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1

Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in Illinois: 2005  

E-print Network

Unaccompanied Homeless Youth in Illinois: 2005 Funded by the Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) Coordinated by the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless Timothy P. Johnson Ingrid Graf Survey Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Chicago December 2005 #12;#12;Unaccompanied Homeless Youth

Illinois at Chicago, University of

2

Helping Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Access College Financial Aid  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unaccompanied homeless youth are young people who lack safe, stable housing and who are not in the care of a parent or guardian. They may have run away from home or been forced to leave by their parents. Unaccompanied youth live in a variety of temporary situations, including shelters, the homes of friends or relatives, cars, campgrounds, public…

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2007

2007-01-01

3

Unaccompanied, Unidentified and Uncounted: Developing Strategies to Meet the Needs of America's Homeless Youth. Issue Brief on the Education of Unaccompanied Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unaccompanied homeless youth appear to be one of the fastest growing and most vulnerable segments of the larger homeless population, but flawed information-gathering by government entities makes it impossible to be sure. This issue brief examines reasons why the plight of unaccompanied homeless youth is not fully captured through current models of…

Appleseed, 2012

2012-01-01

4

Increasing Access to Higher Education for Unaccompanied Youth: Information for Colleges and Universities. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each year, more than a million young people in the United States experience homelessness; some of these young people, known as unaccompanied homeless youth, will face the challenges of homelessness while living on their own without the support of a caring adult. Unaccompanied homeless youth face the same struggles as other young people: trying to…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

2010-01-01

5

Income Tax and the FAFSA for Unaccompanied Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This two-page brief answers various questions about the relationship between the filing of tax returns and a youth's completion of the FAFSA. Questions answered include: How does a youth's decision to file a tax return affect the FAFSA?; Are youth required to file tax returns?; and What should an unaccompanied youth do if his/her parents claim…

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2009

2009-01-01

6

Trauma Among Unaccompanied Homeless Youth: The Integration of Street Culture into a Model of Intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeless adolescents comprise a population particularly vulnerable to developing symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Research has shown that prevalence of trauma-related symptoms among homeless youth living in shelters and on the streets without families is approximately 18%. The detrimental effects of traumatic experiences often inhibit homeless youths' ability to employ the psychosocial skills necessary to a transition out of homelessness. Consequently,

Holly H. McManus; Sanna J. Thompson

2008-01-01

7

2013-2014 Unaccompanied Youth and Homeless Verification The information requested on this form is needed to process your application for financial aid for the 2013-2014 academic year.  

E-print Network

2013-2014 Unaccompanied Youth and Homeless Verification The information requested on this form was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless at any time on or after July 1, 2012. "Homeless of these situations and fleeing an abusive parent you may be considered homeless even if your parent would otherwise

Taylor, Jerry

8

Community factors influencing the prevalence of homeless youth services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of homeless youth services conclude that services contribute to improving the life chances of homeless youth, but little research has addressed the structural conditions that promote the creation of these services. This study investigates the prevalence of programs serving unaccompanied homeless youth in 26 metropolitan areas from 1989 to 2006. Specifically, it examines the extent to which the supply

Nicole Esparza

2009-01-01

9

Educational Rights of Homeless Youth: Exploring Racial Dimensions of Homeless Educational Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research that addresses educational rights of unaccompanied homeless youth in grades 9-12 is limited. The McKinney-Vento Act was created to address the many needs of homeless individuals, including children and youth's right to an education. McKinney-Vento was created over twenty-years ago, and this research sought to examine the implementation of…

Aviles de Bradley, Ann Marie

2009-01-01

10

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Homeless children and youth are arguably the most forgotten population when it comes to education. Since 1989, the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY) has been an advocate for equitable services from public schools for homeless youth. Additionally, their website states that it has encouraged "strategies for effective instruction, pupil services, and research." Visitors unfamiliar with the main piece of legislation in place for educating homeless children and youth can read the full-text of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act under the "Legislation and Policy" tab. Users may also find the "Higher Education" link, also under the Legislation and Policy tab, to be informative about how the Higher Education Act has "the potential to assist these youth to graduate from high school, apply for and access postsecondary education, and complete their degrees." A link to the related resource "NAEHCY PowerPoint Library - Unaccompanied Youth" can be found in the right corner of the page. Valuable information about how unaccompanied homeless youth can successfully fill out the Free Student Application for Financial Aid (FAFSA) is also available in the "Higher Education" area.

11

Homeless Youth: A Concept Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction. A variety of terms have been used to describe the homeless youth population. Purpose. The purpose of this article is to analyze the conceptual meanings of the term homeless youths by examining the evolution of the concept and its related terms in the current literature. Method. Online databases from 1990–2010 were analyzed using the Rodgers evolutionary approach. Results. The

Philisie Starling Washington

2011-01-01

12

Immediate Enrollment under McKinney-Vento: How Schools Can Keep Homeless Students Safe. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children and youth in homeless situations, particularly unaccompanied youth and survivors of domestic violence, are at a high risk for experiencing violence and victimization. Frequently, unaccompanied youth become homeless after leaving abusive or destructive home environments. In turn, their homelessness, which often involves "couch surfing"…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

2007-01-01

13

Immediate Enrollment under McKinney-Vento: How Local Liaisons Can Keep Homeless Students Safe. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children and youth in homeless situations, particularly unaccompanied youth and survivors of domestic violence, are at a high risk for experiencing violence and victimization. Frequently, unaccompanied youth become homeless after leaving abusive or destructive home environments. In turn, their homelessness, which often involves "couch surfing" or…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

2007-01-01

14

Youth Homelessness 2006  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third national census of homeless school students, conducted in 2006, found that the number of homeless students had decreased since 2001. There were 9,389 homeless students in 2006 compared with 12,227 in 2001. Three groups were over-represented in the homeless population: Indigenous students, young people from single parent and blended…

MacKenzie, David; Chamberlain, Chris

2008-01-01

15

Youth Homelessness and Social Stigma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building upon previous exploratory qualitative research (Kidd S.A. (2003) "Child Adol. Social Work J." 20(4):235-261), this paper examines the mental health implications of social stigma as it is experienced by homeless youth. Surveys conducted with 208 youths on the streets and in agencies in New York City and Toronto revealed significant…

Kidd, Sean A.

2007-01-01

16

Service Utilization Patterns of Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies exist on the types of characteristics associated with service utilization (e.g., shelters, food programs) among homeless youth in the U.S. Services are important, however, because without food and shelter, numerous homeless youth resort to trading sex in order to meet their daily survival needs. Access to physical and mental health services gives homeless youth more of an opportunity

Sarah L Akinyemi

2010-01-01

17

Predictors of Homelessness Among Street Living Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

While few studies have identified predictors of exiting homelessness among adults, even fewer studies have attempted to identify\\u000a these predictors among homeless youth. The current study explored predictors of change in homelessness among 180 homeless\\u000a youth between the ages of 14 and 22, recruited through an urban drop-in center. All youth were assessed at baseline, 3 and\\u000a 6 months. The sample

Natasha Slesnick; Suzanne Bartle-Haring; Pushpanjali Dashora; Min Ju Kang; Erin Aukward

2008-01-01

18

Comments of Kathi Sheffel Homeless Liaison, Fairfax County Public Schools Submitted to the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness Federal Strategic Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Strategies for preventing and ending youth homelessness Identifying and providing support for unaccompanied homeless youth requires a comprehensive strategy that examines and addresses: 1) how youth become homeless and on their own; 2) the unique basic and educational needs that they have; and 3) how to build a continuum of services to meet those needs so youth can sustain

Youth Workgroup

19

Successful Adaptation among Sudanese Unaccompanied Minors: Perspectives of Youth and Foster Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the adaptation of unaccompanied Sudanese refugee minors resettled in the US. Seven years after resettlement, in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 Sudanese youths and 20 foster parents regarding factors that contributed to successful adaptation. The youths emphasized personal agency and staying focused on getting an…

Luster, Tom; Qin, Desiree; Bates, Laura; Rana, Meenal; Lee, Jung Ah

2010-01-01

20

Finding Homeless Youth. Patterns Based on Geographical Area and Number of Homeless Episodes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A census of homeless youth was conducted in locations across Los Angeles County, California. Building on previous research that has focused on homeless youth in cruise areas, the authors examined demographic and behavioral differences between homeless youth in cruise and noncruise areas. Youth in cruise areas were more likely than youth in…

Witkin, Andrea L.; Milburn, Norweeta G.; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Batterham, Philip; May, Susanne; Brooks, Ronald

2005-01-01

21

Homeless Youth: Characteristics, Contributing Factors, and Service Options  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distinguishing between causes and consequences of youth homelessness is often difficult. Characteristics may have existed prior to youths' leaving home, likely contributing to their running away, or may develop once the youths become immersed in “street culture.” Owing to these complexities, characteristics and contributing factors associated with youth homelessness often intersect. Homeless youths' diverse backgrounds and experiences, including difficult family

Sanna J. Thompson; Kimberly Bender; Liliane Windsor; Mary S. Cook; Travonne Williams

2010-01-01

22

2013 -2014 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID  

E-print Network

2013 - 2014 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID: On your 2013-2014 Free time on or after July 1, 2012 you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless as determined by: · Your high school or school district homeless liaison

Nelson, Tim

23

2012 -2013 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID  

E-print Network

2012 - 2013 HOMELESSNESS STATUS VERIFICATION FORM STUDENT NAME: SPU ID: On your 2012-2013 Free time on or after July 1, 2011 you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless as determined by: · Your high school or school district homeless liaison

Nelson, Tim

24

An Ecological Systems Comparison Between Homeless Sexual Minority Youths and Homeless Heterosexual Youths  

PubMed Central

This study examined risk and protective outcomes by comparing homeless sexual minority youths to heterosexual homeless youths regarding family, peer behaviors, school, mental health (suicide risk and depression), stigma, discrimination, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. Structured interviews (N = 147) were conducted with individuals ages 16-24 at three drop-in programs serving homeless youths in Toronto. Bivariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences between homeless sexual minorities (n=66) and their heterosexual counterparts (n=81) regarding all variables: family, peer behaviors, stigma, discrimination, mental health, substance use and sexual risk behaviors with the exception of school belonging. Specifically, homeless sexual minority youths fared more poorly (e.g. lower satisfaction with family communication, experienced more stigma, used more drugs and alcohol) than their heterosexual counterparts. Improving family communication may be a worthwhile intervention if the youths are still in contact with their families. Future research should focus on victimization in the context of multiple systems. PMID:23687399

Gattis, Maurice N.

2012-01-01

25

Electronic case management with homeless youth.  

PubMed

Case management, a widely practiced form of service brokerage, is associated with a variety of positive outcomes for homeless youth, but it may be difficult to implement, as youth face logistical barriers to attending in-person meetings. As part of a larger clinical trial, the current study investigates the feasibility of providing electronic case management (ECM) to homeless youth, using cell-phones, texts, email, and Facebook. Youth were given prepaid cell-phones and a case manager who provided four ECM sessions every 2-3 weeks over a 3-month period. Contact logs were used to record how many youth engaged in ECM, how many attempts were necessary to elicit engagement, and youths' preferred technology methods for engaging. Although engagement in the number of ECM sessions varied, the majority of youth (87.5%) engaged in at least one ECM session. Youth (41%) most commonly needed one contact before they engaged in an ECM session, and the majority responded by the third attempt. While youth most commonly answered calls directly, their chosen method of returning calls was texting. The majority of youth (80%) described ECM positively, reporting themes of convenience, connection, and accountability. The use of ECM, particularly of texting, offers promising implications for providing services to homeless youth. PMID:25748603

Bender, Kimberly; Schau, Nicholas; Begun, Stephanie; Haffejee, Badiah; Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Hathaway, Jessica

2015-06-01

26

Determining Eligibility for Rights and Services under the McKinney-Vento Act. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act defines "homeless children and youths" as "individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence." However, because the circumstances of homelessness vary with each family's or unaccompanied youth's situation, determining the extent to which the family or youth fits the definition must…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2006

2006-01-01

27

Correlates of service utilization among homeless youth  

PubMed Central

Though few studies exist on service utilization among homeless youth in the U.S., services are important because without them, many of these young people may resort to delinquent strategies in order to meet their daily survival needs. The current study examines frequency and correlates of service utilization (i.e., shelters, food programs, street outreach, counseling, STI and HIV testing) among a sample of 249 homeless youth ages 14 to 21. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences in service usage by sex, age, and sexual orientation. Experiencing family physical and/or sexual abuse, being kicked out of the family home, spending more nights per week sleeping on the street, and having ever stayed in a group home facility were significant correlates of homeless youths’ service usage. PMID:24496226

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Akinyemi, Sarah L.; Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

2013-01-01

28

Correlates of service utilization among homeless youth.  

PubMed

Though few studies exist on service utilization among homeless youth in the U.S., services are important because without them, many of these young people may resort to delinquent strategies in order to meet their daily survival needs. The current study examines frequency and correlates of service utilization (i.e., shelters, food programs, street outreach, counseling, STI and HIV testing) among a sample of 249 homeless youth ages 14 to 21. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences in service usage by sex, age, and sexual orientation. Experiencing family physical and/or sexual abuse, being kicked out of the family home, spending more nights per week sleeping on the street, and having ever stayed in a group home facility were significant correlates of homeless youths' service usage. PMID:24496226

Tyler, Kimberly A; Akinyemi, Sarah L; Kort-Butler, Lisa A

2012-07-01

29

Resilience and Suicidality among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homeless and street-involved youth are considered an extremely high risk group, with many studies highlighting trajectories characterized by abusive, neglectful, and unstable family histories, victimization and criminal involvement while on the streets, high rates of physical and mental illness, and extremely high rates of mortality. While there…

Cleverley, Kristin; Kidd, Sean A.

2011-01-01

30

Education and Homeless Youth: Policy Implementations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Navigator" is a free newsletter published by the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis (CHEPA) focusing on directions and trends in higher education policy. The theme of this issue is: "Education and Homeless Youth: Policy Implementations." The lead article, authored by CHEPA director William G. Tierney, describes CHEPA's study of the…

Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis, University of Southern California, 2007

2007-01-01

31

Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships Homeless Verification Form  

E-print Network

Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships 2013-2014 Homeless Verification Form According, did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? (Q55) If this is the case, you will need to submit a letter of confirmation

Li, X. Rong

32

A Critical Moment: Child & Youth Homelessness in Our Nation's Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The economic downturn has forced more families and youth to lose their footing, falling downward into the spiral of homelessness and jeopardizing children and youth's educational success. At the same time, a one-time increase in federal funding for school-based efforts to identify and support homeless children and youth has enabled more school…

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2010

2010-01-01

33

Comparisons of Prevention Programs for Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

There are six HIV prevention programs for homeless youth whose efficacy has been or is currently being evaluated: STRIVE, the Community Reinforcement Approach, Strengths-Based Case Management, Ecologically-Based Family Therapy, Street Smart, and AESOP (street outreach access to resources). Programs vary in their underlying framework and theoretical models for understanding homelessness. All programs presume that the youths’ families lack the ability to support their adolescent child. Some programs deemphasize family involvement while others focus on rebuilding connections among family members. The programs either normalize current family conflicts or, alternatively, provide education about the importance of parental monitoring. All programs aim to reduce HIV-related sexual and drug use acts. A coping skills approach is common across programs: Problem-solving skills are specifically addressed in four of the six programs; alternatively, parents in other programs are encouraged to contingently reward their children. Each program also engineers ongoing social support for the families and the youth, either by providing access to needed resources or by substituting a new, supportive relationship for the existing family caretaker. All of the interventions provide access to health and mental health services as basic program resources. A comparison of HIV prevention programs for homeless youth identifies the robust components of each and suggests which programs providers may choose to replicate. PMID:19067164

Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

2014-01-01

34

Risk Factors for Homelessness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths: A Developmental Milestone Approach.  

PubMed

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are over-represented in the homeless population. To examine why some LGB youths become homeless, this report compares homeless and non-homeless LGB youths. Of the 156 LGB youths, 48% reported ever being homeless (i.e., running away or being evicted from home). Results indicate that sexual orientation awareness and the initiation of sexual behavior occurred earlier in homeless than in non-homeless LGB youths and predated the first homeless episode. Substance use was more frequent and first occurred at an earlier age in homeless as compared to non-homeless LGB youths; however, substance use occurred subsequent to first homelessness. Childhood sexual abuse was associated with homelessness; and, early sexual orientation development was related to homelessness among youths without a history of sexual abuse. Findings suggest that interventions should help youths cope with their unfolding sexual orientation and work to prevent or address the consequences of sexual abuse. PMID:22347763

Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce

2012-01-01

35

Risk Factors for Homelessness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths: A Developmental Milestone Approach  

PubMed Central

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are over-represented in the homeless population. To examine why some LGB youths become homeless, this report compares homeless and non-homeless LGB youths. Of the 156 LGB youths, 48% reported ever being homeless (i.e., running away or being evicted from home). Results indicate that sexual orientation awareness and the initiation of sexual behavior occurred earlier in homeless than in non-homeless LGB youths and predated the first homeless episode. Substance use was more frequent and first occurred at an earlier age in homeless as compared to non-homeless LGB youths; however, substance use occurred subsequent to first homelessness. Childhood sexual abuse was associated with homelessness; and, early sexual orientation development was related to homelessness among youths without a history of sexual abuse. Findings suggest that interventions should help youths cope with their unfolding sexual orientation and work to prevent or address the consequences of sexual abuse. PMID:22347763

Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

2011-01-01

36

Addressing the Problems of Homeless Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homeless adolescents, known as "unaccompanied youth," constitute a small but important portion of the overall homeless population, one that needs particular attention at school. In this article, we review existing literature to provide a background for educational leaders, researchers, and policymakers hoping to understand the phenomenon of…

Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri

2012-01-01

37

Gang Involvement and Membership among Homeless and Runaway Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed the extent of gang involvement among homeless and runaway youth, comparing gang members, gang-involved youth (not members), and non-gang youth on several dimensions. Interview data indicated that 15.4 percent of the youth were gang members and 32.2 percent were involved in gangs. These youth reported more family problems and school…

Yoder, Kevin A.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

2003-01-01

38

Homeless Children and Youth in Utah. 1991 Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was done of the numbers and educational status of homeless children in the state of Utah in 1991. A survey was conducted using data provided by 31 shelters statewide and included children and youth who were provided shelter at any time during the year. The total count of 4,894 homeless children and youth, when corrected for general…

Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

39

Homeless Children and Youth in Utah. 1992 Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was done of the numbers and educational status of homeless children in the state of Utah in 1992. A survey was conducted using data provided by 31 shelters statewide and included children and youth who were provided shelter at any time during the year. The total count included 4,424 homeless children and youth in 1992. The largest…

Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

40

Social Networks of Homeless Youth in Emerging Adulthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about the social networks of homeless youth in emerging adulthood despite the importance of this information for interventions to reduce health risks. This study examined the composition of social networks, and the risks and supports present within them, in a random sample of 349 homeless youth (33.4% female, 23.9% African…

Wenzel, Suzanne; Holloway, Ian; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Bowman, Richard; Tucker, Joan

2012-01-01

41

Substance Use and Health and Safety among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines how substance use is associated with the health and safety of homeless youth using cross-sectional, self-report data from 285 homeless adolescents. Path models were used to examine concurrent relationships between youth's substance use and multiple aspects of their health and safety, including measures of psychological…

Rhule-Louie, Dana M.; Bowen, Sarah; Baer, John S.; Peterson, Peggy L.

2008-01-01

42

Utilizing technology for longitudinal communication with homeless youth.  

PubMed

The current study investigated forms of technology (phone calls, texts, email and Facebook) for maintaining contact with homeless youth over baseline, 1-week, 6-week, and 3-month follow-up interviews. The study combined quantitative tracking of youths' response patterns and open-ended interviews regarding youths' preferred methods of communication. Results indicate that maintaining communication with homeless youth requires persistence, including frequent contact attempts over several days. Cell phone contacts (calls or texts) were most successful in communicating with youth, with e-mail and Facebook messaging useful when phones were lost or stolen. Youth who maintained contact were strikingly similar to youth who discontinued contact. PMID:25321934

Bender, Kimberly; Begun, Stephanie; DePrince, Anne; Haffejee, Badiah; Kaufmann, Sarah

2014-10-01

43

Characteristics of Homeless Youth Attending Two Different Youth Drop-In Centers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Services for homeless youth traditionally provided shelter and nourishment but do little to break the cycle of homelessness. A more comprehensive approach to serve homeless youth is the drop-in center model that provides safe and easy-to-find facilities within communities to bridge the gap between the streets and transitional/permanent housing.…

Shillington, A. M.; Bousman, C. A.; Clapp, J. D.

2011-01-01

44

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.15 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.15 What...

2011-10-01

45

45 CFR 1351.20 - What are the additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.20 Section...AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Additional Requirements...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? (a) To...

2014-10-01

46

45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What...

2013-10-01

47

45 CFR 1351.12 - Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.12 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.12 Who...

2011-10-01

48

45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What...

2011-10-01

49

45 CFR 1351.16 - What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.16 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.16 What...

2014-10-01

50

45 CFR 1351.12 - Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.12 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.12 Who...

2013-10-01

51

45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What...

2012-10-01

52

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.11 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.11 Who...

2011-10-01

53

45 CFR 1351.17 - How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.17 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.17 How...

2011-10-01

54

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.11 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.11 Who...

2010-10-01

55

45 CFR 1351.17 - How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.17 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.17 How...

2012-10-01

56

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.15 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.15 What...

2013-10-01

57

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.11 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.11 Who...

2013-10-01

58

45 CFR 1351.20 - What are the additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.20 Section...AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Additional Requirements...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? (a) To...

2012-10-01

59

45 CFR 1351.16 - What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.16 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.16 What...

2010-10-01

60

45 CFR 1351.10 - What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.10 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.10 What...

2012-10-01

61

45 CFR 1351.20 - What are the additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.20 Section...AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Additional Requirements...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? (a) To...

2011-10-01

62

45 CFR 1351.16 - What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.16 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.16 What...

2011-10-01

63

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.15 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.15 What...

2014-10-01

64

45 CFR 1351.17 - How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.17 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.17 How...

2010-10-01

65

45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What...

2014-10-01

66

45 CFR 1351.20 - What are the additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.20 Section...AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Additional Requirements...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? (a) To...

2010-10-01

67

45 CFR 1351.16 - What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.16 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.16 What...

2012-10-01

68

45 CFR 1351.20 - What are the additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.20 Section...AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Additional Requirements...additional requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? (a) To...

2013-10-01

69

45 CFR 1351.17 - How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.17 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.17 How...

2014-10-01

70

45 CFR 1351.12 - Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.12 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.12 Who...

2012-10-01

71

45 CFR 1351.16 - What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...What costs are not allowable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.16 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.16 What...

2013-10-01

72

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.15 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.15 What...

2012-10-01

73

45 CFR 1351.15 - What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...What costs are supportable under a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.15 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.15 What...

2010-10-01

74

45 CFR 1351.10 - What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.10 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.10 What...

2010-10-01

75

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.11 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.11 Who...

2014-10-01

76

45 CFR 1351.10 - What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.10 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.10 What...

2013-10-01

77

45 CFR 1351.18 - What criteria has HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...HHS established for deciding which Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant applications to fund...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.18 What...

2010-10-01

78

45 CFR 1351.10 - What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.10 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.10 What...

2014-10-01

79

45 CFR 1351.12 - Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.12 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.12 Who...

2014-10-01

80

45 CFR 1351.10 - What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false What is the purpose of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.10 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.10 What...

2011-10-01

81

45 CFR 1351.12 - Who gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...gets priority for the award of a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.12 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.12 Who...

2010-10-01

82

45 CFR 1351.17 - How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... How is application made for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.17 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.17 How...

2013-10-01

83

45 CFR 1351.11 - Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Who is eligible to apply for a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.11 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.11 Who...

2012-10-01

84

Homeless youths’ perceptions of services and transitions to stable housing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Use of available services is low among homeless youths, and how youth make decisions to access services or seek housing is unclear. This study explored perspectives of current and former street youth about these processes. Recruited from the streets and a drop-in center, 27 youth ages 16–24, participated in individual qualitative interviews. Findings from consensual qualitative analyses indicated choices to

Sharon B. Garrett; Darrel H. Higa; Melissa M. Phares; Peggy L. Peterson; Elizabeth A. Wells; John S. Baer

2008-01-01

85

Experiences of Being Homeless or at Risk of Being Homeless among Canadian Youths  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A qualitative study was undertaken with four groups -- immigrants, youths, Aboriginal people, and landlords -- in order to explore, compare, and contrast diversity issues among the homeless population and those at risk of homelessness in a larger Canadian city (Calgary, Alberta) with a smaller city (Lethbridge, Alberta), to better understand their…

Miller, Pamela; Donahue, Peter; Este, Dave; Hofer, Marvin

2004-01-01

86

Experiential Therapy with Homeless, Runaway and Street Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the services and activities of the Orion Center, a drop-in day-use facility for homeless and runaway youth in Seattle (Washington). Orion Center uses experiential therapy and adventure-based activities to develop trust, promote fun and relationship building, and facilitate growth and healing among this homeless population. A…

Kallander, Karin; Levings, Laura

87

Homelessness: Its Impact on African American Children, Youth, and Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents findings from a 1991 study that collected descriptive data on over 209 African-American homeless children and youth in Seattle, Washington. A review of the literature indicates that disproportionate numbers of African-Americans are homeless. Discussion in the paper concerns risk factors and conditions that affect…

James, William H.; And Others

88

Prevalence and Predictors of Sexual Risks Among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined prevalence of sexual risks among homeless adolescents and described factors associated with those risks. Community-based outreach methods were used successfully to access this difficult-to-reach population. The sample included 203 homeless youth aged 15-22 recruited from community sites. Questionnaire items addressed…

Halcon, Linda L.; Lifson, Alan R.

2004-01-01

89

Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

2009-01-01

90

Providing Lifelines for Our Nation's Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses educational challenges for homeless children and explains how districts can and must meet their needs. According to the U.S. Department of Education Federal Data Collection, 1,065,794 homeless children and youth were enrolled in public schools for the school year 2010-2011, the highest number on record. After listing…

Duffield, Barbara

2013-01-01

91

Homeless Youth in Toronto Are Nutritionally Vulnerable1,2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was undertaken to characterize nutritional vulnerability among a sample of homeless youth in downtown Toronto. Interviews were conducted with 261 homeless youth (149 male, 112 female), recruited from drop-in centers and outdoor locations. Information about current living circumstances, nutrition and health- related behaviors, and 24-h dietary intake recalls were collected, and height, weight, triceps skinfold thickness, and mid-upper

Valerie Tarasuk; Naomi Dachner; Jinguang Li

92

Mental health correlates of victimization classes among homeless youth.  

PubMed

Literature reports high rates of street victimization among homeless youth and recognizes psychiatric symptoms associated with such victimization. Few studies have investigated the existence of victimization classes that differ in type and frequency of victimization and how youth in such classes differ in psychiatric profiles. We used latent class analysis (LCA) to examine whether classes of homeless youth, based on both type and frequency of victimization experiences, differ in rates of meeting diagnostic criteria for major depressive episodes and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of homeless youth (N=601) from three regions of the United States. Results suggest youth who experience high levels of direct and indirect victimization (high-victimization class) share similarly high rates of depressive episodes and PTSD as youth who experience primarily indirect victimization only (witness class). Rates of meeting criteria for depressive episodes and PTSD were nearly two and three times greater, respectively, among the high victimization and witness classes compared to youth who never or rarely experienced victimization. Findings suggest the need for screening and intervention for homeless youth who report direct and indirect victimization and youth who report indirect victimization only, while prevention efforts may be more relevant for youth who report limited victimization experience. PMID:24725619

Bender, Kimberly; Ferguson, Kristin; Thompson, Sanna; Langenderfer, Lisa

2014-10-01

93

Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth.  

PubMed

Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen's (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido's (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care. PMID:22247795

Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

2011-06-01

94

Impact of Nursing Intervention on Decreasing Substances among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Background Alcohol use, and in particular, binge drinking, and methamphetamine use is pervasive among homeless youth and remains a social pressure among this vulnerable population. However, there is no compelling evidence that specific interventions for reducing drug and alcohol use are effective for homeless youth. Objectives This community-based participatory action pilot study assessed the impact of an intervention study focused on decreasing use of drugs and alcohol among a sample of homeless young adults (N=154) visiting a drop-in site in Santa Monica, California. The two programs consisted of a HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Health Promotion (HHP) program led by nurses and an Art Messaging (AM) program led by artists. Six-month follow-up data were obtained from 100 of these individuals. Results Findings revealed significant reductions in alcohol and marijuana use and binge drinking in both the HHP and AM programs. However, homeless youth in the HHP program reported additional reductions in methamphetamine, cocaine and hallucinogen use at six-month follow-up. Conclusions Reductions in drugs and alcohol are important as these substances are linked to HIV/AIDS, hepatitis and other health risks in homeless youth. Scientific Significance The successful outcomes of the study intervention validate the utility of nurse-led and artistic health promotion strategies to decrease drug and alcohol use and other risky behaviors in homeless youth populations. PMID:23082836

Nyamathi, Adeline; Branson, Catherine; Kennedy, Barbara; Salem, Benissa; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Marfisee, Mary; Getzoff, Daniel; Leake, Barbara

2013-01-01

95

Supporting Foster-Care, Homeless, and Other Disconnected Youth at CSU Times of Economic Downturn  

E-print Network

Supporting Foster-Care, Homeless, and Other Disconnected Youth at CSU Times of Economic Downturn are emancipated foster, homeless and other disconnected youth. A small, but growing population of students

Boone, Randall B.

96

Predictors of Psychological Adjustment Among Homeless and Housed Female Youth  

PubMed Central

Objective: This cross-sectional study explored differences in the impact of self-reported coping style, self-esteem and perceived support on the psychological adjustment of homeless and housed female youth. Method: Data were obtained from homeless female youth (n = 72, M = 17.5 years) accessing an emergency shelter in a large Canadian urban centre and a comparison group of housed females (n = 102 ; M = 17.2 years) from local high schools who had never resided in a shelter. Results: Homeless youth reported lower self-worth, increased suicidal behaviour, less perceived parental support and higher levels of depressive symptoms and both internalizing and externalizing behaviour problems than housed youth. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that disengagement coping was a significant predictor of depressive symptoms and both internalizing and externalizing behaviour problems in homeless and housed youth. Conclusions: Findings reflect the merit of considering coping style, parental support and self-worth in the presentation of depressive symptoms and behaviour problems in homeless and housed female youth. PMID:19495433

Votta, Elizabeth; Farrell, Susan

2009-01-01

97

Feasibility Study of the Social Enterprise Intervention with Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To reduce mental health symptoms and high-risk behaviors and increase social support and service utilization among street-living youth, the authors conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility of the social enterprise intervention (SEI) at a homeless youth agency. Method: Convenience sampling was used to recruit 16 street-living…

Ferguson, Kristin M.; Xie, Bin

2008-01-01

98

Higher Education Act Reauthorization: Homeless and Foster Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth experiencing homelessness or in foster care face numerous barriers to higher education. Inadequate college readiness, the complexity of the financial aid process, and lack of housing and support services once enrolled in college make obtaining a college degree an often insurmountable challenge. Yet a college education offers these youth the…

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 2008

2008-01-01

99

Countervailing Social Network Influences on Problem Behaviors among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of countervailing social network influences (i.e., pro-social, anti-social or HIV risk peers) on problem behaviors (i.e., HIV drug risk, HIV sex risk or anti-social behaviors) among 696 homeless youth was assessed using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that older youth were less likely to report having pro-social peers and…

Rice, Eric; Stein, Judith A.; Milburn, Norweeta

2008-01-01

100

Social Capital and Homeless Youth: Influence of Residential Instability on College Access  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the experiences homeless youth face and the influence of social networks on their education. Using a social capital framework, we analyze the experiences that are different for poor youth in general and those homeless. Data used include interviews with 123 homeless youth and more than 40 policymakers, school counselors, and…

Tierney, William G.; Hallett, Ronald E.

2012-01-01

101

The Mental and Physical Health of Homeless Youth: A Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth homelessness is a growing concern in the United States. Despite difficulties studying this population due to inconsistent definitions of what it means to be a youth and homeless, the current body of research indicates that abuse, family breakdown, and disruptive family relationships are common contributing factors to youth homelessness.…

Edidin, Jennifer P.; Ganim, Zoe; Hunter, Scott J.; Karnik, Niranjan S.

2012-01-01

102

45 CFR 1351.13 - What are the Federal and non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant? 1351.13 Section 1351...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.13 What...

2012-10-01

103

45 CFR 1351.13 - What are the Federal and non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant? 1351.13 Section 1351...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.13 What...

2013-10-01

104

45 CFR 1351.13 - What are the Federal and non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant? 1351.13 Section 1351...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.13 What...

2011-10-01

105

45 CFR 1351.13 - What are the Federal and non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant? 1351.13 Section 1351...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.13 What...

2010-10-01

106

45 CFR 1351.13 - What are the Federal and non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...non-Federal match requirements under a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant? 1351.13 Section 1351...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.13 What...

2014-10-01

107

Youth Substance Use in a Context of Family Homelessness.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE: This study examines the relationship between family processes and youth substance use debuts among a sample of youth residing in urban family homeless shelters. METHOD: Data regarding shelter experiences, youth and family characteristics, and the use of three substances (i.e., cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana) were gathered from a sample of youth (11-14 years) and their respective parents residing in an urban family homeless shelter system. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the influences on youth substance use. RESULTS: Of the 198 youth included in the statistical analysis, 72% (n=143) reported no substance use debuts, while 18% (n=35) indicated one and 10% (n=20) indicated two to three substance use debuts. Within the final model, greater substance use debut was associated with being older (13-14 vs. 11-12; OR=7.5; 95% CI =1.8-30.9) and stressors exposure (OR=4.8; 95% CI =1.5-14.7). Furthermore, youth of adult caretakers that reported low levels of the three family processes considered were almost four and a half more likely (OR=4.4; 95% CI =1.2-16.5) to have made two to three substance use debuts. CONCLUSIONS: Family processes may be a particularly important intervention target toward reducing the rate of substance use among youth residing in urban family homeless shelters. PMID:22888180

Bannon, William M; Beharie, Nisha; Olshtain-Mann, Orly; McKay, Mary M; Goldstein, Leah; Cavaleri, Mary A; Loiacono, Marni L; Elwyn, Laura J; Kalogerogiannis, Kosta; Torres, Ervin; Paulino, Angela; Lawrence, Rita

2012-01-01

108

Youth Substance Use in a Context of Family Homelessness  

PubMed Central

Objective This study examines the relationship between family processes and youth substance use debuts among a sample of youth residing in urban family homeless shelters. Method Data regarding shelter experiences, youth and family characteristics, and the use of three substances (i.e., cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana) were gathered from a sample of youth (11–14 years) and their respective parents residing in an urban family homeless shelter system. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the influences on youth substance use. Results Of the 198 youth included in the statistical analysis, 72% (n=143) reported no substance use debuts, while 18% (n=35) indicated one and 10% (n=20) indicated two to three substance use debuts. Within the final model, greater substance use debut was associated with being older (13–14 vs. 11–12; OR=7.5; 95% CI =1.8–30.9) and stressors exposure (OR=4.8; 95% CI =1.5–14.7). Furthermore, youth of adult caretakers that reported low levels of the three family processes considered were almost four and a half more likely (OR=4.4; 95% CI =1.2–16.5) to have made two to three substance use debuts. Conclusions Family processes may be a particularly important intervention target toward reducing the rate of substance use among youth residing in urban family homeless shelters. PMID:22888180

Beharie, Nisha; Olshtain-Mann, Orly; McKay, Mary M.; Goldstein, Leah; Cavaleri, Mary A.; LoIacono, Marni L.; Elwyn, Laura J.; Kalogerogiannis, Kosta; Torres, Ervin; Paulino, Angela; Lawrence, Rita

2011-01-01

109

Predictors of Substance Use Severity among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Problem This cross-sectional study identified a number of factors that were correlated with drug-use severity among homeless youth. Method To examine a commonly-used measure of substance-use severity, the TCU Drug Screen II, in a convenience sample of 156 homeless youth, ages 15–25 from a drop-in site in Santa Monica, California. Findings Higher drug-use severity scores were independently related to low levels of perceived health and maladaptive coping strategies. Conclusions The findings from this study are particularly relevant in that they support previous results showing that psychosocial variables are related to substance use behavior among young populations. PMID:21073596

Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Greengold, Barbara; Slagle, Alexandra; Marfisee, Mary; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Leake, Barbara

2010-01-01

110

Where the homeless children and youth come from: A study of the residential origins of the homeless in Miami-Dade County, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates where homeless children and youth come from and identifies factors associated with the spatial distribution of the residential origins of homeless children and youth. Data was obtained through a point-in-time homelessness survey in Miami-Dade County, Florida in January 2005. The study identified 545 homeless children and youth in 219 homeless families whose residential origins in Miami-Dade County,

Deden Rukmana

2008-01-01

111

Homelessness among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally…

Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

2012-01-01

112

Family Risk Factors and Prevalence of Dissociative Symptoms among Homeless and Runaway Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine family risk factors associated with dissociative symptoms among homeless and runaway youth. Method: Three hundred and twenty-eight homeless and runaway youth were interviewed using a systematic sampling strategy in metropolitan Seattle. Homeless young people were interviewed on the streets and in shelters by outreach workers…

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Cauce, Ana Mari; Whitbeck, Les

2004-01-01

113

Screening Homeless Youth for Histories of Abuse: Prevalence, Enduring Effects, and Interest in Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To identify the incidence of self-reported physical and sexual child abuse among homeless youth, the self-perceived effects of past abuse, and current interest in treatment for past abuse among homeless youth with histories of abuse. Methods: Homeless and street-involved persons aged 18-23 filled out a questionnaire and participated in…

Keeshin, Brooks R.; Campbell, Kristine

2011-01-01

114

Physical and Mental Health Issues among Homeless Youth in British Columbia, Canada: Are they Different from Older Homeless Adults?  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Youth homelessness is on the rise in North America, yet this vulnerable population is rarely studied and compared with adults. This paper aimed to study the homeless youth and identify specific vulnerabilities, which rendered them different from the adult homeless population. It also aimed to describe the youth homeless population and their significant co-morbidities. Methods: Data was derived from the BC Health of the Homeless Study (BCHOHS), carried out in three cities in British Columbia, Canada: the large urban centre Vancouver (n=250); the mid-sized city and capital of the province Victoria (n=150). Measures included socio-demographic information, the Maudsley Addiction Profile (MAP), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) Plus. Results: Youth constituted 16.5% (n=82) of the homeless population. Compared to the adult homeless, the homeless youth were more often female (55%), were Aboriginal (47.6%), had greater substance abuse of alcohol (70.7%), amphetamines (8.5%) and cannabis (75.6%). A lower prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (0.2%) and psychotic disorders (13.4%) was also observed. The prevalence of traumatic experiences, other psychiatric disorders and physical illnesses were similar between the adult and homeless youth. Conclusion: Homeless youth have high rates of physical and psychiatric comorbidity, similar to the adult homeless, despite being 20 years younger. An urgent need for interventions that go beyond the standardized ones being offered to homeless populations as a whole, and to derive specific strategies that target this vulnerable population is required. PMID:25320613

Saddichha, Sahoo; Linden, Isabelle; Krausz, Michael Reinhardt

2014-01-01

115

Health-Seeking Challenges Among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Background Approximately 1.5 to 2 million homeless young persons live on the streets in the United States. With the current economic situation, research is needed on quality of services geared toward homeless young adults. Objectives The objective of this study was to explore homeless young adults' perspectives on barriers and facilitators of health-care-seeking behavior and their perspectives on improving existing programs for homeless persons. Methods This article is a descriptive qualitative study using focus groups, with a purposeful sample of 24 homeless drug-using young adults. Results Identified themes were failing access to care based on perceived structural barriers (limited clinic sites, limited hours of operation, priority health conditions, and long wait times) and social barriers (perception of discrimination by uncaring professionals, law enforcement, and society in general). Discussion Results provide insight into programmatic and agency resources that facilitate health-seeking behaviors among homeless young adults and include implications for more research with providers of homeless health and social services. PMID:20404776

Hudson, Angela L.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Greengold, Barbara; Slagle, Alexandra; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Getzoff, Daniel

2010-01-01

116

The Initiation of Homeless Youth into the Street Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homeless youth (HY) who lack employment in the formal economy typically turn to the street economy (e.g., prostitution, drug selling) for survival. Guided by the theory of social control, the present paper explores factors influencing HY's initiation into the street economy. Eighty HY (ages 15-23) were recruited from four community-based…

Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Gostnell, Karla; Smolenski, Carol; Willis, Brian; Nish, David; Nolan, Theresa C.; Tharaken, Maya; Ritchie, Amanda S.

2009-01-01

117

Unaccompanied youth: school nurses caring for adolescent minors living without a parent or guardian.  

PubMed

There are many reasons that a child does not have a functional or legal guardian. The parent may be incarcerated, deceased, debilitated, deported, or have abandoned them. The teen may be a runaway or may have been exited from foster care. School nurses are challenged to find an adult who can legally consent to treatment when an unaccompanied minor needs health care. This article provides strategies for case management of these students. The school needs to be a stable and safe environment where the unaccompanied teen can thrive and succeed. PMID:24707658

Adams, Patricia M; Shineldecker, Susan C

2014-03-01

118

A Snapshot of Substance Abuse Among Homeless and Runaway Youth in Denver, Colorado  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on results of a one-day survey measuring rates of substance use and HIV risk behaviors among the homeless youth population of Denver, Colorado. On March 15, 2001, staff of Urban Peak, conducted a single-day survey of homeless and runaway youth in the Denver metropolitan region, going to locations known to be frequented by this population. All youth encountered

James M. Van Leeuwen; Christian Hopfer; Sabrina Hooks; Roxane White; Jerene Petersen; John Pirkopf

2004-01-01

119

A Different Kind of Smart: A Study of the Educational Obstacles Confronting Homeless Youth in New England.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides information on obstacles facing homeless youth in school. Research occurred in four diverse New England cities. Researchers collected detailed case histories on youth age 10-15 years who were currently homeless or who had recently been homeless. Data came from staff of local youth agencies, government officials, and youths

Wilson, Melanie; Houghton, Alison

120

Towards a Delivery System of Services for Rural Homeless Youth: A Literature Review and Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The majority of the literature on homelessness conceptualizes it as an urban problem and a wide body of research exists that\\u000a provides estimates of metropolitan street youth and qualitatively describes their experiences. Similar descriptions and population\\u000a estimates are virtually absent for youth who experience rural homelessness despite the number of urban homeless youth with\\u000a rural origins. Indeed, although some metropolitan

Hans A. Skott-Myhre; Rebecca Raby; Jamie Nikolaou

2008-01-01

121

Homeless Houston Youth Find Refuge in Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To attack their community's homeless student problem, the Houston Board of Education last February opened a "lighted schoolhouse" as a temporary shelter. Houston's superintendent, Joan Raymond, is convinced that more school districts will need to provide residential care. The 20 children using the shelter were turned over to Children's Protective…

Penning, Nick

1989-01-01

122

Homeless youths' interpersonal perspectives of health care providers.  

PubMed

In the United States, youth run away from home due to poor interpersonal relationships with parents or guardians; often times, they have been the recipients of parental neglect or abuse. As youth become increasingly entrenched in street-based living and problem substance use, their ability to rehabilitate their lives is incumbent upon trusting and engaging relationships with adult service providers. A total of 54 substance-using homeless youth (18-25 years) participated in focus groups to provide their perspectives on encounters and interpersonal relationships with health care providers. Participants were recruited from shelters in Hollywood, California, and from a drop-in shelter in Santa Monica, California. Four themes related to interpersonal barriers to care from service providers were identified: authoritative communication, one-way communication, disrespect, and empathy. Participants appreciate care providers who convey information in a helpful, meaningful manner and prefer providers who can, themselves, share similar life experiences. Implications point to the need for agencies and services specifically tailored to homeless, drug-using youth. These agencies should employ care providers who are trained to understand the developmental needs and histories of runaway youth. For proper reintegration of this vulnerable population into mainstream society, the narratives of these youth underscore the necessity of targeted services. PMID:19052945

Hudson, Angela L; Nyamathi, Adeline; Sweat, Jeff

2008-12-01

123

Pet ownership among homeless youth: associations with mental health, service utilization and housing status.  

PubMed

As many as 25 % of homeless persons have pets. To our knowledge, pet ownership has not been studied quantitatively with homeless youth. This study examined pet ownership among 398 homeless youth utilizing two Los Angeles drop-in centers. Twenty-three percent of homeless youth had a pet. The majority of pet owners reported that their pets kept them company and made them feel loved; nearly half reported that their pets made it more difficult to stay in a shelter. Pet owners reported fewer symptoms of depression and loneliness than their non-pet owning peers. Pet ownership was associated with decreased utilization of housing and job-finding services, and decreased likelihood of currently staying in a shelter. These findings elucidate many of the positive benefits of pet ownership for homeless youth, but importantly highlight that pet ownership may negatively impact housing options. Housing and other services must be sensitive to the needs of homeless youth with pets. PMID:24728815

Rhoades, Harmony; Winetrobe, Hailey; Rice, Eric

2015-04-01

124

South Dakota State Plan: Education of Homeless Children and Youth. Implementation Date: July 1, 1989.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

South Dakota's state plan for the education of homeless children and youth is presented in compliance with provisions of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987. The plan is comprised of eight sections. The first section provides a program narrative and presents the following homeless needs as determined by two State surveys: (1)…

South Dakota State Dept. of Education and Cultural Affairs, Pierre.

125

Educating Homeless Children and Youth: A Sample of Programs, Policies and Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report reviews a variety of approaches for working with homeless students. Information was gathered from state Coordinators of Education for Homeless Children and Youth, regional coordinators of homeless programs, and national and local organizations. The programs described are organized into five categories. The first concerns educating…

McCall, Kathleen P.

126

Educational Rights of Homeless Children and Youth: Legal and Community Advocacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many homeless children and youth have difficulty in school due to their loss of stable housing, and lack of consistent contact with family and friends. When a child becomes homeless, schools are federally mandated to identify these students and provide the same access to a free and appropriate education as their non-homeless counterparts. Within a…

de Bradley, Ann Aviles

2008-01-01

127

To the streets and back again: research, social media, and homeless youth I captured this photo of a homeless youth in Toronto, Canada over the Christmas break in 2011.  

E-print Network

To the streets and back again: research, social media, and homeless youth I captured this photo of a homeless youth in Toronto, Canada over the Christmas break in 2011. Surrounded by a dirty blanket and snow, the youth surfs the internet using a beat-up Blackberry. This individual represents one of many homeless

Xia, Xuhua

128

The Care-System for Homeless Youth in the Netherlands: Perceptions of Youngsters through a Peer Research Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of homeless youth of the care they receive. Since we wanted to involve homeless youth as participants in this project, we adopted the approach of peer-research. This form of collaborative research has a major role for homeless youth in making an inventory of the problems. A parallel is drawn…

Noom, Marc J.; de Winter, Micha; Korf, Dirk

2008-01-01

129

Trading sex: voluntary or coerced? The experiences of homeless youth.  

PubMed

This study examined the circumstances surrounding a homeless youth's "decision" to trade sex for food, money, shelter, or drugs. Forty homeless youth in 4 Midwestern states participated in individual in-depth qualitative interviews. Interviewers recruited youth both through service agencies and through street outreach. The findings revealed that approximately 1/3 of the sample had some experience with trading sex, whether it was in the form of having traded sex, having been propositioned to trade sex but having refused, or having friends or acquaintances that had traded sex. Young people's reports indicated that they had traded sex for things they deemed necessary in order to survive (i.e., food, shelter, money, or drugs), and that they did not want to trade sex, but did so because they were desperate and lacked alternatives. Additionally, others were coerced, manipulated, or forced to do so; thus indicating that the decision to trade sex is not always voluntary. We discuss the implications of these findings in terms of cumulative effects on youths' later development. Directions for future research among this population are also discussed. PMID:17599243

Tyler, Kimberly A; Johnson, Katherine A

2006-08-01

130

Adult Support and Substance Use among Homeless Youths Who Attend High School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Despite high rates of substance use among homeless youths, little is known about the interaction of substance-use risk and protective factors. Further, limited research exists on substance use by school-attending homeless youths, as extant studies have relied on street- and shelter-based samples. Objective: The purpose of this study…

Ferguson, Kristin M.; Xie, Bin

2012-01-01

131

Who Is Supporting Homeless Youth? Predictors of Support in Personal Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homeless youth lack the traditional support networks of their housed peers, which increases their risk for poor health outcomes. Using a multilevel dyadic analytic approach, this study identified characteristics of social contacts, relationships, and social networks associated with the provision of tangible and emotional support to homeless youth

de la Haye, Kayla; Green, Harold D., Jr.; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Golinelli, Daniela; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.

2012-01-01

132

The Power of the Drug, Nature of Support, and Their Impact on Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths' perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 drug-using homeless youth. The results provided insight into the

Angela L. Hudson; Adeline Nyamathi; Alexandra Slagle; Barbara Greengold; Deborah Koniak Griffin; Farinaz Khalilifard; Danny Gedzoff; Courtney Reid

2009-01-01

133

A Qualitative Study of the Formation and Composition of Social Networks among Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although social networks are essential for explaining protective and risk factors among homeless youth, little is known about the formation and composition of these groups. In this study, we utilized 19 in-depth interviews with homeless youth to investigate their social network formation, role relationships, housing status, and network member…

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

2011-01-01

134

Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence Reported by Homeless Youth in Columbus, Ohio  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

No study to date has reported intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences among homeless youth. This study sought to uncover lifetime prevalence estimates of physical, sexual, and emotional IPV among a nonprobability sample of 180 homeless male and female youth in Columbus, Ohio. To that aim, self-reported IPV and the association between IPV and…

Slesnick, Natasha; Erdem, Gizem; Collins, Jennifer; Patton, Rikki; Buettner, Cynthia

2010-01-01

135

79 FR 21063 - Runaway and Homeless Youth  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...multiple aspects of health, wellbeing and behavior in...juvenile courts, correctional institutions, detention facilities, law...family budgeting, health and nutrition...unplanned; (5) To a correctional institute or detention center if the youth...multiple aspects of health, wellbeing and behavior...

2014-04-14

136

Homeless Youths’ HIV Risk Behaviors with Strangers: Investigating the Importance of Social Networks  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between homeless youths’ HIV risk behaviors with strangers and risk and protective characteristics of their social networks. Data were from the Social Network and Homeless Youth Project. A total of 249 youth aged 14–21 years were interviewed over 15 months in three Midwestern cities in the United States using a systematic sampling strategy. Multivariate results revealed that homeless youth with a greater average number of network members who engaged in more drug risk behaviors and who pressured them into precarious behaviors at least once were more likely to have participated in a greater number of HIV risk behaviors with strangers compared to homeless youth without such network characteristics. Additionally, 19–21 year olds, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered youth, and those who have run away from home more frequently, participated in more HIV risk behaviors with strangers than 14–18 year olds, heterosexual youth, and those who have run away less often. The final model explained 43 % of the variance in homeless youths’ HIV risk behaviors with strangers. It is important to identify network characteristics that are harmful to homeless youth because continued exposure to such networks and participation in dangerous behaviors may result in detrimental outcomes, including contraction of sexually transmitted infections and potentially HIV. PMID:23613136

2013-01-01

137

Drug use and barriers to and facilitators of drug treatment for homeless youth.  

PubMed

In the United States, homeless youth are becoming increasingly entrenched in problem substance use, including high prevalence of alcohol abuse and injection use. A total of 54 substance-using homeless youth (18-25 years) participated in focus groups in order to provide their perspectives on barriers to and facilitators of seeking treatment. Participants were recruited from shelters in Hollywood, CA, and from a street-based, drop-in site in Santa Monica, CA. Participants identified personal barriers to treatment, but reported that facilitators of treatment tended to be more systematic. Homeless youth used and abused substances to dim the psychological effects of living on the streets. They appreciated programs that facilitated treatment and rehabilitation such as mentoring, support groups, and alternative choices to substance use. Implications point to the need for further development and research on culturally-appropriate, age-sensitive programs for homeless youth. The experiences of these youth underscore the need for strategic interventions. PMID:19956442

Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Mutere, Malaika; Christiani, Ashley; Sweat, Jeff; Nyamathi, Kamala; Broms, Theresa

2007-01-01

138

Associations between youth homelessness, sexual offenses, sexual victimization, and sexual risk behaviors: a systematic literature review.  

PubMed

Homeless youth commonly report engaging in sexual risk behaviors. These vulnerable young people also frequently report being sexually victimized. This systematic review collates, summarizes, and appraises published studies of youth investigating relationships between homelessness, perpetration of sexual offenses, experience of sexual victimization, and engagement in sexual risk behavior. A systematic search of seventeen psychology, health, and social science electronic databases was conducted. Search terms included "homeless*," "youth," "offend*," "victimization," "crime," "rape," "victim*," and "sex crimes." Thirty-eight studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Findings showed homeless youth commonly report being raped and sexually assaulted, fear being sexually victimized, and engage in street prostitution and survival sex. Rates of victimization and sexual risk behavior were generally higher for females. Given the paucity of longitudinal studies and limitations of current studies, it is unclear whether homelessness is prospectively associated with sexual victimization or engagement in sexual risk behavior, and whether such associations vary cross nationally and as a function of time and place. Future prospective research examining the influence of the situational context of homelessness is necessary to develop a better understanding of how homelessness influences the perpetration of sexual offenses, experience of sexual victimization, and engagement in sexual risk behavior among homeless youth. PMID:25411128

Heerde, Jessica A; Scholes-Balog, Kirsty E; Hemphill, Sheryl A

2015-01-01

139

77 FR 58404 - Announcing the Award of Two Urgent Single-Source Grants To Support Unaccompanied Alien Children...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Single-Source Grants To Support Unaccompanied Alien Children Program Services AGENCY: Office...single-source grants from the Unaccompanied Alien Children's Program to Youth for Tomorrow...providing services under the Unaccompanied Alien Children's...

2012-09-20

140

Voices from the periphery: Prospects and challenges for the homeless youth service sector  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a result of its focus on transitionally-aged youth (16–24), the homeless youth service sector finds itself on the periphery of both the children's service sectors, represented by children's mental health, child welfare, education and youth justice, and the adult service sectors that seek to address the varying needs of adults for social assistance and mental health services. Based on

Kiaras Gharabaghi; Carol Stuart

2010-01-01

141

Reaching the Hard to Reach: Innovative Housing for Homeless Youth through Strategic Partnerships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features three housing programs designed to target the needs of youth aging out of child welfare. One program combines housing and treatment to move substance-dependent youth off the streets; one combines the resources of Urban Peak, the only licensed homeless and runaway youth shelter in Colorado, with the Denver Department of Human…

Van Leeuwen, Jamie

2004-01-01

142

An Exploratory Study of the Relationship between Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Youth Homelessness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 1997 study by Lomas and Garside suggests a 62% prevalence rate of ADHD [Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder] amongst homeless, which prompts a need for further elucidation of this relationship. This study sought to examine the relationship between Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the homeless youth population aged 18-24. The…

Harding, Blake

2014-01-01

143

Dimensions and Correlates of Client Satisfaction: An Evaluation of a Shelter for Runaway and Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Client satisfaction surveys give clients a voice in the planning and management of services. While their use is quite widespread, they have hardly at all been used in the evaluation of shelters for homeless youths. In this article, the authors present findings of a client satisfaction survey conducted among residents of a shelter for homeless

Spiro, Shimon E.; Dekel, Rachel; Peled, Einat

2009-01-01

144

Supporting Homeless Youth during the Transition to Adulthood: Housing-Based Independent Living Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While many young people depend on parental financial and emotional support well past the age of 18, those who are homeless must make the transition to adulthood without that support. This article discusses the needs of homeless youth as they transition to adulthood. It then describes three housing-based independent living programs designed to…

Dworsky, Amy

2010-01-01

145

Online Social Networking Technologies, HIV Knowledge, and Sexual Risk and Testing Behaviors Among Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluates associations between online social networking and sexual health behaviors among homeless youth in Los\\u000a Angeles. We analyzed survey data from 201 homeless youth accessing services at a Los Angeles agency. Multivariate (regression\\u000a and logistic) models assessed whether use of (and topics discussed on) online social networking technologies affect HIV knowledge,\\u000a sexual risk behaviors, and testing for sexually

Sean D. Young; Eric Rice

2011-01-01

146

Substance use and risky sexual behavior among homeless and runaway youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To (a) characterize human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related risk behaviors of homeless youth; (b) determine whether substance use is associated with risky sexual behavior in this population; and, if so, (c) explore explanations for this relationship.Methods: A purposive sample of 327 homeless youth (ages 14–21 years) in Washington, DC, were surveyed in 1995 and 1996. Survey items were adapted from

SusanL Bailey; CarolS Camlin; SusanT Ennett

1998-01-01

147

Out on the Street: A Public Health and Policy Agenda for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth Who Are Homeless  

PubMed Central

A disproportionate number of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth experience homelessness each year in the United States. LGBT youth who are homeless have particularly high rates of mental health and substance use problems, suicidal acts, violent victimization, and a range of HIV risk behaviors. Given the intense needs of LGBT youth experiencing homelessness, it is imperative that we understand their unique experiences and develop responsive practices and policies. The range and severity of health risks vary across subgroups of all homeless LGBT youth, and since the population is nonhomogeneous their particular needs must be identified and addressed. Thus the purpose of this article is to review the causes of homelessness among LGBT youth, discuss the mental health and victimization risks faced by this population, address differences among homeless LGBT subgoups, and recommend effective interventions and best practices. We conclude by discussing promising future research and public policy directions. PMID:24826829

Keuroghlian, Alex S.; Shtasel, Derri; Bassuk, Ellen L.

2014-01-01

148

Out on the street: a public health and policy agenda for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth who are homeless.  

PubMed

A disproportionate number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth experience homelessness each year in the United States. LGBT youth who are homeless have particularly high rates of mental health and substance use problems, suicidal acts, violent victimization, and a range of HIV risk behaviors. Given the intense needs of LGBT youth experiencing homelessness, it is imperative to understand their unique experiences and develop responsive practices and policies. The range and severity of health risks vary across subgroups of all homeless LGBT youth, and because the population is nonhomogeneous, their particular needs must be identified and addressed. Thus, the purpose of this article is to review the causes of homelessness among LGBT youth, discuss the mental health and victimization risks faced by this population, address differences among homeless LGBT subgoups, and recommend effective interventions and best practices. The authors conclude by discussing promising future research and public policy directions. PMID:24826829

Keuroghlian, Alex S; Shtasel, Derri; Bassuk, Ellen L

2014-01-01

149

Increased Substance Use and Risky Sexual Behavior among Migratory Homeless Youth: Exploring the Role of Social Network Composition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Travelers are a migratory subgroup of homeless youth who may be especially prone to engaging in risky behavior. This study compared the substance use and sexual behavior of young homeless travelers and non-travelers to evaluate the extent and possible sources of travelers' increased risk. Data came from face-to-face interviews with 419 homeless

Martino, Steven C.; Tucker, Joan S.; Ryan, Gery; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Munjas, Brett

2011-01-01

150

A support intervention to promote health and coping among homeless youths.  

PubMed

Homeless youths are often vulnerable to limited support resources and loneliness. Peers are a potent source of social support. A support intervention for homeless youths was designed to optimize peer influence and was pilot tested. The intervention was based on an initial assessment of support needs and intervention preferences from the perspective of 36 homeless youths and 27 service providers. Based on the results, a 20-week pilot intervention program was designed, consisting of 4 support groups, optional one-on-one support, group recreational activities, and meals. Support was provided by professional and peer mentors, including formerly homeless youths. A total of 56 homeless youths aged 16 to 24 took part. Participants completed pre-, mid-, and post-test quantitative measures and qualitative interviews. In spite of challenges due primarily to attrition, the youths reported enhanced health behaviours, improved mental well-being, decreased loneliness, expanded social network, increased coping skills, enhanced self-efficacy, and diminished use of drugs and alcohol. Further research could focus on replication at other sites with a larger sample. PMID:19650513

Stewart, Miriam; Reutter, Linda; Letourneau, Nicole; Makwarimba, Edward

2009-06-01

151

The Educational Success of Homeless Youth in California: Challenges and Solutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The California Research Bureau (CRB), in participation with the California Council on Youth Relations (CCYR), and with support from The California Wellness Foundation, has been conducting a major research and policy initiative to bring attention to the issues facing homeless youth in California. These include lack of shelter and educational…

Julianelle, Patricia F.

2007-01-01

152

Youth with Disabilities Who Are Runaways and/or Homeless: Responding to the Need.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on two studies by the Bridges to Inclusion project concerning issues surrounding runaway and/or homeless youth with disabilities. The first study surveyed emergency adolescent shelter providers funded by the Family and Youth Service Bureau. Findings addressed types of disabilities frequently identified or suspected in…

Fesko, Sheila Lynch; Graham, Steven; Temelini, David

153

On Their Own: Runaway and Homeless Youth and Programs that Serve Them.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph discusses runaway and homeless youth and the programs that serve them in seven large and medium-sized cities throughout the United States. The monograph focuses on the characteristics and service needs of these youths and the demands they pose for service providers. It examines how the population and the service environment have…

Pires, Sheila A.; Silber, Judith Tolmach

154

Individual and Social Network Sexual Behavior Norms of Homeless Youth at High Risk for HIV Infection  

PubMed Central

Although previous research shows that homeless youth engage in numerous risky sexual behaviors, little is known about whether or not specific rules govern this conduct within their social networks and how group norms influence subsequent sexual actions. The current study utilizes 19 in-depth interviews with homeless youth to investigate different elements of their sexual behavior. Findings reveal that their decision to have sex generally depends on chemistry and physical appearance whereas a potential partner’s risky sexual history and heavy substance use discourages youth from engaging in sex. Both males and females discuss condom usage as it relates to unknown sexual history, availability, pregnancy, and the prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Sixteen homeless youth indicate that they do not discuss safe sex practices with their partners or social network members. PMID:23162182

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

2012-01-01

155

Individual and Social Network Sexual Behavior Norms of Homeless Youth at High Risk for HIV Infection.  

PubMed

Although previous research shows that homeless youth engage in numerous risky sexual behaviors, little is known about whether or not specific rules govern this conduct within their social networks and how group norms influence subsequent sexual actions. The current study utilizes 19 in-depth interviews with homeless youth to investigate different elements of their sexual behavior. Findings reveal that their decision to have sex generally depends on chemistry and physical appearance whereas a potential partner's risky sexual history and heavy substance use discourages youth from engaging in sex. Both males and females discuss condom usage as it relates to unknown sexual history, availability, pregnancy, and the prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Sixteen homeless youth indicate that they do not discuss safe sex practices with their partners or social network members. PMID:23162182

Tyler, Kimberly A; Melander, Lisa A

2012-12-01

156

International note: Association between perceived resilience and health risk behaviours in homeless youth.  

PubMed

Homeless youth are regarded as an extremely high risk group, susceptible to suicidal ideation substance abuse, and high rates of mental illness. While there exists a substantial body of knowledge regarding resilience of homeless youth, few studies has examined the relationship between perceived resilience and health risk behaviours. The present study describes the findings from a quantitative examination of street-related demographics, resilience, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, sexual risk behaviours and violent related behaviours among 227 homeless youth. The findings revealed that perceived resilience was negatively related to suicidal ideation, substance abuse and violence. Suicidal ideation was positively related to both substance abuse and violence, whilst violence and substance abuse were positively correlated. Multiple regressions showed that perceived resilience served as a protective factor for suicidal ideation and having multiple sexual lifetime partners, suggesting that youth with lower level of perceived resilience were more likely to engage in various health risks behaviours. PMID:25575268

Oppong Asante, Kwaku; Meyer-Weitz, Anna

2015-02-01

157

Falling through the Gaps: Homeless Children and Youth. Fact Sheet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In each state, between 41 percent and 91 percent of the homeless students identified by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) are not considered homeless by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Nationwide, as many as 715,238 homeless students fall into a bureaucratic gap between HUD and ED. This is because ED, HUD, and other…

Lovell, Phillip; DeBaun, Bill

2012-01-01

158

Explaining homeless youths' criminal justice interactions: childhood trauma or surviving life on the streets?  

PubMed

Homeless youth are at increased risk for involvement in the criminal justice system. This study investigated childhood trauma as a risk factor for arrest or jail among a sample of youth seeking services at drop in, shelter, and transitional housing settings, while controlling for more established risk factors including: substance use, peer deviance, and engagement in survival behaviors. Standardized and researcher developed measures collected quantitative data through face-to-face interviews with youth (N = 202). Two sequential logic regression models identified significant predictors of arrest and jail, with a particular interest in the effects of childhood maltreatment. Youth with a history of physical abuse were nearly twice as likely to be arrested and to be jailed compared to non-abused youth, controlling for the significant influence of drug use and survival behaviors. These findings suggest the need for trauma screening and trauma-informed services for homeless youth at risk of illegal behavior. PMID:24337524

Yoder, Jamie Rae; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J; Ferguson, Kristin M; Haffejee, Badiah

2014-02-01

159

A Snapshot of Homelessness in Massachusetts Public High Schools: 2005 Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey and Massachusetts Annual Homeless Enrollment Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data collected by the Massachusetts Department of Education (Department) during the 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) suggest that, despite significant efforts to identify homeless students, many are going undetected by their schools. Since the reauthorization of the McKinney Vento Homeless Assistance Education Improvement Act under the No…

Massachusetts Department of Education, 2007

2007-01-01

160

Survival on the Streets: Prosocial and Moral Behaviors Among Food Insecure Homeless Youth in Adelaide, South Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines prosocial and moral behaviours that underpin survival strategies and food acquisition practices among a sample of food insecure homeless youth in Adelaide, Australia. The mixed method study included a study involving in-depth interviews about food procurement and food sharing practices with homeless youth (n = 15) aged 15–24 years. Interviewees demonstrated proactive prosocial behaviours including sharing food,

Susan L. Booth; John Coveney

2007-01-01

161

Runaway and Homeless Youth Grants: Improvements Needed in the Grant Award Process. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-335  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awards grants to provide shelter and services to runaway and homeless youth through the Basic Center, Transitional Living and Street Outreach Programs. In response to a mandate for a review of the grant award process for these programs in the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008 (Pub. L. No.…

Brown, Kay E.

2010-01-01

162

A snapshot of substance abuse among homeless and runaway youth in Denver, Colorado.  

PubMed

We report on results of a one-day survey measuring rates of substance use and HIV risk behaviors among the homeless youth population of Denver, Colorado. On March 15, 2001, staff of Urban Peak, conducted a single-day survey of homeless and runaway youth in the Denver metropolitan region, going to locations known to be frequented by this population. All youth encountered were asked to fill out a brief survey asking about past nine month use of the following substances: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, hallucinogens, ecstasy and ketamine, and HIV risk behaviors. Chi-square analyses of the association of substance used and gender, age, living situation, and ethnicity were conducted. In addition, the use of any club drug was examined. One-hundred-eighty-six homeless or runaway youth were surveyed; 74 percent were between 16 and 25. Rates of use over the last nine months were as follows: alcohol, 69 percent; marijuana, 75 percent; methamphetamine, 18 percent; cocaine, 19 percent; heroin, 12 percent; hallucinogens, 30 percent; ecstasy, 25 percent; and ketamine, 13 percent. Eleven percent reported trading sex for drugs, money, food, or shelter; and 13 percent reported sharing needles. There were significant associations between living situation and use of marijuana, cocaine and hallucinogens. Prevalence rates of club drugs show 75 percent, 77 percent and 77 percent of homeless or runaway youth ihaving used ecstasy, ketamine and hallucinogens one to three times per month over the last nine months, respectively. Prevalence rates of substance use among homeless youth in the Denver metropolitan are similar to rates reported in other larger metropolitan areas. Routine screening for every substance needs to be part of the assessment for all homeless youth. Initial data points to a need for more research exploring protective factors among this population and to better understand the prevalence of club drug use. PMID:15141897

Van Leeuwen, James M; Hopfer, Christian; Hooks, Sabrina; White, Roxane; Petersen, Jerene; Pirkopf, John

2004-06-01

163

Personal Network Correlates of Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use Among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Background Youth who are homeless and on their own are among the most marginalized individuals in the United States and face multiple risks, including use of substances. This study investigates how the use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana among homeless youth may be influenced by characteristics of their social networks. Methods Homeless youth aged 13–24 were randomly sampled from 41 service and street sites in Los Angeles County (N = 419). Predictors of substance use were examined using linear regression analysis (for average number of drinks and average number of cigarettes per day) and negative binomal regression analysis (for frequency of past month marijuana use). Results Youth with more substance users in their networks reported greater alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana consumption regardless of whether these network members provided tangible or emotional support. Marijuana use was more frequent for youth who met more network members through homeless settings, but less frequent among those who met more network members through treatment or AA/NA. Greater alcohol use occurred among youth who met more network members through substance use-related activities. Youth having more adults in positions of responsibility in their networks consumed less alcohol, and those with more school attendees in their networks consumed less alcohol and cigarettes. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of social context in understanding substance use among homeless youth. Results also support the relevance of network-based interventions to change social context for substance using youth, in terms of both enhancing pro-social influences and reducing exposure to substance use. PMID:20656423

Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Green, Harold D.; Zhou, Annie

2013-01-01

164

The Challenge of Pregnancy among Homeless Youth: Reclaiming a Lost Opportunity  

PubMed Central

Young, homeless women often become pregnant, but little is known about how street youth experience their pregnancies. We documented 26 pregnancy outcomes among 13 homeless women (ages 18–26) and eight homeless men through interviews and participant-observation. Eight pregnancies were voluntarily terminated, three were miscarried, and fifteen were carried to term. Regardless of pregnancy outcome, street youths’ narratives focused on ambivalence about parenting, traumatic childhood experiences, and current challenges. Despite significant obstacles, almost all were convinced of their personal capacity to change their lives. While most wanted to be parents, the majority lost custody of their newborns and consequently associated contact with medical and social services with punitive outcomes. Most of the youth who chose to terminate successfully sought safe medical care. We offer recommendations for changing the approach of services to take full advantage of pregnancy as a potential catalyst event for change in this highly vulnerable and underserved population. PMID:20453382

Smid, Marcela; Bourgois, Philippe; Auerswald, Colette L.

2011-01-01

165

Homelessness Comes to School: How Homeless Children and Youths Can Succeed  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness is a complex and layered phenomenon, but schools can be effective in reducing its educational consequences. Schools currently are not doing enough. The next step is to consider the services that are needed for students as they arrive on the school campus. Taking care of homeless children in school systems involves seven provisos:…

Murphy, Joseph F.; Tobin, Kerri J.

2011-01-01

166

Association between prescription drug misuse and injection among runaway and homeless youth  

PubMed Central

Background The nonmedical use of prescription drugs is the fastest growing drug problem in the United States, disproportionately impacting youth. Furthermore, the population prevalence of injection drug use among youth is also on the rise. This short communication examines the association between current prescription drug misuse (PDM) and injection among runaway and homeless youth. Methods Homeless youth were surveyed between October, 2011 and February, 2012 at two drop-in service agencies in Los Angeles, CA. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between current PDM and injection behavior were estimated. The outcome of interest was use of a needle to inject any illegal drug into the body during the past 30 days. Results Of 380 homeless youth (median age, 21; IQR, 17-25; 72% male), 84 (22%) reported current PDM and 48 (13%) reported currently injecting. PDM during the past 30 days was associated with a 7.7 (95% CI: 4.4, 13.5) fold increase in the risk of injecting during that same time. Among those reporting current PDM with concurrent heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine use, the PR with injection was 15.1 (95% CI: 8.5, 26.8). Conclusions Runaway and homeless youth are at increased risk for a myriad of negative outcomes. Our preliminary findings are among the first to show the strong association between current PDM and injection in this population. Our findings provide the basis for additional research to delineate specific patterns of PDM and factors that enable or inhibit transition to injection among homeless and runaway youth. PMID:24300900

Al-Tayyib, Alia A; Rice, Eric; Rhoades, Harmony; Riggs, Paula

2013-01-01

167

The power of the drug, nature of support, and their impact on homeless youth.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths' perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 drug-using homeless youth. The results provided insight into the lives of drug-using homeless youth. The most commonly used drugs were marijuana and alcohol. Reported reasons for drug use were parental drug use, low self-esteem, and harsh living conditions on the streets. Barriers to treatment were pleasurable enjoyment of the drug, physical dependence, and non-empathetic mental health providers. Strategies to prevent initiation and abuse of drugs were creative activities, such as art, sports, and music, and disdain for parental/family drug use and abuse. Comparative research is needed on specific personal factors that cause initiation and deterrence of drugs use/abuse among homeless youth. PMID:20155605

Hudson, Angela L; Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Greengold, Barbara; Griffin, Deborah Koniak; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Gedzoff, Danny; Reid, Courtney

2009-10-01

168

The Power of the Drug, Nature of Support, and their Impact on Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to explore homeless youths’ perspectives on the power of drugs in their lives, the preferred type of drugs used, barriers to treatment, and strategies to prevent drug initiation and abuse. This was a descriptive, qualitative study using focus groups with a purposeful sample of 24 homeless drug-using youth. The results provided insight into the lives of drug-using homeless youth. Most commonly-used drugs were marijuana and alcohol. Reported reasons for drug use were parental drug use, low self-esteem, and harsh living conditions on the streets. Barriers to treatment were pleasurable enjoyment of the drug, physical dependence, and non-empathetic mental health providers. Strategies to prevent initiation and abuse of drugs were creative activities, such as art, sports, and music, and disdain for parental/family drug use and abuse. Comparative research is needed on specific personal factors that cause initiation and deterrence of drugs use/abuse among homeless youth. PMID:20155605

Hudson, Angela L.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Greengold, Barbara; Griffin, Deborah Koniak; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Gedzoff, Danny; Reid, Courtney

2010-01-01

169

The Economic Crisis Hits Home: The Unfolding Increase in Child & Youth Homelessness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the economic downturn has appropriately become the top priority of policy makers, one element of the crisis has gone largely unnoticed: its impact on children and youth. Largely due to the economic and housing crises, many school districts across the country report increases in the number of homeless students in the classroom. "The Economic…

Duffield, Barbara; Lovell, Phillip

2008-01-01

170

Psychiatric Disorders, High-Risk Behaviors, and Chronicity of Episodes Among Predominantly African American Homeless Chicago Youth  

PubMed Central

Objective This cross-sectional study investigated the relationships between psychiatric and substance-related disorders, high-risk behaviors, and the onset, duration, and frequency of homelessness among homeless youth in Chicago. Methods Sixty-six homeless youth were recruited from two shelters in Chicago. Demographic characteristics, psychopathology, substance use, and risk behaviors were assessed for each participant. Results Increased frequency and duration of homeless episodes were positively correlated with higher rates of psychiatric diagnoses. Increased number of psychiatric diagnoses was positively correlated with increased high-risk behaviors. Participants with diagnoses of Current Suicidality, Manic Episodes, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Substance Abuse, and Psychotic Disorder had a higher chronicity of homelessness than those without diagnoses. Conclusions Significant differences were evident between the three time parameters, suggesting that stratification of data by different time variables may benefit homelessness research by identifying meaningful subgroups who may benefit from individualized interventions. PMID:25130234

Castro, Anne L.; Gustafson, Erika L.; Ford, Ashley E.; Edidin, Jennifer P.; Smith, Dale L.; Hunter, Scott J.; Karnik, Niranjan S.

2014-01-01

171

A Review of Services and Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth: Moving Forward  

PubMed Central

Research focused on the impact of community-based services and treatment interventions designed to intervene in the lives of runaway and homeless youth has increased in the last two decades in the U.S. and internationally. In light of the tremendous need for identifying effective strategies to end homelessness and its associated problems among youth, this paper summarizes and critiques the findings of the extant literature including U.S., international, and qualitative studies. Thirty-two papers met criteria for inclusion in the review. Among the conclusions are that comprehensive interventions which target the varied and interconnected needs of these youth and families may be worthy of more study than studies that isolate the intervention focus on one problem. Also, more research incorporating design strategies that increase the reliability and validity of study findings is needed. Other preliminary conclusions and future directions are offered. PMID:20161294

Slesnick, Natasha; Dashora, Pushpanjali; Letcher, Amber; Erdem, Gizem; Serovich, Julianne

2009-01-01

172

Housing Stability Over Two Years and HIV Risk among Newly Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stability of living situation was examined as a predictor of young people’s HIV-related sexual and drug use acts two years\\u000a after leaving home for the first time. Newly homeless youth aged 12–20 years were recruited in Los Angeles County, California,\\u000a U.S.A. (n = 261) and Melbourne, Australia (n = 165) and followed longitudinally at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Their family history of

Doreen Rosenthal; Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus; Philip Batterham; Shelley Mallett; Eric Rice; Norweeta G. Milburn

2007-01-01

173

How to integrate digital media into a drop-in for homeless young people for deepening relationships between youth and adults  

E-print Network

How to integrate digital media into a drop-in for homeless young people for deepening relationships 2010 Keywords: Homeless youth Community drop-ins Digital media Curriculum design Life-skills training for homeless young people, aged 13­25. Motivated by the ordinariness of digital media and its importance

Anderson, Richard

174

Improving Youth Mental Health through Family-Based Prevention In Family Homeless Shelters.  

PubMed

This exploratory study examines changes in suicidal ideation among a sample (N = 28) of homeless youth, ages 11-14, residing within family shelters in a large metropolitan area. Changes in suicidal ideation from pretest to posttest are compared across two group approaches to delivering HIV prevention. Youth and their families participating in the HOPE Family Program, incorporating a family strengthening approach, are compared to those receiving a traditional health education-only approach. Multivariate analyses reveal that youth in the HOPE Family Program were 13 times more likely to report a decrease of suicidal ideation. These findings indicate that health education programs integrating a family strengthening approach hold promise for positively impacting mental health outcomes for vulnerable youth. PMID:25157200

Lynn, Cynthia J; Acri, Mary C; Goldstein, Leah; Bannon, William; Beharie, Nisha; McKay, Mary M

2014-09-01

175

A cluster analysis of service utilization and incarceration among homeless youth.  

PubMed

Our paper examines service usage (e.g., shelter) as well as a typology of individuals who are most likely to use groupings of services among 249 homeless youth. Our results revealed that the majority of homeless young people have used food programs (66%) and street outreach (65%) on at least one occasion within the past year. Cluster analysis of services revealed four distinct groups: (1) basic survival service use, characterized by above average shelter, food, and outreach service use, but below average on counseling, substance abuse/mental health services, and incarceration; (2) multiple service use, which included above average use of all six services; (3) incarceration experience, characterized by above average incarceration experience, but below average use of all other five services; and (4) minimal service use, which included slightly above average use of counseling, but below average use of all other services. These findings have the potential to provide important information that may assist with targeting services to homeless youth. PMID:23017796

Kort-Butler, Lisa A; Tyler, Kimberly A

2012-05-01

176

A Family Intervention to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior, Substance Use, and Delinquency Among Newly Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Purpose We evaluate the efficacy of a short family intervention in reducing sexual risk behavior, drug use, and delinquent behaviors among homeless youth. Methods A randomized controlled trial of 151 families with a homeless adolescent aged 12 to 17 years. Adolescents were recruited from diverse sites in southern California from March 2006 through June 2009 and assessed at recruitment (baseline), 3, 6, and 12 months later. Families were randomly assigned to an intervention condition with five weekly home-based intervention sessions or a control condition (standard care). Main outcome measures reflect self-reported sexual, substance use and delinquent behaviors over the last 90 days. Results Sexual risk (e.g., mean number of partners) (p < .001), alcohol use (p = .003), hard drug use (p < .001), and delinquent behaviors (p = .001) decreased significantly more over 12 months in the intervention condition compared to the control condition. Marijuana use, however, significantly increased in the intervention condition compared to the control condition (p < .001). Conclusion An intervention to re-engage families of homeless youth has significant benefits in reducing risk over 12 months. PMID:22443839

Milburn, Norweeta G.; Iribarren, Francisco Javier; Rice, Eric; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Solorio, Rosa; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Desmond, Katherine; Lee, Alex; Alexander, Kwame; Maresca, Katherine; Eastmen, Karen; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Duan, Naihua

2011-01-01

177

Influence of Gang Membership on Negative Affect, Substance Use, and Antisocial Behavior Among Homeless African American Male Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study examined differences between gang-involved and non-gang-involved homeless African American male youth with regard to negative affect, substance use, and antisocial\\/violent behavior. A total of 69 homeless African American young men were recruited from community agencies and completed structured face-to-face interviews. Overall, gang members reported higher rates of negative mental and physical health outcomes than did non-gang members,

Gary W. Harper; Jonathan Davidson; Sybil G. Hosek

2008-01-01

178

Characteristics of homeless youth who use cocaine and methamphetamine.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional hepatitis health promotion study (N = 156) was designed to identify correlates of cocaine and methamphetamine use among young, homeless persons living in Los Angeles County. Structured questionnaires were administered at baseline to assess sociodemographic characteristics, drug history, and social support. Unadjusted analysis showed that older age, having a history of incarceration, injection drug use (IDU), 10 or more sexual partners, and sex for money were associated with both cocaine and methamphetamine use. Logistic regression results showed that injection drug users had over seven times greater odds of using each stimulant compared with nonusers of injection drugs; those reporting at least 10 sexual partners and alcohol use in the past 6 months were more likely to use cocaine than their respective counterparts. African Americans were also less likely than Whites to report cocaine use. Understanding of these relationships can guide interventions targeting the multiple challenges faced by this population. PMID:22494226

Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Greengold, Barbara; Leake, Barbara

2012-01-01

179

Characteristics of Homeless Youth who Use Cocaine and Methamphetamine  

PubMed Central

This cross-sectional hepatitis health promotion study (N = 156) was designed to identify correlates of cocaine and methamphetamine use, among young, homeless persons living in Los Angeles County. Structured questionnaires were administered at baseline to assess sociodemographic characteristics, drug history and social support. Unadjusted analysis showed that older age, having a history of incarceration, injection drug use (IDU), 10 or more sexual partners and sex for money were associated with both cocaine and methamphetamine use. Logistic regression results showed that injection drug users had over 7 times greater odds of using each stimulant compared with non-users of injection drugs; those reporting at least 10 sexual partners and alcohol use in the past 6 months were more likely to use cocaine than their respective counterparts. African-Americans were also less likely than Whites to report cocaine use. Understanding of these relationships can guide interventions targeting the multiple challenges faced by this population. PMID:22494226

Nyamathi, Adeline; Hudson, Angela; Greengold, Barbara; Leake, Barbara

2013-01-01

180

Surviving on the StreetThe Experiences of Homeless Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article documents the living conditions of a sample of adolescents (N = 390) who had left home and were living on the street in Toronto, Canada The majority of these youth had spenta considerable amount of time without adequate shelter, food, or income; furthermore, many were involved in a variety of illegal activities and had been incarcerated or suicidal

Bill McCarthy; John Hagan

1992-01-01

181

Pro-social and problematic social network influences on HIV\\/AIDS risk behaviours among newly homeless youth in Los Angeles  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the social network composition among newly homeless youth over time and assessed how pro-social and problematic peers affected sexual and drug-using HIV\\/AIDS risk-behaviours among 183 youth in Los Angeles County, California. The percentage of newly homeless youth who reported that ‘most’ or ‘all’ of their friends were attending school, had jobs, and got along with their families was

E. Rice; N. G. Milburn; M. J. Rotheram-Borus

2007-01-01

182

Multiple Victimizations Before and After Leaving Home Associated With PTSD, Depression, and Substance Use Disorder Among Homeless Youth.  

PubMed

Exposure to multiple forms of maltreatment during childhood is associated with serious mental health consequences among youth in the general population, but limited empirical attention has focused on homeless youth-a population with markedly high rates of childhood maltreatment followed by elevated rates of street victimization. This study investigated the rates of multiple childhood abuses (physical, sexual, and emotional abuse) and multiple street victimizations (robbery, physical assault, and sexual assault) and examined their relative relationships to mental health outcomes (meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], depression, and substance use disorder) among a large (N = 601) multisite sample of homeless youth. Approximately 79% of youth retrospectively reported multiple childhood abuses (two or more types) and 28% reported multiple street victimizations (two or more types). Each additional type of street victimization nearly doubled youths' odds for meeting criteria for substance use disorder. Furthermore, each additional type of childhood abuse experienced more than doubled youths' odds for meeting criteria for PTSD. Both multiple abuses and multiple street victimizations were associated with an approximate twofold increase in meeting depression criteria. Findings suggest the need for screening, assessment, and trauma-informed services for homeless youth who consider multiple types of abuse and victimization experiences. PMID:25510502

Bender, Kimberly; Brown, Samantha M; Thompson, Sanna J; Ferguson, Kristin M; Langenderfer, Lisa

2015-05-01

183

Influence of gang membership on negative affect, substance use, and antisocial behavior among homeless African American male youth.  

PubMed

The current study examined differences between gang-involved and non-gang-involved homeless African American male youth with regard to negative affect, substance use, and antisocial/violent behavior. A total of 69 homeless African American young men were recruited from community agencies and completed structured face-to-face interviews. Overall, gang members reported higher rates of negative mental and physical health outcomes than did non-gang members, with current gang members reporting higher levels of depression and anxiety, greater levels of antisocial and violent behavior, and higher levels of lifetime alcohol and marijuana use. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that greater levels of gang involvement were associated with more frequent lifetime use of alcohol and marijuana and higher levels of participation in violent behaviors. Implications of these findings for interventions with homeless African American male youth and future research directions are discussed. PMID:19477786

Harper, Gary W; Davidson, Jonathan; Hosek, Sybil G

2008-09-01

184

A Youth-Friendly Intervention for Homeless and Street-Involved Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a community intervention for a population of youth who are often distrustful of mainstream mental health services. Program focuses on not viewing youth as patients but as experts in working with adults to design youth-friendly interventions. Outlines the development and implementation of a support-group model tailored specifically to the…

O'Connor, Barbara Virley; MacDonald, Brian J.

1999-01-01

185

Homeless Gay and Transgender Youth of Color in San Francisco: "No One Likes Street Kids"--Even in the Castro  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, focused on five transgender and gay youth of color from San Francisco, explored how family problems, poverty, homophobia, and transphobia propelled them into homelessness and made gay-friendly spaces and resources especially meaningful to them. These young people describe seeking support in San Francisco's well-known gay enclave, the…

Reck, Jen

2009-01-01

186

Chasing the European Dream: Unaccompanied African Youths' Educational Experience in a Canary Islands' Reception Centre and Beyond  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the last two decades, Spain's Canary Islands have received thousands of undocumented migrants arriving by boat from the coasts of North and West Africa. The sharp increase of unaccompanied minors has presented a particular challenge, as these minors fall under the State's protection system and are entitled to an education and other…

Auger-Voyer, Valérie; Montero-Sieburth, Martha; Perez, Lidia Cabrera

2014-01-01

187

Using the Social Enterprise Intervention (SEI) and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) models to improve employment and clinical outcomes of homeless youth with mental illness1  

PubMed Central

Prior research reveals high unemployment rates among homeless youth. The literature offers many examples of using evidence-informed and evidence-based supported employment models with vulnerable populations to assist them in obtaining and maintaining employment and concurrently addressing mental health challenges. However, there are few examples to date of these models with homeless youth with mental illness. The purpose of this article was thus to describe a methodology for establishing a university-agency research partnership to design, implement, evaluate, and replicate evidence-informed and evidence-based interventions with homeless youth with mental illness to enhance their employment, mental health, and functional outcomes. Data from two studies are used to illustrate the relationship between vocational skill-building/employment and mental health among homeless youth. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of conducting community-based participatory employment and clinical intervention research. The author highlights the opportunities and tensions associated with this approach. PMID:24294127

Ferguson, Kristin M.

2013-01-01

188

Decision Processes about Condom Use among Shelter-Homeless LGBT Youth in Manhattan.  

PubMed

Health behavior interventions based on Theory of Planned Behavior address participants' personally-held beliefs, perceived social norms, and control over the behavior. New data are always needed to "member check" participants' decision processes and inform interventions. This qualitative study investigates decision processes around condom use among 81 homeless LGBT youth ages 18-26. Findings indicated considerable endorsement of the conventional policy of always using condoms, promulgated in HIV prevention education targeting this population. Although some participants reported risk behavior in contexts of sex work, survival sex, casual encounters, open relationships, and substance use, most were aware of these risks and consistently safe in those situations. Condoms use boundaries became vulnerable in states of emotional need and negative mood. The only effect participants acknowledged of homelessness on condom use was indirect, through negative mood states. The most prevalent context of condom non-use was with long-term primary partners, a potential area of vulnerability because, of 13 participants for HIV or HCV, nine mentioned how they had been infected, and all nine believed they had acquired it from a primary partner. Findings imply programs should emphasize HIV risk potential within long-term romantic partnerships and mental health services to remediate negative mood states. PMID:22693658

Ream, Geoffrey L; Barnhart, Kate F; Lotz, Kevin V

2012-01-01

189

Decision Processes about Condom Use among Shelter-Homeless LGBT Youth in Manhattan  

PubMed Central

Health behavior interventions based on Theory of Planned Behavior address participants' personally-held beliefs, perceived social norms, and control over the behavior. New data are always needed to “member check” participants' decision processes and inform interventions. This qualitative study investigates decision processes around condom use among 81 homeless LGBT youth ages 18–26. Findings indicated considerable endorsement of the conventional policy of always using condoms, promulgated in HIV prevention education targeting this population. Although some participants reported risk behavior in contexts of sex work, survival sex, casual encounters, open relationships, and substance use, most were aware of these risks and consistently safe in those situations. Condoms use boundaries became vulnerable in states of emotional need and negative mood. The only effect participants acknowledged of homelessness on condom use was indirect, through negative mood states. The most prevalent context of condom non-use was with long-term primary partners, a potential area of vulnerability because, of 13 participants for HIV or HCV, nine mentioned how they had been infected, and all nine believed they had acquired it from a primary partner. Findings imply programs should emphasize HIV risk potential within long-term romantic partnerships and mental health services to remediate negative mood states. PMID:22693658

Ream, Geoffrey L.; Barnhart, Kate F.; Lotz, Kevin V.

2012-01-01

190

Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Young Adults Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

Background Art has been shown to be an empowering and engaging entity with numerous benefits to vulnerable populations, including the homeless persons and young adults. Yet, little is known how homeless young adults perceive the use of art as messages that can communicate the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Objectives The purpose of this study was to solicit perspectives of homeless drug-using young adults as to how art can be used to design messages for their peers about the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Methods Qualitative methodology via focus group discussions was utilized to engage 24 homeless young adults enrolled from a drop-in site in Santa Monica. Results The findings revealed support for a myriad of delivery styles, including in person communication, flyers, music, documentary film and creative writing. The young adults also provided insight into the importance of the thematic framework of messages. Such themes ranged from empowering and hopeful messages to those designed to scare young homeless adults into not experimenting with drugs. Conclusions The findings indicate that in addition to messages communicating the need to prevent or reduce drug and alcohol use, homeless young adults respond to messages that remind them of goals and dreams they once had for their future, and to content that is personal, real and truthful. . Our research indicates that messages that reinforce protective factors such as hope for the future and self-esteem may be as important to homeless young adults as information about the risks and consequences of drug use. PMID:21441664

Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Thomas, Alexandra; Hudson, Angela; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Avila, Glenna; Orser, Julie; Cuchilla, Manuel

2013-01-01

191

Rev. 01/2014 Please type or print legibly in blue or black ink.  

E-print Network

guardianship. · You were determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by your high school district liaison to be an unaccompanied homeless youth at risk of being homeless by the director of a runaway or homeless center

Rhode Island, University of

192

Rev. 01/2013 Please type or print legibly in blue or black ink.  

E-print Network

guardianship. · You were determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by your high school district liaison to be an unaccompanied homeless youth at risk of being homeless by the director of a runaway or homeless center

Rhode Island, University of

193

Dietary intake, overweight status, and perceptions of food insecurity among homeless Minnesotan youth.  

PubMed

Youth, 9-18 years (n = 202), living in homeless shelters in Minneapolis, Minnesota, were assessed for height, weight, dietary intake, and perceptions of food insecurity. Perceptions of food security were measured by asking youth to respond to the statements (1) "There are times when we do not have enough food in the house," (2) "I go to bed hungry at night," (3) "I do not get enough to eat at home," and (4) "Have you ever had to miss a meal (or not been able to eat) because there was no food at home?" Additionally, questions evaluated coping mechanisms used by children to ward off hunger. Fifty-five percent of the children reported not enough food in the house and 25% reported going to bed hungry. Youth had inadequate intakes of vitamin D, calcium, and potassium and the majority consumed less than the estimated average requirements (EAR) for vitamins A, C, and E, phosphorus, folate, and zinc. Fruits, vegetables, and dairy were also consumed below recommended levels. Forty-five percent of boys and 50% of girls were at risk-for-overweight or were overweight. Overeating, eating anything, eating disliked foods, and eating at the homes of family and friends were identified as strategies to cope with food insecurity. Overeating when food is available may explain why we see a hunger-obesity paradigm to the magnitude that we do among the poorest Americans. These strategies protect children from the immediate negative associations of poverty and hunger, but they may contribute to long-term weight problems currently found in the US. PMID:18491407

Smith, Chery; Richards, Rickelle

2008-01-01

194

Proceedings of the International Conference on AIDS and Homeless Youth: An Agenda for the Future (1st, San Francisco, California, June 25, 1990).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This proceedings of the first international conference on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and homeless youth included over 125 delegates from 32 countries. There was strong consensus among delegates that street youth are often in high and multiple Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) risk situations, and programmatic responses are needed.…

Luna, G. Cajetan; And Others

195

Families on the Edge: Homeless Young Parents and Their Welfare Experiences. A Survey of Homeless Youth and Service Providers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the experiences of homeless young parents with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which can be an important tool in helping them achieve long-term stability and economic self-sufficiency. The 1996 welfare reform act included special provisions that applied only to minor teen parents, requiring them to…

Reeg, Bob; Grisham, Christine; Shepard, Annie

196

Homeless Families, Children, and Youth in Stanislaus County--Problems and Solutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The homeless crisis in America is a complex issue with no "quick fixes." In Stanislaus County, California, it seems that there are many programs operating in isolation of one another. Approximately 5% of the county's population is homeless. Homeless persons have survival needs for food and clothing, hygiene, health care, affordable housing,…

Boley, Ellen

197

45 CFR 1351.19 - What additional information should an applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.19 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.19...

2011-10-01

198

45 CFR 1351.19 - What additional information should an applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.19 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.19...

2012-10-01

199

45 CFR 1351.19 - What additional information should an applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.19 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.19...

2014-10-01

200

45 CFR 1351.19 - What additional information should an applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.19 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.19...

2010-10-01

201

45 CFR 1351.19 - What additional information should an applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...applicant or grantee have about a Runaway and Homeless Youth Program grant? 1351.19 Section...FAMILY AND YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU RUNAWAY AND HOMELESS YOUTH PROGRAM Runaway and Homeless Youth Program Grant § 1351.19...

2013-10-01

202

Psychopathology in African Unaccompanied Refugee Minors in Austria  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed the prevalence of a range of psychopathology among African unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) in Austria. Additionally, the predictive value of war exposure on PTSD symptoms was examined. Forty-one URMs were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview for children and adolescents, the Youth Self-Report, the UCLA…

Huemer, Julia; Karnik, Niranjan; Voelkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Plattner, Belinda; Friedrich, Max; Steiner, Hans

2011-01-01

203

Increased Substance Use and Risky Sexual Behavior among Migratory Homeless Youth: Exploring the Role of Social Network Composition  

PubMed Central

Travelers are a migratory subgroup of homeless youth who may be especially prone to engaging in risky behavior. This study compared the substance use and sexual behavior of young homeless travelers and non-travelers to evaluate the extent and possible sources of travelers' increased risk. Data came from face-to-face interviews with 419 homeless youth (36.6% female, 34.0% white, 23.9% African American, and 20.0% Hispanic) between the ages of 13 and 24 years (M = 20.1 years, SD = 2.5) who were randomly sampled from 41 shelters, drop-in centers, and street sites in Los Angeles. Travelers were almost twice as likely as non-travelers to exhibit recent heavy drinking, 37% more likely to exhibit recent marijuana use, and five times as likely to have injected drugs. Travelers also had more recent sex partners and were more likely to report having casual or need-based sexual partners and combining sex with substance use. Mediation analyses suggest that travelers' deviant peer associations and disconnection to conventional individuals and institutions may drive their elevated substance use. Differences in sexual risk behaviors are likely attributable to demographic differences between the two groups. Overall, these differences between travelers and non-travelers suggest different service needs and the need for different service approaches. PMID:21400037

Martino, Steven C.; Tucker, Joan S.; Ryan, Gery; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Munjas, Brett

2011-01-01

204

To Use or Not to Use: A Stage-Based Approach to Understanding Condom Use Among Homeless Youth  

PubMed Central

This study used a stage-based approach to understand condom use behavior in a representative sample of 309 sexually active homeless youth recruited from shelters, drop-in centers, and street sites in Los Angeles County. Focusing on the youth’s most recent sexual event, the three stages of condom use examined were: (1) whether the partners decided prior to the event about using condoms; (2) whether a condom was available at the event; and (3) whether a condom was used at the event. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify attitudinal, relationship, and contextual correlates of each of these three stages. Deciding ahead of time about condom use was associated with being Hispanic, level of education, condom attitudes, and various relationship characteristics (e.g,. partner type, monogamy, relationship abuse), with the nature of these associations varying depending on the type of decision (i.e., deciding to use, deciding to not use). Condom availability was more likely to be reported by males, if the event was described as being special in some way, or if the event lacked privacy. Condom use was more likely among youth with more positive condom attitudes and among youth who decide ahead of time to use a condom, but less likely among those in monogamous relationships or when hard drugs were used prior to sex. Whether sexual intercourse is protected or unprotected is the end result of a series of decisions and actions by sexual partners. Results from this study illustrate how condom use can be better understood by unpacking the stages and identifying influential factors at each stage. Each stage may, in and of itself, be an important target for intervention with homeless youth. PMID:24099462

Tucker, Joan S.; Ober, Allison; Ryan, Gery; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Wenzel, Suzanne L.

2014-01-01

205

To use or not to use: a stage-based approach to understanding condom use among homeless youth.  

PubMed

This study used a stage-based approach to understand condom use behavior in a representative sample of 309 sexually active homeless youth recruited from shelters, drop-in centers, and street sites in Los Angeles County. Focusing on the youth's most recent sexual event, the three stages of condom use examined were: (1) whether the partners decided prior to the event about using condoms; (2) whether a condom was available at the event; and (3) whether a condom was used at the event. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify attitudinal, relationship, and contextual correlates of each of these three stages. Deciding ahead of time about condom use was associated with being Hispanic, level of education, condom attitudes, and various relationship characteristics (e.g., partner type, monogamy, relationship abuse), with the nature of these associations varying depending on the type of decision (i.e., deciding to use, deciding to not use). Condom availability was more likely to be reported by males, if the event was described as being special in some way, or if the event lacked privacy. Condom use was more likely among youth with more positive condom attitudes and among youth who decide ahead of time to use a condom, but less likely among those in monogamous relationships or when hard drugs were used prior to sex. Whether sexual intercourse is protected or unprotected is the end result of a series of decisions and actions by sexual partners. Results from this study illustrate how condom use can be better understood by unpacking the stages and identifying influential factors at each stage. Each stage may, in and of itself, be an important target for intervention with homeless youth. PMID:24099462

Tucker, Joan S; Ober, Allison; Ryan, Gery; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett; Wenzel, Suzanne L

2014-01-01

206

Invited commentary: seeking a coherent strategy in our response to homeless and street-involved youth: a historical review and suggested future directions.  

PubMed

This invited commentary seeks to encourage a critical dialogue about youth homelessness that might assist in re-energizing a field that seems increasingly stagnant with a research body focused primarily on analyses of risk, hopelessly inadequate policy frameworks in most cities, diminishing funds for services, and decreasing media attention. Reviewing major trends in research and public responses to youth homelessness in the past century, I propose that there exist three major culturally-bound dimensions from which we construct our understanding of and responses to youth homelessness. These dimensions, which are considered in a transactional framework, are the scope of responsibility, the location of moral responsibility, and the amount of agency attributed to the youth. In this review I highlight the manner in which our historically binary and uncritical understanding of these dimensional characterizations of youth homelessness has led to major lapses in the effectiveness of our collective efforts to address this problem. I highlight gaps in the existing body of research literature and provide this framework, arguing that a strategic and cohesive response is vital if we are to move from reiterations of risk and hackneyed calls for prevention strategies to the generation of meaningful solutions. PMID:22302217

Kidd, Sean

2012-05-01

207

The McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Implications for Special Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the 2008-2009 academic school year, nearly a million (956,914) students were reported by school districts as being homeless, a 41% increase over just a 2-year period year. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of national legislative efforts to address the education of children who are homeless, with a particular…

Losinski, Mickey; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ryan, Joseph B.

2013-01-01

208

Risk to Resilience : : Exploring Protective Factors for Students Experiencing Homelessness at a Traditional High School and a Modified Comprehensive School  

E-print Network

and youth experiencing homelessness: The McKinney-Vento act andHomeless Children and Youth in 1987—the act was reauthorizedand youth program: Title VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act.

Garcia, Joel Romero

209

"You Have to Adapt Because You Have No Other Choice": The Stories of Strength and Resilience of 208 Homeless Youth in New York City and Toronto  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented in this paper are the results of a qualitative analysis of the narratives of 208 homeless youth interviewed on streets and in agencies in New York City and Toronto. The interviews focused on the participants' stories about their struggles to survive and negotiate meaningful and healthy lives in coming to the streets, living on the…

Kidd, Sean A.; Davidson, Larry

2007-01-01

210

A Case Study of the Life Experiences of High School Graduates/General Education Development (GED) Recipients in Texas Who Experienced Homelessness During Their Public School Education  

E-print Network

) Homeless Youth ........... 35 Teenage Pregnancy and Homelessness .............. 39 Post-Katrina New Orleans ................................. 41 Human Trafficking ............................................ 45 Street Life...

Reider, Ruth Ann

2012-07-16

211

Addressing Homelessness: Recent Happenings--Iowa, 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide provides information on the following resources available to the homeless in Iowa: (1) Funding Sources for School District Programs Serving Homeless Students; (2) Local Educational Liaison for Homeless Children and Youth; (3) Homeless Advisory Committee; (4) Identification, Counting, and Maintaining Data at the Local School District…

Iowa Department of Education, 2004

2004-01-01

212

Pro-social and problematic social network influences on HIV/AIDS risk behaviours among newly homeless youth in Los Angeles  

PubMed Central

We examined the social network composition among newly homeless youth over time and assessed how pro-social and problematic peers affected sexual and drug-using HIV/AIDS risk-behaviours among 183 youth in Los Angeles County, California. The percentage of newly homeless youth who reported that ‘most’ or ‘all’ of their friends were attending school, had jobs, and got along with their families was 73%, 24%, and 50% respectively. Logistic regression models indicated that presence of these pro-social peers reduced HIV risk behaviours at two years; odds of HIV-risk were lower with a greater number of peers who attend school, have a job, or have positive family relationships or if networks change over time to include more of these peers. Presence of problematic peers increased the likelihood of HIV risk-taking; odds of HIV risk behaviours increased with a greater number of peers at baseline who steal, have overdosed, have been arrested, or are in a gang, or if networks change to include more of these peers. Interventions should target newly homeless youth in networks that contain problematic peers, but should strive to harness the naturally occurring pro-social peer influences present in these networks. PMID:17505933

Rice, E.; Milburn, N. G.; Rotheram-Borus, M. J.

2010-01-01

213

"We're Locking the Door": Family Histories in a Sample of Homeless Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is well known that the pathways to homelessness for young people are embedded in often ongoing negative childhood experiences. Many of these experiences are rooted in multiple and intersecting problems including, but not limited to: family conflict, abuse, addictions, and mental health issues. The authors draw upon qualitative interviews…

Alvi, Shahid; Scott, Hannah; Stanyon, Wendy

2010-01-01

214

Trials, Tribulations, and Occasional Jubilations While Conducting Research with Homeless Children, Youth, and Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

A personal account of a program of research on homelessness and poverty spanning the past 20 years is provided, with a focus on the many methodological, practical, and ethical difficulties encountered. Interesting discoveries and enjoyable aspects of the research process are also presented. Several role conflicts that arose for the researcher in this community-based work are also described, and the

Paul A. Toro

2006-01-01

215

Homeless Youths and Young Adults in Los Angeles: Prevalence of Mental Health Problems and the Relationship Between Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although understanding of the subsistence patterns, service utilization, and HIV-risk behaviors of homeless youths and young adults is increasing, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of mental health problems in this group or the relationships between mental health problems and substance use. This study measured symptoms of depression, low self-esteem, ADHD, suicidality, self-injurious behavior (SIB), and drug and alcohol

Jennifer B. Unger; Michele D. Kipke; Thomas R. Simon; Susanne B. Montgomery; Christine J. Johnson

1997-01-01

216

Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to identify what is most important to the quality of life (QoL) of those who experience homelessness by directly soliciting the views of homeless and hard-to-house Canadians themselves. These individuals live within a unique social context that differs considerably from that of the general population. To understand the life areas that are most important to them, it is critical to have direct input from target populations of homeless and hard-to-house persons. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 140 individuals aged 15 to 73?years who were homeless or hard-to-house to explore the circumstances in which they were living and to capture what they find to be important and relevant domains of QoL. Participants were recruited in Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and Vancouver. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Six major content themes emerged: Health/health care; Living conditions; Financial situation; Employment situation; Relationships; and Recreational and leisure activities. These themes were linked to broader concepts that included having choices, stability, respect, and the same rights as other members of society. Conclusions These findings not only aid our understanding of QoL in this group, but may be used to develop measures that capture QoL in this population and help programs and policies become more effective in improving the life situation for persons who are homeless and hard-to-house. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study. PMID:22894551

2012-01-01

217

Personality and Psychopathology in African Unaccompanied Refugee Minors: Repression, Resilience and Vulnerability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examining personality and psychopathological symptoms among unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs), we measured intra-individual dimensions (repression and correlates thereof) usually associated with resilience. Forty-one URMs completed the Weinberger Adjustment Inventory (WAI), assessing personality, and the Youth Self-Report (YSR), describing…

Huemer, Julia; Volkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Karnik, Niranjan; Denny, Katherine G.; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Mitterer, Michaela; Humphreys, Keith; Plattner, Belinda; Friedrich, Max; Shaw, Richard J.; Steiner, Hans

2013-01-01

218

Negative Cultural Capital and Homeless Young People  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the ways in which homeless young people find a sense of self-worth and dignity within the conditions of youth homelessness. It notes that, while homeless young people seek a space where they do not feel marginalised and can attain a form of social status and cultural competence, they also engage in practices and acts of…

Barker, Justin David

2013-01-01

219

Estrangement Factors Associated with Addiction to Alcohol and Drugs among Homeless Youth in Three U. S. Cities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Substance use is highly prevalent among homeless, street-involved young people. Societal estrangement is often associated with substance use, particularly among this population. The current study sought to identify four domains of social estrangement (disaffiliation, human capital, identification with homeless culture, and psychological…

Thompson, Sanna; Jun, Jina; Bender, Kimberly; Ferguson, Kristin M.; Pollio, David E.

2010-01-01

220

A Comparison of Weight-Related Behaviors among High School Students Who Are Homeless and Non-Homeless  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Previous research has shown that youth who are homeless engage in high-risk behaviors. However, there has been little information published on nutritional and physical activity behaviors in this population, and studies comparing homeless youth in school with their non-homeless peers are scarce. This study compares weight-related risk…

Fournier, Mary E.; Austin, S. Bryn; Samples, Cathryn L.; Goodenow, Carol S.; Wylie, Sarah A.; Corliss, Heather L.

2009-01-01

221

Educating Homeless Children. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session (Phoenix, Arizona, September 5, 2000).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives, which was held in Phoenix, Arizona, focused on ensuring equal educational opportunities for homeless children. After an opening statement by the Honorable Matt Solomon, Subcommittee on Early…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

222

Homeless Youth: The Saga of "Pushouts" and "Throwaways" in America. Report of the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report of the Senate Subcommittee on the Constitution examines the phenomenon of homeless youth, including the population, their families, survival tactics, the availability of services, and future outlooks. A section reviewing the legal constraints imposed on young people which affect their ability to live on their own is followed by a…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

223

Service utilization among homeless and runaway youth in Los Angeles, California: rates and reasons 1 1 An incorrect version of the following article (De Rosa CJ, Montgomery SB, Kipke MD, Iverson E, Ma JL, Unger JB. Service utilization among homeless and runaway youth in Los Angeles, California: Rates and reasons. J Adolesc Health 1999;24:190–200.) was published in the March 1999 issue of this Journal. 2 2 Following is the corrected version of this article in its entirety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To describe the service utilization patterns of homeless and runaway youth in a “service-rich” area of Los Angeles, California; identify demographic and other correlates of utilization; and contextualize the findings with qualitative data.Method: During Phase 1 of this study, survey data were collected from an ethnically diverse sample of 296 youth aged 13–23 years, recruited from both service and

Christine J De Rosa; Susanne B Montgomery; Michele D Kipke; Ellen Iverson; Joanne L Ma; Jennifer B Unger

1999-01-01

224

Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid 2014-2015 Texas Application for State Financial Aid (TASFA)  

E-print Network

districtliaison determinethat you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? Yes No 10. Did the director were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? Yes No 11. Did the director of a runaway of homeless was homeless or were self-supportingand atrisk of being homeless? Yes No If you answered"No" to all

Azevedo, Ricardo

225

Dependency Status & Policies Penn endorses the principle that education is first and foremost the responsibility of you and your family. Therefore, financial aid fund-  

E-print Network

district homeless liaison determined that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless · at any time.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determined that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless · at any time after July 1, 2015 the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional

Plotkin, Joshua B.

226

OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 0102 Lee Building  

E-print Network

or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? If yes and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? If yes, please the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program determine that you were

Milchberg, Howard

227

19 CFR 148.114 - Shipment of unaccompanied articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS Unaccompanied Shipments From American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or the Virgin Islands of the United States § 148.114 Shipment of unaccompanied articles....

2010-04-01

228

Homeless Children  

MedlinePLUS

... year. That's over 1.6 million children. While homeless, they experience high rates of acute and chronic ... of emotional and behavioral problems compared to non-homeless children. 3 Experiences of Violence Violence plays a ...

229

Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children: Whose Perspective?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent years have seen increasing attention being paid to unaccompanied asylum-seeking children. This article provides an overview of research in the field and its implications for an understanding of these children as a particularly vulnerable category. The existing research focuses primarily on investigating the children's emotional well-being…

Wernesjo, Ulrika

2012-01-01

230

Unaccompanied Refugee Minors: Policies and Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the various policies that affect the rights of unaccompanied refugee children as defined by the Refugee Act of 1980. Included is a discussion of the appropriate interrelationship between the Federal, State and local governments and voluntary agencies in the establishment and funding of refugee programs; and the appropriate…

Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, NY.

231

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed from 1998 to 2008 addressing this topic were reviewed. The literature had a considerable emphasis on the assessment of

Julia Huemer; Niranjan S Karnik; Sabine Voelkl-Kernstock; Elisabeth Granditsch; Kanita Dervic; Max H Friedrich; Hans Steiner

2009-01-01

232

INDEPENDENT STATUS APPEAL Academic Year 20122013 DIRECTIONS--If you do not meet the definition of an independent student,  

E-print Network

to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by your high school district liaison or the director of an emergency shelter program on or after July 1, 2011. · You were determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth at risk of being homeless by the director of a runaway or homeless center/ shelter on or after July 1, 2011

Blanchette, Robert A.

233

Division of Enrollment Management S107 Criser Hall Office for Student Financial Affairs PO Box 114025  

E-print Network

, 2012, my high school or school district homeless liaison determined I was an unaccompanied youth who was homeless. (Attach a photocopy of a letter from your school district certifying your homeless or at risk.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determined I was an unaccompanied youth who was homeless. (Attach

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

234

Educating Homeless Children and Adolescents: Evaluating Policy and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the more enigmatic issues of contemporary homelessness is that of schooling. This collection highlights issues related to the provision of an education to homeless children and youths. Background information is offered, with an analysis of educational policy relating to homeless children. Practical strategies and a review of successful…

Stronge, James H., Ed.

235

School Help for Homeless Children with Disabilities: Information for Parents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is difficult for families dealing with homelessness to enroll their children in school and ensure their daily attendance. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act gives homeless children and youth the right to enroll in school immediately, even if they do not have documents that are usually required for enrollment. The Individuals with…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

2007-01-01

236

Homeless Young People's Experiences with Information Systems: Life and Work  

E-print Network

Homeless Young People's Experiences with Information Systems: Life and Work in a Community Seattle, WA 98195-2840 {woelfj, dhendry}@u.washington.edu ABSTRACT This paper explores how homeless young (Conformity, Youth-Adult Relationships, and Goals). Any information system for homeless young people must

Anderson, Richard

237

Education Rights of Homeless Students: A Guide for Advocates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is no question that students who are homeless, like all students, are entitled to be educated. A federal law, known as the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, requires states to provide homeless children and youth with the same access to free public education as is available to other students. The Act also requires states to eliminate…

Education Law Center, 2005

2005-01-01

238

The role of social support in the acculturation and mental health of unaccompanied minor asylum seekers.  

PubMed

There is a lack of knowledge about psychosocial resources that may sustain post-resettlement psychological adjustment among unaccompanied minor asylum-seekers. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of social support from family abroad and friends on acculturation, discrimination, and mental health among these vulnerable children and youth. Questionnaire data were collected from a population-based multi-ethnic sample involving 895 unaccompanied minors resettled in municipalities in all regions of the country. They met in groups in their local communities. The informants were on average 18.6 years, and had an average length of stay in Norway of 3.5 years. The findings showed that the participants suffered from high levels of ongoing war related intrusive symptoms and depression. Still, at the same time they engaged in adaptation processes that are normative to youth with immigrant backgrounds, in terms of constructing supportive networks and developing culture competence. In accordance with the main effect hypothesis, social support had direct effects on depression and indirect effects by increasing culture competence that may aid the young refugees in dealing with discrimination. However, there were no effects of social support on symptoms of PTSD. The findings give direction to areas of interventions, beyond dealing with the sequel of the traumas the unaccompanied minors have been exposed to, not only for clinicians, but also social workers and school personnel. PMID:25614276

Oppedal, Brit; Idsoe, Thormod

2015-04-01

239

Hearings on the Reauthorization of Title 3(b) of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988: Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth and Youth Gangs. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (Washington, D.C., July 18, 1991; Downey, California, August 2, 1991).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains witness testimonies from two Congressional hearings examining the reauthorization of Title 3(b) of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 relating to the drug abuse education and prevention for runaway and homeless youth and youth gangs. Opening statements are included from Representatives Martinez and Fawell. Witnesses providing…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

240

Human immunodeficiency syndrome and hepatitis B and C infections among homeless adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lifestyle of homeless adolescents places them at high risk for contracting a variety of serious illnesses. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the predictors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis infections among homeless youth. Anonymous and confidential interviewer-administered psychosocial surveys were conducted with 150 homeless youth (ages 14 to 23 years; 70% male). Venous blood

Bettina M. Beech; Leann Myers; Derrick J. Beech; Nita S. Kernick

2003-01-01

241

IT'S TOUGH TO BE A TEENAGER. IT'S EVEN TOUGHER TO BE A HOMELESS TEENAGER.  

E-print Network

&CULTURE IT'S TOUGH TO BE A TEENAGER. IT'S EVEN TOUGHER TO BE A HOMELESS TEENAGER. Hundreds of homeless youth roam the Valley's streets. The reasons for their dislocation vary from being the victim and director of ArtsWork. The play's the thing Innovative ASU ArtsWork partnership gives homeless youth a voice

Thorpe, Michael

242

76 FR 26302 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Reunification Procedures for Unaccompanied Alien...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Reunification Procedures for Unaccompanied Alien Children Description Following the passage...the care and placement of unaccompanied alien children in Federal custody, and implementing...Sponsors requesting release of unaccompanied alien. Annual Burden...

2011-05-06

243

76 FR 51381 - Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers AGENCY: Office...supplement grants to seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers...supplement grants to seven unaccompanied alien shelter care providers for a total...

2011-08-18

244

76 FR 27079 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Activities: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...Reduction Act: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles (CBP Form 255). This is a proposed...Title: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles. OMB Number: 1651-0030. Form...

2011-05-10

245

76 FR 11254 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Activities: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...concerning the Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles (CBP Form 255). This request for comment...Title: Declaration of Unaccompanied Articles. OMB Number: 1651-0030. Form...

2011-03-01

246

Educating Children with Disabilities Who Are Homeless. Policy Forum Proceedings Document (Arlington, Virginia, December 5-7, 1999).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication summarizes the proceedings of a Project FORUM conference that examined the needs of homeless children and youth with disabilities. The summarized presentations address the definition of homelessness, the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, services for homeless students under the Individuals with Disabilities Education…

Markowitz, Joy

247

Factors Associated with Trauma Symptoms Among Runaway\\/Homeless Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Runaway\\/homeless youth often suffer from exposure to chronic family distress and confront numerous traumatic events that may produce symptoms of PTSD. This study evaluated runaway\\/homeless youth's PTSD symptoms and associated factors. Data were collected at youth emergency shelters. Ninety-eight percent of participants had elevated PTSD symptom scores. Although use of inhalants and LSD was associated with PTSD symptoms, only depression,

Sanna J. Thompson

2005-01-01

248

STATEMENT re: Another Dependent 2011-2012 ACADEMIC YEAR  

E-print Network

the sibling's high school or school district homeless liaison determine that he/she was an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? (See notes on FAFSA page 9) 12. At any time on or after July 1, 2010, did and Urban Development determine that the sibling was an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? (See notes

Rosen, Jay

249

The Crisis in Homelessness: Effects on Children and Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents witness testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the effects of homelessness on children and families. In their opening statements, Representatives George Miller and Dan Coats emphasize that homelessness threatens the physical health and safety of children, places them at risk of…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

250

Homelessness During the Transition From Foster Care to Adulthood  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We estimated the incidence of homelessness during the transition to adulthood and identified the risk and protective factors that predict homelessness during this transition. Methods. Using data from the Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study of youths aging out of foster care in 3 Midwestern states, and a bounds approach, we estimated the cumulative percentage of youths who become homeless during the transition to adulthood. We also estimated a discrete time hazard model that predicted first reported episode of homelessness. Results. Youths aging out of foster care are at high risk for becoming homeless during the transition to adulthood. Between 31% and 46% of our study participants had been homeless at least once by age 26 years. Running away while in foster care, greater placement instability, being male, having a history of physical abuse, engaging in more delinquent behaviors, and having symptoms of a mental health disorder were associated with an increase in the relative risk of becoming homeless. Conclusions. Policy and practice changes are needed to reduce the risk that youths in foster care will become homeless after aging out. PMID:24148065

Napolitano, Laura; Courtney, Mark

2013-01-01

251

The Effects of Lyric Analysis and Songwriting Music Therapy Techniques on Self-Esteem and Coping Skills Among Homeless Adolescents  

E-print Network

Homelessness is a troubling epidemic affecting a wide range of individuals, including youth and adolescents. The reasons for homelessness as well as manifestations of the condition are perpetuated by a cycle of abuse, ...

Jurgensmeier, Barbara

2012-12-31

252

Mental health issues in unaccompanied refugee minors  

PubMed Central

Previous studies about unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) showed that they are a highly vulnerable group who have greater psychiatric morbidity than the general population. This review focuses on mental health issues among URMs. Articles in databases PsycINFO, Medline and PubMed from 1998 to 2008 addressing this topic were reviewed. The literature had a considerable emphasis on the assessment of PTSD symptoms. Results revealed higher levels of PTSD symptoms in comparison to the norm populations and accompanied refugee minors. In several studies, age and female gender predicted or influenced PTSD symptoms. The existing literature only permits limited conclusions on this very hard to reach population. Future research should include the analysis of long-term outcomes, stress management and a more thorough analysis of the whole range of psychopathology. Additionally, the development of culturally sensitive norms and standardized measures for diverse ethnic groups is of great importance. PMID:19341468

Huemer, Julia; Karnik, Niranjan S; Voelkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Dervic, Kanita; Friedrich, Max H; Steiner, Hans

2009-01-01

253

Health Risks of Homeless AdolescentsImplications for Holistic Nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the exact number of homeless adolescents is unknown, it is estimated that this population may exceed 2 million. Literally living on the streets, homeless youth are at risk for a variety of physical, psychosocial, and spiritual health problems. Many engage in \\

Lynn Rew

1996-01-01

254

Pregnancy and Sexual Health among Homeless Young Injection Drug Users  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of…

Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

2009-01-01

255

Homeless “squeegee kids”: Food insecurity and daily survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current knowledge about food insecurity in North America is largely based on research with low-income households. Much less is known about the food experiences of homeless people, a group who are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity. This study explored the food experiences of street youth, one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in Canada. To gain an

Naomi Dachner; Valerie Tarasuk

2002-01-01

256

The Invisible Crisis: Connecting Schools with Homeless Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children and youth represent a growing proportion of the homeless population. Using the lens of transformative leadership, this multifamily case study explores the realities of homeless children, the challenges their families face, and the role of school leaders in ensuring that they receive a quality education. It recommends that leaders (1)…

Shields, Carolyn M.; Warke, Amy

2010-01-01

257

Spaces of Trauma: Young People, Homelessness and Violence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little contemporary research has examined young people's experiences of violence and homelessness in detail within the Australian context. This article draws upon qualitative research with 33 homeless youth in Melbourne and seeks to enhance understanding of the impact of violence on young people. It argues that everyday experiences of violence…

Jordan, Lucinda

2012-01-01

258

Homeless service Utilization report  

E-print Network

Homeless service Utilization report H a w a i ` i 2 0 0 9 #12;2 Homeless service Utilization report Hawai`i is unique in having a statewide, centralized electronic data system in which all homeless`i and the Homeless Programs Branch of the Hawai`i Public Housing Authority (HPHA) issued the first Homeless Service

259

Access to Pre-K Education under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Pre-K Policy Brief Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act ("McKinney-Vento") provides federal funding to states to address the problems that homeless children and youth encounter in enrolling, attending, and succeeding in the nation's public schools. McKinney-Vento requires states to develop plans that ensure homeless children and youth the same access…

Boylan, Ellen; Splansky, Deborah

2010-01-01

260

77 FR 58404 - Announcing the Award of Three Single-Source Program Expansion Supplement Grants to Unaccompanied...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Expansion Supplement Grants to Unaccompanied Alien Children's Shelter Care Grantees AGENCY...supplement grants from its Unaccompanied Alien Children's Program to two organizations...will support services to unaccompanied alien children through September 30,...

2012-09-20

261

Families Experiencing Homelessness  

MedlinePLUS

... which may compound the stress the family feels. Families experiencing homelessness: Are typically comprised of a mother ... of other women. The Relationship Between Homelessness and Family Separation: Families who have experienced homelessness have much ...

262

For Homeless Veterans  

MedlinePLUS

... Veterans within this program. Homeless Veterans Dental Program Project CHALENG (Community Homelessness Assessment, Local Education and Networking ... better serve homeless Veterans. For more information on Project CHALENG, call VA’s toll-free hotline or visit ...

263

77 FR 76063 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles (Form 3299). This request for comment...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles OMB Number: 1651-0014 Form...

2012-12-26

264

78 FR 16521 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles (Form 3299). This is a proposed extension...Declaration for Free Entry of Unaccompanied Articles. OMB Number: 1651-0014. Form...

2013-03-15

265

Personality and psychopathology in African unaccompanied refugee minors: repression, resilience and vulnerability.  

PubMed

Examining personality and psychopathological symptoms among unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs), we measured intra-individual dimensions (repression and correlates thereof) usually associated with resilience. Forty-one URMs completed the Weinberger Adjustment Inventory (WAI), assessing personality, and the Youth Self-Report (YSR), describing current symptoms. URMs endorsed high levels of Repressive Defensiveness, Denial of Distress, and Restraint; unexpectedly, URMs reported high Distress and reduced Happiness (WAI, p's < 0.05). Although YSR symptoms were below clinical cut points, there were notable correlations between Distress and Attention Problems, Self-destructive, and Aggressive Behavior (all on the YSR), correcting for multiple comparisons (p's < 0.004). URMs exposed to non-normative stressors reported non-symptomatic outcomes, and high levels of personality dimensions correlating with resilience. However, URMs also endorsed high Distress and low Happiness, calling their resilience into question. Positive correlations between WAI Distress and YSR symptom subscales suggest that URMs harbor vulnerabilities of clinical and forensic significance. PMID:22661148

Huemer, Julia; Völkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Karnik, Niranjan; Denny, Katherine G; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Mitterer, Michaela; Humphreys, Keith; Plattner, Belinda; Friedrich, Max; Shaw, Richard J; Steiner, Hans

2013-02-01

266

Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships Lakefront Campus, 2000 Lakeshore Drive  

E-print Network

, LA 70148 FAX: (504) 280-3973 E-MAIL: PECFORM@UNO.EDU Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Verification-funded shelter: As per the College Cost Reduction and Access Act (Public Law 110-84), I am authorized to verify an unaccompanied homeless youth after July 1, 2008 This means that, after July 1, 2008

Li, X. Rong

267

Runaway and Pregnant: Risk Factors Associated with Pregnancy in a National Sample of Runaway\\/Homeless Female Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Homeless youth are at particularly high risk for teen pregnancy; research indicates as many as 20% of homeless young women become pregnant. These pregnant and homeless teens lack financial resources and adequate health care, resulting in increased risk for low- birth-weight babies and high infant mortality. This study investigated individual and family-level predictors of teen pregnancy among a national

Sanna J. Thompson; Kimberly A. Bender; Carol M. Lewis; Rita Watkins

268

Subgroups of the Homeless: Street Kids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Street kids are a feature of many cities, but only recently have they been included among the homeless. They were defined as runaways, throwaways, or youth in crisis. They had a place to live, even if it was a foster or group home or an institutional setting. However, many are without shelter at one time or another and face the

Bruce Clary; James Harrod; Rachel Olney

1992-01-01

269

Sudanese Refugee Youth in Foster Care: The "Lost Boys" in America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the resettlement experiences of unaccompanied Sudanese refugee youth placed in foster care from the perspectives of the youth, foster parents, and agency caseworkers. Youth experienced considerable success. The challenges of adjusting to school and family life, however, suggest a need for funding to support more intensive…

Bates, Laura; Baird, Diane; Johnson, Deborah J.; Lee, Robert E.; Luster, Tom; Rehagen, Christine

2005-01-01

270

Homelessness as a Choice  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has long been assumed that homelessness is a personal choice. As a choice, homelessness is embedded within debates about deviant behaviours and problematic pathologies. The “homeless person” is either making calculated and immoral choices to be homeless, or they are perceived to be powerless agents who lack the capacity to exercise choices. Rarely has it been adequately explained, however,

Cameron Parsell; Mitch Parsell

2012-01-01

271

Homelessness in Public Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper takes a theoretical and practical approach in defining the "problem" of homelessness in libraries. The author examines three fundamental problems on homelessness. The three fundamental questions are: (a) Who are the homeless? (b) Why are they homeless? (c) What are their information needs in libraries? These questions are important in…

Wong, Yi Ling

2009-01-01

272

20132014 Texas Application for State Financial Aid 1 20132014Texas Application for State Financial Aid (TASFA)  

E-print Network

? Yes No 9. Did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? Yes No 10. Did the director of an emergency shelter program funded was homeless? Yes No 11. Did the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living

O'Toole, Alice J.

273

Print Name UTD Student ID# Financial Statement for  

E-print Network

by a court? Yes No 9. Did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless? Yes No 10. Did the director of an emergency shelter program funded was homeless? Yes No 11. Did the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living

O'Toole, Alice J.

274

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS FA PJDPOV FINANCIAL AID OFFICE 14-15  

E-print Network

of residence to be an emancipated minor. You were determined to be a homeless or unaccompanied youth or at risk of becoming homeless on or after July 1, 2013 by a school district homeless liaison, a director Development, or a director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program. If you

Hartman, Chris

275

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS FA PJDPOV FINANCIAL AID OFFICE 13-14  

E-print Network

of residence to be an emancipated minor. You were determined to be a homeless or unaccompanied youth or at risk of becoming homeless on or after July 1, 2012 by a school district homeless liaison, a director Development, or a director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program. If you

Hartman, Chris

276

Homeless adolescents: a descriptive study of similarities and differences between runaways and throwaways.  

PubMed

A sample of 43 homeless adolescents was categorized as being either runaways, throwaways, or societal rejects. Comparisons of these categories of homeless youths were completed to assess the descriptive utility of internal social control, strain, and psychopathological theory in making distinctions between various homeless adolescents. Descriptive data support the view that control and psychopathology perspectives provide some promise for understanding differing types of runaway adolescents. Sex differences between runaway and throwaway youths were explored. However, few sex X type of homeless adolescent interactions were observed. Implications for secondary prevention, based upon these data, are offered. PMID:4083132

Adams, G R; Gullotta, T; Clancy, M A

1985-01-01

277

Life Shocks and Homelessness  

PubMed Central

We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

2014-01-01

278

Parenting while Being Homeless  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the dynamics of parenting while being in a homeless context. The mosaic of stressors involved in this homeless parenting process are explicated and discussed. In addition, resources and strategies that may support parenting are presented and discussed.

Swick, Kevin J.; Williams, Reginald; Fields, Evelyn

2014-01-01

279

Life shocks and homelessness.  

PubMed

We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

2013-12-01

280

HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT  

E-print Network

HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT H A W A I ` I 2 0 11 #12;State 2007 2,136 2,201 2,204 2,069 2) Hawai`i, Kaua`i and Maui Counties 2 HOMELESS SERVICE UTILIZATION REPORT The 2011 Homeless Service of Hawai`i and the Homeless Programs Office of the Hawai`i State Department of Human Services (DHS

281

24 CFR 578.89 - Limitation on use of grant funds to serve persons defined as homeless under other federal laws.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...grant funds to serve persons defined as homeless under other federal laws. 578.89...grant funds to serve persons defined as homeless under other federal laws. (a) Application...families with children and youth defined as homeless under other federal laws in...

2013-04-01

282

24 CFR 578.89 - Limitation on use of grant funds to serve persons defined as homeless under other federal laws.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...grant funds to serve persons defined as homeless under other federal laws. 578.89...grant funds to serve persons defined as homeless under other federal laws. (a) Application...families with children and youth defined as homeless under other federal laws in...

2014-04-01

283

Educating Homeless Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past decade, the number of homeless children in America has more than doubled. Educators, however, are still legally obligated to enroll and support them, because of the passage of the "No Child Left Behind" Act of 2001, which reauthorized the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Although schools cannot solve homelessness, they can…

Berliner, BethAnn

2002-01-01

284

Japan's “New Homeless  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the mid-1990s, homelessness has become a major issue of public discussion in Japan, and is often viewed as a new social problem facing Japanese society. The issue of homelessness contrasts images of the absence of poverty and homelessness in postwar Japan, often explained based on the unique features of Japanese-style employment and welfare, containing poverty and unemployment. This paper

Aya Ezawa

2002-01-01

285

Homeless Health Concerns  

MedlinePLUS

... Many homeless women are victims of domestic or sexual abuse. Homeless children have high rates of emotional and behavioral problems, often from having witnessed abuse. Help such as shelters, health centers, and free meals are available. Contact your local homelessness assistance agency.

286

Homelessness and theory reconsidered  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theory will not directly explain the development of policy and provision for homeless people, but it is an important consideration and one deserving of careful attention. In the UK, however, homelessness has often been explained simplistically and somewhat atheoretically as either a housing or a welfare problem, caused either by structural or by individual factors. Likewise, homeless people have been

Joanne Neale

1997-01-01

287

Homelessness and health  

Microsoft Academic Search

HOMELESSNESS AFFECTS TENS OF THOUSANDS OF CANADIANS and has important health implications. Homeless people are at increased risk of dying prematurely and suffer from a wide range of health problems, including seizures, chronic obstructive pul- monary disease, musculoskeletal disorders, tuberculosis, and skin and foot prob- lems. Homeless people also face significant barriers that impair their access to health care. More

Stephen W. Hwang

288

TRANSITIONAL SETTLEMENTS Planning Homeless  

E-print Network

TRANSITIONAL SETTLEMENTS 1 Planning Homeless Settlement Communities Western Washington University the living conditions faced by our fellow citizens who live in Homeless camps, public resources are necessary to help the Homeless segment of society regain their footing in society. PROJECT FOCUS This course

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

289

Teaching Our Homeless Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses some of the major concerns associated with the instructional process of our homeless children. The reader is provided with a brief overview of the prevalence of this population. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness the number of school children who are homeless is growing rapidly with 1.4 to 1.5 million…

Sheldon, George H.

2011-01-01

290

SPRING 2004 the Homeless  

E-print Network

SPRING 2004 Hope for the Homeless U of M Alumni Making a Difference #12;Above: Spring and all its play key roles in getting homeless people back on track as Memphis and Shelby County push to end chronic homelessness by 2013. Photograph by Michael Spikes. Illustration by Aaron Drown. #12;issue

Dasgupta, Dipankar

291

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

2013-07-01

292

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

2012-07-01

293

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem rate...accompany you but travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she...

2014-07-01

294

Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships Administration Building, Room 1005  

E-print Network

Youth Verification ****For the Purposes of Federal Financial Aid**** Name of Student physically abused.ii Unaccompanied youth do not receive financial support from their parents and do not have, including identifying youth who meet the definition of homeless and are unaccompanied. The education

Li, X. Rong

295

Examining Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to School Social Work Practice with Homeless Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School social workers are at the forefront of serving homeless children and youths as they pursue education. Because of the negative impact homelessness can have on academic outcomes for children, understanding what factors are perceived to either hinder or facilitate practice and what factors might influence perceptions of practice with this…

Canfield, James P.

2014-01-01

296

Poor Parenting and Antisocial Behavior among Homeless Young Adults: Links to Dating Violence Perpetration and Victimization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though research has examined risk factors associated with street victimization among homeless young people, little is known about dating violence experiences among this group. Given homeless youths' elevated rates of child maltreatment, it is likely that they are at high risk for dating violence. As such, the current study examined the association…

Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

2012-01-01

297

Predictors of Change in Self-Reported Social Networks among Homeless Young People  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research investigates changes in social network size and composition of 351 homeless adolescents over 3 years. Findings show that network size decreases over time. Homeless youth with a conduct disorder begin street life with small networks that remain small over time. Caregiver abuse is associated with smaller emotional networks due to fewer…

Falci, Christina D.; Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.; Rose, Trina

2011-01-01

298

The New Homelessness Revisited  

PubMed Central

The ‘new homelessness’ has drawn sustained attention from scholars over the past three decades. Definitional inconsistencies and data limitations rendered early work during this period largely speculative in nature. Thanks to conceptual, theoretical, and methodological progress, however, the research literature now provides a fuller understanding of homelessness. Contributions by sociologists and other social scientists since the mid-1990s differentiate among types of homelessness, provide credible demographic estimates, and show how being homeless affects a person's life chances and coping strategies. Agreement also exists about the main macro- and micro-level causes of homelessness. Active lines of inquiry examine public, media, and governmental responses to the problem as well as homeless people's efforts to mobilize on their own behalf. Despite the obstacles faced when studying a stigmatized population marked by high turnover and weak anchors to place, recent investigations have significantly influenced homelessness policy. A greater emphasis on prevention should further strengthen the research-policy nexus. PMID:24910495

Lee, Barrett A.; Tyler, Kimberly A.; Wright, James D.

2014-01-01

299

Southeast Asian Refugee Youth: An Annotated Bibliography. Southeast Asian Refugee Studies Occasional Papers. Number Six.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annotated bibliography comprises books and articles on Southeast Asian refugee youth. It is divided into the following cross-referenced sections: (1) Adaptation and Acculturation; (2) Education; (3) Physical and Mental Health; (4) Unaccompanied Minors and Amerasian Youth; (5) Courtship and Marriage; (6) General Topics; (7) Journalism; and (8)…

Hammond, Ruth E., Comp.; Hendricks, Glenn L., Comp.

300

Validation of the Teacher's Report Form for Teachers of Unaccompanied Refugee Minors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric properties of the Dutch Teacher's Report Form (TRF) for teachers of Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM) were evaluated in this study. The teachers (n = 486) that participated received a Dutch TRF to report on the mental health of the unaccompanied minor. Hierarchical confirmative factor analysis and individual confirmatory factor…

Bean, Tammy; Mooijaart, A.; Eurelings-Bontekoe, Elisabeth; Spinhoven, Philip

2007-01-01

301

STUDENT'S COPY DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS  

E-print Network

of legal residence at the time the court's decision was made) Age of Majority HOMELESS: Unaccompanied homeless youth (55­ 57). We shall verify if there is reason to doubt the statement provided by one or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program If the student cannot produce the above

Rosen, Jay

302

Providing care for children and adolescents facing homelessness and housing insecurity.  

PubMed

Child health and housing security are closely intertwined, and children without homes are more likely to suffer from chronic disease, hunger, and malnutrition than are children with homes. Homeless children and youth often have significant psychosocial development issues, and their education is frequently interrupted. Given the overall effects that homelessness can have on a child's health and potential, it is important for pediatricians to recognize the factors that lead to homelessness, understand the ways that homelessness and its causes can lead to poor health outcomes, and when possible, help children and families mitigate some of the effects of homelessness. Through practice change, partnership with community resources, awareness, and advocacy, pediatricians can help optimize the health and well-being of children affected by homelessness. PMID:23713108

2013-06-01

303

20 CFR 672.540 - What program income requirements apply under the YouthBuild program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...YouthBuild program to homeless individuals and families and low-income families is not considered program income. Grantees are encouraged to use that revenue for the long-term sustainability of the YouthBuild...

2012-04-01

304

20 CFR 672.540 - What program income requirements apply under the YouthBuild program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...YouthBuild program to homeless individuals and families and low-income families is not considered program income. Grantees are encouraged to use that revenue for the long-term sustainability of the YouthBuild...

2013-04-01

305

20 CFR 672.540 - What program income requirements apply under the YouthBuild program?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...YouthBuild program to homeless individuals and families and low-income families is not considered program income. Grantees are encouraged to use that revenue for the long-term sustainability of the YouthBuild...

2014-04-01

306

Homelessness: A General Information Packet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet contains documents that provide general information about homelessness and the need for both Federal and local action to help the homeless people in America. Sections 1 and 2 contain the following articles released by the Homelessness Information Exchange: (1) "The Problem of Homelessness Nationwide"; and "Alternative Family Housing…

Homelessness Exchange, Washington, DC.

307

Community-Driven Homeless Housing  

E-print Network

Community-Driven Homeless Housing Programs: Best Practices Report Prepared for City of Champaign Anne Householder Latonya Jones Maria Kaidas Rebecca Long Huong Phu #12;Homeless Housing Best Practices Resources 31 Appendix: Financing Sources 35 #12;Homeless Housing Best Practices 3 Introduction Homelessness

Frank, Thomas D.

308

Homelessness in California  

E-print Network

Homelessness in California · · · John M. Quigley Steven Raphael Eugene Smolensky with Erin Mansur Larry A. Rosenthal 2001 PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE OF CALIFORNIA #12;Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Quigley, John M. Homelessness in California / John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, Eugene Smolensky. p

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

309

Homelessness and Hunger?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We employ data from the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients to examine the character and correlates of hunger among homeless people. Our analysis, couched in an adaptation framework, finds more support for the differentiation hypothesis than for the leveling hypothesis: Complex patterns of food insecurity exist at the individual level, and they vary with the resources available

Barrett A. Lee; Meredith J. Greif

2008-01-01

310

Homelessness and food insecurity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous assistance programs are designed to alleviate homelessness and food insecurity in the US, two of the more severe possible consequences of poverty. While we expect families with a higher probability of homelessness to also be at higher risk of food insecurity, after controlling for observed factors the relationship is not immediately apparent. To analyze this relationship, we use a

Craig Gundersen; Linda Weinreb; Cheryl Wehler; David Hosmer

2003-01-01

311

Homelessness and Dual Diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

People who are dually diagnosed with severe mental illness and substance use disorders constitute 10%–20% of homeless persons. They are a heterogeneous and extremely vulnerable subgroup with complex, poorly understood needs. In this article recent research on the epidemiology, subject characteristics, and service needs of the dually diagnosed homeless population is reviewed. Also, the range of evolving approaches to providing

Robert E. Drake; Fred C. Osher; Michael A. Wallach

1991-01-01

312

Intellectual Disability and Homelessness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

2011-01-01

313

Challenges Faced by Homeless Sexual Minorities: Comparison of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Homeless Adolescents With Their Heterosexual Counterparts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The goal of this study was to identify differences between gay, lesbian, bi- sexual, and transgender (GLBT) homeless youths and their heterosexual counterparts in terms of physical and mental health difficulties. Methods. A sample of 84 GLBT adolescents was matched in regard to age and self- reported gender with 84 heterosexual adolescents. The 2 samples were compared on a

Bryan N. Cochran; Angela J. Stewart; Joshua A. Ginzler; Ana Mari Cauce

2002-01-01

314

Homelessness and hunger.  

PubMed

We employ data from the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients to examine the character and correlates of hunger among homeless people. Our analysis, couched in an adaptation framework, finds more support for the differentiation hypothesis than for the leveling hypothesis: Complex patterns of food insecurity exist at the individual level, and they vary with the resources available (e.g., higher monthly income, regular shelter use) and obstacles faced (e.g., alcohol, drug, and physical and mental health problems). The chronically homeless, who suffer from multiple deficits, appear particularly food-insecure, a finding that favors the desperation hypothesis over its street-wisdom alternative. We conclude that hunger is not uniformly experienced by members of the homeless population. Rather, some individuals are better situated than others to cope with the stressful nature of homelessness when addressing their sustenance needs. PMID:18418982

Lee, Barrett A; Greif, Meredith J

2008-03-01

315

Concurrent Mental Health and Substance Use Problems among Street-Involved Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Among marginalized populations, homeless adults are known to have elevated rates of mental health and substance use problems compared to the general population, but less is known about their youthful homeless counterparts. While few studies currently exist, what research has been conducted among street-involved youth has confirmed high rates of…

Kirst, Maritt; Frederick, Tyler; Erickson, Patricia G.

2011-01-01

316

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2011-10-01

317

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2010-10-01

318

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2013-10-01

319

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2014-10-01

320

45 CFR 400.205 - Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal funding for assistance and services for unaccompanied minors...SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal Funding for Expenditures for Determining Eligibility...

2012-10-01

321

Permanent homelessness in America?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper seeks to determine the approximate number of homeless persons in the U.S., the rate of change in the number, and whether or not the problem is likely to be permanent or transitory. It makes particular use of a new 1985 survey of over 500 homeless people in New York City. It finds that:(1)the much-maligned 1984 study by the

Richard B. Freeman; Brian Hall

1987-01-01

322

Street youth and the AIDS pandemic.  

PubMed

Children responsible for their own survival exist in all countries. Despite social and cultural differences between street youth in developing countries versus homeless youth in developed countries, the predictors and correlates of homelessness are similar among youth. The AIDS pandemic is inextricably linked to homelessness and is a particularly devastating threat to the welfare of the world's disenfranchised youth, as they are continually forced into multiple HIV-related high risk situations and behaviors. Specific recommendations regarding clinical care, prevention programs, research, and the implications for policy and legislative action are discussed in relation to reducing the incidences and impact of HIV. For the world's populations of street children the issue of globally providing AIDS education and prevention within the context of health care services is emphasized, particularly by the promotion and training of physicians and other health professionals in street-based care. PMID:1389865

Luna, G C; Rotheram-Borus, M J

1992-01-01

323

Conduct disorder and HIV risk behaviors among runaway and homeless adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to assess the prevalence of conduct disorder (CD) among runaway and homeless adolescents and to investigate associations between CD and HIV risk behaviors. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children and a standardized HIV risk assessment questionnaire were administered to 219 runaway and homeless adolescents recruited from a drop-in center serving high-risk youth. One-half of the males

Robert E. Booth; Yiming Zhang

1997-01-01

324

SECTION A. Student information Name (last, first, middle initial) University ID  

E-print Network

, 2012 did you receive determination that your were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless? ................................................................... yes is homeless, please contact One Stop Student Services and request an appointment with the Independent Status

Amin, S. Massoud

325

SECTION A. Student information Name (last, first, middle initial) University ID  

E-print Network

, 2011, did you receive determination that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless? ................................................................... yes is homeless, please contact One Stop Student Services and request an appointment with the Independent Status

Blanchette, Robert A.

326

SECTION A. Student information Name (last, first, middle initial) University ID  

E-print Network

, 2013 did you receive determination that your were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless? ................................................................... yes is homeless, please contact One Stop Student Services and request an appointment with the Independent Status

Amin, S. Massoud

327

Counting the homeless in Malta  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are no visible signs of homelessness in Malta similar to what can be seen on the streets of many North American or European cities, yet there are few hundred homeless who stay in shelters and another few thousand households that are at risk of being homeless. Malta has a comparatively sizeable social housing sector (9000–10,000) and approximately 3300 households

Cyrus Vakili-Zad

2006-01-01

328

Homeless Veterans Need your help!!  

E-print Network

Homeless Veterans Need your help!! "1-1-1" Event Please bring: 1 ­ Gently used item of MEN United Veterans who run a shelter for homeless veterans in Yaphank. Please go through your closets adopting-a-shelter or adopt-a-house where the homeless veterans live. For more details please go

Johnson, Peter D.

329

No Homeless Child Left behind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although it is difficult to determine the precise number of homeless children, the National Coalition for the Homeless reports that there are more than 1.3 million children lacking a permanent residence on any given night. Further, 39 percent of the homeless population was comprised of children under the age of 18 in July 2009, the most recent…

Saxberg, David

2011-01-01

330

Confirming Eligibility for McKinney-Vento Services: Do's and Don'ts for School Districts. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, schools must identify children and youth in homeless situations and provide appropriate services. One such service is immediate enrollment in school, even when students lack paperwork normally required for enrollment, such as school records, proof of guardianship, a birth certificate, immunization…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

2007-01-01

331

Confirming Eligibility for McKinney-Vento Services: Do's and Don'ts for Local Liaisons. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, schools must identify children and youth in homeless situations and provide appropriate services. One such service is immediate enrollment in school, even when students lack paperwork normally required for enrollment, such as school records, proof of guardianship, a birth certificate, immunization…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2007

2007-01-01

332

Social networking technology, social network composition, and reductions in substance use among homeless adolescents.  

PubMed

Peer-based prevention programs for homeless youth are complicated by the potential for reinforcing high-risk behaviors among participants. The goal of this study is to understand how homeless youth could be linked to positive peers in prevention programming by understanding where in social and physical space positive peers for homeless youth are located, how these ties are associated with substance use, and the role of social networking technologies (e.g., internet and cell phones) in this process. Personal social network data were collected from 136 homeless adolescents in Los Angeles, CA. Respondents reported on composition of their social networks with respect to: home-based peers and parents (accessed via social networking technology; e.g., the internet, cell phone, texting), homeless peers and agency staff (accessed face-to-face) and whether or not network members were substance-using or non-substance-using. Associations between respondent's lifetime cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine use and recent (previous 30 days) alcohol and marijuana use were assessed by the number of non-substance-using versus substance-using ties in multivariate linear regression models. 43% of adolescents reported a non-substance-using home-based tie. More of these ties were associated with less recent alcohol use. 62% of adolescents reported a substance-using homeless tie. More of these ties were associated with more recent marijuana use as well as more lifetime heroin and methamphetamine use. For homeless youth, who are physically disconnected from positive peers, social networking technologies can be used to facilitate the sorts of positive social ties that effective peer-based prevention programs require. PMID:21194011

Rice, Eric; Milburn, Norweeta G; Monro, William

2011-03-01

333

Hope for Homeless Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Thomas J. Pappas Regional Education Center in Phoenix, Arizona, is a magnet school for homeless students from unorganized territories, military installations, Indian reservations, and national forest lands. This "accommodation" school, supported by federal grants, in-kind business donations, and committed volunteer mentors from the local…

Woods, Cyndy Jones

1996-01-01

334

Paul Glowaski: Garden Director, Homeless Garden Project  

E-print Network

like the Homeless Garden are brilliant, and Food What?! andeconomy and of local food—the Homeless Garden Project hasHomeless Garden Project, Glowaski brings together his passions for economic, social, ecological, and food

Reti, Irene H.

2010-01-01

335

24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Homeless participation. 576.405 Section... Program Requirements § 576.405 Homeless participation. (a) Unless the...the participation of not less than one homeless individual or formerly...

2014-04-01

336

24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Homeless participation. 576.405 Section... Program Requirements § 576.405 Homeless participation. (a) Unless the...the participation of not less than one homeless individual or formerly...

2013-04-01

337

24 CFR 576.405 - Homeless participation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Homeless participation. 576.405 Section... Program Requirements § 576.405 Homeless participation. (a) Unless the...the participation of not less than one homeless individual or formerly...

2012-04-01

338

The Neighborhood Context of Homelessness  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We examined and compared the changing neighborhood characteristics of a group of homeless adults over time. Methods. We collected the addresses of previous housing and sleep locations from a longitudinal study of 400 homeless adults in the St. Louis, Missouri, region and compared census measures of housing and economic opportunities at different points along individual pathways from housing to homelessness and at 1- and 2-year follow-up interviews. Results. Sleep locations of homeless adults were much more concentrated in the urban core at baseline than were their previous housed and follow-up locations. These core areas had higher poverty, unemployment, and rent-to-income ratios and lower median incomes. Conclusions. The spatial concentration of homeless adults in areas with fewer opportunities and more economic and housing distress may present additional barriers to regaining stable housing and employment. A big-picture spatial and time-course viewpoint is critical for both policymakers and future homelessness researchers. PMID:23409889

Pollio, David E.; North, Carol S.

2013-01-01

339

Unaccompanied Migrant Minors from Africa: The case of Mauritania  

E-print Network

samples of the population: adolescent boy and youth migrants; their families; adolescent girls and single Scientific Panel on Adolescent Life Course in Developing Countries, IBGE and El Colegio de México, in Rio de) How can the adolescents' attitude toward the risks, including the danger of death, during the crossing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Emotional Distress and Mental Health Service Use Among Urban Homeless Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Expanded Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations was used to examine the predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with mental health service use in a homeless adolescent sample (N?=?688). Among all youth, 32% perceived a need for help with mental health problems and 15% met Brief-Symptom Inventory (BSI) criteria for emotional distress. The rate of mental health service use in

M. Rosa Solorio; Norweeta G. Milburn; Ronald M. Andersen; Sharone Trifskin; Michael A. Rodríguez

2006-01-01

341

Preventing Family and Educational Disconnection through Wilderness-Based Therapy Targeting Youth at Risk  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to address the issue of youth homelessness in Australia, Regional Extended Family Services (REFS) have developed a wilderness-based therapeutic intervention. REFS aim to provide early intervention services for young people at risk of homelessness, and their families. This study examined the outcomes of the REFS wilderness program by…

Ronalds, Lisa; Allen-Craig, Sandy

2008-01-01

342

Homelessness in Augusta, Georgia. Preliminary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two studies examined homelessness in Augusta, Georgia. The Key Informant Survey, conducted in 1987, involved interviewing individuals (N=42) knowledgeable about homeless people in the community. In the Shelter and Street Surveys of homeless people, conducted in March (N=51) and July (N=71) of 1988, homeless subjects were interviewed concerning…

George, Shirley A.; Bennett, Gerald

343

Can Better National Policy End Family Homelessness?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An understanding of the close link between federal policy and family homelessness is critical for ensuring that one day no child in the United States is homeless. This article discusses the nature of family homelessness, the national policy framework that exists to help vulnerable families, the homeless assistance system that federal policy has…

Roman, Nan

2010-01-01

344

An Investigation of School Counselors' Efforts to Serve Students Who Are Homeless: The Role of Perceived Knowledge, Preparation, Advocacy Role, and Self-Efficacy to Their Involvement in Recommended Interventions and Partnership Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the array of challenges faced by children and youth who are homeless, approaches to support their needs must be systemic and involve partnerships with all key stakeholders. This study examined school counselors' involvement in partnership practices and interventions to meet the needs of students who are homeless. Further, this study…

Gaenzle, Stacey Anita

2012-01-01

345

Pathways to homelessness among the mentally ill  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Persons with mental illness are over-represented among the homeless relative to the general population, and mental illness\\u000a is most likely one of many vulnerabilities that confer risk for homelessness. Method: This paper elucidates the pathways to homelessness for persons with mental illness by comparing and contrasting groups of\\u000a mentally ill homeless persons, non-mentally ill homeless persons, and housed mentally

G. Sullivan; A. Burnam; P. Koegel

2000-01-01

346

Concurrent Mental Health and Substance Use Problems among Street-Involved Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among marginalized populations, homeless adults are known to have elevated rates of mental health and substance use problems\\u000a compared to the general population, but less is known about their youthful homeless counterparts. While few studies currently\\u000a exist, what research has been conducted among street-involved youth has confirmed high rates of comorbidity among this population.\\u000a However, few of these studies explore

Maritt Kirst; Tyler Frederick; Patricia G. Erickson

347

Criteria and Recordkeeping Requirements for Definition of Homeless  

MedlinePLUS

... document provides a high-level overview of the homeless definition by outlining the criteria for defining homelessness ... under which individuals and families may qualify as homeless. These categories include: 1) literally homeless; 2) imminent ...

348

School-based service delivery for homeless students: relevant laws and overcoming access barriers.  

PubMed

Schools in the United States are facing a record number of homeless students. These students are highly at-risk for experiencing negative life outcomes, and they face considerable academic and social-emotional functional impairments. To help address the complex needs of homeless students, this article reviews the intersection of laws and practices that impact homeless students, as well as contemporary school-based service delivery efforts to support the academic and social-emotional needs of these students. In addition, this article also reviews several barriers to school-based service delivery for homeless students and ways to overcome these barriers. These barriers include confusion regarding consent and record-sharing procedures, ineffectively utilizing homeless liaisons, and misapplying tenants of Multitiered Systems of Support (MTSS), which is a school-based service-delivery framework that has been adopted by and implemented in many U.S. schools. Ultimately, this article aims to provide members of school communities with practical information that they can use to support the homeless youth they encounter and serve. PMID:25545437

Sulkowski, Michael L; Joyce-Beaulieu, Diana K

2014-11-01

349

Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth Risks for Emotional, Physical, and Social Problems: Results From a Community-Based Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveHealth problems of gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) youth are reported as differing from those of heterosexual youth. Increased depression, suicide, substance use, homelessness, and school dropout have been reported. Most studies of GLB youth use clinical or convenience samples. The authors conducted a community school-based health survey that included an opportunity to self-identify as GLB.

James Lock; Hans Steiner

1999-01-01

350

The medical origins of homelessness.  

PubMed Central

In 1989 through 1990, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1437 homeless adults in northern California (98% response rate). Prevalences of alcohol abuse, illegal drug use, and psychiatric hospitalization when adults first became homeless were 15% to 33% lower than prevalences following homelessness. The largest differences between the homeless and a comparison group of 3122 nonhomeless adults were for psychiatric hospitalization (odds ratios [ORs] of 4.6 for men and 5.9 for women) and alcohol abuse (ORs of 2.3 for men and 4.0 for women). However, when prehomeless prevalences of addictive and psychiatric disorders were compared with prevalences among the nonhomeless, absolute differences were no greater than 12%. PMID:1415869

Winkleby, M A; Rockhill, B; Jatulis, D; Fortmann, S P

1992-01-01

351

Overdose Deaths Among Homeless Persons  

MedlinePLUS

... of them involving opioids—are now the biggest killer among homeless people in the Boston area. Drug ... Cancer and heart disease were the next biggest killers (at around 16 percent each); HIV =accounted for ...

352

Temporary shelter for the homeless  

E-print Network

A one-person cardboard structure was designed to temporarily shelter the homeless during harsh weather conditions. The overall form is based on the folding Yoshimura pattern. It is collapsible, wind and water resistant, ...

Lin, Christine, 1982-

2005-01-01

353

Engaging the Homeless Paranoid Patient  

PubMed Central

For people who are disenfranchised from society for other reasons, especially homelessness, a paranoid delusional system can create an additional obstacle in the therapeutic engagement and treatment of such individuals. In this article, we describe a composite case of a homeless woman with paranoid schizophrenia. Through this case example, we will explore various obstacles to treatment and discuss strategies to overcome these hurdles to treatment, initiate a therapeutic alliance, and further facilitate and maintain therapy. PMID:20526407

Patel, Gayatri

2007-01-01

354

Homeless Children: Needs and Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored needs of homeless children and shelter services available to them. The first phase of this mixed-method study consisted of open-ended interviews of key personnel in six diverse homeless shelters in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. This qualitative data gave direction to the creation of a questionnaire used in a larger follow-up survey of shelters in the state of Georgia.

Anne Hicks-Coolick; Patricia Burnside-Eaton; Ardith Peters

2003-01-01

355

The health of homeless immigrants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:This study examined the association between immigrant status and current health in a representative sample of 1189 homeless people in Toronto, Canada.Methods:Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between immigrant status and current health status (assessed using the SF-12) among homeless recent immigrants (?10 years since immigration), non-recent immigrants (>10 years since immigration) and Canadian-born individuals recruited at

S Chiu; D A Redelmeier; G Tolomiczenko; A Kiss; S W Hwang

2009-01-01

356

Homelessness and the Homeless: Responses and Innovations. A Canadian Contribution to IYSH 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents descriptions of successful Canadian public and private programs to aid the homeless and alleviate homelessness as part of participation in the International Year of Shelter for the Homeless (IYSH). Part 1, "The International Year of Shelter for the Homeless," includes the following: (1) objectives; (2) global conditions of the…

Oberlander, H. Peter; Fallick, Arthur L.

357

HOMELESS IN AMERICA, HOMELESS IN CALIFORNIA John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, and Eugene Smolensky*  

E-print Network

HOMELESS IN AMERICA, HOMELESS IN CALIFORNIA John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, and Eugene Smolensky of the alternate hypothesis that variations in homelessness arise from changed circumstances in the housing market and in the income distribution. We assemble essentially all the systematic information avail- able on homelessness

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

358

2 Homeless service Utilization report The 2010 Homeless Service Utilization Report is the  

E-print Network

#12;2 Homeless service Utilization report The 2010 Homeless Service Utilization Report is the fifth in a series of reports prepared by the Center on the Family at the University of Hawai`i and the Homeless Programs Office of the Hawai`i State Department of Human Services (DHS). Since the first Homeless Service

Dong, Yingfei

359

Homeless in God's Country: Coping Strategies and Felt Experiences of the Rural Homeless  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines coping behaviors and felt experiences of homeless adults in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Data from in-depth interviews with 55 homeless adults reveal 5 general coping pattern groups: shelter users, campers, couch hoppers, mixed users, and circumstantial homeless. Homeless adults within each group experienced similar levels of…

Hilton, Timothy; DeJong, Cornell

2010-01-01

360

Homeless and Freezing HowYou Can Help the Homeless Community this Winter  

E-print Network

Homeless and Freezing HowYou Can Help the Homeless Community this Winter Each winter't phase us. For someone who is homeless and sleeps on the streets or in an abandoned building, those dips in temperatures can mean the difference ­ literally ­ between life and death. About 10 years ago, a homeless

Subramanian, Venkat

361

Homelessness: A Data-Driven Learning Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a learning guide that uses data to investigate the characteristics of the Washington DC, metropolitan area homeless population, and the relationship between homelessness and several measures of health.

ICPSR

362

Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in  

E-print Network

Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in Tempe's Emerging Urban Setting David V. Summers of the Tempe First United Methodist Church, provides vital support services to homeless and working poor people

Zhang, Junshan

363

Modeling minority stress effects on homelessness and health disparities among young men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Sexual minority youth are more likely to experience homelessness, and homeless sexual minority youth report greater risk for mental health and substance abuse symptoms than homeless heterosexual youth, yet few studies have assessed determinants that help explain the disparities. Minority stress theory proposes that physical and mental health disparities among sexual minority populations may be explained by the stress produced by living in heterosexist social environments characterized by stigma and discrimination directed toward sexual minority persons. We used data from a sample of 200 young men who have sex with men (YMSM) (38 % African American, 26.5 % Latino/Hispanic, 23.5 % White, 12 % multiracial/other) to develop an exploratory path model measuring the effects of experience and internalization of sexual orientation stigma on depression and substance use via being kicked out of home due to sexual orientation and current homelessness. Direct significant paths were found from experience of sexual orientation-related stigma to internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma, having been kicked out of one's home, experiencing homelessness during the past year, and major depressive symptoms during the past week. Having been kicked out of one's home had a direct significant effect on experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months and on daily marijuana use. Internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma and experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months partially mediated the direct effect of experience of sexual orientation-related stigma on major depressive symptoms. Our empirical testing of the effects of minority stress on health of YMSM advances minority stress theory as a framework for investigating health disparities among this population. PMID:24807702

Bruce, Douglas; Stall, Ron; Fata, Aimee; Campbell, Richard T

2014-06-01

364

The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

Seider, Scott C.

2012-01-01

365

The Invisible Homeless: A New Urban Ecology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contemporary homelessness is the result of increasing social and economic inequality faced by those in American society who are most vulnerable to individual, family, and economic instability. This case study of the homeless population of Los Angeles (California), based on two surveys conducted in 1984, views the homeless as a segment of the…

Ropers, Richard H.

366

Homelessness in Cambridge: A Social Attitudes Survey  

E-print Network

Homelessness in Cambridge: A Social Attitudes Survey Department of Geography February 2013 #12;Homelessness in Cambridge: A Social Attitudes Survey February 2013 This report presents the findings today: homelessness. The questions put to the public emerged from an initial consultation workshop

Steiner, Ullrich

367

Homeless Young People and Technology: Ordinary  

E-print Network

Homeless Young People and Technology: Ordinary Interactions, Extraordinary Circumstances JillWashington|dhendry@uw.edu Homelessness among young people aged 13 to 30 is a pressing problem with lasting social and economic consequences for the U.S. By one estimate, 3 million young people experience homelessness annu- ally; that is

Anderson, Richard

368

The Paradox of Homelessness in America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness is a growing problem in the midst of relative prosperity. However, as the problem persists, the public may be becoming increasingly less compassionate to the homeless and annoyed by the problem. Although it is difficult to determine how many people are homeless, the most widely circulated estimate puts their number at about 600,000.…

Levitan, Sar A.; Schillmoeller, Susan

369

Homelessness and Its Effects on Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness influences every facet of children's lives, inhibiting their physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and behavioral development. Homeless women face such obstacles to healthy pregnancies as chemical abuse, chronic health problems, and lack of prenatal care. Homeless infants are more likely to have low birth weights and are at greater…

Hart-Shegos, Ellen

370

When Working Together Works: Academic Success for Students in Out-of-Home Care. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Center for Homeless Education and the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education present this brief to help educators and child welfare advocates work together to support the academic success of children and youth in out-of-home care. The brief offers practical, proven strategies for implementing two federal laws collaboratively: The…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

2010-01-01

371

Clearing the Path to School Success for Students in Out-of-Home Care. Best Practices in Homeless Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education and the National Center for Homeless Education present this guide to help educators and child welfare advocates clear the path to school success for children and youth who are forced to leave their homes due to abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction. Two federal laws, among others, provide tools to…

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2009

2009-01-01

372

Youth Policy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The subject of youth policy is discussed in three articles: youth policy developments in Western Australia, Australian Council of Trade Unions policies on youth employment and training, and an outline of developments and provisions in youth policy. (CT)

Williams, Norm; And Others

1985-01-01

373

Changing Paradigms for Working with Street Youth: The Experience of Street Kids International1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United Nations estimates 100 million street youth across the globe. They are products of poverty, war, urbanization, political instability, family breakdown, and HIV\\/AIDS, among others. Many are not homeless, but primary income earners for their extended families. Many participate in the sex and drug trade because of limited income generation alternatives. How can we support these youth and increase

Stephanie Sauvé

374

Where Do You Go from Nowhere: Homelessness in Maryland.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report assesses the extent of homelessness in Maryland. Data are provided in the following areas: (1) the number of homeless people; (2) causes of homelessness; (3) distribution of the homeless and characteristics of those sheltered; (4) shelter beds available; (5) what is needed to address the problems of homelessness; (6) the extent of the…

Health and Welfare Council of Central Maryland, Inc., Baltimore.

375

A Unique Population: Women Who Are Homeless and Mentally Ill  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a unique population within the homeless community--women who are homeless and mentally ill. Homelessness prevalence and etiology data are presented, followed by a general discussion of how mental illness affects people who are homeless. The article provides an overview of women who are homeless, focusing on those who are…

Markos, Patricia A.; Baron, Heather Lyn; Allen, Daniel N.

2005-01-01

376

Michigan's Campaign to End Homelessness  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Michigan State Homeless Management Information System (MSHMIS) is a single database platform that provides an unduplicated count of homeless persons living in each region of Michigan. The system also measures patterns of service use and the effectiveness of the services delivered, providing the ability to assess progress across programs and regions. It was developed to improve consistency of reporting among Michigan’s Continuum of Care (CoC) network and includes information from all the service organizations in each region, a total of 524 organizations statewide.

Michigan’s Campaign to End Homelessness

377

Elderly Homeless Veterans in Los Angeles: Chronicity and Precipitants of Homelessness  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We compared the characteristics of chronically homeless and acutely homeless elderly veterans to better understand precipitants of homelessness. Methods. We conducted interviews with 33 chronically and 26 acutely homeless veterans aged 65 years and older receiving transitional housing services in Los Angeles, California, between 2003 and 2005. We asked questions regarding their sociodemographic characteristics and other social status measures. Other precipitants of homelessness were acquired via observation and open-ended and structured questions. Results. Both veterans groups were more similar than different, with substantial levels of physical, psychiatric, and social impairment. They differed significantly in homelessness history, with chronically homeless veterans having more homelessness episodes and more total time homeless. They were also less educated and had smaller social networks. In response to open-ended questioning, elderly homeless veterans revealed how health and substance use issues interacted with loss of social support and eviction to exacerbate homelessness. Conclusions. Assessment of a range of factors is needed to address risk factors and events leading to homelessness. Further research with larger samples is needed to confirm the characteristics and needs of the elderly homeless veteran population. PMID:24148059

van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

2013-01-01

378

Macroeconomic Causes of Family Homelessness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The welfare of American families improved steadily for over 20 years after World War II. After the War on Poverty of the 1960s, the number of people living in poverty fell, reaching its lowest point in 1973. During the 1980s, homeless families, including those living in the streets, in cars, and in shelters seemingly appeared out of nowhere. As…

McChesney, Kay Young

379

Designing Services for Homeless Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The complex needs of the heterogeneous group of homeless women suggest that policy and services must focus on a continuum from adequate and accessible emergency services (shelter, food, financial assistance) to transitional assistance with housing, employment, and mental and physical health care, and ultimately to stabilization. (SK)

Hagen, Jan L.

1990-01-01

380

76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...veterans suffering from serious mental illness, including veterans who are homeless...homeless and suffering from serious mental illness or a substance use disorder...homeless veterans with serious mental illness and/or substance use...

2011-08-23

381

75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...veterans suffering from serious mental illness, including veterans who are homeless...homeless and suffering from serious mental illness or a substance use disorder...homeless veterans with serious mental illness and/or substance use...

2010-12-20

382

24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

2011-04-01

383

24 CFR 576.56 - Homeless assistance and participation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Homeless assistance and participation. 576...GRANTS PROGRAM: STEWART B. McKINNEY HOMELESS ASSISTANCE ACT Program Requirements § 576.56 Homeless assistance and participation....

2010-04-01

384

24 CFR 576.56 - Homeless assistance and participation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Homeless assistance and participation. 576...GRANTS PROGRAM: STEWART B. McKINNEY HOMELESS ASSISTANCE ACT Program Requirements § 576.56 Homeless assistance and participation....

2011-04-01

385

7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

2014-01-01

386

7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

2011-01-01

387

24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

2014-04-01

388

24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

2012-04-01

389

7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

2013-01-01

390

7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

2010-01-01

391

24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

2013-04-01

392

7 CFR 272.9 - Approval of homeless meal providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-01-01 false Approval of homeless meal providers. 272.9 Section...STATE AGENCIES § 272.9 Approval of homeless meal providers. The State food...shall approve establishments serving the homeless upon sufficient evidence, as...

2012-01-01

393

24 CFR 91.405 - Housing and homeless needs assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing and homeless needs assessment. 91.405 Section 91...Consolidated Plan § 91.405 Housing and homeless needs assessment. Housing and homeless needs must be described in the...

2010-04-01

394

A TYPOLOGY OF DRUG-RELATED OFFENDING AMONG YOUNG HOMELESS INJECTION DRUG USERS  

PubMed Central

Research indicates a link between drug use and offending, particularly amongst high-risk individuals, such as homeless youth. The extent to which such youth interpret their offending as being related to their drug use, though, is understudied. This manuscript investigates the interpretations of drug-related offenses offered by 151 primarily white, male, homeless IDUs aged 16–29 years. Youth were asked specific questions about their drug-related offenses during in-depth interviews as part of a larger study investigating health risks surrounding drug injection between 2004 and 2006. The first section of the manuscript outlines offenses youth revealed committing either in pursuit of or after using a variety of substances. The second part of the manuscript examines the overall context (motivation, environment), and provides a seven-tiered typology of drug-related offending based on youth's interpretations, linking certain drugs to specific offenses within particular contexts. From here, some theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:21423855

Sanders, Bill; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Jackson Bloom, Jennifer; Hathaz, Dodi S.

2011-01-01

395

An annotated bibliography of unaccompanied violoncello repertoire published in the United States from 1990 to the present  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main purpose of this essay is to offer a listing of literature for the unaccompanied violoncello which will be as comprehensive as possible and will examine compositions written between 1990 and the present. This information should be helpful to cellists in their exploration and performance of this contemporary literature.This study includes an annotated bibliography of a comprehensive list of

Pin-I Wu

2005-01-01

396

Late-Onset PTSD in Unaccompanied Refugee Minors: Exploring the Predictive Utility of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following resettlement in Western countries, unaccompanied refugee minors (URM) are at risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear to what extent PTSD in this group may become manifest at later stages following resettlement and which factors are associated with late onset. We examined data from URM collected 1 (T1) and 2 years (T2) following resettlement for differences

Geert E. Smid; Gerty J. L. M. Lensvelt-Mulders; Jeroen W. Knipscheer; Berthold P. R. Gersons; Rolf J. Kleber

2011-01-01

397

Late-Onset PTSD in Unaccompanied Refugee Minors: Exploring the Predictive Utility of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following resettlement in Western countries, unaccompanied refugee minors (URM) are at risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is unclear to what extent PTSD in this group may become manifest at later stages following resettlement and which factors are associated with late onset. We examined data from URM collected 1 (T1) and 2…

Smid, Geert E.; Lensvelt-Mulders, Gerty J. L. M.; Knipscheer, Jeroen W.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Kleber, Rolf J.

2011-01-01

398

Homelessness Outcome Reporting Normative Framework: Systems-Level Evaluation of Progress in Ending Homelessness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness is a serious and growing issue. Evaluations of systemic-level changes are needed to determine progress in reducing or ending homelessness. The report card methodology is one means of systems-level assessment. Rather than solely establishing an enumeration, homelessness report cards can capture pertinent information about structural…

Austen, Tyrone; Pauly, Bernie

2012-01-01

399

Counting homeless persons with surveys of users of services for the homeless  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of their comparative economy, the most commonly used methods for counting the homeless focus on users of shelters, food lines, health clinics for the homeless, and other services for the homeless. This paper argues that surveys restricted to shelter users are of limited usefulness, but that joint surveys of food?line, shelter, and clinic users include very substantial proportions of

Franklin J. James

1991-01-01

400

Head injury and mortality in the homeless.  

PubMed

Risk factors for head injury are also risk factors for becoming homeless but there is little research on this vulnerable group, who can be neglected by health services that specialize in acquired brain injury. This study investigates the prevalence of admissions to hospital with a head injury in the homeless and associations with later mortality. It compares homeless people with and without a record of hospitalized head injury (HHI) and the Glasgow population. Data were obtained from a U.K. National Health Service strategy to enhance care of the homeless. This included development and production of local registers of homeless people. In Glasgow, the initiative took place over a seven-year period (2004-2010) and comprised 40 general practitioner (family practice) services in the locality of 55 homeless hostels. The register was linked to hospital admissions with head injury recorded in Scottish Medical Records and to the General Register of Scotland, which records deaths. A total of 1590 homeless people was registered in general practitioner (family doctor) returns. The prevalence of admission to hospital with head injury in the homeless over a 30-year period (13.5%) was 5.4 times higher than in the Glasgow population. In the homeless with HHI, 33.6% died in the seven-year census period, compared with 13.9% in the homeless with no hospitalized HI (NHHI). The standardized mortality ratio for HHI (4.51) was more than twice that for NHHI (2.08). The standardized mortality ratio for HHI aged 15-34 (17.54) was particularly high. These findings suggest that HHI is common in the homeless relative to the general population and is a risk factor for late mortality in the homeless population. PMID:25010750

McMillan, Thomas M; Laurie, Marie; Oddy, Michael; Menzies, Mark; Stewart, Elaine; Wainman-Lefley, Jessica

2015-01-15

401

Risk Factors for Homelessness Among US Veterans.  

PubMed

Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. PMID:25595171

Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

2015-01-01

402

Sheltered versus nonsheltered homeless women  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To contrast sociodemographic characteristics, physical and mental health status, substance use, sexual behaviors, victimization,\\u000a and utilization of health services between homeless women residing in sheltered and nonsheltered environments.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. A structured scale was used to measure mental health status. Physical health status, substance use,\\u000a sexual behavior, history of adult victimization, and health services utilization were measured by

Adeline M. Nyamathi; Barbara Leake; Lillian Gelberg

2000-01-01

403

Over the Edge: Homeless Families and the Welfare System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Homelessness among families is quickly reaching crisis proportions across the country. Over 30 percent of America's three million homeless people are members of families, and families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. Perhaps more disturbing, homelessness represents only the most extreme manifestation of a more…

National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC.

404

No place like home: A study of two homeless shelters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homelessness is one of the most pressing social problems today. Society has responded to the problem with the creation of homeless shelters. Yet, the nature of the operation of the shelter is not defined. This study explored the operations of two single adult homeless shelters to understand how they operate in addressing the problem of homelessness. The study identified two

Bruce D. Friedman

1994-01-01

405

Age Differences Among Homeless Individuals: Adolescence Through Adulthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines differences between homeless adolescents, young adults, and older adults served by homeless shelters or food programs to inform service provision. Four homeless studies using the same sampling and measurement methods were pooled to permit comparisons across age groups. Results showed that homeless adolescents demonstrated greater resilience than younger and older adults. Adolescents reported the shortest duration

Carolyn J. Tompsett; Patrick J. Fowler; Paul A. Toro

2009-01-01

406

Homeless Women in Public Spaces: Strategies of Resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores homeless women's use of public spaces and buildings in England. In doing so it problematises the spatial boundaries typically presented in the literature and research which suggest homeless women are largely confined to institutional or private spaces of homelessness. The paper argues that homeless women also use highly visible public spaces and semi-private spaces, and that these

Rionach Casey; Rosalind Goudie; Kesia Reeve

2008-01-01

407

Who Is Doing Well? A Typology of Newly Homeless Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is growing evidence to support developing new typologies for homeless adolescents. Current typologies focus on the risks associated with being homeless, with less consideration of the positive attributes of homeless adolescents. The authors examined both risk and protective factors in a sample of newly homeless adolescents. Using cluster…

Milburn, Norweeta; Liang, Li-Jung; Lee, Sung-Jae; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Rosenthal, Doreen; Mallett, Shelley; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Lester, Patricia

2009-01-01

408

Homeless Women, Special Possessions, and the Meaning of \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article investigates homelessness among adult women, an important and growing subpopulation among the homeless. To examine their situation within a consumer-behavior context, an ethnographic case study of a shelter for homeless women run by an order of Roman Catholic sisters was performed. The study focused on how these women became homeless, the effects of early life experiences on their

Ronald Paul Hill

1991-01-01

409

Predictors of Transience among Homeless Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study identified predictors of transience among homeless emerging adults in three cities. A total of 601 homeless emerging adults from Los Angeles, Austin, and Denver were recruited using purposive sampling. Ordinary least squares regression results revealed that significant predictors of greater transience include White ethnicity, high…

Ferguson, Kristin M.; Bender, Kimberly; Thompson, Sanna J.

2014-01-01

410

Correlates of Homeless Episodes among Indigenous People  

PubMed Central

This study reports the correlates of homeless episodes among 873 Indigenous adults who are part of an ongoing longitudinal study on four reservations in the Northern Midwest and four Canadian First Nation reserves. Descriptive analyses depict differences between those who have and have not experienced an episode of homelessness in their lifetimes. Multivariate analyses assess factors associated with a history of homeless episodes at the time of their first interview. Results show that individuals with a history of homeless episodes had significantly more individual and family health, mental health, and substance abuse problems. Periods of homelessness also were associated with financial problems. Among the female caretakers who experienced episodes of homelessness over the course of the study, the majority had been homeless at least once prior to the start of the study and approximately one–fifth met criteria for lifetime alcohol dependence, drug abuse, or major depression. Family adversity during childhood was also common for women experiencing homelessness during the study. PMID:21656303

Whitbeck, Les B.; Crawford, Devan M.; Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner

2011-01-01

411

Homeless mentally disordered offenders and violent crimes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the prevalence of homelessness in a cross-sectional sample of 150 patients retained in a maximum-security hospital for mentally disordered offenders in New York City. The homeless mentally ill comprise only 2% of the city's mentally ill population, yet they account for 50% of the admissions to this forensic facility from the community. Compared to population base rate

Daniel A. Martell

1991-01-01

412

Homeless Children: The Watchers and the Waiters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book takes an interdisciplinary approach in discussing the issue of homeless children and the resolution of the problem. An introduction by Nancy A. Boxill presents background on the nature of the problem and summarizes the subsequent papers. "Home and Homelessness in the Lives of Children" by Leanne G. Rivlin analyzes the impact on children…

Boxill, Nancy A., Ed.

413

Assessing the Nutritional Needs of Homeless Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey instrument was developed to describe the nutritional habits and needs of homeless adolescents. It incorporated the Block Food Frequency (BFFQ) questionnaire with 37 questions regarding: current practices of obtaining food; nutritional education needs; and demographic information. The survey was reviewed, pilot-tested, and revised Subjects were 18-20 year old residents at a homeless shelter for less than 72 hours

J. L. Grover; AC Hergenroeder; SR Morrow; BL Haefner

1998-01-01

414

Tuberculosis in the Homeless A Prospective Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We set out to determine tuberculosis incidence and risk factors in the homeless population in San Francisco. We also examined the trans- mission of tuberculosis by molecular methods. We followed a cohort of 2,774 of the homeless first seen between 1990 and 1994. There were 25 incident cases during the period 1992 to 1996, or 270 per 100,000 per year

ANDREW R. MOSS; JUDITH A. HAHN; JACQUELINE P. TULSKY; CHARLES L. DALEY; PETER M. SMALL; PHILLIP C. HOPEWELL

415

Moving on from homelessness: A narrative inquiry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This narrative study explores the experience of “moving on” from homelessness for individuals with a major mental illness, after they obtained permanent housing with supports as part of the Province of Ontario Homelessness Strategy. Narrative inquiry provides a valuable method to understand the concept of a journey of recovery, specifically because each person's journey is unique. Individual stories are developed

Helen Kirkpatrick

2005-01-01

416

Food insecurity among homeless and runaway adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of food insecurity and factors related to it among homeless and runaway adolescents. Design: Computer-assisted personal interviews were conducted with homeless and runaway adolescents directly on the streets and in shelters. Setting: Interviews were conducted in eight Midwest cities: Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Iowa City, Kansas City, Lincoln, Omaha,

Les B. Whitbeck; Xiaojin Chen; Kurt D. Johnson

2006-01-01

417

Working to End Family Homelessness. Annual Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Center on Family Homelessness is determined to end family homelessness. Sheltering families provides a temporary safe haven. Connecting families to permanent housing, essential services, and critical supports can change their lives forever. Through research the Center learns what families need to rebound from the housing, economic,…

National Center on Family Homelessness (NJ1), 2012

2012-01-01

418

Homelessness and Substance Use in Cook County  

E-print Network

and Substance Abuse State of Illinois by Timothy P. Johnson and Mark E. Barrett Survey Research Laboratory University of Illinois September 1991 #12;#12;Homelessness & Substance Abuse in Cook County i CONTENTS Page ....................................................................................................49 #12;Homelessness & Substance Abuse in Cook County ii CONTENTS--Continued Page REFERENCES

Illinois at Chicago, University of

419

Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

2012-01-01

420

Perceptions about Homeless Elders and Community Responsibility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Human service students were surveyed ("N" = 207) to determine their perceptions about homeless elders and communal responsibility for their well-being. Using a backward regression analysis, a final model ("F" = 15.617, "df" = 7, "p" < 0.001) for Perceptions about Homeless Persons and Community…

Kane, Michael N.; Green, Diane; Jacobs, Robin

2013-01-01

421

Transmission of Tuberculosis Among the Urban Homeless  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusions.\\\\p=m-\\\\Theminimum percentage of cases due to primary tuberculosis in the homeless was estimated to be 53%, compared with the traditional estimate of 10% in the general population. The results suggest that primary tuberculosis caused the majority of tuberculosis cases in this population of the urban homeless in central Los Angeles. (JAMA. 1996;275:305-307)

Peter F. Barnes; Hiyam El-Hajj; Susan Preston-Martin; M. Donald Cave; Brenda E. Jones; Michiko Otaya; Janice Pogoda; Kathleen D. Eisenach

2010-01-01

422

Homelessness, Poverty, and Children's Literacy Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over 100 million families worldwide lack permanent housing or income sufficient to meet their basic needs. Some homeless children are able to succeed in school despite the many challenges they face, but others are not. Seventy-five percent of U.S. homeless children perform below grade level in reading, and schools and teachers may not be prepared…

Walker-Dalhouse, Doris; Risko, Victoria J.

2008-01-01

423

The Impact of Homelessness on Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews community-based research on the effects of homelessness on children. Homeless children face threats to their future well-being resulting from health problems, hunger, poor nutrition, developmental delays, anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, and educational underachievement. Contributing factors may include inadequate shelter,…

Rafferty, Yvonne; Shinn, Marybeth

1991-01-01

424

Publicizing, Politicizing, and Neutralizing Homelessness: Comic Strips.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes 231 comic strips and 126 editorial cartoons featuring homelessness to uncover differences between public opinion manifested in popular culture and views held by local and national power groups. Finds that 57% of comic strips and 30% of editorial cartoons are neutralizing, either by using the homeless as "props" for other stories or issues…

Penner, Maurice; Penner, Susan

1994-01-01

425

Youth Unemployment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the introduction to this conference report, the problem of youth unemployment is reviewed and youth unemployment rates for 1976 are analyzed. Lester C. Thurow's study is presented as a discussion of the problem of youth unemployment. He examined the impact of economic growth, looked at the significance of the effect of unemployment on youth,…

Rockefeller Foundation, New York, NY.

426

Correlates of adult assault among homeless women.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess predictors of sexual and physical assault among homeless women. A multivariate, correlation design was utilized to identify independent correlates of adult physical and sexual assault. The sample consisted of 202 homeless women residing in shelters or living on the street in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Respondents reporting a history of child sexual abuse were almost four times more likely to report being sexually assaulted as adults and were almost two and one third times more likely to report being physically assaulted as adults. A range of factors increase homeless women's risk of adult physical and sexual victimization, including child sexual abuse, substance use, lifetime sex trade activity, and previous incarceration. It is important for homeless service providers to develop an individual risk profile for homeless women and to intervene in order to decrease their risk of re-victimization. PMID:21099076

Hudson, Angela L; Wright, Kynna; Bhattacharya, Debika; Sinha, Karabi; Nyamathi, Adeline; Marfisee, Mary

2010-11-01

427

Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve. Summary Report. Findings of the National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Survey of Homeless Assistance Providers and Clients (NSHAPC) was conducted to provide information about the providers of homeless assistance services and the characteristics of homeless clients who use them. This survey was conducted for use by federal agencies and other interested parties responsible for administering homeless

Burt, Martha R.; Aron, Laudan Y.; Douglas, Toby; Valente, Jesse; Lee, Edgar; Iwen, Britta

428

The health of homeless children revisited.  

PubMed

To the extent that representative data are available for specific health conditions (eg, under-immunization, asthma prevalence), the authors' data suggest that the gap between the health status of homeless children and housed children in minority, low-income families is narrowing. Studies of the health status of homeless children allow a window into the health status of medically underserved children whose needs may not be readily documented because of their lack of access to the health care system. Although prevalence rates of most of the health conditions discussed in this article exceeded national norms, they were generally consistent with rates characteristic of health disparities based on race-ethnicity and income. It must be emphasized that in most instances, children were seen for their first pediatric visit within weeks of entering the homeless shelter system. The health conditions identified were often present before the child and family became homeless. The high prevalence of asthma among homeless children should therefore be a matter of concern to health providers and payors, because the authors' data strongly suggest that this is not confined to children in homeless shelters as a special population. Similarly, childhood obesity predates homelessness (or at least the episode of homelessness during which health care was provided) and as such the authors' data may indicate the extent of this problem more generally among medically underserved children in the communities of origin. These conditions seem to be exacerbated by the specific conditions associated with homeless shelter life. Asthma care, assuming it was previously available, is disrupted when housing is lost, and shelter conditions may have multiple asthma triggers. Nutrition often suffers as a result of inadequate access to nutritious food and cooking facilities in shelters, as indicated by the high rate of iron-deficiency anemia among very young children. It is clear that homeless children in shelters require enhanced access to primary and specialist care. Shelter placement necessarily disrupts prior health care relationships (if any), while simultaneously placing additional stress on the child's physical and emotional well being. A medical home model is strongly recommended to allow for continuous, culturally competent care. Developmental and mental health problems are also more prevalent among homeless children. These conditions may jeopardize life successes. The overcrowding associated with homeless shelters and the housing conditions that frequently precede episodes of homelessness are associated with the higher prevalence of otitis media found among young children. This in turn is associated with developmental delay. Also contributing to the developmental risk associated with homelessness is exposure to DV, which is also frequently an antecedent of homelessness. Developmental surveillance for young, homeless children, monitoring of school attendance and academic performance, and assessment of mental status for homeless adolescents are recommended to facilitate early identification of problems and delivery of necessary interventions. For young children, providers of health care to the homeless should be well networked into the Early Intervention and Preschool Special Education programs in their locality. Given the multiplicity of needs for homeless families, which of course includes help finding affordable housing, health care providers serving this population should also develop linkages with community agencies, including those that can help parents develop the skills necessary for economic self-sufficiency and long-term ability to sustain independent housing. PMID:17918471

Grant, Roy; Shapiro, Alan; Joseph, Sharon; Goldsmith, Sandra; Rigual-Lynch, Lourdes; Redlener, Irwin

2007-01-01

429

Care of the homeless: an overview.  

PubMed

Homelessness affects men, women, and children of all races and ethnicities. On any given night, more than 610,000 persons in the United States are homeless; a little more than one-third of these are families. Homeless persons are more likely to become ill, have greater hospitalization rates, and are more likely to die at a younger age than the general population. The average life span for a homeless person is between 42 and 52 years. Homeless children are much sicker and have more academic and behavioral problems. Insufficient personal income and the lack of affordable housing are the major reasons for homelessness. Complex, advanced medical problems and psychiatric illnesses, exacerbated by drug and alcohol abuse, in combination with the economic and social issues (such as the lack of housing and proper transportation) make this subset of the population a unique challenge for the health care system, local communities, and the government. An integrated, multidisciplinary health care team with an outreach focus, along with involvement of local and state agencies, seems best suited to address the components needed to ensure quality of care, to help make these patients self-sufficient, and to help them succeed. Family physicians are well suited to manage the needs of the homeless patient, provide continuity of care, and lead these multidisciplinary teams. PMID:24784122

Maness, David L; Khan, Muneeza

2014-04-15

430

Risk factors associated with recurrent homelessness after a first homeless episode.  

PubMed

Alcohol and drug use are commonly associated with the experience of homelessness. In order to better understand this, we explored the prevalence of drug and alcohol use as it related to successful re-housing within a sample of first-time single homeless adults at municipal shelters. From within this sample, we compared the features of recurrent homelessness with those of chronic homelessness and of being stably housed. We interviewed 344 subjects upon shelter entry and followed each one every six months for 18 months using standardized social and mental health measures. We analyzed baseline assessments relative to housing experiences during follow-up using Chi square and multinomial logistic regression. Eighty-one percent (N = 278) obtained housing over 18 months, of which 23.7 % (N = 66) experienced homelessness again. Recurrent homelessness was more common among those with a high school education and if initially re-housed with family. Bivariate analysis resulted in the observation of the highest rate of alcohol and other drug use among this recurrent group and multinomial logistic regression supported this only with the coupling of arrest history and diagnosed antisocial personality disorder. With relatively high rates of recurrent homelessness, there were differences between subjects who experienced recurrent homelessness compared to those who were stably housed and with chronic homelessness. That alcohol and other substance use disorders were associated with recurrent homelessness only if they were linked to other risk factors highlights the complexity of causes for homelessness and a resultant need to organize them into constellations of causal risk factors. Consistent with this, there should be initiatives that span bureaucratic boundaries so as to flexibly meet multiple complex service needs, thus improving outcomes concerning episodes of recurrent homelessness. PMID:23744291

McQuistion, Hunter L; Gorroochurn, Prakash; Hsu, Eustace; Caton, Carol L M

2014-07-01

431

Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders Among Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Adolescents in Norway  

PubMed Central

Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) are known to be subjected to several potentially traumatic life events, risking more mental health problems than other populations of same age. In this study, we aimed to explore the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity at an early stage after arrival to the host country. We performed structured clinical interviews (CIDI) with 160 male UASC from different countries (Afghanistan, Somalia, Iran), after four months in Norway. Most of the participants had experienced life threatening events (82%), physical abuse (78%), or loss of a close relative (78%) in their former life. Altogether 41.9% of the participants fulfilled diagnostic criteria for a current psychiatric disorder. The most prevalent diagnosis was PTSD (30, 6%), followed by MDD (9, 4%), Agoraphobia (4, 4%) and GAD (3, 8%). Implications of this vulnerability call for more mental health resources in the early stages of the asylum process. Increased awareness of psychiatric morbidity in UASC may improve the prognosis, give more appropriate care, and ease the integration process on all levels of society. PMID:25006343

Jakobsen, Marianne; Demott, Melinda A. M; Heir, Trond

2014-01-01

432

Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among unaccompanied asylum-seeking adolescents in norway.  

PubMed

Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) are known to be subjected to several potentially traumatic life events, risking more mental health problems than other populations of same age. In this study, we aimed to explore the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity at an early stage after arrival to the host country. We performed structured clinical interviews (CIDI) with 160 male UASC from different countries (Afghanistan, Somalia, Iran), after four months in Norway. Most of the participants had experienced life threatening events (82%), physical abuse (78%), or loss of a close relative (78%) in their former life. Altogether 41.9% of the participants fulfilled diagnostic criteria for a current psychiatric disorder. The most prevalent diagnosis was PTSD (30, 6%), followed by MDD (9, 4%), Agoraphobia (4, 4%) and GAD (3, 8%). Implications of this vulnerability call for more mental health resources in the early stages of the asylum process. Increased awareness of psychiatric morbidity in UASC may improve the prognosis, give more appropriate care, and ease the integration process on all levels of society. PMID:25006343

Jakobsen, Marianne; Demott, Melinda A M; Heir, Trond

2014-01-01

433

Sleeping Patterns of Afghan Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Adolescents: A Large Observational Study  

PubMed Central

Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) have experienced multiple traumas and are a high-risk group for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The effects of trauma are known to be associated with sleep problems; indeed sleeping problems are core features of PTSD. However, there has been no systematic research examining the sleep of this high risk group of children. This study presents the first evidence on the sleeping patterns of Afghan UASC living in the UK. A total of 222 male Afghan children, aged 13–18, were interviewed using validated self-report questionnaires measuring sleeping patterns and PTSD. Overall, UASC patterns for bed time and rise time appear acculturated to the country of asylum. Mean UASC sleep onset latency scores were approximately 20 minutes greater compared with normative scores, which may be a reflection of UASC pre-migration and post-migration experiences. As expected, UASC who screened above the clinical cut-off for PTSD reported significantly greater sleep onset latency, increased nightmares, and less total sleep time compared to the non-PTSD group. The results may be of particular interest to clinicians given that, compared to screening for PTSD, screening for sleep problems may be a less culturally disputed form of initial assessment indicating distress in UASC. Similarly, the field of UASC and refugee child interventions is largely focused on trauma, yet sleep may provide a novel avenue for equally or more effective treatment. PMID:23457517

Bronstein, Israel; Montgomery, Paul

2013-01-01

434

United States Interagency Council on Homelessness  

MedlinePLUS

... Deals Think Upstream Share the Vision Build a Bank of Knowledge Be an Agent of Change Follow ... more... Issues Human Rights and Alternatives to Criminalization Banks: Investing to End Homelessness Domestic Violence Economic Value ...

435

KINGSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ISIR REQUEST / CORRECTION FORM 2013 -2014  

E-print Network

KINGSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE ISIR REQUEST / CORRECTION FORM 2013 - 2014 Financial Aid Office. Unaccompanied youth who was homeless? ( Doc req'd) #______ YES NO 12. Drivers License State Parent's Information and checking 88. $ 41. $ Net worth of Investments 89. $ 42. $ Net worth of Businesses 90. $ 43a. $ Education

Rosen, Jay

436

Homelessness and health in Canada: research lessons and priorities.  

PubMed

This article was for prepared for an international think-tank on reducing health disparities and promoting equity for vulnerable populations. Its purposes are to provide an overview of homelessness research and to stimulate discussion on strategic directions for research. We identified studies on homelessness, with an emphasis on Canadian research. Studies were grouped by focus and design under the following topics: the scope of homelessness, the health status of homeless persons, interventions to reduce homelessness and improve health, and strategic directions for future research. Key issues include the definition of homelessness, the scope of homelessness, its heterogeneity, and competing explanations of homelessness. Homeless people suffer from higher levels of disease and the causal pathways linking homelessness and poor health are complex. Efforts to reduce homelessness and improve health have included biomedical, educational, environmental, and policy strategies. Significant research gaps and opportunities exist in these areas. Strategic research will require stakeholder and community engagement, and more rigorous methods. Priorities include achievement of consensus on measuring homelessness, health status of the homeless, development of research infrastructure, and ensuring that future initiatives can be evaluated for effectiveness. PMID:16078553

Frankish, C James; Hwang, Stephen W; Quantz, Darryl

2005-01-01

437

Homeless ?Management?: Evaluating Governmental and Faith-Based Mandates on Homeless Persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine four questions related to social welfare policy which have become increasingly important as social welfare policy is devolved to states and faith-based and community groups: What do the homeless want? What do we give them? How do we decide? And, how do they obtain what is not provided? The National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty puts out

Todd Belt; Shannon Northrop

438

Administrator's Memo: Youth Tutoring Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual, designed for the use of administrators in implementing a Youth Tutoring Youth Program (developed to encourage positive attitudes in tutors towards going to school, holding jobs, and helping others), outlines the employment of underachieving, disadvantaged 14- and 15-year-old Neighborhood Youth Corps enrollees as tutors for elementary…

National Commission on Resources for Youth, Inc., New York, NY.

439

Mental Illness, Homelessness Linked to Heart Disease in Study  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mental Illness, Homelessness Linked to Heart Disease in Study High ... Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Homeless people with mental illness are at high risk for heart disease, a ...

440

Art Education for Children and Youth Living in an Emergency Housing Shelter  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the benefit of an art program to children and youth living in an emergency housing facility. Factors leading to homelessness are explored and examples of the positive influence of art for children experiencing crisis and trauma are presented. Through action research, an art program was implemented where…

Morasco, Kara

2013-01-01

441

Mentoring and Social Skills Training: Ensuring Better Outcomes for Youth in Foster Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth in foster care face significant life challenges that make it more likely that they will face negative outcomes (i.e., school failure, homelessness, and incarceration). While the reason(s) for out-of-home placement (i.e., family violence, abuse, neglect and/or abandonment) provide some context for negative outcomes, such negative outcomes…

Williams, Charles A.

2011-01-01

442

The Boston HAPPENS program: needs and use of services by HIV-positive compared to at-risk youth, including gender differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The Boston HAPPENS (HIV Adolescent Provider and Peer Education Network for Services) Program is a linked services network of care for HIV-positive, homeless, and at risk youth in Metropolitan Boston funded by the Special Projects of National Significance Program. This report studies the needs and use of services by HIV-positive youth compared with negative and untested at-risk youth, including

Elizabeth R. Woods; Cathryn L. Samples; Maurice W. Melchiono; Peter M. Keenan; Durrell J. Fox; Louise H. Chase; Michelle A. Burns; Virginia A. Price; Jan Paradise; Rebecca O’Brien; Richard A. Claytor; Robyn Brooke; Elizabeth Goodman

2000-01-01

443

Rural Homelessness in Northwest Ohio: Reasons, Patterns, Statistics, and Trends.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rural homelessness in America is difficult to define, to count, and to see. This article reports the findings of a 1993 county-wide study of rural homelessness. During a one year survey, 118 homeless households were interviewed. Of those surveyed, 25.8 percent were male adults, 30.9 percent were female adults, and 43.2 percent were children.…

Podlin, Georgette A.

444

Private Lives in Public Places: Loneliness of the Homeless  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the dawn of the 21st century, both loneliness and homelessness are more pervasive than we would possibly like to admit. In this study, the experience of loneliness of the homeless was compared to that of the general population. Two hundred and sixty six homeless and 595 men and women from the general population answered a 30 item yes/no…

Rokach, Ami

2005-01-01

445

Food Security and Homelessness in the City of Anaheim  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary purpose of the City of Anaheim's 2007 Homeless Survey was to provide city staff with an opportunity to understand the characteristics of the City's homeless population. The purpose of this study was to determine whether food insecurity was associated with: (1) homelessness, (2) demographic characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity, (3) mental and physical illness, and (4)

Ann G. Ora; Michele Mouttapa; Jie Weiss; Penny Weissmuller

2008-01-01

446

Disaffiliation to Entrenchment: A Model for Understanding Homelessness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Survey data collected from 166 homeless persons in Austin (Texas) identified four clusters distinguished by the size of the individual's social network, the degree of dysfunction, and the length of time homeless. Recommends group-based plans for building better paths out of homelessness. (DM)

Grigsby, Charles; And Others

1990-01-01

447

Transforming Teacher Constructs of Children and Families Who Are Homeless  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this article is on articulating the importance of teacher development of constructs about homeless children and families and examining factors that influence teachers' perceptions of children and families who are homeless or at high-risk of becoming homeless. The article also explores some strategies to support teachers in…

Powers-Costello, Beth; Swick, Kevin J.

2011-01-01

448

Homelessness and Information Systems: Diverse Settings, Common Questions  

E-print Network

Homelessness and Information Systems: Diverse Settings, Common Questions David G. Hendry The Info pre- selected audience discussants will seed a participatory dialog con- cerning homelessness the welfare of homeless people and discuss the potential impacts of information systems on four dimensions

Anderson, Richard

449

Exploring the Lived Experiences of Homeless Families with Young Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study researched the experiences of homeless families with young children between the ages of four and eight. Many families experience homelessness every year; therefore, it is important for early childhood educators to have an understanding of how homelessness affects families with young children so that educators can effectively serve the…

Hinton, Stephanie; Cassel, Darlinda

2013-01-01

450

The Multi-Dimensional Lives of Children Who Are Homeless  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely reported that children who are homeless are victimized by overwhelming challenges like poverty and ill-advised policy decisions, such as underfunding the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. This act is the only federal legislation devoted to this marginalized group. Children who are homeless, however, should not be characterized…

Grineski, Steve

2014-01-01

451

The Teacher Attitudes toward Homeless Students Scale: Development and Validation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent estimates suggest there are roughly 1.6 million homeless children and this number is growing (National Center on Family Homelessness, 2011). This trend is particularly worrisome given that homeless children face a number of obstacles within society and education, not the least of which is negative teacher attitudes (Swick, 2000; U.S.…

Brown, Jessica J.

2012-01-01

452

Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted!  

E-print Network

! Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted! Become a Shadow Count Decoy Shadow Count 2012 What: Monday Jan. 30th ­ 31st (overnight), the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS) will send hundreds of volunteers all across the city to count NYC's unsheltered homeless people

Qiu, Weigang

453

THE ECONOMICS OF HOMELESSNESS: THE EVIDENCE FROM NOR TH AMERICA  

E-print Network

THE ECONOMICS OF HOMELESSNESS: THE EVIDENCE FROM NOR TH AMERICA John M. Quigley and Steven Raphael ABSTRACT It is generally believed that the increased incidence of homelessness in the US has arisen from that variations in homelessness arise from changed circumstances in the housing market and in the income

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

454

Designing for Homeless Young People: Precaution in Ubiquitous Computing  

E-print Network

Designing for Homeless Young People: Precaution in Ubiquitous Computing Abstract How should ubiquitous access to information through computing be shaped to improve the lives of homeless young people? Drawing on social and material considerations of homeless young people and service agencies, uncovered

Anderson, Richard

455

Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted!  

E-print Network

! Shadow Count 2012: Help New York City's Homeless Be Counted! Become a Shadow Count Decoy Shadow Count 2013 What: Monday Jan. 28th ­ 29th (overnight), the NYC Department of Homeless Services (DHS) will send hundreds of volunteers all across the city to count NYC's unsheltered homeless people

Qiu, Weigang

456

Homeless Young People and Living with Personal Digital Artifacts  

E-print Network

Homeless Young People and Living with Personal Digital Artifacts Jill Palzkill Woelfer and David G}@uw.edu ABSTRACT This paper reports on an investigation of how homeless young people hold themselves in relation the ordinary and extraordinary circumstances of homelessness. The paper concludes with a discussion

Anderson, Richard

457

At Home With The Homeless By Ian Jamison  

E-print Network

At Home With The Homeless By Ian Jamison Like millions of other Americans, my first exposure,000 Americans are homeless. Immediately after entering Holy Apostles, our group was made to feel at home. A pair alike. He was quickly joined by a homeless man, who, after finishing his meal, took out his harmonica

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

458

Homeless Children in America: Challenges for the 1990s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1980s brought an unprecedented rise in the number of homeless families with children. That there may be as many as three million homeless persons in the United States, with families representing one-third of this population, indicates that homelessness is a social problem of catastrophic proportions. This paper finds that while Federal…

Rafferty, Yvonne

459

41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

2012-01-01

460

41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

2014-01-01

461

41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

2010-07-01

462

41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

2011-01-01

463

41 CFR 102-75.1200 - How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false How may representatives of the homeless apply for the use of properties to assist the homeless? 102-75.1200 Section 102-75...Use of Federal Real Property to Assist the Homeless Application Process §...

2013-07-01

464

Prolonged and persistent homelessness: multivariable analyses in a cohort experiencing current homelessness and mental illness in Vancouver, British Columbia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research and policy making concerning homelessness has focused on the particular challenges associated with ending chronic homelessness. It is generally assumed that individuals who have been homeless for longer durations have a greater impact on the public system of care and are in need of the most assistance. The aim of this study was to examine key sample characteristics

Michelle L. Patterson; Julian M. Somers; Akm Moniruzzaman

2011-01-01

465

Prolonged and persistent homelessness: multivariable analyses in a cohort experiencing current homelessness and mental illness in Vancouver, British Columbia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research and policy making concerning homelessness has focused on the particular challenges associated with ending chronic homelessness. It is generally assumed that individuals who have been homeless for longer durations have a greater impact on the public system of care and are in need of the most assistance. The aim of this study was to examine key sample characteristics

Michelle L. Patterson; Julian M. Somers; Akm Moniruzzaman

2012-01-01

466

Understanding Youth  

E-print Network

activities that develop skill coordination and enhance the individual?s understanding and appreciation of a growing and changing body. Avoid physical activities that emphasize awkwardness. ? Design health and grooming activities that help youth develop... and maturity levels. ? Design activities that strengthen male and female roles. ? Focus some activities on the physical self to help youth accept who they are. Mental development ? Allow youth to set their own goals, make their own plans, implement those...

Howard, Jeff W.

2005-05-10

467

Youth Development & Youth Leadership. A Background Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

All effective youth programs have youth development at their core. Effective youth leadership programs build on solid youth development principles, with an emphasis on those areas of development and program components that support youth leadership. This paper has been created by the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth

Edelman, Andrea; Gill, Patricia; Comerford, Katey; Larson, Mindy; Hare, Rebecca

2004-01-01

468

Social and Structural Barriers to Housing Among Street-Involved Youth Who Use Illicit Drugs  

PubMed Central

In Canada, approximately 150,000 youth live on the street. Street-involvement and homelessness have been associated with various health risks, including increased substance use, blood-borne infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. We undertook a qualitative study to better understand the social and structural barriers street-involved youth who use illicit drugs encounter when seeking housing. We conducted 38 semi-structured interviews with street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada from May to October 2008. Interviewees were recruited from the At-risk Youth Study (ARYS) cohort, which follows youth aged 14 to 26 who have experience with illicit drug use. All interviews were thematically analyzed, with particular emphasis on participants' perspectives regarding their housing situation and their experiences seeking housing. Many street-involved youth reported feeling unsupported in their efforts to find housing. For the majority of youth, existing abstinence-focused shelters did not constitute a viable option and, as a result, many felt excluded from these facilities. Many youth identified inflexible shelter rules and a lack of privacy as outweighing the benefits of sleeping indoors. Single-room occupancy hotels (SROs) were reported to be the only affordable housing options, since many landlords would not to rent to youth on welfare. Many youth reported resisting moving to SROs as they viewed them as unsafe and as giving up hope for a return to mainstream society. The findings of the present study shed light on the social and structural barriers street-involved youth face in attaining housing and challenge the popular view of youth homelessness constituting a life-style choice. Our findings point to the need for housing strategies that include safe, low threshold, harm reduction focused housing options for youth who engage in illicit substance use. PMID:20102394

Krüsi, Andrea; Fast, Danya; Small, Will; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

2009-01-01

469

Improving access to health care for homeless people.  

PubMed

Homeless people have the poorest health outcomes in our society and the number of people who are homeless is increasing. This article explores the effect that homelessness has on health, provides details of organisations that offer services to the homeless population of London, and highlights the role of nurses in advocating for improved services for homeless patients. The need to understand and address inequalities in access to health care is also discussed. An example of the authors' practice is provided in the form of a case study. PMID:25294486

Lamb, Venetia; Joels, Claire

2014-10-13

470

Homelessness: Programs and the People They Serve, Highlights Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In December 1999, the department of Housing and Urban development released their "most comprehensive study ever of homelessness in America." The survey of the homeless and the social programs supporting them is offered online in three separate chunks. The Highlights Report offers a substantial review of both the data and analytic conclusions. One significant finding that seems to fly in the face of certain myths about homelessness: "when homeless people get housing assistance and needed services - such as health care, substance abuse treatment, mental health services, education and job training - 76% of those living in families and 60% of those living alone end their homeless status."

1999-01-01

471

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different time, what per diem...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...different time, what per diem rate will he/she receive? 302-4.204 Section...different time, what per diem rate will he/she receive? If your spouse does not...travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she will receive the same per diem...

2010-07-01

472

41 CFR 302-4.204 - If my spouse or domestic partner does not accompany me but travels unaccompanied at a different...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...different time, what per diem rate will he/she receive? 302-4.204 Section...different time, what per diem rate will he/she receive? If your spouse or domestic...travels unaccompanied at a different time, he/she will receive the same per diem...

2011-07-01

473

Mercer Veterinary Clinic for Pets of the Homeless All About Mercer Clinic  

E-print Network

Mercer Veterinary Clinic for Pets of the Homeless All About Mercer Clinic Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Homeless is a 501(C)3 non-profit, student an array of services to the homeless. In addition to improving the lives of the pets of the homeless

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

474

Celebrating Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lists the four young people cited as exceptional youth by President Ronald Reagan on September 9, 1988, during Youth 2000 Week. Cited were Andrea Taylor of Kansas City, Missouri, Peggy Lee Rogers of Denver, Colorado, Annette Pino of Pueblo, Colorado, and Ed Lucero, a student at Colorado State University. (SKC)

Children Today, 1988

1988-01-01

475

Youth Suicide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews and analyzes statistics and theories on causes of increasing youth suicides. Emphasizes the importance of identifying suicidal adolescents, accepting their feelings, and providing appropriate intervention. Illustrates categories of youth suicides--the loner, the depressed, the psychotic, the crisis suicide, and as a means to communicate.…

Peck, Michael

1982-01-01

476

Providing WIC Services to Homeless Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Families in Transition program (FIT), in collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Medicine, designed and implemented a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) homeless outreach project. Staff scheduled regular outreach visits to shelters and soup kitchens to ensure that eligible participants were certified for the WIC program and families were closely followed.Two hundred

Lisa Ann Hamm; E. Wayne Holden

1999-01-01

477

Survival Strategies of Older Homeless Men.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined how 281 homeless men aged 50 and older living on skid row were able to procure basic necessities such as money, food, shelter, and health care. Found men had and used informal supports to survive. Inability to fulfill needs was primarily associated with physical health, depression, lack of contacts with institutions and agencies, and…

Cohen, Carl I.; And Others

1988-01-01

478

Gender Differences in Victimized Homeless Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most of what we know about sexual abuse comes from efforts to examine female children victimized by men. Although some researchers have identified similarities between male and female victims of sexual abuse, few studies have examined gender-specific factors associated with sexual health practices among homeless adolescents. The aim of this study…

Johnson, Regina Jones; Rew, Lynn; Kouzekanani, Kamiar

2006-01-01

479

The impact of homelessness on children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews and critiques community-based re- search on the effects of homelessness on children. Home- less children confront serious threats to their ability to succeed and their future well-being. Of particular concern are health problems, hunger, poor nutrition, developmental delays, anxiety, depression, behavioral problems, and ed- ucational underachievement. Factors that may mediate the observed outcomes include inadequate shelter condi-

Yvonne Rafferty; Marybeth Shinn

1991-01-01

480

24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

2013-04-01

481

24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

2010-04-01

482

24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

2014-04-01

483

38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

2010-07-01

484

78 FR 26559 - Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing: Rural Housing Stability Assistance...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...No. 5573-N-02] RIN 2506-AC33 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition...to the Definition of ``Chronically Homeless'' Extension of Public Comment Only...to the definition of ``chronically homeless.'' This document announces that...

2013-05-07

485

77 FR 39342 - Proposed Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program) Activity; Comment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...2900-0554] Proposed Information Collection (Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...or per diem for programs to assist homeless veterans' transition to independent...of information technology. Titles a. Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem...

2012-07-02

486

24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

2012-04-01

487

78 FR 28947 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (VANS)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AFFAIRS Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...grantee projects funded under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program...copies) for assistance under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem...

2013-05-16

488

38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

2014-07-01

489

24 CFR 291.415 - Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...purchase properties for use by the homeless. 291.415 Section 291.415...Single Family Properties for the Homeless § 291.415 Lease with option to purchase properties for use by the homeless. (a) Certification....

2011-04-01

490

38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

2013-07-01

491

38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

2011-07-01

492

38 CFR 1.710 - Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and correspondence.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments and...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Homeless Claimants § 1.710 Homeless claimants: Delivery of benefit payments...

2012-07-01

493

Fostering youth engagement:  

E-print Network

Youth-adult partnerships are collaborations between adults and youth in the decision-making and planning processes. When adults enable youth to be a part of the decision-making and planning processes, youth voice, empowerment, and participation...

Maynard, Karen Kimberly

2009-05-15

494

Age differences among homeless individuals: adolescence through adulthood.  

PubMed

The present study examines differences between homeless adolescents, young adults, and older adults served by homeless shelters or food programs to inform service provision. Four homeless studies using the same sampling and measurement methods were pooled to permit comparisons across age groups. Results showed that homeless adolescents demonstrated greater resilience than younger and older adults. Adolescents reported the shortest duration of homelessness, lowest number of life stressors, fewest physical symptoms, largest social networks, and fewest clinically significant mental health problems. Adolescents also received fewer alcohol and drug abuse diagnoses than younger and older adults. Younger adults reported less time homeless and fewer physical symptoms than older adults, but more life stressors. Younger adults also endorsed higher levels of hostile and paranoid psychological symptoms. Implications for service provision and policy are discussed. PMID:19363770

Tompsett, Carolyn J; Fowler, Patrick J; Toro, Paul A

2009-01-01

495

Predictors of substance abuse treatment participation among homeless adults.  

PubMed

The current study focuses on the relationships among a trauma history, a substance use history, chronic homelessness, and the mediating role of recent emotional distress in predicting drug treatment participation among adult homeless people. We explored the predictors of participation in substance abuse treatment because enrolling and retaining clients in substance abuse treatment programs is always a challenge particularly among homeless people. Participants were 853 homeless adults from Los Angeles, California. Using structural equation models, findings indicated that trauma history, substance use history and chronicity of homelessness were associated, and were significant predictors of greater recent emotional distress. The most notable result was that recent emotional distress predicted less participation in current substance abuse treatment (both formal and self-help) whereas a substance use history alone predicted significantly more participation in treatment. Implications concerning treatment engagement and difficulties in obtaining appropriate dual-diagnosis services for homeless mentally distressed individuals are discussed. PMID:24238716

Ibabe, Izaskun; Stein, Judith A; Nyamathi, Adeline; Bentler, Peter M

2014-03-01

496

The reality of homeless mobility and implications for improving care.  

PubMed

Homeless persons are perceived as a highly mobile population, and have high rates of co-morbid conditions, including mental health and substance use issues. This study sought to determine the characteristics of the mobility and reported health conditions of homeless persons. The sample for this cross sectional study (n = 674) accounted for 88 % of the homeless population in a medium sized southern city in the United States. Participants were recruited from a homeless shelter operating during the winter season. Homeless persons were less mobile than the general state population (46.11 % were born in-state vs. 40.7 % of the general population) and less transient than the general state population (78 % reported an in-state zip code for the last permanent residence). 31.9 % reported a disabling condition of a serious and long term nature. These findings challenge the concept that homeless persons are primarily a mobile population. Furthermore, homeless persons in this sample were more likely to remain in the state where they lived after becoming homeless. Thus, provider perceptions that homeless persons would not benefit from referral to a regular source of outpatient care may be misinformed. As homeless persons often seek care in emergency departments for conditions that could be addressed through outpatient care, if a medical care system implemented standard practices specifically for homeless patients, this could decrease recidivism. Such interventions represent significant opportunities to reduce costs, conserve resources, and improve care through policy modification that ensures a focus on a successful, active linkage to outpatient care and programs specific to the homeless population. PMID:23494281

Parker, R David; Dykema, Shana

2013-08-01

497

Substance abuse and homelessness: social selection or social adaptation?  

PubMed

Although substance abuse has for many years been documented as a serious problem among homeless populations, there is as yet no clear understanding of the nature of the relationship between substance abuse and homelessness. We evaluate alternative social selection and social adaptation models of this process. Using data from a random probability sample, the substance abuse and homeless experiences of 303 homeless people and people at risk of homelessness in Cook County, Illinois, were investigated. Proportional hazards regression models were employed to assess both social selection and social adaptation models. Drug but not alcohol abuse was associated with first homeless episode. Prior homeless experiences were found to be predictive of first symptoms of both alcohol and drug abuse. Other variables, including the availability of social and economic resources, were also associated with each of these outcomes. Models of both selection and adaptation processes are necessary to account for the association between homelessness and substance abuse, indicating that a multi-directional model is more appropriate. In addition findings suggest that, in recent years, drugs may have displaced alcohol as an important precursor of homelessness for many individuals. PMID:9177065

Johnson, T P; Freels, S A; Parsons, J A; Vangeest, J B

1997-04-01

498

Evaluations of Continuums of Care for Homeless People  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Prepared by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, "Evaluations of Continuums of Care for Homeless People" is a comprehensive study that examines the continuums of care for homeless people throughout the United States. Critiquing the agenda of the Continuum of Care (CoC), a system designed to help homeless people as well as those at imminent risk of becoming homeless, this 216-page report examines their development, current structure, and possible future. Users should note that this report defaults to small font and may be more easily readable if printed.

2002-01-01

499

How Effective Homelessness Prevention Impacts the Length of Shelter Spells  

PubMed Central

Homelessness prevention programs intervene with households apparently in imminent danger of becoming homeless, and try to keep them housed. If they are at least partially successful, how do they change the average shelter spell of households actually becoming homeless? We use data from 2003 to 2008 for Homebase, a New York City homelessness prevention program that studies have found to be effective in reducing shelter entries. Homebase made no difference in average shelter spells at the community level. This result, like many results about shelter spell length, is not easy to reconcile with the idea that shelter spell length is a reflection of the seriousness of underlying problems. PMID:24610995

Goodman, Sarena; Messeri, Peter; O’Flaherty, Brendan

2014-01-01

500

U.S. government announces new policy to address homelessness  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Integrating Services a Key to Homelessness Planhttp://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory?id=10985475Shelter residents, operators react to U.S. Homeless planhttp://www.joplinglobe.com/local/x383282834/Shelter-residents-operators-react-to-U-S-homeless-planObama builds on Bush success to help the homelesshttp://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/the-monitors-view/2010/0622/Obama-builds-on-Bush-success-to-help-the-homelessA 1% fix for homelessnesshttp://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/home/49752645-73/percent-homeless-housing-homelessness.html.cspUnited States Interagency Council on Homelessness http://www.usich.gov/U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development: Homelessness Resource Exchangehttp://www.hudhre.info/Addressing the problems of the homeless population is a multi-faceted undertaking, and many different governmental agencies have tried novel approaches recently. For example, a coalition of groups in Seattle opened a residential facility several years ago where homeless persons who were dependent on alcohol could drink openly while living in the facility. This Tuesday, the White House made an announcement that a new effort called "Opening Doors" would be utilized to offer a new approach on the federal level to dealing with homelessness. The basic premise behind this approach is that better coordination among the "many agencies that try to help homeless people find employment and health care as well as stable places to live" is a crucial step to ending homelessness entirely. One of the key components of this plan is to also add housing vouchers for low-income families and affordable rental units in the short-term. The hope is that chronic homelessness (where people tend to cycle through shelters and hospitals) can be effectively alleviated with the implementation of this policy. The first link will take visitors to a story from ABC News about the recent announcement from the White House about this new plan. The second link will lead users to an article from the Joplin Globe which takes a look at reactions from residents and operators of homeless shelters in Joplin, MO. The third link will take users to an editorial from this Tuesday's Christian Science Monitor which discusses the work of the Bush administration on a similar plan to end chronic homelessness. Moving on, the fourth link leads to a thoughtful article from the Salt Lake Tribune which talks about the movement to encourage Utahns to pledge 1 percent of one year's income to generate an endowment to solve homelessness in the state. The fifth link will whisk users to the homepage of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness. Here visitors can learn about the details of this plan and consider statistics on homelessness. The last and final link leads to the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Homelessness Resource Exchange website. The site contains information for those people "assisting persons who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless."

Grinnell, Max

2010-06-25