, are at a high risk for experiencing violence and victimization. Frequently, unaccompanied youth become homeless after leaving abusive or destructive home environments. In turn, their homelessness, which often involves "couch surfing" or…

  7. Immediate Enrollment under McKinney-Vento: How Schools Can Keep Homeless Students Safe. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Children and youth in homeless situations, particularly unaccompanied youth and survivors of domestic violence, are at a high risk for experiencing violence and victimization. Frequently, unaccompanied youth become homeless after leaving abusive or destructive home environments. In turn, their homelessness, which often involves "couch surfing"…

  8. Predictors of Homelessness among Street Living Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Dashora, Pushpanjali; Kang, Min Ju; Aukward, Erin

    2008-01-01

    While few studies have identified predictors of exiting homelessness among adults, even fewer studies have attempted to identify these predictors among homeless youth. The current study explored predictors of change in homelessness among 180 homeless youth between the ages of 14 and 22, recruited through an urban drop-in center. All youth were…

  9. Youth Homelessness and Social Stigma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Sean A.

    2007-01-01

    Building upon previous exploratory qualitative research (Kidd S.A. (2003) "Child Adol. Social Work J." 20(4):235-261), this paper examines the mental health implications of social stigma as it is experienced by homeless youth. Surveys conducted with 208 youths on the streets and in agencies in New York City and Toronto revealed significant…

  10. Predictors of Homelessness Among Street Living Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natasha Slesnick; Suzanne Bartle-Haring; Pushpanjali Dashora; Min Ju Kang; Erin Aukward

    2008-01-01

    While few studies have identified predictors of exiting homelessness among adults, even fewer studies have attempted to identify\\u000a these predictors among homeless youth. The current study explored predictors of change in homelessness among 180 homeless\\u000a youth between the ages of 14 and 22, recruited through an urban drop-in center. All youth were assessed at baseline, 3 and\\u000a 6 months. The sample

  11. Predictors of Homelessness Among Street Living Youth.

    PubMed

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Dashora, Pushpanjali; Kang, Min Ju; Aukward, Erin

    2008-01-01

    While few studies have identified predictors of exiting homelessness among adults, even fewer studies have attempted to identify these predictors among homeless youth. The current study explored predictors of change in homelessness among 180 homeless youth between the ages of 14 and 22, recruited through an urban drop-in center. All youth were assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months. The sample included 118 males and the reported ethnicity included Latino (n = 54), Anglo (n = 73), Native American (n = 24), African American (n = 6) and mixed ethnicity or "other" (n = 23). Four distinct patterns of change in homelessness were identified among youth which included those who (1) had fairly low rates of homelessness at each follow-up point, (2) started in the mid-range of homelessness, increased at 3 months and sharply declined at 6-months (MHL), (3) reported high rates of homelessness at baseline and low rates at each follow-up point (HLL), and finally, (4) remained consistently homeless across time (HMH). These patterns of change were most strongly predicted by social connections and engagement in HIV risk behaviors. The findings from this study suggest that developing trust and linkages between homeless youth and service providers may be a more powerful immediate target of intervention than targeting child abuse issues, substance use and mental health problems. PMID:18584069

  12. Homeless Youth: Characteristics, Contributing Factors, and Service Options

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanna J. Thompson; Kimberly Bender; Liliane Windsor; Mary S. Cook; Travonne Williams

    2010-01-01

    Distinguishing between causes and consequences of youth homelessness is often difficult. Characteristics may have existed prior to youths' leaving home, likely contributing to their running away, or may develop once the youths become immersed in “street culture.” Owing to these complexities, characteristics and contributing factors associated with youth homelessness often intersect. Homeless youths' diverse backgrounds and experiences, including difficult family

  13. Prescription Drug Misuse among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey; Rice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Prescription drug misuse (PDM) is highly prevalent among youth in the U.S., and can have serious health consequences. Homeless youth are a particularly vulnerable population with high rates of substance use. However, PDM has not been studied in a sample comprised exclusively of homeless youth. Methods A sample of 451 homeless youth recruited from drop-in centers in Los Angeles, CA provided information on substance use, mental health, service utilization, trauma, and sexual risk behavior. Multivariable logistic regression assessed correlates of past month PDM. Results Nearly 50% reported lifetime PDM and 21.6% reported PDM in the past month. The most frequently used prescriptions in the past month were: opioids only (24.5%), sedatives only (23.4%), and stimulants only (10.6%); 14.9% used some combination of these three types of prescription medications. Homeless youth reported that prescriptions were most commonly obtained for free from friends or relatives (24.5%). Foster care involvement was associated withdecreased PDM, while hard drug use, suicidal ideation, and unprotected sex were associated with increased PDM. Conclusions Homeless youth report high rates of PDM, and access these medications most frequently from friends and family. PDM among homeless youth clusters with other risk factors, including hard drug use, unprotected sex, and suicidal ideation. Surprisingly, foster care history was associated with decreased PDM. Programs aimed at preventing PDM among homeless youth should recognize the clustering of risk behaviors, assess prescription use/access when providing mental health services, and educate the general public about proper disposal of prescriptions. PMID:24613220

  14. The High-Stakes Literacies of Undocumented, Unaccompanied Immigrant Youth Detained in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullerton, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Every year, thousands of undocumented, unaccompanied immigrant youth take dangerous journeys to the United States only to be apprehended by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) upon arrival. These youth, who are both involuntary and voluntary immigrants, are then faced with the challenge of having to navigate the complex contexts of the legal…

  15. Successful Adaptation among Sudanese Unaccompanied Minors: Perspectives of Youth and Foster Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luster, Tom; Qin, Desiree; Bates, Laura; Rana, Meenal; Lee, Jung Ah

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the adaptation of unaccompanied Sudanese refugee minors resettled in the US. Seven years after resettlement, in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 Sudanese youths and 20 foster parents regarding factors that contributed to successful adaptation. The youths emphasized personal agency and staying focused on getting an…

  16. Daily Hassles and Coping Dispositions as Predictors of Psychological Adjustment: A Comparative Study of Young Unaccompanied Refugees and Youth in the Resettlement Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seglem, Karoline B.; Oppedal, Brit; Roysamb, Espen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined daily hassles and coping dispositions in relation to life satisfaction and depressive symptoms among resettled unaccompanied refugees and other youth in the resettlement country. A total of 223 unaccompanied refugees ("M" = 20 years) was compared with 609 ethnic minority and 427 majority youth in Norway. Unaccompanied

  17. Trading sex: Voluntary or coerced? The experiences of homeless youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberly A. Tyler; Katherine A. Johnson

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the circumstances surrounding a homeless youth's “decision “ to trade sex for food, money, shelter, or drugs. Forty homeless youth in 4 Midwestern states participated in individual, in?depth qualitative interviews. Interviewers recruited youth through both service agencies and street outreach. The findings revealed that approximately one third of the sample had some experience with trading sex, whether

  18. Nowhere to Run: HIV Prevention for Runaway and Homeless Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Marc

    This volume is a guide to providing effective Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and substance abuse prevention services to runaway and homeless youth. The guide is based on current research and the best programs in this field. Chapters 1 and 2 summarize what is known about runaway and homeless youth, the services these youth require if they are…

  19. Cross-National Variations in Behavioral Profiles Among Homeless Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norweeta G. Milburn; Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus; Eric Rice; Shelley Mallet; Doreen Rosenthal

    2006-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons of homeless youth in Melbourne, Australia, and Los Angeles, CA, United States were conducted. Newly\\u000a (n = 427) and experienced (n = 864) homeless youth were recruited from each site. Compared to Australia, homeless youth in the United States were younger,\\u000a more likely to be in school or jail, demonstrated fewer sexual and substance use risk acts, fewer

  20. Gang Involvement and Membership among Homeless and Runaway Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Kevin A.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

    2003-01-01

    Assessed the extent of gang involvement among homeless and runaway youth, comparing gang members, gang-involved youth (not members), and non-gang youth on several dimensions. Interview data indicated that 15.4 percent of the youth were gang members and 32.2 percent were involved in gangs. These youth reported more family problems and school…

  1. Education of Homeless Children & Youth: Program Manual. Revised 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The right of homeless children and youth to enjoy a free, appropriate public education is ensured in Oregon by ORS 339.115 (3). This law establishes that homeless children and youth cannot be denied enrollment simply because they lack a fixed place of residence or because they are not under a parent's or guardian's supervision. State Board of…

  2. Social Networks of Homeless Youth in Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Suzanne; Holloway, Ian; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Bowman, Richard; Tucker, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the social networks of homeless youth in emerging adulthood despite the importance of this information for interventions to reduce health risks. This study examined the composition of social networks, and the risks and supports present within them, in a random sample of 349 homeless youth (33.4% female, 23.9% African…

  3. Risk profile of homeless pregnant adolescents and youth.

    PubMed

    Pennbridge, J; Mackenzie, R G; Swofford, A

    1991-11-01

    Pregnant homeless young women have special service needs. This article examine those needs by comparing the risk profiles of 55 pregnant homeless youths and 85 pregnant youths who live with their families. These young women were seen in a primary health care clinic and underwent extensive lifestyle interviews during their physical examinations. Clinical social workers provided social services and follow-up. The homeless pregnant youths were younger, primarily white, and from outside Los Angeles County. They were more likely to be diagnosed as depressed, to have previously attempted suicide, to have histories of sexual and physical abuse, and to be diagnosed as drug abusing. Review of pregnancy outcomes showed the difficulty of serving homeless pregnant youth and the lack of services for them. Following this study, the clinic instituted new monitoring procedures and established a team case management approach to serving homeless pregnant teens and youths. PMID:1772891

  4. Follow-Up of Youth Using Runaway and Homeless Youth Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Barbara E.; van Houten, Therese

    There is an increasing body of literature about runaway and homeless youth, but few studies have investigated what happens to the youth after they use Runaway and Homeless Youth Centers (RHYCs). This study examines the services available and the impact these services have on the youth. Data are analyzed from a survey mailed to all RHYCs operated…

  5. Utilizing technology for longitudinal communication with homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Bender, Kimberly; Begun, Stephanie; DePrince, Anne; Haffejee, Badiah; Kaufmann, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    The current study investigated forms of technology (phone calls, texts, email and Facebook) for maintaining contact with homeless youth over baseline, 1-week, 6-week, and 3-month follow-up interviews. The study combined quantitative tracking of youths' response patterns and open-ended interviews regarding youths' preferred methods of communication. Results indicate that maintaining communication with homeless youth requires persistence, including frequent contact attempts over several days. Cell phone contacts (calls or texts) were most successful in communicating with youth, with e-mail and Facebook messaging useful when phones were lost or stolen. Youth who maintained contact were strikingly similar to youth who discontinued contact. PMID:25321934

  6. Quality of Health Care: The Views of Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Josephine

    2004-01-01

    Objective To develop homeless-youth-identified process and outcome measures of quality of health care. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collection with homeless youth from both street and clinic settings in Seattle, Washington, for calendar year 2002. Study Design The research was a focused ethnography, using key informant and in-depth individual interviews as well as focus groups with a purposeful sample of 47 homeless youth aged 12–23 years. Data Collection/Extraction Methods All interviews and focus groups were tape-recorded, transcribed, and preliminarily coded, with final coding cross-checked and verified with a second researcher. Principal Findings Homeless youth most often stated that cultural and interpersonal aspects of quality of care were important to them. Physical aspects of quality of care reported by the youth were health care sites separate from those for homeless adults, andsites that offered a choice of allopathic and complementary medicine. Outcomes of health care included survival of homelessness, functional and disease-state improvement, and having increased trust and connections with adults and with the wider community. Conclusions Homeless youth identified components of quality of care as well as how quality of care should be measured. Their perspectives will be included in a larger follow-up study to develop quality of care indicators for homeless youth. PMID:15230923

  7. Resilience, loneliness, and psychological distress among homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Perron, Jeff L; Cleverley, Kristin; Kidd, Sean A

    2014-08-01

    Extant quantitative research on loneliness among homeless youth has grouped loneliness with other elements of psychological distress. The current study seeks to determine if loneliness has a different relationship with resilience than does psychological distress among street youth. Using data from 47 participants, linear regression was conducted. Results indicate that homeless youth experiencing higher psychological distress reported lower resilience scores. However, levels of resilience are not significantly associated with feelings of loneliness when psychological distress was accounted for. This study has implications for how researchers and clinicians conceptualize and address feelings of loneliness among homeless youth. PMID:25017554

  8. Experiences of Being Homeless or at Risk of Being Homeless among Canadian Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pamela; Donahue, Peter; Este, Dave; Hofer, Marvin

    2004-01-01

    A qualitative study was undertaken with four groups -- immigrants, youths, Aboriginal people, and landlords -- in order to explore, compare, and contrast diversity issues among the homeless population and those at risk of homelessness in a larger Canadian city (Calgary, Alberta) with a smaller city (Lethbridge, Alberta), to better understand their…

  9. Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

  10. Prevalence and Predictors of Sexual Risks Among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halcon, Linda L.; Lifson, Alan R.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined prevalence of sexual risks among homeless adolescents and described factors associated with those risks. Community-based outreach methods were used successfully to access this difficult-to-reach population. The sample included 203 homeless youth aged 15-22 recruited from community sites. Questionnaire items addressed…

  11. Successful Transitions of Runaway/Homeless Youth from Shelter Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebbitt, Von E.; House, Laura E.; Thompson, Sanna J.; Pollio, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research indicates that runaway and homeless youth often achieve positive outcomes after shelter stays however few studies have examined how these outcomes are achieved. This study employs qualitative methods to explicate this phenomenon. Twenty-five providers and 21 youth from four shelters participated in this study. Youth were…

  12. Social Networks of Homeless Youth in Emerging Adulthood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Wenzel; Ian Holloway; Daniela Golinelli; Brett Ewing; Richard Bowman; Joan Tucker

    Little is known about the social networks of homeless youth in emerging adulthood despite the importance of this information\\u000a for interventions to reduce health risks. This study examined the composition of social networks, and the risks and supports\\u000a present within them, in a random sample of 349 homeless youth (33.4% female, 23.9% African American, 17.7% Hispanic) between\\u000a the ages of

  13. Mental health correlates of victimization classes among homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Bender, Kimberly; Ferguson, Kristin; Thompson, Sanna; Langenderfer, Lisa

    2014-10-01

    Literature reports high rates of street victimization among homeless youth and recognizes psychiatric symptoms associated with such victimization. Few studies have investigated the existence of victimization classes that differ in type and frequency of victimization and how youth in such classes differ in psychiatric profiles. We used latent class analysis (LCA) to examine whether classes of homeless youth, based on both type and frequency of victimization experiences, differ in rates of meeting diagnostic criteria for major depressive episodes and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of homeless youth (N=601) from three regions of the United States. Results suggest youth who experience high levels of direct and indirect victimization (high-victimization class) share similarly high rates of depressive episodes and PTSD as youth who experience primarily indirect victimization only (witness class). Rates of meeting criteria for depressive episodes and PTSD were nearly two and three times greater, respectively, among the high victimization and witness classes compared to youth who never or rarely experienced victimization. Findings suggest the need for screening and intervention for homeless youth who report direct and indirect victimization and youth who report indirect victimization only, while prevention efforts may be more relevant for youth who report limited victimization experience. PMID:24725619

  14. Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen’s (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido’s (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care. PMID:22247795

  15. Challenges to immunization: the experiences of homeless youth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Homelessness is a critical social issue, both a product of, and contributing to, poor mental and physical health. Over 150,000 young Canadians live on the streets. Homeless youth experience a high incidence of infectious diseases, many of which are vaccine preventable. Early departure from school and limited access to public health services makes them a particularly vulnerable high-risk group. This study explores challenges to obtaining essential vaccines experienced by homeless youth. Methods A qualitative research study to explore knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and experiences surrounding immunization of hard-to-reach homeless youth was designed. Participants were recruited for focus groups from Phoenix House and Shelter, a non-profit, community-based organization assisting homeless youth in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. An experienced facilitator guided the recorded discussions. Transcripts of audiotapes were analyzed using a constant comparative method until data revealed a set of exemplars and themes that best captured participants’ knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and experiences surrounding immunization and infectious diseases. Results Important themes emerged from our analysis. Considerable variability in knowledge about immunization and vaccine preventable diseases was found. The homeless youth in the study had limited awareness of meningitis in contrast to a greater knowledge about sexually transmitted infections and influenza, gained during the H1N1/09 public health campaign. They recognized their poverty as a risk for contracting infectious diseases, along with their inability to always employ known strategies to prevent infectious diseases, due to circumstances. They showed considerable insight into the detrimental effects of poor hygiene, sleeping locations and risk behaviour. Interviewed homeless youth regarded themselves as good compliers of health professional advice and offered valuable suggestions to improve immunization in their population. Conclusions To provide effective public health interventions, it is necessary to consider the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and experiences of hard to reach, high risk groups. Our study shows that homeless youth are interested and capable in discussing immunization. Active targeting of homeless youth for public health immunization programs is needed. Working collaboratively with non-profit organizations that assist homeless youth provides an opportunity to increase their knowledge of infectious risks and to improve immunization strategies in this vulnerable group. PMID:22568937

  16. Capacity for Survival: Exploring Strengths of Homeless Street Youth

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.; McManus, Holly; Lantry, Janet; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of research on homeless youth has focused on the multitude of problems faced by this vulnerable population. The current study, while acknowledging the hazards of life on the streets, seeks to explore the personal strengths and informal resources street youth rely on to navigate their environments. Qualitative data from seven focus groups conducted with street youth ages 18–24 were analyzed using content analysis. These data, rich with interactions among youth participants, highlight three important themes: developing “street smarts,” existence of personal strengths, and informal resources relied upon by youth to survive. Results provide valuable insights into the strengths of homeless youth that can be useful to providers in assessing street youths’ service needs and increasing the likelihood of long-term positive outcomes. PMID:19915687

  17. Countervailing Social Network Influences on Problem Behaviors among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Eric; Stein, Judith A.; Milburn, Norweeta

    2008-01-01

    The impact of countervailing social network influences (i.e., pro-social, anti-social or HIV risk peers) on problem behaviors (i.e., HIV drug risk, HIV sex risk or anti-social behaviors) among 696 homeless youth was assessed using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that older youth were less likely to report having pro-social peers and…

  18. Feasibility Study of the Social Enterprise Intervention with Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Xie, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To reduce mental health symptoms and high-risk behaviors and increase social support and service utilization among street-living youth, the authors conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility of the social enterprise intervention (SEI) at a homeless youth agency. Method: Convenience sampling was used to recruit 16 street-living…

  19. Higher Education Act Reauthorization: Homeless and Foster Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Youth experiencing homelessness or in foster care face numerous barriers to higher education. Inadequate college readiness, the complexity of the financial aid process, and lack of housing and support services once enrolled in college make obtaining a college degree an often insurmountable challenge. Yet a college education offers these youth the…

  20. A Health-Profile Comparison of Delinquent and Homeless Youths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forst, Martin L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Uses medical data (medical history and physical examination) on samples of 245 delinquent and 160 homeless youths in San Francisco (California) to discuss health needs of this population. The article reveals that a substantial number of these youth did not have adequate health care coverage despite considerable medical problems compared to the…

  1. The Mental and Physical Health of Homeless Youth: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edidin, Jennifer P.; Ganim, Zoe; Hunter, Scott J.; Karnik, Niranjan S.

    2012-01-01

    Youth homelessness is a growing concern in the United States. Despite difficulties studying this population due to inconsistent definitions of what it means to be a youth and homeless, the current body of research indicates that abuse, family breakdown, and disruptive family relationships are common contributing factors to youth homelessness.…

  2. Intervention for homeless and at-risk youth: Assessing youth and staff perspectives on service provision, satisfaction and quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hillary J. Heinze; Debra M. Hernandez Jozefowicz-Simbeni

    2009-01-01

    This study applies a developmental framework to examining service provision within an agency servicing homeless and at-risk youth. Forty-five youth and 30 staff provided quantitative ratings and qualitative description of five core dimensions of service delivery informed by research on youth development within community agencies and studies of service utilization within homeless youth populations; namely, program rules and organization, safety,

  3. Homelessness among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally…

  4. Gender Differences in Traumatic Events and Rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Nish, David; Leonard, Noelle R.; Strauss, Shiela M.

    2007-01-01

    In the present report we describe patterns of traumatic events and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), both partial and full, among homeless youth and those at risk for homelessness, with an emphasis on gender differences. Participants were 85 homeless and at-risk youth (49% female) recruited from a drop-in center in New York City in 2000.…

  5. Family Risk Factors and Prevalence of Dissociative Symptoms among Homeless and Runaway Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Cauce, Ana Mari; Whitbeck, Les

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine family risk factors associated with dissociative symptoms among homeless and runaway youth. Method: Three hundred and twenty-eight homeless and runaway youth were interviewed using a systematic sampling strategy in metropolitan Seattle. Homeless young people were interviewed on the streets and in shelters by outreach workers…

  6. Countervailing social network influences on problem behaviors among homeless youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Rice; Judith A. Stein; Norweeta Milburn

    2008-01-01

    The impact of countervailing social network influences (i.e., pro-social, anti-social or HIV risk peers) on problem behaviors (i.e., HIV drug risk, HIV sex risk or anti-social behaviors) among 696 homeless youth was assessed using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that older youth were less likely to report having pro-social peers and were more likely to have HIV risk and anti-social

  7. The Initiation of Homeless Youth into the Street Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Gostnell, Karla; Smolenski, Carol; Willis, Brian; Nish, David; Nolan, Theresa C.; Tharaken, Maya; Ritchie, Amanda S.

    2009-01-01

    Homeless youth (HY) who lack employment in the formal economy typically turn to the street economy (e.g., prostitution, drug selling) for survival. Guided by the theory of social control, the present paper explores factors influencing HY's initiation into the street economy. Eighty HY (ages 15-23) were recruited from four community-based…

  8. Stress, Coping, and Social Support among Homeless Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Jennifer B.; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Evaluated extent to which stress, coping strategies, and social support were associated with depressive symptoms, poor physical health, and substance use in homeless youth. Found that stressful life events were associated with depressive symptoms, poor physical health, and substance use. Problem-focusing coping and social support counteracted some…

  9. A Different Kind of Smart: A Study of the Educational Obstacles Confronting Homeless Youth in New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Melanie; Houghton, Alison

    This study provides information on obstacles facing homeless youth in school. Research occurred in four diverse New England cities. Researchers collected detailed case histories on youth age 10-15 years who were currently homeless or who had recently been homeless. Data came from staff of local youth agencies, government officials, and youths

  10. Comparison of HIV Risks among Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Heterosexual Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangamma, Rashmi; Slesnick, Natasha; Toviessi, Paula; Serovich, Julianne

    2008-01-01

    Youth who are homeless and gay, lesbian or bisexual (GLB) are one of the most disenfranchised and marginalized groups in our society. The purpose of this study is to examine and compare HIV in GLB homeless youth with their heterosexual counterparts. Participants for this study included 268 youth involved in treatment outcome studies with substance…

  11. Homeless Houston Youth Find Refuge in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1989-01-01

    To attack their community's homeless student problem, the Houston Board of Education last February opened a "lighted schoolhouse" as a temporary shelter. Houston's superintendent, Joan Raymond, is convinced that more school districts will need to provide residential care. The 20 children using the shelter were turned over to Children's Protective…

  12. Characteristics of Natural Mentoring Relationships from the Perspectives of Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Michelle T.; Miller, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    PROBLEM Homeless youth experience high risks for poor mental health outcomes. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the characteristics of natural mentoring relationships among homeless youth and to identify possible mechanisms that can enhance social support for this population. METHODS Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 homeless youth aged 14 to 21 who had natural mentors. The interviews focused on how youth met their natural mentors, the function of these relationships, and how natural mentoring relationships differed from other relationships in the youth’s social networks. FINDINGS Main themes that emerged from the interviews included parental absence, natural mentors as surrogate parents, and social support from mentors. CONCLUSIONS Findings suggest that social supports provided by mentors enhance youth’s adaptive functioning and may promote resilience, thus the use of natural mentors may be an important untapped asset in designing interventions to improve outcomes for homeless youth. PMID:24180604

  13. Educating Homeless Children and Youth: A Sample of Programs, Policies and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Kathleen P.

    This report reviews a variety of approaches for working with homeless students. Information was gathered from state Coordinators of Education for Homeless Children and Youth, regional coordinators of homeless programs, and national and local organizations. The programs described are organized into five categories. The first concerns educating…

  14. The parallel universe of homeless and HIV-positive youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah L. Ebner; Marcia M. Laviage

    2003-01-01

    The HIV\\/AIDS crisis among teens in this country is alarming, but the rates are even more staggering when these youth are homeless. They tend to live in a world typically considered by those trying to care for them—family, friends, and healthcare providers—as unreachable and hopeless. This article seeks to present “their world” to health professionals in attempts to depict it

  15. Care and the Lives of Homeless Youth in Neoliberal Times in Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fran Klodawsky; Tim Aubry; Susan Farrell

    2006-01-01

    Socio-spatial insights from feminist theories of care are examined in relation to the complex, difficult lives of some homeless youth in Ottawa, and their embeddedness within multiple scales of public policy construction and implementation. As lengthy interviews with 78 female and 78 male homeless youth in Ottawa revealed, both care and self-sufficiency figure strongly in these young peoples' lives. It

  16. Protective Factors Associated with Fewer Multiple Problem Behaviors among Homeless/Runaway Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Marguerita; Stein, Judith A.; Tevendale, Heather; Preston, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Although homeless youth exhibit numerous problem behaviors, protective factors that can be targeted and modified by prevention programs to decrease the likelihood of involvement in risky behaviors are less apparent. The current study tested a model of protective factors for multiple problem behavior in a sample of 474 homeless youth (42% girls;…

  17. Outcomes of a brief sexual health intervention for homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Rew, Lynn; Fouladi, Rachel T; Land, Lee; Wong, Y Joel

    2007-09-01

    Homeless youth face various health challenges. The effectiveness of a short intervention to promote sexual health in 572 homeless 16-23-year-olds (M = 19.467+1.89) was conducted using a quasi-experimental repeated measures design. Data collected at three time points (pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention and follow-up) via laptop computers were analyzed using multivariate general linear mixed models. A significant condition by time interaction was found for self-reported AIDS/STD knowledge; intervention participants had higher scores at first post-test. Females scored significantly higher on cognitive and behavioral outcomes while males reported significantly more sexual risk-taking behaviors. Findings support gender-specific interventions. PMID:17855465

  18. The parallel universe of homeless and HIV-positive youth.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Deborah L; Laviage, Marcia M

    2003-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS crisis among teens in this country is alarming, but the rates are even more staggering when these youth are homeless. They tend to live in a world typically considered by those trying to care for them-family, friends, and healthcare providers-as unreachable and hopeless. This article seeks to present "their world" to health professionals in attempts to depict it not as inaccessible, but as a sensitive one that takes great care and support in order for contact to be successful. Their words and those of individuals who have tried to make this connection are used to facilitate the presentation. PMID:12748920

  19. Enhancing Empowerment and Leadership Among Homeless Youth in Agency and Community Settings: A Grounded Theory Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristin M. FergusonMin; Min Ah Kim; Stacy McCoy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study with homeless youth (ages 18–24) was to understand their involvement in decision-making\\u000a within agency and community settings. Three focus groups with eight, six and six homeless youth were conducted at an urban\\u000a drop-in center and shelter from June to August 2008. Emergent themes include youth voice and ownership in agency and community\\u000a programming, emotional

  20. Associations between youth homelessness, sexual offenses, sexual victimization, and sexual risk behaviors: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Heerde, Jessica A; Scholes-Balog, Kirsty E; Hemphill, Sheryl A

    2015-01-01

    Homeless youth commonly report engaging in sexual risk behaviors. These vulnerable young people also frequently report being sexually victimized. This systematic review collates, summarizes, and appraises published studies of youth investigating relationships between homelessness, perpetration of sexual offenses, experience of sexual victimization, and engagement in sexual risk behavior. A systematic search of seventeen psychology, health, and social science electronic databases was conducted. Search terms included "homeless*," "youth," "offend*," "victimization," "crime," "rape," "victim*," and "sex crimes." Thirty-eight studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Findings showed homeless youth commonly report being raped and sexually assaulted, fear being sexually victimized, and engage in street prostitution and survival sex. Rates of victimization and sexual risk behavior were generally higher for females. Given the paucity of longitudinal studies and limitations of current studies, it is unclear whether homelessness is prospectively associated with sexual victimization or engagement in sexual risk behavior, and whether such associations vary cross nationally and as a function of time and place. Future prospective research examining the influence of the situational context of homelessness is necessary to develop a better understanding of how homelessness influences the perpetration of sexual offenses, experience of sexual victimization, and engagement in sexual risk behavior among homeless youth. PMID:25411128

  1. Who is Supporting Homeless Youth? Predictors of Support in Personal Networks

    PubMed Central

    de la Haye, Kayla; Green, Harold D.; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Golinelli, Daniela; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    Homeless youth lack the traditional support networks of their housed peers, which increases their risk for poor health outcomes. Using a multilevel dyadic analytic approach, this study identified characteristics of social contacts, relationships, and social networks associated with the provision of tangible and emotional support to homeless youth (N = 419, M age = 20.09, SD = 2.80). Support providers were likely to be family members, sex-partners, or non-street based contacts. The provision of support was also associated with contacts’ employment and homelessness status, frequency of contact, shared risk behaviors, and the number of network members that were homeless and employed. The results provide insights into how homeless youth could be assisted to develop more supportive social networks. PMID:23204810

  2. The Education of Homeless Children and Youth: A Compendium of Research & Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H., Comp.; Popp, Patricia, Comp.

    This publication provides current research and related literature on issues surrounding the education of homeless children and youth. It includes a variety of perspectives, reflecting the most recent trends in homelessness, determined by changes in policies, economics, and demographics. It also offers the latest research and scholarly opinions…

  3. Dimensions and Correlates of Client Satisfaction: An Evaluation of a Shelter for Runaway and Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Shimon E.; Dekel, Rachel; Peled, Einat

    2009-01-01

    Client satisfaction surveys give clients a voice in the planning and management of services. While their use is quite widespread, they have hardly at all been used in the evaluation of shelters for homeless youths. In this article, the authors present findings of a client satisfaction survey conducted among residents of a shelter for homeless

  4. Reaching the Hard to Reach: Innovative Housing for Homeless Youth through Strategic Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Leeuwen, Jamie

    2004-01-01

    This article features three housing programs designed to target the needs of youth aging out of child welfare. One program combines housing and treatment to move substance-dependent youth off the streets; one combines the resources of Urban Peak, the only licensed homeless and runaway youth shelter in Colorado, with the Denver Department of Human…

  5. Children in Crisis: A Report on Runaway and Homeless Youth in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Health and Social Services, Juneau. Div. of Family and Youth Services.

    Participants, at a conference convened by the Division of Family and Youth Services in Alaska on November 7th and 8th, 1991, began the development of a framework for a statewide plan for runaway and homeless youth. With the assistance of Division staff and the Northwest Network of Runaway and Youth Services, over 100 professionals and citizens…

  6. Online Social Networking Technologies, HIV Knowledge, and Sexual Risk and Testing Behaviors Among Homeless Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean D. Young; Eric Rice

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates associations between online social networking and sexual health behaviors among homeless youth in Los\\u000a Angeles. We analyzed survey data from 201 homeless youth accessing services at a Los Angeles agency. Multivariate (regression\\u000a and logistic) models assessed whether use of (and topics discussed on) online social networking technologies affect HIV knowledge,\\u000a sexual risk behaviors, and testing for sexually

  7. A strengths based method for homeless youth: Effectiveness and fidelity of Houvast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While homelessness among youth is a serious problem, there is little information about evidence-based interventions for homeless youth. In cooperation with professionals and youths, Wolf (2012) developed Houvast (Dutch for ‘grip’): a strengths based method grounded in scientific and practice evidence. The main aim of Houvast is to improve the quality of life of homeless youths by focusing on their strengths, thus stimulating their capacity for autonomy and self-reliance. Method/Design The effectiveness and fidelity of Houvast will be tested in ten Dutch services for homeless youth which are randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 5), or a control group which provides care as usual (n = 5). Measurements of both objective and subjective quality of life and secondary outcomes (mental and physical health, substance use, coping, resilience, psychological needs, care needs, working relationship with the professional and attainment of personal goals) will be conducted among homeless youths (n = 251). Youths in both groups will be interviewed by means of a structured interview at baseline, at time of ending care or after having received care for six months (T1) and at nine months after baseline (T2). Model fidelity will be tested around T1. Discussion This study is unique as it includes a large number of homeless youths who are followed for a period of nine months, and because it focuses on a strengths based approach. If the Houvast method proves to be effective in improving quality of life it will be the first evidence-based intervention for homeless youth. Trail registration Netherlands Trail Register (NTR):NTR3254 PMID:23594410

  8. The Educational Success of Homeless Youth in California: Challenges and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julianelle, Patricia F.

    2007-01-01

    The California Research Bureau (CRB), in participation with the California Council on Youth Relations (CCYR), and with support from The California Wellness Foundation, has been conducting a major research and policy initiative to bring attention to the issues facing homeless youth in California. These include lack of shelter and educational…

  9. A Qualitative Study of Early Family Histories and Transitions of Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    Using intensive qualitative interviews with 40 homeless youth, this study examined their early family histories for abuse, neglect, and other family problems and the number and types of transitions that youth experienced. Multiple forms of child maltreatment, family alcoholism, drug use, and criminal activity characterized early family histories…

  10. The Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Learning To Succeed. Volume II. Educating Homeless Children and Youth: A Resource Guide to Promoting Practices. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funkhouser, Janie E.; Riley, Derek L.; Suh, H. Jenny; Lennon, Jean M.

    This guide suggests strategies to help states, districts, and schools overcome barriers that keep homeless children and youth from getting the education to which they are entitled, presenting approaches for helping them achieve the same high standards expected of all children. The promising practices all come from states and districts that have…

  11. International note: association between perceived resilience and health risk behaviours in homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Oppong Asante, Kwaku; Meyer-Weitz, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Homeless youth are regarded as an extremely high risk group, susceptible to suicidal ideation substance abuse, and high rates of mental illness. While there exists a substantial body of knowledge regarding resilience of homeless youth, few studies has examined the relationship between perceived resilience and health risk behaviours. The present study describes the findings from a quantitative examination of street-related demographics, resilience, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, sexual risk behaviours and violent related behaviours among 227 homeless youth. The findings revealed that perceived resilience was negatively related to suicidal ideation, substance abuse and violence. Suicidal ideation was positively related to both substance abuse and violence, whilst violence and substance abuse were positively correlated. Multiple regressions showed that perceived resilience served as a protective factor for suicidal ideation and having multiple sexual lifetime partners, suggesting that youth with lower level of perceived resilience were more likely to engage in various health risks behaviours. PMID:25575268

  12. Runaway and Homeless Youth Grants: Improvements Needed in the Grant Award Process. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-335

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kay E.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awards grants to provide shelter and services to runaway and homeless youth through the Basic Center, Transitional Living and Street Outreach Programs. In response to a mandate for a review of the grant award process for these programs in the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008 (Pub. L. No.…

  13. Out of the Shadows: Building an Agenda and Strategies for Preventing HIV Infection and AIDS among Street and Homeless Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    This report summarizes the findings of a conference that examined the problem of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among street and homeless youth. Street and homeless youth, by virtue of their circumstances and the behaviors they engage in, are at great risk of becoming infected with HIV,…

  14. A snapshot of substance abuse among homeless and runaway youth in Denver, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, James M; Hopfer, Christian; Hooks, Sabrina; White, Roxane; Petersen, Jerene; Pirkopf, John

    2004-06-01

    We report on results of a one-day survey measuring rates of substance use and HIV risk behaviors among the homeless youth population of Denver, Colorado. On March 15, 2001, staff of Urban Peak, conducted a single-day survey of homeless and runaway youth in the Denver metropolitan region, going to locations known to be frequented by this population. All youth encountered were asked to fill out a brief survey asking about past nine month use of the following substances: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, hallucinogens, ecstasy and ketamine, and HIV risk behaviors. Chi-square analyses of the association of substance used and gender, age, living situation, and ethnicity were conducted. In addition, the use of any club drug was examined. One-hundred-eighty-six homeless or runaway youth were surveyed; 74 percent were between 16 and 25. Rates of use over the last nine months were as follows: alcohol, 69 percent; marijuana, 75 percent; methamphetamine, 18 percent; cocaine, 19 percent; heroin, 12 percent; hallucinogens, 30 percent; ecstasy, 25 percent; and ketamine, 13 percent. Eleven percent reported trading sex for drugs, money, food, or shelter; and 13 percent reported sharing needles. There were significant associations between living situation and use of marijuana, cocaine and hallucinogens. Prevalence rates of club drugs show 75 percent, 77 percent and 77 percent of homeless or runaway youth ihaving used ecstasy, ketamine and hallucinogens one to three times per month over the last nine months, respectively. Prevalence rates of substance use among homeless youth in the Denver metropolitan are similar to rates reported in other larger metropolitan areas. Routine screening for every substance needs to be part of the assessment for all homeless youth. Initial data points to a need for more research exploring protective factors among this population and to better understand the prevalence of club drug use. PMID:15141897

  15. The Challenge of Pregnancy among Homeless Youth: Reclaiming a Lost Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela; Bourgois, Philippe; Auerswald, Colette L.

    2011-01-01

    Young, homeless women often become pregnant, but little is known about how street youth experience their pregnancies. We documented 26 pregnancy outcomes among 13 homeless women (ages 18–26) and eight homeless men through interviews and participant-observation. Eight pregnancies were voluntarily terminated, three were miscarried, and fifteen were carried to term. Regardless of pregnancy outcome, street youths’ narratives focused on ambivalence about parenting, traumatic childhood experiences, and current challenges. Despite significant obstacles, almost all were convinced of their personal capacity to change their lives. While most wanted to be parents, the majority lost custody of their newborns and consequently associated contact with medical and social services with punitive outcomes. Most of the youth who chose to terminate successfully sought safe medical care. We offer recommendations for changing the approach of services to take full advantage of pregnancy as a potential catalyst event for change in this highly vulnerable and underserved population. PMID:20453382

  16. TRANSITIONS INTO AND OUT OF HOMELESSNESS AMONG STREET-INVOLVED YOUTH IN A CANADIAN SETTING

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tessa; Wood, Evan; Feng, Cindy; Mathias, Steve; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas; DeBeck, Kora

    2013-01-01

    The impact of transitions in housing status among street youth have not been well explored. This study uses a generalized linear mixed effects model to identify factors associated with transitions into and out of homelessness among a prospective cohort of 685 drug-using street-involved youth aged 14–26. In multivariate analysis, high intensity substance use, difficulty accessing addiction treatment, incarceration, sex work, and difficulty accessing housing (all p < 0.05) either significantly facilitated or hindered housing transitions. Findings highlight the importance of external structural factors in shaping youth’s housing status and point to opportunities to improve the housing stability of vulnerable youth. PMID:23838565

  17. Association between prescription drug misuse and injection among runaway and homeless youth

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tayyib, Alia A; Rice, Eric; Rhoades, Harmony; Riggs, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Background The nonmedical use of prescription drugs is the fastest growing drug problem in the United States, disproportionately impacting youth. Furthermore, the population prevalence of injection drug use among youth is also on the rise. This short communication examines the association between current prescription drug misuse (PDM) and injection among runaway and homeless youth. Methods Homeless youth were surveyed between October, 2011 and February, 2012 at two drop-in service agencies in Los Angeles, CA. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between current PDM and injection behavior were estimated. The outcome of interest was use of a needle to inject any illegal drug into the body during the past 30 days. Results Of 380 homeless youth (median age, 21; IQR, 17-25; 72% male), 84 (22%) reported current PDM and 48 (13%) reported currently injecting. PDM during the past 30 days was associated with a 7.7 (95% CI: 4.4, 13.5) fold increase in the risk of injecting during that same time. Among those reporting current PDM with concurrent heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine use, the PR with injection was 15.1 (95% CI: 8.5, 26.8). Conclusions Runaway and homeless youth are at increased risk for a myriad of negative outcomes. Our preliminary findings are among the first to show the strong association between current PDM and injection in this population. Our findings provide the basis for additional research to delineate specific patterns of PDM and factors that enable or inhibit transition to injection among homeless and runaway youth. PMID:24300900

  18. Interventions to modify sexual risk behaviours for preventing HIV in homeless youth

    PubMed Central

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Meyer-Weitz, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background Homeless youth are at high risk for HIV infection as a consequence of risky sexual behavior. Interventions in homeless youth are challenging. Assessment of the effectiveness of interventions to modify sexual risk behaviours for preventing HIV in homeless youth is needed. Objectives To evaluate and summarize the effectiveness of interventions for modifying sexual risk behaviours and preventing transmission of HIV among homeless youth. Search methods We searched electronic databases (CENTRAL, Medline, EMBASE, AIDSearch, Gateway, PsycInfo, LILACS), reference lists of eligible articles, international health agency publication lists, and clinical trial registries. The search was updated January 2010. We contacted authors of published reports and other key role players. Selection criteria Randomized studies of interventions to modify sexual risk behavior (biological, self-report sexual-risk behavior or health seeking behavior) in homeless youth (12–24 years). Data collection and analysis Data from eligible studies were extracted by two reviewers. We assessed risk of bias per the Cochrane Collaborations tool. None of the eligible studies reported any primary biological outcomes for this review and the reporting of self-report sexual risk behavior outcomes was highly variable across studies precluding calculation of summary measures of effect; we present the outcomes descriptively for each study. We contacted authors for missing or ambiguous data. Results We identified three eligible studies after screening a total of 255 unique records. All three were performed in the United States of America and recruited substance-abusing male and female adolescents (total N=615) through homeless shelters into randomised controlled trials of independent and non-overlapping behavioural interventions. The three trials differed in theoretical background, delivery method, dosage (number of sessions,) content and outcome assessments. Overall, the variability in delivery and outcomes precluded estimation of summary of effect measures. We assessed the risk of bias to be high for each of the studies. Whilst some effect of the interventions on outcome measures were reported, heterogeneity and lack of robustness in these studies necessitate caution in interpreting the effectiveness of these interventions. Authors’ conclusions The body of evidence does not permit conclusions on the impact of interventions to modify sexual risk behaviour in homeless youth. More research is required. While the psychosocial and contextual factors that fuel sexual risk behaviours among homeless youth challenge stringent methodologies of RCT’s, novel ways for program delivery and trial retention are in need of development. Future trials should endeavour to comply with rigorous methodology in design, delivery, outcome measurement and reporting. PMID:21249691

  19. The Impact of Specific and Complex Trauma on the Mental Health of Homeless Youth.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carolyn F; Clark, Leslie F; Marlotte, Lauren

    2014-11-11

    This study investigates the relative impact of trauma experiences that occurred prior to and since becoming homeless on depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and self-injurious behaviors among a sample of homeless youth (N = 389). Youth (aged 13 to 25) who had been homeless or precariously housed in the past year completed a survey about housing history, experiences of violence and victimization, mental health, and service utilization. In addition to examining the impact associated with specific trauma types, we also considered the effect of "early-on" poly-victimization (i.e., cumulative number of reported traumas prior to homelessness) and the influence of a compound sexual trauma variable created to represent earlier complex trauma. This created-variable has values ranging from no reported trauma, single trauma, multiple non-sexual traumas, and multiple traumas that co-occurred with sexual abuse. Multivariate analyses revealed that specific traumatic experiences prior to homelessness, including sexual abuse, emotional abuse/neglect, and adverse home environment, predicted greater mental health symptoms. Poly-victimization did not add to the prediction of mental health symptoms after the inclusion of specific traumas. Results with early compound sexual trauma revealed significant differences between lower-order trauma exposures and multiple-trauma exposures. Specifically, experience of multiple traumas that co-occurred with sexual trauma was significantly more detrimental in predicting PTSD symptoms than multiple traumas of non-sexual nature. Findings support the utility of an alternate/novel conceptualization of complex trauma, and support the need to carefully evaluate complex traumatic experiences that occurred prior to homelessness, which can impact the design and implementation of mental health care and services for homeless youth. PMID:25392379

  20. The power of the drug, nature of support, and their impact on homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Angela L; Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Greengold, Barbara; Griffin, Deborah Koniak; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Gedzoff, Danny; Reid, Courtney

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths' perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 drug-using homeless youth. The results provided insight into the lives of drug-using homeless youth. The most commonly used drugs were marijuana and alcohol. Reported reasons for drug use were parental drug use, low self-esteem, and harsh living conditions on the streets. Barriers to treatment were pleasurable enjoyment of the drug, physical dependence, and non-empathetic mental health providers. Strategies to prevent initiation and abuse of drugs were creative activities, such as art, sports, and music, and disdain for parental/family drug use and abuse. Comparative research is needed on specific personal factors that cause initiation and deterrence of drugs use/abuse among homeless youth. PMID:20155605

  1. ARRESTS AMONG HOMELESS AND RUNAWAY YOUTHS: THE EFFECTS OF RACE AND GENDER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin A. Yoder; Ed A. Muńoz; Les B. Whitbeck; Dan R. Hoyt; Barbara J. McMorris

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the contributions of race and gender to the likelihood of a first post-run arrest for a more serious and less serious offense in a sample of homeless and runaway youths from four Midwestern states. Event history analysis was used to test the hypothesis that race and gender would interact so that the likelihood of a first post-run

  2. Correlates of Engaging in Survival Sex among Homeless Youth and Young Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Eugene Walls; Stephanie Bell

    2010-01-01

    Using a sample of 1,625 homeless youth and young adults aged 10 to 25 from 28 different states in the United States, this study examines the correlates of having engaged in survival sex. Findings suggest that differences exist based on demographic variables (gender, age, race, and sexual orientation), lifetime drug use (inhalants, Valium™, crack cocaine, alcohol, Coricidin™, and morphine), recent

  3. Providing smoking cessation programs to homeless youth: the perspective of service providers.

    PubMed

    Shadel, William G; Tucker, Joan S; Mullins, Leslie; Staplefoote, Lynette

    2014-10-01

    There is almost no information available on cigarette smoking among homeless youth, whether they are currently receiving services for smoking cessation, and how to best help them quit. This paper presents data collected from a series of semi-structured telephone interviews with service providers from 23 shelters and drop-in centers serving homeless youth in Los Angeles County about their current smoking cessation programming, interest in providing smoking cessation services to their clients, potential barriers to providing this service, and ways to overcome these barriers. Results indicated that 84% of facilities did not offer smoking cessation services, although nearly all (91%) were interested in doing so. Barriers to implementing formal smoking cessation programs on site included lack of resources (e.g., money, personnel) to support the programs, staff training, and concern that smoking cessation may not be a high priority for homeless youth themselves. Overall, service providers seemed to prefer a less intensive smoking cessation program that could be delivered at their site by existing staff. Data from this formative needs assessment will be useful for developing and evaluating a smoking cessation treatment that could be integrated into the busy, complex environment that characterizes agencies that serve homeless youth. PMID:25012554

  4. The Power of the Drug, Nature of Support, and their Impact on Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Angela L.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Greengold, Barbara; Griffin, Deborah Koniak; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Gedzoff, Danny; Reid, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths’ perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 homeless drug-using youth. The results provided insight into the lives of drug-using homeless youth. Most commonly-used drugs were marijuana and alcohol. Reported reasons for drug use were parental drug use, low self-esteem, and harsh living conditions on the streets. Barriers to treatment were pleasurable enjoyment of the drug, physical dependence, and non-empathetic mental health providers. Strategies to prevent initiation and abuse of drugs were creative activities, such as art, sports, and music, and disdain for parental/family drug use and abuse. Comparative research is needed on specific personal factors that cause initiation and deterrence of drugs use/abuse among homeless youth. PMID:20155605

  5. The Economic Crisis Hits Home: The Unfolding Increase in Child & Youth Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Barbara; Lovell, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    While the economic downturn has appropriately become the top priority of policy makers, one element of the crisis has gone largely unnoticed: its impact on children and youth. Largely due to the economic and housing crises, many school districts across the country report increases in the number of homeless students in the classroom. "The Economic…

  6. Youth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2016 Budget is designed to bring middle class economics into the 21st Century.... The National Center on ... Criminalization Banks: Investing to End Homelessness Domestic Violence Economic Value of Ending Homelessness HIV/AIDS LGBT Youth ...

  7. North Dakota Annual State Plan for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Program Year 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumhardt, Lynette K.

    This state plan is North Dakota's response to Title VII, Subtitle B of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987 (the McKinney Act), which charges states with collecting information on the number and needs of homeless children and youth, identifying problems impeding their education, and developing a plan to overcome such problems.…

  8. A Review of Services and Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth: Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Dashora, Pushpanjali; Letcher, Amber; Erdem, Gizem; Serovich, Julianne

    2009-01-01

    Research focused on the impact of community-based services and treatment interventions designed to intervene in the lives of runaway and homeless youth has increased in the last two decades in the U.S. and internationally. In light of the tremendous need for identifying effective strategies to end homelessness and its associated problems among youth, this paper summarizes and critiques the findings of the extant literature including U.S., international, and qualitative studies. Thirty-two papers met criteria for inclusion in the review. Among the conclusions are that comprehensive interventions which target the varied and interconnected needs of these youth and families may be worthy of more study than studies that isolate the intervention focus on one problem. Also, more research incorporating design strategies that increase the reliability and validity of study findings is needed. Other preliminary conclusions and future directions are offered. PMID:20161294

  9. A Qualitative Study of the Formation and Composition of Social Networks Among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social networks are essential for explaining protective and risk factors among homeless youth, little is known about the formation and composition of these groups. In this study, we utilized 19 in-depth interviews with homeless youth to investigate their social network formation, role relationships, housing status, and network member functions. Our findings reveal that the formation of these networks occurred in different ways including meeting network members through others or in specific social situations. The majority of social network members were currently housed and provided various functions including instrumental and social support and protection. Responses from participants provide valuable insight into the formation of social networks and potentially explain their subsequent involvement in risky behaviors. PMID:22121330

  10. Street-based STD testing and treatment of homeless youth are feasible, acceptable and effective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colette L. Auerswald; Eiko Sugano; Jonathan M. Ellen; Jeffrey D. Klausner

    Purpose: Current Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines recommend that sexually trans- mitted disease (STD) screening measures for high-risk populations such as homeless youth prioritize testing in out-of-clinic settings and incorporate new approaches to STD eradication, such as field-delivered testing and treatment and patient-delivered partner therapy (PDPT). Our non- medically trained research staff offered field-based STI testing, field-delivered therapy, and

  11. Improving Youth Mental Health through Family-Based Prevention In Family Homeless Shelters.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Cynthia J; Acri, Mary C; Goldstein, Leah; Bannon, William; Beharie, Nisha; McKay, Mary M

    2014-09-01

    This exploratory study examines changes in suicidal ideation among a sample (N = 28) of homeless youth, ages 11-14, residing within family shelters in a large metropolitan area. Changes in suicidal ideation from pretest to posttest are compared across two group approaches to delivering HIV prevention. Youth and their families participating in the HOPE Family Program, incorporating a family strengthening approach, are compared to those receiving a traditional health education-only approach. Multivariate analyses reveal that youth in the HOPE Family Program were 13 times more likely to report a decrease of suicidal ideation. These findings indicate that health education programs integrating a family strengthening approach hold promise for positively impacting mental health outcomes for vulnerable youth. PMID:25157200

  12. Characteristics of homeless youth who use cocaine and methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Greengold, Barbara; Leake, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional hepatitis health promotion study (N = 156) was designed to identify correlates of cocaine and methamphetamine use among young, homeless persons living in Los Angeles County. Structured questionnaires were administered at baseline to assess sociodemographic characteristics, drug history, and social support. Unadjusted analysis showed that older age, having a history of incarceration, injection drug use (IDU), 10 or more sexual partners, and sex for money were associated with both cocaine and methamphetamine use. Logistic regression results showed that injection drug users had over seven times greater odds of using each stimulant compared with nonusers of injection drugs; those reporting at least 10 sexual partners and alcohol use in the past 6 months were more likely to use cocaine than their respective counterparts. African Americans were also less likely than Whites to report cocaine use. Understanding of these relationships can guide interventions targeting the multiple challenges faced by this population. PMID:22494226

  13. Online Social Networking Technologies, HIV Knowledge, and Sexual Risk and Testing Behaviors Among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates associations between online social networking and sexual health behaviors among homeless youth in Los Angeles. We analyzed survey data from 201 homeless youth accessing services at a Los Angeles agency. Multivariate (regression and logistic) models assessed whether use of (and topics discussed on) online social networking technologies affect HIV knowledge, sexual risk behaviors, and testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One set of results suggests that using online social networks for partner seeking (compared to not using the networks for seeking partners) is associated with increased sexual risk behaviors. Supporting data suggest that (1) using online social networks to talk about safe sex is associated with an increased likelihood of having met a recent sex partner online, and (2) having online sex partners and talking to friends on online social networks about drugs and partying is associated with increased exchange sex. However, results also suggest that online social network usage is associated with increased knowledge and HIV/STI prevention among homeless youth: (1) using online social networks to talk about love and safe sex is associated with increased knowledge about HIV, (2) using the networks to talk about love is associated with decreased exchange sex, and (3) merely being a member of an online social network is associated with increased likelihood of having previously tested for STIs. Taken together, this study suggests that online social networking and the topics discussed on these networks can potentially increase and decrease sexual risk behaviors depending on how the networks are used. Developing sexual health services and interventions on online social networks could reduce sexual risk behaviors. PMID:20848305

  14. Pro-social and problematic social network influences on HIV\\/AIDS risk behaviours among newly homeless youth in Los Angeles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Rice; N. G. Milburn; M. J. Rotheram-Borus

    2007-01-01

    We examined the social network composition among newly homeless youth over time and assessed how pro-social and problematic peers affected sexual and drug-using HIV\\/AIDS risk-behaviours among 183 youth in Los Angeles County, California. The percentage of newly homeless youth who reported that ‘most’ or ‘all’ of their friends were attending school, had jobs, and got along with their families was

  15. Mobilizing Homeless Youth for HIV Prevention: A Social Network Analysis of the Acceptability of a Face-to-Face and Online Social Networking Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Adhikari, Anamika Barman; Milburn, Norweeta G.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth. Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F…

  16. Educating Homeless Children and Youth: How Are We Measuring Up? A Progress Report, School Year 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Compensatory Education and Support Services.

    This report measures how well Maryland educators are working together to provide a public education that meets the long- and short-term needs of homeless children and youth by providing environments that support their physical, social, and emotional growth. It outlines accomplishments for the 1990-91 school year, recommends ways of addressing…

  17. Joined-Up Practice: Five Areas of Exemplary Practice for Social Workers and Educators to Re-Engage Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Phil; Livock, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Young people seen as "at risk" are a substantial focus across a wide range of policy and practice fields in national and international contexts. This article addresses two of those fields, youth homelessness and young people failing to obtain a basic education that will give them access to employment and full community participation. By comparing…

  18. The Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Learning To Succeed. Volume I: Reducing Barriers for Homeless Children and Youth for Access and Achievement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Clarenda M.; Wodatch, Jessica K.; Kelliher, Catherine T.

    A 1984 amendment to the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act instructs states to ensure that homeless students have equal access to the same free and appropriate public education as nonhomeless students. It provides local educational authorities increased flexibility to use funds, specify the rights of homeless preschoolers, give parents of…

  19. 64 FR 23305 - Administration on Children, Youth and Families; Runaway and Homeless Youth Program (RHYP): Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-04-30

    ...ethnic and racial backgrounds, sexual orientations, or who are street youth. 5...members of ethnic, racial and sexual minority groups and/or who are...youth such as substance abuse, sexual abuse, learning...

  20. Understanding Condom Use Decision Making Among Homeless Youth Using Event-Level Data.

    PubMed

    Rana, Yashodhara; Brown, Ryan A; Kennedy, David P; Ryan, Gery W; Stern, Stefanie; Tucker, Joan S

    2014-11-14

    This is one of the first qualitative event-based studies to understand the various mechanisms through which multiple factors influence condom use decision making among homeless youth. Event-level interviews that explore characteristics of the environment surrounding sexual events were conducted with 29 youth who were asked to describe two recent sexual encounters. In thematic analyses of data across events, reasons that youth gave for engaging in unprotected sex included the expectation of having sex and use of alternative methods of protection against pregnancy. Other nonevent factors that influenced condom use decision making were related to attributes of the partnership (e.g., testing, trust and love, and assessments of risk) and attributes of the youth (e.g., perceptions of diseases, concerns over pregnancy, and discomfort using condoms). Additional event analyses conducted within the same individuals found that decision making was influenced by multiple interacting factors, with different pathways operating for event and nonevent factors. Future interventions should consider taking a multilevel and individualized approach that focuses on event-based determinants of risky sex in this population. PMID:25396781

  1. Pregnancy attitudes, contraceptive service utilization, and other factors associated with Los Angeles homeless youths’ use of effective contraception and withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Winetrobe, H.; Rhoades, H.; Barman-Adhikari, A.; Cederbaum, J.; Rice, E.; Milburn, N.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective This study aims to understand the associations of contraceptive service utilization (i.e., accessing condoms or birth control), pregnancy attitudes, and lifetime pregnancy history among male and female homeless youth in relation to use of effective contraception and withdrawal. Design, Setting, and Participants Between October 2011 and February 2012, homeless youth (14–27 years old) from two drop-in centers in Los Angeles (N=380) were recruited and completed a questionnaire. The data in this paper are restricted to those who reported vaginal sex at last sex (N=283). Main Outcome Measures Analyses examined history of foster care, sexual abuse, exchange sex, pregnancy, lifetime homelessness duration, current living situation, contraceptive service utilization, and pregnancy attitudes in predicting use of effective contraception and withdrawal at last sex. Results Over 62% of females and 43% of males report having ever been pregnant or impregnating someone. There are no gender-based differences in pregnancy attitudes; 21% agree they would like to become pregnant within the year. Additionally, there are no gender-based differences in reported contraceptive use at last vaginal sex. In the multivariable model, high school education, contraceptive service utilization (RRR: 4.0), and anti-pregnancy attitudes (RRR: 1.3) are significant positive predictors of using effective contraception; anti-pregnancy attitudes (RRR:1.2) and gender (RRR: 0.3) are significantly associated with using withdrawal. Conclusions Health professionals should acknowledge that some homeless youth desire pregnancy; for those that do not, access to effective contraception is important. Programs must continue to promote pregnancy prevention, and include discussions of healthy pregnancy habits for pregnancy-desiring youth. PMID:24238265

  2. Separate and Unequal: A Report on Educational Barriers for Homeless Children & Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Sarah

    To update previous reports about the education provided for homeless children, the National Law Center conducted a survey of providers of services for the homeless and of other advocates for the homeless. The 80 respondents represented 64 family shelter providers in 33 states. Nearly 79% of respondents reported that transportation is a barrier for…

  3. Homeless Families, Children, and Youth in Stanislaus County--Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boley, Ellen

    The homeless crisis in America is a complex issue with no "quick fixes." In Stanislaus County, California, it seems that there are many programs operating in isolation of one another. Approximately 5% of the county's population is homeless. Homeless persons have survival needs for food and clothing, hygiene, health care, affordable housing,…

  4. Proceedings of the International Conference on AIDS and Homeless Youth: An Agenda for the Future (1st, San Francisco, California, June 25, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, G. Cajetan; And Others

    This proceedings of the first international conference on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and homeless youth included over 125 delegates from 32 countries. There was strong consensus among delegates that street youth are often in high and multiple Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) risk situations, and programmatic responses are needed.…

  5. Strengthening Families by Involving Communities: A Report on [a Conference on] Runaway and Homeless Youth in Alaska (2nd, Anchorage, Alaska, October 5-6, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Health and Social Services, Juneau. Div. of Family and Youth Services.

    The purpose of the conference summarized in this paper was threefold: to review progress made on behalf of runaway and homeless youth by communities who attended the 1991 conference; to introduce participants to the Target Population Planning Model; and to offer participants workshops on youth problems. Presenters were from the national, state,…

  6. To Use or Not to Use: A Stage-Based Approach to Understanding Condom Use Among Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joan S.; Ober, Allison; Ryan, Gery; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Wenzel, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    This study used a stage-based approach to understand condom use behavior in a representative sample of 309 sexually active homeless youth recruited from shelters, drop-in centers, and street sites in Los Angeles County. Focusing on the youth’s most recent sexual event, the three stages of condom use examined were: (1) whether the partners decided prior to the event about using condoms; (2) whether a condom was available at the event; and (3) whether a condom was used at the event. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify attitudinal, relationship, and contextual correlates of each of these three stages. Deciding ahead of time about condom use was associated with being Hispanic, level of education, condom attitudes, and various relationship characteristics (e.g,. partner type, monogamy, relationship abuse), with the nature of these associations varying depending on the type of decision (i.e., deciding to use, deciding to not use). Condom availability was more likely to be reported by males, if the event was described as being special in some way, or if the event lacked privacy. Condom use was more likely among youth with more positive condom attitudes and among youth who decide ahead of time to use a condom, but less likely among those in monogamous relationships or when hard drugs were used prior to sex. Whether sexual intercourse is protected or unprotected is the end result of a series of decisions and actions by sexual partners. Results from this study illustrate how condom use can be better understood by unpacking the stages and identifying influential factors at each stage. Each stage may, in and of itself, be an important target for intervention with homeless youth. PMID:24099462

  7. Psychopathology in African Unaccompanied Refugee Minors in Austria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huemer, Julia; Karnik, Niranjan; Voelkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Plattner, Belinda; Friedrich, Max; Steiner, Hans

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of a range of psychopathology among African unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) in Austria. Additionally, the predictive value of war exposure on PTSD symptoms was examined. Forty-one URMs were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview for children and adolescents, the Youth Self-Report, the UCLA…

  8. A demographic and behavioral profile of homeless youth in New York City: implications for AIDS outreach and prevention.

    PubMed

    Clatts, M C; Davis, W R

    1999-09-01

    Rapid changes in the world market economy have served to destabilize many local institutions, widening the gap between the rich and the poor and undermining viability of key social and economic institutions such as family and household. Among those most deeply affected by this displacement are children and adolescents, many of whom are forced to leave family institutions before they have acquired the skills and maturity needed to become economically self-sufficient. Fending for themselves amid the vagaries of the underworld of virtually every major city in the world, these youths are at exceptional risk for a wide range of poor health outcomes and premature death. While perhaps a familiar sight in many non-Western countries, this phenomenon also has emerged in the industrialized world, a fact that accounts for the rise in exposure to violence and disease among street-involved youth and young adults in nations such as the United States. There are as yet few empirical data available about the nature of these youth populations or the constellation of behaviors that place them at increased risk for disease outcomes. In this report we construct a demographic and behavioral profile of the homeless youth population in New York City, particularly as behavioral patterns relate to risk associated with HIV infection. PMID:10509314

  9. Homelessness and public policy priorities.

    PubMed

    Kiesler, C A

    1991-11-01

    Public policy issues related to homelessness and their priorities are reviewed. It is argued that the three most important policy issues are housing, income, and health. Cutting across these priority areas are the special problems of homeless children and youth, both in families and alone. Alcohol, drug abuse, and mental health services, although needed and effective, will neither stop nor slow the rate of increase in homelessness experienced in recent years. Psychologists, in emphasizing aspects of homelessness that they are expert in, are deflected from variables determining the prevalence and incidence of homelessness. The latter variables must be regarded as the priority policy issues in homelessness. PMID:1772163

  10. Q&A: Questions and Answers Guide on the Education of Children and Youth in Homeless Situations. Opening the Doors of Public Education for Children and Youth in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Office for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth.

    This publication provides school administrators, teachers, staff, shelter personnel, social service providers, and others with information on the education of homeless children and youth in Texas. It covers a broad range of topics with information on current federal and state laws and policies, educational programs and services, and state and…

  11. Homeless Youths and Young Adults in Los Angeles: Prevalence of Mental Health Problems and the Relationship Between Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer B. Unger; Michele D. Kipke; Thomas R. Simon; Susanne B. Montgomery; Christine J. Johnson

    1997-01-01

    Although understanding of the subsistence patterns, service utilization, and HIV-risk behaviors of homeless youths and young adults is increasing, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of mental health problems in this group or the relationships between mental health problems and substance use. This study measured symptoms of depression, low self-esteem, ADHD, suicidality, self-injurious behavior (SIB), and drug and alcohol

  12. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify what is most important to the quality of life (QoL) of those who experience homelessness by directly soliciting the views of homeless and hard-to-house Canadians themselves. These individuals live within a unique social context that differs considerably from that of the general population. To understand the life areas that are most important to them, it is critical to have direct input from target populations of homeless and hard-to-house persons. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 140 individuals aged 15 to 73?years who were homeless or hard-to-house to explore the circumstances in which they were living and to capture what they find to be important and relevant domains of QoL. Participants were recruited in Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and Vancouver. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Six major content themes emerged: Health/health care; Living conditions; Financial situation; Employment situation; Relationships; and Recreational and leisure activities. These themes were linked to broader concepts that included having choices, stability, respect, and the same rights as other members of society. Conclusions These findings not only aid our understanding of QoL in this group, but may be used to develop measures that capture QoL in this population and help programs and policies become more effective in improving the life situation for persons who are homeless and hard-to-house. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study. PMID:22894551

  13. 65 FR 34708 - Notice of Availability of Financial Assistance for the Runaway and Homeless Youth Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-05-31

    ...youth who have been subjected to or are at risk of sexual exploitation or abuse. The goal of the program is...represent particular ethnic and racial backgrounds and sexual orientations. Applicants are encouraged to describe the...

  14. 59 FR- Runaway and Homeless Youth Program (RHYP): Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 Final Program Priorities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-05-12

    ...adults, including physical and sexual abuse (63 percent); other...ethnic and racial backgrounds, sexual orientations, or are street youth. 4...ethnic and racial backgrounds, sexual orientations, or who are street...

  15. 62 FR 10964 - Runaway and Homeless Youth Program (RHYP): Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 Final Program Priorities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-03-10

    ...adults, including physical and sexual abuse; other family crises such...ethnic and racial backgrounds, sexual orientations, or who are street youth. 4...being subjected to exploitation or sexual abuse. These programs must...

  16. 65 FR 31338 - Notice of Availability of Financial Assistance for the Runaway and Homeless Youth Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-05-17

    ...youth who have been subjected to or are at risk of sexual exploitation or abuse. The goal of the program is...represent particular ethnic and racial backgrounds and sexual orientations. Applicants are encouraged to describe the...

  17. 60 FR 20684 - Runaway and Homeless Youth Program (RHYP): Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 Final Program Priorities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-04-27

    ...adults, including physical and sexual abuse; other family crises...ethnic and racial backgrounds, sexual orientations, or are street youth. 4...ethnic and racial backgrounds, sexual orientations, or who are street...

  18. 61 FR 16534 - Runaway and Homeless Youth Program (RHYP): Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 Final Program Priorities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-04-15

    ...adults, including physical and sexual abuse; other family crises such...ethnic and racial backgrounds, sexual orientations, or who are street youth...members of ethnic, racial and sexual minority groups and/or who...

  19. The after-school occupations of homeless youth: three narrative accounts.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ann E

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY This study describes the after-school and weekend time use of young adolescents residing in a temporary shelter for homeless families in Los Angeles County. Data were collected from three individual interviews, focus groups with 24 young adolescents and one-week time use journals. Data were analyzed qualitatively using the constant comparative method. Three narrative profiles were constructed from these data. Emergent themes and concepts describing the occupational participation of young adolescents during the non-school hours were summarized into three major concepts. These were the following: (a) Occupational Necessity: Social Intensity; (b) Boredom and Shelter Living: Occupational Advantages and Disadvantages; and, (c) Designing a Life: Taking Control. Implications for occupational science, occupational therapy, and public policy were identified with relevant recommendations. PMID:23926936

  20. Homeless Children: Addressing the Challenge in Rural Schools. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne M.

    Despite stereotypes to the contrary, homelessness is as prevalent in rural as urban areas. This digest examines the implications of homelessness for rural children and youth and discusses possible actions by rural educators. An estimated half of the rural homeless are families with children. Compared to urban counterparts, rural homeless families…

  1. From Home to Street: Understanding Young People's Transitions into Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Justeen

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores why young people leave home and become homeless. Drawing on life history interviews conducted with 50 homeless youth in Los Angeles, explanations provided by participants for becoming homelessness and how they understand their experiences are presented. In professional discourses, homeless young people are often portrayed as…

  2. 19 CFR 145.43 - Unaccompanied tourist shipments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unaccompanied tourist shipments 145.43 Section 145.43 Customs...Classes of Merchandise § 145.43 Unaccompanied tourist shipments Unaccompanied tourist shipments for which entry is claimed under...

  3. 19 CFR 145.43 - Unaccompanied tourist shipments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Unaccompanied tourist shipments 145.43 Section 145.43 Customs...Classes of Merchandise § 145.43 Unaccompanied tourist shipments Unaccompanied tourist shipments for which entry is claimed under...

  4. 19 CFR 145.43 - Unaccompanied tourist shipments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Unaccompanied tourist shipments 145.43 Section 145.43 Customs...Classes of Merchandise § 145.43 Unaccompanied tourist shipments Unaccompanied tourist shipments for which entry is claimed under...

  5. 19 CFR 145.43 - Unaccompanied tourist shipments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Unaccompanied tourist shipments 145.43 Section 145.43 Customs...Classes of Merchandise § 145.43 Unaccompanied tourist shipments Unaccompanied tourist shipments for which entry is claimed under...

  6. 19 CFR 145.43 - Unaccompanied tourist shipments

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Unaccompanied tourist shipments 145.43 Section 145.43 Customs...Classes of Merchandise § 145.43 Unaccompanied tourist shipments Unaccompanied tourist shipments for which entry is claimed under...

  7. Homeless Youth: The Saga of "Pushouts" and "Throwaways" in America. Report of the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    This report of the Senate Subcommittee on the Constitution examines the phenomenon of homeless youth, including the population, their families, survival tactics, the availability of services, and future outlooks. A section reviewing the legal constraints imposed on young people which affect their ability to live on their own is followed by a…

  8. Young Children and Families Experiencing Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Allison B.; Squires, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of homelessness among young children and families in the United States is described, as is the developmental impact on young children and cost to society. Although services are mandated for this population under the McKinney­-Vento Act, Education of Homeless Children and Youth Program, and the Individuals With…

  9. Predictors of Social Network Composition among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, K.D.; Whitbeck, L.B.; Hoyt, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research on the social support networks of homeless and runaway youth suggest the social networks of runaway youth are made up largely of transient deviant peer relationships. This paper examined social network characteristics of 428 homeless and runaway adolescents from small-to moderate-sized cities in four Midwestern states. We…

  10. Educational Experiences of Hidden Homeless Teenagers: Living Doubled-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    Homeless youth face countless barriers that limit their ability to complete a high school diploma and transition to postsecondary education. Their experiences vary widely based on family, access to social services, and where they live. More than half of the 1.5 million homeless youth in America are in fact living "doubled-up," staying with family…

  11. National Symposium on Transportation for Homeless Children and Youth. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (Williamsburg, Virginia, February 20-21, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Diana, Comp.; Bundy, Atticia, Comp.; Peoples, Abigail, Comp.

    In February 2000, the National Center for Homeless Education convened 25 experts to examine issues pertaining to the transportation of homeless students in a move to ensure their access to education. In a variety of presentations and discussions, participants examined and analyzed the complex issues surrounding transporting homeless students. The…

  12. [Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among homeless adolescents].

    PubMed

    Aichhorn, Wolfgang; Santeler, Stefan; Stelzig-Schöler, Renate; Kemmler, Georg; Steinmayr-Gensluckner, Maria; Hinterhuber, Hartmann

    2008-01-01

    Various studies show a high prevalence of mental disorders among homeless people. So far most of these studies deal solely with single men, mainly affected by homelessness. Few data exist for women, children, adolescents and whole families that are more and more affected by poverty and homelessness. This study, conducted in Innsbruck/Austria, determined the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among homeless adolescents. The adolescents were recruited in a counselling centre and homeless shelter specifically founded for homeless youth. Mental disorders were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SKID-I). 40 adolescents and young adults ranging from 14-23 years (mean 17.9 years) were included in the study. The results show that 58% of the homeless adolescents were exposed to continuous violence in their families and that violence was a major reason for them to leave home. The overall prevalence of diagnosed psychiatric disorders was 80% in the whole sample; the leading disorder was substance abuse/dependence (65%), followed by mood disorders (42.5%), anxiety disorders (17.5%) and eating disorders (17.5%). 57.5% of the adolescents had a history of self-harm and 25% reported at least one suicide attempt. Duration of homelessness had the greatest influence on the prevalence of mental disorders. Longer duration of homelessness was associated with a higher risk of psychiatric disorder or self-harm. These results demonstrate the urgent need for early psychosocial and psychiatric help for homeless adolescents. PMID:18826872

  13. Homelessness and unstable housing associated with an increased risk of HIV and STI transmission among street-involved youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brandon D. L. Marshall; Thomas Kerr; Jean A. Shoveller; Thomas L. Patterson; Jane A. Buxton; Evan Wood

    2009-01-01

    The role that environmental factors play in driving HIV and STI transmission risk among street-involved youth has not been well examined. We examined factors associated with number of sex partners using quasi-Poisson regression and consistent condom use using logistic regression among participants enroled in the At Risk Youth Study (ARYS). Among 529 participants, 253 (47.8%) reported multiple partners while only

  14. High prevalence of HIV infection among homeless and street-involved Aboriginal youth in a Canadian setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brandon DL Marshall; Thomas Kerr; Chris Livingstone; Kathy Li; Julio SG Montaner; Evan Wood

    2008-01-01

    Aboriginal people experience a disproportionate burden of HIV infection among the adult population in Canada; however, less is known regarding the prevalence and characteristics of HIV positivity among drug-using and street-involved Aboriginal youth. We examined HIV seroprevalence and risk factors among a cohort of 529 street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. At baseline, 15 (2.8%) were HIV positive, of whom 7

  15. Ethical issues in research with unaccompanied asylum-seeking children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Hopkins

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers reflections on some of the ethical and methodological issues involved in doing research with unaccompanied asylum-seeking children. Drawing upon a Scottish Refugee Council funded research project with unaccompanied minors and service providers, I highlight some of the complications involved in conducting ethical research with unaccompanied children. Focusing upon issues of ethical approval and research design, access and

  16. Social Networking Technology, Social Network Composition, and Reductions in Substance Use Among Homeless Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Rice; Norweeta G. Milburn; William Monro

    2011-01-01

    Peer-based prevention programs for homeless youth are complicated by the potential for reinforcing high-risk behaviors among\\u000a participants. The goal of this study is to understand how homeless youth could be linked to positive peers in prevention programming\\u000a by understanding where in social and physical space positive peers for homeless youth are located, how these ties are associated\\u000a with substance use,

  17. 24 CFR 91.325 - Certifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...first occupied by a homeless individual or family...services or shelter to homeless individuals and families...unaccompanied youth, veterans, disabled individuals...subrecipient will assist homeless individuals in obtaining...including medical and mental health treatment,...

  18. 24 CFR 91.325 - Certifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...first occupied by a homeless individual or family...services or shelter to homeless individuals and families...unaccompanied youth, veterans, disabled individuals...subrecipient will assist homeless individuals in obtaining...including medical and mental health treatment,...

  19. 24 CFR 91.325 - Certifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...first occupied by a homeless individual or family...services or shelter to homeless individuals and families...unaccompanied youth, veterans, disabled individuals...subrecipient will assist homeless individuals in obtaining...including medical and mental health treatment,...

  20. Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children: Whose Perspective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernesjo, Ulrika

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen increasing attention being paid to unaccompanied asylum-seeking children. This article provides an overview of research in the field and its implications for an understanding of these children as a particularly vulnerable category. The existing research focuses primarily on investigating the children's emotional well-being…

  1. The role of social support in the acculturation and mental health of unaccompanied minor asylum seekers.

    PubMed

    Oppedal, Brit; Idsoe, Thormod

    2015-04-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about psychosocial resources that may sustain post-resettlement psychological adjustment among unaccompanied minor asylum-seekers. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of social support from family abroad and friends on acculturation, discrimination, and mental health among these vulnerable children and youth. Questionnaire data were collected from a population-based multi-ethnic sample involving 895 unaccompanied minors resettled in municipalities in all regions of the country. They met in groups in their local communities. The informants were on average 18.6 years, and had an average length of stay in Norway of 3.5 years. The findings showed that the participants suffered from high levels of ongoing war related intrusive symptoms and depression. Still, at the same time they engaged in adaptation processes that are normative to youth with immigrant backgrounds, in terms of constructing supportive networks and developing culture competence. In accordance with the main effect hypothesis, social support had direct effects on depression and indirect effects by increasing culture competence that may aid the young refugees in dealing with discrimination. However, there were no effects of social support on symptoms of PTSD. The findings give direction to areas of interventions, beyond dealing with the sequel of the traumas the unaccompanied minors have been exposed to, not only for clinicians, but also social workers and school personnel. PMID:25614276

  2. The Crisis in Homelessness: Effects on Children and Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the effects of homelessness on children and families. In their opening statements, Representatives George Miller and Dan Coats emphasize that homelessness threatens the physical health and safety of children, places them at risk of…

  3. The Legal Rights and Educational Needs of Homeless Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Yvonne

    This paper highlights the educational rights and needs of homeless children under both the McKinney Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Act. Section 1 explains the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987, which included the Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program mandating a free, appropriate public education for all…

  4. A. STUDENT INFORMATION-To be completed by the student B. To be completed by the person providing the determination

    E-print Network

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    to be an unaccompanied homeless youth for the purpose of applying for federal financial aid. This means that after July 1, 2013 the student was: Check one Ł An unaccompanied homeless youth - The student was living in a homeless situation, as defined by Section 725 of the McKinney-Vento Act, and was not in the physical

  5. Homeless “squeegee kids”: Food insecurity and daily survival

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomi Dachner; Valerie Tarasuk

    2002-01-01

    Current knowledge about food insecurity in North America is largely based on research with low-income households. Much less is known about the food experiences of homeless people, a group who are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity. This study explored the food experiences of street youth, one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in Canada. To gain an

  6. Educating Homeless Children: Issues and Answers. Fastback 313.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.; Tenhouse, Cheri

    This publication summarizes issues relating to the education of homeless children and youth and reviews programs that are effective in the delivery of educational services to this population. The report is comprised of five sections. The first section, "Introduction," surveys factors contributing to homelessness and indicates the special needs of…

  7. 76 FR 27079 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ...Activities: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...Reduction Act: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles (CBP Form 255). This is a proposed...Title: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles. OMB Number: 1651-0030. Form...

  8. 76 FR 11254 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ...Activities: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...concerning the Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles (CBP Form 255). This request for comment...Title: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles. OMB Number: 1651-0030. Form...

  9. Pregnancy and mental health of young homeless women.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Devan M; Trotter, Emily C; Hartshorn, Kelley J Sittner; Whitbeck, Les B

    2011-04-01

    Pregnancy rates among young women who are homeless are significantly higher than rates among housed young women in the United States (J. M. Greene & C. L. Ringwalt, 1998). Yet, little research has addressed mental health or risk and resilience among young mothers who are homeless. Based on a sample from the Midwest Longitudinal Study of Homeless Adolescents, this study explores pregnancy and motherhood in unaccompanied homeless young women over a period of 3 years. The data are supplemented by in-depth interviews with a subset of young women. Results show that almost half (46.4%) of sexually active young women who are homeless (n=222, M age = 17.2) had been pregnant at baseline. Among those who stated they had children between Waves 2 and 13 (n=90), only half reported caring for their children consistently over time, and one fifth reported never seeing their children. Of the participants with children in their care at the last interview (Wave 13), almost one third met criteria for lifetime major depressive episode, lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder, and lifetime drug abuse, and half met criteria for lifetime antisocial personality disorder. Twelve-month diagnoses are also reported. The impacts of homelessness on maternal and child outcomes are discussed. PMID:21486259

  10. Increasing School Stability for Students Experiencing Homelessness: Overcoming Challenges to Providing Transportation to the School of Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Diana; Barksdale, Katina

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to review the provisions of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act as related to the provision of transportation of homeless children and youth to their school of origin and provide recommendations for implementing the transportation mandate. The National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) in 2003-2004…

  11. Residential Instability and the McKinney-Vento Homeless Children and Education Program: What We Know, Plus Gaps in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Mary; Harwood, Robin; Hall, Sam

    2010-01-01

    As homelessness increased among families and children during the 1980s and 1990s, policymakers created, and strengthened, the McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) program. The McKinney-Vento EHCY program aims to mitigate the effects of residential instability through the identification of homeless children in schools and…

  12. Suicidal Behavior Among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin A. Yoder; Dan R. Hoyt; Les B. Whitbeck

    1998-01-01

    The present study considered risk factors associated with suicidal ideation and the likelihood of a suicide attempt in a sample of 297 homeless and runaway youth from four Midwestern states. It was hypothesized that sociodemographic characteristics, family factors, suicide exposure, street factors, externalizing behavior, and internalizing behavior would be related to suicidal ideation and to the likelihood of a suicide

  13. Larkin Street Youth Services: Helping Kids Get Off the Street for Good (1982–2007)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Loren Farrar; Sara L. Schwartz; Michael J. Austin

    2011-01-01

    Larkin Street Youth Services is a pioneering nonprofit organization that was established in 1981 to serve the growing urban homeless and runaway youth population. What began as a neighborhood effort has evolved into a $12 million organization over the course of its 25-year history. Larkin Street Youth Services delivers a continuum of services to homeless youth including counseling, housing, education,

  14. 19 CFR 148.111 - Written declaration for unaccompanied articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS Unaccompanied Shipments From American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana...returning crewmember) arriving directly or indirectly from American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern...

  15. Life shocks and homelessness.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  16. Pennsylvania's Rural Homeless Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Rural Pennsylvania, Harrisburg.

    The Center for Rural Pennsylvania analyzed data from the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare concerning rural homelessness for fiscal years 1997 through 1999. Findings indicate that rural Pennsylvania has a homeless population and it is growing. In 1999, more than 21,700 clients received homeless assistance in rural areas, 44 percent of whom…

  17. Family and Youth Services Bureau

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pregnancy Prevention Grants Resources FAQs New Trainings on Domestic Violence and Disaster Response Access the Facilitator and Participant ... an end to youth homelessness , adolescent pregnancy and domestic violence . Latest from FYSB 2015 Amendment to Opening Doors ...

  18. Poor Parenting and Antisocial Behavior among Homeless Young Adults: Links to Dating Violence Perpetration and Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Though research has examined risk factors associated with street victimization among homeless young people, little is known about dating violence experiences among this group. Given homeless youths' elevated rates of child maltreatment, it is likely that they are at high risk for dating violence. As such, the current study examined the association…

  19. 77 FR 76063 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles (Form 3299). This request for comment...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles OMB Number: 1651-0014 Form...

  20. 78 FR 16521 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles (Form 3299). This is a proposed extension...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles. OMB Number: 1651-0014. Form...

  1. National Center on Family Homelessness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Strengthening At Risk and Homeless Young Mothers and Children START With Kids Healing Hearts, Promoting Health Domestic Violence and Homelessness TA America's Youngest Outcasts Veterans Veterans ...

  2. Providing care for children and adolescents facing homelessness and housing insecurity.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    Child health and housing security are closely intertwined, and children without homes are more likely to suffer from chronic disease, hunger, and malnutrition than are children with homes. Homeless children and youth often have significant psychosocial development issues, and their education is frequently interrupted. Given the overall effects that homelessness can have on a child's health and potential, it is important for pediatricians to recognize the factors that lead to homelessness, understand the ways that homelessness and its causes can lead to poor health outcomes, and when possible, help children and families mitigate some of the effects of homelessness. Through practice change, partnership with community resources, awareness, and advocacy, pediatricians can help optimize the health and well-being of children affected by homelessness. PMID:23713108

  3. Unaccompanied Refugee Minors; A Challenging Group to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Tammy; Eurelings-Bontekoe, Elisabeth; Spinhoven, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM), like all adolescents, have the right to be able to develop emotionally and cognitively to their fullest potential in host countries (Article 6, Convention of the Rights of the Child, 1991). URM make up a very special and vulnerable population of young people under the age of 18 who have been separated from their…

  4. Factors Related to Educational Resilience among Sudanese Unaccompanied Minors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rana, Meenal; Qin, Desiree Baolian; Bates, Laura; Luster, Tom; Saltarelli, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Educational resilience is defined as having successful outcomes in school despite the adversities one has faced in life. There is a dearth of research on a particularly high-risk group--unaccompanied refugee minors who are separated from their parents by war and lack the protection and advocacy provided by adult caretakers.…

  5. A Risk and Resilience Perspective on Unaccompanied Refugee Minors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Bonnie E.; Cacciatore, Joanne; Klimek, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) are a diverse and extremely vulnerable group served by social workers about whom there is little research. URMs enter the United States from many lands without parents or kin, often having experienced war and other traumatic events. Using a risk and resilience framework, we summarize the…

  6. The Rights of Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Penny

    This booklet presents information concerning homelessness and the education of homeless children nationwide and in Illinois. Estimates of the number of homeless children vary widely. Reasons for homeless children's failure to attend school include school residency requirements, delays in transfer of documents, and lack of transportation. The…

  7. Student Financial Aid Office 103 Wilder Tower Memphis, TN 38152

    E-print Network

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    Homeless Youth verification as a (check one): -Vento School District Liaison -funded shelter: ___________________________________________ -funded shelter: __________________________________________ I am authorized to verify this student or been forced to leave by their parents. Unaccompanied youth live in a variety of temporary situations

  8. Street Kids--Homeless and Runaway Youth. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Children, Family, Drugs and Alcoholism of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate. One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This hearing was the second in a series examining the impact of homelessness and dislocation on young people in America. This session focused on the problems of homeless and runaway adolescents. Witnesses described the need for multiple services for this population, for effective provision of services, and for greater coordination and planning.…

  9. From homeless to hopeless and healthless?: the health impacts of housing challenges among former foster care youth transitioning to adulthood in California.

    PubMed

    Yen, Irene H; Hammond, Wizdom Powell; Kushel, Margot B

    2009-01-01

    A childhood history of placement in the foster care system makes the emerging adult period more complicated and problematic in a variety of ways including meeting basic needs, such as housing and health. We conducted focus groups with 31 former foster youth in San Francisco and Oakland, California to explore their housing and health care circumstances since "aging out" of the foster care system. Five key themes were identified: 1) housing circumstances have direct and indirect impacts on access to health care; 2) housing instability can impede the flow of information between social services staff and youth; 3) housing circumstances and health care differed for men and women; 4) service agency rules and structures may be developmentally mismatched with participant needs; and 5) emerging adults experience repercussions of institutional life including the suspicion of authority and mistrust of medical providers. PMID:21992092

  10. Homelessness and Hunger*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barrett A; Greif, Meredith J

    2014-01-01

    We employ data from the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients to examine the character and correlates of hunger among homeless people. Our analysis, couched in an adaptation framework, finds more support for the differentiation hypothesis than for the leveling hypothesis: Complex patterns of food insecurity exist at the individual level, and they vary with the resources available (e.g., higher monthly income, regular shelter use) and obstacles faced (e.g., alcohol, drug, and physical and mental health problems). The chronically homeless, who suffer from multiple deficits, appear particularly food-insecure, a finding that favors the desperation hypothesis over its street-wisdom alternative. We conclude that hunger is not uniformly experienced by members of the homeless population. Rather, some individuals are better situated than others to cope with the stressful nature of homelessness when addressing their sustenance needs. PMID:18418982

  11. A portrait of homelessness.

    PubMed

    Wallsten, S M

    1992-09-01

    The homeless elderly are vulnerable, silent, and fearful. Their trajectory into homelessness more often than not precludes recovery and takes them on a course toward early death or nursing home placement. Psychiatric nurses who work in community or acute care settings are in key positions to recognize elderly victims of homelessness, assess their needs, match them to services, start them on the road to recovery, and become their advocates. The definition of a homeless person as agreed on in the Report of the Federal Task Force on Homelessness and Severe Mental Illness (1992) is the one used in the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (Public Law 100-77). A homeless person is someone "who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence" and whose main nighttime residence is a "supervised public or private shelter designed to provide temporary living accommodations; an institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to be institutionalized; or a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings." This definition, then, excludes those individuals living on the "fringes" in substandard or condemned housing, a condition that warrants attention in general and particularly among the elderly. PMID:1404012

  12. Homeless "squeegee kids": food insecurity and daily survival.

    PubMed

    Dachner, Naomi; Tarasuk, Valerie

    2002-04-01

    Current knowledge about food insecurity in North America is largely based on research with low-income households. Much less is known about the food experiences of homeless people, a group who are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity. This study explored the food experiences of street youth, one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in Canada. To gain an in-depth understanding of food insecurity within the context of daily life, ethnographic research was undertaken with street youth at one inner-city drop-in centre in Toronto, Canada. Results of this study reveal that street youth's access to food was precarious amidst the instability and chaos of street life. The day-to-day lives of the street youth encountered in this study were characterized by a constant struggle to find safe, secure shelter, generate income, and obtain sufficient food. In this context, food was a precious commodity. Food access was inextricably linked to and contingent upon conditions of health, shelter, and income. Food access was precarious since everyday food sources purchased food and charitable food assistance were ultimately insecure. "Squeegeeing" (washing car windows), the primary source of income for youth in the study, was dependent on the weather, political and public will, and youth's physical health, and thus did not generate enough money to continuously meet basic food needs. Charitable food assistance was considered poor quality and was associated with food sickness. The often unsavoury atmosphere of charitable food programmes, their locations, capacity, and idiosyncratic rules, policies, and hours of operation also affected access. Findings from this study extend the current understanding of food insecurity to homeless youth and offer insight into current responses to hunger and homelessness. PMID:11999501

  13. 41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

  14. 41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

  15. 41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

  16. Southeast Asian Refugee Youth: An Annotated Bibliography. Southeast Asian Refugee Studies Occasional Papers. Number Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Ruth E., Comp.; Hendricks, Glenn L., Comp.

    This annotated bibliography comprises books and articles on Southeast Asian refugee youth. It is divided into the following cross-referenced sections: (1) Adaptation and Acculturation; (2) Education; (3) Physical and Mental Health; (4) Unaccompanied Minors and Amerasian Youth; (5) Courtship and Marriage; (6) General Topics; (7) Journalism; and (8)…

  17. Counting the homeless in Malta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cyrus Vakili-Zad

    2006-01-01

    There are no visible signs of homelessness in Malta similar to what can be seen on the streets of many North American or European cities, yet there are few hundred homeless who stay in shelters and another few thousand households that are at risk of being homeless. Malta has a comparatively sizeable social housing sector (9000–10,000) and approximately 3300 households

  18. Validation of the Teacher's Report Form for Teachers of Unaccompanied Refugee Minors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Tammy; Mooijaart, A.; Eurelings-Bontekoe, Elisabeth; Spinhoven, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Dutch Teacher's Report Form (TRF) for teachers of Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM) were evaluated in this study. The teachers (n = 486) that participated received a Dutch TRF to report on the mental health of the unaccompanied minor. Hierarchical confirmative factor analysis and individual confirmatory factor…

  19. Homelessness Experiences, Sexual Orientation, and Sexual Risk Taking among High School Students in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Eric; Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey; Fulginiti, Anthony; Astor, Roee; Montoya, Jorge; Plant, Aaron; Kordic, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Prior studies reported homeless adolescents engage in more sexual risk than their housed peers. However, these comparisons are typically made post hoc by comparing homeless adolescent community-based samples with high school probability samples. This study utilizes a random sample of high school students to examine homelessness experiences and sexual risk behaviors. Methods A supplemental survey to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey containing questions regarding homelessness and sexual health was administered to Los Angeles high school students (N=1,839). Multivariate logistic regressions assessed the associations between demographics, past year homelessness experiences (i.e., place of nighttime residence), and being sexually active and condom use at last intercourse. Results Homelessness experiences consisted of staying in a shelter (10.4%), a public place (10.1%), and with a stranger (5.6%). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning (LGBTQ), younger, and male adolescents were more likely to experience homelessness. LGBTQ adolescents were also more likely to report staying with a stranger and less likely to report staying in a shelter. Compared to adolescents who stayed in shelters, adolescents who stayed with strangers and in public places were more likely to engage in unprotected sex at last intercourse. Conclusions Adolescents who report sexual activity and sexual risk taking are more likely to report homelessness experiences. With regard to sexual health, staying with strangers could be a particularly risky form of homelessness; LGBTQ and Black adolescents are more likely to experience this form of homelessness. Efforts to reduce homelessness and sexual risk-taking need to recognize the specific vulnerabilities faced by these populations. PMID:23360897

  20. Homelessness and Dual Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Robert E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reviews recent research on the epidemiology, subject characteristics, and service needs of the homeless population who are dually diagnosed to suffer both severe mental illness and substance abuse disorders. Discusses evolving approaches to providing social services, various treatments, system and legal issues, and problems with current research.…

  1. Readings in Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matuszowicz, Peter F.

    Researchers have documented links between a number of behavioral issues and homelessness, including the following: limited/no social networks; social isolation; proneness of victimization; history of emotional, physical, sexual, and substance abuse; lack of education; and anxiety resulting from inadequate physical space. The possible benefits of…

  2. Hope for Homeless Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Cyndy Jones

    1996-01-01

    The Thomas J. Pappas Regional Education Center in Phoenix, Arizona, is a magnet school for homeless students from unorganized territories, military installations, Indian reservations, and national forest lands. This "accommodation" school, supported by federal grants, in-kind business donations, and committed volunteer mentors from the local…

  3. 79 FR 21063 - Runaway and Homeless Youth

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-04-14

    ...gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, physical...gender identity/expression, sexual orientation), (4) applied human...gender identity/expression, sexual orientation,...

  4. What's Age Gotta Do with It? Understanding the Age-Identities and School-Going Practices of Mexican Immigrant Youth in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Recent reports of out-of-school immigrant youth have brought attention to predominantly Mexican and Central American immigrant youth who immigrate to the United States and do not enroll in formal schooling (Fry, 2002; Hill and Hayes, 2007). Many arrive to the United States unaccompanied, joining their older, undocumented counterparts in becoming…

  5. Can Better National Policy End Family Homelessness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Nan

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the close link between federal policy and family homelessness is critical for ensuring that one day no child in the United States is homeless. This article discusses the nature of family homelessness, the national policy framework that exists to help vulnerable families, the homeless assistance system that federal policy has…

  6. Homelessness: An Annotated Bibliography of Australian Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loft, Jenny, Comp.; Davis, Mari, Comp.

    This bibliography, compiled for the International Year of Shelter for the Homeless, lists Australian works published since 1974 about homelessness. It includes definitions of homelessness from the literature and an introductory article looking at different perspectives on homelessness. The entries, mainly taken from FAMILY database, are each…

  7. The Homeless in Contemporary Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Richard D.; And Others

    This book consists of 15 chapters on understanding and helping the homeless. The first seven chapters present the "new" homeless in historical context and describe this population and its situation. The remaining eight chapters discuss policy and program options of the government and other organizations in attempting to alleviate the problems of…

  8. Social Supports among the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solarz, Andrea

    The homeless have long been considered a disaffiliated and socially isolated group. Research has indicated that most of the homeless are single and have no family relationships or friends to provide support. A study was conducted to gather information on both objective and subjective measures of social support from 125 individuals residing at a…

  9. The Effects of Runaway-Homeless Episodes on High School Dropout

    PubMed Central

    Aratani, Yumiko; Cooper, Janice L.

    2013-01-01

    This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to examine the relationship between running away from home between the ages of 12 and 14 and dropping from high school among youth. Propensity score matching was conducted in estimating the effect of running away on high school dropout while controlling for confounding factors, such as familial instability and socioemotional health risks. The findings suggest that having runaway-homeless episodes have a detrimental effect on academic achievement. PMID:25641997

  10. Assessment, Prevention, and Intervention Activities in a School-Based Program for Children Experiencing Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabors, Laura A.; Weist, Mark D.; Shugarman, Ryan; Woeste, Michael J.; Mullet, Elizabeth; Rosner, Leah

    2004-01-01

    Children who experience homelessness are at increased risk for a range of health and mental health problems. In spite of this increased risk, they are often less likely to receive appropriate services. School-based programs offer considerable potential to reduce the gap between needs and appropriate services for these youth; however, there are few…

  11. Child Abuse, Street Victimization, and Substance Use among Homeless Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous research documents high rates of child abuse, street victimization, and substance use among homeless youth, few studies have investigated these three constructs simultaneously, and thus little is known about how various forms of victimization are uniquely associated with substance use among this population. The purpose of this…

  12. Predictors of self?reported sexually transmitted diseases among homeless and runaway adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberly A. Tyler; Les B. Whitbeck; Dan R. Hoyt; Kevin A. Yoder

    2000-01-01

    Path analysis was used to investigate factors associated with self?reported sexually transmitted diseases among 569 homeless and runaway adolescents in four Midwestern states. Youth were interviewed by outreach workers directly on the streets, in shelters, and in drop?in centers. Results indicated that family abuse was positively related to substance use, affiliation with friends who sold sex, and time on own.

  13. Comparing Suicide Attempters, Suicide Ideators, and Nonsuicidal Homeless and Runaway Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Kevin A.

    1999-01-01

    Study considers variables that distinguish between attempters, ideators, and nonsuicidal youth in a sample of homeless and runaway adolescents. Analyses reveal five variables that best distinguish among the three groups: self-esteem, depression, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and having a friend who attempted suicide. Suggests that accumulation of…

  14. Foster Care Placement, Poor Parenting, and Negative Outcomes among Homeless Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Although homeless youth with and without foster care histories both face adverse life circumstances, little is known about how these two groups compare in terms of their early histories and whether they face similar outcomes. As such, we compared those with and without a history of foster care placement to determine if the associations between a…

  15. The Real Cost of Linking Homeless Young People to Employment, Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the implementation of the Victorian Youth Employment, Education and Training Initiative (YEETI). This statewide initiative delivered brokerage funds to homeless young people through their housing advocates. One of the findings of the project was that the main barrier to young people achieving a stable continuum in their lives…

  16. Gender differences in Brazilian street youth’s family circumstances and experiences on the street

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcela Raffaelli; Silvia H Koller; Caroline T Reppold; Mateus B Kuschick; Fernanda M. B Krum; Denise R Bandeira; Carson Simőes

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: It has been proposed that homeless street girls are more likely to be from dysfunctional families and exhibit psychological distress than homeless street boys, reflecting cultural factors that result in differential norms for male and female behavior. The current analysis examined whether male and female street youth in a mid-sized Brazilian city differed in their family circumstances and day-to-day

  17. A Case Study of the Life Experiences of High School Graduates/General Education Development (GED) Recipients in Texas Who Experienced Homelessness During Their Public School Education 

    E-print Network

    Reider, Ruth Ann

    2012-07-16

    ...................... 31 Blaming the Victim???????????. 31 Why Do They Run? Runaway Youth???? 34 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ... suggest that the destitution of homelessness for American families, children and youth typically impacts individuals and then radiates outward in a ripple effect, subsequently touching public schools, health care facilities and social service providers...

  18. Mental health consultation at a youth shelter: An ethnographic approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Kevin Grigsby

    1992-01-01

    Shelters for homeless and runaway youth offer temporary, safe shelter to children and youth who have no alternative available to them other than life on the streets, many of whom also present a wide range of mental health problems. Traditional office- or clinic-based mental health services may not be available to or may not meet the needs of this population,

  19. The Spatial Origins of the Homeless: How the Homeless Vary in Their Geographic Distribution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deden Rukmana

    2006-01-01

    There has been no such study to date to investigate the residential origin of the varying categories of homeless. This study investigates the spatial distribution of residential origins of the varying categories of homeless and the factors that contribute to the vulnerability of individuals to become homeless. The study categorizes homeless people based on gender, family status, the occurrence of

  20. Critical Homelessness: Expanding Narratives of Inclusive Democracy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Finley; Marcelo Diversi

    2010-01-01

    The experience (as opposed to the concept) of homelessness is hardly part of the academic discourse in education, cultural studies, or human development. One of the central goals of our special issue is to create a bridge between homelessness as a personal experience and homelessness as a public issue. Along with the personal experience that breaks free from the deficit-model

  1. The health of homeless immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Shirley; Redelmeier, Donald A.; Tolomiczenko, George; Kiss, Alex; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    Background This study examined the association between immigrant status and current health in a representative sample of 1,189 homeless people in Toronto, Canada. Methods Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between immigrant status and current health status (assessed using the SF-12) among homeless recent immigrants (?10 years since immigration), non-recent immigrants (>10 years since immigration), and Canadian-born individuals recruited at shelters and meal programs (response rate 73%). Results After adjusting for demographic characteristics and lifetime duration of homelessness, recent immigrants were significantly less likely to have chronic conditions (RR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.9), mental health problems (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.7), alcohol problems (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.5), and drug problems (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.4) compared to non-recent immigrants and Canadian-born individuals. Recent immigrants were also more likely to have better mental health status (+3.4 points, SE ±1.6) and physical health status (+2.2 points, SE ±1.3) on scales with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation of 10 in the general population. Conclusion Homeless recent immigrants are a distinct group who are generally healthier and may have very different service needs compared to other homeless people. PMID:19654122

  2. Homelessness: Issues and Legislation in the 101st Congress. Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasem, Ruth Ellen

    This report discusses the nature of homelessness and the homeless in America, recent programs that have been implemented to help the homeless, and issues concerning the Federal government's role in helping these people. The following topics concerning the characteristics of the homeless and the causes of homelessness are covered: (1) "Mental…

  3. Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth Risks for Emotional, Physical, and Social Problems: Results From a Community-Based Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Lock; Hans Steiner

    1999-01-01

    ObjectiveHealth problems of gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) youth are reported as differing from those of heterosexual youth. Increased depression, suicide, substance use, homelessness, and school dropout have been reported. Most studies of GLB youth use clinical or convenience samples. The authors conducted a community school-based health survey that included an opportunity to self-identify as GLB.

  4. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY...community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV...response to ``RIN 2900-AN73, Health Care for Homeless Veterans...

  5. Macroeconomic Causes of Family Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McChesney, Kay Young

    The welfare of American families improved steadily for over 20 years after World War II. After the War on Poverty of the 1960s, the number of people living in poverty fell, reaching its lowest point in 1973. During the 1980s, homeless families, including those living in the streets, in cars, and in shelters seemingly appeared out of nowhere. As…

  6. Homeless--And Doubled Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    The bank foreclosed on your home because your parents divorced and don't have enough money to pay the mortgage. You're locked out of your house. Where will the family sleep? Most families turn to friends and relatives at times like these. That's why about 75 percent of the 1,258,182 homeless students in the United States live…

  7. Comparing subgroups of suicidal homeless adolescents: Multiple attempters, single attempters and ideators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin A. Yoder; Les B. Whitbeck; Dan R. Hoyt

    2010-01-01

    This study compared multiple attempters, single attempters, ideators and non-suicidal homeless adolescents from the Midwestern United States. The data were collected in 1999–2000 from youths aged 16–19 years. More than one-quarter (26.7%) of the 405 participants made multiple lifetime attempts, 9.8% attempted suicide once, 48.9% thought about – but did not attempt – suicide and 14.6% never attempted or thought

  8. Foster Care Placement, Poor Parenting, and Negative Outcomes Among Homeless Young Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberly A. TylerLisa; Lisa A. Melander

    2010-01-01

    Although homeless youth with and without foster care histories both face adverse life circumstances, little is known about\\u000a how these two groups compare in terms of their early histories and whether they face similar outcomes. As such, we compared\\u000a those with and without a history of foster care placement to determine if the associations between a history of poor parenting

  9. Universal screening for homelessness and risk for homelessness in the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Fargo, Jamison D; Byrne, Thomas H; Kane, Vincent R; Culhane, Dennis P

    2013-12-01

    We examined data for all veterans who completed the Veterans Health Administration's national homelessness screening instrument between October 1, 2012, and January 10, 2013. Among veterans who were not engaged with the US Department of Veterans Affairs homeless system and presented for primary care services, the prevalence of recent housing instability or homelessness was 0.9% and homelessness risk was 1.2%. Future research will refine outreach strategies, targeting of prevention resources, and development of novel interventions. PMID:24148032

  10. The role of non-governmental organisations in the management of separated and unaccompanied children, following disasters in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Following disasters, separated and unaccompanied children are among the most vulnerable, therefore international organisations have formed guidelines regarding the management of these children. Guidelines include recommendations for identifying and registering children, tracing family members, reunification and arrangements for interim and durable care. There is a lack of experiential evidence on how these principles are put into practice at operational levels, and whether existing policies were useful. There is a particular lack of empirical evidence from the disaster prone country of Iran. The aim of this study was to describe the role of Non- Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in the management of separated and unaccompanied children, following disasters in Iran in order to plan for and provision of future disasters. Findings The Iranian Red Crescent Organisation, Committee Emdad Imam Khomeini (a national organisation unique to Iran that is protected by the government and supported by public contributions) and Behzisti (the government welfare organisation in Iran) are the main figures involved in the management of separated and unaccompanied children, following disasters in Iran. NGOs are rarely responsible for caring for unaccompanied children, however they provide valuable support including financial assistance, arrangement of educational and extra-curricular activities and psychosocial support. Following the initial chaos after the Bam earthquake, international guidelines on separated and unaccompanied children were largely followed. Conclusions Systems for managing separated and unaccompanied children following disasters in Iran, involving NGOs, are emerging. However, most are yet to be formalised. PMID:20929548

  11. A TYPOLOGY OF DRUG-RELATED OFFENDING AMONG YOUNG HOMELESS INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Hathaz, Dodi S.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates a link between drug use and offending, particularly amongst high-risk individuals, such as homeless youth. The extent to which such youth interpret their offending as being related to their drug use, though, is understudied. This manuscript investigates the interpretations of drug-related offenses offered by 151 primarily white, male, homeless IDUs aged 16–29 years. Youth were asked specific questions about their drug-related offenses during in-depth interviews as part of a larger study investigating health risks surrounding drug injection between 2004 and 2006. The first section of the manuscript outlines offenses youth revealed committing either in pursuit of or after using a variety of substances. The second part of the manuscript examines the overall context (motivation, environment), and provides a seven-tiered typology of drug-related offending based on youth's interpretations, linking certain drugs to specific offenses within particular contexts. From here, some theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:21423855

  12. Factors Associated with Mental Health Service Need and Utilization among Unaccompanied Refugee Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tammy Bean; Elisabeth Eurelings-Bontekoe; Ab Mooijaart; Philip Spinhoven

    2006-01-01

    This study is the first to address the need for mental health Care (MHC) and the patterns of utilization of MHC services among\\u000a Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM). Information concerning the well being, mental health need, and utilization of services\\u000a of URM was collected from three informants, the minors themselves (n = 920), their legal guardians (n = 557), and their teachers (n = 496). The well-being,

  13. Changing Paradigms for Working with Street Youth: The Experience of Street Kids International1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Sauvé

    The United Nations estimates 100 million street youth across the globe. They are products of poverty, war, urbanization, political instability, family breakdown, and HIV\\/AIDS, among others. Many are not homeless, but primary income earners for their extended families. Many participate in the sex and drug trade because of limited income generation alternatives. How can we support these youth and increase

  14. Can't Do It Alone: Housing Collaborations to Improve Foster Youth Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choca, Miryam J.; Minoff, Jedediah; Angene, Lyn; Byrnes, Michele; Kenneally, Lois; Norris, DeWayne; Pearn, Deanne; Rivers, Marina M.

    2004-01-01

    Research documents that youth transitioning out of the foster care system experience a variety of negative outcomes, including homelessness. Housing collaborations, which aim to comprehensively address resource and service needs for transitioning youth, including permanent connections, education, and employment, have resulted in innovative…

  15. Characteristics of sheltered homeless families.

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, E L; Rubin, L; Lauriat, A S

    1986-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of homeless families, we interviewed 80 homeless mothers and 151 children living in 14 family shelters in Massachusetts (two-thirds of the shelters in the state). Ninety-four per cent of the families were headed by women, 91 per cent were on AFDC (aid to families with dependent children), with twice as many as the state average having been on AFDC for at least two years; most had long histories of residential instability. Although 60 per cent had completed high school, only a third had worked for longer than one month. One-third of the mothers reported having been abused during their childhood, and two-thirds had experienced a major family disruption. At the time of the interview, almost two-thirds either lacked or had minimal supportive relationships and one-fourth of these named their child as the major support. Eighteen mothers were involved with the Department of Social Services because of probable child abuse or neglect. Seventy-one per cent of the mothers had personality disorders. In contrast to many adult homeless individuals, however, deinstitutionalized persons or those suffering from psychoses were not overrepresented. About 50 percent of the homeless children were found to have developmental lags, anxiety, depression, and learning difficulties, and about half required further psychiatric evaluation. Two-thirds described housing and social welfare agencies as not helpful. Given the many serious problems of the mothers and the difficulties already manifested by their children, comprehensive psychosocial and economic interventions must be made to interrupt a cycle of extreme instability and family breakdown. PMID:3740332

  16. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Reasons for Homelessness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Tessler; Robert Rosenheck; Gail Gamache

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate some of the ways in which the perceived pathways into homelessness are socially structured. We do this by examining the relative frequency of 11 different reasons homeless males and females cite for being homeless. Males were more likely to cite the following as their main reasons for homelessness: loss of a job,

  17. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Homeless Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony C. Lee; John G. Hanlon; Jessica Ben-David; Gillian L. Booth; Warren J. Cantor; Philip W. Connelly; Stephen W. Hwang

    2010-01-01

    Background—Homeless people represent an extremely disadvantaged group in North America. Among older homeless men, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death. The objective of this study was to examine cardiovascular risk factors in a representative sample of homeless adults and identify opportunities for improved risk factor modification. Methods and Results—Homeless persons were randomly selected at shelters for single

  18. The Impact of Homelessness on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Yvonne; Shinn, Marybeth

    1991-01-01

    Reviews community-based research on the effects of homelessness on children. Homeless children face threats to their future well-being resulting from health problems, hunger, poor nutrition, developmental delays, anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, and educational underachievement. Contributing factors may include inadequate shelter,…

  19. Homeless patients' experience of satisfaction with care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan McCabe; Carol L. Macnee; Mary Kay Anderson

    2001-01-01

    This article explores homeless individuals' experiences of satisfaction with health care, and explores the interrelationship among experiences of being homeless, health perceptions of participants, and experiences of satisfaction with health care. It presents the findings of a phenomenological study that was conducted using participants selected from five sites in one southeastern state. Participant interviews were conducted at a nurse-managed primary

  20. Assessing the Nutritional Needs of Homeless Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Grover; AC Hergenroeder; SR Morrow; BL Haefner

    1998-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed to describe the nutritional habits and needs of homeless adolescents. It incorporated the Block Food Frequency (BFFQ) questionnaire with 37 questions regarding: current practices of obtaining food; nutritional education needs; and demographic information. The survey was reviewed, pilot-tested, and revised Subjects were 18-20 year old residents at a homeless shelter for less than 72 hours

  1. Measuring pain in the context of homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Rebecca; Kline, Susan; Cook, Karon F.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to inform the development of measures of pain impact appropriate for all respondents, including homeless individuals, so that they can be used in clinical research and practice. The secondary objective was to increase understanding about the unique experience of homeless people with pain. Methods Seventeen homeless individuals with chronic health conditions (often associated with pain) participated in cognitive interviews to test the functioning of 56 pain measurement items and provided information about their experience living with and accessing treatment for pain. Results The most common problems identified with items were that they lacked clarity or were irrelevant in the context of homelessness. Items that were unclear, irrelevant and/or had other identified problems made it difficult for participants to respond. Participants also described multiple ways in which their pain was exacerbated by conditions of homelessness and identified barriers to accessing appropriate treatment. Conclusions Results suggested that the majority of items were problematic for the homeless and require substantial modifications to make the pain impact bank relevant to this population. Additional recommendations include involving homeless in future item bank development, conducting research on the topic of pain and homelessness, and using cognitive interviewing in other types of health disparities research. PMID:19582592

  2. Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

  3. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  4. Health interventions for people who are homeless.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Stephen W; Burns, Tom

    2014-10-25

    Homelessness has serious implications for the health of individuals and populations. Primary health-care programmes specifically tailored to homeless individuals might be more effective than standard primary health care. Standard case management, assertive community treatment, and critical time intervention are effective models of mental health-care delivery. Housing First, with immediate provision of housing in independent units with support, improves outcomes for individuals with serious mental illnesses. Many different types of interventions, including case management, are effective in the reduction of substance misuse. Interventions that provide case management and supportive housing have the greatest effect when they target individuals who are the most intensive users of services. Medical respite programmes are an effective intervention for homeless patients leaving the hospital. Although the scientific literature provides guidance on interventions to improve the health of homeless individuals, health-care providers should also seek to address social policies and structural factors that result in homelessness. PMID:25390579

  5. Health disparities in the Native Hawaiian homeless.

    PubMed

    Yamane, David P; Oeser, Steffen G; Omori, Jill

    2010-06-01

    While it is well accepted that Native Hawaiians have poor health statistics compared to other ethnic groups in Hawaii, it is not well documented if these disparities persist when comparing Native Hawaiian homeless individuals to the general homeless population. This paper examines the Native Hawaiian homeless population living in three shelters on the island of Oahu, to determine if there are significant differences in the frequency of diseases between the Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian homeless. A retrospective data collection was performed using records from the Hawaii Homeless Outreach and Medical Education (H.O.M.E.) project. Data from 1182 patients was collected as of 12/05/09. Information collected included patient demographics, frequency of self reported diseases, family history of diseases, risk factors, prevalence of chronic diseases, and most common complaints. The data from Native Hawaiians and non-Native Hawaiians were examined for differences and a 1-tail Fisher exact analysis was done to confirm significance. The data reveals that the Native Hawaiian homeless population is afflicted more frequently with asthma and hypertension compared to other ethnic groups. While diabetes constituted more visits to the clinics for Native Hawaiians compared to the non-Native Hawaiians, there was no significant difference in patient reported prevalence of diabetes. The Native Hawaiian homeless also had increased rates of risky behaviors demonstrated by higher past use of marijuana and methamphetamines. Interestingly, there was a lower use of alcohol in the Native Hawaiian homeless and no significant difference between Native Hawaiians and non-native Hawaiians in current use of illicit drugs, which may represent a hopeful change in behaviors. These troubling statistics show that some of the health disparities seen in the general Native Hawaiian population persist despite the global impoverished state of all homeless. Hopefully, these results will aid organizations like the H.O.M.E. project to better address the health needs of the Native Hawaiian homeless population. PMID:20540000

  6. Global Female Homelessness: A MultiFaceted Problem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keri Weber Sikich

    2008-01-01

    International female homelessness is a difficult subject to address for a number of reasons. First, understanding what defines\\u000a homelessness poses a problem because female homelessness often takes on a different form than that of male homelessness. Also,\\u000a homelessness in industrialized countries looks different from that of developing nations where women are more likely to have\\u000a inadequate housing in temporary shelters

  7. Youth on the Street: Abuse and Neglect in the Eighties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kufeldt, Kathleen; Nimmo, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    Interviews with 489 runaway and homeless youth (often victims of abuse and neglect) identified two groups: (1) "runners," who leave home intending not to return and (2) "in and outers," who run away as an impulsive temporary coping mechanism. Risk of engaging in illegal activity increased with distance and time away. (Author/VW)

  8. Stressful life experiences and mental health problems among unaccompanied asylum-seeking children.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Tine K; Fjermestad, Krister W; Granly, Lene; Wilhelmsen, Nicolai H

    2015-01-01

    Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children aged 10-16 years (N = 93, M = 13.8, SD = 1.4, 81% boys) were assessed 6 months after arrival in Norway (SD = 5 months). Participants originated from 14 countries (63% Asia; 36% Africa). Severe life events (SLE) and psychological symptoms were measured by self-report. Participants reported a mean of 5.5 SLE (SD = 2.4), the most prevalent being death of a close person (68%), witnessing violence (63%), and war (62%). Some 54% scored above clinical cutoff on posttraumatic stress symptoms, 30% on anxiety symptoms, 20% on depressive symptoms, and 7% on externalizing symptoms. Number of SLE was associated with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (r =.50, p < .001), depression (r =.27, p = .020), and anxiety symptoms(r =. 34, p = .003), but not externalizing symptoms (r =.02, p = .874). None of the symptom variables were associated with age or gender. Results indicate that many unaccompanied asylum-seeking children have experienced not only war-related traumas but several other severe life adversities as well. It may thus be helpful to conduct early assessments on this group of children to assess their need for treatment or other psychosocial interventions. PMID:23982990

  9. An annotated bibliography of unaccompanied violoncello repertoire published in the United States from 1990 to the present

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pin-I Wu

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this essay is to offer a listing of literature for the unaccompanied violoncello which will be as comprehensive as possible and will examine compositions written between 1990 and the present. This information should be helpful to cellists in their exploration and performance of this contemporary literature.This study includes an annotated bibliography of a comprehensive list of

  10. An Analysis for Performance of Selected Unaccompanied Works for Trumpet by Robert Henderson, Hans Werner Henze and Verne Reynolds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brendan McGlynn

    2007-01-01

    Unaccompanied literature has been gaining a world-wide reputation and importance in the trumpet performance repertoire. This study examined how analysis of these pieces contributed not only to the knowledge of the performer, but to the performance itself. Three compositions were analyzed in this document: Variation Movements (1967) by Robert Henderson (b. 1948), Sonatina (1974) by Hans Werner Henze (b. 1926)

  11. Late-Onset PTSD in Unaccompanied Refugee Minors: Exploring the Predictive Utility of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smid, Geert E.; Lensvelt-Mulders, Gerty J. L. M.; Knipscheer, Jeroen W.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Kleber, Rolf J.

    2011-01-01

    Following resettlement in Western countries, unaccompanied refugee minors (URM) are at risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear to what extent PTSD in this group may become manifest at later stages following resettlement and which factors are associated with late onset. We examined data from URM collected 1 (T1) and 2…

  12. A Taxonomy of Medical Comorbidity for Veterans Who are Homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MPH Adam J. Gordon

    2008-01-01

    Homeless veterans have numerous medical and behavioral health problems. Grouping homeless people based on comorbidity patterns may assist in determining severity of illness and triaging health care more effectively. We sought to determine if a finite number of profiles could be identified related to demographic characteristics, living situation, length of homelessness, and referral areas using interview data from 2,733 veterans

  13. Homelessness in America: Unabated and Increasing. A 10-Year Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Barbara; Gleason, Mary Ann

    Ten years after passage of the McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, homelessness was studied in 11 urban, rural, and suburban communities and 4 states. The first section of the report examines the findings of detailed research on homelessness in these locations. The second section draws conclusions and outlines future directions for efforts to…

  14. Materials on the Education of Homeless Children. Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Education, Boston, MA.

    Information is provided about the legal developments affecting the educational rights of homeless students that were made by the McKinney Homeless Assistance Amendments Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-645). Presented in three parts, Part 1 gives an overview of some of the problems that keep homeless children from attending school or hindering their…

  15. Health of the homeless street women in South Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olusola Olufemi

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative survey conducted among 88 homeless street women in Johannesburg inner city about their health profile. The survey analysis is a descriptive one that elicits information about the types and causes of diseases prevalent among the street homeless women as well as their access to health care services based on the experiences of the homeless

  16. From substance use to homelessness or vice versa?

    PubMed

    McVicar, Duncan; Moschion, Julie; van Ours, Jan C

    2015-07-01

    Homelessness is associated with substance use, but whether substance use precedes or follows homelessness is unclear. We investigate the nature of the relationship between homelessness and substance use using data from the unique Australian panel dataset Journeys Home collected in 4 surveys over the period from October 2011 to May 2013. Our data refer to 1325 individuals who were homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. We investigate dynamics in homelessness and substance use over the survey period. We find that the two are closely related: homeless individuals are more likely to be substance users and substance users are more likely to be homeless. These relationships, however, are predominantly driven by observed and unobserved individual characteristics which cause individuals to be both more likely to be homeless and to be substance users. Once we take these personal characteristics into account it seems that homelessness does not affect substance use, although we cannot rule out that alcohol use increases the probability that an individual becomes homeless. These overall relationships also hide some interesting heterogeneity by 'type' of homelessness. PMID:25989002

  17. Broken Lives: Denial of Education to Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Lydia; And Others

    According to recent studies, families with children are now the fastest-growing segment of the homeless population: 40 percent of the homeless population consists of members of families. Forty-three percent of homeless children do not attend school, which provides children with a much-needed sense of place and continuity that they otherwise lack…

  18. Homeless youth: statement of problem and suggested policies.

    PubMed

    Bucy, J; Nichols, N

    1991-01-01

    There are an estimated 100,000 to 300,000 adolescents living on the streets with no supervision, nurturance or regular assistance from a parent or responsible adult. These young people are not "Huck Finns" seeking adventure but have been forced into this lifestyle and frame of mind. The reasons range from family dysfunctions such as abuse, sexual exploitation, neglect, and abandonment to inaction at the "system" level with regard to the overburdened child protective system, inadequate minimum wage, and lack of affordable housing opportunities. The consequences of this national problem are devastating and must be responded to. PMID:10114324

  19. Homelessness in Chicago: Poverty and Pathology, Social Institutions and Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosin, Michael R.; And Others

    All of the very poor have a certain potential for homelessness due to traditional economic reasons. This report on the homeless in Chicago (Illinois) presents an overview of a two-part project whose goals are to determine the following: (1) how to prevent homelessness; (2) how to relieve homelessness; and (3) how to reverse homelessness. The…

  20. Mentoring and Social Skills Training: Ensuring Better Outcomes for Youth in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Youth in foster care face significant life challenges that make it more likely that they will face negative outcomes (i.e., school failure, homelessness, and incarceration). While the reason(s) for out-of-home placement (i.e., family violence, abuse, neglect and/or abandonment) provide some context for negative outcomes, such negative outcomes…

  1. The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Later Sexual Victimization among Runaway Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Hoyt, Dan R.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Cauce, Ana Mari

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the impact of childhood sexual abuse on later sexual victimization among homeless and runaway youth. Found high rates of childhood sexual abuse and street sexual victimization, with females experiencing higher rates than males. Early sexual abuse increased likelihood of later victimization indirectly by increasing amount of time at…

  2. 77 FR 44653 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-Technical Submission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ...DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5603-N-50] Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application...information not contained in the original Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application...following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant...

  3. 76 FR 81520 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ...Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Program Registration...following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Program Registration...associated with registration requirements that Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance (CoC)...

  4. 77 FR 24214 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ...Information Collection for Public Comment: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance--Technical...following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance--Technical...information not contained in the original Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant...

  5. Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Refugee Children's Forced Repatriation: Social Workers' and Police Officers' Health and Job Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Johanna; Hansson, Jonas; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Ögren, Kenneth; Padyab, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    During the past ten years the number of unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children has dramatically increased in Sweden. Some of them are permitted to stay in the receiving country, but some are forced back to their country of origin. Social workers and police officers are involved in these forced repatriations, and such complex situations may cause stressful working conditions. This study aimed to bridge the gap in knowledge of the relationship between general mental health and working with unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children who are due for forced repatriation. In addition, the role of psychosocial job characteristics in such relationships was investigated. A questionnaire including sociodemographic characteristics, the Swedish Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire, and the 12-item General Mental Health Questionnaire were distributed nationally. Univariate and multivariable regression models were used. Poorer mental health was associated with working with unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children among social workers but not among police officers. Psychological job demand was a significant predictor for general mental health among social workers, while psychological job demand, decision latitude, and marital status were predictors among police officers. Findings are discussed with special regard to the context of social work and police professions in Sweden. PMID:26153185

  6. Gender Differences in Victimized Homeless Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Regina Jones; Rew, Lynn; Kouzekanani, Kamiar

    2006-01-01

    Most of what we know about sexual abuse comes from efforts to examine female children victimized by men. Although some researchers have identified similarities between male and female victims of sexual abuse, few studies have examined gender-specific factors associated with sexual health practices among homeless adolescents. The aim of this study…

  7. Helping the Homeless in School and Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holgersson-Shorter, Helena

    2010-01-01

    However much the recession might be receding, the effects remain deep and cruel to families living in poverty. Many have fallen through their communities' social safety nets. Today, families with young children comprise 41% of the nation's homeless population. According to the Institute of Children and Poverty, more than 1.35 million kids in the…

  8. Voices from the street: exploring the realities of family homelessness.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, Laura; Brush, Barbara L; Baiardi, Janet M; Kirk, Keri; VanMaldeghem, Kelley

    2014-11-01

    Homelessness threatens the health and well-being of thousands of families in the United States, yet little is known about their specific needs and how current services address them. To fill this knowledge gap, we explored the experiences of homelessness families in Detroit, Michigan. We targeted homeless mothers and their caseworkers for study to see if the perceptions of needs and services were in alignment. Using focus groups and content analysis, we identified four overarching themes that illustrate homeless mothers' experience with homelessness. We then analyzed data from caseworkers to look specifically for similarities and differences in their perceptions. Key findings included reports of family histories of violence, poverty, social isolation, and a lack of informal support as contributing to homelessness. The differing perspectives of mothers and their caseworkers regarding how best to move forward highlight how current programs and services may not be meeting the needs of this growing and vulnerable cohort. PMID:25186947

  9. Psychopathology in Young People Experiencing Homelessness: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Katherine H.; van den Bree, Marianne B.?M.; Los, Férenc J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding mental health issues faced by young homeless persons is instrumental to the development of successful targeted interventions. No systematic review of recent published literature on psychopathology in this group has been completed. We conducted a systematic review of published research examining the prevalence of psychiatric problems among young homeless people. We examined the temporal relationship between homelessness and psychopathology. We collated 46 articles according to the PRISMA Statement. All studies that used a full psychiatric assessment consistently reported a prevalence of any psychiatric disorder from 48% to 98%. Although there was a lack of longitudinal studies of the temporal relationship between psychiatric disorders and homelessness, findings suggested a reciprocal link. Supporting young people at risk for homelessness could reduce homelessness incidence and improve mental health. PMID:23597340

  10. Predictors of substance abuse treatment participation among homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Ibabe, Izaskun; Stein, Judith A; Nyamathi, Adeline; Bentler, Peter M

    2014-03-01

    The current study focuses on the relationships among a trauma history, a substance use history, chronic homelessness, and the mediating role of recent emotional distress in predicting drug treatment participation among adult homeless people. We explored the predictors of participation in substance abuse treatment because enrolling and retaining clients in substance abuse treatment programs is always a challenge particularly among homeless people. Participants were 853 homeless adults from Los Angeles, California. Using structural equation models, findings indicated that trauma history, substance use history and chronicity of homelessness were associated, and were significant predictors of greater recent emotional distress. The most notable result was that recent emotional distress predicted less participation in current substance abuse treatment (both formal and self-help) whereas a substance use history alone predicted significantly more participation in treatment. Implications concerning treatment engagement and difficulties in obtaining appropriate dual-diagnosis services for homeless mentally distressed individuals are discussed. PMID:24238716

  11. Perceived health status among the new urban homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard H. Ropers; Richard Boyer

    1987-01-01

    Homelessness may be the leading social problem in the United States in the mid 1980s. While there may be anywhere from 250,000 to three million homeless persons, few empirically based published studies are available concerning the correlates of mental and physical health status among the homeless. Los Angeles, where the present study was conducted, has been designated by the U.S.

  12. Evaluations of Continuums of Care for Homeless People

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    Prepared by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, "Evaluations of Continuums of Care for Homeless People" is a comprehensive study that examines the continuums of care for homeless people throughout the United States. Critiquing the agenda of the Continuum of Care (CoC), a system designed to help homeless people as well as those at imminent risk of becoming homeless, this 216-page report examines their development, current structure, and possible future. Users should note that this report defaults to small font and may be more easily readable if printed.

  13. Administrator's Memo: Youth Tutoring Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Resources for Youth, Inc., New York, NY.

    This manual, designed for the use of administrators in implementing a Youth Tutoring Youth Program (developed to encourage positive attitudes in tutors towards going to school, holding jobs, and helping others), outlines the employment of underachieving, disadvantaged 14- and 15-year-old Neighborhood Youth Corps enrollees as tutors for elementary…

  14. Social and Structural Barriers to Housing Among Street-Involved Youth Who Use Illicit Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Krüsi, Andrea; Fast, Danya; Small, Will; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In Canada, approximately 150,000 youth live on the street. Street-involvement and homelessness have been associated with various health risks, including increased substance use, blood-borne infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. We undertook a qualitative study to better understand the social and structural barriers street-involved youth who use illicit drugs encounter when seeking housing. We conducted 38 semi-structured interviews with street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada from May to October 2008. Interviewees were recruited from the At-risk Youth Study (ARYS) cohort, which follows youth aged 14 to 26 who have experience with illicit drug use. All interviews were thematically analyzed, with particular emphasis on participants' perspectives regarding their housing situation and their experiences seeking housing. Many street-involved youth reported feeling unsupported in their efforts to find housing. For the majority of youth, existing abstinence-focused shelters did not constitute a viable option and, as a result, many felt excluded from these facilities. Many youth identified inflexible shelter rules and a lack of privacy as outweighing the benefits of sleeping indoors. Single-room occupancy hotels (SROs) were reported to be the only affordable housing options, since many landlords would not to rent to youth on welfare. Many youth reported resisting moving to SROs as they viewed them as unsafe and as giving up hope for a return to mainstream society. The findings of the present study shed light on the social and structural barriers street-involved youth face in attaining housing and challenge the popular view of youth homelessness constituting a life-style choice. Our findings point to the need for housing strategies that include safe, low threshold, harm reduction focused housing options for youth who engage in illicit substance use. PMID:20102394

  15. Changing homelessness services: revanchism, 'professionalisation' and resistance.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Lisa; Somerville, Peter; Brown, Philip; Morris, Gareth

    2015-07-01

    This paper argues that the increasing international salience of homelessness can be partially explained by reference to the revanchist thesis (involving processes of coerced exclusion and abjection), but the situation on the ground is more complex. It reports on interviews with 18 representatives of 11 homelessness service providers in one city in England. As Cloke et al. found, these providers tended to be either larger, more 'professional', 'insider' services or smaller, more 'amateur', 'outsider' services. However, this does not mean that the former were necessarily more revanchist and the latter less so. Rather, the actions of both types of organisation could, in some cases, be construed as both advancing and counteracting a revanchist project. PMID:25442718

  16. Arizona Head Start for Homeless Children and Families Project. 1994-95 Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Lori; Greene, Andrea

    Homeless families with children comprise the fastest growing segment of the United States homeless population. This study evaluated Year 1 of the Arizona Head Start for Homeless Children and Families Project, designed to meet educational and social needs of homeless children and families, and to assist Head Start agencies in developing effective…

  17. Arizona Head Start for Homeless Children and Families Project. 1995-96 Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Lori

    Homeless families with children constitute the fastest growing segment of the United States homeless population. This study evaluated Year 2 of the Arizona Head Start for Homeless Children and Families Project, designed to meet educational and social needs of homeless children and families, and to assist Head Start agencies in developing effective…

  18. Impaired Immune Function in a Homeless Population with Stress-Related Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorena Arranz; Aída de Vicente; Manuel Muńoz; Mónica De la Fuente

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Homeless people suffer high levels of psychological distress. The aim of the present work was to study the immune function in a group of homeless people with stress-related disorders and compare it with that of healthy non-homeless controls. Methods: We included in the study 40 homeless persons and 40 housed controls recruited from the population of Madrid and matched

  19. Standards to prevent, detect, and respond to sexual abuse and sexual harassment involving unaccompanied children. Interim final rule (IFR).

    PubMed

    2014-12-24

    This IFR proposes standards and procedures to prevent, detect, and respond to sexual abuse and sexual harassment involving unaccompanied children (UCs) in ORR's care provider facilities. DATES: This IFR is effective on December 24, 2014. ORR care provider facilities must be in compliance with this IFR by June 24, 2015 but encourages care provider facilities to be in compliance sooner, if possible. HHS will work with facilities to implement and enforce the standards contained in this rule. Comments on this IFR must be received on or before February 23, 2015. PMID:25546883

  20. Adult Education for the Homeless: A Program in Jeopardy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education and Literacy.

    During its 8-year history, the federal Adult Education for the Homeless Program (AEH) pioneered new methods of service to adults in need and benefited over 320,000 homeless adults and families. Despite an evaluation that documented program success, funding was rescinded from the 1995 federal budget and never reinstated. AEH programs developed the…

  1. Homelessness among people with severe mental illness in Switzerland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph Lauber; Barbara Lay; Wulf Rössler

    Questions under study: This study addresses socio-demographic and clinical characteristics among homeless people in Switzerland admitted to inpatient care, the use of and pathways to inpa- tient care by this group and, the extent to which psychiatric disorders contribute to the risk of homelessness. Methods: Based on data of a psychiatric case register we analysed 16 247 people consecutively referred

  2. Planning Services for the Homeless in the San Francisco Peninsula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars G. Osterberg; Donald A. Barr

    2007-01-01

    Summary: A survey of clients seeking homeless services at agencies in the SF Peninsula, indicates that a disproportionate percentage are minority group members (African American and Hispanic) and veterans, and points to the need for integrated housing, social services, and health care for this vulnerable population. Significant efforts have been made to change public attitudes towards the homeless and to

  3. Homelessness and the Fiscal Year 1993 Federal Budget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC.

    This paper analyzes the Bush Administration's budget request for homelessness programs, and argues that it promised little to alleviate the suffering of homeless people. The paper asserts that the proposal is the weakest in years, with overall spending down by 7 percent when adjusted for inflation. Programs hardest hit are new funding to increase…

  4. Health Status, Needs, and Health Care Barriers Among the Homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurie Wojtusik; Mary Castle White

    1998-01-01

    :Perceived health status, health conditions, and access and barriers to care are important predictors of mortality and the use of services among the homeless. This study assesses these issues by structured interview of 128 homeless adults from San Francisco. Of these adults, 21.1 percent were women (mean age 37 compared to 42 for men). In terms of ethnicity, 38 percent

  5. Deviant Behavior and Victimization Among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LES B. WHITBECK; DAN R. HOYT; KEVIN A. YODER; ANA MARI CAUCE; MATT PARADISE

    2001-01-01

    This study used a high-risk population of runaway and homeless adolescents to investigate the effects of a history of caretaker abuse and deviant subsistence strategies on victimization among adolescents. Based on a multisite sample of 974 homeless and runaway adolescents, logistic regression models were used first to examine factors predicting involvement in sexual and nonsexual deviant subsistence strategies and then

  6. Deja Vu: Family Homelessness in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    This report describes family homelessness in New York City, which has risen sharply since 1980. Currently, the City's family shelter system is at capacity. Homeless children are typically raised by single mothers who receive no child support, are 27 years old, are unemployed and receiving welfare, and have had at least one public assistance…

  7. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY...community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV...services or been enrolled in the VA health care system. Through the HCHV...

  8. The State of Homeless Children in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabler, Brenda; Weinstein, Elana

    2009-01-01

    Across America, the numbers of homeless children and families are growing as a result of many factors including the recent economic crisis, home foreclosures, and natural disasters. Because of an increase in the number of homeless children throughout the United States, this population has unmet needs that can be targeted in school settings under…

  9. Toward A Concept of Homelessness among Aged Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Carl I.; Sokolovsky, Jay

    1983-01-01

    Compared homeless aged men who live on the Bowry or in hotel rooms in New York City. Results showed homelessness is not a uniform category. Sociability differentiated them from nonhomeless age peers and socioeconomic status differentiated the two groups; also found differences in each groups' social adaptation. (Author/JAC)

  10. Predicting Overt and Covert Antisocial Behaviors: Parents, Peers, and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompsett, Carolyn J.; Toro, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Parental deviance, parental monitoring, and deviant peers were examined as predictors of overt and covert antisocial behaviors. Homeless (N=231) and housed (N=143) adolescents were assessed in adolescence and again in early adulthood. Homelessness predicted both types of antisocial behaviors, and effects persisted in young adulthood. Parental…

  11. Understanding survival sex: young women, homelessness and intimate relationships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juliet Watson

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to explore gendered experiences of homelessness through an examination of survival sex. Survival sex is usually understood to be the exchange of sex for material support, however, this research found a greater complexity in the intimate relationships being undertaken by young women experiencing homelessness. In-depth interviews were conducted with 15 young women aged 18–25 years living in

  12. Confronting Homelessness among American Families: Federal Programs and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWoody, Madelyn

    This book offers specific information on the wide range of federal prevention, emergency shelter, and family service programs available today that provide children and families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness with financial support, education, job training, nutritional services, and crisis funding. The chapters are: (1) "Coordinating a…

  13. Learning in Limbo: The Educational Deprivation of Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Yvonne; Rollins, Norma

    This document presents a report on the educational needs of homeless children in New York City. Data were analyzed from the following sources: (1) review of the current literature on the impact of homelessness on the physical and emotional well-being of children; (2) field-based interviews with 277 families in New York's shelters and hotels; and…

  14. A Repeated Observation Approach for Estimating the Street Homeless Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Risks of life on the street caused by inclement weather, harassment, and assault threaten the unsheltered homeless population. We address some challenges of enumerating the street homeless population by testing a novel capture-recapture (CR) estimation approach that models individuals' intermittent daytime visibility. We tested walking and…

  15. Factors associated with geriatric syndromes in older homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca T; Kiely, Dan K; Bharel, Monica; Mitchell, Susan L

    2013-05-01

    Although older homeless adults have high rates of geriatric syndromes, risk factors for these syndromes are not known. We used multivariable regression models to estimate the association of subject characteristics with the total number of geriatric syndromes in 250 homeless adults aged 50 years and older. Geriatric syndromes included falls, cognitive impairment, frailty, major depression, sensory impairment, and urinary incontinence. A higher total number of geriatric syndromes was associated with having less than a high school education, medical comorbidities (diabetes and arthritis), alcohol and drug use problems, and difficulty performing one or more activities of daily living. Clinicians who care for older homeless patients with these characteristics should consider screening them for geriatric syndromes. Moreover, this study identifies potentially modifiable risk factors associated with the total number of geriatric syndromes in older homeless adults. This knowledge may provide targets for clinical interventions to improve the health of older homeless patients. PMID:23728022

  16. Deriving costs of service use among an urban homeless population.

    PubMed

    Fuehrlein, Brian S; Cowell, Alexander J; Pollio, David E; Cupps, Lori Y; Balfour, Margaret E; North, Carol S

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a novel approach to calculating service use costs across multiple domains of service for homeless populations. A randomly-selected sample of homeless persons was interviewed in St. Louis, MO and followed for 2 years. Service- and cost-related data were collected from homeless individuals and from the agencies serving them. Detailed interviews of study participants and of agency personnel in specific domains of service (medical, psychiatric, substance abuse, homeless maintenance, and homeless amelioration services) were conducted using a standardized approach. Service utilization data were obtained from agency records. Standardized service-related costs were derived and aggregated across multiple domains from agency-reported data. Housing status was not found to be significantly associated with costs. Although labor intensive, this approach to cost estimation allows costs to be accurately compared across domains. These methods could potentially be applied to other populations. PMID:24462220

  17. Homeless women with minor children in the Detroit metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Mills, C

    1989-11-01

    Eighty-seven homeless families served by the emergency shelter of the Coalition on Temporary Shelter in Detroit during the first quarter of 1987 were studies through a review of admission data. Most of the families were black and contained an adult female with one or two minor children. Most of the mothers were young, did not have a high school diploma, and had no income. Some had histories of psychiatric disorders or substance abuse. Many had been in a dependent living situation before becoming homeless. Children accounted for more than one-fourth of admissions during the study period. Policies should address prevention of homelessness through income support programs, provision of low-income housing, basic living skill training programs, and mental health service delivery. When available resources fail in prevention, programming should address the effects of homelessness on children, because these effects perpetuate a cycle that will increase the homeless population in future generations. PMID:10296495

  18. Homeless women's gynecological symptoms and use of medical care.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, S L; Andersen, R M; Gifford, D S; Gelberg, L

    2001-08-01

    Information is lacking on homeless women's gynecological symptoms and use of medical care for symptoms. This paper documents and explains gynecological symptoms and conditions and use of medical care in a probability sample of 974 reproductive-age (15-44) homeless women. Two-thirds of women reported symptoms during the previous year; 71 percent of those received medical care for their gynecological symptoms. Pregnancy, drug dependence, more episodes of homelessness, and general physical health symptoms were positively associated with a number of gynecological symptoms. Gynecological symptoms, younger age, better perceived health, and insurance coverage were positively associated with medical care; women reporting recent drug use and rape received less care. These findings support the importance of medical care and other treatment and support services for homeless women, including expanded care during pregnancy and substance abuse treatment. Health insurance coverage and an interruption in the cycle of homelessness also appear vital to women's health. PMID:11475550

  19. Maximizing Credit Accrual and Recovery for Homeless Students. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Middle and high school students experiencing homelessness often face challenges in accruing credits. Class offerings, methods of calculating credits, and graduation requirements can vary greatly among school districts. Students who change schools late in high school can find themselves suddenly in danger of not graduating due to differing class…

  20. Empowering Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Jennifer; Elshof, Leo; Redden, Anna; Terry, John

    2004-01-01

    The Gulf of Maine Institute (GOMI) is striving to empower youth to take on stewardship roles in their communities. Through its Community Based Initiative (CBI) program, GOMI addresses environmental degradation by working with teams of students, teachers, and community members from around the Gulf of Maine to inspire youth to be stewards of the…

  1. Community psychiatric care for homeless people in inner London.

    PubMed

    Hamid, W A; McCarthy, M

    1989-08-01

    Data about 'homeless' and 'home-based' clients referred to and recorded by community psychiatric nurses (CPNs) in Bloomsbury, an inner London health district, in 1985 and 1986 were reviewed. Of the 974 people seen, 642 were home-based and 322, homeless at time of referral. The homeless were more commonly under 65-years-of-age, living alone and unemployed. Two thirds of both groups had a psychiatric history, with half also having been admitted to a mental hospital. CPNs identified mental health problems in both groups with equal frequency, but homeless people were more likely to express their main problem as related to housing, finance or unemployment. Four out of five home-based clients were referred by statutory services compared with only two out of five homeless clients. The latter were less likely to receive supportive care from the CPN service and were more often referred to other agencies; these differences remained after controlling for the presenting problems. One in three people referred to this service were homeless. The social aspects of their problems, and their lack of contact with statutory services, suggest that homeless people need a multi-disciplinary approach for mental health care. PMID:10295815

  2. Sexual Maltreatment of Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Minors from the Horn of Africa: A Mixed Method Study Focusing on Vulnerability and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Margaret; Papadopoulos, Irena

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The study described in this paper sought to identify the social, cultural, and political factors that effect African unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors' (UASM) vulnerability to sexual maltreatment in England. It aimed to illuminate how child protection measures could be strengthened for this highly marginalized group. Methods: A mixed…

  3. Previous Homelessness as a Risk Factor for Recovery from Serious Mental Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Castellow, Jennifer; Kloos, Bret; Townley, Greg

    2015-08-01

    This paper argues that the experience of homelessness is inherently traumatic and thus has the potential to affect the manifestation of mental illness. The experiences related to being homeless might act as specific and unique sources of vulnerability. This study included 424 people diagnosed with serious mental illnesses living in supported housing programs in South Carolina. Three hierarchical regression analyses measuring the impact of homelessness on three types of outcomes revealed the following: (1) ever experiencing homelessness as well as the amount of time spent homeless were related to higher levels of psychiatric distress, (2) ever experiencing homelessness was related to higher levels of reported alcohol use, and (3) total amount of time spent homeless was related to lower perceived recovery from mental illness. These findings suggest that experiencing homelessness might contribute to psychosocial vulnerability to negative mental health outcomes. Future investigations examining this concept of risk and vulnerability as a result of homelessness are in order. PMID:25566947

  4. Mentoring and social skills training: ensuring better outcomes for youth in foster care.

    PubMed

    Williams, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    Youth in foster care face significant life challenges that make it more likely that they will face negative outcomes (i.e., school failure, homelessness, and incarceration). While the reason(s) for out-of-home placement (i.e., family violence, abuse, neglect and/or abandonment) provide some context for negative outcomes, such negative outcomes need not be a foregone conclusion. In fact, interventions created to serve at-risk youth could ostensibly address the needs of youth in foster care as well, given that they often face similar social, emotional, and other challenges. Specifically, the author posits that supporting foster care youth through the use ofmentoring and social skills training could reduce the negative outcomes far too common for many of these youth. PMID:21950175

  5. Providing sensitive health care to gay and lesbian youth.

    PubMed

    Sanford, N D

    1989-05-01

    While the years of adolescence are usually very difficult, for gay and lesbian youth they are tremendously traumatic. Gay and lesbian youth face many problems because of the homophobia in our culture; such a young person often hides his or her gay or lesbian identity, and health care professionals often deny its existence. Increased anxiety and fear cause gay and lesbian youth to be particularly vulnerable to the major problems of adolescence, such as drug and alcohol abuse, sexual acting-out, pregnancy, AIDS, homelessness and suicide. The etiology of homosexuality is still not understood, and a number of theories are discussed in this article. Troiden's model of gay and lesbian identity development is presented, covering sensitization, identity confusion, assumption and commitment. A lack of appropriate role models has been a significant problem, although some change is occurring. Specific ways of helping these troubled adolescents are given, with a particular emphasis on education and providing methods of support. PMID:2726016

  6. A quantitative review of cognitive functioning in homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Depp, Colin A; Vella, Lea; Orff, Henry J; Twamley, Elizabeth W

    2015-02-01

    Homeless people experience elevated rates of risk factors for cognitive impairment. We reviewed available peer-reviewed studies reporting data from objective measures of cognition in samples identified as homeless. Pooled sample-weighted estimates of global cognitive screening measures, full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ), and premorbid IQ were calculated, in addition to pooled sample characteristics, to understand the representativeness of available studies. A total of 24 unique studies were identified, with 2969 subjects. The pooled estimate for the frequency of cognitive impairment was 25%, and the mean full-scale IQ score was 85, 1 standard deviation below the mean of the normal population. Cognitive impairment was found to be common among homeless adults and may be a transdiagnostic problem that impedes rehabilitative efforts in this population. Comparatively little data are available about cognition in homeless women and unsheltered persons. PMID:25594792

  7. Health problems of sheltered homeless women and their dependent children.

    PubMed

    Burg, M A

    1994-05-01

    Increasing numbers of homeless female-headed families are entering temporary shelters. Social workers who work with sheltered families are confronted with a complex array of health care problems. This article introduces an analytic framework that classifies the types of health problems that emerge among shelter residents and serves as a guide to social work intervention with the health problems of shelter residents. The framework covers three categories of health problems: illness coincident with homelessness, those exacerbated by limited health care access, and those associated with the psychosocial burdens of homelessness. The failures of the current structure of the health care reimbursement and the deficiencies of service delivery to homeless families are discussed. The analytic framework conceptualizes the interrelationship between health and poverty. It can be used as a tool for informed social work intervention, advocacy, training, and research activities. PMID:8045446

  8. 76 FR 76917 - Homeless Management Information Systems Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ...and Data Quality Standards and Management (Sec. 580...the HMIS system and provide...HOMELESS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM Subpart A...and Data Quality Standards...37 Data quality standards and management. Subpart...information system...

  9. Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness: Introduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence D. Rickards; Sarah A. McGraw; Lynnette Araki; Roger J. Casey; Cynthia W. High; Mary Ellen Hombs; Robyn S. Raysor

    2010-01-01

    The Collaborative Initiative to Help End Chronic Homelessness was a coordinated effort by the US Departments of Health and\\u000a Human Services (HHS), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Veterans Affairs (VA), and the US Interagency Council on Homelessness\\u000a to house and provide comprehensive supportive services to individuals with serious psychiatric, substance use, health, and\\u000a related disabilities who were experiencing long-term

  10. 77 FR 56712 - Agency Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program) Activities Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB...Collection (Homeless Providers Grant...Review AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration...the Veterans Health Administration...Department of Veterans Affairs, will...Titles: a. Homeless Providers...

  11. A Population-Based Inquiry of Homeless Episode Characteristics and Early Educational Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzo, John; Leboeuf, Whitney; Brumley, Benjamin; Perlman, Staci

    2013-06-01

    Child homelessness and educational well-being is an area of national research that requires more precise investigation to address mixed findings. The aim of this study was to extend the investigation of the relations between homelessness and educational well-being by determining if timing and frequency of homeless episodes are differentially associated with children's academic and classroom engagement outcomes. This investigation used a comprehensive research model to study the effects of these homeless episode characteristics within a large urban student cohort. Additionally, this study accounted for co-occurring early risk factors. Findings indicated that having a first homeless episode in early childhood was associated with non-proficiency in mathematics and academic engagement problems. Also more frequent homeless episodes were related to truancy in third grade. These results stress the importance of early intervention for homeless children and underscore the need to further understand the variation in young children's homeless experiences. PMID:24072948

  12. 77 FR 26027 - Privacy Act: Notification of a New Privacy Act System of Records, Veterans Homelessness...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ...Homelessness Prevention Demonstration Evaluation Data Files System AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer...Homelessness Prevention Demonstration Evaluation Data Files (VHPD Data Files) system. The VHPD Data Files system will...

  13. Self-identified health concerns of two homeless groups.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, D

    1991-04-01

    A number of conclusions can be drawn from the themes derived from the interview data. First, even though the most basic physical needs, such as food, clothing, and shelter were being met, a recurring theme from the responses of the homeless was the need for interaction with a caring person. The feeling that no one cares, a lack of self-worth, and a sense of limited control over their lives may lead to depression, hopelessness, and finally illness. The extent and effectiveness of health-seeking behaviors among this group are limited because of decreased trust, decreased motivation for self-care, and isolation from social and health care systems. Second, if health needs are to be met, services must be provided in sites where they can be accessed by the homeless. For transients, health care services may be provided most effectively through the shelters. For the SRO residents, these services could be provided through a combination of clinics in hotel lobbies and visits to rooms. Third, developing trust with the homeless includes meeting their self-perceived basic needs. What may seem like nonnursing activities, such as fixing a meal, may be important in establishing rapport with SRO residents. If a nurse assists a homeless person to meet survival needs, that person may be more willing to deal with health issues. Fourth, the population is highly heterogeneous. Each subgroup has its own identity. Most SRO residents do not want to be identified with street people, even through a portion of them move between street life and SRO life. Health care professionals need to recognize these differences, accept the life-style of each subgroup, and respect each homeless person as a unique individual. Finally, caring is the primary element necessary in providing nursing services to the homeless. Awareness and understanding of the homeless way of life will increase nurses' effectiveness in working with this ever growing population. PMID:2048311

  14. Mother–Child Separations Among Homeless and Housed Families Receiving Public Assistance in New York City

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirsten Cowal; Marybeth Shinn; Beth C. Weitzman; Daniela Stojanovic; Larissa Labay

    2002-01-01

    We examined the incidence, characteristics, and predictors of separations of children from mothers in 543 poor families receiving public assistance, 251 of whom had experienced homelessness during the previous 5 years. Forty-four percent of the homeless mothers and 8% of housed mothers were separated from one or more children. A total of 249 children were separated from 110 homeless families

  15. The Mental Health of Children Exposed to Maternal Mental Illness and Homelessness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilan Harpaz-Rotem; Robert A. Rosenheck; Rani Desai

    2006-01-01

    In recent years a number of reports have documented an increase in the number of homeless families in the US. Using a sample of 195 mothers who were veterans of the US armed forces we assessed the association of maternal homelessness and clinical status, with measures of children’s mental health, school enrolment and attendance. Although maternal homelessness had no significant

  16. Conventional and Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Homeless Patients in Budapest, Hungary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judit Lukacs; Vilmos Tubak; Judit Mester; Sandor David; Zoltan Bartfai; Tanja Kubica; Stefan Niemann; Akos Somoskovi

    2004-01-01

    In Hungary the incidence of tuberculosis among the homeless population was 676 per 100,000 in 2002. Sixty-nine percent (140 patients) of all homeless tuberculosis patients were notified in Budapest (the capital). Therefore, a retrospective study that included 66 homeless tuberculosis patients notified in Budapest in 2002 was conducted to determine the rate of recent transmission of the disease and medical

  17. What Research Tells Us About the Intersecting Streams of Homelessness and Foster Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl Zlotnick

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews mounting evidence linking foster care and homelessness and considers new ap- proaches for intervention. Although there is no causal evidence that family homelessness leads to foster care or vice versa, the association no longer originates solely from samples of homeless people, but also from samples of people with childhood histories of foster care. Many programs work with

  18. Temporary Housing for the Homeless: A Pre-Engineering Design Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreuders, Paul D.; Salmon, Scott D.; Stewardson, Gary A.

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported by the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty that in 2004, over 3.5 million Americans were homeless. While many homeless live in temperate climates, many others live in locations where it can get very cold in the winter. Without adequate shelter, this can become very hazardous to the health and well-being of these…

  19. Does a Baby Help Young Women Transition out of Homelessness? Motivation, Coping, and Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruttan, Lia; Laboucane-Benson, Patricia; Munro, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Homeless young women experience high levels of stress, challenges to mental health, substance use and abuse, and a lack of housing or of secure housing. This article explores one of the findings from a longitudinal qualitative study designed to follow homeless young women for a 2-year period as they make efforts to transition out of homelessness.…

  20. "I Can Draw a Happy Face for You": Coping Strategies of Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisosky, Joanne M.

    This qualitative study examined the ways in which homeless children cope with their environment. Preliminary data were gathered by observing homeless children at a homeless shelter day care center in a medium-sized midwestern city. As many as 12 children, aged 2 to 6 years, were observed in the day care setting on three different weekday mornings.…

  1. Over the Brink: Homeless Families in Los Angeles. California Children, California Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, David; And Others

    This report examines homeless families, isolates similarities and differences between homeless and poor but stably-housed families, identifies paths along which families slide into homelessness, and recommends policy changes. The report uses a body of data collected in 1987-1988 on two groups of poor families in Los Angeles (California) half of…

  2. Toward Differentiated Decision-Making: Family Systems Theory with the Homeless Clinical Population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KATHERINE MILEWSKI HERTLEIN; J. MARK KILLMER

    2004-01-01

    The clinical treatment of the homeless population typically focuses on issues of mental illness and drug\\/alcohol dependency. This treatment, however, does not address the problems of the homeless who are not mentally ill or those without a dependency problem. Because of the nature of the presenting problems of the homeless, Bowen family systems theory provides an appropriate framework from which

  3. Prompt and Proper Placement: Enrolling Students without Records. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, reauthorized as Title X, Part C, of the No Child Left Behind Act, requires schools to enroll homeless students immediately, even if they do not have the documents normally required for enrollment such as school records, medical records, proof of residency, or others. Unfortunately for many homeless

  4. Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Homeless Children and Families in Small-Town America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne M.

    Homelessness in small towns and rural areas is on the rise, and a substantial portion of the rural homeless consists of families with children. This book draws on interviews and case studies of over 300 homeless children and their families, primarily in New Hampshire, and on supporting statistics to provide individual and sociological perspectives…

  5. 78 FR 77697 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ...Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary...for suitability for use to assist the homeless. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Juanita...section 501 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C....

  6. Perchance to Sleep: Homeless Children without Shelter in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for the Homeless, New York, NY.

    New York City's response to the demand for shelter has consistently been adequate. The city's homeless population is estimated at 35,000, including 11,000 members of homeless families, of whom almost 7,625 are children. The City's Human Resources Administration (HRA) has routinely failed to provide temporary emergency shelter for homeless

  7. Homeless and Disabled: Rights, Responsibilities, and Recommendations for Serving Young Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gargiulo, Richard M.

    2006-01-01

    Homelessness is a growing social problem in the United States. Especially vulnerable to this phenomenon are young children because homelessness is viewed as a breeding ground for disabilities. Despite federal legislation ensuring educational opportunities, the educational needs of children who are homeless are frequently unfulfilled. This article…

  8. Stressful Life Event Experiences of Homeless Adults: A Comparison of Single Men, Single Women, and Women with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zugazaga, Carole

    2004-01-01

    This article describes stressful life events experienced by a multi-shelter sample of 162 homeless adults in the Central Florida area. Participants included homeless single men (n = 54), homeless single women (n = 54), and homeless women with children (n = 54). Subjects were interviewed with a modified version of the List of Threatening…

  9. Management of chronic kidney disease and dialysis in homeless persons

    PubMed Central

    Podymow, Tiina; Turnbull, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    End-stage renal disease and dialysis are complicated illnesses to manage in homeless persons, who often suffer medical comorbidities, psychiatric disease, cognitive impairment and addictions; descriptions of this population and management strategies are lacking. A retrospective review of dialysis patients who were homeless or unstably housed was undertaken at an urban academic Canadian center from 2001 to 2011. Electronic hospital records were analyzed for demographic, housing, medical, and psychiatric history, dialysis history, adherence to treatment, and outcomes. Two detailed cases of homeless patients with chronic kidney disease are presented. Eleven homeless dialysis patients with a mean age of 52.7±12.3 years, mostly men and mostly from minority groups were dialyzed for 41.1±29.2 months. Most resided permanently in shelters, eventually obtained fistula access, and were adherent to dialysis schedules. Patients were often nonadherent to pre-dialysis management, resulting in emergency starts. Many barriers to care for homeless persons with end-stage kidney disease and on dialysis are identified, and management strategies are highlighted. Adherence is optimized with shelter-based health care and intensive team-oriented case management. PMID:25018988

  10. Self-perceived strengths among people who are homeless

    PubMed Central

    Tweed, Roger G.; Biswas-Diener, Robert; Lehman, Darrin R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined self-perceived strengths among 116 people who were homeless. Those who had experienced a longer period of current homelessness tended to report fewer personal strengths (r = ?0.23). Nonetheless, in spite of their marginalized position in society, the vast majority of participants (114 out of 116) perceived personal strengths. A prior diagnosis with mental illness was not associated with the number of strengths reported, but self-perception of strengths was associated with altruistic orientation. The Values in Action (VIA) taxonomy of character strengths captured many of the responses generated by this population. The most frequently mentioned character categories included social intelligence, kindness, persistence, authenticity and humour. The most frequently mentioned other strengths included personal skills (e.g. music, sports), job skills, intelligence and education. The results have relevance for efforts to build self-perceptions that facilitate escape from homelessness. PMID:23173008

  11. National Resource Center on Homelessness and Mental Illness

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Operated by a private research firm under contract to the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Resource Center on Homelessness and Mental Illness serves as a clearinghouse for technical assistance and research information. Included here are comprehensive, well-annotated national listings of organizations concerned with mental health, housing and homelessness, as well as housing-related technical assistance resources. The site also provides an "extensive bibliographic database on homelessness and mental illness" broken down by subject; a listing of research monographs and papers commissioned by the center, some of which may be accessed online; an annotated directory of online resources; information about technical assistance given by the Center to professionals in the field; and selected posted articles from issues of Access, a periodic information letter to the field.

  12. Missing, Exploited and Runaway Youth: Strengthening the System. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Select Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Eighth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    These hearings transcripts compile testimony regarding how programs authorized by the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act and the Missing Children's Assistance Act currently operate, in preparation for upcoming reauthorization. Opening statements by U.S. Representatives Peter Hoekstra (Michigan) and Ruben Hinojosa (Texas) underscore the obligation to…

  13. Smoking policy change at a homeless shelter: attitudes and effects.

    PubMed

    Businelle, Michael S; Poonawalla, Insiya B; Kendzor, Darla E; Rios, Debra M; Cuate, Erica L; Savoy, Elaine J; Ma, Ping; Baggett, Travis P; Reingle, Jennifer; Reitzel, Lorraine R

    2015-01-01

    Homeless adults are exposed to more smokers and smoke in response to environmental tobacco cues more than other socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Addressing the culture of smoking in homeless shelters through policy initiatives may support cessation and improve health in this vulnerable and understudied population. This study examined support for and expected/actual effects of a smoking ban at a homeless shelter. A 2-wave cross-sectional study with an embedded cohort was conducted in the summer of 2013 two weeks before (wave 1) and two months after (wave 2) a partial outdoor smoking ban was implemented. A total of 394 homeless adults were surveyed (i.e., wave 1 [n=155]; wave 2 [n=150]; and 89 additional participants completed both waves). On average, participants were 43 years old, primarily African American (63%), male (72%), and had been homeless for the previous 12 months (median). Most participants were smokers (76%) smoking 12 cigarettes per day on average. Most participants supported the creation of a large smoke-free zone on the shelter campus, but there was less support for a shelter-wide smoking ban. Average cigarettes smoked per day did not differ between study waves. However, participants who completed both study waves experienced a reduction in expired carbon monoxide at wave 2 (W1=18.2 vs. W2=15.8 parts per million, p=.02). Expected effects of the partial ban were similar to actual effects. Partial outdoor smoking bans may be well supported by homeless shelter residents and may have a positive impact on shelter resident health. PMID:25222848

  14. Bullying and LGBT Youth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Support the Kids Involved Be More Than a Bystander GET HELP NOW Home > Who is at Risk > Considerations for Specific Groups > LGBT Youth WHO IS AT RISK Risk Factors Warning Signs Effects Considerations for Specific Groups LGBT Youth Youth With ...

  15. Swimming upstream: the strengths of women who survive homelessness.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, C

    1994-03-01

    A study of the strengths and personal resources of women who had overcome homelessness revealed that the experience of homelessness for these women was a temporary state of disruption resulting from an effort to free themselves from conditions associated with despair, such as abuse or addictions, and to search for a better life. Personal, interpersonal, and transpersonal categories of strengths were identified that enabled these women to move in a positive direction toward health and self-actualization. The synthesizing metaphor "swimming upstream" describes the stoic determination required to go against the overwhelming negative forces of their environment. PMID:7515608

  16. Sources of psychological pain and suicidal thoughts among homeless adults.

    PubMed

    Coohey, Carol; Easton, Scott D; Kong, Jooyoung; Bockenstedt, Julie K W

    2015-06-01

    Homeless adults experience problems in multiple areas of their lives. It was hypothesized that adults who were troubled by problems in more areas of their lives would be more likely to report suicidal thoughts. The sample included 457 homeless men and women who resided in three emergency shelters. The number of sources of psychological pain, past suicide attempts, and being a man predicted current suicidal thoughts, but being diagnosed with a depressive disorder did not. Shelter workers should ask adults whether they have attempted suicide in the past and how troubled they are by each area of their lives. PMID:25255999

  17. Is Shared Housing a Way to Reduce Homelessness? The Effect of Household Arrangements on Formerly Homeless People

    PubMed Central

    He, Yinghua; O’Flaherty, Brendan; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Most single adults share housing with other adults, and living alone is considerably more expensive than living with someone else. Yet policies that discourage shared housing for formerly homeless people or people at risk of becoming homeless are common, and those that encourage it are rare. This would be understandable if such housing adversely affected its users in some way. We ask whether shared housing produces adverse effects. Our provisional answer is no. For the most part, whether a person lives alone or shares housing seems to make no difference to the outcomes we studied although shared housing is associated with reduced psychotic symptomology. We use data from ACCESS, a 5-year, 18-site demonstration project with over 6,000 formerly homeless individuals as participants. PMID:20440383

  18. BRIEF REPORT: The Aging of the Homeless Population: Fourteen-Year Trends in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Judith A; Kushel, Margot B; Bangsberg, David R; Riley, Elise; Moss, Andrew R

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Homelessness is associated with high rates of health and substance use problems. OBJECTIVE To examine trends in the age, housing, health status, health service utilization, and drug use of the homeless population over a 14-year period. DESIGN Serial cross-sectional. PARTICIPANTS We studied 3,534 literally homeless adults recruited at service providers in San Francisco in 4 waves: 1990–1994, 1996–1998, 1999–2000, and 2003. MEASUREMENTS Age, time homeless, self-reported chronic conditions, hospital and emergency department utilization, and drug and alcohol use. RESULTS The median age of the homeless increased from 37 to 46 over the study waves, at a rate of 0.66 years per calendar year (P < 0.01). The median total time homeless increased from 12 to 39.5 months (P < 0.01). Emergency department visits, hospital admissions, and chronic health conditions increased. CONCLUSIONS The homeless population is aging by about two thirds of a year every calendar year, consistent with trends in several other cities. It is likely that the homeless are static, aging population cohort. The aging trends suggest that chronic conditions will become increasingly prominent for homeless health services. This will present challenges to traditional approaches to screening, prevention, and treatment of chronic diseases in an aging homeless population. PMID:16808781

  19. Recruitment and Retention of Homeless Mentally Ill Participants in Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard L. Hough; Henry Tarke; Virginia Renker; Patricia Shields; Jeff Glatstein

    1996-01-01

    Are the unstable residential and personal lives of homeless mentally ill (HMI) individuals so difficult as to preclude their inclusion in rigorous, longitudinal research protocols? The continued presence of HMI individuals in U.S. society has prompted the mental health research community to reconsider the question of whether clinical trial and demonstration research protocols are feasible with this population. This article

  20. An investigation of alcoholic subgroups in the homeless population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alisa Debra Lamnin

    1989-01-01

    A cluster analysis was performed on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II) profiles of homeless alcoholics. Five groups emerged, four of which had been found in previous work. Two groups of sociopaths emerged which differed in the degree to which internal discomfort was experienced. A \\

  1. Nutrition Education and Food for the Homeless--University Outreach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truesdell, Delores; Sani, Amy V.

    2001-01-01

    The Food Stamp Nutrition Education Initiative targeted homeless people in overnight shelters. College students made monthly visits to provide nutrition education and meals. Students received training in quantity food service and leadership in helping improve food security. (Contains 16 references.) (JOW)

  2. General Welfare Assistance: Barriers to Mentally Disabled Homeless Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marjorie J.

    The present study describes specific conditions which are thought to interfere with application for general welfare assistance by homeless persons with mental disabilities. This report summarizes the observations and recommendations of direct-service providers who serve the target population in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. In-depth structured…

  3. The Reading Connection: Literacy Development and Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanning, Eileen

    Educational and developmental researchers suggest that children who have experienced homelessness suffer both in self-esteem and in literacy development, although early research is not complete. The Reading Connection (TRC), a community-based nonprofit organization in northern Virginia, focuses on the social aspect of reading, rather than…

  4. Homelessness and Money Mismanagement in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Connor P.; Wolfe, James; Wagner, Henry Ryan; Beckham, Jean C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the empirical link between money mismanagement and subsequent homelessness among veterans. Methods. We used a random sample of Iraq and Afghanistan War era veterans from the National Post-Deployment Adjustment Survey in 2009–2011. Results. Veterans were randomly selected from a roster of all US military service members in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom who were separated from active duty or in the Reserves/National Guard. Veterans (n?=?1090) from 50 states and all military branches completed 2 waves of data collection 1 year apart (79% retention rate). Thirty percent reported money mismanagement (e.g., bouncing or forging a check, going over one’s credit limit, falling victim to a money scam in the past year). Multivariate analysis revealed money mismanagement (odds ratio [OR]?=?4.09, 95% CI?=?1.87, 8.94) was associated with homelessness in the next year, as were arrest history (OR?=?2.65, 95% CI?=?1.33, 5.29), mental health diagnosis (OR?=?2.59, 95% CI?=?1.26, 5.33), and income (OR?=?0.30, 95% CI?=?0.13, 0.71). Conclusions. Money mismanagement, reported by a substantial number of veterans, was related to a higher rate of subsequent homelessness. The findings have implications for policymakers and clinicians, suggesting that financial education programs offered by the US Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs may be targeted to effectively address veteran homelessness. PMID:24148067

  5. Schooling Homeless Children: A Working Model for America's Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quint, Sharon

    This book describes how an urban public school assumed ownership of the problems of its homeless students and their families and assumed responsibility for correcting social ills and building a better society. The B. F. Day School in Seattle (Washington) was transformed through the efforts of the principal, Carole Williams. When she took over the…

  6. The Dynamics of Violence and Homelessness among Young Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin James

    2008-01-01

    Violence is one of the most prevalent elements in the lives of homeless families with young children. This violence may come in various forms: domestic violence, street violence, violence in one's childhood, witnessing violence, and other avenues and modes. Violence disrupts the normal bonding between parent and child. It isolates and degrades…

  7. Religious and Affective Variables of Dually Diagnosed Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Joseph J.; And Others

    This study investigates the interaction of religious and quasi-religious variables through measures of psychopathology and alcohol and drug abuse in a sample of homeless subjects. Participants included 25 males and 14 females with potential dual diagnoses who lacked, or were in danger of being without, appropriate housing. Researchers administered…

  8. Estimating the Size of the Homeless Population in Budapest, Hungary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beáta Dávid; TOM A. B. SNIJDERS

    2002-01-01

    In this study we try to estimate the size of the homeless population in Budapest by using two - non-standard - sampling methods: snowball sampling and capture-recapture method. Using two methods and three different data sets we are able to compare the methods as well as the results, and we also suggest some further applications. Apart from the practical purpose

  9. Recognizing the Needs of the Homeless and the Hungry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    France, Joseph B.

    This publication describes services of selected American Red Cross chapters to the homeless and the hungry. Chapter profiles provide information on how chapters of various sizes develop, fund, and implement programs in response to their communities' needs. Program descriptions detail the chapters' fund-raising from private, public, and voluntary…

  10. Working with Families Experiencing Homelessness: Understanding Trauma and Its Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Kathleen; Bassuk, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of traumatic stress in the lives of families who are homeless is extraordinarily high. Often these families are headed by single mothers who have experienced ongoing trauma in the form of childhood abuse and neglect, domestic violence, and community violence, as well as the trauma associated with poverty and the loss of home,…

  11. Women Speak: Healing the Wounds of Homelessness through Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Karen Anne; And Others

    1997-01-01

    The Women Speak writing project explored the use of writing as therapy for homeless women at an urban drop-in center. By sharing experiences, a sense of empowerment began. Nursing students and faculty were challenged to rethink the traditional clinical relationship that gives highest priority to the needs of students and faculty rather than the…

  12. Homelessness in Urban America: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Heidi

    In the 1980s, homelessness attracted considerable attention from the media, advocates, politicians, and the public. Virtually every sector of society and the government responded. Interest in the issue has waned considerably since then, but the problem continues growing, particularly in large urban areas. While public policies address the problem,…

  13. Procedures at public schools may prevent enrollment of homeless children.

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Jennifer

    UI undergraduates have answered the call of their president to wage war. Their weapons are booksProcedures at public schools may prevent enrollment of homeless children. Bérubé directs new are trying to train the tutors to do some relatively simple activities." Tutors will introduce new books

  14. Characteristics of Home: Perspectives of Women Who Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Christine A.; Rutherford, Gayle E.; Kuzmak, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    We employed participatory, community-based research methods to explore the perceptions of home among women who are homeless. Twenty women engaged in one or more techniques including qualitative interviews, digital story telling, creative writing, photovoice, and design charrette to characterize their perceptions of home. Analysis of the data…

  15. "Sanmao, the Vagrant": Homeless Children of Yesterday and Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mo, Weimin; Shen, Wenju

    2006-01-01

    The intensifying globalization has made street survival more brutal and miserable for homeless children, especially in Third World countries. "Sanmao, the Vagrant" is a wordless picture book which tells of the adventures of a boy named Sanmao in streets of Shanghai during WWII. The essay analyzes how the artist's ingenious visual narrative…

  16. Youth for Justice: 1995 Youth Summit Compendium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Science Education Consortium, Inc., Boulder, CO.

    This paper describes the activities of the Youth for Justice programs nationwide. Youth for Justice is a unique national initiative that uses the power of active learning about the law to build upon the vitality of young people and to address the risks of being young in American society today. Youth for Justice involves young people in law-related…

  17. Moving beyond Youth Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serido, Joyce; Borden, Lynne M.; Perkins, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    This study combines research documenting the benefits of positive relationships between youth and caring adults on a young person's positive development with studies on youth voice to examine the mechanisms through which participation in youth programs contributes to positive developmental outcomes. Specifically, the study explores whether youth's…

  18. Growing Youth Food Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Wynne; Nault, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    How can youth be educated and empowered to become responsible food citizens? Evidence from a university-community partnership with youth in Michigan is presented to illuminate participatory approaches to youth engagement in food systems. We found that youth have valuable knowledge to enhance our understanding of food environments. At the same…

  19. Adult Education for the Homeless. FY 89 Project Abstracts. Twenty-Eight Programs that Can Help the Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Adult Education and Literacy.

    In the first portion of this document, abstracts are given for 30 projects that were designed to provide basic skills and literacy training to homeless adults in fiscal year 1989. The following information is provided for each project: state; grant award number; grantee; project title; project director, telephone number, and address; and…

  20. Teaching about vulnerable populations: nursing students' experience in a homeless center.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Mary Jo

    2013-10-01

    Cultural competence is not limited to ethnicity, religion, or race but is inclusive of vulnerable groups, such as the homeless. The complex health and social issues related to homelessness requires educational instruction that supports students' ability to address and care for the multidimensional elements that surround this group. Exposure to homeless populations provides nursing students with increased awareness of the issues related to health disparities, while promoting introspective reflection on one's values and beliefs. To increase student exposure to working with homeless clients, a service-learning project using a critical social theory (CST) lens was offered at a homeless center. The students' response that clients were "just like" them, coupled with ambiguity regarding the complex social-economic-political issues surrounding the homeless, may indicate a need for further education regarding cultural understanding, sensitivity, and vulnerability. This project demonstrates the need for learning experiences that support advocacy and social responsibility for vulnerable groups. PMID:24040771

  1. Coming Home: Health Status and Homelessness Risk of Older Prerelease Prisoners

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brie A. Williams; James McGuire; Rebecca G. Lindsay; Jacques Baillargeon; Irena Stijacic Cenzer; Sei J. Lee; Margot Kushel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND  Older adults comprise an increasing proportion of the prison and homeless populations. While older age is associated with\\u000a adverse post-release health events and incarceration is a risk factor for homelessness, the health status and homelessness\\u000a risk of older pre-release prisoners are unknown. Moreover, most post-release services are geared towards veterans; it is unknown\\u000a whether the needs of non-veterans differ from

  2. Post-Hospital Medical Respite Care and Hospital Readmission of Homeless Persons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan G. Kertesz; Michael A. Posner; James J. OConnell; Stacy Swain; Ashley N. Mullins; Michael Shwartz; Arlene S. Ash

    2009-01-01

    Medical respite programs offer medical, nursing, and other care as well as accommodation for homeless persons discharged from acute hospital stays. They represent a community-based adaptation of urban health systems to the specific needs of homeless persons. This article examines whether post-hospital discharge to a homeless medical respite program was associated with a reduced chance of 90-day readmission compared to

  3. Exploring patterns in resource utilization prior to the formal identification of homelessness in recently returned veterans.

    PubMed

    Gundlapalli, Adi V; Redd, Andrew; Carter, Marjorie E; Palmer, Miland; Peterson, Rachel; Samore, Matthew H

    2014-01-01

    There are limited data on resources utilized by US Veterans prior to their identification as being homeless. We performed visual analytics on longitudinal medical encounter data prior to the official recognition of homelessness in a large cohort of OEF/OIF Veterans. A statistically significant increase in numbers of several categories of visits in the immediate 30 days prior to the recognition of homelessness was noted as compared to an earlier period. This finding has the potential to inform prediction algorithms based on structured data with a view to intervention and mitigation of homelessness among Veterans. PMID:25000067

  4. Homelessness during pregnancy: a unique, time-dependent risk factor of birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cutts, Diana B; Coleman, Sharon; Black, Maureen M; Chilton, Mariana M; Cook, John T; de Cuba, Stephanie Ettinger; Heeren, Timothy C; Meyers, Alan; Sandel, Megan; Casey, Patrick H; Frank, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Evaluate homelessness during pregnancy as a unique, time-dependent risk factor for adverse birth outcomes. 9,995 mothers of children <48 months old surveyed at emergency departments and primary care clinics in five US cities. Mothers were classified as either homeless during pregnancy with the index child, homeless only after the index child's birth, or consistently housed. Outcomes included birth weight as a continuous variable, as well as categorical outcomes of low birth weight (LBW; <2,500 g) and preterm delivery (<37 weeks). Multiple logistic regression and adjusted linear regression analyses were performed, comparing prenatal and postnatal homelessness with the referent group of consistently housed mothers, controlling for maternal demographic characteristics, smoking, and child age at interview. Prenatal homelessness was associated with higher adjusted odds of LBW (AOR 1.43, 95 % CI 1.14, 1.80, p < 0.01) and preterm delivery (AOR 1.24, 95 % CI 0.98, 1.56, p = 0.08), and a 53 g lower adjusted mean birth weight (p = 0.08). Postnatal homelessness was not associated with these outcomes. Prenatal homelessness is an independent risk factor for LBW, rather than merely a marker of adverse maternal and social characteristics associated with homelessness. Targeted interventions to provide housing and health care to homeless women during pregnancy may result in improved birth outcomes. PMID:25404405

  5. Strategies for Developing Youth Leadership

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Strategies for Developing Youth Leadership Youth leadership development happens through shared of youth leadership opportunities because of misconceptions about their disability, segregation in school suggestions to create opportunities and encourage leadership in youth with and without disabilities: Encourage

  6. Empowering Youth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jennifer Miner

    2007-04-01

    The Gulf of Maine Institute (GOMI) is striving to empoweryouth to take on stewardship roles in their communities.Through its Community Based Initiative (CBI) program,GOMI addresses environmental degradation by workingwith teams of students, teachers, and community membersfrom around the Gulf of Maine to inspire youth tobe stewards of the gulf and its watershed. In preparingyoung enthusiastic leaders who will take on these stewardshiproles in their communities, GOMI provides solidtraining in environmental sciences and civic engagement.As a result, students become more environmentally awareand actively contribute to environmental initiatives intheir hometowns. This bioregional approach helps participantsfrom urban, suburban, and rural communitiesin Canada and the United States relate to one another asthey learn about the interconnectedness of their watershedand their dependence on its continued health.

  7. Pion-to-proton ratio for unaccompanied high-energy cosmic-ray hadrons at mountain altitude using transition-radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, R.W.; Ito, A.S.; MacFall, J.R.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Tonwar, S.C.; Viswanath, P.R.; Yodh, G.B.

    1983-05-01

    A transition-radiation (TR) detector, consisting of 24 modules of styrofoam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers, and an ionization calorimeter have been used to measure the pion-to-proton ratio among the unaccompanied cosmic-ray hadrons at a mountain altitude of 730 g cm/sup -2/. Using the characteristics of the TR detector obtained from calibrations with particle beams at accelerators, the ..pi../p ratio has been determined for cosmic-ray hadrons as ..pi../p = 0.96 +- 0.15 for hadron energy = 400--800 GeV, and ..pi../p = 0.45 +- 0.25 for energy >800 GeV. Monte Carlo simulations of hadron cascades in the atmosphere using the approximate criterion of unaccompaniment suggest that the observed ..pi../p ratio as well as the previously reported neutral-to-charge ratio can be understood by assuming a value of about (1/3) for the charge exchange in nucleon--air-nucleus inelastic interactions at energies above 400 GeV.

  8. Infectious Disease Exposures and Contact Tracing in Homeless Shelters

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Stephen W.; Kiss, Alex; Ho, Minnie M.; Leung, Cheryl S.; Gundlapalli, Adi V.

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak among homeless shelter users of a communicable disease with a short generation time would pose serious public health challenges. Data from Toronto were used to examine the number of shelter residents potentially exposed in the event of such an outbreak. A shelter user had contact with a mean of 97 other residents (range, 1–292) in one day and a mean of 120 (range, 2–624) in eight days. After a single week, contact tracing becomes difficult due to the challenge of locating homeless people who have left the shelter system. Over an 8-day period, individuals who used more than one shelter had contact with an average of 98 more other shelter residents than those who stayed in a single shelter had. At the onset of a serious outbreak, it may be desirable to institute policies that strongly encourage individuals to remain at their current shelter for the duration of the outbreak. PMID:19029743

  9. Unique health care utilization patterns in a homeless population in Ghent

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Existing studies concerning the health care use of homeless people describe higher utilisation rates for hospital-based care and emergency care, and lower rates for primary care by homeless people compared to the general population. Homeless people are importantly hindered and/or steered in their health care use by barriers directly related to the organisation of care. Our goal is to describe the accessibility of primary health care services, secondary care and emergency care for homeless people living in an area with a universal primary health care system and active guidance towards this unique system. Methods Observational, cross-sectional study design. Data from the Belgian National health survey were merged with comparable data collected by means of a face-to-face interview from homeless people in Ghent. 122 homeless people who made use of homeless centres and shelters in Ghent were interviewed using a reduced version of the Belgian National Health survey over a period of 5 months. 2-dimensional crosstabs were built in order to study the bivariate relationship between health care use (primary health care, secondary and emergency care) and being homeless. To determine the independent association, a logistic model was constructed adjusting for age and sex. Results and Discussion Homeless people have a higher likelihood to consult a GP than the non-homeless people in Ghent, even after adjusting for age and sex. The same trend is demonstrated for secondary and emergency care. Conclusions Homeless people in Ghent do find the way to primary health care and make use of it. It seems that the universal primary health care system in Ghent with an active guidance by social workers contributes to easier GP access. PMID:20723222

  10. Identifying Homelessness among Veterans Using VA Administrative Data: Opportunities to Expand Detection Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Rachel; Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Metraux, Stephen; Carter, Marjorie E.; Palmer, Miland; Redd, Andrew; Samore, Matthew H.; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have used administrative criteria to identify homelessness among U.S. Veterans. Our objective was to explore the use of these codes in VA health care facilities. We examined VA health records (2002-2012) of Veterans recently separated from the military and identified as homeless using VA conventional identification criteria (ICD-9-CM code V60.0, VA specific codes for homeless services), plus closely allied V60 codes indicating housing instability. Logistic regression analyses examined differences between Veterans who received these codes. Health care services and co-morbidities were analyzed in the 90 days post-identification of homelessness. VA conventional criteria identified 21,021 homeless Veterans from Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn (rate 2.5%). Adding allied V60 codes increased that to 31,260 (rate 3.3%). While certain demographic differences were noted, Veterans identified as homeless using conventional or allied codes were similar with regards to utilization of homeless, mental health, and substance abuse services, as well as co-morbidities. Differences were noted in the pattern of usage of homelessness-related diagnostic codes in VA facilities nation-wide. Creating an official VA case definition for homelessness, which would include additional ICD-9-CM and other administrative codes for VA homeless services, would likely allow improved identification of homeless and at-risk Veterans. This also presents an opportunity for encouraging uniformity in applying these codes in VA facilities nationwide as well as in other large health care organizations. PMID:26172386

  11. Children Having Children: Teen Pregnancy and Homelessness in New York City. A Report of the Institute for Children and Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    This study surveyed 337 mothers residing in New York City homeless shelters regarding their backgrounds and experiences, comparing those who were teen mothers to homeless mothers who had children later in life. Two groups of homeless families emerged: those with a foundation for advancement and those deprived of opportunities by the early burden…

  12. Quality of life in Ethiopia's street youth at a rehabilitation center and the association with trauma.

    PubMed

    Mannert, Kerstin; Dehning, Sandra; Krause, Daniela; Leitner, Bianka; Rieder, Georg; Siebeck, Matthias; Tesfaye, Markos; Abera, Mubarek; Hailesilassie, Hailemariam; Tesfay, Kenfe; Jobst, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Quality of life (QOL) tends to be lower among the homeless than the general population, and traumatic events experienced on the streets have a negative impact on QOL. Low-income countries face a high number of street youth, yet little research has been performed so far on QOL, trauma, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among this group. This study aimed at examining the QOL of a sample of Ethiopian street youth within a rehabilitation program and at exploring whether the street youth have experienced traumatic events and show posttraumatic stress symptoms. We interviewed 84 street youths with the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) and the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents (DICA). Mean QOL scores differed significantly between the groups assessed at the beginning and at the end of the program (Cohen's d = 0.48). Eighty-three percent of the Ethiopian street youths had experienced traumatic events, and 25.0% met criteria for PTSD according to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. QOL did not differ between those with and without PTSD symptoms. These findings show the high rate of traumatic events among Ethiopian street youth and the importance for rehabilitation programs that focus on improving QOL. The results of the study may have cultural limitations. PMID:25322888

  13. Safe Youth. Safe Schools.

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dedicated to protecting the online experiences of youth everywhere. i-SAFE combines classroom curriculum with community outreach ... prevent or stop bullying. Striving to Reduce Violence Everywhere (STRYVE) STRYVE, or Striving To Reduce Youth Violence ...

  14. Homeless in Dhaka: Violence, Sexual Harassment, and Drug-abuse

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jasim; Ashraf, Ali; Rashid, Mashida

    2009-01-01

    Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest urban population growth rates (around 7% per year) over the past three decades. Dhaka, the capital city, attracts approximately 320,000 migrants from rural areas every year. The city is unable to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare, and employment for its rapidly-expanding population. An estimated 3.4 million people live in the overcrowded slums of Dhaka, and many more live in public spaces lacking the most basic shelter. While a small but growing body of research describes the lives of people who live in urban informal settlements or slums, very little research describes the population with no housing at all. Anecdotally, the homeless population in Dhaka is known to face extortion, erratic unemployment, exposure to violence, and sexual harassment and to engage in high-risk behaviours. However, this has not been systematically documented. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to better understand the challenges in the lives of the homeless population in 11 areas of Dhaka during a 13-month period from June 2007 to June 2008. A modified cluster-sampling method was used for selecting 32 clusters of 14 female and male respondents, for a sample of 896. In addition to sociodemographic details, this paper focuses specifically on violence, drug-abuse, and sexual harassment. The findings showed that physical assaults among the homeless, particularly among women, were a regular phenomenon. Eighty-three percent of female respondents (n=372) were assaulted by their husbands, station masters, and male police officers. They were subjected to lewd gestures, unwelcome advances, and rape. Male respondents reported being physically assaulted while trying to collect food, fighting over space, or while stealing, by police officers, miscreants, or other homeless people. Sixty-nine percent of the male respondents (n=309) used locally-available drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, and two-thirds of injecting drug-users shared needles. The study determined that the homeless are not highly mobile but tend to congregate in clusters night after night. Income-generating activities, targeted education, gender-friendly community police programmes, shelters and crises centres, and greater community involvement are suggested as policy and programmatic interventions to raise the quality of life of this population. In addition, there is a need to reduce high rates of urban migration, a priority for Bangladesh. PMID:19761080

  15. Homeless in Dhaka: violence, sexual harassment, and drug-abuse.

    PubMed

    Koehlmoos, Tracey Pérez; Uddin, Md Jasim; Ashraf, Ali; Rashid, Mashida

    2009-08-01

    Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest urban population growth rates (around 7% per year) over the past three decades. Dhaka, the capital city, attracts approximately 320,000 migrants from rural areas every year. The city is unable to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare, and employment for its rapidly-expanding population. An estimated 3.4 million people live in the overcrowded slums of Dhaka, and many more live in public spaces lacking the most basic shelter. While a small but growing body of research describes the lives of people who live in urban informal settlements or slums, very little research describes the population with no housing at all. Anecdotally, the homeless population in Dhaka is known to face extortion, erratic unemployment, exposure to violence, and sexual harassment and to engage in high-risk behaviours. However, this has not been systematically documented. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to better understand the challenges in the lives of the homeless population in 11 areas of Dhaka during a 13-month period from June 2007 to June 2008. A modified cluster-sampling method was used for selecting 32 clusters of 14 female and male respondents, for a sample of 896. In addition to sociodemographic details, this paper focuses specifically on violence, drug-abuse, and sexual harassment. The findings showed that physical assaults among the homeless, particularly among women, were a regular phenomenon. Eighty-three percent of female respondents (n=372) were assaulted by their husbands, station masters, and male police officers. They were subjected to lewd gestures, unwelcome advances, and rape. Male respondents reported being physically assaulted while trying to collect food, fighting over space, or while stealing, by police officers, miscreants, or other homeless people. Sixty-nine percent of the male respondents (n=309) used locally-available drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, and two-thirds of injecting drug-users shared needles. The study determined that the homeless are not highly mobile but tend to congregate in clusters night after night. Income-generating activities, targeted education, gender-friendly community police programmes, shelters and crises centres, and greater community involvement are suggested as policy and programmatic interventions to raise the quality of life of this population. In addition, there is a need to reduce high rates of urban migration, a priority for Bangladesh. PMID:19761080

  16. Case Management Models for Persons Who Are Homeless and Mentally Ill: The ACCESS Demonstration Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew Johnsen; Laura Samberg; Robert Calsyn; Margaret Blasinsky; Wendy Landow; Howard Goldman

    1999-01-01

    Persons who are homeless and mentally illpresent unique challenges to service providers and humanservice systems. In vivo case management approaches suchas assertive community treatment (ACT) have shown promise in engaging this population. This paperexplores case management models employed within theACCESS program, a five year, 18-site demonstrationprogram enriching services for homeless persons with serious mental illness. We describe theimplementation of case

  17. Perceptions of Students about Younger and Older Men and Women who May Be Homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael N. Kane; Diane Green; Robin J. Jacobs

    2010-01-01

    Future human service providers will interact with homeless persons in health, mental health, and social service practice contexts. This study investigated the perceptions of students enrolled in social work courses who are pursuing degrees in human service programs toward older and younger female and male homeless individuals. Respondents (N = 207) were given one of four vignettes in which a

  18. The Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act. Revised Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC.

    The Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987 was reauthorized for another two years by the Omnibus McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1988. This report summarizes the nine titles of the McKinney Act, including changes brought about in the 1988 reauthorization. Title I covers general provisions of the Act. Title II establishes the…

  19. Education for Homeless Adults: Strategies for Implementation. Volume II - Resources and Additional Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    This document, the second in a series of guidebooks that were developed for educators of homeless adults in New York, offers strategies and plans for sample lessons in which a holistic approach is used to help homeless adults and families improve their lives through education. The guidebook begins with lists of print and nonprint resources,…

  20. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  1. Educating Homeless Students in Urban Settings: An Introduction to the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Introduces background issues regarding the education of homeless children in urban areas, focusing on problems of definition and identification and sociological factors related to homelessness. An overview is provided of the articles of the special issue. The challenges are how to meet the needs of an amorphous and troubled population. (SLD)

  2. The Role of Privilege as Identity in Adolescents' Beliefs about Homelessness, Opportunity, and Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods study investigated the impact of learning about homelessness on the civic development of privileged adolescents. Pre-post surveys, classroom observations, and qualitative interviews revealed that the participating adolescents developed a more complex understanding of the factors that contribute to homelessness; however, this…

  3. Meeting the Educational Needs of Homeless Children and Families. Access to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Access to Success, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The role and importance of education for homeless children and families particularly in New York City at the Homes for the Homeless organization are considered. The educational needs and role of parents are also explored. Education is a key component in the struggle against poverty, and parents need to embrace education both to move toward greater…

  4. HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

  5. Exploring the Psychosocial and Behavioral Adjustment Outcomes of Multi-Type Abuse among Homeless Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the psychosocial and behavioral adjustment outcomes associated with verbal, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse among homeless young adults as well as the associations among abuse types. Convenience sampling was used to select 28 homeless young adults (ages 18 to 24) from one drop-in center. Overall, subjects experienced…

  6. Narrative and Collaborative Practices in Work with Families that Are Homeless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, Peter; Hameline, Thomas; Shannon, Michele

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the use of narrative therapy ideas and practices in working with families that are homeless in a shelter-based, multiple-family discussion group program called Fresh Start for Families. It begins with a review of the challenges facing homeless families. It then briefly describes the collaborative methods used to develop the…

  7. A Survey of American Psychiatric Residency Programs Concerning Education in Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuistion, Hunter L.; Ranz, Jules M.; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to document how psychiatric residencies address homelessness and mental illness, to discover training barriers, and to identify educational recommendations. Methods: The authors mailed a survey to 178 American psychiatric residency programs, requesting information about didactic and clinical offerings in homelessness.…

  8. Limiting Attrition in Longitudinal Research on Homeless Adolescents: What Works Best?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobden, Karen; Forney, Jason Curtis; Durham, Kathleen Wyszacki; Toro, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of five tracking strategies (collateral contacts, Internet databases, driver's records, letters, and community visits) used in attempting to locate homeless and housed adolescents 4.5 years after they were first contacted was examined and compared. The study sample comprised 401 adolescents (252 homeless and 149 matched housed)…

  9. An Exploration of Child Maltreatment among Homeless Families: Implications for Family Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardeck, John T.

    2005-01-01

    This research explores the incidence of child maltreatment among homeless families. The maltreatment explored in the study includes physical, emotional and sexual abuse. The data reported a high incidence of child maltreatment in the lives of the homeless. The policy implications for these findings are discussed.

  10. Patterns, Predictors, and Situational Contexts of HIV Risk Behaviors among Homeless Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somlai, Anton M.; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Wagstaff, David A.; Whitson, Donna P.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates psychosocial, relationship, and situational factors associated with HIV risk in a sample of 152 inner-city homeless men and women. Results show gender differences in risk patterns. Concludes that HIV prevention efforts tailored to the different risk circumstances of men and women are needed in social services programs for homeless

  11. Untangling the Complex Needs of People Experiencing Gambling Problems and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Louise; Tiyce, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    People with gambling problems are now recognised among those at increased risk of homelessness, and the link between housing and gambling problems has been identified as an area requiring further research. This paper discusses the findings of a qualitative study that explored the relationship between gambling problems and homelessness. Interviews…

  12. America's Homeless Children: New Outcasts. A Public Policy Report from the Better Homes Fund.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Better Homes Fund, Newton, MA.

    This report presents information on homeless children in the United States to gain the attention of policymakers and the media. Information comes from years of rigorous scientific research. The report presents both findings and solutions, including concrete steps to secure food, shelter, health care, and schooling to help homeless children and…

  13. Problems of Definition in Sampling Special Populations: The Case of Homeless Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Timothy P.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Problems of definition in estimation in evaluation research were studied through a survey of homeless persons in Cook County (Illinois) based on 481 interviews. Differences arising from the following four population definitions are presented: (1) traditional homeless; (2) marginally housed; (3) social isolates; and (4) total of these categories.…

  14. Substance Misuse, Suicidal Ideation, and Suicide Attempts Among a National Sample of Homeless

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy L. Dietz

    2010-01-01

    This study's purpose was to identify the relationship between the annual incidence of drug and alcohol misuse among a national probability sample of 2,974 homeless individuals and self-reports of suicidal ideation and attempts while considering the predictors of both drug and alcohol misuse and suicidal ideation and attempts. By using a national dataset, the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers

  15. Health Services Utilization between Older and Younger Homeless Adults.(author Abstract)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakonezny, Paul A.; Ojeda, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose in the current study was to examine the relationship between health services utilization delivered by means of the Homeless Outreach Medical Services (HOMES) program and health services utilization delivered by means of the Parkland emergency room and inpatient units among a sample of older and younger homeless adults being…

  16. Exploring the Needs of Students Experiencing Homelessness from School Counselors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havlik, Stacey A.; Brady, Jennifer; Gavin, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    An increased understanding of the needs of students experiencing homelessness will better inform educational and clinical practices to ensure student success. Through an analysis of survey data using the Knowledge and Skills with Homeless Students Survey (Gaenzle & Bryan, 2013), this exploratory study applied a mixed methods approach to assess…

  17. Blocks to Their Future: A Report on the Barriers to Preschool Education for Homeless Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty, Washington, DC.

    Homelessness has a devastating impact on children. School provides stability and a sense of continuity during an otherwise chaotic time, as well as access to other comprehensive services, both inside and outside the school, such as meals, health care, counseling, and recreation. But despite their desperate need, homeless children face high, often…

  18. The Challenge of Educating Children Who Are Or Have Been Homeless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Yvonne

    Homeless children confront abject poverty and experience a constellation of risks that are having a devastating impact on their well-being. This paper reviews research linking homelessness among children to hunger and poor nutrition, health problems and lack of health and mental health care, developmental delays, psychological problems, and…

  19. Homelessness as the Unforgiving Minute of the Present: The Rhetorical Tenses of Democratic Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehwing, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Popular discourse and advocacy efforts characterize homelessness as a social problem bound by the present-centered concerns of physical affliction and material deprivation. Wayne Powers's documentary film "Reversal of Fortune" exemplifies this tendency by performing a "social experiment" to investigate how giving a homeless man $100,000 would…

  20. An end to chronic homelessness: an introduction to the 100,000 homes campaign.

    PubMed

    Kanis, Rebecca; McCannon, Joe; Craig, Catherine; Mergl, Kara A

    2012-02-01

    Across the nation communities are rapidly identifying and housing their most vulnerable people experiencing homelessness. Building on these examples, Community Solutions and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement have launched the 100,000 Homes Campaign, an historic effort to eliminate chronic homelessness by July 2014. PMID:22643479

  1. The Continuing Growth of Hunger, Homelessness, and Poverty in America's Cities: 1987. A 26-City Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Lilia M.; Waxman, Laura DeKoven

    This survey assesses the status of hunger, homelessness, and poverty in cities in the United States during 1987. The findings include the following: (1) the number of the homeless and the poor had increased and was expected to continue to increase; (2) the demand for emergency food assistance and emergency shelter assistance had increased and was…

  2. How Homeless Sector Workers Deal with the Death of Service Users: A Grounded Theory Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Lakeman

    2011-01-01

    Homeless sector workers often encounter the deaths of service users. A modified grounded theory methodology project was used to explore how workers make sense of, respond to, and cope with sudden death. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 16 paid homeless sector workers who had experienced the death of someone with whom they worked. Transcripts of interviews and field notes were

  3. 78 FR 27988 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ...Proposed Information Collection to OMB Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-Technical...following information: Title of Proposed: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-Technical...the Technical Submission phase of the Continuum of Care (CoC) Program...

  4. Consumer and Homemaking Education Instruction for Homeless Families: A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chui L.; Svabek, William H.; Abma, Deanna; Scanlan, Sonia S.

    This guide contains lesson plans for teaching consumer and homemaking skills to homeless families to support their transition to more secure and traditional lifestyles. Prioritized and developed based on the needs assessment of homeless families at the Salvation Army Gateway Transitional Housing in San Francisco, the 20 lessons in the guide cover…

  5. Consumer and Homemaking Education Instruction for Homeless Families: A Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chui L.; Svabek, William H.; Abma, Deanna; Scanlan, Sonia S.

    This study guide contains lessons on consumer and homemaking skills for homeless families to aid their transition to more secure and traditional lifestyles. Prioritized and developed based on the needs assessment of homeless families at the Salvation Army Gateway Transitional Housing in San Francisco, the 20 lessons in the guide cover topics such…

  6. Removing Barriers: The Struggle to Ensure Educational Rights for Students Experiencing Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix-Hodes, Patricia; Heybach, Laurene M.

    2014-01-01

    While the intent of the federal and state homeless education laws is clear, securing the educational rights of students without housing has been a long legal and political struggle in Chicago and Illinois. Education for students experiencing homelessness is a continuation of the civil rights struggle for equality in education and educational…

  7. Social Support of Homeless and Housed Mothers: A Comparison of Temporary and Permanent Housing Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letiecq, Bethany L.; Anderson, Elaine A.; Koblinsky, Sally A.

    1998-01-01

    Compares the social support of 115 low-income housed mothers and 92 homeless mothers residing in emergency shelters, transitional housing, and doubled-up arrangements. Results reveal that homeless mothers in emergency shelters and transitional housing had significantly less contact with friends and relatives. Implications for policy development…

  8. Meeting the Needs of Homeless Children Who Live in Temporary Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Deborah

    This study investigated the strengths homeless children exhibit. Homeless children living in shelters and children of the same peer group living in low income housing were interviewed about home activities, interests, abilities, talents, character strengths, autonomous behavior, and interactions with adults. All children were selected from first,…

  9. Building an empowerment policy paradigm: self-reported strengths of homeless mothers.

    PubMed

    Banyard, V L; Graham-Bermann, S A

    1995-10-01

    Self-reported strengths and goals of a sample of 64 mothers of young children residing in a temporary shelter for homeless families, were documented. The strengths most frequently reported included ability to take action, parental competence, and determination in the face of stress. Program and policy implications of these positive attributes of homeless mothers are discussed. PMID:8561182

  10. Assessment of Risk and Protective Factors for Homelessness : Preliminary Validation of the Life Needs Inventory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dena L. Brown-Young

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the LNI (Life Needs Inventory), used by the VOADV (Volunteers of America Delaware Valley) organization to identify risk factors, as well as protective strengths, associated with the securing of stable housing among the homeless population. Homelessness is a growing concern in the United States (Rosenberg, Solarz, & Bailey, 1991) and individuals or

  11. A Descriptive Study of Single Adults in Homeless Shelters: Increasing Counselors' Knowledge and Social Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggerly, Jennifer; Zalaquett, Carlos P.

    2006-01-01

    This article is intended to help counselors increase their knowledge and social action for single adults who are homeless. Findings from a period-prevalence study of 71 single adults in a homeless shelter over 2 years reveal demographics, mental health needs, and sociopolitical issues of this population. Implications including social justice…

  12. Skin-Test Screening and Tuberculosis Transmission among the Homeless1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Po-Marn Kong; Jan Tapy; Patricia Calixto; William J. Burman; Randall R. Reves; Zhenhua Yang; M. Donald Cave

    2002-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a mandatory tuberculosis (TB) screening program that uses symptom screening and tuberculin skin testing in homeless shelters. We used the results of DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates to evaluate the effect of the program on TB incidence and transmis- sion. After the program was implemented, the proportion of cases among homeless persons detected by

  13. Stress and Traumatic Stress: How Do Past Events Influence Current Traumatic Stress among Mothers Experiencing Homelessness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julie K.; Hall, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the relationship between past traumatic events and the level of current traumatic stress among mothers experiencing homelessness. The data for this study were gathered from 75 homeless mothers between May 2006 and October 2006 using a cross-sectional survey design with purposive sampling. All mothers…

  14. Social Emotional Development in Infants and Toddlers Who are Homeless as Reported by Mothers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debra Rybski

    2008-01-01

    Children who are homeless are reported to have mental health problems at rates of 44% compared to 18% of homed children (1, 2.) A contributing factor to mental health problems can be poor social emotional development (3.) Mothers who experience homelessness may find facilitating social emotional development a challenge when basic necessities such as securing food, shelter and clothing are

  15. A Pilot Study Comparing Two Developmental Screening Tools for Use With Homeless Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheau-Huey Chiu; Marguerite A. DiMarco

    2010-01-01

    Homelessness and poverty can present serious health issues for children, including those associated with developmental delays. Early identification and intervention may decrease risk associated with delayed development. Parent-completed measures have been used to help screen for children's development, but little is known about how they may enhance early detection with homeless children. The primary aims of this pilot study were

  16. The Homeless in the Public Library: Implications for Access to Libraries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall C. Simmons

    1985-01-01

    The homeless in America have been described by journalists, social scientists, and librarians. The literature on the problem patron in the public library is examined to determine the response of librarians to the presence of homeless individuals in the library who may offend staff and clientele. Matters of civility rather than criminality are the focus of the discussion. How librarians

  17. How Homeless Sector Workers Deal with the Death of Service Users: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Homeless sector workers often encounter the deaths of service users. A modified grounded theory methodology project was used to explore how workers make sense of, respond to, and cope with sudden death. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 16 paid homeless sector workers who had experienced the death of someone with whom they worked.…

  18. Sociodemographic Variables, Childhood Characteristics, and Family Risk Factors for Homelessness: A "Puerto Rican Paradox?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Aileen; Garcia-Carrasquillo, Aida; Nogueras, Juan

    2010-01-01

    This study explored sociodemographic variables, childhood characteristics, and family factors in the Puerto Rican homeless. The study is a secondary analysis in which a Puerto Rican homeless sample (N = 113) is compared with a Puerto Rican primary care patient group (N = 102). Discriminant function analysis was employed to determine if family and…

  19. Fostering youth engagement: 

    E-print Network

    Maynard, Karen Kimberly

    2009-05-15

    FOSTERING YOUTH ENGAGEMENT: A MODEL OF YOUTH VOICE, EMPOWERMENT, AND PARTICIPATION A Thesis by KAREN KIMBERLY MAYNARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2008 Major Subject: Recreation, Park, and Tourism Sciences FOSTERING YOUTH ENGAGEMENT: A MODEL OF YOUTH VOICE, EMPOWERMENT, AND PARTICIPATION A Thesis by KAREN KIMBERLY MAYNARD Submitted...

  20. Youth Radio

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    With an impressive headquarters in downtown Oakland, Youth Radio is fast becoming a compelling and insightful media phenomenon that should be watched closely. Their mission is a laudable one, and as their website puts it, â??â?¦. is to promote young peopleâ??s intellectual creative and professional growth through training and access to media and to produce the highest quality original media for local and national outlets.â?ť Of course, the real heart of the site contains the actual programming, which is streamed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Along with unique mix of music, individuals can listen to a host of stories reported by young people. Visitors can also browse a list of recently added stories by topic, which include relationships, society, sports, poetry, and health. Those who are hoping to get some of the basic flavor of the offerings here would do well to take a look at the story featuring reporting from a group of Berkeley High School students at the World Social Forum in Caracas, or by listening to the commentary offered by Lauryn Silverman on the modern conundrum of multi-tasking.

  1. Hardcore Youth Unemployment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forthman, Robert Crooks

    This action research project examined the culture of a low-income white youth population in San Pablo, California, and attempted to assist certain youth with employment problems. From May 1, 1969 through August 31, 1970 approximately 100 unemployed youths between the ages of 14 and 24 were located and offered various individual and group social…

  2. Service Opportunities for Youths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, David; Tarlov, Suzanne

    The emerging youth service movement has reinforced and built on the foundation of service in traditional organizations and focuses on tapping youth talent and energy. Youth service is a concept that has roots in pre-20th century American society. Service programs today increasingly include training, education, prevention, and employment…

  3. Two-Year Predictors of Runaway and Homeless Episodes Following Shelter Services among Substance Abusing Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Guo, Xiamei; Brakenhoff, Brittany; Feng, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Given high levels of health and psychological costs associated with the family disruption of homelessness, identifying predictors of runaway and homeless episodes is an important goal. The current study followed 179 substance abusing, shelter-recruited adolescents who participated in a randomized clinical trial. Predictors of runaway and homeless episodes were examined over a two year period. Results from the hierarchical linear modeling analysis showed that family cohesion and substance use, but not family conflict or depressive symptoms, delinquency, or school enrollment predicted future runaway and homeless episodes. Findings suggest that increasing family support, care and connection and reducing substance use are important targets of intervention efforts in preventing future runaway and homeless episodes amongst a high risk sample of adolescents. PMID:24011094

  4. A Qualitative Study of Pregnancy Intention and the Use of Contraception among Homeless Women with Children

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sara; Grewal, MPH Mandeep; Roberts, Elizabeth M.; Steinauer, Jody; Dehlendorf, Christine

    2014-01-01

    We undertook a qualitative analysis informed by grounded theory to explore pregnancy intention and the barriers to contraceptive use as perceived by homeless women with children. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were performed in English and in Spanish. The dominant theme emerging from the interviews was a strong desire to avoid pregnancy while homeless. However, few women in our sample used contraception or accessed reproductive health care consistently. There were multiple barriers to using contraception and to accessing reproductive health care services that homeless women reported: (1) inability to prioritize health due to competing demands, (2) shelter-related obstacles and restrictive provider practices that impede access to reproductive health care services and the use of contraception, and (3) change in the power dynamics of sexual relationships while homeless, making women more vulnerable to sexual exploitation. Findings suggest a multifactorial approach is needed to help homeless women use contraception and access reproductive health services. PMID:24858884

  5. Health Characteristics and Medical Service Use Patterns of Sheltered Homeless and Low-Income Housed Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, Linda; Goldberg, Robert; Perloff, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the health characteristics and service utilization patterns of homeless women and low-income housed women who are heads of household. DESIGN Case-control study. SETTING Community of Worcester, Massachusetts. PARTICIPANTS A sample of 220 homeless mothers and 216 low-income housed mothers receiving welfare. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Outcome measures included health status, chronic conditions, adverse lifestyle practices, outpatient and emergency department use and hospitalization rates, and use of preventive screening measures. Both homeless mothers and housed mothers demonstrated low levels of physical and role functioning and high levels of bodily pain. Prevalence rates of asthma, anemia, and ulcer disease were high in both groups. More than half of both groups were current smokers. Compared with the housed mothers, homeless mothers reported more HIV risk behaviors. Although 90% of the homeless mothers had been screened for cervical cancer, almost one third had not been screened for tuberculosis. After controlling for potential confounding factors, the homeless mothers, compared with the housed mothers, had more frequent emergency department visits in the past year (adjusted mean, homeless vs housed, 1.41 vs .95, p = .10) and were significantly more likely to be hospitalized in the past year (adjusted odds ratio 2.22; 95% confidence interval 1.13, 4.38). CONCLUSIONS Both homeless mothers and low-income housed mothers had lower health status, more chronic health problems, and higher smoking rates than the general population. High rates of hospitalization, emergency department visits, and more risk behaviors among homeless mothers suggest that they are at even greater risk of adverse health outcomes. Efforts to address gaps in access to primary care and to integrate psychosocial supports with health care delivery may improve health outcomes for homeless mothers and reduce use of costly medical care services. PMID:9669568

  6. Disparities in Health Care Utilization Among Urban Homeless in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Changgyo; Ju, Young-Su

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We examined health care disparities in Korean urban homeless people and individual characteristics associated with the utilization of health care. Methods We selected a sample of 203 homeless individuals at streets, shelters, and drop-in centers in Seoul and Daejeon by a quota sampling method. We surveyed demographic information, information related to using health care, and health status with a questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was adopted to identify factors associated with using health care and to reveal health care disparities within the Korean urban homeless population. Results Among 203 respondents, 89 reported that they had visited health care providers at least once in the past 6 months. Twenty persons (22.5%) in the group that used health care (n = 89) reported feeling discriminated against. After adjustment for age, sex, marital status, educational level, monthly income, perceived health status, Beck Depression Inventory score, homeless period, and other covariates, three factors were significantly associated with medical utilization: female sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR, 15.95; 95% CI, 3.97 to 64.04], having three or more diseases (aOR, 24.58; 95% CI, 4.23 to 142.78), and non-street residency (aOR, 11.39; 95% CI, 3.58 to 36.24). Conclusions Health care disparities in Seoul and Daejeon homeless exist in terms of the main place to stay, physical illnesses, and gender. Under the current homeless support system in South Korea, street homeless have poorer accessibility to health care versus non-street homeless. To provide equitable medical aid for homeless people, strategies to overcome barriers against health care for the street homeless are needed. PMID:22143177

  7. A cross-sectional examination of the mental health of homeless mothers: does the relationship between mothering and mental health vary by duration of homelessness?

    PubMed Central

    Zabkiewicz, Denise M; Patterson, Michelle; Wright, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study draws on baseline data from the At Home/Chez Soi demonstration project to examine the association between parenting status and mental health among homeless women and whether the association varies by duration of homelessness. Setting Structured interviews were conducted with participants in five cities across Canada including Moncton, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and Winnipeg. Participants Eligibility criteria included those with legal adult status, with a mental illness, and who lacked a regular, fixed shelter. All 713 women who participated in the larger project were selected for inclusion in this analysis. Measures The mental health conditions of interest include depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), alcohol dependence and substance dependence. Results The relationship between parenting status and depression, as well as PTSD, varied by duration of homelessness. Among women who had been homeless for less than 2?years, no relationship was found between parenting status and depression, or PTSD. However, among women who had been homeless for 2 or more years, the odds of depression was twice as high among parenting women compared with others (aOR=2.05, p?0.05). A similar relationship was found between parenting status and PTSD (aOR=2.03, p?0.05). The odds of substance dependence was found to be 2.62 times greater among parenting women compared with others and this relationship did not vary by duration of homelessness (aOR=2.62; 95% CI 1.86 to 3.69). No relationship was found between parenting and alcohol dependence. Conclusions Overall, the findings from this study suggest that there is a relationship between long-term homelessness and mothers’ risk of poor mental health. Given the multiple demands mothers face, a failure to recognise their unique needs is likely to contribute to intergenerational legacies of homelessness and mental health problems. Trial registration number World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ISRCTN66721740 and ISRCTN57595077). PMID:25492272

  8. Residential trajectories of street youth-the Montréal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Roy, Élise; Robert, Marie; Fournier, Louise; Vaillancourt, Éric; Vandermeerschen, Jill; Boivin, Jean-François

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about the course of homelessness among youth between the ages of 18 and 25 despite the many characteristics distinguishing them from adolescents and from older street-involved populations. We examined the residential trajectories of homeless young adults in Montréal over a 21-month period and identified determinants of various trajectory profiles. The 365 study participants (79 % men, mean age 21.9 years) were followed for an average of 515 days (range 81-630 days). We assessed housing status with a questionnaire based on the residential follow-back calendar designed by the New Hampshire Dartmouth Research Center. Using latent growth analysis to examine achievement of residential stability over time, we observed three different trajectories: group 1 presented a low probability of housing throughout the entire study period; group 2 showed a high probability of early and stable housing; group 3 displayed a fluctuating pattern. Protective correlates of residential stability included high school education, birth in Canada, and presence of mental health problems. Drug abuse or dependence was associated with a decreased probability of housing. PMID:24515932

  9. Youth Gangs: An Overview. Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Youth Gang Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, James C.

    1998-01-01

    This bulletin provides an overview of the problems that youth gangs pose. It pinpoints the differences between youth gangs and adult criminal organizations and examines the risk factors that lead to youth gang membership. Some promising strategies being used to curb youth gang involvement are reviewed. The proliferation of youth gangs since 1980…

  10. Psychiatry, homeless patients and welfare reforms: historical links and chains.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hamid, Walid Khalid; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2014-02-01

    The birthplace of the specialty of psychiatry was in the asylum, which was created to divert patients from workhouses where the most disadvantaged and destitute people with mental illness were to be found. The current welfare reforms are endangering the welfare and livelihood of the most disadvantaged of our patients. These reforms in the authors' opinion are related more to the historical cycle of societal attitude to homeless people than to seeing them as the undeserving poor. This is particularly true since the current economic crisis was not caused by the poor, so it is very unfair that our poorest patients should suffer most as a result of the welfare reforms. PMID:23564721

  11. Dying on the Streets: Homeless Persons’ Concerns and Desires about End of Life Care

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Dianne M.; Ratner, Edward R.; Alderton, Lucy; Hudson, Brenda; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2007-01-01

    Background There is little understanding about the experiences and preferences at the end of life (EOL) for people from unique cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Homeless individuals are extreme examples of these overlooked populations; they have the greatest risk of death, encounter barriers to health care, and lack the resources and relationships assumed necessary for appropriate EOL care. Exploring their desires and concerns will provide insight for the care of this vulnerable and disenfranchised population, as well as others who are underserved. Objective Explore the concerns and desires for EOL care among homeless persons. Design Qualitative study utilizing focus groups. Participants Fifty-three homeless persons recruited from agencies providing homeless services. Measurements In-depth interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Results We present 3 domains encompassing 11 themes arising from our investigation, some of which are previously unreported. Homeless persons worried about dying and EOL care; had frequent encounters with death; voiced many unique fears, such as dying anonymously and undiscovered; favored EOL documentation, such as advance directives; and demonstrated ambivalence towards contacting family. They also spoke of barriers to EOL care and shared interventions to improve dying among the very poor and estranged. Conclusions Homeless persons have significant personal experience and feelings about death, dying, and EOL care, much of which is different from those previously described in the EOL literature about other populations. These findings have implications not only for homeless persons, but for others who are poor and disenfranchised. PMID:17372789

  12. Risks associated with long-term homelessness among women: battery, rape, and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Fisher, B; Hovell, M; Hofstetter, C R; Hough, R

    1995-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of battery, rape, and HIV risk practices in a sample of long-term homeless women and to explore correlates of HIV risk practices. Fifty-three women who had been homeless for at least three months in the last year were interviewed at day and night shelters. The women were demographically similar to other samples of homeless men and women and had similar rates of drug use. However, a higher proportion of homeless women were exposed to battery (91 percent), rape (56 percent), and mental distress, and they had a smaller support network (three people). Eighty-six percent had been battered prior to homelessness. A positive association was found between HIV risk practices and the use of certain drugs and having a protector. A higher level of assertiveness was associated with less HIV risk. The study demonstrated that homeless women are at very high risk of battery and rape. Being homeless may require life-styles that increase the risk of HIV infection and transmission. PMID:7622323

  13. Experience of primary care among homeless individuals with mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Chrystal, Joya G; Glover, Dawn L; Young, Alexander S; Whelan, Fiona; Austin, Erika L; Johnson, Nancy K; Pollio, David E; Holt, Cheryl L; Stringfellow, Erin; Gordon, Adam J; Kim, Theresa A; Daigle, Shanette G; Steward, Jocelyn L; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of primary care to homeless individuals with mental health conditions presents unique challenges. To inform healthcare improvement, we studied predictors of favorable primary care experience among homeless persons with mental health conditions treated at sites that varied in degree of homeless-specific service tailoring. This was a multi-site, survey-based comparison of primary care experiences at three mainstream primary care clinics of the Veterans Administration (VA), one homeless-tailored VA clinic, and one tailored non-VA healthcare program. Persons who accessed primary care service two or more times from July 2008 through June 2010 (N = 366) were randomly sampled. Predictor variables included patient and organization characteristics suggested by the patient perception model developed by Sofaer and Firminger (2005), with an emphasis on mental health. The primary care experience was assessed with the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) questionnaire, a validated survey instrument. Multiple regression identified predictors of positive experiences (i.e. higher PCQ-H total score). Significant predictors of a positive experience included a site offering tailored service design, perceived choice among providers, and currently domiciled status. There was an interaction effect between site and severe psychiatric symptoms. For persons with severe psychiatric symptoms, a homeless-tailored service design was significantly associated with a more favorable primary care experience. For persons without severe psychiatric symptoms, this difference was not significant. This study supports the importance of tailored healthcare delivery designed for homeless persons' needs, with such services potentially holding special relevance for persons with mental health conditions. To improve patient experience among the homeless, organizations may want to deliver services that are tailored to homelessness and offer a choice of providers. PMID:25659142

  14. Intellectual Disability among Dutch Homeless People: Prevalence and Related Psychosocial Problems

    PubMed Central

    Van Straaten, Barbara; Schrijvers, Carola T. M.; Van der Laan, Jorien; Boersma, Sandra N.; Rodenburg, Gerda; Wolf, Judith R. L. M.; Van de Mheen, Dike

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a higher prevalence of intellectual disability (ID) among homeless people than in the general population. However, little is known about the additional psychosocial problems faced by homeless people with ID. We describe the prevalence of ID in a cohort of homeless people in the Netherlands, and report relationships between ID and psychosocial problems in terms of psychological distress, substance (mis)use and dependence, as well as demographic characteristics in this cohort. Methods This cross-sectional study is part of a cohort study among homeless people in the four major cities of the Netherlands. Data were derived from 387 homeless people who were interviewed and screened for ID six months after the baseline measurement. Multivariate logistic regression analyses and ?2 tests were performed to analyze relationships between ID, psychosocial problems and demographic characteristics. Findings Of all cohort members, 29.5% had a suspected ID. Participants with a suspected ID had a higher mean age, were more likely to be male and to fall in the lowest category of education than participants without a suspected ID. Having a suspected ID was related to general psychological distress (OR ?=?1.56, p<0.05), somatization (OR ?=?1.84, p<0.01), depression (OR ?=?1.58, p<0.05) and substance dependence (OR ?=?1.88, p<0.05). No relationships were found between a suspected ID and anxiety, regular substance use, substance misuse and primary substance of use. Conclusion The prevalence of ID among Dutch homeless people is higher than in the general population, and is related to more psychosocial problems than among homeless people without ID. Homeless people with a suspected ID appear to be a vulnerable subgroup within the homeless population. This endorses the importance of the extra attention required for this subgroup. PMID:24465905

  15. Youth Asset Mapping: Showcasing Youth Empowerment and Positive Youth-Adult Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Deborah J.; Rodgers, Kathleen Boyce; Schwieterman, Tiffany Anne

    2011-01-01

    Youth and adult partners participated in youth asset mapping, a form of action research, to assess community assets and youth involvement opportunities. Qualitative data were analyzed to examine youths' feelings of empowerment and experiences with adult partners. Asset mapping contributed to youth empowerment, especially when adults were engaging…

  16. The developmental status and adaptive behavior of homeless and low-income housed infants and toddlers.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Coll, C; Buckner, J C; Brooks, M G; Weinreb, L F; Bassuk, E L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study describes the development status of 127 homeless and 91 low-income housed infants and toddlers. METHODS: The Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Vineland Screener were used to gather data. RESULTS: There were no differences between homeless and low-income housed children. However, younger children in both groups performed better than the older children on most summary scores. CONCLUSIONS: Homeless and low-income housed children did not differ in their cognitive and motor skills. However, older children scored lower than younger children on most measures of development status, suggesting that the cumulative effects of poverty may increase with time. PMID:9736879

  17. The illusions and juxtapositions of commercial sexual exploitation among youth: identifying effective street-outreach strategies.

    PubMed

    Holger-Ambrose, Beth; Langmade, Cheree; Edinburgh, Laurel D; Saewyc, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    To explore sexually exploited youths' perspectives of how street outreach workers can effectively provide outreach and connections to services, we conducted qualitative interviews with 13 female participants, ages 14 to 22, in a Midwest U.S. city. Participants reported multiple types of exploitation, most first exploited by age 13, plus substance use and recurrent homelessness. Nearly all had a pimp, and all used the internet as a venue for sexual exploitation. Participants wanted outreach workers to use "soft words" to refer to exploitation. They expressed contradictory images of their "boyfriend" pimps and their exploitation. They wanted outreach workers to "provide resources," "be nonjudgmental," "listen," and "care." Street outreach can be one way to support sexually exploited youth but should occur in multiple settings. PMID:23590353

  18. Bushfire impact on youth.

    PubMed

    Yelland, C; Robinson, P; Lock, C; La Greca, A M; Kokegei, B; Ridgway, V; Lai, B

    2010-04-01

    The authors examined the association between disaster-related traumatic experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 155 youth, aged 8-18 years, from the Lower Eyre Peninsula of South Australia who were affected by January 2005 bushfires. Youth completed measures of PTSD symptoms and disaster experiences 11-5 months postdisaster. Many youth (27%) reported moderate to severe levels of PTSD symptoms; younger children reported greater PTSD symptom severity than older youth. Perceived personal life threat and ongoing loss/disruption were related to greater PTSD symptomatology. Following disasters, it may be helpful to identify young children and youth who perceived that their life was threatened and experienced more ongoing life disruption, as these youth may be at higher risk for persistent PTSD symptoms. PMID:20419736

  19. Youth lead youth in Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G

    1988-01-01

    The promotion of family planning and birth control in Pacific countries is often frustrated by traditional and religious beliefs, if not deterred by tremendous funding and logistics problems. In the central Pacific republic of the Marshall Islands, however, youthful health workers are taking a unique approach to health promotion that has spurred acceptance of the once controversial subjects of family planning and birth control. A group known as Youth to Youth in Health is spearheading a family planning outreach drive in the schools and community in the Marshall Islands. Coupling health presentations with traditional island music and dance to produce lively health shows, the group's programs on family planning, birth control, nutrition, and cancer have struck a responsive chord in a culture known for its religious and traditional conservatism. The group makes creative use of puppet shows, skits, health songs, and pantomimes, interspersed with contemporary renditions of Marshall Islands music and traditional dances. These have rekindled pride in their culture among the group and sparked a sense of urgency about the need to improve health conditions in the islands. As evidence of the group's impact, family planning staff point to a nearly 4-fold rise in the number of youth clients under 19 years since the Youth to Youth started in mid-1986. Their combination of traditional custom with family planning and other health information has proved to be an innovative and needed program for the islands. PMID:12269067

  20. Evidence for Site-Specific, Systematic Adaptation of Substance Prevention Curriculum With High Risk Youth in Community and Alternative School Settings.

    PubMed

    Holleran Steiker, Lori K; Hopson, Laura M; Goldbach, Jeremy T; Robinson, Charletta

    2014-09-01

    The problem of substance use among older youth is of great concern, but has received little attention in prevention research. This may be due to the perception that prevention programming is developmentally inappropriate for older youth who are actively experimenting with substances. This project examined the differential effectiveness of youth-driven adaptations of the evidence-based prevention program, keepin' it REAL (KiR). The participating sites included a juvenile justice day program, a homeless shelter, four alternative high schools, low-income housing programs, an LGBTQ youth center, and a youth group on the Texas-Mexico border. In the project's first phase, high risk youth in community settings tailored KiR workbooks and videos to increase the relevance for their peers, older adolescents who are likely to have already initiated drug use. The second phase of the study, discussed here in detail, evaluates the effectiveness of the adapted versions of KiR compared with the original version and a comparison condition. The study employed a quasi-experimental pretest posttest design with a 6-week follow-up. Youth also participated in focus groups. Both qualitative and quantitative data suggest that participants receiving the adapted version of the curriculum experienced greater improvement in acceptance and use of substances than youth in the other two groups. PMID:25221419

  1. Leaving Homelessness Behind: Housing Decisions among Families Exiting Shelter1

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Benjamin W.; Mayberry, Lindsay; Shinn, Marybeth; Khadduri, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Because homelessness assistance programs are designed to help families, it is important for policymakers and practitioners to understand how families experiencing homelessness make housing decisions, particularly when they decide not to use available services. This study explores those decisions using in-depth qualitative interviews with 80 families recruited in shelters across four sites approximately six months after they were assigned to one of four conditions (permanent housing subsidies, project-based transitional housing, community-based rapid re-housing, and usual care). Familiar neighborhoods near children’s schools, transportation, family and friends, and stability were important to families across conditions. Program restrictions on eligibility constrained family choices. Subsidized housing was the most desired intervention and families leased up at higher rates than in other studies of poor families. Respondents were least comfortable in and most likely to leave transitional housing. Uncertainty associated with community-based rapid re-housing generated considerable anxiety. Across interventions, many families had to make unhappy compromises, often leading to further moves. Policy recommendations are offered. PMID:25258503

  2. Development of fragility functions to estimate homelessness after an earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Susan A.; Daniell, James; Khazai, Bijan; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2014-05-01

    Immediately after an earthquake, many stakeholders need to make decisions about their response. These decisions often need to be made in a data poor environment as accurate information on the impact can take months or even years to be collected and publicized. Social fragility functions have been developed and applied to provide an estimate of the impact in terms of building damage, deaths and injuries in near real time. These rough estimates can help governments and response agencies determine what aid may be required which can improve their emergency response and facilitate planning for longer term response. Due to building damage, lifeline outages, fear of aftershocks, or other causes, people may become displaced or homeless after an earthquake. Especially in cold and dangerous locations, the rapid provision of safe emergency shelter can be a lifesaving necessity. However, immediately after an event there is little information available about the number of homeless, their locations and whether they require public shelter to aid the response agencies in decision making. In this research, we analyze homelessness after historic earthquakes using the CATDAT Damaging Earthquakes Database. CATDAT includes information on the hazard as well as the physical and social impact of over 7200 damaging earthquakes from 1900-2013 (Daniell et al. 2011). We explore the relationship of both earthquake characteristics and area characteristics with homelessness after the earthquake. We consider modelled variables such as population density, HDI, year, measures of ground motion intensity developed in Daniell (2014) over the time period from 1900-2013 as well as temperature. Using a base methodology based on that used for PAGER fatality fragility curves developed by Jaiswal and Wald (2010), but using regression through time using the socioeconomic parameters developed in Daniell et al. (2012) for "socioeconomic fragility functions", we develop a set of fragility curves that can be used to estimate homelessness as a function of information that is readily available immediately after an earthquake. These fragility functions could be used by relief agencies and governments to provide an initial assessment of the need for allocation of emergency shelter immediately after an earthquake. Daniell JE (2014) The development of socio-economic fragility functions for use in worldwide rapid earthquake loss estimation procedures, Ph.D. Thesis (in publishing), Karlsruhe, Germany. Daniell, J. E., Khazai, B., Wenzel, F., & Vervaeck, A. (2011). The CATDAT damaging earthquakes database. Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, 11(8), 2235-2251. doi:10.5194/nhess-11-2235-2011 Daniell, J.E., Wenzel, F. and Vervaeck, A. (2012). "The Normalisation of socio-economic losses from historic worldwide earthquakes from 1900 to 2012", 15th WCEE, Lisbon, Portugal, Paper No. 2027. Jaiswal, K., & Wald, D. (2010). An Empirical Model for Global Earthquake Fatality Estimation. Earthquake Spectra, 26(4), 1017-1037. doi:10.1193/1.3480331

  3. [Taking care of outreach workers who intervene with marginal youths : Part 2].

    PubMed

    Aubin, Diane; Abdel-Baki, Amal; Baret, Caroline; Cadieux, Christiane; Glaize, Axel; Hill, Terri; Lafortune, David; Létourneau, Pierre; Monast, Danielle; Tiberghien, Candice

    2012-01-01

    Outreach work with youths in a precarious situation raises emotions and questions in workers while confronting them with their own suffering and fragility. In order to help them help as well as counter the risk of vicarious traumatisation, spaces for talking and exchanging with a third party have been created in various intervention settings. The objective is to allow them to elaborate on what their work makes them feel and thus preserve their stability and their ability to think. Through group or individual clinical discussions, these exchanges favor distancing and allow new perspectives on their work. That is why peer support appeared as an essential element for psychologists and therapists who support not only youths but the workers who help them. The setting up of our outreach meetings-a result of our observation, allows keeping the flame alive without risking being burned. In this article, the issue of marginality in professionals working with homeless youths-as well as our own-is raised. It sometimes translates in the absence of a fixed location for a meeting symbolizing traditional stability, sometimes in the necessary flexibility of a framework to reach this population, sometimes in the openness to otherness and more precisely to a difference that disturbs when anxiety that this disaffiliated being raises, could well be our very self! Is it really marginality or a particular positioning aiming at constructive denunciation of stigmatization, unjust exclusion that youths with mental health and addiction problems sustain that place them at risk of homelessness? Neither missionaries, nor saviors are needed, but only hopeful facilitators working alongside people who want to stand up and take their place in society. PMID:23254824

  4. 77 FR 33229 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ...Application--Continuum of Care Application AGENCY: Office of...comment entitled Continuum of Care of Homeless Assistance Grant Application- Continuum of Care Application. The comment due date should be 60 days after publication in the...

  5. Rhetorical Response to the Homeless Movement: Adopting Discursive Units in Counter-Frames 

    E-print Network

    Mathe, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14

    American cities have a combination of policies that both provide emergency services and restrict the movements and activities of homeless people. These policies are the product of active public debates that construct narratives that explain...

  6. [The care of homeless person: reviewing the meanings of health-disease process].

    PubMed

    Rosa, Anderson da Silva; Secco, Maria Garbriela; Brętas, Ana Cristina Passarela

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative research had the objective of knowing the significance of the health-sickness-care process to homeless person and workers of a community center to homeless people on Sio Paulo city. The dates were collected by the interview with four homeless person and four workers. The interviews were separated in three categories: (1) the apprehension of the health - sickness-care process, (2) the caring of health in the street, (3) advices to survive in the street. The results showed that even with the difference of the homeless person, the street have a specific culture relative of the health-sickness-care person that need to be comprehend by nurses. PMID:17175723

  7. 76 FR 58822 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Fiscal Year 2010 Transformation Initiative: Homeless Families...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ...R) of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) grants to support small research projects that enhance or complement the contractual study HUD is supporting called The Impact of Various Housing and Service Interventions on Homeless...

  8. 77 FR 45367 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ...DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5603-N-53] Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application AGENCY: Office of...Pre-established communities, called Continuums of Care (CoC), will complete the...

  9. 77 FR 59543 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Continuum of Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ...Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Continuum of Care Program: Extension of Public...that established the regulations for the Continuum of Care program, and which solicits...the regulatory framework for the new Continuum of Care program. The Homeless...

  10. 77 FR 27243 - Notice of Propose Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ...Information Collection for Public Comment; Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application--Continuum of Care Application AGENCY: Office of...information: Title of Proposal: HEARTH Continuum of Care Program Application....

  11. Expanding Service Delivery: Does It Improve Relationships Among Agencies Serving Homeless People with Mental Illness?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James McGuire; Robert Rosenheck; Craig Burnette

    2002-01-01

    Enhancing interagency services integration for homeless people has been advocated as an approach for improving service delivery to this population. In contrast to system-level “top-down” interventions, this study examines the association of expanded funding of client-level homeless services, a “bottom-up” approach, with strengthening of interorganizational relationships. We compared Veterans Affairs\\/non-Veterans Affairs interagency relationships at VA facilities supporting community-oriented programs (N=72),

  12. Identifying US veterans who access services from health care for the homeless clinics.

    PubMed

    Knopf-Amelung, Sarah M; Jenkins, Darlene M

    2013-12-01

    Research on veterans experiencing homelessness is predominantly focused on the US Department of Veterans Affairs setting, despite the fact that substantial numbers receive services from Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) clinics. We explored how HCH clinics identified veteran patients through a survey of administrators (49% response rate). The majority (98%) identified veterans but used varied language and approaches. Implementing a streamlined, culturally competent identification process is vital to collecting accurate data, connecting veterans with benefits, and informing treatment plans. PMID:24148058

  13. Comparing the Housing Trajectories of Different Classes Within a Diverse Homeless Population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tim Aubry; Fran Klodawsky; Daniel Coulombe

    The paper presents findings from a longitudinal study identifying different classes of homeless individuals in a mid-size\\u000a Canadian city based on health-related characteristics and comparing the housing trajectories of these classes 2 years later.\\u000a Using data collected through in-person interviews with a sample of 329 single persons who have experienced homelessness, the\\u000a paper presents results of a latent class analysis. Results

  14. Housing as an Intervention on Hospital Use: Access among Chronically Homeless Persons with Disabilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Parker

    2010-01-01

    A study examining demographics and hospital utilization for chronically homeless persons with disabilities was conducted at\\u000a pre-housing enrollment and at 6 months post-housing. Of the 20 participants, 70% (n?=?14) were Black American and 30% (n?=?6) were White; 100% (n?=?20) were non-Hispanic; 90% (n?=?18) were men; 40% (n?=?8) were veterans; Median years since last permanent housing and total homelessness were 7 and

  15. Risk Behaviors of Homeless Men in India: A Potential Bridge Population for HIV Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arunansu Talukdar; Krishnendu Roy; Indrajit Saha; Jayashree Mitra; Roger Detels

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether homeless men are a bridge group for transmission of HIV to the general population in India.\\u000a A cross-sectional study design was used to measure subjects’ past and current sexual activities. We surveyed 493 of 606 homeless\\u000a men aged 18–49 years who live in public places in Kolkata, India, who were invited to take part in a structured

  16. Sex and Relationships on the Street: How Homeless Men Judge Partner Risk on Skid Row

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryan A. BrownDavid; David P. Kennedy; Joan S. Tucker; Suzanne L. Wenzel; Daniela Golinelli; Samuel R. Wertheimer; Gery W. Ryan

    Homeless men in the U.S. represent a large and growing population, and have elevated rates of HIV\\/AIDS and sexual risk behaviors,\\u000a including unprotected sex with women. We conducted qualitative interviews (n = 30) with homeless men using shelters and meal lines in downtown Los Angeles (Skid Row) to better understand how such men\\u000a view the risks of sexual encounters with female partners.

  17. A Comparison of Treatment Outcomes Among Chronically Homelessness Adults Receiving Comprehensive Housing and Health Care Services Versus Usual Local Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvin S. MaresRobert; Robert A. Rosenheck

    Service use and 2-year treatment outcomes were compared between chronically homelessness clients receiving comprehensive housing\\u000a and healthcare services through the federal Collaborative Initiative on Chronic Homelessness (CICH) program (n = 281) a sample of similarly chronically homeless individuals receiving usual care (n = 104) in the same 5 communities. CICH clients were housed an average of 23 of 90 days (52%) more than comparison group

  18. Holocaust Youth and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Joanna

    As Holocaust study for youth becomes integrated into the U.S. educational structure, educators throughout the country are going to need resources that combine history and humanity to convey to young people the impact of tragedy and violence that World War II and the Holocaust had on the youth of a particular time in the 20th century. This paper…

  19. Youth in Contemporary Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, David, Ed.

    This book, a major purpose of which is to attempt to identify how different kinds of youth will be reacting to different aspects of the social system in the years ahead, includes 15 essays: "Black Brainpower: Characteristics of Bright Black Youth," D.J. Watley; "Bright Achievers: Their Characteristics and Some Expected Behavior Patterns," D.J.…

  20. Masculinity and Nigerian Youths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EGODI UCHENDU

    This paper considers the masculine views of a cross-section of Nigerian youths or, more precisely, undergraduates, to determine the forms of masculinity among youths. Drawn from different ethnic groups the masculine notions of the category of young men represented in this study show both similarities and differences. Influenced by the university environment, which promotes cross-cultural mingling and exchange of ideas,

  1. Australia's Regional Youth Exodus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, M.

    2002-01-01

    Examines media coverage of youth outmigration from Tasmania in the context of Australia's regional crisis. Focuses on how young people are constructed by others and positioned in others' visions of their rural home towns. Discusses two recurring narratives: strategies to keep youth at home, and preoccupation with the "best and brightest" young…

  2. Rural Youth and Leisure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Barbara

    A synthesis of Polish research and research methodology (1965-75) re: leisure time and rural youth reveals methodological differences and research results with implications for the future of rural youth. In the order of their popularity, the major Polish research methods are: inquiry; the memorialist approach; a combination of inquiry and free…

  3. Helping America's Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Laura

    2005-01-01

    As First Lady of the United States, Laura Bush is leading the Helping America's Youth initiative of the federal government. She articulates the goal of enlisting public and volunteer resources to foster healthy growth by early intervention and mentoring of youngsters at risk. Helping America's Youth will benefit children and teenagers by…

  4. Youth Who Sexual Offended

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Li Lian; Zeng, Gerald; Teoh, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding youth sexual offending in recent years, but there has been limited empirical research on the causes, pathways, and treatment of youth who have sexually offended—especially within a non-Western context. The Good Lives and Self-Regulation Models have often been used to understand and rehabilitate adult sexual offenders, but (unfortunately) there is scant research on youth who sexually offended using these models. The present study aims to describe the different primary goods that are associated with youth sexual offending behaviors in an Asian context. In addition, the study sought to explore whether the age of victim (child vs. nonchild) and nature of sexual offense (penetrative vs. nonpenetrative) influenced the youth’s engagement in offense pathways. The results suggest that pleasure, relatedness, and inner peace were the primary human goods that were most sought after by a sample of 168 youth who sexually offended in Singapore. In addition, offender classification (in relation to the age of victim and nature of sexual offense) influenced the pathways to sexual offending. Therefore, these findings have important clinical implications for assessment, management, and intervention planning for youth who sexually offended. PMID:24048701

  5. Education, Economics & Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blancero, Douglas

    YOUTH DARES (Dynamic Alternatives for Rehabilitation through Educational Services) is a program that services a variety of communities located primarily in Brooklyn, New York. It was founded on the belief that the problems facing young students require alternative and imaginative solutions. YOUTH DARES believes there are three major environments…

  6. Alcohol and Minority Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.; Watts, Thomas D.

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that minority youth who use (or abuse) alcohol in American society deal with using alcohol, being minority, and being young, three dimensions viewed by society with mixed, sometimes hostile and/or fearful reactions. Suggests that examining alcoholism among minority youth involves coming to grips with poverty, education, income, and life…

  7. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth

  8. Queering the Youthful "Cyberflaneur"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Mary Lou; Kenway, Jane

    2004-01-01

    This article explores ways of queering the youthful cyberflaneur, using the television series "Queer as Folk" as the touchstone for such explorations. The concept of the youthful cyberflaneur, as developed by Kenway and Bullen, links power, pleasure, and consumer politics to pedagogy. However, it has been criticised for its heterosexist register.…

  9. The Nation's Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Elizabeth; Richards, Catharine

    This chart book presents basic data on the youth of the United States, the conditions under which they grow up, and selected facets of that process. The first section of charts indicates the relative size of the population of children and youth, and its urban-rural distribution. The charts following describe aspects of the environments that…

  10. Youth: Transition to Adulthood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James S. Coleman

    1974-01-01

    Editor's Note. NASSP's interest in action-learn ing predated the appearance of Youth: Transition to Adulthood, the report of the Panel on Youth of the President's Science Advisory Committee, which was completed in the summer of 1973; but that report did much to fuel the fires of NASSP's interest, and it became a basic working document at Wingspread. Professor James S.

  11. Youth Deferred - II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featherstone, Joseph

    1974-01-01

    In this review essay on James Coleman's "Youth: Transition to Adulthood," several criticisms are directed toward the "Youth" report's failure to pay sufficient attention to the problems associated with the alternatives that are to replace or supplement the formal school system.

  12. Characteristics of traumatic brain injuries sustained among veterans seeking homeless services.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Sean M; Russell, Leah M; Hostetter, Trisha A; Forster, Jeri E; Devore, Maria D; Brenner, Lisa A

    2015-02-01

    This hypothesis-generating research describes the characteristics of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) sustained among 229 Veterans seeking homeless services. Nearly all participants (83%) had sustained at least one TBI prior to their first episode of homelessness. Among participants with a TBI, assaults, transportation-related accidents, and falls were the most common causes of these injuries. Thirty percent of individuals sustained injuries with severity levels that would be expected to be associated with ongoing TBI-related deficits. Forty-three percent of the Veterans sustained at least one brain injury following their first episode of homelessness. Median lifetime number of TBIs was three. The severity of TBIs was similar among Veterans who sustained injuries before or after their first incident of homelessness. Findings suggest that future research should directly examine the potential bi-directional relationship between TBI and homelessness, as well as the impact of TBI-related deficits on Veterans' ability to benefit from homeless services and/or maintain stable housing. PMID:25702730

  13. Happiness on the street: Overall happiness among homeless people in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Panadero, Sonia; Guillén, Ana Isabel; Vázquez, José Juan

    2015-07-01

    This article tests a hypothesized model of overall happiness among homeless people in Spain. The research was conducted based on a representative sample of homeless people in Madrid (n = 235), all adults, who had spent the night before the interview in a shelter for homeless people, on the street or in other places not initially designed for sleeping, or who were in supervised accommodation for homeless people at the time of the interview. Information was gathered using a structured interview. The results obtained show that around half of the homeless people in Madrid said that they were happy. A positive meta-stereotype and a better perceived general health were associated with a higher overall happiness, while feelings of loneliness were associated with a lower overall happiness. Happiness also showed a significant effect on future expectations. Disabilities and handicaps had a significant effect on perceived general health, which was in turn associated with overall happiness among homeless people. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26167804

  14. A prospective trial of customized adherence enhancement plus long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication in homeless or recently homeless individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Levin, Jennifer; Ramirez, Luis F.; Hahn, David Y.; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Bialko, Christopher S.; Cassidy, Kristin A.; Fuentes-Casiano, Edna; Williams, Tiffany D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment non-adherence in people with schizophrenia is associated with relapse and homelessness. Building upon the usefulness of long-acting medication, and our work in psychosocial interventions to enhance adherence, we conducted a prospective uncontrolled trial of customized adherence enhancement (CAE) plus long-acting injectable antipsychotic (LAI) using haloperidol decanoate in 30 homeless or recently homeless individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Methods Participants received monthly CAE and LAI (CAE-L) for 6 months. Primary outcomes were adherence as measured by the Tablets Routine Questionnaire (TRQ) and housing status. Secondary outcomes included psychiatric symptoms, functioning, side effects, and hospitalizations. Results Mean age of participants was 41.8 years (SD 8.6), mainly minorities (90% African-American) and mainly single/never married (70%). Most (97%) had past or current substance abuse, and had been incarcerated (97%). Ten individuals (33%) terminated the study prematurely. CAE-L was associated with good adherence to LAI (76% at 6 months) and dramatic improvement in oral medication adherence, which changed from missing 46% of medication at study enrollment to missing only 10% at study end (p = 0.03). There were significant improvements in psychiatric symptoms (p<.001) and functioning (p<.001). Akathisia was a major side effect with LAI. Conclusion While interpretation of findings must be tempered by the methodological limitations, CAE-L appears to be associated with improved adherence, symptoms, and functioning in homeless or recently homeless individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Additional research is needed on effective and practical approaches to improving health outcomes for homeless people with serious mental illness. PMID:24434094

  15. The health of homeless people in high-income countries: descriptive epidemiology, health consequences, and clinical and policy recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fazel, Seena; Geddes, John R; Kushel, Margot

    2014-10-25

    In the European Union, more than 400,000 individuals are homeless on any one night and more than 600,000 are homeless in the USA. The causes of homelessness are an interaction between individual and structural factors. Individual factors include poverty, family problems, and mental health and substance misuse problems. The availability of low-cost housing is thought to be the most important structural determinant for homelessness. Homeless people have higher rates of premature mortality than the rest of the population, especially from suicide and unintentional injuries, and an increased prevalence of a range of infectious diseases, mental disorders, and substance misuse. High rates of non-communicable diseases have also been described with evidence of accelerated ageing. Although engagement with health services and adherence to treatments is often compromised, homeless people typically attend the emergency department more often than non-homeless people. We discuss several recommendations to improve the surveillance of morbidity and mortality in homeless people. Programmes focused on high-risk groups, such as individuals leaving prisons, psychiatric hospitals, and the child welfare system, and the introduction of national and state-wide plans that target homeless people are likely to improve outcomes. PMID:25390578

  16. Substance use trends among younger vs. older homeless parolees.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa; Marshall, Lori; Idemundia, Faith; Mata, Ray; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Farabee, David; Leake, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study of 540 homeless ex-offenders exiting prisons and jails assessed sociodemographic, childhood, and drug-related differences. Older ex-offenders from prison were more likely to have been married, come from a two-parent family, and used crack, whereas younger ex-offenders from prison were more likely to have used methamphetamine. Older ex-offenders from jail were more likely to be African American, have children, and report a history of crack and injection drug use, whereas younger ex-offenders from jail were more likely to have engaged in binge drinking and be in a gang. Our findings showcase the need to understand unique correlates of younger and older incarcerated populations. PMID:24784498

  17. Voices of Youth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    UNICEF's Voices of Youth teaches young people about current global issues and fosters discussion of these issues among children worldwide. Comprised of three educational forums: The Meeting Place, The Learning Place, and The Teachers Place--Voices of Youth explores, through collaborative projects and interactive learning modules, the role of young people in relation to issues of human rights, work, gender, environment, and war. Each international forum has very successfully encouraged lively discussion among youths; approximately 7000 children from more than 80 countries have participated in discussions thus far. The entire site is searchable and some sections are available in French and Spanish.

  18. Youth and cities : planning with low-income youth and urban youth cultures in New York City and Paris

    E-print Network

    Knorr, Lilian (Lilian M.)

    2014-01-01

    Are the cities of North America and Europe governed, built, and planned by authorities to encourage youth development or facilitate repression? Youth and Cities: Planning with Low- Income Youth and Urban Youth Cultures in ...

  19. Impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on homeless injecting drug users: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Charlotte NE; Wright, Nat MJ; Jones, Lesley

    2005-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of injecting drug users are presenting to primary care and a growing number of general practices are specifically providing care for homeless people. Injecting drug users are at the greatest risk of hepatitis C infection and homeless drug misusers, because of their drug-taking behaviour and patterns, have been identified as being at greater risk of harm of blood-borne diseases than the general population. However, little work has been conducted with injecting drug users or homeless people who have hepatitis C and little is known about how the virus may affect them. Aim To explore the impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on homeless injecting drug users. Design of study This study employed qualitative research. In-depth interviews allowed the exploration of the impact of a potentially life-threatening diagnosis within the context of a person's expressed hierarchy of needs. Setting A primary care centre for homeless people in the north of England. Method In-depth interviews about the impact of a positive hepatitis C diagnosis on their lives were conducted with 17 homeless injecting drug users who had received a positive hepatitis C diagnosis. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analysed using the framework approach. Results Receiving a positive diagnosis for hepatitis C resulted in feelings of shock, devastation, disbelief, anger, and questioning. A positive diagnosis had lasting social, emotional, psychological, behavioural, and physical effects on homeless injecting drug users, even years after the initial diagnosis. Most responders were diagnosed by a doctor in primary care or by hospital staff; however, not all had sought testing and a number were tested while inpatients and were unaware that blood had been taken for hepatitis C virus serology. Conclusions The implications for clinical policy and primary care practice are discussed, including the issues of patient choice, confidentiality, and pre- and post-test discussions. Post-test discussions should be followed up with additional social, psychological, and medical support and counselling. PMID:15826432

  20. Applying Cluster Analysis to Test a Typology of Homelessness by Pattern of Shelter Utilization: Results from the Analysis of Administrative Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randall Kuhn; Dennis P. Culhane

    1998-01-01

    This study tests a typology of homelessness using administrative data on public shelter use in New York City (1988–1995) and Philadelphia (1991–1995). Cluster analysis is used to produce three groups (transitionally, episodically, and chronically homeless) by number of shelter days and number of shelter episodes. Results show that the transitionally homeless, who constitute approximately 80% of shelter users in both

  1. Impact of Hepatitis B and C Infection on Health Services Utilization in Homeless Adults: A Test of the Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith A. Stein; Ronald M. Andersen; Marjorie Robertson; Lillian Gelberg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Homeless people have disproportionately high rates of viral hepatitis. The Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations (predisposing, enabling, and need variables) was expanded to predict prevalence and awareness of hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) infection, as well as health services utilization (HSU) among homeless adults using structural equation modeling. Design: A population-based sample of 534 homeless adults

  2. Home Is Where the Heart Is: The Crisis of Homeless Children and Families in New York City. A Report to the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Janice; And Others

    This report on homeless children between infancy and 5 years of age highlights issues facing the 11,000 homeless children and their families living in emergency temporary housing in New York City. The rising incidence of homelessness among families is considered in national and local contexts. There follows an overview of the transitional shelter…

  3. Comparing Two Service Delivery Models for Homeless Individuals With Complex Behavioral Health Needs: Preliminary Data From Two SAMHSA Treatment for Homeless Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Scott Young; Colleen Clark; Kathleen Moore; Blake Barrett

    2009-01-01

    Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and the Comprehensive, Continuous, Integrated System of Care (CCISC) are two models for delivering services to homeless persons with complex behavioral health needs. This quasi-experimental study presents preliminary data comparing these two programs. The first program was based out of a community mental health center and utilized the ACT model of care with supported housing (ACT-SH),

  4. Case Study: Youth Perceptions of Citizenship 

    E-print Network

    Bryant, Marie Jolliff

    2012-10-19

    This study examines the perceptions of citizenship of youth involved in a community civic engagement program. The UP-BEAT Youth Health Leadership program trained youth participants in public speaking, technology, youth mapping, leadership...

  5. Understanding Youth Violence

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent youth violence, we need to know how big the problem is, where it is, and who it affects. CDC learns about a problem by gathering and studying data. These data are critical because they help us ...

  6. How can health services effectively meet the health needs of homeless people?

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat MJ; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2006-01-01

    Background Homelessness affects many people in contemporary society with consequences for individuals and the wider community. Homeless people experience poorer levels of general physical and mental health than the general population and there is a substantial international evidence base which documents multiple morbidity. Despite this, they often have problems in obtaining suitable health care. Aim To critically examine the international literature pertaining to the health care of homeless people and discuss the effectiveness of treatment interventions. Design of study Review and synthesis of current evidence. Method Medline (1966–2003), EMBASE (1980–2003), PsycINFO (1985–2003), CINAHL (1982–2003), Web of Science (1981–2003) and the Cochrane Library (Evidence Based Health) databases were reviewed using key terms relating to homelessness, intervention studies, drug misuse, alcohol misuse and mental health. The review was not limited to publications in English. It included searching the internet using key terms, and grey literature was also accessed through discussion with experts. Results Internationally, there are differing models and services aimed at providing health care for homeless people. Effective interventions for drug dependence include adequate oral opiate maintenance therapy, hepatitis A, B and tetanus immunisation, safer injecting advice and access to needle exchange programmes. There is emerging evidence for the effectiveness of supervised injecting rooms for homeless injecting drug users and for the peer distribution of take home naloxone in reducing drug-related deaths. There is some evidence that assertive outreach programmes for those with mental ill health, supportive programmes to aid those with motivation to address alcohol dependence and informal programmes to promote sexual health can lead to lasting health gain. Conclusions As multiple morbidity is common among homeless people, accessible and available primary health care is a pre-requisite for effective health interventions. This requires addressing barriers to provision and multi-agency working so that homeless people can access the full range of health and social care services. There are examples of best practice in the treatment and retention of homeless people in health and social care and such models can inform future provision. PMID:16611519

  7. Episodic homelessness and health care utilization in a prospective cohort of HIV-infected persons with alcohol problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theresa W Kim; Stefan G Kertesz; Nicholas J Horton; Nicole Tibbetts; Jeffrey H Samet

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because individuals with HIV\\/AIDS often have complex medical and social needs, the impact of housing status on medical service utilization is difficult to isolate from the impact of conditions that may worsen during periods of homelessness such as depression and substance abuse. We examine whether episodes of homelessness are independently associated with suboptimal medical utilization even when accounting for

  8. Relationship of sexual orientation to substance use, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and other factors in a population of homeless adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W Noell; Linda M Ochs

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the relationship of sexual orientation and gender to four sets of factors: (a) family history, (b) incarceration, (c) substance use, and (d) depression and suicide, in a population of homeless adolescents.Methods: A sample of homeless adolescents was recruited in Portland, Oregon and assessed using semi-structured interviews at baseline, three months and six months. A total of 532

  9. Molecular clues of a microepidemy among homeless tuberculosis patients in Budapest due to a new and local Mycobacterium tuberculosis clade

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Csaba Ködmön; Stefan Niemann; M. Cristina Gutierrez; Christophe Sola; Nalin Rastogi; Judit Lukács; Ákos Somoskövi

    2007-01-01

    In Budapest, the capital of Hungary, one of the most important tuberculosis related risk factor is homelessness. The aim of this retrospective study was the genetic characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from 66 homeless tuberculosis patients by spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) typing. The study identified a local microepidemy in the district with the highest tuberculosis incidence

  10. Effectiveness Of Intensive Case Management For Homeless AdolescentsResults Of A 3Month Follow-Up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria Wagner; Jennifer Sy; Kim Weeden; Trish Blanchard; Ana Mari Cauce; Charles J. Morgan; Elizabeth Moore; Kathryn Wurzbacher; Sandy Tomlin

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the Seattle Homeless Adolescent Research Project (SHARP), a research demonstration program with a goal of implementing and evaluating an intensive mental health case management program for homeless adolescents. This new program, Project Passage, is based on nine primary components: (a) assessment, (b) planning, (c) linkage, (d) monitoring or tracking, (e) advocacy, (f) counseling or the therapeutic relationship,

  11. The Homeless Clients of a Community Psychiatric Nursing Service in Inner London: 2. Referral Process and Main Intervention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walid Abdul-Hamid; Stephen Stansfeld; Til Wykes

    1998-01-01

    The 'homeless' and 'home-based' clients of the Community Psychiatric Nursing service (CPNs) in Bloomsbury described in the first paper were examined further. The referral process and the CPN intervention were compared in the two groups.The homeless clients had different referral pattern, different types of care provided, and had less time spent with them even when control for the type of

  12. Homelessness: Implementation of Food and Shelter Programs under the McKinney Act. Report to the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, passed in July 1987, authorized over $400 million for fiscal year 1987 in homeless assistance for several federal programs, including the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This report examines how funds appropriated to HUD and FEMA…

  13. 75 FR 61169 - Privacy Act; Notification of a New Privacy Act System of Records, Homeless Families Impact Study...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ...Records, Homeless Families Impact Study Data Files AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information...the Homeless Families Impact Study Data Files (HFISDF). The records system will be...identified as Housing Families Impact Study Data Files. Title 5 U.S.C....

  14. Agreement between Self-Report and Archival Public Service Utilization Data among Chronically Homeless Individuals with Severe Alcohol Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifasefi, Seema L.; Collins, Susan E.; Tanzer, Kenneth; Burlingham, Bonnie; Hoang, Sara E.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Public service utilization data are often used as key outcomes in studies on homelessness. Although self-report data on these outcomes are accessible and cost-effective, various factors may affect retrospective recall in homeless populations. It is therefore necessary to establish validity of self-report to ensure the integrity of studies…

  15. Working Girls: Abuse or Choice in Street-Level Sex Work? A Study of Homeless Women in Nottingham

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Harding; Paul Hamilton

    2009-01-01

    SummaryThis paper uses fifteen indices of abuse and a definition of ‘coercion’ as ‘constraint, restraint, compulsion; the application of force to control the action of a voluntary agent’ (OED Online, 2006) to explore how homeless women understand their choice to sex work. Twenty-six homeless women were interviewed, nine of whom had sex worked. A structured, qualitative questionnaire was used in

  16. Relocation, Residence & Risk: A Study of Housing Risks and the Causes of Homelessness among the Urban Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keigher, Sharon M.; And Others

    Homelessness is growing among the elderly as it is among every other age cohort in America, but the elderly appear to be underrepresented. This underrepresentation is puzzling, since the elderly appear to have unique vulnerabilities to homelessness. This study explored the connection between the growing shortage of low rent housing, the unique…

  17. Attitudes Towards Employment and Employment Outcomes Among Homeless Veterans with Substance Abuse and\\/or Psychiatric Problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALVIN S. MARES; ROBERT A. ROSENHECK

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between attitudes towards employment and employment outcomes among homeless veterans with psychiatric and substance abuse problems. Attitudes towards employment among over 300 homeless veterans participating in a study of vocational outcomes were characterized using factor analysis. Mixed linear regression was then used to examine the association between each of five employment attitudes and number of

  18. Setting the stage for chronic health problems: cumulative childhood adversity among homeless adults with mental illness in Vancouver, British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well documented that childhood abuse, neglect and household dysfunction are disproportionately present in the backgrounds of homeless adults, and that these experiences adversely impact child development and a wide range of adult outcomes. However, few studies have examined the cumulative impact of adverse childhood experiences on homeless adults with mental illness. This study examines adverse events in childhood as predictors of duration of homelessness, psychiatric and substance use disorders, and physical health in a sample of homeless adults with mental illness. Methods This study was conducted using baseline data from a randomized controlled trial in Vancouver, British Columbia for participants who completed the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) scale at 18 months follow-up (n?=?364). Primary outcomes included current mental disorders; substance use including type, frequency and severity; physical health; duration of homelessness; and vocational functioning. Results In multivariable regression models, ACE total score independently predicted a range of mental health, physical health, and substance use problems, and marginally predicted duration of homelessness. Conclusions Adverse childhood experiences are overrepresented among homeless adults with complex comorbidities and chronic homelessness. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of literature indicating that childhood traumas are potent risk factors for a number of adult health and psychiatric problems, particularly substance use problems. Results are discussed in the context of cumulative adversity and self-trauma theory. Trials registration This trial has been registered with the International Standard Randomized Control Trial Number Register and assigned ISRCTN42520374. PMID:24726046

  19. RN-to-MSN students' attitudes toward women experiencing homelessness: A focus group study.

    PubMed

    Chung-Park, Min; Hatton, Diane; Robinson, Linda; Kleffel, Dorothy

    2006-08-01

    When health professionals, including RNs, have negative attitudes toward women experiencing homelessness, they create barriers to services. It is incumbent on nursing faculty to develop curricula that address homelessness and associated stereotypes, as well as to prepare students to provide safe and appropriate care to the homeless population. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the attitudes of RN-to-MSN students toward mothers living with their children in a transitional shelter. A convenience sample of 10 students enrolled in a community health nursing course at a university in southern California participated in the study. Two focus groups were conducted: one before and one after a 15-week clinical experience. Data analysis revealed that during the clinical experience, students discovered that they, or perhaps an individual like them, could become homeless. Their attitudes and views changed to include a bigger picture of homelessness, described by public health nursing researchers as "moving upstream." This article suggests strategies for integrating clinical experiences with socioeconomically vulnerable individuals into undergraduate nursing curricula. PMID:16915991

  20. Homeless persons' decisions to accept or reject public health disease-detection services.

    PubMed

    Swigart, Valerie; Kolb, Randall

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the factors that homeless persons report as influencing their decisions to utilize or reject a public health disease-detection program. Although there is copious literature on homelessness, few studies report the real-life perspectives of homeless persons toward health or health promotion. A convenience sample of 55 sheltered and street-dwelling homeless persons, who either resided in or were visiting seven shelters in a large northeastern U.S. city, were interviewed. The interview questions focused on the bases for decisions to accept or reject tuberculosis screening. The in-depth semistructured audio-taped interviews were transcribed, coded, and categorized using Ethnograph software. Interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative content analysis methods. The findings describe homeless persons' reasons for accepting or rejecting a tuberculosis-detection service, the prominent role of shelter personnel in recruitment for health-related interventions, and the confidentiality needs of women with children. This information can assist community health practitioners in designing and advertising health-promotion and disease-detection programming. PMID:14987216

  1. Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Homelessness and the Impact of Axis I and II Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Leslie E.; Mota, Natalie; Afifi, Tracie O.; Katz, Laurence Y.; Distasio, Jino

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the links between homelessness associated with serious mental and physical healthy disparities and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in nationally representative data, with Axis I and II disorders as potential mediators. Methods. We examined data from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions in 2001–2002 and 2004–2005, and included 34?653 participants representative of the noninstitutionalized US population who were 20 years old or older. We studied the variables related to 4 classes of Axis I disorders, all 10 Axis II personality disorders, a wide range of ACEs, and a lifetime history of homelessness. Results. Analyses revealed high prevalences of each ACE in individuals experiencing lifetime homelessness (17%–60%). A mediation model with Axis I and II disorders determined that childhood adversities were significantly related to homelessness through direct effects (adjusted odd ratios?=?2.04, 4.24) and indirect effects, indicating partial mediation. Population attributable fractions were also reported. Conclusions. Although Axis I and II disorders partially mediated the relationship between ACEs and homelessness, a strong direct association remained. This novel finding has implications for interventions and policy. Additional research is needed to understand relevant causal pathways. PMID:24148049

  2. Modified therapeutic community for homeless mentally ill chemical abusers: emerging subtypes.

    PubMed

    De Leon, G; Sacks, S; Staines, G; McKendrick, K

    1999-08-01

    This paper is one of a series reporting on a clinical field trial evaluating the efficacy of the modified therapeutic community (TC) approach for the treatment of homeless mentally ill chemical abusers (MICAs). The social and psychological characteristics of the treatment sample were described in an earlier paper; the purpose of the present report was to categorize subtypes of homeless MICA clients to predict with greater accuracy their treatability in modified TCs. An index that consistently correlated with treatment-relevant variables was identified for each of three dimensions; Homelessness (residential instability), Mental Illness (current severity), and Substance Abuse (current substance abuse/dependence diagnosis). These indices yielded distributions that captured the variability in the sample with respect to a number of variables, including drug use, criminality, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk (sexual behavior), psychological status, and motivation. Bivariate and multivariate analyses showed that the indices were not strongly related to demographic variables such as race/ethnicity, age, or gender, but were significantly associated with baseline drug use, criminal activity, HIV risk (sexual behavior), psychological symptoms, and motivation and readiness. These findings indicate that, even among those admitted to residential treatment for substance abuse, homeless MICA clients are not homogeneous; rather, subgroup differences emerge among the indices of homelessness, mental illness, and substance abuse. The efficacy of treatment in modified TCs for these subgroups will be assessed in subsequent papers examining the relationships among the three indices, client retention, and outcomes during and subsequent to residential treatment. PMID:10473011

  3. Discrimination and well-being amongst the homeless: the role of multiple group membership

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Melissa; Jetten, Jolanda; Dingle, Genevieve A.; Parsell, Cameron; Walter, Zoe C.

    2015-01-01

    The homeless are a vulnerable population in many respects. Those experiencing homelessness not only experience personal and economic hardship they also frequently face discrimination and exclusion because of their housing status. Although past research has shown that identifying with multiple groups can buffer against the negative consequences of discrimination on well-being, it remains to be seen whether such strategies protect well-being of people who are homeless. We investigate this issue in a longitudinal study of 119 individuals who were homeless. The results showed that perceived group-based discrimination at T1 was associated with fewer group memberships, and lower subsequent well-being at T2. There was no relationship between personal discrimination at T1 on multiple group memberships at T2. The findings suggest that the experience of group-based discrimination may hinder connecting with groups in the broader social world — groups that could potentially protect the individual against the negative impact of homelessness and discrimination. PMID:26082741

  4. Correlates of Depressed Mood among Young Stimulant-Using Homeless Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Branson, Catherine M.; Idemundia, Faith E.; Reback, Cathy J.; Shoptaw, Steve; Marfisee, Mary; Keenan, Colleen; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Liu, Yihang; Yadav, Kartik

    2013-01-01

    Homeless gay and bisexual (G/B) men are at risk for reporting suicide attempts and have high risk of depressed mood, defined as elevated level of depressive symptoms. This study describes baseline socio-demographic, cognitive, psychosocial and health- and drug-related correlates of depressed mood in 267 stimulant-using homeless G/B young men who entered a study designed to reduce drug use. G/B men without social support were 11 times more likely to be experience depressed mood than their counterparts who had support while persons who reported severe body pain were almost 6 times more likely to report depressed mood than those without pain. Other factors that increased risk of depressed mood included being homeless in the last four months, injecting drugs, reporting poor or fair health status and high levels of internalized homophobia. This study is one of the first to draw a link between pain experienced and depressed mood in homeless young G/B men. Understanding the correlates of depressed mood among homeless G/B young men can help service providers design more targeted treatment plans and more appropriate referrals to ancillary care services. PMID:23017039

  5. Discrimination and well-being amongst the homeless: the role of multiple group membership.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Melissa; Jetten, Jolanda; Dingle, Genevieve A; Parsell, Cameron; Walter, Zoe C

    2015-01-01

    The homeless are a vulnerable population in many respects. Those experiencing homelessness not only experience personal and economic hardship they also frequently face discrimination and exclusion because of their housing status. Although past research has shown that identifying with multiple groups can buffer against the negative consequences of discrimination on well-being, it remains to be seen whether such strategies protect well-being of people who are homeless. We investigate this issue in a longitudinal study of 119 individuals who were homeless. The results showed that perceived group-based discrimination at T1 was associated with fewer group memberships, and lower subsequent well-being at T2. There was no relationship between personal discrimination at T1 on multiple group memberships at T2. The findings suggest that the experience of group-based discrimination may hinder connecting with groups in the broader social world - groups that could potentially protect the individual against the negative impact of homelessness and discrimination. PMID:26082741

  6. Psychological homelessness and enculturative stress among US-deported Salvadorans: a preliminary study with a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Negy, Charles; Reig-Ferrer, Abilio; Gaborit, Mauricio; Ferguson, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the construct psychological homelessness-feelings of not belonging in one's home country-within the context of deported Salvadorans' enculturation to El Salvador. Participants (n = 66) who had been deported from the United States completed a set of questionnaires related to their deportation experience. Results indicated that deportees, in various degrees, experienced the phenomenon of psychological homelessness and enculturative stress related to living in El Salvador. As hypothesized, enculturative stress related to re-adapting to life in El Salvador significantly correlated with psychological homelessness after controlling for time spent in the United States, acculturation, and enculturation. Additional analyses revealed that maladaptive cognitions related to the deportation experience also predicted psychological homelessness. Our findings suggest psychological homelessness appears to be a valid construct and is experienced by many undocumented immigrants. PMID:24639053

  7. New Media Use by Patients Who Are Homeless: The Potential of mHealth to Build Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Federico E; Doran, Kelly M; Luco, Cali; Naftilan, Matthew; Dziura, James; Brandt, Cynthia; Bernstein, Steven; Jagminas, Liudvikas; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients experiencing homelessness represent a disproportionate share of emergency department (ED) visits due to poor access to primary care and high levels of unmet health care needs. This is in part due to the difficulty of communicating and following up with patients who are experiencing homelessness. Objective To determine the prevalence and types of “new media” use among ED patients who experience homelessness. Methods This was a cross-sectional observational study with sequential enrolling of patients from three emergency departments 24/7 for 6 weeks. In total, 5788 ED patients were enrolled, of whom 249 experienced homelessness. Analyses included descriptive statistics, and unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios. Results 70.7% (176/249) of patients experiencing homelessness own cell phones compared to 85.90% (4758/5539) of patients in stable housing (P=.001) with the former more likely to own Androids, 70% (53/76) versus 43.89% (1064/2424), and the latter more likely to have iPhones, 44.55% (1080/2424) versus 17% (13/76) (P=.001). There is no significant difference in new media use, modality, or frequency for both groups; however, there is a difference in contract plan with 50.02% (2380/4758) of stably housed patients having unlimited minutes versus 37.5% (66/176) of homeless patients. 19.78% (941/4758) of patients in stable housing have pay-as-you-go plans versus 33.0% (58/176) of homeless patients (P=.001). Patients experiencing homelessness are more likely to want health information on alcohol/substance abuse, mental health, domestic violence, pregnancy and smoking cessation. Conclusions This study is unique in its characterization of new media ownership and use among ED patients experiencing homelessness. New media is a powerful tool to connect patients experiencing homelessness to health care. PMID:24001876

  8. Extracting Concepts Related to Homelessness from the Free Text of VA Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Carter, Marjorie E.; Divita, Guy; Shen, Shuying; Palmer, Miland; South, Brett; Durgahee, B.S. Begum; Redd, Andrew; Samore, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Mining the free text of electronic medical records (EMR) using natural language processing (NLP) is an effective method of extracting information not always captured in administrative data. We sought to determine if concepts related to homelessness, a non-medical condition, were amenable to extraction from the EMR of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical records. As there were no off-the-shelf products, a lexicon of terms related to homelessness was created. A corpus of free text documents from outpatient encounters was reviewed to create the reference standard for NLP training and testing. V3NLP Framework was used to detect instances of lexical terms and was compared to the reference standard. With a positive predictive value of 77% for extracting relevant concepts, this study demonstrates the feasibility of extracting positively asserted concepts related to homelessness from the free text of medical records. PMID:25954364

  9. Attitudes and intentions of homeless people towards service provision in South Wales.

    PubMed

    Christian, Julie; Armitage, Christopher J

    2002-06-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB: Ajzen, 1988, 1991) was used as a framework to investigate homeless people's participation in outreach service programmes. In total, 104 homeless people from South Wales were interviewed using a schedule based on the TPB. Congruent with previous research on the TPB, attitude was the dominant predictor of behavioural intentions, and intention and perceived behavioural control were predictive of behaviour. Contrary to predictions, subjective norms also exerted a direct effect on behaviour. The discussion focuses on two issues: first, the utility of social cognition models in explaining the relationship between demographic variables and behaviour in homelessness research; second, the direct effects of norms on behaviour and the extent to which work on social groups might usefully extend research on models such as the TPB to aid understanding of behaviour amongst stigmatized populations. PMID:12133225

  10. Increasing hepatitis C knowledge among homeless adults: results of a community-based, interdisciplinary intervention.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Darlene; Nyamathi, Adeline; Stein, Judith A; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Hodge, Felicia; Gelberg, Lillian

    2014-01-01

    Homeless adults have high rates of hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) and low levels of HCV knowledge. This study reports results of an interdisciplinary, community-based intervention using stakeholder cooperation, case management, risk factor identification, and modification of dysfunctional psychosocial factors to increase HCV knowledge among homeless adults (N?=?747). Data are from a randomized quasi-experimental study, with the major goal of evaluating the effectiveness of a Nurse Case Managed Intervention compared to a Standard Intervention, encouraging completion of a three-series hepatitis A/hepatitis B vaccination program. Increased HCV knowledge was measured with an 18-item questionnaire discerning risk factors for HCV and common misconceptions about individuals with HCV. A significant increase in HCV knowledge resulted regardless of intervention format. Receiving the Nurse Case Managed Intervention predicted greatest gain in HCV knowledge (p?homeless people themselves proved most efficacious in increasing HCV knowledge. PMID:23616250

  11. Prevalence of gambling problems among the clients of a toronto homeless shelter.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Flora I; Devotta, Kimberly; Wendaferew, Aklilu; Pedersen, Cheryl

    2014-06-01

    Few studies have examined the prevalence of problem and pathological gambling among clients of homeless service agencies. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of problem gambling among these clients. We collected primary data on gambling using the NORC diagnostic screen for disorders. Using a modified time-location recruitment approach 264 clients of a community homeless service agency were screened for lifetime gambling problems. Descriptive statistics were produced using SPSSX. The prevalence of lifetime problem gambling was 10 % and that of pathological gambling was 25 % in this sample. The prevalence of lifetime problem and pathological gambling was alarmingly high relative to the general population lifetime prevalence. Better insight into interventions for gambling that might reduce risk of homelessness will help service agencies gauge the needs of their clients and to implement change to service delivery and screening practices. PMID:24569904

  12. A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities 2000

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2000-01-01

    The United States Conference of Mayors makes available its annual status report on hunger and homelessness in America's cities. "The survey, conducted in 25 cities, examined the causes of hunger and homelessness, the demographic groups that make up this population, demand for emergency food and housing-related assistance, model programs that respond to these problems, and the projected impact of the economy on hunger and homelessness in America." The 125-page report finds that emergency demands for food were at their second highest rate in 2000 since 1991 with a seventeen percent increase in demand. The average demand for emergency shelter also increased by fifteen percent -- the highest one-year increase of the decade. The data are compiled from surveys conducted by city officials who consult with and collect data from community-based providers and government agencies.

  13. Youth Organizing: From Youth Development to School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Mark R.; Mira, Meredith; Nikundiwe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, youth organizing has grown across the country. Through organizing, young people identify issues of concern and mobilize their peers to build action campaigns to achieve their objectives. Youth organizing has been appreciated for its contributions to youth and community development. The authors use two case studies to…

  14. Youth Assets and Sexual Abstinence in Native American Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy F. Oman; Sara K. Vesely; Cheryl B. Aspy; Eleni Tolma; Sharon Rodine; LaDonna Marshall; Janene Fluhr

    2006-01-01

    Compared with youth of other races\\/ethnicities, Native American youth (ages 15-19 years) are more likely to have participated in sexual intercourse, thus placing them at greater risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unintended pregnancies. This study's purpose was to investigate relationships among protective factors (assets) and sexual intercourse in a Native American youth population. Data were collected from Native

  15. Discriminant analyses of willingness to talk with a counselor and most difficult issues in the experience of unsheltered homeless men: self-actualization, loneliness, and depression.

    PubMed

    Sumerlin, J R

    1996-04-01

    Stepwise discriminant analyses of willingness to talk with a counselor (Wilks Lambda=.75, p<.001) and most difficult issues (Wilks Lambda=.81, p<.001) in 145 unsheltered homeless men's experience were examined using self-actualization constructs, loneliness, depression, and history-of-being-homeless variables. For example, homeless men with higher scores on loneliness, autonomy, courage, Jonah Complex, and self-acceptance were less willing to talk with a counselor. The variable, longer intervals of having a home after a first homeless episode, was associated with personal issues rather than with homeless issues. Selected participants' responses to the items, "what have you learned from your homeless experience that you could not have learned any other way" and "what would you like for me to know about your experience of homelessness," are posted to give perspective on a homeless person's internal frame of reference. This phenomenological approach indicated strengths as well as weaknesses of homeless men. Counseling programs should embrace all homeless persons including mentally well, nondrug-dependent homeless individuals. PMID:9148325

  16. The nature and prevalence of chronic pain in homeless persons: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    Background: Homeless people are known to suffer disproportionately with health problems that reduce physical functioning and quality of life, and shorten life expectancy. They suffer from a wide range of diseases that are known to be painful, but little information is available about the nature and prevalence of chronic pain in this vulnerable group. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of chronic pain among homeless people, and to examine its location, effect on activities of daily living, and relationship with alcohol and drugs. Methods: We conducted face-to-face interviews with users of homeless shelters in four major cities in the United Kingdom, in the winters of 2009-11. Participants completed the Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form McGill Pain questionnaire, Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs, and detailed their intake of prescribed and unprescribed medications and alcohol. We also recorded each participant’s reasons for homelessness, and whether they slept rough or in shelters. Findings: Of 168 shelter users approached, 150 (89.3%) participated: 93 participants (63%) reported experiencing pain lasting longer than three months; the mean duration of pain experienced was 82.2 months. The lower limbs were most frequently affected. Opioids appeared to afford a degree of analgesia for some, but whilst many reported symptoms suggestive of neuropathic pain, very few were taking anti-neuropathic drugs. Interpretation: The prevalence of chronic pain in the homeless appears to be substantially higher than the general population, is poorly controlled, and adversely affects general activity, walking and sleeping. It is hard to discern whether chronic pain is a cause or effect of homelessness, or both. Pain is a symptom, but in this challenging group it might not always be possible to treat the underlying cause. Exploring the diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain may offer a means of improving the quality of these vulnerable people’s lives. PMID:24555079

  17. Inhalant Use in Florida Youth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorena M. Siqueira; Lee A. Crandall

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prevalence of use, (2) risk and protective factors for use of inhalants in Florida youth.Methods: The Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey 2004 is a comprehensive assessment of youth substance abuse attitudes and practices obtained by sampling youth from sixty-five counties.Results: The sample consisted of 60,345 students from 6th to 12th grade; ages 10 to 19

  18. Youth leadership at PPNC.

    PubMed

    Ecker, N; Smith, J

    2000-04-01

    Planned Parenthood of Nassau County (PPNC) employs a wide range of local programs to assist young people in developing the skills necessary to make responsible decisions and help them become good leaders in the future. The mission that underpins their work with the youth is to help them recognize the powerful positive impact they can have on their peers, friends, loved ones, and families. For the last 16 years, peer education has played an essential role in the programs and services of PPNC for teens. The Teen Advocate Project (TAP) has trained and supported dozens of local youth who have in turn participated in several outreach and education activities. The PPNC also created the Teen Info Line, a telephone peer support service operated by and for teens. Along with the TAP, PPNC operates three other successful components of its education programs targeting the youth and their families: 1) male involvement program, 2) multicultural education program, and 3) substance awareness/sexual health education program. In recognizing that its mission to help the youth must not stop at the county border, PPNC established the Global Institute for Training in 1992 to develop youth leadership programs throughout sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and Eastern Europe. PMID:12295858

  19. Youth services in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Meredith, P

    1990-12-01

    Departing from the usual family planning education format in teenage counseling, the IPPF is funding youth centers providing contraception as well as education in Ethiopia, Kenya, Togo, Tunisia, and Turkey. The development concern is for a cost efficient and effective center with minimal criticism. 2 experimental Mexican models were used in the Ethiopian youth centers. Both models utilize young adult coordinators who supervise young promoters, however each operates differently. Mexican staff trained their African counterparts and a detailed project manual will be available soon. The Ethiopian youth centers utilizing NGO's and the private sector have been permitted freedom from central control. Alarming statistics include: 20.8% of pregnancies are teenaged; 20.8% of hospital reported abortions are teenaged; the contraceptive prevalence rate is 2%; population increased by 3% per year with the average children per woman of 7.5. Addis Ababa's youth project provides services to mostly zone 5 school aged adolescents who are informed and eager to purchase condoms, although they are not able to purchase them commercially. Revolutionary Ethiopian Youth Association (REYA) with its 200,000 membership, is increasing its contribution to expanding the network of promoters. Promoters are used to register those receiving free condoms, but the recommendation to cease this practice of registration is in, and replace it with the sale of 50 US cents per condom. PMID:12283767

  20. What Constitutes a Good and Bad Death?: Perspectives of Homeless Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunjeong; Kwak, Jung; Nelson-Becker, Holly

    2015-08-01

    This qualitative study explored perspectives toward a good or bad death among 21 older homeless adults residing in transitional housing. Using grounded theory approach, the themes for a good death were (a) dying peacefully; (b) not suffering; (c) experiencing spiritual connection; and (d) making amends with significant others. Themes for a bad death were (a) experiencing death by accident or violence; (b) prolonging life with life supports; (c) becoming dependent while entering a dying trajectory; and (d) dying alone. Healthcare professionals need to develop approaches for end-of-life care grounded in understanding unique needs of older homeless adults. PMID:25674672