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Sample records for uncontrolled gestational diabetes

  1. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mellitus: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . 2014;160:414-20. Serlin DC, Lash RW. Diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus. Am Fam Physician . 2009;80:57-62.

  2. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Often gestational diabetes can be controlled through eating healthy foods and regular exercise. Sometimes a woman with gestational ... 5 Tips for Women with Gestational Diabetes Eat Healthy Foods Eat healthy foods from a meal plan made ...

  3. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  4. Screening for Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... then tested to see how well her body processes the sugar. January 2014 Task Force FINAL Recommendation | ... blood tested to see how well her body processes the sugar. gestational diabetes... Diabetes that begins during ...

  5. Update on gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pridjian, Gabriella; Benjamin, Tara D

    2010-06-01

    As the rate of obesity increases in adolescent and adult women in the United States, practitioners of obstetrics see higher rates of gestational diabetes. Recent clinical studies suggest that women with gestational diabetes have impaired pancreatic beta-cell function and reduced beta-cell adaptation resulting in insufficient insulin secretion to maintain normal glycemia. Despite recent evidence that even mild hyperglycemia is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, controversies still exist in screening, management, and treatment of gestational diabetes. Initial studies regarding glyburide for treatment of gestational diabetes are promising. Overall, only about half of the women with gestational diabetes are screened in the postpartum period, an ideal time for education and intervention, to decrease incidence of glucose intolerance and progression to type 2 diabetes. PMID:20685552

  6. Gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Thomas A.; Xiang, Anny H.

    2005-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance of various degrees that is first detected during pregnancy. GDM is detected through the screening of pregnant women for clinical risk factors and, among at-risk women, testing for abnormal glucose tolerance that is usually, but not invariably, mild and asymptomatic. GDM appears to result from the same broad spectrum of physiological and genetic abnormalities that characterize diabetes outside of pregnancy. Indeed, women with GDM are at high risk for having or developing diabetes when they are not pregnant. Thus, GDM provides a unique opportunity to study the early pathogenesis of diabetes and to develop interventions to prevent the disease. PMID:15765129

  7. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Senat, M-V; Deruelle, P

    2016-04-01

    While the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was estimated between 5 and 10% in 2010, the application of new thresholds recommended by IADPSG and adopted in 2010 by CNGOF seems to significantly increase the number of patients affected by this pathology. A prospective single-center French study estimated in 2014 the prevalence of gestational diabetes at 14% with these criteria, making it one of the most frequent complications during pregnancy. However, to date, there is no published study using these criteria to show a benefit to the health of women and children. If a diagnosis of GDM or type 2 diabetes during pregnancy is definitively an important risk factor for maternal as well as newborn and child complications, it is probably not the case for moderate hyperglycemia discovered during pregnancy. PMID:26948827

  8. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Pollak, Arnold; Repa, Andreas; Lechleitner, Monika; Weitgasser, Raimund

    2012-12-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy and is associated with increased feto-maternal morbidity as well as long-term complications in mothers and offspring. Women detected to have diabetes early in pregnancy receive the diagnosis of overt, non-gestational, diabetes. GDM is diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or fasting glucose concentrations (> 92 mg/dl). Screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit (Evidence level B) is recommended in women at increased risk using standard diagnostic criteria (high risk: history of GDM or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance); malformation, stillbirth, successive abortions or birthweight > 4,500 g in previous pregnancies; obesity, metabolic syndrome, age > 45 years, vascular disease; clinical symptoms of diabetes (e.g. glucosuria). Performance of the OGTT (120 min; 75 g glucose) may already be indicated in the first trimester in some women but is mandatory between 24 and 28 gestational weeks in all pregnant women with previous non-pathological glucose metabolism (Evidence level B). Based on the results of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study GDM is defined, if fasting venous plasma glucose exceeds 92 mg/dl or 1 h 180 mg/dl or 2 h 153 mg/dl after glucose loading (OGTT; international consensus criteria). In case of one pathological value a strict metabolic control is mandatory. All women should receive nutritional counseling and be instructed in blood glucose self-monitoring. If blood glucose levels cannot be maintained in the normal range (fasting < 95 mg/dl and 1 h after meals < 140 mg/dl) insulin therapy should be initiated. Maternal and fetal monitoring is required in order to minimize maternal and fetal/neonatal morbidity and perinatal mortality. After delivery all women with GDM have to be reevaluated as to their glucose tolerance by a 75 g OGTT (WHO criteria) 6-12 weeks postpartum and every 2 years in case of normal glucose tolerance (Evidence level B). All women have to be instructed about their (sevenfold increased relative) risk of type 2 diabetes at follow-up and possibilities for diabetes prevention, in particular weight management and maintenance/increase of physical activity. Monitoring of the development of the offspring and recommendation of healthy lifestyle of the children and family is recommended. PMID:23250453

  9. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Harreiter, Jürgen; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Berger, Angelika; Repa, Andreas; Lechleitner, Monika; Weitgasser, Raimund

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy and is associated with increased feto-maternal morbidity as well as long-term complications in mothers and offspring. Women detected to have diabetes early in pregnancy receive the diagnosis of overt, non-gestational, diabetes (glucose: fasting > 126 mg/dl, spontaneous > 200 mg/dl or HbA1c > 6.5 % before 20 weeks of gestation). GDM is diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or fasting glucose concentrations (> 92 mg/dl). Screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit (Evidence level B) is recommended in women at increased risk using standard diagnostic criteria (high risk: history of GDM or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance); malformation, stillbirth, successive abortions or birth weight > 4,500 g in previous pregnancies; obesity, metabolic syndrome, age > 45 years, vascular disease; clinical symptoms of diabetes (e. g. glucosuria)). Performance of the OGTT (120 min; 75 g glucose) may already be indicated in the first trimester in some women but is mandatory between 24 and 28 gestational weeks in all pregnant women with previous non-pathological glucose metabolism (Evidence level B). Based on the results of the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study GDM is defined, if fasting venous plasma glucose exceeds 92 mg/dl or 1 h 180 mg/dl or 2 h 153 mg/dl after glucose loading (OGTT; international consensus criteria). In case of one pathological value a strict metabolic control is mandatory. This diagnostic approach was recently also recommended by the WHO. All women should receive nutritional counseling and be instructed in blood glucose self-monitoring and to increase physical activity to moderate intensity levels- if not contraindicated. If blood glucose levels cannot be maintained in the normal range (fasting < 95 mg/dl and 1 h after meals < 140 mg/dl) insulin therapy should be initiated as first choice. Maternal and fetal monitoring is required in order to minimize maternal and fetal/neonatal morbidity and perinatal mortality. After delivery all women with GDM have to be reevaluated as to their glucose tolerance by a 75 g OGTT (WHO criteria) 6-12 weeks postpartum and every 2 years in case of normal glucose tolerance (Evidence level B). All women have to be instructed about their (sevenfold increased relative) risk of type 2 diabetes at follow-up and possibilities for diabetes prevention, in particular weight management and maintenance/increase of physical activity. Monitoring of the development of the offspring and recommendation of healthy lifestyle of the children and family is recommended. PMID:27052232

  10. [Gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Anazawa, Sonoko

    2015-12-01

    Five years have passed since the criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were revised. Under these new criteria, prevalence of GDM has increased from 2-3% to 8-10%. This increase raises many arguments especially about cost effectiveness of managing newly diagnosed mild GDM showing only one abnormal value in 75 gOGTT. No evidence is yet to be found. But in our everyday experience, we find out few poor perinatal outcome with mild GDM mothers who are treated only with diet regimen to control their body weight. Considering later development to type 2 diabetes with these mild GDM mothers, they show no obvious difference from non GDM mothers in the retrospective study. PMID:26666146

  11. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Spaight, Caroline; Gross, Justine; Horsch, Antje; Puder, Jardena Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Based on the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome study, new universal screening recommendations and cut-offs for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been proposed. In addition to the immediate perinatal risk, GDM carries an increased risk of metabolic disease in the mother and child. Maternal obesity has even been shown to be associated with increased all-cause mortality in offspring. In addition to known risk factors, excessive gestational weight gain, increased fat consumption, a low vitamin D level, psychological stress and negative mood are risk factors for GDM. Regarding therapy, the US Preventive Task Force concluded in 2013 that GDM treatment significantly reduces the risks of pre-eclampsia, macrosomia and shoulder dystocia (relative risks of 0.62, 0.5 and 0.42, respectively). Although nutrition therapy represents a cornerstone in GDM management, the results of studies are not clear regarding which types of dietary advice are the most suitable. Most physical activity interventions improve glucose control and/or reduce insulin use. Recent studies have evaluated and provided more information about treatment with metformin or glyburide. Postpartum management is essential and should focus on long-term screening and diabetes prevention strategies. PMID:26824237

  12. Gestational diabetes: A clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Ulla; Madsen, Lene Ring; Skajaa, Gitte Oeskov; Iversen, Ditte Smed; Moeller, Niels; Ovesen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing in prevalence in tandem with the dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of childbearing age. Much controversy surrounds the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes, emphasizing the importance and relevance of clarity and consensus. If newly proposed criteria are adopted universally a significantly growing number of women will be diagnosed as having GDM, implying new therapeutic challenges to avoid foetal and maternal complications related to the hyperglycemia of gestational diabetes. This review provides an overview of clinical issues related to GDM, including the challenges of screening and diagnosis, the pathophysiology behind GDM, the treatment and prevention of GDM and the long and short term consequences of gestational diabetes for both mother and offspring. PMID:26240703

  13. Gestational diabetes (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... During your pregnancy, hormonal changes can cause the body to be less sensitive to the effect of insulin. These changes can lead to high blood sugar and diabetes. High blood sugar levels in pregnancy ...

  14. Gestational Diabetes and Testing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to the baby. The baby turns the extra sugar into fat — mostly around his or her belly. This extra birth fat increases your baby’s chance of having obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes later in life. In addition, the baby may have difficulty being born if ...

  15. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples…

  16. Understanding Gestational Diabetes: A Practical Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This brochure addresses the problem of gestational diabetes and answers the most frequently asked questions about the disease. It begins by defining gestational diabetes and discussing its cause, then addresses such topics as: (1) how gestational diabetes differs from other types of diabetes; (2) who is at risk for developing gestational diabetes…

  17. Am I at Risk for Gestational Diabetes?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... level is: High 1 Average 0 Low Your health care provider: Will test you as soon as you know you are ... their lifetime. If you had gestational diabetes, your health care provider will test you for diabetes 6 weeks after you give ...

  18. [Screening for gestational diabetes in Denmark].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, J L; Kierkegaard, O

    1992-10-01

    A questionnaire regarding the screening procedure for gestational diabetes was sent to all maternity hospitals in Denmark in 1990. Only 15 out of 51 departments used the screening procedure as proposed by Guttorm & Pedersen. Glucosuria was a clinical risk factor in 49 of 51 departments. There was no agreement about the histories and clinical risk factors. The factors used were family history of diabetes, obesity, a previous infant weighing 9 lbs or more, a previous infant born with low gestational age, habitual abortion, previous perinatal deaths, previous preterm delivery, hydramnios, excessive fetal growth or glucosuria in the present pregnancy. No department used universal screening. PMID:1413225

  19. Managing Gestational Diabetes: A Patient's Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research Planning Data Sharing and Other Resources Research Managing Gestational Diabetes: A Patient's Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy Skip ... improve the health of mothers, children, and families. Managing Gestational Diabetes: A Patient's Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy provides ...

  20. Pre-Pregnancy Potato Consumption Linked to Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 156648.html Pre-Pregnancy Potato Consumption Linked to Gestational Diabetes Five cups of spuds weekly boosts odds by ... potatoes before pregnancy appear more likely to develop gestational diabetes, a new study suggests. A woman's risk of ...

  1. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Taifeng; Han, Huijun; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans) can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium) for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily) on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily) for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women. PMID:25255832

  2. Gestational diabetes mellitus: insulinic management.

    PubMed

    Magon, Navneet; Seshiah, Veerasamy

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic pregnancies have attendant risks. Adverse fetal, neonatal, and maternal outcomes in a diabetic pregnancy can be avoided by optimum glycemic control. Most pregnancies with GDM can be managed with non-insulinic management, which includes medical nutrition therapy. However, many necessitate concomitant insulinic management. The new insulin analogs present undoubted advantages in reducing the risk of hypoglycemia, mainly during the night, and in promoting a more physiologic glycemic profile in pregnant women with diabetes. Rapid-acting insulin analogs seem to be safe and efficient in reducing postprandial glucose levels more proficiently than regular human insulin, with less hypoglycemia. The long-acting insulin analogs do not have a pronounced peak effect as NPH insulin, and cause less hypoglycemia, mainly during the night. The review focuses on glycemic goals in pregnancy, insulinic management of GDM, and posology of insulin and its analogs. Clear understanding of the insulinic management of GDM is essential for women's health care providers to provide comprehensive care to women whose pregnancies are complicated with diabetes and rechristen the ''diabetic capital of the world'' to the ''diabetic care capital of the world.'' PMID:24757334

  3. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, P. G.; Sridhar, G. R.; Sujatha, V.; Anita, V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml) were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml) (P < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women. PMID:22701850

  4. Effect of uncontrolled hyperglycemia on levels of adhesion molecules in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2*

    PubMed Central

    Ruszkowska-Ciastek, Barbara; Sokup, Alina; Wernik, Tomasz; Ruprecht, Zofia; Góralczyk, Barbara; Góralczyk, Krzysztof; Gadomska, Grażyna; Rość, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Uncontrolled diabetes has become a major cause of mortality and morbidity by reason of vascular angiopathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of soluble forms of vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), E-selectin, and thrombomodulin in patients with well-controlled and uncontrolled diabetes type 2. Methods: The study was conducted on 62 patients with diabetes. Group I consisted of 35 patients with well-controlled diabetes. The second group included 27 patients with uncontrolled diabetes with micro-albuminuria. A control group was made up of 25 healthy volunteers. The concentrations of sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, sE-selectin, and soluble thrombomodulin were assayed in plasma. Serum concentration of creatinine was measured and the plasma concentrations of fasting glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) determined. Results: Lower concentrations of ICAM-1 were found in the group of uncontrolled diabetes patients compared with those with well-controlled disease. In patients with uncontrolled diabetes, VCAM-1 levels were significantly higher compared with the group with well-controlled diabetes. In patients with uncontrolled diabetes a positive correlation was obtained between glomerular filtration rate and sE-selectin and a negative correlation between the levels of creatinine and ICAM-1, although there was a positive correlation between (HbA1c) and ICAM-1. Conclusions: The study confirmed the participation of the inflammatory process associated with impaired vascular endothelial function in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The opposite effect of uncontrolled hyperglycemia on adhesion molecules suggests different functions of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in complications of diabetes. PMID:25990052

  5. Updated guidelines on screening for gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yashdeep; Kalra, Bharti; Baruah, Manash P; Singla, Rajiv; Kalra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of complications for both mother and baby during pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period. Screening and identifying these high-risk women is important to improve short- and long-term maternal and fetal outcomes. However, there is a lack of international uniformity in the approach to the screening and diagnosis of GDM. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on screening for GDM and overt diabetes during pregnancy, and discuss the controversies in this field. We take on debatable issues such as adoption of the new International association of diabetes and pregnancy study groups criteria instead of the Carpenter and Coustan criteria, one-step versus two-step screening, universal screening versus high-risk screening before 24 weeks of gestation for overt diabetes, and, finally, the role of HbA1c as a screening test of GDM. This discussion is followed by a review of recommendations by professional bodies. Certain clinical situations, in which a pragmatic approach is needed, are highlighted to provide a comprehensive overview of the subject. PMID:26056493

  6. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Positive Predictor of Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gregory E.; E. Illanes, Sebastian; Mitchell, Murray D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider the relative benefits of screening for type two diabetes mellitus in women with a previous pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus. Recent studies suggest that women who experience GDM are at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 10–20 years of their index pregnancy. If considered as a stand-alone indicator of the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, GDM is a poor diagnostic test. Most women do not develop GDM during pregnancy and of those that do most do not develop type 2 diabetes. There is, however, a clear need for better early detection of predisposition to disease and/or disease onset to significantly impact on this global pandemic. The putative benefits of multivariate approaches and first trimester and preconception screening to increase the sensitivity of risk assignment modalities for type 2 diabetes are proposed. PMID:22675354

  7. A review of current treatment strategies for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Kristi W; Carroll, Dana G; Meyer, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 90% of diabetes cases in pregnant women are considered gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). It is well known that uncontrolled glucose results in poor pregnancy outcomes in both the mother and fetus. Worldwide there are many guidelines with recommendations for appropriate management strategies for GDM once lifestyle modifications have been instituted and failed to achieve control. The efficacy and particularly the safety of other treatment modalities for GDM has been the source of much debate in recent years. Studies that have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of both glyburide and metformin in the management of patients with GDM will be reviewed. There is a lack of evidence with other oral and injectable non-insulin agents to control blood glucose in GDM. The role of insulin will be discussed, with emphasis on insulin analogs. Ideal patient characteristics for each treatment modality will be reviewed. In addition, recommendations for postpartum screening of patients will be described as well as recommendations for use of agents to manage subsequent type 2 diabetes in patients who are breastfeeding. PMID:26213555

  8. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Ashwal, Eran; Hod, Moshe

    2015-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any carbohydrate intolerance first diagnosed during pregnancy. The prevalence of GDM is about 2-5% of normal pregnancies and depends of the prevalence of same population to type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is associated with adverse outcome for the mother, the fetus, neonate, child and adult offspring of the diabetic mother. Detection of GDM lies on screening, followed as necessary by diagnostic measures. Screening can either be selective, based upon risk stratification or universal. Timely testing enables the obstetrician to assess glucose tolerance in the presence of the insulin-resistant state of pregnancy and permits treatment to begin before excessive fetal growth has occurred. Once a diagnosis of GDM was made close perinatal surveillance is warranted. The goal of treatment is reducing fetal-maternal morbidity and mortality related with GDM. The exact glucose values needed are still not absolutely proved. The decision whether and when to induce delivery depends on gestational age, estimated fetal weight, maternal glycemic control and bishop score. Future research is needed regarding prevention of GDM, treatment goals and effectiveness of interventions, guidelines for pregnancy care and prevention of long term metabolic sequel for both the infant and the mother. PMID:25655741

  9. Potential Mechanisms of Exercise in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Laher, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed during pregnancy. This condition shares same array of underlying abnormalities as occurs in diabetes outside of pregnancy, for example, genetic and environmental causes. However, the role of a sedentary lifestyle and/or excess energy intake is more prominent in GDM. Physically active women are less likely to develop GDM and other pregnancy-related diseases. Weight gain in pregnancy causes increased release of adipokines from adipose tissue; many adipokines increase oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Increased intramyocellular lipids also increase cellular oxidative stress with subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species. A well-planned program of exercise is an important component of a healthy lifestyle and, in spite of old myths, is also recommended during pregnancy. This paper briefly reviews the role of adipokines in gestational diabetes and attempts to shed some light on the mechanisms by which exercise can be beneficial as an adjuvant therapy in GDM. In this regard, we discuss the mechanisms by which exercise increases insulin sensitivity, changes adipokine profile levels, and boosts antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:23691290

  10. [Postpartum and contraception after gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kerlan, V

    2010-12-01

    Women who had gestational diabetes must have their glycemia closely checked after delivery to insure complete normalization. Few studies are published but breast feeding does not seem to modify the metabolic profile of the mother or the children. Contraception must take account associated risk factors. Very few studies are published and none notified a significant modification of the carbohydrate metabolism with hormonal contraception, either estroprogestative or progestative only. But associated obesity, hypertension or dyslipidemia need the prescription of a contraception with no vascular secondary effect. In these cases an intrauterine device represents a very good choice. PMID:21185480

  11. Gestational Diabetes May Lead to More Body Fat on Babies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158813.html Gestational Diabetes May Lead to More Body Fat on Babies Finding held ... maternal diabetes has on the baby," said study lead author Karen Logan of Imperial College London. "This ...

  12. Postpartum Healthcare After Gestational Diabetes and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Kristin; Rogers, Stephanie; Ball, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy identify women with an elevated lifetime risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods: Prospective cohort of women recruited from the postpartum service of a large community-based academic obstetrical hospital after delivery of a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) or a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP). Interviews were conducted, and validated surveys completed, before hospital discharge and again 3 months postpartum. Results: The study sample included 249 women: 111 with GDM, 127 with HDP, and 11 with both. Most, 230 (92.4%) had a PCP prior to pregnancy and 97 (39.0%) reported an office visit with their PCP during the prenatal period. Of the 176 (70.7%) participants who attended the 3-month study visit, 169 (96.0%) women with either diagnosis reported they had attended their 6-week postpartum visit. By the 3-month study visit, 51 (57.9%) women with GDM had completed follow-up glucose testing; 93 (97.9%) with HDP had follow-up blood pressure testing; and 101 (57.4%) with either diagnosis recalled ever having completed lipid screening. Women least likely to complete screening tests were those who had no college education, less than a high school level of health literacy, and who were not privately insured. Conclusion: There are important opportunities to improve postpartum testing for diabetes and CVD risk factor assessment. Most women were connected to primary care suggesting a “hand-off” to a primary care physician after pregnancy is feasible. More robust strategies may be needed to improve follow-up care for women with less education, lower health literacy, and those without private health insurance. PMID:25089915

  13. Prescribing physical activity to prevent and manage gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Colberg, Sheri R; Castorino, Kristin; Jovanovič, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is the most prevalent metabolic disorder during pregnancy. Women diagnosed with GDM have a substantially greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 5-10 years after delivery, and the risk is increased by excess body weight. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia during pregnancy is potentially harmful to both mother and fetus, resulting in a greater need for Caesarian-section deliveries, delivery of larger infants with more excess body fat, a greater risk of infant death and stillbirth, and an elevated risk of infant hypoglycemia immediately after birth. Fortunately, engaging in physical activity prior to and during pregnancy may lower the risk of developing GDM. Pregnant women should also be advised how to safely increase their physical activity during pregnancy and the postpartum period. An initial approach to becoming more physically active can simply be to encourage women to incorporate more unstructured physical activity into daily living, both before and during pregnancy. Giving women an appropriate exercise prescription can encourage them to participate in physical activity safely and effectively throughout pregnancy to prevent and/or manage GDM. Engaging in 30 min of moderate intensity physical activity on most, if not all, days of the week has been adopted as a recommendation for all pregnant women. PMID:24379915

  14. Gestational diabetes and childhood obesity: what is the link?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Y.; Sharma, Andrea J.; Callaghan, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recently published studies examining the role of prepregnancy obesity in the relationship between gestational diabetes mellitus and childhood obesity. Recent findings Seven epidemiologic studies published from January 2011 to February 2012 differentiate between preexisting diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes mellitus, and six of them examine the role of maternal obesity. In studies that account for maternal obesity as a covariate, the association between gestational diabetes mellitus and childhood obesity is attenuated significantly after adjustment for prepregnancy BMI. In the one study that does not adjust for maternal obesity, maternal glucose level during pregnancy is associated with greater offspring adiposity, independent of the child’s diet and lifestyle. Summary This review shows a positive association between maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and offspring overweight and obesity that is attenuated significantly after adjustment for prepregnancy BMI. The relationship between maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and offspring overweight and obesity could reflect fetal programming, shared genes and/or shared environments, such as postnatal diet and physical activity. Maternal gestational hyperglycemia and subsequent fetal hyperinsulinemia may predispose offspring to increased adiposity, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Because maternal obesity is a more prevalent condition than gestational diabetes mellitus and strongly associated with offspring obesity, effective interventions addressing prepregnancy obesity need to be further explored as they may have a greater public health impact on childhood overweight and obesity than those targeting women with gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:23000698

  15. [Predisposition and phenotypes of gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kleinwechter, H; Demandt, N; Schäfer-Graf, U

    2014-05-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed with a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test based on IADPSG criteria which had been recently adopted by WHO. In industrial countries GDM is one of the most frequent pregnancy complications. In 2012, in Germany GDM had been diagnosed in 4,3 % of all births, overall 27,700 cases. GDM has to be considered as a preliminary stage of type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance and inadequate β-cell-compensation. Additionally, adverse metabolic profile, associations with inflammatory parameters, with D vitamin metabolism, and insufficient decline of renal threshold for glucose had been identified in women with GDM. Within 10 years after GDM roughly 50 % of the women convert to overt diabetes, mostly type 2. GDM and type 2 diabetes share potential candidate genes. In about 1 % of GDM in Caucasian women a mutation in glucokinase gene had been found (GCK-MODY). Predisposition to GDM is predominantly characterized by family history of diabetes, previous GDM in pregnancies, factors of metabolic syndrome, and unfavorable life style. The probability for GDM rises with increasing mother's age and preconceptional BMI. Via fetal programming GDM dispones to offspring obesity as early as school entry. Prevention of GDM focus on regular physical exercise, normalizing body weight before conception, reducing excess intake of animal protein and soft drinks, planning of pregnancy in younger ages, and avoiding pollutant exposition as well as smoking cessation. PMID:24823983

  16. The placenta and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gauster, M; Desoye, G; Tötsch, M; Hiden, U

    2012-02-01

    By its location between maternal and fetal bloodstreams the human placenta not only handles the materno-fetal transport of nutrients and gases, but may also be exposed to intrauterine conditions adversely affecting placental and fetal development. Such adverse conditions exist in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and have been associated with alterations in placental anatomy and physiology. These alterations are mainly based on changes on the micro-anatomical and/or even molecular level including aberrant villous vascularization, a disbalance of vasoactive molecules, and enhanced oxidative stress. The consequence thereof may be impaired fetal oxygenation and changes in transplacental nutrient supply. Although transplacental glucose flux is flow limited and independent of glucose transporter availability, transport of essential and nonessential amino acids and expression of genes involved in lipid transport and metabolism are significantly affected by GDM. PMID:22102097

  17. Genetic polymorphisms associated with overweight and obesity in uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kasim, Nor Bahirah; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna; Ibrahim, Luqman; Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar

    2016-04-01

    Generally, obese and overweight individuals display higher free fatty acid levels, which stimulate insulin resistance. The combination of overweight or obesity with insulin resistance can trigger Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and are primary contributing factors to the development of uncontrolled T2DM. Genetic polymorphisms also play an important role as they can impact a population's susceptibility to becoming overweight or obese and developing related chronic complications, such as uncontrolled T2DM. This review specifically examines the genetic polymorphisms associated with overweight and obesity in patients with uncontrolled T2DM. Particularly, gene polymorphisms in ADIPOQ (rs1501299 and rs17300539), LepR (rs1137101 and rs1045895), IRS2 (rs1805092), GRB14 (rs10195252 and rs3923113) and PPARG (rs1801282) have been associated with overweight and obesity in uncontrolled T2DM. PMID:26999420

  18. Metformin in gestational diabetes: An emerging contender

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance occurring first time during pregnancy. Its prevalence is simultaneously increasing with the global rise of diabesity. GDM commonly develops, when maternal glucose metabolism is unable to compensate for the progressive development of insulin resistance, arising primarily from the consistently rising diabetogenic placental hormones. It classically develops during the second or third trimester. Theoretically, insulin sensitizers should have been the ideal agent in its treatment, given the insulin resistance, the major culprit in its pathogenesis. Fortunately, majority of women can be treated satisfactorily with lifestyle modification, and approximately 20% requires more intensive treatment. For several decades, insulin has been the most reliable treatment strategy and the gold standard in GDM. Metformin is effective insulin sensitizing agent and an established first line drug in type 2 diabetes currently. As it crosses the placenta, a safety issue remains an obstacle and, therefore, metformin is currently not recommended in the treatment of GDM. Nevertheless, given the emerging clinically equivalent safety and efficacy data of metformin compared to insulin, it appears that it may perhaps open a rather new door in managing GDM. The aim of this review is to critically analyze, the safety and efficacy data of metformin regarding its use in GDM and pregnant mothers with polycystic ovarian disease, which has emerged in past decades. PMID:25729685

  19. Gestational diabetes: risks, management, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is commonly defined as glucose intolerance first recognized during pregnancy. Diagnostic criteria for GDM have changed over the decades, and several definitions are currently used; recent recommendations may increase the prevalence of GDM to as high as one of five pregnancies. Perinatal complications associated with GDM include hypertensive disorders, preterm delivery, shoulder dystocia, stillbirths, clinical neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and cesarean deliveries. Postpartum complications include obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in the offspring and diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the mothers. Management strategies increasingly emphasize optimal management of fetal growth and weight. Monitoring of glucose, fetal stress, and fetal weight through ultrasound combined with maternal weight management, medical nutritional therapy, physical activity, and pharmacotherapy can decrease comorbidities associated with GDM. Consensus is lacking on ideal glucose targets, degree of caloric restriction and content, algorithms for pharmacotherapy, and in particular, the use of oral medications and insulin analogs in lieu of human insulin. Postpartum glucose screening and initiation of healthy lifestyle behaviors, including exercise, adequate fruit and vegetable intake, breastfeeding, and contraception, are encouraged to decrease rates of future glucose intolerance in mothers and offspring. PMID:21151681

  20. The role of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in monitoring uncontrolled hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Stana, D; Iancu, R; Leasu, C; Popescu, V; Dumitrescu, A; Gradinaru, S

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy is multifactorial, and a range of hyperglycemia-linked pathways has been implicated in the initiation and progression of this condition. All the cells in the retina are affected by the diabetic milieu, and in view of such disease and tissue complexity, it is unlikely that any single process is solely responsible for the retinal pathophysiology. Dyslipidemia is considered a trigger to rapid worsening of the condition and its treatment is becoming a part of normal diabetes treatment. Nevertheless, as establishing causal mechanisms and related conditions remain an important research goal, also the means to follow up the impact on the retina and other ocular tissues are as important. Objective: this retrospective study shows the progression of diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with dyslipidemia related to poor glycemic and blood control in subjects with existing DME by measuring the total macular volume (TMV) and thickness through the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD- OCT). Methods and results: 30 uncontrolled cases of type 2 diabetes that were measured monthly by SD- OCT through a period of 3 months with correlation to the degree of dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, were analyzed. Conclusion: The role of OCT in monitoring the progression of DME in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes is essential and the collaboration between the ophthalmologist and endocrinologist is essential to monitor the course of disease in uncontrolled patients.

  1. Vitamin D status and gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Muthukrishnan, Jayaraman; Dhruv, Goel

    2015-01-01

    Context: Vitamin D (Vit D) deficiency and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are increasingly being seen in Indian women. The role of Vit D in causing GDM is not clear. Aims: (1) To compare Vit D status in pregnant women with or without GDM. (2) Frequency of GDM in women with Vit D insufficiency and deficiency. (3) To reassess glucose tolerance after replacement of Vit D in those women with Vit D deficiency and GDM. Settings and Design: Tertiary Care Hospital, Antenatal Care Department based prospective, controlled study. Subjects and Methods: Seventy-eight consecutive women (<28 weeks gestational period) were screened for GDM by glucose tolerance test (GTT) (75 g 2 h). Fifty-nine of these women were confirmed to have GDM (2 h postglucose > 140 mg/dl). Eight of these women were excluded as per laid exclusion criteria. Remaining 19 women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) were included as controls. Serum 25-OH Vit D level was estimated by radioimmuno assay. Standard advice regarding diet, sunlight exposure, and exercise was given to all by the same dietician. Women with Vit D levels below 20 ng/ml were prescribed 60,000 IU of oral cholecalciferol to be administered twice weekly for 4 weeks. GTT was repeated after 6 weeks. Frequency of glucose intolerance was compared between Vit D sufficient and deficient groups. Women with GDM and Vit D deficiency who revert to NGT after supplementation with cholecalciferol were evaluated. Statistical Analysis used: Paired t-test for comparing means, and Fisher's test for comparing proportions. Results: Baseline characteristics of GDM and NGT with respect to their age, prepregnancy body mass index, and gestational period were comparable. Serum 25-OH Vit D levels were significantly lower in GDM 24.7 (±17.6) ng/ml versus NGT (45.8 ± 28) group (P = 0.0004). Frequency of GDM was similar irrespective of Vit D status 67% versus 42% (P = 0.09). Standard advice on diet and exercise with or without Vit D supplementation did not significantly differ in the conversion of GDM to NGT (P = 0.63). Conclusion: Although Vit D deficiency is associated with GDM however its replacement does not reverse the glucose intolerance. There is no justification at present for routine screening for Vit D deficiency or its replacement in the management of GDM. PMID:26425469

  2. Screening and diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Hartling, Lisa; Dryden, Donna M; Guthrie, Alyssa; Muise, Melanie; Vandermeer, Ben; Aktary, Walie M; Pasichnyk, Dion; Seida, Jennifer C; Donovan, Lois

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is uncertainty as to the optimal approach for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Based on systematic reviews published in 2003 and 2008, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concluded that there was insufficient evidence upon which to make a recommendation regarding routine screening of all pregnant women. OBJECTIVES (1) Identify properties of screening tests for GDM, (2) evaluate benefits and harms of screening for GDM, (3) assess the effects of different screening and diagnostic thresholds on outcomes for mothers and their offspring, and (4) determine the benefits and harms of treatment for a diagnosis of GDM. DATA SOURCES We searched 15 electronic databases from 1995 to May 2012, including MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (which contains the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group registry); gray literature; Web sites of relevant organizations; trial registries; and reference lists. METHODS Two reviewers independently conducted study selection and quality assessment. One reviewer extracted data, and a second reviewer verified the data. We included published randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials and prospective and retrospective cohort studies that compared any screening or diagnostic test with any other screening or diagnostic test; any screening with no screening; women who met various thresholds for GDM with those who did not meet various criteria, where women in both groups did not receive treatment; any treatment for GDM with no treatment. We conducted a descriptive analysis for all studies and meta-analyses when appropriate. Key outcomes included preeclampsia, maternal weight gain, birth injury, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, macrosomia, and long-term metabolic outcomes for the child and mother. RESULTS The search identified 14,398 citations and included 97 studies (6 randomized controlled trials, 63 prospective cohort studies, and 28 retrospective cohort studies). Prevalence of GDM varied across studies and diagnostic criteria: American Diabetes Association (75 g) 2 to 19 percent; Carpenter and Coustan 3.6 to 38 percent; National Diabetes Data Group 1.4 to 50 percent; and World Health Organization 2 to 24.5 percent. Lack of a gold standard for the diagnosis of GDM and little evidence about the accuracy of screening strategies for GDM remain problematic. The 50 g oral glucose challenge test with a glucose threshold of 130 mg/dL versus 140 mg/dL improves sensitivity and reduces specificity. Both thresholds have high negative predictive values (NPV) but variable positive predictive values (PPVs) across a range of prevalence. There was limited evidence for the screening of GDM diagnosed less than 24 weeks' gestation (three studies). One study compared the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups' (IADPSG) diagnostic criteria with a two-step strategy. Sensitivity was 82 percent, specificity was 94 percent. Only two studies examined the effects on health outcomes from screening for GDM. One retrospective cohort study (n=1,000) showed more cesarean deliveries in the screened group. A survey within a prospective cohort study (n=93) found the same incidence of macrosomia (≥4.3 kg) in screened and unscreened groups (7 percent each group). Thirty-eight studies examined health outcomes for women who met different criteria for GDM and did not undergo treatment. Methodologically strong studies showed a continuous positive relationship between increasing glucose levels and the incidence of primary cesarean section and macrosomia. One of these studies also found significantly fewer cases of preeclampsia, cesarean section, shoulder dystocia and/or birth injury, clinical neonatal hypoglycemia, and hyperbilirubinemia for women without GDM compared with those meeting IADPSG criteria. Among the other studies, fewer cases of preeclampsia were observed for women with no GDM and women who were false positive versus those meeting Carpenter and Coustan criteria. For maternal weight gain, few comparisons showed differences. For fetal birth trauma, single studies showed no differences for women with Carpenter and Coustan GDM and World Health Organization impaired glucose tolerance versus women without GDM. Women diagnosed based on National Diabetes Data Group GDM had more fetal birth trauma compared with women without GDM. Fewer cases of macrosomia were seen in the group without GDM compared with Carpenter and Coustan GDM, Carpenter and Coustan 1 abnormal oral glucose tolerance test, National Diabetes Data Group GDM, National Diabetes Data Group false positives, and World Health Organization impaired glucose tolerance. Fewer cases of neonatal hypoglycemia were found among patient groups without GDM compared with those meeting Carpenter and Coustan criteria. There was more childhood obesity for Carpenter and Coustan GDM versus patient groups with no GDM. Eleven studies compared diet modification, glucose monitoring, and insulin as needed with no treatment. Moderate evidence showed fewer cases of preeclampsia in the treated group. The evidence was insufficient for maternal weight gain and birth injury. Moderate evidence found less shoulder dystocia with treatment for GDM. Low evidence showed no difference for neonatal hypoglycemia between treated and untreated GDM. Moderate evidence showed benefits of treatment for reduction of macrosomia (>4,000 g). There was insufficient evidence for long-term metabolic outcomes among offspring. Five studies provided data on harms of treating GDM. No difference was found for cesarean delivery, induction of labor, small for gestational age, or admission to a neonatal intensive care unit. There were significantly more prenatal visits among those treated. CONCLUSIONS While evidence supports a positive association with increasing plasma glucose on a 75 g or 100 g oral glucose tolerance test and macrosomia and primary cesarean section, clear thresholds for increased risk were not found. The 50 g oral glucose challenge test has high NPV but variable PPV. Treatment of GDM results in less preeclampsia and macrosomia. Current evidence does not show that treatment of GDM has an effect on neonatal hypoglycemia or future poor metabolic outcomes. There is little evidence of short-term harm from treating GDM other than an increased demand for services. Research is needed on the long-term metabolic outcome for offspring as a result of GDM and its treatment, and the "real world" effects of GDM treatment on use of care. PMID:24423035

  3. What I Need to Know about Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alternate Language URL Español What I need to know about Gestational Diabetes Page Content On this page: ... not harm your baby. [ Top ] How will I know whether my blood glucose levels are on target? ...

  4. Excessive gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes: importance of the first weeks of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Julie

    2015-10-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with many adverse neonatal and maternal outcomes and prevention of this condition is considered a key strategy for breaking the intergenerational cycle of obesity and diabetes. Whether prevention of excessive gestational weight gain in the first weeks of pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk for GDM is currently unclear. In this issue of Diabetologia, Brunner et al (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3686-5) address this possible association by conducting a systematic review and a meta-analysis. The results of their study provide evidence that excessive gestational weight gain prior to a GDM screening test is associated with an increased risk of GDM compared with non-excessive gestational weight gain. These results emphasise the need for appropriate preconception care and for better prevention of early excessive gestational weight gain and GDM. PMID:26253766

  5. Exercise guidelines for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Padayachee, Cliantha; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. This disease has many detrimental consequences for the woman, the unborn foetus and child. The management of GDM aims to mediate the effects of hyperglycaemia by controlling blood glucose levels. Along with pharmacology and dietary interventions, exercise has a powerful potential to assist with blood glucose control. Due to the uncertainty of risks and benefits of exercise during pregnancy, women tend to avoid exercise. However, under adequate supervision exercise is both safe and beneficial in the treatment of GDM. Therefore it is vital that exercise is incorporated into the continuum of care for women with GDM. Medical doctors should be able to refer to competently informed exercise professionals to aid in GDM treatment. It is important that exercise treatment is informed by research. Hence, the development of evidence-based guidelines is important to inform practice. Currently there are no guidelines for exercise in GDM. This review aims to assess the efficacy of exercise for the management of GDM in order to establish an exercise prescription guideline specific to the condition. It is recommended that women with GDM should do both aerobic and resistance exercise at a moderate intensity, a minimum of three times a week for 30-60 min each time. PMID:26240700

  6. Gestational diabetes mellitus, programing and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jie; Yang, Huixia

    2014-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common medical complication in pregnancy. Offspring exposed to maternal hyperglycemia have a higher birth weight and are prone to develop metabolic disease in adult life. The intrauterine environmental or nutritional status seems to be involved in the fetal programing. The concept of "Developmental Origins of Health and Disease" (DOHaD) has been widely accepted and it brings new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of human diseases. The underlying mechanism is still under discussion and epigenetic mechanisms may provide an explanation for the phenomenon. The aim of this review is to illustrate the role of epigenetic modifications in the development of insulin resistance in metabolic diseases induced by adverse intrauterine exposures. Changes in epigenetic mechanism may be an early event in pathogenesis and progression of the metabolic disease in humans. Studies on epigenetic modifications contribute to our understanding of long-term effects of in utero exposure and shed light on the disease prevention and treatment by modulating epigenetic changes. PMID:24125565

  7. [Gestational diabetes: diagnosis, short and long term management].

    PubMed

    Vambergue, Anne

    2013-05-01

    Universal consensus on the diagnosis methods and thresholds has long been lacking. The recently published Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study has been used to confirm the link between hyperglycemia and materno-fetal complications. Consequently, in France, the Société francophone du diabète (SFD) and the Collège national des gynécologues et obstétriciens français (CNGOF) proposed an expert consensus on gestational diabetes mellitus for clinical practice. Fasting blood glucose should be measured at the first visit during early pregnancy for women with risk factors to identify the women with pregestational diabetes. It is proposed a selective screening on risk factors rather than universal screening. Specific treatment of gestational diabetes reduced materno-fetal complications compared to the absence of therapy. Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus are characterized by a high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23588192

  8. [Epidemiology of gestational syphilis in Fortaleza, Ceará State, Brazil: an uncontrolled disease].

    PubMed

    Campos, Ana Luiza de Araujo; Araújo, Maria Alix Leite; Melo, Simone Paes de; Gonçalves, Marcelo Luiz Carvalho

    2010-09-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the epidemiological profile of pregnant women with positive VDRL in Fortaleza, Ceará State, Brazil, in 2008. The study verified the proportion of pregnant women with syphilis that was classified as treated incorrectly according to Brazilian Ministry of Health guidelines, and assessed the reasons for inadequate treatment. Fifty-eight women who had given birth at five public maternity hospitals were interviewed consecutively following delivery. Data were also recovered from medical files and pregnancy cards. Sociodemographic and obstetric data and information related to the diagnosis and treatment of syphilis in both pregnant women and their partners were analyzed. Only three (5.2%; 95%CI: 1.8%-14.1%) pregnant women had received adequate treatment. The main reason for inadequate treatment was lack of partner treatment (88% of cases; 95%CI: 76.2%-94.4%). Medical care as currently provided does not guarantee the control of gestational syphilis in this sample. PMID:20877935

  9. Animal models for clinical and gestational diabetes: maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Ana CI; Lima, Paula HO; Sinzato, Yuri K; Takaku, Mariana; Takeno, Marisa A; Rudge, Marilza VC; Damasceno, Débora C

    2009-01-01

    Background Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes and gestational diabetes. Experimental models are developed with the purpose of enhancing understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases that affect humans. With regard to diabetes in pregnancy, experimental findings from models will lead to the development of treatment strategies to maintain a normal metabolic intrauterine milieu, improving perinatal development by preventing fetal growth restriction or macrosomia. Based on animal models of diabetes during pregnancy previously reported in the medical literature, the present study aimed to compare the impact of streptozotocin-induced severe (glycemia >300 mg/dl) and mild diabetes (glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dl) on glycemia and maternal reproductive and fetal outcomes of Wistar rats to evaluate whether the animal model reproduces the maternal and perinatal results of clinical and gestational diabetes in humans. Methods On day 5 of life, 96 female Wistar rats were assigned to three experimental groups: control (n = 16), severe (n = 50) and mild diabetes (n = 30). At day 90 of life, rats were mated. On day 21 of pregnancy, rats were killed and their uterine horns were exposed to count implantation and fetus numbers to determine pre- and post-implantation loss rates. The fetuses were classified according to their birth weight. Results Severe and mild diabetic dams showed different glycemic responses during pregnancy, impairing fetal glycemia and weight, confirming that maternal glycemia is directly associated with fetal development. Newborns from severe diabetic mothers presented growth restriction, but mild diabetic mothers were not associated with an increased rate of macrosomic fetuses. Conclusion Experimental models of severe diabetes during pregnancy reproduced maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women presenting uncontrolled clinical diabetes. On the other hand, the mild diabetes model caused mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy, although it was not enough to reproduce the increased rate of macrosomic fetuses seen in women with gestational diabetes. PMID:19840387

  10. Back to the future: examining type 2 diabetic vasculature using the gestational diabetic placenta.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Rekha; Ramanathan, Kavitha; Mathews, Jiji E; Seshadri, Mandalam S

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the association between the intrauterine hyperglycemic milieu and the development of adult diabetic vasculopathy is of particular relevance in India, where diabetes and vascular disease are prevalent. The gestational diabetes mellitus placenta is a valuable tool to examine blood vessels that have been exposed to hyperglycemic cues. We report an interesting observation in a cohort of gestational diabetes mellitus foetal placental vasculature from South India. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated pericyte detachment and pericyte ghost cells reminiscent of adult type 2 diabetic retinopathy, in gestational diabetes mellitus foetal placental blood vessels that were not observed in non-gestational diabetes mellitus placentas (p ?0.001). Endothelial cell irregularity was observed in 76% gestational diabetes mellitus foetal blood vessels as compared with 10.4% non-gestational diabetes mellitus placental vasculature (p ?0.001). Other abnormalities noted in gestational diabetes mellitus placenta included mitochondrial abnormalities, increased micro vessel density and thickening of basement membranes. These results suggest that adult type 2 diabetic vasculopathy has developmental origins in utero. PMID:25116005

  11. Determinants of uncontrolled hypertension in adult type 2 diabetes mellitus: an analysis of the Malaysian diabetes registry 2009

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) is a significant contributor of morbidity and even mortality in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. This study was done to determine the significant determinants of uncontrolled blood pressure in T2D patients in Malaysia. Methods Between 1st January 2009 to 31st December 2009, data from 70 889 patients with Type 2 diabetes was obtained from the Adult Diabetes Control and Management Registry for analysis; 303 centers participated in the study. Their demographic characteristics, the nature of their diabetes, their state of hypertension, treatment modalities, risk factors, and complications are described. Based on their most recent BP values, subjects were divided into controlled BP and uncontrolled BP and their clinical determinants compared. Independent determinants were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Results The mean age of patients at diagnosis of diabetes was 52.3 ± 11.1 years old. Most were women (59.0 %) and of Malay ethnicity (61.9 %). The mean duration of diabetes was 5.9 ± 5.6 years. A total of 57.4 % were hypertensive. Of the 56 503 blood pressure (BP) measured, 13 280 (23.5 %) patients had BP <130/80 mmHg. Eighteen percent was on > two anti-hypertensive agents. Health clinics without doctor, older age (≥ 50 years old), shorter duration of diabetes (< 5 years), Malay, overweight were determinants for uncontrolled blood pressure (BP ≥130/80 mmHg). Patients who were on anti-hypertensive agent/s were 2.7 times more likely to have BP ≥130/80 mmHg. Type 2 diabetes patients who had ischaemic heart disease or nephropathy were about 20 % and 15 % more likely to have their blood pressure treated to target respectively. Conclusions Major independent determinants of uncontrolled BP in our group of T2D patients were Malay ethnicity, older age, recent diagnosis of diabetes, overweight and follow-up at health clinics without a doctor and possibly the improper use of anti hypertensive agent. More effort, education and resources, especially in the primary health care centres are needed to improve hypertensive care among our patients with diabetes. PMID:22607105

  12. Disseminated Cutaneous Herpes Zoster in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh M

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a clinical manifestation which results from reactivation of latent VZV (Varicella zoster virus) present in the sensory root ganglia. Disseminated herpes zoster has been reported in immune-compromised patients such as patient on cancer chemotherapy, HIV (Human immune deficiency virus) infection, systemic corticosteroid therapy. However, we report a case of disseminated herpes zoster infection in an uncontrolled diabetic patient. A brief review of literature on this topic has been bestowed. PMID:26393187

  13. Gestational diabetes mellitus and gene mutations which affect insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Allan, C J; Argyropoulos, G; Bowker, M; Zhu, J; Lin, P M; Stiver, K; Golichowski, A; Garvey, W T

    1997-06-01

    We investigated whether genetic mutations known to impair insulin secretion and glucose tolerance are operative in a group of American women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Study groups were comprised of elderly non-diabetic controls (n = 55) with normal glucose tolerance and patients with gestational diabetes (n = 50), together with one family with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (three controls and three affected). No mutations were detected in any exon of the human glucokinase gene or the mitochondrial tRNA[Leu](UUR) gene by single strand conformational analysis and direct exon sequencing. Also, chi2 analysis showed no significant association with gestational diabetes for a polymorphism at position -30 (G --> A) of the beta-cell-specific glucokinase gene promoter. We have determined that glucokinase and mitochondrial tRNA[Leu](UUR) gene mutations, which are known to impair insulin secretion are relatively uncommon and do not constitute a large component of genetic risk for gestational diabetes in the study population. PMID:9237779

  14. Postpartum and contraception in women after gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kerlan, V

    2010-12-01

    Women who have had gestational diabetes mellitus must be monitored in the immediate postpartum period to ensure that blood glucose levels return to normal without further treatment. In the few studies performed specifically in these women, those that breastfed did not have a different metabolic profile, at least during the period of breastfeeding; the metabolic profiles of children born to women that had gestational diabetes and that breastfed also did not differ from those that were not breastfed. The choice of contraception must mainly take into consideration the associated risk factors. The studies, even if few have specifically focused on women with a history of gestational diabetes, have not demonstrated a significant disturbance of glucose metabolism while using hormonal contraception, whether combined oral oestrogen/progestogen or progestogen-only contraception. However, the presence of obesity, hypertension, or dyslipidaemia must direct the choice of contraception towards one without cardiovascular consequences. In these cases, the intrauterine device is an excellent choice. PMID:21163421

  15. [Screening for gestational diabetes: Still many unsolved issues].

    PubMed

    Bartolo, S; Vambergue, A; Deruelle, P

    2016-02-01

    For many years, there is a debate on gestational diabetes screening, including what screening test and thresholds to use. The purpose of this literature review is to determine whether gestational diabetes screening in France meets the 10 definition criteria of the WHO. The DG is a public health problem, with a natural history partially known and detectable at an early stage. Currently, there is no data showing that there is a benefit to treat patient screens by the new criteria. The one-step approach-screening test can only detect fetal complications and not maternal complications. It seems to be acceptable for the population of pregnant women. The diagnostic test and treatment also seem to be acceptable to us. To this day, its reproducibility is uncertain. Screening leads to an increase in obstetric interventions. Several studies found that screening for gestational diabetes is cost-effective but in a different context of care than in France. PMID:26780845

  16. Myo-Inositol Supplementation to Prevent Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Celentano, Claudio; Matarrelli, Barbara; Mattei, Peter A; Pavone, Giulia; Vitacolonna, Ester; Liberati, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common complication characterized by increased insulin resistance, and by increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes affecting both the mother and the fetus. International guidelines describe optimal ways to recognize it, and the recommended treatment of patients affected to reduce adverse outcomes. Improving insulin resistance could reduce incidence of GDM and its complications. Recently, a few trials have been published on the possible prevention of GDM. Inositol has been proposed as a food supplement that might reduce gestational diabetes incidence in high-risk pregnant women. PMID:26898405

  17. Maternal outcomes and follow-up after gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kim, C

    2014-03-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus reflects impaired maternal insulin secretion relative to demand prior to pregnancy, as well as temporary metabolic stressors imposed by the placenta and fetus. Thus, after delivery, women with gestational diabetes have increased risk of diabetes and recurrent gestational diabetes because of their underlying impairment, which may be further exacerbated by fat accretion during pregnancy and post-partum deterioration in lifestyle behaviours. This hypothetical model is discussed in greater detail, particularly the uncertainty regarding pregnancy as an accelerator of β-cell decline and the role of gestational weight gain. This report also presents risk estimates for future glucose intolerance and diabetes and reviews modifiable risk factors, particularly body mass and lifestyle alterations, including weight loss and breastfeeding. Non-modifiable risk factors such as race/ethnicity and insulin use during pregnancy are also discussed. The review concludes with current literature on lifestyle modification, recommendations for post-partum glucose screening, and future directions for research to prevent maternal disease. PMID:24341443

  18. Patient Perspectives on Quality of Life With Uncontrolled Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Qualitative Meta-synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vanstone, Meredith; Rewegan, Alex; Brundisini, Francesca; Dejean, Deirdre; Giacomini, Mita

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus may be candidates for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. This report synthesizes qualitative research on how patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes perceive their quality of life. Objective The objective of this analysis was to examine the perceptions of patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes on how it affects their lived experience and quality of life. Data Sources This report synthesizes 31 primary qualitative studies to examine quality of life from the perspectives of adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their families or partners. Review Methods We performed a qualitative meta-synthesis to integrate findings across primary research studies. Results Long- and short-term negative consequences of uncontrolled type 1 diabetes affect all aspects of patients’ lives: physical, emotional, practical, and social. The effect on each domain is far-reaching, and effects interact across domains. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels lead to substantial psychological distress, negative moods, cognitive difficulties, irritable or aggressive behaviour, and closely associated problems with relationships, self-image, and confidence. Emotional distress is pervasive and under-addressed by health care providers. Patients live in fear of complications from diabetes over the long term. In the shorter term, they are anxious about the personal, social, and professional consequences of hypoglycemic episodes (e.g., injury, humiliation), and may curtail normal activities such as driving or socializing because they are worried about having an episode. The quality of life for patients’ family members is also negatively impacted by uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. Conclusions Uncontrolled type 1 diabetes has significant negative impacts on the quality of life of both people with the disease and their families. PMID:26649106

  19. Association of GSTs polymorphisms with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Shaoru; Zhai, Qianqian; Hai, Jie; Wang, Di; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association between GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphisms and development of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. A total of 320 patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and 358 pregnancy subjects were consecutively collected between January 2013 and December 2014. Genotyping for detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 IIe105Val was conducted by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms) method. By Fisher’s exact test, we found that the genotype distributions of GSTP1 IIe105Val were in line with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in control subjects (P=0.57). By Chi-square test, we found significant differences in the genotype distributions of GSTM1 (χ2=11.49, P=0.001) and GSTT1 (χ2=18.50, P<0.001). Using unconditional logistic analysis, individuals carrying the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were associated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus when compared with the present genotype, and the adjusted Ors (95% CI) were 1.71 (1.24-2.36) and 2.00 (1.44-2.79), respectively. However, the GSTP1 IIe105Val polymorphism was not associated with an elevated risk of gestational diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we suggest that the GSTM1 null genotype and GSTT1 null genotype are correlated with an increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population. PMID:26823865

  20. Effectiveness of a behavior modification program for older people with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ounnapiruk, Liwan; Wirojratana, Virapun; Meehatchai, Nitaya; Turale, Sue

    2014-06-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined the effectiveness of a behavior modification program for diabetic control in Thai elders with uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes. Purposive sampling was used to select 30 elders from one community as an intervention group, and 30 from a neighboring community as a control group. The intervention group participated in a program of 12 weeks' duration involving activities related to group counseling, group discussion, and an empowerment process that enhanced appropriate consumption of healthy diet, medication taking, and exercise. Data were collected by interviews using a questionnaire to assess knowledge of diabetes, perceived self-efficacy, and diabetes control behavior, including fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin, were examined at the baseline and three months thereafter. At program completion, the intervention group had significantly higher scores of knowledge, self-efficacy, and health behaviors than those in the control group, but blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were not significantly different. Although nurses can use aspects of this program to benefit elders with diabetes who require support and education, further research is required to provide improved health outcomes such as better glycemic control. PMID:23991917

  1. [Gestational diabetes--perinatal hyperinsulinism and postnatal developmental disorders].

    PubMed

    Briese, V; Stiete, H; Stiete, S

    1997-01-01

    The impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy (IGT) represents an important fact in aetiopathogenesis of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and non insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM) as well as obesitas and cardiovascular diseases in context with fetal hyperinsulinism. Prospective studies of diabetic mothers newborns are difficult by reason of health controls in different outpatient departments. The aim of this review is to claim a general glucose screening in pregnancy looking on the development of newborns in later life. In present preventive prospects were not used to decrease the morbidity in diabetes, obesitas and cardiovascular diseases without gestational diabetes screening in pregnancy. The neonatal onset and late morbidity is dependent on the quality of maternal glycemia in pregnancy measured by means of glycosylated hemoglobin and insulin the amniotic fluid. PMID:9340971

  2. Neonatal Hairy Ear Pinnae and Gestational Diabetes: Just a Coincidence?

    PubMed

    Valerio, Enrico; Riello, Laura; Chirico, Michela; Semenzato, Rossella; Cutrone, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A newborn girl of 36 weeks gestation was noted to have several anomalies, including bilateral low ear attachment with ear pinnae hypertrichosis, left preauricular pit, micrognathia, short lingual frenulum, and short neck. Pregnancy history revealed poorly controlled maternal gestational diabetes (GD). Localized hypertrichosis of the ear pinnae may represent a potential marker of GD and thereby alert physicians to suspect other potentially GD-associated conditions such as macrosomia, asphyxia, respiratory distress, hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, hyperbilirubinemia, polycythemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and congenital anomalies, particularly those involving the central nervous system. PMID:26391439

  3. A Multicenter, Randomized Trial of Treatment for Mild Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Landon, Mark B.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Thom, Elizabeth; Carpenter, Marshall W.; Ramin, Susan M.; Casey, Brian; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Thorp, John M.; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Harper, Margaret; Saade, George; Lain, Kristine Y.; Sorokin, Yoram; Peaceman, Alan M.; Tolosa, Jorge E.; Anderson, Garland B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is uncertain whether treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus improves pregnancy outcomes. METHODS Women who were in the 24th to 31st week of gestation and who met the criteria for mild gestational diabetes mellitus (i.e., an abnormal result on an oral glucose-tolerance test but a fasting glucose level below 95 mg per deciliter [5.3 mmol per liter]) were randomly assigned to usual prenatal care (control group) or dietary intervention, self-monitoring of blood glucose, and insulin therapy, if necessary (treatment group). The primary outcome was a composite of stillbirth or perinatal death and neonatal complications, including hyperbilirubinemia, hypoglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and birth trauma. RESULTS A total of 958 women were randomly assigned to a study group — 485 to the treatment group and 473 to the control group. We observed no significant difference between groups in the frequency of the composite outcome (32.4% and 37.0% in the treatment and control groups, respectively; P = 0.14). There were no perinatal deaths. However, there were significant reductions with treatment as compared with usual care in several prespecified secondary outcomes, including mean birth weight (3302 vs. 3408 g), neonatal fat mass (427 vs. 464 g), the frequency of large-for-gestational-age infants (7.1% vs. 14.5%), birth weight greater than 4000 g (5.9% vs. 14.3%), shoulder dystocia (1.5% vs. 4.0%), and cesarean delivery (26.9% vs. 33.8%). Treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus, as compared with usual care, was also associated with reduced rates of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension (combined rates for the two conditions, 8.6% vs. 13.6%; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Although treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus did not significantly reduce the frequency of a composite outcome that included stillbirth or perinatal death and several neonatal complications, it did reduce the risks of fetal overgrowth, shoulder dystocia, cesarean delivery, and hypertensive disorders. PMID:19797280

  4. Gestational diabetes mellitus management with oral hypoglycemic agents.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Rachel J; Hays, Karen E; Hebert, Mary F

    2014-12-01

    Oral hypoglycemic agents such as glyburide (second-generation sulfonylurea) and metformin (biguanide) are attractive alternatives to insulin due to lower cost, ease of administration, and better patient adherence. The majority of evidence from retrospective and prospective studies suggests comparable efficacy and safety of oral hypoglycemic agents such as glyburide and metformin as compared to insulin when used in the treatment of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Glyburide and metformin have altered pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and both agents cross the placenta. In this article, we review the efficacy, safety, and dosage of oral hypoglycemic agents for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. Additional research is needed to evaluate optimal dosage for glyburide and metformin during pregnancy. Comparative studies evaluating the effects of glyburide and metformin on long-term maternal and fetal outcomes are also needed. PMID:25315294

  5. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Management with Oral Hypoglycemic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Rachel J.; Hays, Karen E.; Hebert, Mary F.

    2014-01-01

    Oral hypoglycemic agents such as glyburide (second generation sulfonylurea) and metformin (biguanide) are attractive alternatives to insulin due to lower cost, ease of administration, and better patient adherence. The majority of evidence from retrospective and prospective studies suggests comparable efficacy and safety of oral hypoglycemic agents such as glyburide and metformin as compared to insulin when used in the treatment of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Glyburide and metformin have altered pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and both agents cross the placenta. In this article, we review the efficacy, safety and dosage of oral hypoglycemic agents for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. Additional research is needed to evaluate optimal dosage for glyburide and metformin during pregnancy. Comparative studies evaluating the effects of glyburide and metformin on long-term maternal and fetal outcomes are also needed. PMID:25315294

  6. Lower treatment targets for gestational diabetes: is lower really better?

    PubMed

    Kevat, Dev A S; Sinha, Ashim K; McLean, Anna G

    2014-08-18

    Proposed lower diagnostic thresholds and lower treatment targets for gestational diabetes have been controversial internationally. Intervention trials for the recently revised lower Australian treatment targets are currently lacking. While there may be benefits, lowering treatment targets may cause a number of harms including increased risk of hypoglycaemia in pregnant women, greater medicolegal risk for health practitioners, and heavier economic costs for the health system. Regional and remote care providers in particular will have greater costs, and may be overwhelmed in attempts to implement new treatment targets. An excessively glucose-centric focus may divert attention and resources from identifying and addressing other important and growing contributors to adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as obesity. Important groups such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians may not gain overall benefit from lowering treatment targets for gestational diabetes because of current low birthweights and the effect of social costs. It has not yet been established whether implementing lower treatment targets for gestational diabetes will create more benefit than harm. Implementation at this stage is premature. PMID:25164846

  7. A rare case of facial Candida albicans cellulitis in an uncontrolled diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Om-Sub; Kang, Mi-Il; Kim, Jeong-Bae; Kim, Min-Wook; Kim, Young Keun

    2009-07-01

    Facial cellulitis is defined as infections or inflammation of the skin or connective tissue in orbital, periorbital area and cheeks, and is known to be caused mainly by bacterial infections, for which treatment with proper antibiotics and incision and drainage are necessary. Candidal cellulitis is a rare disease and only two cases have been reported in the world to our knowledge. Candidal facial cellulitis is a non-haematogenous, deep-seated infection and we should figure out for known risk factors of candidal colonisation or overgrowth and possible routes of infection for candidiasis. We report one case of facial cellulitis caused by Candida albicans in an uncontrolled diabetic woman aged 50. PMID:18983432

  8. Variation in the relationship between gestational diabetes diagnosis and total gestational weight gain by race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Chakkalakal, Rosette J; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Jagasia, Shubhada; Shintani, Ayumi; Elasy, Tom A

    2015-04-01

    Prior research suggests that women diagnosed and treated for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) gain less total gestational weight than normoglycemic women. Our study finds that race/ethnicity modifies this association. Relative to normoglycemic women, non-Hispanic white women with GDM gain less weight but non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women gain more weight. PMID:25661665

  9. Glutathione synthesis is diminished in patients with uncontrolled diabetes and restored by dietary supplementation with cysteine and glycine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustained hyperglycemia is associated with low cellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH), which leads to tissue damage attributed to oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that diminished GSH in adult patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes is attributed to decreased synthesis and ...

  10. 77 FR 38844 - Notice of NIH Consensus Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... women who have GDM during pregnancy will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Although the U.S..., and how were these thresholds chosen? 2. What are the effects of various gestational diabetes mellitus... Gestational Diabetes Mellitus SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is holding a conference...

  11. 78 FR 11210 - Notice of NIH Consensus Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Although the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found in 2008 that...? 2. What are the effects of various gestational diabetes mellitus screening/diagnostic approaches for... Gestational Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  12. The Therapeutic Effect of Zuogui Wan in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qianjin; Niu, Xin; Liu, Xinshe; Xu, Kaixia; Yang, Xiangzhu; Wang, Huifeng

    2014-01-01

    In this experiment, we established an animal model of gestational diabetes mellitus rats using streptozotocin. Using the rat model of GDM, the pregnant rats in 1-19d were divided into three groups: (1) Zuogui Wan gestational diabetes mellitus group (group I, n = 12), (2) gestational diabetes mellitus rats as the control group (group II, n = 11), and (3) rats of normal pregnancy group (group III, n = 11). Compared with gestational diabetes mellitus rats as the control group, Zuogui Wan can change the indexes of fasting blood glucose, body weight, total cholesterol, insulin, and metabolism cage index significantly in Zuogui Wan gestational diabetes mellitus group. We can conclude that Zuogui Wan has the therapeutic effect on gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:25136475

  13. The role of adipokines in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Al-Badri, Marwa R; Zantout, Mira S; Azar, Sami T

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a complication of pregnancy that is characterized by impaired glucose tolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. The reported prevalence of GDM varies between 0.6% and 20% of pregnancies depending on screening method, gestational age and the population studied. GDM is characterized by pancreatic β-cell function that is insufficient to meet the body's insulin needs. Available evidence suggests that β-cell defects in GDM result from the same spectrum of causes that underline hyperglycemia in general, including autoimmune disease, monogenic causes and insulin resistance. Adipokines are proteins secreted from the adipocytes and are believed to have a metabolic influence. Our review suggests that, in GDM, various adipokines, mainly leptin and adiponectin, are dysregulated. These two adipokines might have both prognostic and pathophysiological significance in this disease. PMID:26137214

  14. The role of adipokines in gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Badri, Marwa R.; Zantout, Mira S.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a complication of pregnancy that is characterized by impaired glucose tolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. The reported prevalence of GDM varies between 0.6% and 20% of pregnancies depending on screening method, gestational age and the population studied. GDM is characterized by pancreatic β-cell function that is insufficient to meet the body’s insulin needs. Available evidence suggests that β-cell defects in GDM result from the same spectrum of causes that underline hyperglycemia in general, including autoimmune disease, monogenic causes and insulin resistance. Adipokines are proteins secreted from the adipocytes and are believed to have a metabolic influence. Our review suggests that, in GDM, various adipokines, mainly leptin and adiponectin, are dysregulated. These two adipokines might have both prognostic and pathophysiological significance in this disease. PMID:26137214

  15. Telomere length, pre-eclampsia, and gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Telomere length is a marker of cumulative damage to the cell, and has been associated with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Findings The association of telomere length with pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was examined in a nested case-control study. Circulating leukocyte telomere length was measured by Quantitative-PCR. Mean and median telomere length among cases and controls was compared, and logistic regression was used to model the outcomes as a function of tertile telomere length, with control for effects of potential confounders. Mean telomere length in pre-eclampsia cases was 0.77 (SD 0.14), in GDM cases was 0.73 (SD 0.10), and in controls was 0.74 (SD 0.14). The adjusted odds ratio comparing the highest tertile to the lowest for pre-eclampsia was 0.92 (0.15-5.46), and for gestational diabetes was 0.65 (0.13-3.34). Conclusions Further study is necessary to determine if telomere length is associated with these pregnancy complications. PMID:20416088

  16. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection and Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Diabetic Patients with Controlled and Uncontrolled Glycemia in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Sewify, May; Nair, Shinu; Warsame, Samia; Murad, Mohamed; Alhubail, Asma; Behbehani, Kazem; Al-Refaei, Faisal; Tiss, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have higher risk of urinary tract infection (UTI). In the present study, we investigated the impact of glycemic control in diabetic patients on UTI prevalence, type of strains, and their antimicrobial drugs susceptibility. This study was conducted on urine samples from 722 adult diabetic patients from which 252 (35%) samples were positive for uropathogens. Most UTI cases occurred in the uncontrolled glycemic group (197 patients) versus 55 patients with controlled glycemia. Higher glycemic levels were measured in uncontrolled glycemia group (HbA1c = 8.3 ± 1.5 and 5.4 ± 0.4, resp., P < 0.0001). Females showed much higher prevalence of UTI than males in both glycemic groups (88.5% and 11.5%, resp., P < 0.0001). In the uncontrolled glycemia group 90.9% of the UTI cases happened at ages above 40 years and a clear correlation was obtained between patient age ranges and number of UTI cases (r = 0.94; P = 0.017), whereas in the group with controlled glycemia no trend was observed. Escherichia coli was the predominant uropathogen followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and they were together involved in 76.2% of UTI cases. Those species were similarly present in both diabetic groups and displayed comparable antibiotic resistance pattern. These results highlight the importance of controlling glycemia in diabetic patients to reduce the UTI regardless of age and gender. PMID:26844231

  17. Relationship Between Myo-Inositol Supplementary and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangqin; Liu, Zhaozhen; Zhang, Yulong; Lin, Yuan; Song, Jianrong; Zheng, Lianghui; Lin, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine whether myo-inositol supplement will increase the action of endogenous insulin, which is mainly measured by markers of insulin resistance such as homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and web of science were comprehensively searched using “gestational diabetes mellitus” and “myo-inositol” to identify relevant studies. Both subject headings and free texts were adopted. The methodological quality of the included studies were assessed and pooled analyzed by the methods recommended by the Cochrane collaboration. A total of 5 trials containing 513 participants were included. There was a significant reduction in aspects of gestational diabetes incidence (risk ratio [RR], 0.29; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.19–0.44), birth weight (mean difference [MD], −116.98; 95% CI, −208.87 to −25.09), fasting glucose oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (MD, −0.36; 95% CI, −0.51 to −0.21), 1-h glucose OGTT (MD, −0.63; 95% CI, −1.01 to −0.26), 2-h glucose OGTT (MD, −0.45; 95% CI, −0.75 to −0.16), and related complications (odds ratio [OR], 0.28; 95% CI 0.14–0.58). On the basis of current evidence, myo-inositol supplementation reduces the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), although this conclusion requires further evaluation in large-scale, multicenter, blinded randomized controlled trials. PMID:26496267

  18. Glycated albumin is an optimal biomarker for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YAPING; HU, YONGWEI; MA, YU; YE, GUANGYONG

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) refers to abnormal glucose tolerance, which is a common complication that occurs in some women for the first time during the gestation period. However, the relationship between onset of GDM and factors including advanced age and a family history of diabetes remains to be determined. The study aimed to examine the clinical significance of the detection of glycated albumin (GA) in pregnant women with GDM. A total of 893 cases of pregnant women with GDM were included, with 661 healthy pregnant women serving as the normal controls. A conditional logistic regression model was used to analyze the univariate and multivariate data to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). As the gestational weeks increased, the fasting blood glucose (FGP) concentration and GA-L value of the pregnant women in the normal control group gradually decreased whereas those of pregnant women with GDM greatly increased. The univariate analysis revealed that the impact factors on the occurrence of early-onset neonatal sepsis included, mother's age >35 years, complication of pregnancy hypertension, family history of hypertension, family history of diabetes, cesarean delivery, height, BMI, GA-L, and FGP. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the complication of pregnancy hypertension (OR=3.302; 95% CI, 1.705–6.394), family history of hypertension (OR=2.970; 95% CI, 1.520–5.801), GA-L (OR=1.556; 95% CI, 0.940–2.012) and FGP (OR=5.431; 95% CI, 4.097–7.198) were the main factors for pregnant women with GDM. In conclusion, pregnant women with GDM may be affected by various factors. Additionally, GA may be applied to reflect the recent blood glucose control on pregnant women with GDM. PMID:26668607

  19. Sedentary behavior, gestational diabetes mellitus, and type 2 diabetes risk: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven T; Lynch, Brigid; Vallance, Jeff; Davenport, Margie H; Gardiner, Paul A; Butalia, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    A substantial number of pregnancies are complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and up to 70 % of women with GDM go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Given the extensive body of research suggesting physical activity reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes, facilitating physical activity, and reducing sedentary time may be effective approaches to promote the health of women with a previous GDM diagnosis. Here, we discuss physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behavior, in the context of GDM and the potential for type 2 diabetes risk reduction. PMID:26823010

  20. Pre-gestational versus gestational diabetes: A population based study on clinical and demographic differences☆

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Alex; Serra, Allison; Herrero, Tiffany; Pan, Deyu; Ogunyemi, Dotun

    2014-01-01

    Aims To assess the clinical and demographic differences in patients with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) compared to those with gestational diabetes (GDM). Methods Using the 2001–2007 California Health Discharge Database, we identified 22,331 cases of PGDM and 147,097 cases of GDM via ICD-9-CM codes after excluding cases which were missing race or age data or with extremes of age. Data analyzed included demographics, pre-existing medical conditions, antepartum complications, and intrapartum complications. Logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. Results Both PGDM and GDM incidences increased during the study period. Advancing age was associated with increased prevalence of both diseases. Although Asians were found to have the highest prevalence of GDM, they, along with Caucasians, were found have the lowest prevalence of PGDM. Conditions with increased frequency in PGDM versus GDM included chronic hypertension, renal disease, thyroid dysfunction, fetal CNS malformation, fetal demise, pyelonephritis, and eclampsia. Subjects with PGDM were more likely than those with GDM to have a shoulder dystocia, failed induction of labor, or undergo cesarean delivery. Conclusions We have demonstrated clinical morbidities and demographic factors which differ in patients with PGDM compared to patients with GDM. Our findings suggest PGDM to be associated with significantly higher morbidity when compared to GDM. Our findings also suggest that races with the highest tendency for GDM during pregnancy may not necessarily have the highest tendency for PGDM outside of pregnancy. PMID:24094665

  1. Strategies in the Nutritional Management of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Teri L.; Anderson, Molly A.; Chartier-Logan, Catherine; Friedman, Jacob E.; Barbour, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the optimal macronutrient composition for dietary management of gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM) has enormous potential to improve perinatal outcomes. Diet therapy may result in significant cost savings if effective in deterring the need for expensive medical management within this growing population. In only 6 randomized controlled trials(RCTs) in 250 women, data suggest that a diet higher in complex carbohydrate and fiber, low in simple sugar, and lower in saturated fat may be effective in blunting postprandial hyperglycemia, preventing worsened insulin resistance and excess fetal growth. The use of diet in GDM remains an area in grave need for high-quality RCTs. PMID:24047934

  2. What is the optimal gestational age for women with gestational diabetes type A1 to deliver?

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ms. Brenda; Lee, Ms. Vanessa R.; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Frias, Antonio E.; Nicholson, James M.; Caughey, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Gestational diabetes type A1 (A1GDM), also known as diet-controlled gestational diabetes, is associated with an increase in adverse perinatal outcomes such as macrosomia and Erb’s palsy. However, it remains unclear when to deliver these women because optimal timing of delivery requires balancing neonatal morbidities from early term delivery against the risk of IUFD. We sought to determine the optimal gestational age (GA) for women with A1GDM to deliver. STUDY DESIGN A decision-analytic model was built to compare the outcomes of delivery at 37 through 41 weeks in a theoretical cohort of 100,000 women with A1GDM. Strategies involving expectant management until a later GA accounted for probabilities of spontaneous delivery, indicated delivery, and IUFD during each week. GA associated risks of neonatal complications included cerebral palsy, infant death, and Erb’s palsy. Probabilities were derived from the literature, and total quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated. Sensitivity analyses were used to investigate the robustness of the baseline assumptions. RESULTS Our model showed that induction at 38 weeks maximized QALYs. Within our cohort, delivery at 38 weeks would prevent 48 stillbirths but lead to 12 more infant deaths compared to 39 weeks. Sensitivity analysis revealed that 38 weeks remains the optimal timing of delivery until IUFD rates fall below 0.3-fold of our baseline assumption at which expectant management until 39 weeks is optimal. CONCLUSION By weighing the risks of IUFD against infant deaths and neonatal morbidities from early term delivery, the ideal GA for women with A1GDM to deliver is 38 weeks. PMID:24912097

  3. A systematic review of the literature associating breastfeeding with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julie Scott; Kacmar, Jennifer E; Nothnagle, Melissa; Lawrence, Ruth A

    2005-10-01

    As diabetes becomes more prevalent in younger women, diabetes and maternal-child health issues such as breastfeeding co-exist with increasing frequency. We sought to determine the relationship between breastfeeding and both type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (GDM) in a variety of clinical contexts, with a focus on prevention. The Medline database from 1966-2003, relevant references of selected articles, the Cochrane database, and the NIH Clinical Trials website were searched. Search terms included breastfeeding, infant nutrition, and diabetes. The search was restricted to the English language and human subjects. Each study was reviewed by at least two of the authors and included if it pertained to the relationship between type 2 diabetes or GDM and breastfeeding. Twelve of 15 identified studies (80%) met selection criteria. All studies were observational. Specific maternal-child health populations varied by study. Two of the authors abstracted information from each article on 1) study design, 2) target population, 3) sample size/power, 4) definition of breastfeeding, 5) definition of diabetes, and 6) confounders. Higher rates of pregnancy and neonatal complications among women with type 2 or gestational diabetes can pose significant challenges to breastfeeding. Low estrogen levels in breastfeeding women may have a protective effect on glucose metabolism and subsequent risk of diabetes. Having been breastfed for at least 2 months may lower the risk of diabetes in children. Initial research has begun on the long-term effects of diabetes during pregnancy on children. Breastfeeding may lower both maternal and pediatric rates of diabetes. Women with diabetes should be strongly encouraged to breastfeed because of maternal and childhood benefits specific to diabetes that are above and beyond other known benefits of breastfeeding. PMID:16192255

  4. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hajduk, Joanna; Klupczynska, Agnieszka; Dereziński, Paweł; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Piotr; Nowak, Dorota M.; Gajęcka, Marzena; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Kokot, Zenon J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18) and a matched control group (n = 13). The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, l-citrulline, l-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44%) and specificity (84.62%), as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32%) calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases. PMID:26694367

  5. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, Joanna; Klupczynska, Agnieszka; Dereziński, Paweł; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Piotr; Nowak, Dorota M; Gajęcka, Marzena; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Kokot, Zenon J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18) and a matched control group (n = 13). The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, L-citrulline, L-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44%) and specificity (84.62%), as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32%) calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases. PMID:26694367

  6. Comparison of the effects of gestational weight gain on pregnancy outcomes between non-diabetic and diabetic women

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ji Man; Kim, Tae Hyun; Hahn, Myeong Hi; Cho, Geum Joon; Hong, Soon Cheol; Oh, Min Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Appropriate gestational weight gain (GWG) is important in diabetic women. Current GWG guideline is for US general population, but not specific for diabetic women. We compared the effect of GWG on perinatal outcomes between diabetic and non-diabetic women. Methods Fifty two hundred and twelve women who delivered live singleton infants at Korea University Medical Center from January 2009 to December 2013 were included. One hundred twenty-nine overt diabetes women and 322 gestational diabetes women were categorized as diabetic women, and the others were categorized as none-diabetic women. 5,212 women were categorized by GWG (low 1,081; adequate 2,102; or high 2,029; according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines), and each of the 3 GWG groups was categorized into 2 groups; diabetic or non-diabetic women. And then, we compared perinatal outcomes between diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Results In each 3 GWG groups, primary cesarean section delivery, high birth weight, and large for gestational age rates were significantly higher in diabetic women than non-diabetic women. Only in adequate GWG group, preterm birth rate was significantly higher in diabetic women than non-diabetic women. Conclusion Our study shows that diabetic women had higher rates of adverse perinatal outcomes than non-diabetic women, although they achieved same GWG. It suggests that current GWG guideline may not be adequate for diabetic women, and that diabetic women may need more strict GWG control than normal population. PMID:26623409

  7. Trends in the Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Surabhi; Rao, Chythra R.; Shetty, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance of variable degree with onset or recognition during pregnancy. As prevalence of diabetes is linked to impaired glucose tolerance during antenatal period, routine antenatal screening of GDM is required. However, screening tests for GDM remain controversial. Objective. To review different diagnostic criteria for GDM. Materials and Methods. Freely accessible, full-text articles from 1964 to 2015, available in PubMed in English language, pertaining to screening of GDM were reviewed. Results. First diagnostic criteria for GDM in 1964 by O'Sullivan and Mahan, modified by the National Diabetes Data Group (NDDG) in 1979 and Carpenter in 1982. The cut-off value as per WHO definition of GDM was 140 mg/dL, 2 hours after 75 g glucose intake. Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group India (DIPSI), in 2006, endorsed WHO criteria but irrespective of the last meal timings. Being cost-effective, it formed the basis of national guidelines for Indians in 2014. Conclusions. As typical clinical scenarios are usually varied, practical guidelines that meet the constraints of low-resource settings like India are required. PMID:27190681

  8. Migrant Health: A Preliminary Report on the Incidence of Gestational Diabetes in a Hispanic Migrant Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the preliminary results of an attempt to screen pregnant Hispanic migrant farm workers for gestational diabetes. They are slightly more prone than the overall population of pregnant women to suffer from it. Provides recommendations for management of women with gestational diabetes, and describes how this is performed at the Indian Health…

  9. Solving the mystery: the true prevalence of gestational diabetes in indigenous women.

    PubMed

    Saad, Nathalie; Wilson, Don; Donovan, Lois E

    2015-07-01

    This commentary briefly reviews what is currently known about estimating the prevalence of gestational diabetes in indigenous women. It offers insights into numerous factors likely playing a role in its observed variability. It also highlights important key concepts to consider in the overall evaluation and management of gestational diabetes in this particular population. PMID:25782614

  10. Cigarette Smoking and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Hispanic Woman

    PubMed Central

    Moore Simas, Tiffany A.; Szegda, Kathleen L.; Liao, Xun; Pekow, Penelope; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Aims Hispanic women are at increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as compared to non-Hispanic white women. While smoking has been associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, studies of smoking and GDM are sparse and conflicting. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between cigarette smoking and GDM in Hispanic women. Methods We conducted a pooled analysis of two Hispanic datasets based in Massachusetts: the UMass Medical Health Care dataset and the Proyecto Buena Salud dataset. A total of 3,029 Hispanic prenatal care patients with singleton gestations were included. Cigarette smoking prior to and during pregnancy was collected via self-report. Diagnosis of GDM was abstracted from medical records and confirmed by study obstetricians. Results One-fifth of participants (20.4%) reported smoking prior to pregnancy, and 11.0% reported smoking in pregnancy. A total of 143 women (4.7%) were diagnosed with GDM. We did not observe an association between pre-pregnancy cigarette smoking and odds of GDM (multivariable OR=0.77, 95% CI 0.47–1.25). In contrast, smoking during pregnancy was associated with a 54% reduction in odds of GDM (OR=0.46, 95% CI 0.22, 0.95). However, this association was no longer statistically significant after adjustment for age, parity, and study site (OR=0.47, 95% CI 0.23, 1.00). Conclusions In this population of Hispanic pregnant women, we did not observe statistically significant associations between pre-pregnancy smoking and odds of GDM. A reduction in odds of GDM among those who smoked during pregnancy was no longer apparent after adjustment for important diabetes risk factors. PMID:24857814

  11. The Risk of Stillbirth and Infant Death Stratified by Gestational Age in Women with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    ROSENSTEIN, Melissa G.; CHENG, Yvonne W.; SNOWDEN, Jonathan M.; NICHOLSON, James A.; DOSS, Amy E.; CAUGHEY, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the different mortality risks between delivery and expectant management in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Study Design This is a retrospective cohort study that included singleton pregnancies of women diagnosed with GDM delivering at 36-42 weeks gestational age (GA) in California from 1997-2006. A composite mortality rate was developed to estimate the risk of expectant management at each GA incorporating the stillbirth risk during the week of continuing pregnancy plus the infant mortality risk at the GA one week hence. Results In women with GDM, the risk of expectant management is lower than the risk of delivery at 36 weeks, (17.4 vs. 19.3 per 10,000), but at 39 weeks, the risk of expectant management exceeds that of delivery (RR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2 – 2.6). Conclusion In women with GDM, infant mortality rates at 39 weeks are lower than the overall mortality risk of expectant management for one week absolute risks of stillbirth and infant death are low. PMID:22464068

  12. Attenuating type 2 diabetes with postpartum interventions following gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wasalathanthri, Sudharshani

    2015-01-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes should be screened during and after the postpartum period because of a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although differences exist between guidelines practiced throughout various parts of the world, all recommend the use of cutoffs for fasting and/or post-load plasma glucose to diagnose diabetes or pre-diabetes. The use of these glycemic parameters could be optimized when a trend is observed, rather than considering them as isolated values at various time points. As the presence of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction start before glycemic changes are evident, the estimation of insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function by Homeostatic Model Assessment is suggested for women who have additional risk factors for diabetes, such as obesity. Disease-modifying lifestyle intervention should be the first-line strategy to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Intensive lifestyle interventions are designed to decrease caloric intake and increase physical activity in order to reduce body weight and fat, which will in turn reduce insulin resistance. This article also reviews unique problems of postpartum women, which should be considered when designing and implementing an intervention. Innovative “out of the box” thinking is appreciated, as continued adherence to a program is a challenge to both the women and the health care personnel who deal with them. PMID:25987963

  13. Uncontrolled Hypertension and Its Determinants in Patients with Concomitant Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent; Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Goon, Daniel Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background Paucity of data on the prevalence, treatment and control of hypertension in individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the rural communities of South Africa may undermine efforts to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases. This study examines the socio-demographic and clinical determinants of uncontrolled hypertension among individuals living with T2DM in the rural communities of Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study involved a serially selected sample of 265 individuals living with T2DM and hypertension at Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 140mmHg and diastolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 90mmHg in accordance with the Eight Joint National Committee Report (JNC 8) (2014). We performed univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to identify the significant determinants of uncontrolled hypertension. Results Of the total participants (n = 265), the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension was 75.5% (n = 200). In univariate analysis of all participants, male gender (p = 0.029), age≥65 years (p = 0.016), unemployed status (p<0.0001), excessive alcohol intake (p = 0.005) and consumption of western-type diet (p<0.0001) were positively associated with uncontrolled hypertension. In multivariate logistic regression (LR method) analysis, unemployed status (p<0.0001), excessive alcohol intake (p = 0.007) and consumption of western-type diet (p<0.0001) were independently and significantly associated with uncontrolled hypertension. There is significant association between increasing number and classes of anti-hypertensive drugs and uncontrolled hypertension (p = 0.05 and 0.02, respectively). Conclusion Prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension was high in individuals with concomitant hypertension and T2DM in the study population. Male sex, aging, clinic inertia, unemployed status and nutritional transitions are the most important determinants of uncontrolled hypertension in T2DM in Mthatha, South Africa. Treatment to blood pressure targets, though feasible in our setting, would require concerted efforts by addressing these determinants and clinic inertia. PMID:26930050

  14. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814

  15. Changing trends in management of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Poomalar, Gunasekaran Kala

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is on the rise globally. In view of the increasing prevalence of GDM and fetal and neonatal complications associated with it, there is a splurge of research in this field and management of GDM is undergoing a sea change. Trends are changing in prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment and future follow up. There is emerging evidence regarding use of moderate exercise, probiotics and vitamin D in the prevention of GDM. Regarding treatment, newer insulin analogs like aspart, lispro and detemir are associated with better glycemic control than older insulins. Continuous glucose monitoring systems and continuous subcutaneous insulin systems may play a role in those who require higher doses of insulin for sugar control. Evidence exists that favors metformin as a safer alternative to insulin in view of good glycemic control and better perinatal outcomes. As the risk of developing GDM in subsequent pregnancies and also the risk of overt diabetes in later life is high, regular assessment of these women is required in future. Lifestyle interventions or metformin should be offered to women with a history of GDM who develop pre-diabetes. Further studies are required in the field of prevention of GDM for optimizing obstetric outcome. PMID:25789109

  16. [Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) risk].

    PubMed

    Issat, Tadeusz; Nowicka, Małgorzata A; Jakimiuk, Artur J

    2015-05-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common complication of pregnancy In the course of pregnancy elevated levels of hormones and other proteins having insulin-antagonistic effects lead to higher insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, followed by hyperinsulinemia. Risk factors for the development of GDM have been well-established. However, the debate whether polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may predispose to GDM continues. Patients with PCOS are often affected by obesity dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and tissue-specific insulin resistance. Obesity occurs in 50% of the cases, while tissue-specific insulin resistance is observed in 20-40% of the affected patients. This paper aims at systematizing risk factors that could contribute to the development of GDM, as well as reviewing literature reports and analyses on the occurrence of a potential correlation. PMID:26117980

  17. Diagnostic Criteria and Treatment for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Voormolen, Daphne N; Abell, Sally K; James, Rachel; Hague, William M; Mol, Ben Willem

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is high, and the risks of maternal and perinatal complications with clear hyperglycemia are well recognized. The worldwide obesity epidemic and the consequent excess of hyperglycemia have resulted in a rising prevalence of GDM. Changing definitions and more intensive screening may also be contributing to an increased prevalence. Despite the recognized risks, much controversy surrounds the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of GDM. The more stringent diagnostic criteria, advocated in new guidelines, are based on observational studies and are not guided by interventional studies. Here, we review the evidence behind updated diagnostic criteria, stricter treatment targets, and current controversies and conclude that international consensus regarding diagnosis and treatment will only be achieved with further evidence from interventional studies. PMID:26866601

  18. Gestational diabetes mellitus and iron supplement; effects on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Javadian, Pouya; Alimohamadi, Shohreh; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Hantoushzadeh, Sedigheh

    2014-01-01

    The possible effect of iron supplementation has been investigated in the normal population and patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In this study, we survey the risk factors of GDM in pregnant women in contrast with normoglycemic patients in a case control study in patients using iron supplement. This case control study conducted on 52 pregnant women with GDM (25 women with type Al and 27 women with Type A2 of GDM). The control group randomly selected 50 normoglycemic women. Venous blood sampling was done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy for measuring of ferritin, lipoproteins, uric acid and malondialdehyde serum levels. Under study variables including age, gestational age, weight and BMI were gathered. All the women were followed up until the time of delivery and pregnancy outcome were gathered. The serum ferritin levels in GDM group was 31.22+15.44, which is significantly higher than 24.76+8.94, in the control group with (P=0.012). Plasma hemogulobin in the control group was 12.2+0.1 compared to 12.9+0.1 in GDM group which was significantly lower (P=0.005). Triglycerides was significantly higher in GDM group in contrast with the control group, 275.08+143.17 and 192.30+92.13 (P=0.001), respectively. Finally, our findings indicate the concentration of serum ferritin levels was significantly higher in The GDM group. PMID:24902020

  19. Bariatric Surgery and the Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Willis, Kent; Alexander, Charlotte; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an increasingly common obstetrical problem. Due to the global escalation in the prevalence of obesity, as many as 15 % of pregnant women may soon be classified as having GDM. While often not diagnosed until late gestation, GDM is now recognized as a disorder of glucose and lipid metabolism, systemic inflammation, and insulin resistance that begins early in pregnancy. Recent large randomized trials have clarified the risk of maternal and neonatal complications caused by GDM, as well as the potential to ameliorate these risks. There is significant interest in the potential to reduce the risk for developing GDM in obese women through the performance of bariatric surgery (BS) before pregnancy. BS significantly reduces the risk for GDM, preeclampsia, and large neonates. However, it seems that the risk for small neonates and preterm delivery is increased. No significant differences are observed in regard to cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, or perinatal mortality. In this article, we address the effects of GDM on the mother and child, and explore the risks and benefits of BS in the obstetrical population. PMID:26879304

  20. Gestational diabetes and macrosomia by race/ethnicity in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to have long-term sequelae for both the mother and infant. Women with GDM are at increased risk of macrosomia, which predisposes the infant to birth injuries. Previous studies noted increased rates of GDM in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) women; however, the rate of macrosomia in API women with GDM is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between ethnicity, gestational diabetes (GDM), and macrosomia in Hawaii. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed using Hawaii Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data. Data from 2009–2011, linked with selected items from birth certificates, were used to examine GDM and macrosomia by ethnicity. SAS-callable SUDAAN 10.0 was used to generate odds ratios, point estimates and standard errors. Results Data from 4735 respondents were weighted to represent all pregnancies resulting in live births in Hawaii from 2009–2011. The overall prevalence of GDM in Hawaii was 10.9%. The highest prevalence of GDM was in Filipina (13.1%) and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (12.1%) women. The lowest prevalence was in white women (7.4%). Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Filipina, and other Asian women all had an increased risk of GDM compared to white women using bivariate analysis. Adjusting for obesity, age, maternal nativity, and smoking, Asian Pacific Islander (API) women, which includes Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Filipina, and other Asian women, had a 50% increased odds of having GDM compared to white women when compared using multivariate analysis. Among women with GDM, the highest prevalence of macrosomia was in white women (14.5%) while the lowest was in Filipina (5.3%) women. Conclusions API women in Hawaii have increased rates of GDM compared to white women. Paradoxically, this elevated GDM risk in API women is not associated with an increased rate of macrosomia. This suggests the relationship between GDM and macrosomia is more complex in this population. PMID:24083634

  1. Role of probiotics in reducing the risk of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Collado, M C; Salminen, S

    2015-08-01

    Overweight and obesity currently constitute a major threat to human well-being. Almost half of the female population are currently overweight. Pregnant overweight women are at risk of gestational diabetes affecting the health of the mother and the child, in both the short and long term. Notwithstanding the extensive scientific interest centred on the problem, research efforts have thus far been unable to devise preventive strategies. Recent scientific advances point to a gut microbiota dysbiosis, with ensuing low-grade inflammation as a contributing element, in obesity and its comorbidities. Such findings would suggest a role for specific probiotics in the search for preventive and therapeutic adjunct applications in gestational diabetes. The aim of the present paper was to critically review recent demonstrations of the role of intestinal microbes in immune and metabolic regulation, which could be exploited in nutritional management of pregnant women by probiotic bacteria. By modulating specific target functions, probiotic dietary intervention may exert clinical effects beyond the nutritional impact of food. As this approach in pregnancy is new, an overview of the role of gut microbiota in shaping host metabolism, together with the definition of probiotics are presented, and finally, specific targets and potential mechanisms for probiotics in pregnancy are discussed. Pregnancy appears to be the most critical stage for interventions aiming to reduce the risk of non-communicable disease in future generations, beyond the immediate dangers attributable to the health of the mother, labour and the neonate. Specific probiotic interventions during pregnancy provide an opportunity, therefore, to promote the health not only of the mother but also of the child. PMID:25885278

  2. Gestational and Pregestational Diabetes Mellitus in Omani Women

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Heija, Adel T.; Al-Bash, Majeda; Mathew, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) among pregnant women in Oman and compare their obstetric and perinatal outcomes. Methods: This retrospective study assessed the obstetric and perinatal outcomes of pregnant Omani women with GDM or PGDM who delivered at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, between January 2009 and December 2010. Results: There were a total of 5,811 deliveries during the study period. Of the 5,811 women who gave birth, 639 women were found to have diabetes mellitus (11.0%). A total of 581 of the diabetic women had GDM (90.9%) and only 58 (9.1%) had PGDM. Women with PGDM had a significantly higher incidence of pre-eclampsia (P = 0.022), preterm deliveries (P <0.001) and Caesarean sections (P <0.001). Neonatal complications, such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), neonatal hypoglycaemia, neonatal jaundice and subsequent admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) were significantly higher for neonates born to mothers with PGDM compared to those born to mothers with GDM (P <0.001). The corrected perinatal mortality rates for women with PGDM and GDM were 34.5 and 13.7 per 1,000 live births, respectively. Conclusion: In this Omani cohort, women with PGDM were at higher risk of developing obstetric and perinatal complications such as pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery and Caesarean delivery compared to women with GDM. In addition, neonates who had mothers with PGDM had higher rates of RDS, neonatal hypoglycaemia, neonatal jaundice and admission to the NICU. PMID:26629376

  3. Effects of obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus on placental phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Olaf; Demmelmair, Hans; Segura, Mara Teresa; Florido, Jess; Rueda, Ricardo; Campoy, Cristina; Koletzko, Berthold

    2015-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with adverse effects in the offspring. The composition of placental glycerophospholipids (GPL) is known to be altered in GDM and might reflect an aberrant fatty acid transfer across the placenta and thus affect the foetal body composition. The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of obesity and GDM, respectively, on placental GPL species composition. We investigated molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in term placentas from controls (lean non-diabetic, body-mass-index [BMI] 18-24.9k g/m(2), n=31), obese non-diabetics (BMI ?30 kg/m(2), n=17) and lean diabetics (n=15), using liquid chromatography - triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. PE(16:0/22:6) and PE(18:0/20:4) were increased in GDM and decreased species were PC(18:0/20:3), PC(18:1/20:3) and PS(18:0/18:2). A consistent difference between BMI related changes and changes caused by GDM was not observed. Arachidonic acid percentages of cord blood correlated with placental PC(16:0/20:4), whereas foetal docosahexaenoic acid correlated to placental PE species. Furthermore, a positive correlation of placental weight was found to levels of PE containing arachidonic acid. We demonstrated that obesity and GDM are associated with decreased dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and increased arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid contents of placental GPL, with unknown consequences for the foetus. PC(16:0/20:4) was identified as the major component for the supply of arachidonic acid to the foetal circulation, whereas PE containing arachidonic acid was found to be associated to the placental and infant growth. PMID:26021978

  4. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Get, set, go From diabetes capital of the world to diabetes care capital of the world

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet

    2011-01-01

    Screening and diagnosis for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as well as interventions for its management evoke considerable controversy. There are different types of screening methods: universal or risk-based, one step or two step. Different thresholds for diagnosis of GDM have been in vogue. Previous definition and diagnostic criteria had no place for diagnosis of overt diabetes in pregnancy. Following Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) study and International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) recommendations, new screening and diagnostic criteria around the world seem to be gaining consensus. The present recommendation given by IADPSG for screening and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy has two discrete phases. The first is detection of women with overt diabetes not previously diagnosed or treated outside of pregnancy. Universal early testing in populations is recommended at the first prenatal visit. The second phase is a 75-g OGTT at 24–28 week gestation in all women not previously found to have overt diabetes or GDM. ACHOIS and MFMU Network trails have proven benefit in treating hyperglycemias less than what is diagnostic for diabetes. DIPSI has shown the alternative way for resource-challenged communities. Efforts from all stake holders with interest in GDM are required to make the diabetes capital of the world into the diabetes care capital of the world. PMID:21897891

  5. Free Thyroxine During Early Pregnancy and Risk for Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Haddow, James E; Craig, Wendy Y; Neveux, Louis M; Palomaki, Glenn E; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Malone, Fergal D; D'Alton, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have now reported associations between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low free thyroxine (fT4) during the second and third trimesters, but not in the first trimester. The present study further examines relationships between low fT4, maternal weight, and GDM among women in the FaSTER (First and Second Trimester Evaluation of Risk) trial, in an effort to determine the extent to which thyroid hormones might contribute to causality. The FaSTER cohort includes 9351 singleton, euthyroid women; 272 of these women were subsequently classified as having GDM. Thyrotropin (TSH), fT4, and thyroid antibodies were measured at 11-14 weeks' gestation (first trimester) and 15-18.9 weeks' gestation (second trimester). An earlier report of this cohort documented an inverse relationship between fT4 in the second trimester and maternal weight. In the current analysis, women with GDM were significantly older (32 vs. 28 years) and weighed more (75 vs. 64.5 kg). Maternal weight and age (but not TSH) were significantly associated univariately with fT4 (dependent variable), in the order listed. Second trimester fT4 odds ratios (OR) for GDM were 2.06 [95% CI 1.37-3.09] (unadjusted); and 1.89 [95% CI 1.26-2.84] (adjusted). First trimester odds ratios were not significant: OR 1.45 [95%CI 0.97-2.16] (unadjusted) and 1.11 [95% CI 0.74-1.62] (adjusted). The second trimester fT4/GDM relationship thus appeared to strengthen as gestation progressed. In FaSTER, high maternal weight was associated with both low fT4 and a higher GDM rate in the second trimester. Peripheral deiodinase activity is known to increase with high caloric intake (represented by high weight). We speculate that weight-related low fT4 (the metabolically inactive prohormone) is a marker for deiodinase activity, serving as a substrate for conversion of fT4 to free triiodothyronine (fT3), the active hormone responsible for glucose-related metabolic activity. PMID:26910563

  6. Free Thyroxine During Early Pregnancy and Risk for Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, James E.; Craig, Wendy Y.; Neveux, Louis M.; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Malone, Fergal D.; D’Alton, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have now reported associations between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low free thyroxine (fT4) during the second and third trimesters, but not in the first trimester. The present study further examines relationships between low fT4, maternal weight, and GDM among women in the FaSTER (First and Second Trimester Evaluation of Risk) trial, in an effort to determine the extent to which thyroid hormones might contribute to causality. The FaSTER cohort includes 9351 singleton, euthyroid women; 272 of these women were subsequently classified as having GDM. Thyrotropin (TSH), fT4, and thyroid antibodies were measured at 11–14 weeks’ gestation (first trimester) and 15–18.9 weeks’ gestation (second trimester). An earlier report of this cohort documented an inverse relationship between fT4 in the second trimester and maternal weight. In the current analysis, women with GDM were significantly older (32 vs. 28 years) and weighed more (75 vs. 64.5 kg). Maternal weight and age (but not TSH) were significantly associated univariately with fT4 (dependent variable), in the order listed. Second trimester fT4 odds ratios (OR) for GDM were 2.06 [95% CI 1.37–3.09] (unadjusted); and 1.89 [95% CI 1.26–2.84] (adjusted). First trimester odds ratios were not significant: OR 1.45 [95%CI 0.97–2.16] (unadjusted) and 1.11 [95% CI 0.74–1.62] (adjusted). The second trimester fT4/GDM relationship thus appeared to strengthen as gestation progressed. In FaSTER, high maternal weight was associated with both low fT4 and a higher GDM rate in the second trimester. Peripheral deiodinase activity is known to increase with high caloric intake (represented by high weight). We speculate that weight-related low fT4 (the metabolically inactive prohormone) is a marker for deiodinase activity, serving as a substrate for conversion of fT4 to free triiodothyronine (fT3), the active hormone responsible for glucose-related metabolic activity. PMID:26910563

  7. Moderate and Vigorous Intensity Exercise During Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain in Women with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Samantha F; Sternfeld, Barbara; Krefman, Amy E; Hedderson, Monique M; Brown, Susan D; Mevi, Ashley; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Quesenberry, Charles P; Ferrara, Assiamira

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To estimate the associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy with the rate of gestational weight gain (GWG) from gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnosis to delivery, overall and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Methods Prospective cohort study with physical activity reported shortly after the GDM diagnosis and prepregnancy weight and post-diagnosis GWG obtained from electronic health records (n = 1055). Multinomial logistic regression models in the full cohort and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity estimated associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise with GWG below and above the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) prepregnancy BMI-specific recommended ranges for weekly rate of GWG in the second and third trimesters. Results In the full cohort, any participation in vigorous intensity exercise was associated with decreased odds of GWG above recommended ranges as compared to no participation [odds ratio (95 % confidence interval): 0.63 (0.40, 0.99)], with a significant trend for decreasing odds of excess GWG with increasing level of vigorous intensity exercise. Upon stratification by prepregnancy overweight/obesity, significant associations were only observed for BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m(2): any vigorous intensity exercise, as compared to none, was associated with 54 % decreased odds of excess GWG [0.46 (0.27, 0.79)] and significant trends were detected for decreasing odds of GWG both below and above the IOM's recommended ranges with increasing level of vigorous exercise (both P ≤ 0.03). No associations were observed for moderate intensity exercise. Conclusions for Practice In women with GDM, particularly overweight and obese women, vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy may reduce the odds of excess GWG. PMID:26955997

  8. Beneficial effects of breastfeeding in women with gestational diabetes mellitus☆

    PubMed Central

    Much, Daniela; Beyerlein, Andreas; Roßbauer, Michaela; Hummel, Sandra; Ziegler, Anette-G.

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increases the future risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There is now a growing evidence that breastfeeding has short- and long-term health benefits for mothers with GDM. Mothers with GDM who breastfeed have improved lipid and glucose metabolic profiles for the first 3 months after birth. However, women with GDM are less likely to breastfeed and, if they do, breastfeeding is usually continued for a shorter duration compared with women without GDM. One long-term prospective study followed women with GDM from delivery for up to 19 years postpartum, and found that breastfeeding for ≥3 months reduced the risk of T2DM and delayed the development of T2DM by a further 10 years compared with breastfeeding for <3 months. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying the protective effects of breastfeeding are still unknown, even though it is important to gain a full understanding of the pathways involved in these effects. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the recent developments in the field of GDM and breastfeeding. We reviewed data from animal experiments and human studies. We also provide insight into the molecular pathways and describe promising topics for future research. PMID:24749058

  9. Beneficial effects of breastfeeding in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Much, Daniela; Beyerlein, Andreas; Roßbauer, Michaela; Hummel, Sandra; Ziegler, Anette-G

    2014-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increases the future risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There is now a growing evidence that breastfeeding has short- and long-term health benefits for mothers with GDM. Mothers with GDM who breastfeed have improved lipid and glucose metabolic profiles for the first 3 months after birth. However, women with GDM are less likely to breastfeed and, if they do, breastfeeding is usually continued for a shorter duration compared with women without GDM. One long-term prospective study followed women with GDM from delivery for up to 19 years postpartum, and found that breastfeeding for ≥3 months reduced the risk of T2DM and delayed the development of T2DM by a further 10 years compared with breastfeeding for <3 months. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying the protective effects of breastfeeding are still unknown, even though it is important to gain a full understanding of the pathways involved in these effects. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the recent developments in the field of GDM and breastfeeding. We reviewed data from animal experiments and human studies. We also provide insight into the molecular pathways and describe promising topics for future research. PMID:24749058

  10. Lifestyle interventions to reduce risk of diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by >50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, nine studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM. PMID:25220104

  11. Gestational diabetes mellitus with diabetic ketoacidosis in a Yorkshire terrier bitch.

    PubMed

    Armenise, Andrea; Pastorelli, Gianfranco; Palmisano, Angela; Sontas, Hasan B; Romagnoli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    A 6 yr old pregnant Yorkshire terrier bitch presented 62 days after mating with an acute history of vomiting and coughing. The owners also reported that the dog was polyuric and polydypsic for the last 2 weeks. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis revealed hyperglycemia, ketonemia, ketonuria, and metabolic acidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed and after emergency treatment, including fluid therapy, prophylactic antibiotics, and regular insulin, the bitch whelped six healthy normal puppies. Two weeks after treatment, the bitch was clinically normal with normal fructosamine levels. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of gestational diabetes mellitus in a small breed dog. PMID:21673334

  12. Euglycemic control of gestational diabetes mellitus by specific dietary manipulation: a case study presentation.

    PubMed

    Mahaffey, P J; Podell, S K

    1991-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is the most common complication of pregnancy. If maternal hyperglycemia is not well controlled, excess glucose is transmitted to the fetus, which can lead to fetal macrosomia and maternal and fetal complications. Dietary treatment for gestational diabetes varies among practitioners. A case review is presented of a 32-year-old white woman with gestational diabetes whose condition was complicated by her blood glucose intolerance to lactose in milk. By following a carefully monitored regimen using specific dietary manipulation to maintain normoglycemia, the woman was able to deliver a normal, healthy baby by spontaneous vaginal delivery. PMID:1935553

  13. Glycosylation Failure Extends to Glycoproteins in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Chiu, Philip C.N.; Pang, Poh-Choo; Chu, Ivan K.; Lee, Kai-Fai; Koistinen, Riitta; Koistinen, Hannu; Seppälä, Markku; Morris, Howard R.; Tissot, Bérangère; Panico, Maria; Dell, Anne; Yeung, William S.B.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common metabolic disorder of pregnancy. Patients with GDM are at risk for high fetal mortality and gestational complications associated with reduced immune tolerance and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. Glycodelin-A (GdA) is an abundant decidual glycoprotein with glycosylation-dependent immunomodulatory activities. We hypothesized that aberrant carbohydrate metabolism in GDM was associated with changes in glycosylation of GdA, leading to defective immunomodulatory activities. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS GdA in the amniotic fluid from women with normal (NGdA) and GDM (DGdA) pregnancies was purified by affinity chromatography. Structural analysis of protein glycosylation was preformed by lectin-binding assay and mass spectrometry. Cytotoxicity, cell death, cytokine secretion, and GdA binding of the GdA-treated lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells were determined. The sialidase activity in the placental tissue from normal and GDM patients was measured. RESULTS GDM affected the glycosylation but not the protein core of GdA. Specifically, DGdA had a lower abundance of α2-6–sialylated and high-mannose glycans and a higher abundance of glycans with Sda (NeuAcα2-3[GalNAcβ1-4]Gal) epitopes compared with NGdA. DGdA had reduced immuosuppressive activities in terms of cytotoxicity on lymphocytes, inhibitory activities on interleukin (IL)-2 secretion by lymphocytes, stimulatory activities on IL-6 secretion by NK cells, and binding to these cells. Desialylation abolished the immunomodulation and binding of NGdA. Placental sialidase activity was increased in GDM patients, which may account for the reduced sialic acid content of DGdA. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, this study provides the first direct evidence for altered enzymatic glycosylation and impaired bioactivity of GdA in GDM patients. PMID:21300843

  14. Effect of gestational diabetes on maternal artery function.

    PubMed

    Stanley, J L; Cheung, C C; Rueda-Clausen, C F; Sankaralingam, S; Baker, P N; Davidge, Sandra T

    2011-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been observed systemically in women with gestational diabetes (GDM). Important cardiovascular adaptations occur during pregnancy, including enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in systemic and uterine arteries, which are necessary to ensure the health of both mother and fetus. The effects of GDM, however, on uterine artery function and the possible mechanisms that mediate endothelial dysfunction remain unknown. The aim of this study was to utilize a mouse model of GDM to investigate (a) effects on uteroplacental flow, (b) endothelial function of uterine and mesenteric arteries, and (c) possible mechanisms of any dysfunction observed. Pregnant mice heterozygous for a leptin receptor mutation (Lepr(db) (/+); He) spontaneously develop GDM and were compared to wild-type (WT) mice at day 18.5 of gestation. Uterine artery flow was assessed using ultrasound biomicroscopy. Uterine and mesenteric artery function was assessed using wire myography. Arterial superoxide production was measured using oxidative fluorescence microphotography. In vivo uteroplacental perfusion was impaired in mice with GDM, indicated by a significant increase in uterine artery resistance index. Maximal endothelium-dependent relaxation to methacholine was significantly impaired in mesenteric arteries from mice with GDM, while sensitivity was significantly reduced in uterine arteries. Both uterine and mesenteric arteries from mice with GDM exhibited a greater dependence on nitric oxide and increased superoxide production compared with those from mice with a healthy pregnancy. A significant source of superoxide in GDM mice was uncoupled nitric oxide synthase. These changes may contribute to the development of some of the fetal and maternal complication associated with GDM. PMID:21266665

  15. Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: The influence of changing diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Noctor, Eoin; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-01-01

    A previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) carries a lifetime risk of progression to type 2 diabetes of up to 60%. Identification of those women at higher risk of progression to diabetes allows the timely introduction of measures to delay or prevent diabetes onset. However, there is a large degree of variability in the literature with regard to the proportion of women with a history of GDM who go on to develop diabetes. Heterogeneity between cohorts with regard to diagnostic criteria used, duration of follow-up, and the characteristics of the study population limit the ability to make meaningful comparisons across studies. As the new International Association for Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group criteria are increasingly adopted worldwide, the prevalence of GDM is set to increase by two-to three-fold. Here, we review the literature to examine the evolution of diagnostic criteria for GDM, the implications of changing criteria on the proportion of women with previous GDM progressing to diabetes, and how the use of different diagnostic criteria may influence the development of appropriate follow-up strategies. PMID:25789105

  16. Predictive Risk Factors in the Treatment of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aktun, Lebriz Hale; Yorgunlar, Betul; Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to investigate predictive risk factors in the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 256 pregnant women who underwent 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during 24–28 weeks of pregnancy were included according to the World Health Organization criteria. Demographic characteristics of the patients, including age, parity, family history of diabetes, body weight before pregnancy, and body weight at the diagnosis of GDM, were recorded. Fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values at the time of diagnosis were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups: those requiring insulin treatment (insulin group, n = 89) and those receiving diet therapy (diet group, n = 167) during pregnancy according to the American Diabetes Association recommendations. RESULTS A total of 34.76% of the pregnant women with GDM required insulin treatment. The mean age of these patients was significantly higher compared to the diet group (34.9 ± 0.6 years vs. 31.9 ± 0.6 years; P = 0.004). Body mass index before pregnancy was also significantly higher in the insulin group than that in the diet group (32 ± 0.9 kg/m2 vs. 29 ± 0.7 kg/m2; P = 0.004). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) during OGTT was 105.6 ± 2.1 mg/dL and 96.7 ± 1.1 mg/dL in the insulin group and diet group, respectively (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in fasting plasma glucose during OGTT between the groups (P = 0.069), while plasma glucose at two hours was 161.1 ± 6.8 mg/dL in the insulin group and 145.1 ± 3.7 mg/dL in the diet group (P = 0.027). At the time of diagnosis, HbA1c values were significantly higher in the insulin group compared to the diet group (5.3 ± 0.1 vs. 4.9 ± 0.1; P = 0.001). There was no significant difference in FBG and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance values between the groups (P = 0.908, P = 0.073). CONCLUSION Our study results suggest that age, family history of diabetes, body weight before pregnancy, FBG, and HbA1c values are predictors for the necessity of insulin treatment. PMID:26508897

  17. Neuropsychological Impairment in School-Aged Children Born to Mothers With Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Lourdes; Matute, Esmeralda; Ramírez-Dueñas, María de Lourdes; Zarabozo, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether school-aged children born to mothers with gestational diabetes show delays in their neuropsychological development. Several key neuropsychological characteristics of 32 children aged 7 to 9 years born to mothers with gestational diabetes were examined by comparing their performance on cognitive tasks to that of 28 children aged 8 to 10 years whose mothers had glucose levels within normal limits during pregnancy. The gestational diabetes group showed low performance on graphic, spatial, and bimanual skills and a higher presence of soft neurologic signs. Lower scores for general intellectual level and the working memory index were also evident. Our results suggest that gestational diabetes is associated with mild cognitive impairment. PMID:25814475

  18. Glyburide metabolism by placentas of healthy and gestational diabetics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sangeeta; Zharikova, Olga L; Ravindran, Selvan; Nanovskya, Tatiana N; Mattison, Donald R; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the metabolism of glyburide (GL) by microsomes prepared from placentas obtained from uncomplicated pregnancies (UP), women with gestational diabetics (GD) on a diabetic diet, and those on a diet and GL. Term placentas were obtained from UP and GD. Crude microsomal fractions were prepared by differential centrifugation and stored at -80 degrees C. The activity of the microsomes in metabolizing glyburide to the trans-4-hydroxycyclohexyl glyburide (THCGL) and cis-3-hydroxycyclohexyl glyburide (CHCGL) was determined and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (HPLC-MS). The activity of the placental microsomes varied widely between individual placentas in each group. The median values (pmol.mg (-1) P.min (-1)) for the rates of THCGL formation were 0.34, 0.3, and 0.23 for placentas of UP, GD on diet, and GD on GL and a diet, respectively. The median values for CHCGL formation were 0.13 for UP, 0.11 for GD on a diet, and 0.10 (pmol.mg (-1) P.min (-1)) for GD on GL and a diet. A pool of individual microsomal fractions from each group was prepared and its activity revealed the following: greater formation of THCGL in the UP (0.36 +/- 0.10) than GD (0.22 +/- 0.03) ( P = 0.058 for GD on a diet, 0.04 for GD on GL). There was greater formation of CHCGL in UP (0.26 +/- 0.04) than GD (0.12 +/- 0.003) ( P < 0.006). There was no difference in GD on a diet and GD on GL plus diet. We concluded that the apparent differences in the formation of metabolites may be statistically significant, but it is unlikely to be of physiological importance, given the sample size and other experimental factors. Therefore, a more comprehensive investigation is underway. PMID:18300189

  19. Systematic review A systematic review of metabolite profiling in gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Jennifer; Xiong, Grace; Bentley-Lewis, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes during, as well as subsequent to, pregnancy, including increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Because of the importance of early risk stratification in preventing these complications, improved first-trimester biomarker determination for diagnosing gestational diabetes would enhance our ability to optimise both maternal and fetal health. Metabolomic profiling, the systematic study of small molecule products of biochemical pathways, has shown promise in the identification of key metabolites associated with the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including gestational diabetes. This article provides a systematic review of the current state of research on biomarkers and gestational diabetes and discusses the clinical relevance of metabolomics in the prediction, diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes. Methods We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE (PubMed) up to the end of February 2014 using the key term combinations of ‘metabolomics,’ ‘metabonomics,’ ‘nuclear magnetic spectroscopy,’ ‘mass spectrometry,’ ‘metabolic profiling’ and ‘amino acid profile’ combined (AND) with ‘gestational diabetes’. Additional articles were identified through searching the reference lists from included studies. Quality assessment of included articles was conducted through the use of QUADOMICS. Results This systematic review included 17 articles. The biomarkers most consistently associated with gestational diabetes were asymmetric dimethylarginine and NEFAs. After QUADOMICS analysis, 13 of the 17 included studies were classified as ‘high quality’. Conclusions/interpretation Existing metabolomic studies of gestational diabetes present inconsistent findings regarding metabolite profile characteristics. Further studies are needed in larger, more racially/ethnically diverse populations. PMID:25193282

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus. Unresolved issues and future research directions.

    PubMed Central

    Okun, N.; Verma, A.; Demianczuk, N.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the controversial aspects of gestational diabetes (GDM) and introduce readers to possible relevant research questions that could be examined to provide clinicians with good-quality data on which to base decisions about this relatively common pregnancy-related issue. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: Ongoing review of the English literature related to GDM. Sources were not restricted to prospective, controlled trials, as these are severely limited in number. SYNTHESIS: Controversial issues include the relevance of GDM to clinically meaningful outcomes in the index pregnancy, the effectiveness of current therapy in altering these outcomes, and the resultant questionable relevance of routine screening and diagnosis of an entity with as yet uncertain significance in pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Suggested questions to be addressed in multicentre controlled trials include randomization with respect to screening and with respect to treatment. Until such trials are completed, continuing with a standard approach to screening, diagnosis, and treatment, such as that suggested by the third international workshop on GDM, is recommended. PMID:9626427

  1. Ultrastructure of Placenta of Gravidas with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qian; Shao, Li; Luo, Xiucui; Mu, Yingping; Xu, Wen; Gao, Chao; Gao, Li; Liu, Jiayin; Cui, Yugui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) leads to an abnormal placental environment which may cause some structural alterations of placenta and affect placental development and function. In this study, the ultrastructural appearances of term placentas from women with GDM and normal pregnancy were meticulously compared. Materials and Methods. The placenta tissues of term birth from 10 women with GDM and 10 women with normal pregnancy were applied with the signed informed consent. The morphology of fetomaternal interface of placenta was examined using light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results. On LM, the following morphological changes in villous tissues were found in the GDM placentas when compared with the control placentas: edematous stroma, apparent increase in the number of syncytial knots, and perivillous fibrin deposition. On TEM, the distinct ultrastructural alterations indicating the degeneration of terminal villi were found in the GDM placentas as follows: thickening of the basal membrane (BM) of vasculosyncytial membrane (VSM) and the VSM itself, significantly fewer or even absent syncytiotrophoblastic microvilli, swollen or completely destroyed mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and syncytiotrophoblasts with multiple vacuoles. Conclusion. Ultrastructural differences exist between GDM and control placentas. The differences of placenta ultrastructure are likely responsible for the impairment of placental barrier and function in GDM. PMID:26379710

  2. Ultrastructure of Placenta of Gravidas with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qian; Shao, Li; Luo, Xiucui; Mu, Yingping; Xu, Wen; Gao, Chao; Gao, Li; Liu, Jiayin; Cui, Yugui

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) leads to an abnormal placental environment which may cause some structural alterations of placenta and affect placental development and function. In this study, the ultrastructural appearances of term placentas from women with GDM and normal pregnancy were meticulously compared. Materials and Methods. The placenta tissues of term birth from 10 women with GDM and 10 women with normal pregnancy were applied with the signed informed consent. The morphology of fetomaternal interface of placenta was examined using light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results. On LM, the following morphological changes in villous tissues were found in the GDM placentas when compared with the control placentas: edematous stroma, apparent increase in the number of syncytial knots, and perivillous fibrin deposition. On TEM, the distinct ultrastructural alterations indicating the degeneration of terminal villi were found in the GDM placentas as follows: thickening of the basal membrane (BM) of vasculosyncytial membrane (VSM) and the VSM itself, significantly fewer or even absent syncytiotrophoblastic microvilli, swollen or completely destroyed mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and syncytiotrophoblasts with multiple vacuoles. Conclusion. Ultrastructural differences exist between GDM and control placentas. The differences of placenta ultrastructure are likely responsible for the impairment of placental barrier and function in GDM. PMID:26379710

  3. Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Bain, Paul A.; Gelaye, Bizu; Redline, Susan; Williams, Michelle A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recently, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been reported to be associated with the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Accordingly, as this is emergent area of research that has significant clinical relevance, the objective of this meta-analysis is to examine the relationship between SDB with GDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched several electronic databases for all of the studies published before January 2013 and reviewed references of published articles. Meta-analytic procedures were used to estimate the unadjusted and BMI-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) using a random effects model. Significant values, weighted effect sizes, and 95% CIs were calculated, and tests of homogeneity of variance were performed. RESULTS Results from nine independent studies with a total of 9,795 pregnant women showed that SDB was significantly associated with an increased risk of GDM. Women with SDB had a more than threefold increased risk of GDM, with a pooled BMI-adjusted OR 3.06 (95% CI 1.89–4.96). CONCLUSIONS These findings demonstrate a significant association between SDB and GDM that is evident even after considered confounding by obesity. This meta-analysis indicates a need to evaluate the role of early recognition and treatment of SDB early during pregnancy. PMID:24065843

  4. Gestational diabetes mellitus: advocating for policy change in India.

    PubMed

    Madhab, Anand; Prasad, Vishwa Mohan; Kapur, Anil

    2011-11-01

    A multimedia awareness and advocacy campaign for mainstreaming gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the public health domain is described. The multimedia campaign has created awareness about the relevance of GDM to women's health and the health of future generations through direct contact, reaching out to over half a million people in 7 districts of 4 states in northern India. Using mass media, over 3.7 million people have received information on GDM. Through multistakeholder forums, more than 1000 key stakeholders have been encouraged to mainstream GDM into the existing health delivery system. The Indian Ministry of Health has introduced free screening for GDM among the 5 services offered to pregnant women below the poverty line in the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) program. In addition, several state governments, such as in Bihar, Delhi, Jharkhand, and Punjab, have pledged similar initiatives addressing GDM; the Government of Tamil Nadu is already implementing such a policy. Policy development is a complex process that requires action on many fronts. By showcasing evidence, raising awareness, creating public opinion through dialogue and discussion, media can help build a positive environment and momentum for effective policy creation as well as service utilization. PMID:22099441

  5. Screening of high-risk and general populations for gestational diabetes. Clinical application and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavin, J P

    1985-06-01

    Two thousand seventy-seven women attending a university-based prenatal clinic were screened for gestational diabetes. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 959 patients with historic or clinical factors traditionally employed to identify patients as being at high risk for the occurrence of gestational diabetes. Group 2 consisted of the remaining 1118 patients. The O'Sullivan 50-g 1-h test, with an upper limit of normal for serum glucose of 150 mg/dl, was employed as the initial screening procedure. Patients with an abnormal screening test underwent a 3-h oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) with a 100-g load. The values recommended by the First American Diabetes Association Workshop-Conference on Gestational Diabetes were employed for interpretation. Group 1 patients underwent screening at their initial visit and again at 28 wk gestation. Group 2 patients underwent an identical screening sequence between 28 and 32 wk gestation. Cost analysis was performed. The prevalences of positive screening tests were 7.2% and 6.1%, and the frequencies of abnormal GTTs were 1.5% and 1.4% among group 1 and group 2 patients, respectively. These rates were not statistically significantly different. Overall, 46.7% and 53.5% of the cases of gestational diabetes were identified among the patients with and without risk factors, respectively. The total cost of the screening program was +9869.00. The cost per patient screened and the cost per case of gestational diabetes identified were +4.75 and +328.96, respectively. These results reemphasize the inadequacy of screening only those patients with traditional risk factors for gestational diabetes and demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a program of universal glucose screening among a large obstetric population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3996767

  6. Increased Maternal and Cord Blood Betatrophin in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wawrusiewicz-Kurylonek, Natalia; Telejko, Beata; Kuzmicki, Mariusz; Sobota, Angelika; Lipinska, Danuta; Pliszka, Justyna; Raczkowska, Beata; Kuc, Pawel; Urban, Remigiusz; Szamatowicz, Jacek; Kretowski, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr; Gorska, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to compare maternal and cord blood levels of betatrophin – a new peptide potentially controlling beta cell growth - as well as in its mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue and placental tissue obtained from pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and gestational diabetes (GDM). Methods Serum betatrophin and irisin concentrations were measured by ELISA in 93 patients with GDM and 97 women with NGT between 24 and 28 week of gestation. Additionally, maternal and cord blood betatrophin and irisin, as well as their genes (C19orf80 and Fndc5) expression were evaluated in 20 patients with GDM and 20 women with NGT at term. Results In both groups, serum betatrophin concentrations were significantly higher in the patients with GDM than in the controls (1.91 [1.40-2.60] ng/ml vs 1.63 [1.21-2.22] ng/ml, p=0.03 and 3.45 [2.77-6.53] ng/ml vs 2.78 [2.16-3.65] ng/ml, p=0.03, respectively). Cord blood betatrophin levels were also higher in the GDM than in the NGT group (20.43 [12.97-28.80] ng/ml vs 15.06 [10.11-21.36] ng/ml, p=0.03). In both groups betatrophin concentrations in arterial cord blood were significantly higher than in maternal serum (p=0.0001). Serum irisin levels were significantly lower in the patients with GDM (1679 [1308-2171] ng/ml) than in the healthy women between 24 and 28 week of pregnancy (1880 [1519-2312] ng/ml, p=0.03). Both C19orf80 and Fndc5 mRNA expression in fat and placental tissue did not differ significantly between the groups studied. Conclusions Our results suggest that an increase in maternal and cord blood betatrophin might be a compensatory mechanism for enhanced insulin demand in GDM. PMID:26115519

  7. Diet during early pregnancy and development of gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Radesky, Jenny S.; Oken, Emily; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Kleinman, Ken P.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Gillman, Matthew W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Diet composition may be a modifiable predictor of risk for abnormal glucose tolerance during pregnancy. Prior studies suggest that diets high in total fat, saturated fat, red and processed meats, and with high glycaemic load increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), while polyunsaturated fats, carbohydrates and fibre are protective. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of these and other nutrients and foods, including n-3 fatty acids, trans fats, whole grains and dietary patterns, with risk of GDM. We studied 1733 women with singleton pregnancies enrolled in Project Viva, a prospective pregnancy and birth cohort study in eastern MA. Using multinomial logistic regression, we examined associations of first trimester diet, assessed by validated food frequency questionnaire, with results of glucose tolerance testing at 26?28 weeks of gestation. A total of 91 women developed GDM and 206 women had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) was a strong predictor for GDM risk (OR 3.44 [95% CI 1.88, 6.31] for pre-pregnancy BMI ?30 vs. <25 kg/m2). After adjustment for confounders, the OR [95% CI] for risk of GDM for total dietary fat was 1.00 [0.96, 1.05], for saturated fat 0.98 [0.88, 1.08], for polyunsaturated fat 1.09 [0.94, 1.26], for trans fat 0.87 [0.51, 1.49], and for carbohydrates 1.00 [0.96, 1.03] per each 1% of total energy. The adjusted OR [95% CI] for risk of GDM for a one standard deviation increase in energy-adjusted glycaemic load (32 units, about two soft drinks) was 0.96 [0.76, 1.22] and for each daily serving of whole grains was 0.90 [0.73, 1.13]. Dietary patterns and intake of red and processed meats were not predictive of glucose tolerance outcome. Estimates for IGT were similar to those for GDM. Intake of n-3 fatty acids was associated with increased GDM risk (OR 1.11 [95% CI 1.02, 1.22] per each 300 mg/day), but not with IGT risk. Except for this finding, perhaps due to chance, these data do not show that nutrient or food intake in early pregnancy is linked to risk of GDM. Nutritional status entering pregnancy, as reflected by pre-pregnancy BMI, is probably more important than pregnancy diet in development of GDM. PMID:18173784

  8. Glycosylated haemoglobin for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Eileen; Al-Barazan, Abdul Majeed; Nikakis, Irena; Radford, Andrea; Clarkson, Wade; Trevett, Clinton; Brain, Terry; Gebski, Val; Corbould, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a cumbersome test that is time consuming, labour intensive and often poorly tolerated by pregnant women. To date, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is the most accepted measure of chronic glycaemia outside of pregnancy. HbA1c is an uncomplicated test, less time consuming, does not require any specific patient preparation and is considered straightforward compared with the OGTT. Therefore, we prospectively tested the utility of the HbA1c when used as a screening tool in pregnancy for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Settings Primary health care. Single tertiary referral centre, Tasmania, Australia. Participants A direct comparison between HbA1c levels and the OGTT results in pregnant women, tested concurrently at the 24–28 gestational week, was undertaken. A full profile of 480 pregnant women during the period from September 2012 to July 2014 was completed. Median and mean age of participants was 29 years (range 18–47 years). Interventions A simultaneous prospective assessment of HbA1c versus standard OGTT in a cohort of consecutive pregnant women presenting to our institute was performed. Results The number of women who had GDM according to OGTT criteria was 57, representing 11.9% of the evaluated 480 pregnant women. Using a cut-off value for HbA1c at 5.1% (32 mmol/mol) for detecting GDM showed sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 68% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 93%, versus sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 95% with NPV of 91% when using HbA1c cut-off value of 5.4% (36 mmol/mol). Conclusions Our results suggest that pregnant women with an HbA1c of≥5.4% (36 mmol/mol) should proceed with an OGTT. This may result in a significant reduction in the burden of testing on both patients and testing facility staff and resources. Further investigations are required to integrate and optimise the HbA1c as a single, non-fasting, screening tool for GDM. Trial registration number ACTRN12611000739910. PMID:27044587

  9. Health Behaviors Among Pregnant Latina Women at Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common complication of pregnancy, increases the risk of subsequent diabetes and obesity. Latina women have over twice the risk for developing GDM as compared to non-Latina white women. Health-promoting practices during pregnancy may improve metabolic status an...

  10. Did You Have Gestational Diabetes When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know. Page Content What You Need to Know. Some women get diabetes when they are pregnant. ... When You Were Pregnant? What You Need to Know. (PDF, 444 KB) ​ Did You Have Gestational Diabetes ...

  11. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Challenges for different ethnic groups

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Lili; Wong, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    Ethnicity is defined as “belonging to a social group that has a common national or cultural tradition”. Membership of certain ethnic groups has long been associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Studies that examined ethnic differences amongst women with GDM were often conducted in western countries where women from various ethnic backgrounds were represented. The prevalence of GDM appears to be particularly high among women from South Asia and South East Asia, compared to Caucasian, African-American and Hispanic communities. For some, but not all ethnic groups, the body mass index is a risk factor for the development of GDM. Even within a particular ethnic group, those who were born in their native countries have a different risk profile for GDM compared to those born in western countries. In terms of treatment, medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays a key role in the management of GDM and the prescription of MNT should be culturally sensitive. Limited studies have shown that women who live in an English-speaking country but predominantly speak a language other than English, have lower rates of dietary understanding compared with their English speaking counterparts, and this may affect compliance to therapy. Insulin therapy also plays an important role and there appears to be variation as to the progression of women who progress to requiring insulin among different ethnicities. As for peri-natal outcomes, women from Pacific Islander countries have higher rates of macrosomia, while women from Chinese backgrounds had lower adverse pregnancy outcomes. From a maternal outcome point of view, pregnant women from Asia with GDM have a higher incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance test results post-partum and hence a higher risk of future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. On the other hand, women from Hispanic or African-American backgrounds with GDM are more likely to develop hypertension post-partum. This review highlights the fact that management needs to be individualised and the clinician should be mindful of the impact that differences in ethnicity may have on the clinical characteristics and pregnancy outcomes in women affected by GDM, particularly those living in Western countries. Understanding these differences is critical in the delivery of optimal antenatal care for women from diverse ethnic backgrounds. PMID:26240699

  12. Gestational diabetic transcriptomic profiling of microdissected human trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Bari, Muhammad Furqan; Ngo, Sherry; Bastie, Claire C; Sheppard, Allan M; Vatish, Manu

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the most common metabolic complication of pregnancy, is influenced by the placenta, and its prevalence directly increases with obesity. Therefore, to define the aetiology of GDM requires that the confounding influence of obesity and the heterogeneous nature of the placenta impairing accurate quantitative studies be accounted for. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM), we optimized RNA extraction from human placental trophoblast, the metabolic cellular interface between mother and foetus. This allowed specific transcriptomic profiling of trophoblast isolated from GDM, and obese and normal human placentae. Genome-wide gene expression analysis was performed on the RNA extracted from the trophoblast of GDM and obese and normal placentae. Forty-five differentially expressed genes (DEGs) specifically discriminated GDM from matched obese subjects. Two genes previously linked with GDM, pregnancy specific beta-1 glycoprotein 6 (PSG6) and placental system A sodium-dependent transporter system (SLC38A1), were significantly increased in GDM. A number of these DEGs (8 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (UBE) splice variants (UBE2D3 variants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 9) and UBE2V1 variant 4)) were involved in RNA processing and splicing, and a significant number of the DEGs, including the UBE variants, were associated with increased maternal fasting plasma glucose.It is concluded that DEGs discriminating GDM from obese subjects were pinpointed. Our data indicate a biological link between genes involved in RNA processing and splicing, ubiquitination, and fasting plasma glucose in GDM taking into account obesity as the confounder. PMID:26869332

  13. Intrauterine Exposure to Gestational Diabetes, Child Adiposity, and Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Charmaine S.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Taveras, Elsie M.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Oken, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Background Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) may promote offspring obesity and higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) by adolescence. Few studies have examined adiposity or SBP in younger children exposed to GDM. This study’s objective was to examine associations of maternal glucose tolerance during pregnancy with offspring adiposity and SBP at age 3 years. Methods We studied 1,238 mother-child pairs in Project Viva, a prospective prebirth cohort study. Exposures were maternal blood glucose following oral glucose load, and GDM confirmed by 3-h glucose tolerance test. Main child outcomes were age 3-year body mass index (BMI) z-score, the sum (SS+TR) and ratio (SS/TR) of subscapular (SS) and tricep (TR) skinfold thicknesses, and SBP. We performed adjusted multivariable analyses. Results Fifty-one (4%) mothers had GDM. 9.3% of 3 year-old children were obese and mean (s.d.) SBP was 92 (11) mm Hg. Children exposed to GDM had higher SBP (3.2 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4, 5.9, P = 0.02) and greater adiposity when assessed by the sum of skinfolds (SS+TR 1.31 mm, 95% CI: 0.08, 2.55, P = 0.04) but not by BMI z-score (−0.08 units, 95% CI: −0.37, 0.22, P = 0.61). After additional adjustment for the sum of skinfold thicknesses (SS+TR), the relationship between GDM and SBP was attenuated and no longer significant (2.6 mm Hg, 95% CI: −0.2, 5.4, P = 0.07). Conclusions Children exposed to GDM have higher adiposity, which may mediate the higher SBP in these children. These findings extend to younger children the adverse effects of GDM previously found among adolescents and adults. PMID:19023272

  14. Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Long-Term Child Health

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Madeline Murguia; Varner, Michael W.; Casey, Brian M.; Reddy, Uma M.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Biggio, Joseph R.; Thorp, John M.; Chien, Edward K.; Saade, George; Peaceman, Alan M.; Blackwell, Sean C.; VanDorsten, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) confers sustained offspring health benefits, including a lower frequency of obesity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Follow-up study of children (ages 5–10) of women enrolled in a multicenter trial of treatment versus no treatment of mild GDM. Height, weight, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol were measured. RESULTS Five hundred of 905 eligible offspring (55%) were enrolled. Maternal baseline characteristics were similar between the follow-up treated and untreated groups. The frequencies of BMI ≥95th (20.8% and 22.9%) and 85th (32.6% and 38.6%) percentiles were not significantly different in treated versus untreated offspring (P = 0.69 and P = 0.26). No associations were observed for BMI z score, log waist circumference, log triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure, or log HOMA-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The effect of treatment was different by sex for fasting glucose and log HOMA-IR (P for interaction = 0.002 and 0.02, respectively) but not by age-group (5–6 and 7–10 years) for any outcomes. Female offspring of treated women had significantly lower fasting glucose levels. CONCLUSIONS Although treatment for mild GDM has been associated with neonatal benefits, no reduction in childhood obesity or metabolic dysfunction in the offspring of treated women was found. However, only female offspring of women treated for mild GDM had lower fasting glucose. PMID:25414152

  15. Circulating irisin is lower in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Li, Jun; Li, Zhao-Liang; Yang, Jie; Li, Ming-Long; Wang, Gong-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Irisin is a newly identified myokine. Several studies have reported irisin concentrations in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but because of smaller sample sizes, the data from previous reports showed a wide range in serum/plasma irisin. Therefore, the present investigation is designed to summarize a precise confidence interval of circulating irisin in participants with GDM from a cross-sectional study in Chinese population and a meta-analysis for validation. Serum irisin was tested in patients with GDM and healthy controls (newly diagnosed cases: 61 and matched controls: 61) in the cross-sectional study. The two groups of participants were matched for age and pregnancy duration. Furthermore, we did a comprehensive meta-analysis to confirm whether serum/plasma irisin differs between participants with GDM and controls. Articles reported "circulating irisin and GDM" in Medline, PubMed, and EMBase were obtained, with the key word "myokine" or "irisin". The comparison was analyzed by Review Manager 5.2. In the cross-sectional investigation, serum irisin showed a significant lower level in the GDM patients, compared with that in the control group. In the meta-analysis study, the summarized results of the present 5 studies in which 632 participants were included indicated that there was a lower level irisin of -58.68 ng/mL [95% confidence interval (CI)](-113.42, -3.93, P=0.04) in GDM patients than in the control group. The present cross-sectional investigation and meta-analysis is the first to show significant lower circulating irisin in subjects with GDM. PMID:26228794

  16. Obstetric Outcome in Early and Late Onset Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Easmin, S; Chowdhury, T A; Islam, M R; Beg, A; Jahan, M K; Latif, T; Dhar, S; Alam, M N; Akhter, M

    2015-07-01

    Obstetric outcome in early onset and late onset GDM was compared in a prospective study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology in BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A total 120 pregnant women were recruited purposively for the study in which 60 were early onset GDM and 60 were late onset GDM during study period of January 2008 to December 2009. Patients were followed up in different periods of gestation, during delivery and early postpartum period & findings were compared between two groups. BMI & family history of diabetes were significantly higher in early GDM group (p<0.05). Evidence of increased glycaemia was observed in early GDM group & difference of glycaemic status was statistically significant (p<0.05). Insulin was needed in 85% of early onset GDM and 55% in late onset GDM. There was also significant difference (p<0.05). In this study, 23.3% of early onset GDM group developed pre-eclampsia while in late onset GDM it was 10% and was statistically significant (p<0.05). Regarding intrapartum & postpartum complications - perineal tear, PPH wound infection, puerperal sepsis were more in early onset than late onset GDM group with no significant difference. Regarding foetal outcome, 8.3% early GDM group delivered asphyxiated baby in comparison to 3.3% in late GDM group. Twenty percent (20%) of early onset GDM group had to admit their babies in neonatal unit while in late onset group it was 5%. There was significant difference between two groups (p<0.05). Neonatal hypoglycaemia was also statistically significantly (p<0.05) higher in early GDM group. Neonatal hyper-bilirubinaemia, RDS, perinatal death was more in early onset GDM subjects. Early onset GDM subjects are high risk subgroup & have significant deleterious effect on maternal and perinatal outcome than late GDM groups. PMID:26329938

  17. Effects of gestational and overt diabetes on placental cytochromes P450 and glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Glover; McRobie; Tracy

    1998-07-01

    Objective: Animal and in vivo human studies have observed that diabetes alters the expression of hepatic metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes. The placenta has the ability to metabolize a number of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds by processes similar to those seen in the liver. Our objective was to compare placental xenobiotic metabolizing activity in diabetics to matched non-diabetic controls to determine if the presence of diabetes alters placental xenobiotic metabolizing activity.Methods: The catalytic activities of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation [EROD] (CYP1A1), chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation (CYP2E1), dextromethorphan N-demethylation (CYP3A4), dextromethorphan O-demethylation (CYP2D6), and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) conjugation with glutathione (GST) from placentas of diet controlled (class A1) and insulin-dependent (class A2) gestational diabetics and overt diabetics were compared to matched controls.Results: No differences in EROD activity were observed among overt or gestational diabetics and their respectively matched controls. CYP2E1, 2D6, and 3A4 enzyme activity were not detected in human placentas. In contrast, GST activity was significantly reduced by 30% (P <.05) in overt diabetics as compared to their matched controls and gestational diabetics.Conclusion: Pregnant women with overt diabetes have reduced GST activity in the placenta, which could potentially result in exposure of the fetus to harmful reactive electrophilic metabolites. PMID:10838356

  18. Gestational weight loss and perinatal outcomes in overweight and obese women subsequent to diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Lynn M.; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Inturrisi, Maribeth; Caughey, Aaron B.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether gestational weight loss after the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in overweight and obese women is associated with improved perinatal outcomes. Obesity and GDM are risk factors for adverse perinatal outcomes, but few studies have investigated weight loss during pregnancy in women with these comorbidities. METHODS Retrospective cohort study of 26,205 overweight and obese gestational diabetic women enrolled in the California Diabetes and Pregnancy Program. Women with gestational weight loss (GWL) during program enrollment were compared to those with weight gain. Perinatal outcomes were assessed using chi-square test and multivariable logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: 5.2% of women experienced GWL. GWL was associated with decreased odds of macrosomia (aOR 0.63, 95% CI 0.52–0.77), NICU admission (aOR 0.51, 95% CI 0.27–0.95), and cesarean delivery (aOR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68–0.97). Odds of SGA status (aOR 1.69, 95% CI 1.32–2.17) and preterm delivery <34 weeks (aOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.23–2.37) were increased. CONCLUSIONS In overweight and obese women with GDM, third trimester weight loss is associated with some improved maternal and neonatal outcomes, although this effect is lessened by increased odds of SGA status and preterm delivery. We recommend further research on weight loss and interventions to improve adherence to weight guidelines in this population. PMID:23613187

  19. Infratemporal Space Infection Following Maxillary Third Molar Extraction in an Uncontrolled Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mesgarzadeh, Ali Hossein; Ghavimi, Mohammad Ali; Gok, Gulşen; Zarghami, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    Infratemporal space infection is a rare but serious sequel of odontogenic infection. The diagnosis is difficult due to non spe-cific signs and symptoms. Diabetes mellitus as a definitive risk factor for odontogenic infections needs more consideration during clinical procedures. We report a case of an undiagnosed diabetic patient with isolated infratemporal space infection after tooth extraction with presentation of similar signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint and muscle problem. PMID:22991649

  20. Perceptions of diabetes control among physicians and people with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled on basal insulin in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Brod, Meryl; Pfeiffer, Kathryn M; Barnett, Anthony H; Berntorp, Kerstin; Vilsbøll, Tina; Weissenberger, Benno

    2016-06-01

    Objective A large proportion of people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) remain uncontrolled on basal insulin. Yet, there is limited understanding of how people with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (PWUD) perceive control and insulin intensification and whether their perceptions differ from those of physicians. The purpose of the study was to investigate perceptions of control and views on insulin intensification among physicians and PWUD. Research design and methods Web surveys of 1012 PWUD on basal insulin and 300 physicians were conducted in Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Results Analyses revealed significant differences between physicians and PWUD. Physicians were significantly more likely than PWUD to indicate that HbA1c (85.0% vs. 78.9%, p < 0.05), complications from diabetes (89.3% vs. 75.3%, p < 0.001), and frequency/severity of hypoglycemia (93.3% vs. 68.6%, p < 0.001) were very/extremely important for deciding whether or not diabetes is well controlled. In contrast PWUD were significantly more likely to place importance on a variety of factors, including energy levels (74.5% vs. 33.0%, p < 0.001), insulin units/day (77.6% vs. 29.0%, p < 0.001) and how predictable life is (72.1% vs. 29.3%, p < 0.001). PWUD also perceived significantly greater obstacles to control and viewed uncontrolled T2D as more interfering in their lives compared to physicians. Physicians were most reluctant to intensify insulin when there is a lack of patient agreement. Worries about weight gain and feelings of 'getting sicker' were the most frequently reported reasons why PWUD on basal insulin were reluctant to intensify insulin. Conclusions Results revealed a significant disconnect between physicians and PWUD in their perceptions of diabetes control. While physicians generally expressed a more focused and clinical view of diabetes control, patients had a broader view. Results also provide insights into PWUD and physicians' reluctance to intensify insulin. The findings suggest that physician and patient education on differing perceptions could benefit communication and improve diabetes management. PMID:26849483

  1. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kunihiko; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucose tolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications, and so the definition and diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricter glycemic control than before is required to reduce the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications. Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without an indicator of glycemic control; this review proposes a reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator of glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstrated that HbA1c does not reflect glycemic control accurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency. It has also become clear that glycated albumin, another indicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by iron deficiency and therefore might be a better indicator of glycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. However, large-population epidemiological studies are necessary in order to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline the most recent findings about the indicators of glycemic control during pregnancy including fructosamine and 1,5-anhydroglucitol. PMID:26240701

  2. Prevalence of Gestational Diabetes and Risk of Progression to Type 2 Diabetes: a Global Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yeyi; Zhang, Cuilin

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing epidemic of diabetes mellitus affecting populations at different life stages, the global burden of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is not well assessed. Systematically synthesized data on global prevalence estimates of GDM are lacking, particularly among developing countries. The hyperglycemic intrauterine environment as exemplified in pregnancies complicated by GDM might not only reflect but also fuel the epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We comprehensively reviewed available data in the past decade in an attempt to estimate the contemporary global prevalence of GDM by country and region. We reviewed the risk of progression from GDM to T2DM as well. Synthesized data demonstrate wide variations in both prevalence estimates of GDM and the risk of progression from GDM to T2DM. Direct comparisons of GDM burden across countries or regions are challenging given the great heterogeneity in screening approaches, diagnostic criteria, and underlying population characteristics. In this regard, collaborative efforts to estimate global GDM prevalence would be a large but important leap forward. Such efforts may have substantial public health implications in terms of informing health policy makers and healthcare providers for disease burden and for developing more targeted and effective diabetes prevention and management strategies globally. PMID:26742932

  3. Compliance with treatment regimen in women with gestational diabetes: Living with fear

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Salsali, Mahvash; Rahnavard, Zahra; Parvizy, Soroor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus is a prevalent pregnancy complication that seriously endangers mothers and babies health. The aim of this study was to explore factors affecting treatment compliance among women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis approach was employed. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospitalized pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. The research was conducted in four teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran; purposive sampling was used. Results: Participants experiences regarding factors that influence treatment compliance fell into six categories: Unexpected diagnosis, the need for urgent change, temptation to consume inappropriate foods, life in the shadow of the illness, risk avoidance, and seeking adjustment. Conclusions: Holistic education of families on gestational diabetes, training specialist diabetes nurses, and referral to public health centers and diabetes clinics could increase treatment compliance. These findings could serve patients and the healthcare system in general, if considered by healthcare officials and policy makers. Furthermore, providing outpatient services, considering cultural dietary conventions when recommending diets, and alleviating the stigma associated with diabetes through mass media could also promote treatment compliance. PMID:25949244

  4. The role of gestational diabetes, pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on the risk of newborn macrosomia: results from a prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is crucial to identify in large population samples the most important determinants of excessive fetal growth. The aim of the study was to evaluate the independent role of pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes on the risk of macrosomia. Methods A prospective study collected data on mode of delivery and maternal/neonatal outcomes in eleven Hospitals in Italy. Multiple pregnancies and preterm deliveries were excluded. The sample included 14109 women with complete records. Associations between exposure variables and newborn macrosomia were analyzed using Pearson’s chi squared test. Multiple logistic regression models were built to assess the independent association between potential predictors and macrosomia. Results Maternal obesity (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4-2.2), excessive gestational weight gain (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.2) and diabetes (adjusted OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-3.0 for gestational; adjusted OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.2-7.6 for pre-gestational) resulted to be independent predictors of macrosomia, when adjusted for other recognized risk factors. Since no significant interaction was found between pre-gestational BMI and gestational weight gain, excessive weight gain should be considered an independent risk factor for macrosomia. In the sub-group of women affected by gestational or pre-gestational diabetes, pre-gestational BMI was not significantly associated to macrosomia, while excessive pregnancy weight gain, maternal height and gestational age at delivery were significantly associated. In this sub-population, pregnancy weight gain less than recommended was not significantly associated to a reduction in macrosomia. Conclusions Our findings indicate that maternal obesity, gestational weight gain excess and diabetes should be considered as independent risk factors for newborn macrosomia. To adequately evaluate the clinical evolution of pregnancy all three variables need to be carefully assessed and monitored. PMID:24428895

  5. SPRING: an RCT study of probiotics in the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus in overweight and obese women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is increasing in the child-bearing population as are the rates of gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is associated with higher rates of Cesarean Section for the mother and increased risks of macrosomia, higher body fat mass, respiratory distress and hypoglycemia for the infant. Prevention of gestational diabetes through life style intervention has proven to be difficult. A Finnish study showed that ingestion of specific probiotics altered the composition of the gut microbiome and thereby metabolism from early gestation and decreased rates of gestational diabetes in normal weight women. In SPRING (the Study of Probiotics IN the prevention of Gestational diabetes), the effectiveness of probiotics ingestion for the prevention of gestational diabetes will be assessed in overweight and obese women. Methods/design SPRING is a multi-center, prospective, double-blind randomized controlled trial run at two tertiary maternity hospitals in Brisbane, Australia. Five hundred and forty (540) women with a BMI > 25.0 kg/m2 will be recruited over 2 years and receive either probiotics or placebo capsules from 16 weeks gestation until delivery. The probiotics capsules contain > 1x109 cfu each of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12 per capsule. The primary outcome is diagnosis of gestational diabetes at 28 weeks gestation. Secondary outcomes include rates of other pregnancy complications, gestational weight gain, mode of delivery, change in gut microbiome, preterm birth, macrosomia, and infant body composition. The trial has 80% power at a 5% 2-sided significance level to detect a >50% change in the rates of gestational diabetes in this high-risk group of pregnant women. Discussion SPRING will show if probiotics can be used as an easily implementable method of preventing gestational diabetes in the high-risk group of overweight and obese pregnant women. PMID:23442391

  6. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    PubMed

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:26066567

  7. The Inter- and Intragenerational Impact of Gestational Diabetes on the Epidemic of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dyck, Roland F.; Grassmann, Winfried K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the contribution of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to the historic epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Saskatchewan. Methods. We constructed a population-level simulation model of the inter- and intragenerational interaction of GDM and T2DM for the period 1956 to 2006. The model was stratified by gender, ethnicity, and age; parameterized with primary and secondary data; and calibrated to match historic time series. Risk of diabetes was sigmoidally trended to capture exogenous factors. Results. Best-fit calibrations suggested GDM may be responsible for 19% to 30% of the cases of T2DM among Saskatchewan First Nations people, but only for approximately 6% of cases among other persons living in Saskatchewan. The estimated contribution of GDM to the growth in T2DM was highly sensitive to assumptions concerning the post-GDM risk of developing T2DM. Conclusions. GDM may be an important driver for the T2DM epidemic in many subpopulations. Because GDM is a readily identifiable, preventable, and treatable condition, investments in prevention, rapid diagnosis, and evidence-based treatment of GDM in at-risk populations may offer substantial benefit in lowering the T2DM burden over many generations. Model-informed data collection can aid in assessing intervention tradeoffs. PMID:21148717

  8. Increased circulating heat shock protein 70 (HSPA1A) levels in gestational diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garamvölgyi, Zoltán; Prohászka, Zoltán; Rigó, János; Kecskeméti, András; Molvarec, Attila

    2015-07-01

    Recent data indicate that serum Hsp70 (HSPA1A) levels are increased in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is no report in the literature on circulating Hsp70 levels in gestational diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we measured serum Hsp70 levels in 11 pregnant women with pregestational diabetes, 38 women with gestational diabetes, and 40 healthy pregnant women with ELISA. Plasma glucose levels, serum insulin concentrations, HbA1c values, and the Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index were also determined. According to our results, serum Hsp70 concentrations were significantly higher in women with pregestational and gestational diabetes mellitus than in healthy pregnant women. In addition, pregestational diabetic women had significantly higher Hsp70 levels than those with gestational diabetes. Furthermore, in the group of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, serum Hsp70 levels showed a significant positive correlation with HbA1c values. However, there was no other relationship between clinical features and metabolic parameters of the study subjects and their serum Hsp70 levels in either study group. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time in the literature that serum Hsp70 levels are increased and correlate with HbA1c values in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to determine whether circulating Hsp70 plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes or elevated serum Hsp70 levels are only consequences of the disease. PMID:25720752

  9. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    JAFARI-SHOBEIRI, Mehri; GHOJAZADEH, Morteza; AZAMI-AGHDASH, Saber; NAGHAVI-BEHZAD, Mohammad; PIRI, Reza; POURALI-AKBAR, Yasmin; NASROLLAH-ZADEH, Raheleh; BAYAT-KHAJEH, Parvaneh; MOHAMMADI, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gestational Diabetes (GD) is one of the major public health issues. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the risk factors and prevalence rate of this disorder in Iran. Methods: This systematic review and meta- analysis article was prepared using the databases of Science Direct, Pub-Med, Scopus, Magiran, Iranmedex and SID, Google search engine, Gray Literature, reference lists check and hand searching using keywords such as “prevalence”, “gestational diabetes mellitus”, “GDM”, “risk factor*”, “Iran” and “Postpartum Diabetes”. The selected papers were fully reviewed and the required information for the systematic review was extracted and summarized using extraction table in Microsoft Office Excel software. Results: Twenty-four of 1011 papers were quite relevant to the objectives of the review so they were included. The mean age of the participants was 29.43±4.97 yr and the prevalence of GDM was 3.41% (the highest and the lowest prevalence rates were 18.6% and 1.3% respectively). Among the influential factors mentioned in the literature, potential causes of GDM are gestational age, history of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes, body mass index, abortions and parity, and history of macrosomia. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of postpartum diabetes and its related factors in Iran, strategic planning for disease prevention and reduction is inevitable. PMID:26587467

  10. Therapeutic management, delivery, and postpartum risk assessment and screening in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Wanda K; Wilson, Lisa M; Witkop, Catherine Takacs; Baptiste-Roberts, Kesha; Bennett, Wendy L; Bolen, Shari; Barone, Bethany B; Golden, Sherita Hill; Gary, Tiffany L; Neale, Donna M; Bass, Eric B

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We focused on four questions: What are the risks and benefits of an oral diabetes agent (i.e., glyburide), as compared to all types of insulin, for gestational diabetes? What is the evidence that elective labor induction, cesarean delivery, or timing of induction is associated with benefits or harm to the mother and neonate? What risk factors are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes? What are the performance characteristics of diagnostic tests for type 2 diabetes in women with gestational diabetes? DATA SOURCES We searched electronic databases for studies published through January 2007. Additional articles were identified by searching the table of contents of 13 journals for relevant citations from August 2006 to January 2007 and reviewing the references in eligible articles and selected review articles. REVIEW METHODS Paired investigators reviewed abstracts and full articles. We included studies that were written in English, reported on human subjects, contained original data, and evaluated women with appropriately diagnosed gestational diabetes. Paired reviewers performed serial abstraction of data from each eligible study. Study quality was assessed independently by each reviewer. RESULTS The search identified 45 relevant articles. The evidence indicated that: Maternal glucose levels do not differ substantially in those treated with insulin versus insulin analogues or oral agents. Average infant birth weight may be lower in mothers treated with insulin than with glyburide. Induction at 38 weeks may reduce the macrosomia rate, with no increase in cesarean delivery rates. Anthropometric measures, fasting blood glucose (FBG), and 2-hour glucose value are the strongest risk factors associated with development of type 2 diabetes. FBG had high specificity, but variable sensitivity, when compared to the 75-gm oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes after delivery. CONCLUSIONS The evidence suggests that benefits and a low likelihood of harm are associated with the treatment of gestational diabetes with an oral diabetes agent or insulin. The effect of induction or elective cesarean on outcomes is unclear. The evidence is consistent that anthropometry identifies women at risk of developing subsequent type 2 diabetes; however, no evidence suggested the FBG out-performs the 75-gm OGTT in diagnosing type 2 diabetes after delivery. PMID:18457474

  11. Uncontrolled diabetes resulting in diabetic cardiomyopathy in a young male patient and eventually presenting with a stroke.

    PubMed

    Kritikos, Konstantinos; Soitou, Kristina; Kapranou, Roxani; Mavroidis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCP) is defined as the cardiovascular damage present in diabetes patients, which is characterized by myocardial dilatation and hypertrophy, as well as a decrease in the systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle, and its presence is independent of the coexistence of ischemic heart disease or hypertension. As in the case of the patient that we present here, DCP may be subclinical for a long time, before the appearance of serious clinical symptoms, signs and complications. DCP is poorly recognized by most physicians. Currently, there is no specific treatment for this pathologic entity. However, proper treatment of diabetes and its metabolic abnormalities in the primary care setting reduces the rates of this serious metabolic complication of diabetes. As this high-risk diabetic population is constantly rising, increasing the awareness of physicians for the serious metabolic complications of diabetes, especially in the primary care setting, will help in taking appropriate and early action towards the prevention of full -blown disease and decreasing disability and mortality. PMID:25657971

  12. Modelling effective diagnosis of risk complications in gestational diabetes mellitus: an e-diabetic expert system for pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedevi, E.; Vijaya Lakshmi, K.; Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. This paper deals with study and development of algorithm to develop an initial stage expert system to provide diagnosis to the pregnant women who are suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) by means of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

  13. Factors associated with diabetes mellitus prediction among pregnant Arab subjects with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aljohani, Naji; Al Serehi, Amal; Ahmed, Amjad M; Buhary, Badr Aldin M; Alzahrani, Saad; At-Taras, Eeman; Almujally, Najla; Alsharqi, Maha; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Almalki, Mussa

    2015-01-01

    There is scarcity of available information on the possible significant risk factors related to diabetes mellitus (DM) prediction among expectant Saudi mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The present study is the first to identify such risk factors in the Arab cohort. A total of 300 pregnant subjects (mean age 33.45 ± 6.5 years) were randomly selected from all the deliveries registered at the Obstetrics Department of King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh Saudi Arabia from April 2011 to March 2013. Demographic and baseline glycemic information were collected. A total of 7 highly significant and independent risk factors were identified: age, obesity, and family history of DM, GDM < 20 weeks, macrosomia, insulin therapy and recurrent GDM. Among these factors, subjects who had insulin therapy use are 5 times more likely to develop DMT2 (p-value 3.94 × 10(-14)) followed by recurrent GDM [odds-ratio 4.69 (Confidence Interval 2.34-4.84); P = 1.24 × 10(-13)). The identification of the risk factors mentioned with their respective predictive powers in the detection of DMT2 needs to be taken seriously in the post-partum assessment of Saudi pregnant patients at highest risk. PMID:26339426

  14. Nutritional Intake of Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun-Young; Yoo, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Ae-Lan; Oh, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Hun-Sung; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Cho, Jae-Hyoung

    2013-01-01

    Adequate intake of nutrients by pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is very important for appropriate weight gain and maintenance of normoglycemia without ketonuria. The aim of this study was to investigate the nutritional intake of pregnant women with GDM or T2DM who had not been provided with nutritional education regarding blood glucose management. Between June 2008 and May 2010, 125 pregnant women who had been diagnosed with GDM or T2DM and had not received any nutrition education regarding glycemic control and proper diet during pregnancy were interviewed to collect data regarding background characteristics, health-related behaviors, and course of pregnancy and instructed to record their dietary intake using a 24-hour recall method for one day. Using the collected data, the index of nutritional quality, nutrient adequacy ratio, and mean adequacy ratio values of the subjects were calculated. Analysis of the values indicated that the majority of the subjects did not meet recommended intake levels for most micronutrients and consumed an undesirable ratio of macronutrients, specifically a higher percentage of total carbohydrates than the current recommendation level. The GDM and T2DM groups obtained 56.6% and 63.6%, respectively (p = 0.012), of their calories by carbohydrate intake, which exceeded the recommended levels (125.8% in GDM groups, 141.3% in T2DM groups). PMID:23908974

  15. Food Perceptions and Concerns of Aboriginal Women Coping with Gestational Diabetes in Winnipeg, Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Hannah Tait

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe how Aboriginal women in an urban setting perceive dietary treatment recommendations associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Design: Semi-structured explanatory model interviews explored Aboriginal women's illness experiences with GDM. Setting and Participants: Twenty-nine self-declared Aboriginal women who had…

  16. Food Perceptions and Concerns of Aboriginal Women Coping with Gestational Diabetes in Winnipeg, Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Hannah Tait

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe how Aboriginal women in an urban setting perceive dietary treatment recommendations associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Design: Semi-structured explanatory model interviews explored Aboriginal women's illness experiences with GDM. Setting and Participants: Twenty-nine self-declared Aboriginal women who had

  17. Gestational Diabetes and Preeclampsia in Association with Air Pollution at Levels below Current Air Quality Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Kristina; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna; Rylander, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several studies have estimated associations between air pollution and birth outcomes, but few have evaluated potential effects on pregnancy complications. Objective: We investigated whether low-level exposure to air pollution is associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Methods: High-quality registry information on 81,110 singleton pregnancy outcomes in southern Sweden during 1999–2005 was linked to individual-level exposure estimates with high spatial resolution. Modeled exposure to nitrogen oxides (NOx), expressed as mean concentrations per trimester, and proximity to roads of different traffic densities were used as proxy indicators of exposure to combustion-related air pollution. The data were analyzed by logistic regression, with and without adjusting for potential confounders. Results: The prevalence of gestational diabetes increased with each NOx quartile, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.03) for the highest (> 22.7 µg/m3) compared with the lowest quartile (2.5–8.9 µg/m3) of exposure during the second trimester. The adjusted OR for acquiring preeclampsia after exposure during the third trimester was 1.51 (1.32, 1.73) in the highest quartile of NOx compared with the lowest. Both outcomes were associated with high traffic density, but ORs were significant for gestational diabetes only. Conclusion: NOx exposure during pregnancy was associated with gestational diabetes and preeclampsia in an area with air pollution levels below current air quality guidelines. PMID:23563048

  18. Healthy Pre-Pregnancy Diet and Exercise May Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not treated, gestational diabetes can cause problems for mothers and babies, some of them serious. Cuilin Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. , an investigator in the Epidemiology Branch within the NICHD Division of Intramural Population Health Research , studied the diets of a group of women before they became ...

  19. Comparison of the predictive value of plateletcrit with various other blood parameters in gestational diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Sahbaz, Ahmet; Cicekler, Humeyra; Aynioglu, Oner; Isik, Hatice; Ozmen, Ulku

    2016-07-01

    Gestational diabetes is the most encountered metabolic disease in pregnancy and affects both the mother and fetus adversely. Low-grade subchronic inflammation is associated with gestational diabetes development. Platelets (PLT) play role in blood coagulation and inflammatory process. We aimed to compare the various platelet indices in patients with GDM and healthy pregnant controls and to determine whether PLT indices are useful in Gestational diabetes diagnosis. The present study was performed at the Zonguldak Bulent Ecevit University, School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Statistically significant relationships with plateletcrit, mean platelet volume, and platelet distribution width and patients with GDM were found (p < 0.001). Plateletcrit had higher sensitivity and specificity than other platelet indices. Although plateletcrit is a largely unknown or an underestimated parameter in complete blood count, it gives more precise information than platelet count and mean platelet volume. Platelet-related indices and their determination are inexpensive and routinely ordered markers, the significance of which is often ignored. They may be useful in screening for gestational diabetes as an adjunct to oral glucose tolerance test. PMID:26758049

  20. Recommendations for nutrition best practice in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus. Executive summary (1).

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Nutrition therapy is an integral part of the management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Four leading nutrition and diabetes organizations, the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA), Dietitians of Canada (DC), Diabète Québec (DQ), and the Ordre professionnel des diététistes du Québec (OPDQ), formed a partnership to develop evidence-based nutrition practice guidelines for the management of GDM. It was generally agreed that nutrition requirements during pregnancy are similar for women with or without diabetes. However, evidence supporting current nutrition therapy practice specific to these clients remains limited. Nutrition recommendations for the management of GDM provided here are built on the available evidence and the principles, practices and treatment goals of the Canadian Diabetes Association 2003 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada. They identify areas where additional research is needed to support optimal nutrition therapy. PMID:17150144

  1. [Efficiency of a screening program for gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, J L; Kierkegaard, O

    1992-10-01

    From 1.1.1991-31.5.1989, we evaluated a selective screening system for detection of diabetes in pregnancy in an unselected consecutive population of 665 pregnant women. The screening procedure was carried out by the general practitioners and the midwives. The screening was based on clinical criteria for potential diabetes consisting of previous delivery of a large baby, a family history of diabetes and obesity combined with examination for glucosuria and determination of the fasting blood glucose concentration. Only 2% of the pregnant women were examined correctly and only two out of 665 women were found to have diabetes in pregnancy. The screening procedure failed when it was organised by general practitioners and midwives. PMID:1413224

  2. Pre-Conception Dyslipidemia Is Associated with Development of Preeclampsia and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Baumfeld, Yael; Novack, Lena; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Sheiner, Eyal; Henkin, Yakov; Sherf, Michael; Novack, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The association between glucose intolerance, elevated blood pressure and abnormal lipid levels is well established and comprises the basis of metabolic syndrome pathophysiology. We hypothesize that abnormal preconception lipid levels are associated with the increased risk of severe pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods We included all singleton deliveries (n = 27,721) of women without known cardiovascular morbidity and preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus during previous pregnancies. Association between preconception low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc level≤50 mg/dL), high triglycerides (level≥150 mg/dL) and the primary outcome (composite of gestational diabetes mellitus/or preeclampsia) was assessed using Generalized Estimation Equations. Results Primary outcome of preeclampsia and/or gestational diabetes was observed in a total of 3,243 subjects (11.7%). Elevated triglycerides and low HDLc were independently associated with the primary outcome: with odds ratio (OR) of 1.61 (95% CI 1.29–2.01) and OR = 1.33 (95% CI 1.09–1.63), respectively, after adjusting for maternal age, weight, blood pressure, repeated abortions, fertility treatments and fasting glucose. There was an interaction between the effects of HDLc≤50 mg/dL and triglycerides≥150 mg/dL with an OR of 2.69 (95% CI 1.73–4.19). Conclusions Our analysis showed an increased rate of preeclampsia and/or gestational diabetes in women with low HDLc and high triglycerides values prior to conception. In view of the severity of these pregnancy complications, we believe this finding warrants a routine screening for the abnormal lipid profile among women of a child-bearing age. PMID:26452270

  3. Glycemic Characteristics and Neonatal Outcomes of Women Treated for Mild Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Durnwald, Celeste P.; Mele, Lisa; Spong, Catherine Y.; Ramin, Susan M.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Saade, George; Sorokin, Yoram; Tolosa, Jorge E.; Casey, Brian; Anderson, Garland D.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the association between fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose levels and neonatal outcomes in women treated for mild gestational diabetes. METHODS In this secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized treatment trial of mild gestational diabetes, the median fasting and 2-hour postprandial glucose levels were analyzed in 2-week intervals and change over time (slope) was calculated for women with gestational diabetes (abnormal oral glucose tolerance test) and a fasting glucose less than 95 mg/dL who received nutritional management with self blood glucose monitoring and insulin as needed. Regression analyses were performed to estimate the relationship between median fasting and postprandial glucose and neonatal fat mass, cord blood C-peptide, birth weight, large-for-gestational-age neonates, macrosomia (greater than 4,000 g), and neonatal hypoglycemia. RESULTS Among 460 women with gestational diabetes, median fasting (P<.001), postprandial breakfast (P<.001), and postprandial lunch (P<.001) glucose values declined over the treatment period, whereas postprandial dinner values remained stable (P=.83). Higher median fasting glucose during the first 2 weeks of treatment was significantly associated with increased odds ratios for neonatal fat mass (1.35; 95% CI 1.09–1.66; P=.006) and elevated C-peptide (1.29; CI 1.09–1.52; P=.003). Higher median fasting glucose during the last 2 weeks before delivery was associated with higher rates of large-for-gestational-age neonates (1.27; CI 1.05–1.53; P=.01), macrosomia (1.32; CI 1.04–1.65; P = .02), and elevated C-peptide (1.19; CI 1.03–1.38; P=.02). CONCLUSION In women treated for mild gestational diabetes, higher fasting glucose during initiation of diet therapy was associated with increased neonatal fat mass and elevated C-peptide and during the last 2 weeks before delivery with macrosomia, large-for-gestational age, and elevated C-peptide. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE II PMID:21422852

  4. Comparison of maternal morbidity and medical costs during pregnancy and delivery between patients with gestational diabetes and patients with pre-existing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Son, K H; Lim, N-K; Lee, J-W; Cho, M-C; Park, H-Y

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effects of gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes on maternal morbidity and medical costs, using data from the Korea National Health Insurance Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Methods Delivery cases in 2010, 2011 and 2012 (459 842, 442 225 and 380 431 deliveries) were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. The complications and medical costs were compared among the following three pregnancy groups: normal, gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes. Results Although, the rates of pre-existing diabetes did not fluctuate (2.5, 2.4 and 2.7%) throughout the study, the rate of gestational diabetes steadily increased (4.6, 6.2 and 8.0%). Furthermore, the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased in conjunction with maternal age, pre-existing hypertension and cases of multiple pregnancy. The risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, urinary tract infections, premature delivery, liver disease and chronic renal disease were greater in the gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes groups than in the normal group. The risk of venous thromboembolism, antepartum haemorrhage, shoulder dystocia and placenta disorder were greater in the pre-existing diabetes group, but not the gestational diabetes group, compared with the normal group. The medical costs associated with delivery, the costs during pregnancy and the number of in-hospital days for the subjects in the pre-existing diabetes group were the highest among the three groups. Conclusions The study showed that the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased with maternal age at pregnancy and were associated with increases in medical costs and pregnancy-related complications. PMID:25472691

  5. Increased Serum Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor in Women with Gestational Diabetes Is Associated with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong-Huan; Qiu, Chun-Jian; Yu, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Peng-Fei; Wu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is demonstrated to be elevated in diabetes patients. However, no reports have emerged in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This study was undertaken to investigate serum PEDF levels in GDM women and to evaluate PEDF as a biomarker to predict diabetes postpartum. Methods. Serum PEDF concentration and clinical characteristics were detected in the pregnant women with GDM (n = 120) and without GDM (control group, n = 120). Results. PEDF levels were elevated in subjects with GDM versus controls. Univariate correlations showed that serum PEDF levels were positively correlated with fasting glucose and fasting insulin levels, respectively, and negatively correlated with adiponectin. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis demonstrated that the AUC of serum PEDF for diabetes mellitus in women postpartum was 0.893. Conclusion. Serum PEDF was elevated in pregnant women with GDM, which is probably an early detection marker for predicting development of GDM to diabetes mellitus. PMID:25918527

  6. Delivery room triage of large for gestational age infants of diabetic mothers

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Krista; Zheng, Katherine; Landon, Mark B; Nankervis, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review our 4-year experience (2008–2011) with delivery room triage of large for gestational age infants of diabetic mothers. Design/Methods: Retrospective cohort investigation of 311 large for gestational age infants of diabetic mothers (White’s Class A1 (77), A2 (87), B (77), and C-R (70)). Results: Of 311 women, 31% delivered at 34–36 weeks gestational age and 69% at term. While 70% were delivered by cesarean, 30% were vaginal deliveries. A total of 160 asymptomatic infants were triaged from the delivery room to the well baby nursery. Of these, 55 (34%) developed hypoglycemia. In 43 cases, the hypoglycemia was corrected by early feedings; in the remaining 12, intravenous dextrose treatment was required. A total of 151 infants were triaged from the delivery room to the neonatal intensive care unit. Admission diagnoses included respiratory distress (51%), prevention of hypoglycemia (27%), prematurity (21%), and asphyxia (1%). Hypoglycemia affected 66 (44%) of all neonatal intensive care unit infants. Conclusion: Safe triage of asymptomatic large for gestational age infants of diabetic mothers from the delivery room to well baby nursery can be accomplished in the majority of cases. Those infants in need of specialized care can be accurately identified and effectively treated in the neonatal intensive care unit setting. PMID:26770716

  7. Womens experiences of factors that facilitate or inhibit gestational diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes rates have increased dramatically in the past two decades and this pattern of increase appears to relate primarily to the obesity epidemic, older maternal age and migration from world areas of high GDM risk. Women from disadvantaged and migrant backgrounds are most at risk of developing and of mismanaging this condition. The aim of the study was to explore the factors that facilitated or inhibited gestational diabetes self-management among women in a socially deprived area. Methods Fifteen pregnant women, with a diagnosis of gestational diabetes, were purposively recruited for this study. Qualitative semi structured interviews and 1 focus group were conducted when participants were approximately 2838 weeks gestation. The studys theoretical framework was based on interpretative phenomenology and data was analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Women in this study identified a number of factors that complicated their task of GDM self-management. Barriers included: (1) time pressures; (2) physical constraints; (3) social constraints; (4) limited comprehension of requirements, and (5) insulin as an easier option. Factors facilitating GDM self-management included: thinking about the baby and psychological support from partners and families. Conclusion Women from low socio economic and migrant backgrounds often struggle to comprehend GDM self-management requirements. To improve adherence to management plans, these women require educational and supportive services that are culturally appropriate and aimed at a low level of literacy. PMID:22988897

  8. Strategies to Optimize Participation in Diabetes Prevention Programs following Gestational Diabetes: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Da Costa, Deborah; Pillay, Sabrina; De Civita, Mirella; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Leong, Aaron; Bacon, Simon; Stotland, Stephen; Chetty, V. Tony; Garfield, Natasha; Majdan, Agnieszka; Meltzer, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Objective We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM) diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2) prevention program. Research Design and Methods Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. Results Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. Conclusions Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners. PMID:23861824

  9. ENDOCRINOLOGY OF PREGNANCY: Gestational diabetes mellitus: definition, aetiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Baz, Baz; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Gautier, Jean-François

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is defined as a glucose intolerance resulting in hyperglycaemia of variable severity with onset during pregnancy. This review aims to revisit the pathogenesis and aetiology of GDM in order to better understand its clinical presentation and outcomes. During normal pregnancy, insulin sensitivity declines with advancing gestation. These modifications are due to placental factors, progesterone and estrogen. In a physiological situation, a compensatory increase in insulin secretion maintains a normal glucose homeostasis. GDM occurs if pancreatic β-cells are unable to face the increased insulin demand during pregnancy. GDM is most commonly a forerunner of type 2 diabetes (T2D) - the most prevalent form of diabetes. These women share similar characteristics with predisposed subjects to T2D: insulin resistance before and after pregnancy, and carry more T2D risk alleles. Auto-immune and monogenic diabetes are more rare aetiologies of GDM. Adverse pregnancy outcomes of GDM are mainly related to macrosomia caused by fetal hyperinsulinism in response to high glucose levels coming from maternal hyperglycaemia. Screening recommendations and diagnosis criteria of GDM have been recently updated. High risk patients should be screened as early as possible using fasting plasma glucose, and if normal, at 24-28 weeks of gestation using 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. The treatment of GDM is based on education with trained nurses and dieticians, and if necessary insulin therapy. PMID:26431552

  10. Alpha-tocopherol concentration in serum and colostrum of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Fernanda Barros S.; Clemente, Heleni Aires; Bezerra, Dalila Fernandes; Grilo, Evellyn Câmara; de Melo, Larisse Rayanne M.; Bellot, Paula Emília N. R.; Dantas, Raquel Costa S.; Dimenstein, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and compare the levels of α-tocopherol in colostrum and in the serum of healthy and diabetic mothers. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 51 volunteer mothers, 20 with the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus and 31 without associated diseases. Serum and colostrum samples were collected in fasting in the immediate postpartum period and α-tocopherol was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In order to define the nutritional status of vitamin E, the cutoff point for the serum (697.7µg/dL) was adopted. Student's t-test for independent variables compared the average concentrations of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum between control and gestational diabetes mellitus groups. Pearson's correlation was used to assess the relationship between the concentration of α-tocopherol in serum and colostrum for both groups. Differences were considered significant when p<0.05. RESULTS: The α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum was 1,483.1±533.8µg/dL for Control Group and 1,368.8±681.8µg/dL for diabetic women, without differences between groups (p=0.50). However, α-tocopherol concentration in the serum was 1,059.5±372.7µg/dL in the Control Group and 1,391.4±531.5µg/dL in the diabetic one (p<0.01). No correlation was found between the concentration of α-tocopherol in the serum and in the colostrum for control and diabetic groups. CONCLUSIONS: The groups had adequate nutritional status of vitamin E. Gestational diabetes was not associated with changes in α-tocopherol concentration in colostrum. PMID:25119748

  11. Application of seamless care service with multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment in patients with gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Shen-Qiu; Liang, Xiao; Hong, Pu; Wu, Dan; Ke, Wei-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article was to explore the effect of trinity seamless care service (TSCS) in patients with gestational diabetes with multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment (MDT), and thus, to provide basis for improvement in the quality of patient care. Materials and methods: A total of 200 patients were recruited and randomly divided into observation group and control group with 100 cases in each group, who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes through oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 24 to 28 weeks of gestation from September 2012 to September 2014. In order to control blood glucose and weight, patients in the control group received routine treatment and nursing after diagnosis, while those in the observation group received TSCS with MDT. Rate of insulin usage, weight changes and glycemic indexes before and after nursing were compared within the two groups during pregnancy. Results: Compared with the pregnant patients in the control group, the rate of those in the observation group who needed extra insulin to control blood glucose, or the change of body mass index during pregnancy (?BMI) ?6 kg/m2 and less average weight gain prior to delivery was significantly lower (P<0.05). Glycemic indexes in the observation group after nursing were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Incidences of cesarean delivery, polyhydramnios, gestational hypertension and postpartum hemorrhage in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Incidences of macrosomia, hyperbilirubinemia, fetal distress, stillbirth and teratogeny in the observation group were also significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Application of TSCS with MDT in patients with gestational diabetes helps to keep appropriate weight gain, control blood glucose by improving glycemic indexes, significantly reduce the incidences of maternal perinatal and neonatal complications and improve pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26629204

  12. Risk Stratification in Women with Gestational Diabetes According to and Beyond Current WHO Criteria.

    PubMed

    Much, D; Jaschinski, H; Lack, N; Hummel, S; Fchtenbusch, M; Hummel, M; Ziegler, A-G; Beyerlein, A

    2016-01-01

    The pregnancy outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 'overt diabetes in pregnancy' were compared and the need for further subclassification was investigated with respect to postpartum outcome risk. Data from 944 women who had been uniformly diagnosed as having GDM in Munich, Germany, between 1998 and 2010, were re-classified into GDM and 'overt diabetes in pregnancy'. Pregnancy related outcomes in the offspring were derived from Bavarian birth registry data. Classification and regression trees were used to identify further GDM sub-phenotypes. In total, 88 women (9.3%) were re-classified as having 'overt diabetes in pregnancy'. Compared to women with GDM, women with 'overt diabetes in pregnancy' used insulin more frequently, and were at increased risk for large for gestational age infants [odds ratio 2.50 (95% confidence interval 1.02, 6.13)], preterm delivery [odds ratio 3.28 (1.02, 10.50)], and low APGAR-score at 5?min [odds ratio 12.70 (1.58, 102.2)]. In the 856 women with GDM, classification and regression tree analyses provided further risk stratification in that a combination of fasting glucose>5.3?mmol/l and 1-h glucose>11.1?mmol/l at GDM diagnosis predicted insulin requirement [OR 5.57 (3.75, 8.27) compared to the rest], and maternal body mass index (BMI)?35?kg/m(2) predicted large for gestational age status. The new differentiation between GDM and 'overt diabetes in pregnancy' is a first step towards refining classification relevant to fetal and maternal postpartum risk. A combination of glucose levels and maternal BMI at diagnosis of GDM may provide further improvement. PMID:26566100

  13. Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Screening Strategies in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin Yu; Finkelstein, Eric A; Ng, Mor Jack; Yap, Fabian; Yeo, George S H; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang Mei; Kwek, Kenneth Y C; Tan, Kok Hian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer's perspective in Singapore of 3 gestational diabetes mellitus screening strategies: universal, targeted, or no screening. A decision tree model assessed the primary outcome: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Probabilities, costs, and utilities were derived from the literature, the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort study, and the KK Women's and Children's Hospital's database. Relative to targeted screening using risk factors, universal screening generates an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $USD10 630/QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses show that disease prevalence rates and intervention effectiveness of glycemic management have the biggest impacts on the ICERs. Based on the model and best available data, universal screening is a cost-effective approach for reducing the complications of gestational diabetes mellitus in Singapore as compared with the targeted screening approach or no screening. PMID:26512030

  14. Gestational diabetes as one of the "great obstetrical syndromes"--the maternal, placental, and fetal dialog.

    PubMed

    Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Baschat, Ahmet A

    2015-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-associated fetal and neonatal adverse outcome results from the metabolic milieu projected on the fetus via the placental interface. Therefore, it can be considered to be one of the great obstetrical syndromes. Placentas from GDM pregnancies differ from nondiabetic pregnancies by an increased placental to fetal ratio and by histological findings such as villous fibrinoid necrosis, villous immaturity, chorangiosis, and ischemic changes. While early onset diabetes is more associated with marked structural changes of the placenta, GDM that rises at late gestation is associated more with placental functional changes. These placental changes, causing increased intervillous diffusion distance of immature villi and placental size to perfusion mismatch, may predispose the fetus to chronic and acute changes in gas and nutrient exchange thus turning the placenta from being a "fetus protector" to a potential source of adverse outcome. Understanding placental changes and how they affect outcome is necessary in order to develop effective screening, prevention, and management approaches. PMID:25225057

  15. Chronic renal failure, diabetes mellitus type-II, and gestation: an overwhelming combination.

    PubMed

    Kontomanolis, E N; Panagoutsos, S; Pasadakis, P; Koukouli, Z; Liberis, A

    2016-01-01

    This case report highlights on a child-bearer with chronic renal failure and diabetes mellitus type-II. Chronic renal failure (CRF) with diabetes mellitus (DM) type I in gestation is a rare case of a high-risk pregnancy. What is of significance though in this gestation, is that conception was achieved with the patient treated by a dialysis program. Furthermore, neither hypertension nor intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were detected and the patient was normotensive throughout gestation with no clinical signs of anemia. Strict and frequent application of the dialysis programs eradicates the uremic intrauterine environment, reduces the amniotic fluid volume, eliminates the chances of uterine rupture, leads to a longer gestation, increases the newborn's birth weight, and offers an optimal fetal survival rate; this is of note mainly in patients with cesarean sections reported in their medical history. To eliminate the complications of a premature delivery, the present authors had to find the right time point to give birth to this baby taking into account lung maturity, amniotic fluid volume, and preservation of the anatomical uterine integrity. PMID:27132429

  16. Delivery Timing and Cesarean Delivery Risk in Women with Mild Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    SUTTON, Amelia L.; MELE, Lisa; LANDON, Mark B.; RAMIN, Susan M.; VARNER, Michael W.; THORP, John M.; SCISCIONE, Anthony; CATALANO, Patrick; HARPER, Margaret; SAADE, George; CARITIS, Steve N.; SOROKIN, Yoram; GROBMAN, William A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the relationship between gestational age (GA) and induction of labor (IOL) and the rate of cesarean delivery (CD) in women with mild gestational diabetes (GDM). STUDY DESIGN Secondary analysis of data from a multi-center RCT of mild GDM treatment. CD rate of women delivering at term (≥ 37 weeks) was evaluated using two complementary approaches: 1) IOL vs. spontaneous labor: women induced at each GA compared with those who spontaneously labored at the same GA, and 2) IOL vs. expectant management: women delivered after IOL at each GA compared with those delivering after spontaneous labor at the same GA or subsequently after spontaneous or induced labor (outcome at each week compared with expectant management at that week). Logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS The overall CD rate was 13%. When compared to 39 weeks (either IOL or spontaneous labor) as the referent, there was no significant difference in the CD rate in women delivered at 37, 38, or 40 weeks. However, IOL was associated with a 3-fold increase in CD rate at 41 weeks and beyond as compared with IOL at 39 weeks. Similarly, there was a 3-fold increase in CD rate in women who were induced when compared to those managed expectantly at 40 completed weeks. CONCLUSIONS Induction of labor in women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) does not increase the rate of cesarean delivery prior to 40 weeks gestation. PMID:24607755

  17. Effect of Pioglitazone on Pancreatic β-Cell Function and Diabetes Risk in Hispanic Women With Prior Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Anny H.; Peters, Ruth K.; Kjos, Siri L.; Marroquin, Aura; Goico, Jose; Ochoa, Cesar; Kawakubo, Miwa; Buchanan, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    The Pioglitazone In Prevention Of Diabetes (PIPOD) study was conducted to evaluate β-cell function, insulin resistance, and the incidence of diabetes during treatment with pioglitazone in Hispanic women with prior gestational diabetes who had completed participation in the Troglitazone In Prevention Of Diabetes (TRIPOD) study. Women who completed the TRIPOD study were offered participation in the PIPOD study for a planned 3 years of drug treatment and 6 months of postdrug washout. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed annually on pioglitazone and at the end of the postdrug washout. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs) for assessment of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function were conducted at baseline, after 1 year on pioglitazone, and at the end of the postdrug washout. Of 95 women who were not diabetic at the end of the TRIPOD study, 89 enrolled in the PIPOD study, 86 completed at least one follow-up visit, and 65 completed all study visits, including the postdrug tests. Comparison of changes in β-cell compensation for insulin resistance across the TRIPOD and PIPOD studies revealed that pioglitazone stopped the decline in β-cell function that occurred during placebo treatment in the TRIPOD study and maintained the stability of β-cell function that had occurred during troglitazone treatment in the TRIPOD study. The risk of diabetes, which occurred at an average rate of 4.6% per year, was lowest in women with the largest reduction in total IVGTT insulin area after 1 year of treatment. The similarity of findings between the PIPOD and TRIPOD studies support a class effect of thiazolidinedione drugs to enhance insulin sensitivity, reduce insulin secretory demands, and preserve pancreatic β-cell function, all in association with a relatively low rate of type 2 diabetes, in Hispanic women with prior gestational diabetes. PMID:16443789

  18. Impact of Systemic Inflammation on the Progression of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lekva, Tove; Norwitz, Errol R; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor

    2016-04-01

    With increasing rates of obesity and new diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the overall prevalence of GDM is increasing worldwide. Women with GDM have an increased risk of maternal and fetal complications during pregnancy as well as long-term risks including higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In recent years, the role of immune activation and inflammation in the pathogenesis of GDM has gained increasing attention. This monograph explores the current state of the literature as regards the expression of markers of inflammation in the maternal circulation, placenta, and adipose tissue of women with GDM. PMID:26879309

  19. Atlantic DIP: the prevalence and consequences of gestational diabetes in Ireland.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, E P; Avalos, G; O'Reilly, M; Dennedy, M C; Gaffney, G; Dunne, F P

    2012-05-01

    ATLANTIC DIP carried out a universal screening programme for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) along the Irish Atlantic seaboard. Using a 75g OGTT and new International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) cut off points for diagnosis we found the prevalence of GDM to be 12.4%. Pregnancies complicated by GDM displayed increased morbidities for mother and infant when compared to women who had normal glucose tolerance. With rising obesity levels and older age of mothers, both risk factors for GDM, these results would support a national universal screening programme. PMID:22838101

  20. Quantitative macroscopic study on preterm placenta in gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Akhter, F; Ferdausi, R

    2011-04-01

    Preterm birth is the major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. During the last decade, it has become an important issue in public health policies of developing countries. Gestational diabetes mellitus and Pregnancy induced hypertension are two important high-risk factors for preterm birth. The proposed study aimed to make a macroscopic analysis on the functional tissues (Parenchymal tissues) in preterm placenta in respect of Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH). The study was observational and cross sectional. The patients under this study were selected from the Obstetric ward of BSMMU and BIRDEM hospital, from June 2005 to October 2005. Sixty-six samples were collected from women during 28 weeks to 36 weeks of gestation. Among them, twenty-two samples were from gestational diabetic mothers, twenty-two were from pregnancy induced hypertensive mothers and twenty-two were from mothers who were non-diabetic and non-hypertensive in current pregnancy. Placentas were fixed and preserved in 10% formal saline solution. The volume proportions of parenchymal and non-parenchymal components were measured by using a point counting technique on formalin fixed placentas. In this study, the GDM group had significantly more absolute volume and mean proportional volume of the parenchyma but less mean proportional volume of the non-parenchyma when compared with Control and PIH group. However, the PIH group had significantly less absolute volume of the parenchyma than the control group and the mean value of the absolute volume of non parenchyma was also less than control value but did not reach a significant level. The results obtained from diseased and control groups demonstrated a significant change in some events, and some trends were also observed among these groups. However, it could be suggest that, in these two pregnancy-induced disorders, there is placental insufficiency where the placenta tries to exert its reserve capacity by changing its functional structures and consequently overcomes the possible damage to the fetus. PMID:21522101

  1. Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein change in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Jin; Wang, Du-Juan; Deng, Ren-Tang; Huang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Mei-Lian; Jang, You-Ming; Wen, Shu; Yang, Hong-Ling; Huang, Xian-zhang

    2015-09-01

    We compared urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) among non-pregnant and pregnant women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Higher urinary L-FABP was found in pregnant with and without GDM, and considerably higher urinary L-FABP was found in the GDM group compared with the non-GDM group. Hyperglycemia and anemia were related with high urinary L-FABP expression. PMID:26254248

  2. Gestational Diabetes Alters Offspring DNA Methylation Profiles in Human and Rat: Identification of Key Pathways Involved in Endocrine System Disorders, Insulin Signaling, Diabetes Signaling, and ILK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Guillemin, Claire; Ergaz, Zivanit; Dimov, Sergiy; Suderman, Matthew; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with risk for metabolic disease later in life. Using a cross-species approach in rat and humans, we examined the hypothesis that gestational diabetes during pregnancy triggers changes in the methylome of the offspring that might be mediating these risks. We show in a gestation diabetes rat model, the Cohen diabetic rat, that gestational diabetes triggers wide alterations in DNA methylation in the placenta in both candidate diabetes genes and genome-wide promoters, thus providing evidence for a causal relationship between diabetes during pregnancy and DNA methylation alterations. There is a significant overlap between differentially methylated genes in the placenta and the liver of the rat offspring. Several genes differentially methylated in rat placenta exposed to maternal diabetes are also differentially methylated in the human placenta of offspring exposed to gestational diabetes in utero. DNA methylation changes inversely correlate with changes in expression. The changes in DNA methylation affect known functional gene pathways involved in endocrine function, metabolism, and insulin responses. These data provide support to the hypothesis that early-life exposures and their effects on metabolic disease are mediated by DNA methylation changes. This has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:25514087

  3. Relationship Between Myo-Inositol Supplementary and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangqin; Liu, Zhaozhen; Zhang, Yulong; Lin, Yuan; Song, Jianrong; Zheng, Lianghui; Lin, Sheng

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether myo-inositol supplement will increase the action of endogenous insulin, which is mainly measured by markers of insulin resistance such as homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and web of science were comprehensively searched using "gestational diabetes mellitus" and "myo-inositol" to identify relevant studies. Both subject headings and free texts were adopted. The methodological quality of the included studies were assessed and pooled analyzed by the methods recommended by the Cochrane collaboration.A total of 5 trials containing 513 participants were included. There was a significant reduction in aspects of gestational diabetes incidence (risk ratio [RR], 0.29; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.19-0.44), birth weight (mean difference [MD], -116.98; 95% CI, -208.87 to -25.09), fasting glucose oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (MD, -0.36; 95% CI, -0.51 to -0.21), 1-h glucose OGTT (MD, -0.63; 95% CI, -1.01 to -0.26), 2-h glucose OGTT (MD, -0.45; 95% CI, -0.75 to -0.16), and related complications (odds ratio [OR], 0.28; 95% CI 0.14-0.58).On the basis of current evidence, myo-inositol supplementation reduces the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), although this conclusion requires further evaluation in large-scale, multicenter, blinded randomized controlled trials. PMID:26496267

  4. Evaluation of DIABNET, a decision support system for therapy planning in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, M E; Gómez, E J; Corcoy, R; del Pozo, F

    2000-07-01

    DIABNET is a knowledge-based system designed to aid doctors with therapy planning in gestational diabetes. The system core is a qualitative model, implemented by a Causal Probabilistic Network, that is able to detect the insulin effectiveness on a daily basis. DIABNET analyses monitoring data and proposes quantitative changes in insulin therapy and qualitative diet modifications. This paper proposes an evaluation methodology to assess the system performance when working in a real scenario. The methodology manages the absence of a gold standard and includes: a subjective analysis based on questionnaires and an objective analysis based on a quantitative comparison of the system's and experts' proposals. The paper also shows the results of two experiments in which expert diabetologists evaluated the therapeutical advice provided by DIABNET during the follow up of 9 patients with gestational diabetes. DIABNET detected the need of a therapy modification in 92% of the cases showing its appropriateness for automatic alarm generation. Around 80% of the proposals were accepted by experts. The evaluation results are encouraging and allow characterisation of the system's performance when proposing therapy modifications. Evaluation in its turn helps to refine the knowledge managed by DIABNET and enables us to look towards the further clinical use of DIABNET as a decision tool in gestational diabetes integrated in a telemedicine service. PMID:10837909

  5. Associations between ozone and preterm birth in women who develop gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ting; Jung, Chau-Ren; Lee, Yungling Leo; Hwang, Bing-Fang

    2015-02-15

    Prenatal exposure to ambient air pollutants might cause adverse birth outcomes; however, there have been few studies in which the association between air pollution and preterm birth was examined after stratifying by pregnancy complications. We conducted a population-based case-control study of 1,510,064 singleton births from the Taiwanese birth registry during 2001-2007. Of the total of 1,510,064 births, we designated all 86,224 preterm births as the case group and then randomly selected an additional 344,896 from the remaining births (equivalent to 4 full-term births for every 1 preterm birth) as the control sample. We used an inverse distance weighting approach to calculate an average exposure parameter for air pollutants. The adjusted odds ratio for preterm birth per 10-ppb increase in ozone was 1.12 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.23) for women with gestational diabetes mellitus who were exposed in the third trimester and 1.02 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.03) for women without gestational diabetes (P for interaction <0.001). These findings suggest that exposure to ozone in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, particularly for women who have gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:25652551

  6. Association Between Contraceptive Use and Gestational Diabetes: Missouri Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Brittney A.; Kintzel, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy and safety of contraceptives have been questioned for decades; however, whether a relationship exists between hormonal contraceptives and gestational diabetes (GDM) is undetermined. The aim of this study was to investigate whether maternal risk for GDM was influenced by type of contraceptive method used before pregnancy. Methods Data collected in 2007 and 2008 by the Missouri Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) were analyzed to determine if type of contraception before pregnancy influenced maternal risk for GDM. We used a logistic regression model to determine the adjusted odds for GDM given exposure to hormonal forms of contraception. Results Of the 2,741 women who completed the 2007–2008 PRAMS survey, 8.3% were diagnosed with gestational diabetes, and 17.9% of the respondents had used hormonal contraceptive methods. Women who used hormonal methods of birth control had higher odds for gestational diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32–1.55) than did women who used no contraception. A protective effect was also observed for women who had used barrier methods of contraception (AOR = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.72–0.86). Conclusion Findings suggest there may be a relationship between type of contraceptive method and GDM. More research is needed to verify contraception as a potential risk factor for GDM. PMID:25032836

  7. Pregnancy outcome among women universally screened for gestational diabetes mellitus with a lime-flavoured drink.

    PubMed

    Bassaw, B; Mohammed, N; Ramsewak, S; Bassawh, L; Khan, A; Bhola, M; Chekuri, A

    2012-07-01

    We performed a prospective study involving 400 consecutive pregnant patients to determine whether the administration of a lime-flavoured glucose drink followed by a blood test 1 h later was a better method of screening for gestational diabetes (GDM) than the use of selective screening based on risk factors (maternal age over 30 years, East Indian ancestry and obesity). Complete data were available for 388 women, 76 were screen positive (1 h blood glucose ? 140 mg/dl) and GDM was diagnosed in 42 (using a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test) giving a positive predictive value of 55%. Selective screening applied to the same population would have identified only 34 cases, eight fewer with GDM. In this population, the use of the lime-flavoured glucose drink detected approximately 25% more cases of GDM than selective screening based on risk factors. Caesarean sections were performed in 18 (42.8%) of women with gestational diabetes. None of the four perinatal deaths was observed among the women with gestational diabetes. PMID:22663310

  8. Comparison of Lifestyles of Women With Gestational Diabetes and Healthy Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Fatereh Momeni; Simbar, Masoumeh; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Majd, Hamid Alavi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes is the most common medical condition in pregnancy and can be a predisposing factor in incidence of type II diabetes in future. Incorrect lifestyles can predispose people to various diseases, including diabetes, which is a serious health risk. Therefore, this study was conducted to compare lifestyles of women with gestational diabetes and healthy pregnant women attending the health centers affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (SBMU) in 2013. Methods: A comparative-descriptive study was conducted on 100 pregnant women with definite diagnosis of gestational diabetes and 100 healthy pregnant women attending the health centers affiliated to SBMU. Data were collected by a researcher-made questionnaire about lifestyle during pregnancy. Informed consents were obtained, and sampling was performed using convenient multi-stage random sampling method. Data were analyzed using SPSS-18 software. Results: Demographic and obstetrics variables were not significantly different in the two groups. However, two groups were significantly different regarding their lifestyles as the mean scores of pregnancy diet were 65.05 in the diabetic group and 74.12 in the healthy group (P<0.001), and the mean moderate physical activity scores in the two groups were 4.62 and 5.69, respectively (P=0.042), the mean pregnancy self-care scores were 71.9 and 81.87, respectively (P<0.001), the mean perceived social support in the two groups were 65.75 and 73.88, respectively (P<0.001), and the mean scores of perceived stress were 51.57 and 60.27, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion: Women’s lifestyles were different in some areas. This study further reveals the importance of women’s diet, self-care, moderate physical activity, and perceived social support during pregnancy. Incidence of gestational diabetes can be prevented through increased awareness and education of pregnant women about having appropriate lifestyles during pregnancy and any intervention that would lead to improved lifestyle. PMID:25716401

  9. Inpatient management of women with gestational and pregestational diabetes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Etoi A; Jagasia, Shubhada

    2014-02-01

    For women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and gestational diabetes (GDM), poor maternal glycemic control can significantly increase maternal and fetal risk for adverse outcomes. Outpatient medical and nutrition therapy is recommended for all women with diabetes in order to facilitate euglycemia during the antepartum period. Despite intensive outpatient therapy, women with diabetes often require inpatient diabetes management prior to delivery as maternal hyperglycemia can significantly increase neonatal risk of hypoglycemia. Consensus guidelines recommend maternal glucose range of 80-110 mg/dL in labor. The most optimal inpatient strategies for the prevention of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia proximate to delivery remain unclear and will depend upon factors such as maternal diabetes diagnosis, her baseline insulin resistance, duration and route of delivery etc. Low dose intravenous insulin and dextrose protocols are necessary to achieve optimal predelivery glycemic control for women with T1DM and T2DM. For most with GDM however, euglycemia can be maintained without intravenous insulin. Women treated with a subcutaneous insulin pump during the antepartum period represent a unique challenge to labor and delivery staff. Strategies for self-managed subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) use prior to delivery require intensive education and coordination of care with the labor team in order to maintain patient safety. Hospitalization is recommended for most women with diabetes prior to delivery and in the postpartum period despite appropriate outpatient glycemic control. Women with poorly controlled diabetes in any trimester have an increased baseline maternal and fetal risk for adverse outcomes. Common indications for antepartum hospitalization of these women include failed outpatient therapy and/or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Inpatient management of DKA is a significant cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and remains a common indication for hospitalization of the pregnant woman with diabetes. Changes in maternal physiology increase insulin resistance and the risk for DKA. A systematic approach to its management will be reviewed. PMID:24414141

  10. Simulated Estimates of Pre-Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the US: 1980 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Mayorga, Maria E.; Reifsnider, Odette S.; Neyens, David M.; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta G.; Hunt, Kelly J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To simulate national estimates of prepregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in non-Hispanic white (NHW) and non-Hispanic black (NHB) women. Methods Prepregnancy diabetes and GDM were estimated as a function of age, race/ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI) using South Carolina live singleton births from 2004–2008. Diabetes risk was applied to a simulated population. Age, natality and BMI were assigned to women according to race- and age-specific US Census, Natality and National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) data, respectively. Results From 1980–2008, estimated GDM prevalence increased from 4.11% to 6.80% [2.68% (95% CI 2.58%–2.78%)] and from 3.96% to 6.43% [2.47% (95% CI 2.39%–2.55%)] in NHW and NHB women, respectively. In NHW women prepregnancy diabetes prevalence increased 0.90% (95% CI 0.85%–0.95%) from 0.95% in 1980 to 1.85% in 2008. In NHB women from 1980 through 2008 estimated prepregnancy diabetes prevalence increased 1.51% (95% CI 1.44%–1.57%), from 1.66% to 3.16%. Conclusions Racial disparities in diabetes prevalence during pregnancy appear to stem from a higher prevalence of prepregnancy diabetes, but not GDM, in NHB than NHW. PMID:24039941

  11. Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with increased leukocyte peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? expression

    PubMed Central

    Mac-Marcjanek, Katarzyna; Nadel, Iwona; Wo?niak, Lucyna; Cypryk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) is a ligand-activated transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism as well as inflammation; thereby it participates in metabolic diseases including diabetes. Although PPAR? expression has been observed in different tissues of diabetic patients, its level in leukocytes from subjects affected by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has not yet been reported. This study aimed to investigate leukocyte PPARG expression in GDM patients at 2433 weeks of gestation and, in turn, to correlate these alterations with anthropometric and metabolic parameters of patients. Material and methods Leukocytes were isolated from the blood of normal glucose tolerant (NGT; n = 34) and GDM (n = 77) pregnant women between 24 and 33 weeks of gestation. Leukocyte PPARG mRNA expression was determined by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Univariate correlation analysis was performed to investigate associations between PPARG expression and clinical characteristics of patients. Results Leukocyte PPARG mRNA level was significantly higher in GDM than NGT women (p < 0.05). In the whole study group, PPARG expression positively correlated with plasma glucose concentrations at 1 h (r = 0.222, p = 0.049) and 2 h (r = 0.315, p = 0.020) of 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and negatively correlated with plasma HDL cholesterol concentration (r = -0.351, p = 0.010). Conclusions The correlation between leukocyte PPARG overexpression and hyperglycaemia suggests that PPARG mRNA expression in these cells might be up-regulated in high-glucose conditions in GDM patients at 2433 weeks of gestation. PMID:26322090

  12. New estimates of the costs of universal screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, P; O'Neill, C; Avalos, G; Dunne, F P

    2012-05-01

    The new International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) diagnostic criteria have been predicted to increase the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus 2-to-3 fold and will have important resource implications for healthcare systems. A bottom-up, prevalence-based analysis was undertaken to estimate the costs of universal screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in Ireland using the new criteria. Healthcare activity was identified from the Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy database and grouped into five categories: (i) screening and testing, (ii) GDM treatment, (iii) prenatal care, (iv) delivery care, and (v) neonatal care. When individual resource components were valued using unit cost data and aggregated, the total healthcare cost was estimated at Euro 46,311,301 (95% CI: Euro 36,381,038, Euro 68,007,432). The average cost per case detected was Euro 351 (95% CI: (Euro 126, Euro 558) and the average total cost per case detected and treated was Euro 9,325 (95% CI: Euro 5,982, Euro 13,996). Further research is required to determine the cost effectiveness of screening in the region with a view to improving resource allocation in this area in the future. PMID:22838102

  13. Is there a socioeconomic gradient in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed

    Cullinan, J; Gillespie, P; Owens, L; Avalos, G; Dunne, F P

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have shown an association between Type 2 diabetes and lower socioeconomic status. This link is less clear in those with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We test for a socioeconomic gradient in the prevalence of GDM by analysing data on 9,842 pregnant women who were offered testing for GDM in the Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy universal screening programme. A bivariate probit model relating GDM prevalence to socioeconomic status was estimated, controlling for variation in screening uptake rates across socioeconomic groups. The estimated increased prevalence of GDM is 8.6% [95% CI 2.7%-12.0%] for women in the lowest socioeconomic group when compared to the highest, suggesting a strong socioeconomic gradient in the prevalence of GDM. This gradient is found to be driven by differences in personal, clinical and lifestyle factors across socioeconomic groups. PMID:22838104

  14. Impact of Breastfeeding on Maternal Metabolism: Implications for Women with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lactating compared with nonlactating women display more favorable metabolic parameters, including less atherogenic blood lipids, lower fasting and postprandial blood glucose as well as insulin, and greater insulin sensitivity in the first 4 months postpartum. However, direct evidence demonstrating that these metabolic changes persist from delivery to postweaning is much less available. Studies have reported that longer lactation duration may reduce long-term risk of cardiometabolic disease, including type 2 diabetes, but findings from most studies are limited by self-report of disease outcomes, absence of longitudinal biochemical data, or no assessment of maternal lifestyle behaviors. Studies of women with a history gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) also reported associations between lactation duration and lower the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The mechanisms are not understood, but hormonal regulation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation and function or other metabolic pathways may mediate the lactation association with cardiometabolic disease in women. PMID:24402327

  15. Effect of Acupressure on Maternal Anxiety in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bastani, Farideh

    2016-06-01

    Women with diabetes often experience a higher level of anxiety. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure on relieving anxiety of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 women with GDM at a university hospital. The participants were allocated to an experimental and a placebo group (30 women per group). The experimental group received a nurse-provided acupressure at the true point, and the placebo group received pressure (touching) at a sham (false) point. Anxiety was measured immediately in the groups prior to and after a 2-day intervention by a questionnaire and the Visual Analogue Scale. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results indicated that the acupressure group had significantly lower anxiety than the placebo group (p ≤ .0001). In conclusion, the effects of acupressure appeared to be effective in reducing anxiety in diabetic pregnant women. PMID:25848127

  16. [Short-term and long-term risks for children born from patients with gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Boyadzhieva, M

    2012-01-01

    The risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in women who had previously been diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GDM) is well established. A growing body of literature suggests that chronic disease has much of its origins in the fetal response to the intrauterine environment, a concept known as "fetal programming". Longitudinal studies have demonstrated that higher rates of obesity impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia are evident in the offspring of diabetic women. Furthermore, distinct differences in regional populations, lack of routine screening and treatment of GDM worldwide, and long follow-up periods for offspring represent a challenge in assessing the risk for development of these abnormalities in the offspring of women who have had GDM. PMID:23610909

  17. Shear wave elastography of the placenta in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Mehmet Aytac; Kilic, Fahrettin; Kayadibi, Yasemin; Alici Davutoglu, Ebru; Imamoglu, Metehan; Bakan, Selim; Mihmanli, Ismail; Kantarci, Fatih; Madazli, Riza

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate placental elasticty in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and non-diabetic controls. Thirty-three pregnant women with GDM according to the current criteria of the American Diabetes Association and 43 healthy pregnant women who were admitted to the antenatal clinic were recruited for this case-control study. Elasticity values of both the peripheral and the central parts of the placentas of the patients in both groups were determined by shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging. Mean elasticity values of both the central and the peripheral part of the placentas were significantly higher in GDM pregnancies (p < 0.001). No difference was observed in the mean elasticity values of the central and the peripheral part of the placentas in two groups (p > 0.05). SWE imaging technology might provide a quantitative assessment of the morphological pathologies of placentas in pregnant women with GDM. PMID:27012734

  18. The role of blood groups in the development of diabetes mellitus after gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karagoz, Hatice; Erden, Abdulsamet; Ozer, Ozerhan; Esmeray, Kubra; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Karahan, Samet; Basak, Mustafa; Bulut, Kadir; Mutlu, Hasan; Simsek, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common condition that is defined as glucose intolerance of varying degree with onset or first recognition during pregnancy and it affects approximately 5% of all pregnancies all over the world. GDM is not only associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as macrosomia, dystocia, birth trauma, and metabolic complications in newborns, but it is also a strong predictor of transitioning to overt DM postpartum. The association of ABO blood groups with DM has been observed before in several epidemiological and genetic studies and resulted with inconsistent findings, but still there are not enough studies in the literature about the association of ABO blood groups with GDM. In this study, we aimed at investigating any possible relationship between the ABO blood group system and GDM and also the transitioning of GDM to overt DM postpartum, in Turkey. Patients and methods A total of 233 patients with GDM from Kayseri Training and Research Hospital between 2002 and 2012 were included in the study. The cases that have serologically determined blood groups and Rh factor in the hospital records were included in the study, and the patients with unknown blood groups were excluded. Patients were classified according to blood groups (A, B, AB, and O) and Rh status (+/−). GDM was diagnosed based on the glucose cut-points of the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Society Groups. The distributions of blood groups of the patients with GDM were compared with the distribution of blood groups of 17,314 healthy donors who were admitted to the Turkish Red Crescent Blood Service in our city in 2012. Results There was a significant difference between the patients with GDM and control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups. Blood group AB was found to be higher in the patients with GDM compared to the control group (P=0.029). When the patients were compared according to the development of DM, the ratio of group O was higher than others, while the ratio of group B was lower in the group developing DM (P=0.001). There was a significant difference between the groups – GDM patients with or without DM – in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups with Rh factor and the ratio of developing DM is found to be higher in patients with +Rh factor among all the blood groups except for group B (P=0.008). Conclusion In this study, we found a higher risk of GDM for the patients with blood group AB, which means that we have to be more careful on the follow-up of pregnant women with blood group AB. The patients with GDM of blood group O are under a higher risk of developing DM and also +Rh factor must be considered as another risk factor, so these patients should be closely followed postpartum by the oral glucose tolerance tests. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis that investigates the association between the ABO blood groups and transitioning to DM after GDM. PMID:26527878

  19. Surrogate Markers of the Kidney and Liver in the Assessment of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Fetal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Liang, Cheng; Feng, Bai; Wei, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To investigate whether serum levels of butyrylcho-linesterase activity, cystatin C, and pre-albumin has the potential value as γ-glutamyl transferase in reflecting gestational diabetes mellitus and its fetal outcome. Materials and Methods: Seventy-six gestational diabetes mellitus women and 76 pregnancies with normal glucose tolerance in the second trimester were enrolled. Maternal serum parameters of butyrylcholinesterase activity, γ-glutamyl transferase, cystatin C, and pre-albumin were detected and evaluated. The pregnant complications and fetal outcome were also evaluated. Results: Levels of butyrylcholinesterase activity, γ-glutamyl transferase, cystatin C, pre-albumin and glycemic variables were higher in the gestational diabetes mellitus patients than in the controls. Levels of butyrylcholinesterase activity were significantly correlated to the levels of fasting plasma glucose, cystatin C, and γ- glutamyl transferase (p < 0.05) in the gestational diabetes mellitus group. There were statistical differences in cases of preterm delivery, preeclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage. Higher levels of γ-glutamyl transferase and pre-albumin were risk markers for gestational diabetes mellitus (p < 0.05). The diagnosis curve demonstrated that γ-glutamyl transferase had a significant advantage over other markers (p < 0.001) but no significance compared with pre-albumin (p = 0.096). None of the detected markers showed predictive value for fetal outcome. Conclusion: Serum levels of butyrylcholinesterase activity, γ-glutamyl transferase, cystatin C and pre-albumin were correlated with gestational diabetes mellitus status but not with the fetal outcome. Pre-albumin can be equivalent as γ-glutamyl transferase in reflecting the presence of gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:25738017

  20. Biochemical view on: Precocious markers of cardiovascular risk and vascular damage in apparently healthy women with previous gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kayadibi, Huseyin; Sertoglu, Erdim; Uyanik, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. In the recently published article by Zajdenverg et al., they aimed to identify endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus. However, authors did not evaluate the role of total homocysteine, which has important effects for endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin B12 and folic acid are important vitamins since their deficiency may lead to the probable microvascular abnormalities by increasing the tHcy, which is an independent risk factor for endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25798200

  1. Screening and subsequent management for gestational diabetes for improving maternal and infant health

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Joanna; Middleton, Philippa; McPhee, Andrew J; Crowther, Caroline A

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs in pregnancy. Although GDM usually resolves following birth, it is associated with significant morbidities for mother and baby both perinatally and in the long term. There is strong evidence to support treatment for GDM. However, there is little consensus on whether or not screening for GDM will improve maternal and infant health and if so, the most appropriate protocol to follow. Objectives To assess the effects of different methods of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus and maternal and infant outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (April 2010). Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of different methods of screening for gestational diabetes mellitus. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently conducted data extraction and quality assessment. We resolved disagreements through discussion or through a third author. Main results We included four trials involving 3972 women were included in the review. One quasi-randomised trial compared risk factor screening with universal or routine screening by 50 g oral glucose challenge testing. Women in the universal screening group were more likely to be diagnosed with GDM (one trial, 3152 women, risk ratio (RR) 0.44 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26 to 0.75). Infants of mothers in the risk factor screening group were born marginally earlier than infants of mothers in the routine screening group (one trial, 3152 women, mean difference −0.15 weeks, 95% CI −0.27 to −0.53). The remaining three trials evaluated different methods of administering a 50 g glucose load. Two small trials compared glucose monomer with glucose polymer testing, with one of these trials including a candy bar group. One trial compared a glucose solution with food. No differences in diagnosis of GDM were found between each comparison. Overall, women drinking the glucose monomer experienced fewer side effects from testing than women drinking the glucose polymer (two trials, 151 women, RR 2.80, 95% CI 1.10 to 7.13). However, we observed high heterogeneity between the trials for this result (I2 = 61%). Authors’ conclusions There was insufficient evidence to determine if screening for gestational diabetes, or what types of screening, can improve maternal and infant health outcomes. PMID:20614455

  2. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated With Changes in the Concentration and Bioactivity of Placenta-Derived Exosomes in Maternal Circulation Across Gestation.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Sarker, Suchismita; Sweeney, Emma; Kobayashi, Miharu; Correa, Paula; Longo, Sherri; Duncombe, Gregory; Mitchell, Murray D; Rice, Gregory E; Illanes, Sebastian E

    2016-03-01

    Although there is significant interest in elucidating the role of placenta-derived exosomes (PdEs) during pregnancy, the exosomal profile in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remains to be established. The aim of this study was to compare the gestational-age profile of PdEs in maternal plasma of GDM with normal pregnancies and to determine the effect of exosomes on cytokine release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. A prospective cohort of patients was sampled at three time points during pregnancy for each patient (i.e., 11-14, 22-24, and 32-36 weeks' gestation). A retrospective stratified study design was used to quantify exosomes present in maternal plasma of normal (n = 13) and GDM (n = 7) pregnancies. Gestational age and pregnancy status were identified as significant factors contributing to variation in plasma exosome concentration (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Post hoc analyses established that PdE concentration increased during gestation in both normal and GDM pregnancies; however, the increase was significantly greater in GDM (∼2.2-fold, ∼1.5-fold, and ∼1.8-fold greater at each gestational age compared with normal pregnancies). Exosomes isolated from GDM pregnancies significantly increased the release of proinflammatory cytokines from endothelial cells. Although the role of exosomes during GDM remains to be fully elucidated, exosome profiles may be of diagnostic utility for screening asymptomatic populations. PMID:26718504

  3. Behavior modification techniques used to prevent gestational diabetes: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Skouteris, Helen; Morris, Heather; Nagle, Cate; Nankervis, Alison

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and obesity is increasing in developed countries, presenting significant challenges to acute care and public health. The aim of this study is to systematically review published controlled trials evaluating behavior modification interventions to prevent the development of GDM. Nine studies were identified involving such techniques as repetition of information, use of verbal and written educational information, goal setting, and planning, in addition to group and individual counseling sessions. Of the 3 trials with GDM incidence as a primary outcome, only 1 showed a significant reduction. GDM was a secondary outcome in 6 studies where the prevention of excessive gestational weight gain was the primary outcome and only 1 trial study determined an effective intervention. The small number of effective interventions highlights a significant gap in evidence to inform maternity health policy and practice. PMID:24554382

  4. Proteomic-driven biomarker discovery in gestational diabetes mellitus: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Apoorva; Subramani, Elavarasan; Datta Ray, Chaitali; Rapole, Srikanth; Chaudhury, Koel

    2015-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy and it affects 18% of pregnant women worldwide. GDM is considered a high-risk state which may lead to type II diabetes which is associated with an increase in a number of interrelated adverse perinatal outcomes. Given the fact that the progress of a successful pregnancy is dependent on the intricate communication between several biological molecules, identification of the proteomic profile perturbations in women with GDM is expected to help in understanding the disease pathogenesis and also discovery of clinical biomarker(s). In recent years, both gel-free and gel-based proteomics have been extensively investigated for improving maternal and child health. Although there are several reports integrating various aspects of proteomics in pregnancy related diseases such as preeclampsia, extensive Pubmed search shows no review so far on the application of proteomics in gestational diabetes. In this review, we focus on various high-throughput proteomic technologies for the identification of unique biosignatures and biomarkers responsible for the early prediction of GDM. Further, different analytical strategies and biological samples involved in proteomic analysis of this pregnancy-related disease are discussed.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:26216595

  5. Nutrient intake of pregnant women at high risk of gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Meinilä, Jelena; Koivusalo, Saila B.; Valkama, Anita; Rönö, Kristiina; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Kautiainen, Hannu; Stach-Lempinen, Beata; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gestational diabetes (GDM) has been increasing along with the obesity pandemic. It is associated with pregnancy complications and a risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective To study nutrient intake among pregnant Finnish women at increased risk of GDM due to obesity or a history of GDM. Design Food records from obese women or women with GDM history (n=394) were examined at baseline (≤20 weeks of pregnancy) of the Finnish Gestational Diabetes Prevention Study. Results The pregnant women had a mean fat intake of 33 en% (SD 7), saturated fatty acids (SFA) 12 en% (SD 3), and carbohydrate 46 en% (SD 6). Sucrose intake among pregnant women with GDM history was 7 en% (SD 3), which was different from the intake of the other pregnant women, 10 en% (SD 4) (p<0.001). Median intakes of folate and vitamins A and D provided by food sources were below the Finnish national nutrition recommendation, but, excluding vitamin A, supplements raised the total intake to the recommended level. The frequency of use of dietary supplements among pregnant women was 77%. Conclusions The observed excessive intake of SFA and low intake of carbohydrates among women at high risk of GDM may further increase their risk of GDM. A GDM history, however, seems to reduce sucrose intake in a future pregnancy. Pregnant women at high risk of GDM seem to have insufficient intakes of vitamin D and folate from food and thus need supplementation, which most of them already take. PMID:25994096

  6. Risk of Vaginal Infections at Early Gestation in Patients with Diabetic Conditions during Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marschalek, Julian; Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Göbl, Christian S; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Kueronya, Verena; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are reported to be at increased risk for infections of the genital tract. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Candida colonization at early gestation between pregnant women with and without diabetic conditions during pregnancy. We included data from 8, 486 singleton pregnancies that underwent an antenatal infection screen-and-treat programme at our department. All women with GDM or pre-existing diabetes were retrospectively assigned to the diabetic group (DIAB), whereas non-diabetic women served as controls (CON). Prevalence for BV and Candida colonization was 9% and 14% in the DIAB group, and 9% and 13% in the CON group, respectively (n.s.). No significant difference regarding stillbirth and preterm delivery (PTD), defined as a delivery earlier than 37 + 0 (37 weeks plus 0 days) weeks of gestation was found. We could not find an increased risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens at early gestation in pregnant women with diabetes, compared to non-diabetic women. Large prospective studies are needed to evaluate the long-term risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens during the course of pregnancy in these women. PMID:27167850

  7. Timing of treatment initiation for mild gestational diabetes and perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik, Anna; Mele, Lisa; Landon, Mark B.; Reddy, Uma M.; Ramin, Susan M.; Carpenter, Marshall W.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Thorp, John M.; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Saade, George R.; Caritis, Steve N.; Sorokin, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between gestational age (GA) at the time of treatment initiation for gestational diabetes (GDM) and maternal and perinatal outcomes. Study Design A secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized treatment trial of mild GDM in which women with mild GDM were randomized to treatment versus usual care. The primary outcome of the original trial, as well as this analysis, was a composite perinatal adverse outcome that included neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hyperinsulinemia, and perinatal mortality. Other outcomes examined included the frequency of large for gestational age (LGA), birth weight, neonatal intensive care unit admission (NICU), gestational hypertension / preeclampsia and cesarean delivery. The interaction between GA at treatment initiation (stratified as 24-26 weeks, 27 weeks, 28 weeks, 29 weeks, ≥30 weeks) and treatment group (treated vs. routine care), with the outcomes of interest, was used to determine whether GA at treatment initiation was associated with outcome differences. Results Of 958 women analyzed, those who initiated treatment at an earlier GA did not gain an additional treatment benefit compared to those who initiated treatment at a later GA (p-value for interaction with the primary outcome is 0.44). Similarly, there was no evidence that other outcomes were significantly improved by earlier initiation of GDM treatment (LGA p=0.76; NICU admission p=0.8; cesarean delivery p=0.82). The only outcome that had a significant interaction between GA and treatment was gestational hypertension/preeclampsia (p=0.04), although there was not a clear cut GA trend where this outcome improved with treatment. Conclusion Earlier initiation of treatment of mild GDM was not associated with stronger effect of treatment on perinatal outcomes. PMID:26071920

  8. Inflammatory and Other Biomarkers: Role in Pathophysiology and Prediction of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Abell, Sally K.; De Courten, Barbora; Boyle, Jacqueline A.; Teede, Helena J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding pathophysiology and identifying mothers at risk of major pregnancy complications is vital to effective prevention and optimal management. However, in current antenatal care, understanding of pathophysiology of complications is limited. In gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), risk prediction is mostly based on maternal history and clinical risk factors and may not optimally identify high risk pregnancies. Hence, universal screening is widely recommended. Here, we will explore the literature on GDM and biomarkers including inflammatory markers, adipokines, endothelial function and lipids to advance understanding of pathophysiology and explore risk prediction, with a goal to guide prevention and treatment of GDM. PMID:26110385

  9. A hybrid knowledge based system for therapy adjustment in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, M E; Gómez, E J; Corcoy, R; del Pozo, F; Arredondo, M T

    1994-01-01

    This poster describes a system to analyze self-monitoring data of gestational diabetic patients, for obtaining an assessment of their metabolic control with the final goal of supporting decision-making in therapy adjustment. The system is able to manage incomplete data and to make temporal reasoning under uncertainty, the two most important constraints when analyzing ambulatory monitoring data. Two different formalism have been used to represent and manage the knowledge: a dynamic Bayesian network and a production system based on rules. The outcomes provided by the whole system are: information on possible patient transgressions of the prescribed treatment and recommendations of treatment adjustments. PMID:7950077

  10. Troponin T and NT ProBNP Levels in Gestational, Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetic Mothers and Macrosomic Infants.

    PubMed

    Mert, Mustafa Kurthan; Satar, Mehmet; Özbarlas, Nazan; Yaman, Akgün; Özgünen, Fatma Tuncay; Asker, Hüseyin Selim; Çekinmez, Eren Kale; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    This study compares NT proBNP and troponin T levels in umbilical cord arterial blood and postnatal echocardiographic findings for infants of gestational and pregestational diabetic mothers and macrosomic infants. Twenty-seven infants of pregestational diabetic mothers, 61 infants of gestational diabetic mothers and 37 macrosomic infants of nondiabetic mothers were prospectively enrolled in this study along with a control group of 58 healthy infants of mothers without any pregestational or gestational disorders as the control group. All enrollees were born after 34 weeks of gestation. For this study, umbilical cord blood was drawn during delivery to determine NT proBNP and troponin T levels. Echocardiography was performed 24-72 h after the delivery. Umbilical cord troponin T and NT proBNP levels were found to be higher in the diabetic and macrosomic groups than in the control group (all of them p < 0.001). NT proBNP levels were positively correlated with interventricular septum thickness in the pregestational and gestational infants of diabetic mothers groups (r = 0.564 and r = 0.560, respectively, p < 0.01). Both pregestational and gestational diabetic mothers were divided into two groups according to HbA1c levels in the third trimester as good (<6.1 %) and suboptimal (>6.1 %) metabolic control. In the good and suboptimal metabolic control diabetic groups, NT proBNP levels were also positively correlated with interventricular septum thickness (r = 0.536 and r = 0.576, respectively, p < 0.01). In the suboptimal metabolic control diabetic group, NT proBNP was only found to be positively correlated with the left ventricular mass index (r = 0.586, p < 0.01). While there was no correlation in the myocardial performance index between infants of diabetic mothers and the control group, the myocardial performance index of macrosomic infants was lower than that of the control group (p = 0.017). Cardiac biomarkers (NT proBNP and troponin T) were elevated in infants of diabetic mothers and macrosomic infants. While there was a positive correlation between NT proBNP levels and cardiac structure in infants of pregestational and gestational diabetic mothers, there was no relationship between NT proBNP levels and cardiac function. PMID:26266327

  11. The impact of travel distance on the decision to attend for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, J; Gillespie, P; Owens, L; Dunne, F P

    2012-05-01

    This paper estimates the impact of travel distance on the decision to attend for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), controlling for a range of personal, clinical and lifestyle characteristics. The results suggest that women who live further away from a screening site are less likely to attend for screening. In particular, the probability of attending for screening is reduced by 1.8% [95% CI: 1.2% to 2.4%] for every additional 10 kms of travel. This is consistent wth previous research that shows geographic inequalities in access to GDM screening in Ireland. We also find that older women, those with a family history of diabetes, and those who are obese are more likely to accept the screening offer, suggesting that certain higher-risk groups may be either self-selecting into the screening programme or are being targeted by health care professionals through specific initiatives. PMID:22838103

  12. Gestational Diabetes

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  13. Pre-pregnancy body mass index and weight gain during pregnancy: relations with gestational diabetes and hypertension, and birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Heude, B; Thiébaugeorges, O; Goua, V; Forhan, A; Kaminski, M; Foliguet, B; Schweitzer, M; Magnin, G; Charles, M A

    2012-02-01

    To study the relationship between pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and weight gain during pregnancy with pregnancy and birth outcomes, with a focus on gestational diabetes and hypertension and their role in the association with fetal growth. We studied 1,884 mothers and offspring from the Eden mother-child cohort. Weight before pregnancy (W1) and weight after delivery (W2) were collected and we calculated BMI and net gestational weight gain (netGWG = (W2 - W1)/(weeks of gestation)). Gestational diabetes, hypertension gestational age and birth weight were collected. We used multivariate linear or logistic models to study the association between BMI, netGWG and pregnancy and birth outcomes, adjusting for center, maternal age and height, parity and average number of cigarettes smoked per day during pregnancy. High BMI was more strongly related to the risk of giving birth to a large-for-gestational-age (LGA) baby than high netGWG (odds ratio OR [95% CI] of 3.23 [1.86-5.60] and 1.61 [0.91-2.85], respectively). However, after excluding mothers with gestational diabetes or hypertension the ORs for LGA, respectively weakened (OR 2.57 [1.29-5.13]) for obese women and strengthened for high netGWG (OR 2.08 [1.14-3.80]). Low in comparison to normal netGWG had an OR of 2.18 [1.20-3.99] for pre-term birth, which became stronger after accounting for blood pressure and glucose disorders (OR 2.70 [1.37-5.34]). Higher net gestational weight gain was significantly associated with an increased risk of LGA only after accounting for blood pressure and glucose disorders. High gestational weight gain should not be neglected in regard to risk of LGA in women without apparent risk factors. PMID:21258962

  14. Pre-pregnancy body mass index and weight gain during pregnancy: relations with gestational diabetes and hypertension, and birth outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Heude, Barbara; Thiébaugeorges, Olivier; Goua, Valérie; Forhan, Anne; Kaminski, Monique; Foliguet, Bernard; Schweitzer, Michel; Magnin, Guillaume; Charles, Marie-Aline

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relationship between pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and weight gain during pregnancy with pregnancy and birth outcomes, with a focus on gestational diabetes and hypertension and their role in the association with fetal growth. METHODS We studied 1884 mothers and offspring from the Eden mother-child cohort. Weight before pregnancy (W1) and weight after delivery (W2) were collected and we calculated BMI and net gestational weight gain (netGWG=(W2−W1)/(weeks of gestation)). Gestational diabetes, hypertension gestational age and birth weight were collected. We used multivariate linear or logistic models to study the association between BMI, netGWG and pregnancy and birth outcomes, adjusting for center, maternal age and height, parity and average number of cigarettes smoked per day during pregnancy. RESULTS High BMI was more strongly related to the risk of giving birth to a large-for-gestational-age (LGA) baby than high netGWG (odds ratio OR [95% CI] of 3.23 [1.86–5.60] and 1.61 [0.91–2.85] respectively). However, after excluding mothers with gestational diabetes or hypertension the ORs for LGA respectively weakened (OR 2.57 [1.29–5.13]) for obese women and strengthened for high netGWG (OR 2.08 [1.14–3.80]). Low in comparison to normal netGWG had an OR of 2.18 [1.20–3.99] for pre-term birth, which became stronger after accounting for blood pressure and glucose disorders (OR 2.70 [1.37–5.34]). CONCLUSION Higher net gestational weight gain was significantly associated with an increased risk of LGA only after accounting for blood pressure and glucose disorders. High gestational weight gain should not be neglected in regard to risk of LGA in women without apparent risk factors. PMID:21258962

  15. Low rates of postpartum glucose screening among indigenous and non-indigenous women in Australia with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Catherine; McLean, Anna; Oats, Jeremy; Oldenburg, Brian; Eades, Sandra; Sinha, Ashim; Wolfe, Rory

    2015-03-01

    Women with gestational diabetes have a high risk of type 2 diabetes postpartum, with Indigenous women particularly affected. This study reports postpartum diabetes screening rates among Indigenous and non-Indigenous women with gestational diabetes, in Far North Queensland, Australia. Retrospective study including 1,012 women with gestational diabetes giving birth at a regional hospital from 1/1/2004 to 31/12/2010. Data were linked between hospital records, midwives perinatal data, and laboratory results, then analysed using survival analysis and logistic regression. Indigenous women had significantly longer times to first oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) [hazards ratio (HR) 0.62, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.48-0.79, p < 0.0001) and 'any' postpartum glucose test (HR 0.81, 95 % CI 0.67-0.98, p = 0.03], compared to non-Indigenous women. Postpartum screening rates among all women were low. However, early OGTT screening rates (<6 months) were significantly lower among Indigenous women (13.6 vs. 28.3 %, p < 0.0001), leading to a persistent gap in cumulative postpartum screening rates. By 3 years postpartum, cumulative rates of receiving an OGTT, were 24.6 % (95 % CI 19.9-30.2 %) and 34.1 % (95 % CI 30.6-38.0 %) among Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, respectively. Excluding OGTTs in previous periods, few women received OGTTs at 6-24 months (7.8 vs. 6.7 %) or 2-4 years (5.2 vs. 6.5 %), among Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, respectively. Low rates of postpartum diabetes screening demonstrate that essential 'ongoing management' and 'equity' criteria for population-based screening for gestational diabetes are not being met; particularly among Indigenous women, for whom recent guideline changes have specific implications. Strategies to improve postpartum screening after gestational diabetes are urgently needed. PMID:24981736

  16. The Role of Metformin in Metabolic Disturbances during Pregnancy: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of gestation implicates complex function of multiple endocrine mechanisms, and disruptions of the global metabolic environment prompt profound consequences on fetomaternal well-being during pregnancy and postpartum. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are very frequent conditions which increase risk for pregnancy complications, including early pregnancy loss, pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders, and preterm labor, among many others. Insulin resistance (IR) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of both PCOS and GDM, representing an important therapeutic target, with metformin being the most widely prescribed insulin-sensitizing antidiabetic drug. Although traditional views neglect use of oral antidiabetic agents during pregnancy, increasing evidence of safety during gestation has led to metformin now being recognized as a valuable tool in prevention of IR-related pregnancy complications and management of GDM. Metformin has been demonstrated to reduce rates of early pregnancy loss and onset of GDM in women with PCOS, and it appears to offer better metabolic control than insulin and other oral antidiabetic drugs during pregnancy. This review aims to summarize key aspects of current evidence concerning molecular and epidemiological knowledge on metformin use during pregnancy in the setting of PCOS and GDM. PMID:25763406

  17. Prevention of Diabetes in Women with a History of Gestational Diabetes: Effects of Metformin and Lifestyle Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Robert E.; Christophi, Costas A.; Metzger, Boyd E.; Dabelea, Dana; Bennett, Peter H.; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Fowler, Sarah; Kahn, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Context: A past history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) confers a very high risk of postpartum development of diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes. Objective: The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) sought to identify individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and intervene in an effort to prevent or delay their progression to diabetes. This analysis examined the differences between women enrolled in DPP with and without a reported history of GDM. Design: The DPP was a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Setting: The study was a multicenter, National Institutes of Health-sponsored trial carried out at 27 centers including academic and Indian Health Services sites. Patients: A total of 2190 women were randomized into the DPP and provided information for past history of GDM. This analysis addressed the differences between those 350 women providing a past history of GDM and those 1416 women with a previous live birth but no history of GDM. Interventions: Subjects were randomized to either standard lifestyle and placebo or metformin therapy or to an intensive lifestyle intervention. Main Outcomes: The primary outcome was the time to development of diabetes ascertained by semiannual fasting plasma glucose and annual oral glucose tolerance testing. Assessments of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were also performed. Results: Whereas entering the study with similar glucose levels, women with a history of GDM randomized to placebo had a crude incidence rate of diabetes 71% higher than that of women without such a history. Among women reporting a history of GDM, both intensive lifestyle and metformin therapy reduced the incidence of diabetes by approximately 50% compared with the placebo group, whereas this reduction was 49 and 14%, respectively in parous women without GDM. These data suggest that metformin may be more effective in women with a GDM history as compared with those without. Conclusions: Progression to diabetes is more common in women with a history of GDM compared with those without GDM history despite equivalent degrees of IGT at baseline. Both intensive lifestyle and metformin are highly effective in delaying or preventing diabetes in women with IGT and a history of GDM. PMID:18826999

  18. Physician Care Patterns and Adherence to Postpartum Glucose Testing after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Monica L.; Donatelle, Rebecca J.; Lindsay, Karen; Rosenberg, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examines obstetrician/gynecologists and family medicine physicians' reported care patterns, attitudes and beliefs and predictors of adherence to postpartum testing in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Research Design and Methods In November–December 2005, a mailed survey went to a random, cross-sectional sample of 683 Oregon licensed physicians in obstetrician/gynecologists and family medicine from a population of 2171. Results Routine postpartum glucose tolerance testing by both family physicians (19.3%) and obstetrician/gynecologists physicians (35.3%) was reportedly low among the 285 respondents (42% response rate). Factors associated with high adherence to postpartum testing included physician stated priority (OR 4.39, 95% CI: 1.69–7.94) and physician beliefs about norms or typical testing practices (OR 3.66, 95% CI: 1.65–11.69). Specialty, sex of physician, years of practice, location, type of practice, other attitudes and beliefs were not associated with postpartum glucose tolerance testing. Conclusions Postpartum glucose tolerance testing following a gestational diabetes mellitus pregnancy was not routinely practiced by responders to this survey. Our findings indicate that physician knowledge, attitudes and beliefs may in part explain suboptimal postpartum testing. Although guidelines for postpartum care are established, some physicians do not prioritize these guidelines in practice and do not believe postpartum testing is the norm among their peers. PMID:23071709

  19. Protein turnover and 3-methylhistidine excretion in non-pregnant, pregnant and gestational diabetic women

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, W.L.; King, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    Protein turnover was studied in nine non-pregnant (NP) women, eight pregnant (P) and two gestational diabetic (GDM) women. Whole body protein turnover, synthesis and catabolism rates were measured using a single oral dose of /sup 15/N-glycine followed by measurement of enrichment of urinary ammonia. Urinary 3-methylhistidine (3MH) excretion was measured for three consecutive days, including the day of the protein turnover study. Whole body protein turnover and synthesis rates did not differ between the P and NP women, although the synthesis rates tended to be higher in the P group. Gestational diabetic women appeared to have considerably higher rates of both turnover and synthesis. Pregnant women excreted significantly more urinary 3MH than did non-pregnant women. GDM women appeared to have lower 3MH excretion than the P women. Correlation between 3MH excretion and protein turnover rates was nearly significant (p = .06) in the NP women, but was poorly correlated (p = .43) in the P women, suggesting that muscles may be a less important site of whole body protein turnover in pregnancy than in the non-pregnant state.

  20. What neonatal complications should the pediatrician be aware of in case of maternal gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Mitanchez, Delphine; Yzydorczyk, Catherine; Simeoni, Umberto

    2015-06-10

    In the epidemiologic context of maternal obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the incidence of gestational diabetes has significantly increased in the last decades. Infants of diabetic mothers are prone to various neonatal adverse outcomes, including metabolic and hematologic disorders, respiratory distress, cardiac disorders and neurologic impairment due to perinatal asphyxia and birth traumas, among others. Macrosomia is the most constant consequence of diabetes and its severity is mainly influenced by maternal blood glucose level. Neonatal hypoglycemia is the main metabolic disorder that should be prevented as soon as possible after birth. The severity of macrosomia and the maternal health condition have a strong impact on the frequency and the severity of adverse neonatal outcomes. Pregestational T2D and maternal obesity significantly increase the risk of perinatal death and birth defects. The high incidence of maternal hyperglycemia in developing countries, associated with the scarcity of maternal and neonatal care, seriously increase the burden of neonatal complications in these countries. PMID:26069722

  1. First trimester depression scores predict development of gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant rural Appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Chelsea; McCook, Judy G; Bailey, Beth A

    2016-03-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) occurs in up to 9% of pregnancies. Perinatal depression affects up to 20% of women during pregnancy, and can extend into the postpartum period. A number of studies have linked depression and diabetes, however, whether this applies to GDM or which might come first is less understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential relationship between depression identified in the first trimester of pregnancy and the subsequent development of GDM. Women without pre-existing Type I/II diabetes (n = 1021) were evaluated for depression during the first trimester of pregnancy, and medical records were reviewed to identify a positive history of diabetes. Women identified as depressed during the first trimester were more likely to have GDM compared to those not depressed. After controlling for demographic factors and weight-related variables level of depression in the first trimester still predicted later GDM development. Depression identified in early pregnancy may predict increased risk of subsequent GDM development. Due to the numerous maternal, fetal and neonatal complications associated with GDM, early recognition is essential to promote the best possible outcomes for mother and infant. Recognizing depression as a possible risk factor for GDM development could lead to earlier screening and preventative measures. PMID:26594894

  2. What neonatal complications should the pediatrician be aware of in case of maternal gestational diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Mitanchez, Delphine; Yzydorczyk, Catherine; Simeoni, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    In the epidemiologic context of maternal obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the incidence of gestational diabetes has significantly increased in the last decades. Infants of diabetic mothers are prone to various neonatal adverse outcomes, including metabolic and hematologic disorders, respiratory distress, cardiac disorders and neurologic impairment due to perinatal asphyxia and birth traumas, among others. Macrosomia is the most constant consequence of diabetes and its severity is mainly influenced by maternal blood glucose level. Neonatal hypoglycemia is the main metabolic disorder that should be prevented as soon as possible after birth. The severity of macrosomia and the maternal health condition have a strong impact on the frequency and the severity of adverse neonatal outcomes. Pregestational T2D and maternal obesity significantly increase the risk of perinatal death and birth defects. The high incidence of maternal hyperglycemia in developing countries, associated with the scarcity of maternal and neonatal care, seriously increase the burden of neonatal complications in these countries. PMID:26069722

  3. Development of a Screening Tool for Predicting Adverse Outcomes of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jee Soo; Kim, Deok Won; Kwon, Ja-Young; Park, Yong Won; Kim, Young Han; Cho, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common disease in pregnancy causing maternal and fetal complications. To prevent these adverse outcomes, optimal screening and diagnostic criteria must be adequate, timely, and efficient. This study suggests a novel approach that is practical, efficient, and patient- and clinician-friendly in predicting adverse outcomes of GDM. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study via medical record review of patients admitted between March 2001 and April 2013 at the Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. Patients diagnosed by a conventional 2-step method were evaluated according to the presence of adverse outcomes (neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and hyperinsulinemia; admission to the neonatal intensive care unit; large for gestational age; gestational insulin therapy; and gestational hypertension). Of 802 women who had an abnormal 50-g, 1-hour glucose challenge test, 306 were diagnosed with GDM and 496 did not have GDM (false-positive group). In the GDM group, 218 women (71.2%) had adverse outcomes. In contrast, 240 women (48.4%) in the false-positive group had adverse outcomes. Women with adverse outcomes had a significantly higher body mass index (BMI) at entry (P = 0.03) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) (P = 0.03). Our logistic regression model derived from 2 variables, BMI at entry and FBG, predicted GDM adverse outcome with an area under the curve of 0.642, accuracy of 61.3%, sensitivity of 57.2%, and specificity of 66.9% compared with the conventional 2-step method with an area under the curve of 0.610, accuracy of 59.1%, sensitivity of 47.6%, and specificity of 74.4%. Our model performed better in predicting GDM adverse outcomes than the conventional 2-step method using only BMI at entry and FBG. Moreover, our model represents a practical, inexpensive, efficient, reproducible, easy, and patient- and clinician-friendly approach. PMID:26735528

  4. Reasons for participation and non-participation in a diabetes prevention trial among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle intervention can prevent progression to type 2 diabetes in high risk populations. We designed a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effectiveness of an established lifestyle intervention compared to standard care for delaying diabetes onset in European women with recent GDM. Recruitment into the RCT was more challenging than anticipated with only 89 of 410 (22%) women agreeing to participate. This paper identifies factors that could enhance participation of the target population in future interventions. Methods We hypothesised that women who agreed to participate would have higher diabetes risk profiles than those who declined, and secondly that it would be possible to predict participation on the bases of those risk factors. To test our hypothesis, we identified the subset of women for whom we had comprehensive data on diabetes risks factors 3-5 years following GDM, reducing the sample to 43 participants and 73 decliners. We considered established diabetes risk factors: smoking, daily fruit and vegetable intake, participation in exercise, family history of diabetes, glucose values and BMI scores on post-partum re-screens, use of insulin during pregnancy, and age at delivery. We also analysed narrative data from 156 decliners to further understand barriers to and facilitators of participation. Results Two factors differentiated participants and decliners: age at delivery (with women older than 34 years being more likely to participate) and insulin use during pregnancy (with women requiring the use of insulin in pregnancy less likely to participate). Binary logistic regression confirmed that insulin use negatively affected the odds of participation. The most significant barriers to participation included the accessibility, affordability and practicality of the intervention. Conclusions Women with recent GDM face multiple barriers to lifestyle change. Intervention designers should consider: (i) the practicalities of participation for this population, (ii) research designs that capitalise on motivational differences between participants, (iii) alleviating concerns about long-term diabetes management. We hope this work will support future researchers in developing interventions that are more relevant, effective and successful in recruiting the desired population. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41202110 PMID:24461045

  5. Beverage Consumption Patterns and Associations with Metabolic Risk Factors Among Low-Income Latinos with Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Monica L.; Lemon, Stephenie C.; Olendzki, Barbara; Rosal, Milagros C.

    2013-01-01

    In the U.S., Latinos experience disproportionately higher rates of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related complications than non-Latino whites. Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is strongly associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing caloric intake, particularly from energy-dense, low-nutrient foods or beverages, can be an effective and key strategy for metabolic and weight control. However, little is known about the contribution of various types of beverages, including but not limited to SSBs, to total caloric intake among Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Low-income Latinos (87.7% Puerto Rican) participating in a diabetes self-management intervention trial (N=238) provided cross-sectional, descriptive data on beverage consumption patterns, anthropometric outcomes, and metabolic characteristics. Beverages accounted for one-fifth of the total daily caloric intake. SSBs and milk beverages, respectively, contributed 9.6% of calories to overall daily caloric intake. Interventions directed at diabetes risk factors among low-income Latinos with diabetes may benefit from consideration of beverage consumption behaviors as an important strategy to reduce caloric and sugar intake. PMID:23999278

  6. Women with gestational diabetes in Vietnam: a qualitative study to determine attitudes and health behaviours

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes is increasing in prevalence globally, notably amongst populations from low- and middle- income countries. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus(GDM), a precursor for type 2 diabetes, is increasing in line with this trend. Few studies have considered the personal and social effects of GDM on women living in low and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was determine attitudes and health behaviours of pregnant women with GDM in Vietnam. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group methodology conducted in Ho Chi Minh City. Pregnant women, aged over 18 years, with GDM were eligible to participate. Women were purposely sampled to obtain a range of gestational ages and severity of disease. They were invited to attend a 1-hour focus group. Questions were semi structured around six themes. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, translated and cross-referenced. Non-verbal and group interactions were recorded. Thematic analysis was performed using a theoretical framework approach. Results From December 2010 to February 2011, four focus groups were conducted involving 34 women. Median age was 31.5 years (range 23 to 44), median BMI 21.8 kg/m2. Women felt confusion, anxiety and guilt about GDM. Many perceived their baby to be at increased risk of death. Advice to reduce dietary starch was confusing. Women reported being ‘hungry’ or ‘starving’ most of the time, unaware of appropriate food substitutions. They were concerned about transmission of GDM through breast milk. Several women planned not to breastfeed. All felt they needed more information. Current sources of information included friends, magazines, a health phone line or the Internet. Women felt small group sessions and information leaflets could benefit them. Conclusions This study highlights the need for culturally appropriate clinical education and health promotion activities for women with GDM in Vietnam. PMID:22873351

  7. Effect of Pioglitazone on Progression of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Non-Diabetic Premenopausal Hispanic Women with Prior Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Anny H.; Hodis, Howard N.; Kawakubo, Miwa; Peters, Ruth K.; Kjos, Siri L.; Marroquin, Aura; Goico, Jose; Ochoa, Cesar; Liu, Chao-ran; Liu, Ci-hua; Buchanan, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The Pioglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes (PIPOD) study was a single arm 3-year open-label pioglitazone treatment to determine the effects of pioglitazone in women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who had completed the Troglitazone in the Prevention of Diabetes (TRIPOD) study. Here we report the results on progression of subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in non-diabetic women. Data were analyzed to compare CIMT progression rates during pioglitazone treatment to rates that had been observed during either placebo or troglitazone treatment in the TRIPOD study. Sixty-one women met the entry criteria with mean age of 40 years. In the 30 women who came to PIPOD from the placebo arm of TRIPOD, the CIMT rate was 69% lower during pioglitazone treatment than it had been during placebo (0.0031 vs. 0.0100 mm/yr, p=0.006). In the 31 women who came to PIPOD from the troglitazone arm of TRIPOD, CIMT rate was 38% lower during pioglitazone than it had been during troglitazone, a difference that was not statistically significant (0.0037 vs. 0.0060 mm/year; p=0.26). Adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics and potential on-trial confounders did not alter the conclusion but did increase the CIMT rates differences slightly. We conclude that treatment with pioglitazone slowed CIMT progression in women who had been on placebo in the TRIPOD study and maintained a relatively low rate of progression in women who had been on troglitazone. Pioglitazone slows progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in young Hispanic women at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. PMID:18054942

  8. Preconception and early pregnancy air pollution exposures and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, Candace A.; Mendola, Pauline; Yeung, Edwina; Männistö, Tuija; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Liu, Danping; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Grantz, Katherine L.

    2015-02-15

    Background: Air pollution has been linked to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) but no studies have evaluated impact of preconception and early pregnancy air pollution exposures on GDM risk. Methods: Electronic medical records provided data on 219,952 singleton deliveries to mothers with (n=11,334) and without GDM (n=208,618). Average maternal exposures to particulate matter (PM) ≤ 2.5 μm (PM{sub 2.5}) and PM{sub 2.5} constituents, PM ≤ 10 μm (PM{sub 10}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) were estimated for the 3-month preconception window, first trimester, and gestational weeks 1–24 based on modified Community Multiscale Air Quality models for delivery hospital referral regions. Binary regression models with robust standard errors estimated relative risks (RR) for GDM per interquartile range (IQR) increase in pollutant concentrations adjusted for study site, maternal age and race/ethnicity. Results: Preconception maternal exposure to NO{sub X} (RR=1.09, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.13) and SO{sub 2} (RR=1.05, 1.01, 1.09) were associated with increased risk of subsequent GDM and risk estimates remained elevated for first trimester exposure. Preconception O{sub 3} was associated with lower risk of subsequent GDM (RR=0.93, 0.90, 0.96) but risks increased later in pregnancy. Conclusion: Maternal exposures to NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} preconception and during the first few weeks of pregnancy were associated with increased GDM risk. O{sub 3} appeared to increase GDM risk in association with mid-pregnancy exposure but not in earlier time windows. These common exposures merit further investigation. - Highlights: • Air pollution may be related to gestational diabetes (GDM). • No prior studies have examined preconception exposure. • Maternal exposure to NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} before conception increased subsequent GDM risk. • NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} exposure in the first seven weeks of pregnancy also increased GDM risk. • Early exposure to O{sub 3} reduced GDM risk but risk increased after 15 weeks gestation.

  9. Prevalence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Korea: A National Health Insurance Database Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Introduction This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and use of anti-diabetic medications for patients with GDM in Korea, using data of the period 2007–2011 from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment (HIRA) database, which includes the claims data of 97% of the Korean population. Materials and Methods We used the Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes provided by the HIRA to identify women with delivery in the HIRA database between 2009 and 2011. GDM was defined according to ICD-10 codes, and patients with pre-existing diabetes between January 1, 2007 and pregnancy were excluded. A Poisson regression was performed to evaluate the trends in annual prevalence rates. Results The annual numbers of deliveries in 2009–2011 were 479,160 in 2009, 449,747 in 2010, and 377,374 in 2011. The prevalence of GDM during that period was 7.5% in 2009–2011: 5.7% in 2009, 7.8% in 2010, and 9.5% in 2011. The age-stratified analysis showed that the prevalence of GDM was highest in women aged 40–44 years, at 10.6% in 2009–2011, and that the annual prevalence significantly increased even in young women aged 20–29 years during that period (P < 0.05). More than 95% of the patients with GDM did not take any anti-diabetic medication. Among the anti-diabetic medications prescribed for patients with GDM, insulin was most commonly prescribed (for >98% of the patients with GDM on medication). Conclusions The prevalence of GDM in Korean women recently reached 5.7–9.5% in recent years. This represents a public health concern that warrants proper screening and medical care for GDM in women during the childbearing years. PMID:27046149

  10. Effects of the DASH Diet and Walking on Blood Pressure in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Uncontrolled Hypertension: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Paula, Tatiana P; Viana, Luciana V; Neto, Alessandra T Z; Leitão, Cristiane B; Gross, Jorge L; Azevedo, Mirela J

    2015-11-01

    Data on the potential beneficial effects of combining diet and exercise on blood pressure (BP) are still scarce. A 4-week randomized controlled clinical trial was undertaken in 40 hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes with uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) in office and daytime ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Patients were assigned to follow a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet associated with advice to increase walking using a pedometer (intervention group) or a diet based on the American Diabetes Association recommendations (control group). The lifestyle intervention caused a greater ABPM (mm Hg) reduction in systolic 24-hour, diastolic 24-hour, nighttime systolic, daytime systolic, and daytime diastolic measurements than observed in the control group. In the intervention group there was a decrease in urinary sodium and an increase in urinary potassium, plasma aldosterone, and the number of steps per day (P<.05). The DASH diet and increased walking were associated with clinically significant reductions in ABPM values in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26041459

  11. A comparative study of the different diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus and its incidence

    PubMed Central

    Somani, BL; Arora, MM; Bhatia, Kapil; Arora, Devendra; Banerjee, Mithu

    2012-01-01

    Background High prevalence of diabetes and genetic predisposition to metabolic syndrome among Indians places Indian women at risk to develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and its complications. Literature defines multiple criteria for GDM. This prospective study compares available diagnostic criteria for GDM in Indian women and their correlation with perinatal morbidity. Method Nine hundred and forty-eight consecutive voluntary nondiabetic pregnant women were recruited for the study. Seven hundred and twenty-three of these (mean age 23.45 years; 75.7% < 25 years) who reported for the follow-up were screened for GDM at 24–28 weeks gestation by American College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (ACOG) guidelines and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting and two-hours postglucose plasma insulin levels were also analysed. Pregnancy outcome was known for 291 of these. Concordance of risk factors and perinatal complications was analysed with respect to GDM. Results Prevalence of GDM at 24–28 weeks gestation was found to be 4.8% by WHO criteria, 6.36% by Carpenter and Coustan's criteria, and 3.5% by O'Sullivan's criteria. Prevalence was marginally higher in women of higher age, having past history of abortion or family history of diabetes mellitus (DM) (P > 0.05). None of these women had HbA1c > 6%. Relative risk of abnormal delivery (pregnancy outcome) was 1.93, 1.39, and 1.17 in women with GDM by O'Sullivan's, WHO, and Carpenter's criteria, respectively (P > 0.05). Abnormal deliveries were marginally higher in women with high postglucose load insulin levels. Mean weight of the newborns was essentially the same in GDM and nonGDM women by any of the criteria. One-hour and two-hours postglucose values were more sensitive in diagnosing GDM by O'Sullivan's criteria while fasting plasma glucose value had the poorest specificity with 2.5% of nonGDM women having values above the cut-off. Modifications of these criteria did not im-prove their predictive value for abnormal delivery over that of O'Sullivan's criteria. Conclusion Prevalence of GDM and abnormal delivery in women < 35 years of age is low. Therefore, global screening for GDM may not be very useful in women < 25 years of age unless family history of DM or past history of abortion is present. Existing evidence is inadequate to justify the switchover from O'Sullivan's criteria for diagnosis of GDM. PMID:24623912

  12. Advancements and challenges in generating accurate animal models of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pasek, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of glucose homeostasis during pregnancy is critical to the health and well-being of both the mother and the developing fetus. Strikingly, approximately 7% of human pregnancies are characterized by insufficient insulin production or signaling, resulting in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In addition to the acute health concerns of hyperglycemia, women diagnosed with GDM during pregnancy have an increased incidence of complications during pregnancy as well as an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life. Furthermore, children born to mothers diagnosed with GDM have increased incidence of perinatal complications, including hypoglycemia, respiratory distress syndrome, and macrosomia, as well as an increased risk of being obese or developing T2D as adults. No single environmental or genetic factor is solely responsible for the disease; instead, a variety of risk factors, including weight, ethnicity, genetics, and family history, contribute to the likelihood of developing GDM, making the generation of animal models that fully recapitulate the disease difficult. Here, we discuss and critique the various animal models that have been generated to better understand the etiology of diabetes during pregnancy and its physiological impacts on both the mother and the fetus. Strategies utilized are diverse in nature and include the use of surgical manipulation, pharmacological treatment, nutritional manipulation, and genetic approaches in a variety of animal models. Continued development of animal models of GDM is essential for understanding the consequences of this disease as well as providing insights into potential treatments and preventative measures. PMID:24085033

  13. An Exploratory Mixed Method Assessment of Low Income, Pregnant Hispanic Women's Understanding of Gestational Diabetes and Dietary Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads-Baeza, Maria Elena; Reis, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and assess low income, healthy, pregnant Hispanic women's understanding of gestational diabetes (GDM) and willingness to change aspects of their diet. Design: One-on-one, in-person interviews conducted in Spanish with 94 women (primarily Mexican). Setting: Federal Qualified Community Health Center's prenatal clinic. Method:…

  14. An Exploratory Mixed Method Assessment of Low Income, Pregnant Hispanic Women's Understanding of Gestational Diabetes and Dietary Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads-Baeza, Maria Elena; Reis, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and assess low income, healthy, pregnant Hispanic women's understanding of gestational diabetes (GDM) and willingness to change aspects of their diet. Design: One-on-one, in-person interviews conducted in Spanish with 94 women (primarily Mexican). Setting: Federal Qualified Community Health Center's prenatal clinic. Method:

  15. Lack of predictive power of plasma lipids or lipoproteins for gestational diabetes mellitus in Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Iimura, Yuko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Yao, Zemin; Ito, Satoru; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Yoshitsugu, Michiyasu; Miyauchi, Akito; Hiyoshi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction To determine the diagnostic potential of plasma lipids and apolipoproteins in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 1,161 Japanese women at 20–28 weeks of gestation who underwent a glucose challenge test (GCT). Materials and Methods A total of 1,161 Japanese women at 20–28 weeks of gestation underwent a GCT. Participants with a positive test (GCT[+]) underwent a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test. Clinical and biochemical parameters were determined and quantification of apolipoproteins (Apo), including ApoB, ApoB48, ApoA-I and ApoC-III, was carried out. Results The prevalence of GCT(+; with a 130 mg/dL glucose cut-off) and GDM was 20% and 4%, respectively. There was a trend for increased triglycerides and ApoC-III in GDM(+) participants. However, the difference in plasma triglycerides, ApoC-III or ApoB48 did not reach statistical significance between GDM(+) and GDM(−) women. Values of 1-h glucose (P < 0.001) and fasting glucose (P = 0.002) were significant risk factors for GDM. Conclusions Prediction of GDM using only the ApoC-III value is not easy, although triglycerides and ApoC-III were higher in the GDM(+) group. The present findings show no significant difference in plasma lipid levels between women diagnosed with GDM and those with normal glucose tolerance. PMID:26543537

  16. Maternal Body Weight and Gestational Diabetes Differentially Influence Placental and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martino, J.; Sebert, S.; Segura, M. T.; García-Valdés, L.; Florido, J.; Padilla, M. C.; Marcos, A.; Rueda, R.; McArdle, H. J.; Budge, H.; Campoy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can both contribute to adverse neonatal outcomes. The extent to which this may be mediated by differences in placental metabolism and nutrient transport remains to be determined. Objective: Our objective was to examine whether raised maternal body mass index (BMI) and/or GDM contributed to a resetting of the expression of genes within the placenta that are involved in energy sensing, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic pathways. Methods: Pregnant women from Spain were recruited as part of the “Study of Maternal Nutrition and Genetics on the Foetal Adiposity Programming” survey at the first antenatal visit (12–20 weeks of gestation) and stratified according to prepregnancy BMI and the incidence of GDM. At delivery, placenta and cord blood were sampled and newborn anthropometry measured. Results: Obese women with GDM had higher estimated fetal weight at 34 gestational weeks and a greater risk of preterm deliveries and cesarean section. Birth weight was unaffected by BMI or GDM; however, women who were obese with normal glucose tolerance had increased placental weight and higher plasma glucose and leptin at term. Gene expression for markers of placental energy sensing and oxidative stress, were primarily affected by maternal obesity as mTOR was reduced, whereas SIRT-1 and UCP2 were both upregulated. In placenta from obese women with GDM, gene expression for AMPK was also reduced, whereas the downstream regulator of mTOR, p70S6KB1 was raised. Conclusions: Placental gene expression is sensitive to both maternal obesity and GDM which both impact on energy sensing and could modulate the effect of either raised maternal BMI or GDM on birth weight. PMID:26513002

  17. [Insulin treatment of gestational diabetes and respiratory outcome in late-preterm and term babies].

    PubMed

    Becquet, O; El Khabbaz, F; Alberti, C; Mohamed, D; Blachier, A; Biran, V; Sibony, O; Baud, O

    2016-03-01

    While the incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) during pregnancy has been steadily increasing in recent years, the link between gestational DM and respiratory outcome in neonates has not been firmly established. To address this gap in understanding, we asked whether DM status and its treatment during pregnancy influence risk of neonatal respiratory distress. We conducted retrospective analysis of a large cohort to determine the relationship between maternal DM status (non-DM, insulin-treated DM [DTI], and non-insulin-treated DM [DTR]) and respiratory distress in term and near-term singletons, born at Robert-Debré Hospital over a 7-year period. Of 18,095 singletons delivered at 34 weeks of gestation or later, 412 (2.3%) were admitted to the NICU for respiratory distress within the first hours of life. The incidence of NICU admissions due to respiratory distress was 2.2% in the non-DM group, 2.1% in the DTR group, and 5.7% in the DTI group. Insulin treatment of DM, together with several other perinatal factors, was associated with an increased risk for severe respiratory distress. In a multivariate model, we found that DTI, but not DTR, was a risk factor independent of gestational age and cesarean section, with an IRR of 1.44 (95% CI, 1.00-2.08). The data indicate that newborns of mothers with DM treated with diet are not at risk for severe respiratory distress. Conversely, newborns of mothers with DM treated with insulin are associated with elevated risk for severe respiratory disease and should therefore be closely monitored. PMID:26879967

  18. Perinatal Outcomes in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women With Mild Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Erica K.; Mele, Lisa; Landon, Mark B.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Ramin, Susan M.; Casey, Brian; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Harper, Margaret; Saade, George; Caritis, Steve N.; Sorokin, Yoram; Peaceman, Alan M.; Tolosa, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare perinatal outcomes between self-identified Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or glucose intolerance. METHODS In a secondary analysis of a mild GDM treatment trial, we compared perinatal outcomes by race and ethnicity for 767 women with glucose intolerance (abnormal 50g 1-hour screen, normal 100g 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]), 371 women with mild GDM assigned to usual prenatal care, and 397 women with mild GDM assigned to treatment. Outcomes included: composite adverse perinatal outcome (neonatal death, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hyperinsulinemia; stillbirth; birth trauma), gestational age at delivery, birthweight, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Adjusted regression models included: 100g 3-hour OGTT results; parity; gestational age, body mass index, maternal age at enrollment; and current tobacco use. RESULTS The sample of 1535 women was 68.3% Hispanic and 31.7% non-Hispanic White. Among women with glucose intolerance, Hispanic women had more frequent composite outcome (37% vs. 27%, aOR 1.62 95%CI 1.10, 2.37), with more neonatal elevated C-cord peptide (19% vs. 13%, aOR 1.79 95%CI 1.04, 3.08) and neonatal hypoglycemia (21% vs. 13%, aOR 2.04 95%CI 1.18, 3.53). Among women with untreated mild GDM, outcomes were similar by race/ethnicity. Among Hispanic women with treated mild GDM, composite outcome was similar to non-Hispanic White women (35% vs. 25%, aOR 1.62 95% CI 0.92, 2.86), but Hispanic neonates had more frequent hyperinsulinemia (21% vs. 10%, aOR 2.96 95%CI 1.33, 6.60). CONCLUSION Individual components of some neonatal outcomes were more frequent in Hispanic neonates, but most perinatal outcomes were similar between Hispanic and non-Hispanic ethnic groups. PMID:23090528

  19. Changes in Sweet Taste Across Pregnancy in Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Relationship to Endocrine Factors

    PubMed Central

    Belzer, Lisa M.; Smulian, John C.; Lu, Shou-En

    2009-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is glucose intolerance diagnosed during pregnancy. Previous work suggested that women with GDM showed exaggerated preferences for sweet taste, but data were limited to a single time point during pregnancy. This study longitudinally assessed sweet taste changes across pregnancy in women who developed GDM (n = 15) as compared with women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 93) and nonpregnant controls (n = 19). A second objective was to relate sweet taste changes in GDM to fasting leptin and insulin profiles. Following an overnight fast, subjects evaluated strawberry-flavored milks varying in sucrose and fat content, as well as glucose solutions. Evaluations were made at 3 time points during pregnancy and during early postpartum. At 34–38 weeks gestation, women with GDM gave higher liking ratings to moderately sweetened (5% and 10% sucrose) strawberry milks than women with NGT. These differences were not related to alterations in the perception of the samples. At 24–28 weeks gestation, and in women with GDM only, fasting insulin was correlated with liking of the glucose solutions (R2 = 0.63, P = 0.004) and fasting leptin was correlated with sweetness liking of the 10% sucrose milk (R2 = 0.42, P = 0.017). These data suggest that women with GDM exhibit higher liking ratings for a sweet fat milk drink late in pregnancy. Also, higher hedonic ratings for sweet taste in GDM may be related to elevated leptin and insulin concentrations at midpregnancy. GDM may increase the desire for sweet taste that could influence dietary management of this disease. PMID:19587026

  20. Expression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Downstream Targets in Normal and Gestational Diabetic Human Term Placenta.

    PubMed

    Sati, Leyla; Soygur, Bikem; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling serves as a central regulator of cell growth, proliferation, and survival by interacting with various proteins. To date, few studies implicated mTOR in placenta. Human placenta in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) shows several alterations including villous immaturity, impaired placental function, and overgrowth. Hence, we aimed to investigate the expression of mTOR, phospho-mTOR (p-mTOR), and the 2 phosphorylated downstream targets of mTOR, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (p-p70S6K), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (p-4EBP1) in normal term and gestational diabetic human placentas. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were performed with antibodies against mTOR, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K, and p-4EBP1 (Thr37/46) in normal and diabetic placentas (n = 6 each) and quantified by ImageJ. All mTOR pathway components that we studied were immunolocalized in both normal and diabetic placenta groups. Syncytiotrophoblast and the vascular wall in villi displayed cytoplasmic mTOR and p-mTOR (S2448) immunoreactivities in all placenta samples. However, increased expression of p70S6K in syncytiotrophoblast and p-4EBP1 (Thr37/46) in villous stromal cells was observed in gestational diabetic placentas. Western blot analysis also confirmed the statistically significant increase in p-p70S6K (T389) expression in diabetic placentas. The altered expression of downstream components of mTOR signaling in gestational diabetic placentas suggests an involvement of mTOR activity in the placental pathology of GDM. However, whether increased nutrient transport via this pathway will stimulate fetal and placental overgrowth is still unknown. Although this is a descriptive study, further studies with a functional analysis to highlight the molecular mechanisms underlying this placental pathology are proposed. PMID:26335179

  1. Role of Medical Nutrition Therapy in the Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Cristina; Mauricio, Didac; Hernandez, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays an important role in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and accordingly, it has a significant impact on women and newborns. The primary objective of MNT is to ensure adequate pregnancy weight gain and fetus growth while maintaining euglycemia and avoiding ketones. However, the optimal diet (energy content, macronutrient distribution, its quality and amount, among others) remains an outstanding question. Overall, the nutritional requirements of GDM are similar for all pregnancies, but special attention is paid to carbohydrates. Despite the classical intervention of restricting carbohydrates, the latest evidence, although limited, seems to favor a low-glycemic index diet. There is general agreement in the literature about caloric restrictions in the case of being overweight or obese. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to investigate the optimal MNT for GDM; this knowledge could yield health benefits and cost savings. PMID:26879305

  2. Upregulation of microRNA processing enzymes Drosha and Dicer in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Giti; Jafari, Naser; Khodabakhsh, Mehnoush; Shirzad, Zohreh; Dogaheh, Hadi Peeri

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play important roles in diverse cellular processes and linked to variety of disorders. Dicer and Drosha are two major enzymes in the miRNA biogenesis process. DGCR8 is the assistant of Drosha in the microprocessor complex. In this study, we evaluated the mRNA expression profiles of major miRNA processing machinery Drosha, Dicer, and DGCR8 in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnant and healthy women. Our findings indicate that the expression levels of Drosha, Dicer and DGCR8 were upregulated in both pregnant and GDM patients compared to the control group. However, Drosha and Dicer were upregulated more than pregnant group. In conclusion, we detected dysregulation of Drosha, Dicer and DGCR8 expression in pregnant and GDM patients when compared to healthy control participants. Therefore, we favor the hypothesis that miRNAs are involved in the development of GDM. PMID:25295740

  3. [Experiences, perceptions and self-management of gestational diabetes in a group of overweight multiparous women].

    PubMed

    Chávez-Courtois, Mayra; Graham, Chelsea; Romero-Pérez, Irma; Sánchez-Miranda, Georgina; Sánchez-Jiménez, Bernarda; Perichart-Perera, Otilia

    2014-06-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a public health problem in Mexico and diet therapy is the main form of treatment. Self-management abilities are required to control the disease. Five women with GDM were studied to assess GDM risk perception and experiences related with self-management practices. Sociodemographic data were obtained and in-depth interviews were conducted and subsequently analyzed using Atlas ti V.5 software. The results revealed that women were conscious regarding the role of diet and physical activity in improving GDM control, and about the perinatal risks associated with the disease. Adherence to diet recommendations was partial, but gradual and positive lifestyle changes were observed. Emotionally, perception about having GDM was a key factor with respect to adhering to the diet. In conclusion, the medical and dietary treatment influences the cultural food behavior of women with GDM. Health professionals should consider sociocultural determinants when designing and implementing treatment strategies. PMID:24897466

  4. Comparison of the performance of screening test for gestational diabetes in singleton versus twin pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun Ji; Kwon, Ja Young; Cho, Hee Young; Park, Yong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective We compared the performance of the 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) in singleton versus twin pregnancies and investigated the need for adjusting GCT cutoff values for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in twin pregnancies among Korean women. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed in women who underwent GCT at 24 to 28 weeks' gestation and delivered in our department between January 2000 and April 2008. GCT performance was compared between singleton and twin pregnancies for an ideal cutoff value of the GCT for GDM screening. Results GCT results were available in 3,578 pregnancies (3,435 singleton and 143 twin pregnancies). The mean GCT value was higher in the twin group than in the singleton group. Women in the twin group had a higher mean GCT value (P=0.043) and a higher incidence of GCT ≥130, ≥135, and ≥140 mg/dL (P=0.014, 0.005, and 0.015, respectively). The false positive rate for GCT ≥140 mg/dL was significantly higher in the twin than in the singleton group (P=0.042). The optimal GCT screening cutoff value appears to be ≥145 mg/dL in twin pregnancies. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the GCT is associated with a higher false positive rate in twin rather than singleton pregnancies. This study suggests we should consider adjusting the GCT cutoff value for GDM in Korean twin pregnancies. PMID:26623406

  5. GESTATIONAL DIABETES ALTERS MATERNAL AND NEONATAL CIRCULATING ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR CELL SUBSETS

    PubMed Central

    ACOSTA, Juan C.; HAAS, David M.; SAHA, Chandan K.; DIMEGLIO, Linda A.; INGRAM, David A.; HANELINE, Laura S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine whether women with gestational diabetes (GDM) and their offspring have reduced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) subsets and vascular reactivity. Study Design Women with GDM, healthy controls, and their infants participated. Maternal blood and cord blood were assessed for colony forming unit-endothelial cells (CFU-ECs) and EPC subsets using polychromatic flow cytometry. Cord blood endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) were enumerated. Vascular reactivity was tested by laser Doppler imaging. Results Women with GDM had fewer CD34+CD133+CD45+CD31+ cells (circulating progenitor cells, CPCs) at 24–32 weeks gestation and 1–2 days post-partum compared to controls. No differences were detected in CFU-ECs or ECFCs. In controls, CPCs were higher in the third trimester compared to post-partum. Cord blood from GDM pregnancies had reduced CPCs. Vascular reactivity was not different between GDM and control subjects. Conclusion The normal physiologic increase in CPCs during pregnancy is impaired in women with GDM, which may contribute to endothelial dysfunction and GDM-associated morbidities. PMID:21167470

  6. The Effect of Race/Ethnicity on Adverse Perinatal Outcomes among Patients with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, Brian T.; CHENG, Yvonne W.; SNOWDEN, Jonathan M.; ESAKOFF, Tania F.; FRIAS, Antonio E.; CAUGHEY, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine racial/ethnic differences in perinatal outcomes among women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). STUDY DESIGN Retrospective cohort study of 32,193 singleton births among GDMs in California from 2006, using Vital Statistics Birth and Death Certificate and Patient Discharge Data. Women were divided by race/ethnicity: White, Black, Hispanic, or Asian. Multivariable logistic regression analyzed associations between race/ethnicity and adverse outcomes, controlling for potential confounders. Outcomes included: primary cesarean, preeclampisa, neonatal hypoglycemia, preterm delivery, macrosomia, fetal anomaly, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). RESULTS Compared to other races, Black women had higher odds of preeclampsia [aOR=1.57, 95%CI(1.47-1.95)], neonatal hypoglycemia [aOR=1.79, 95%CI(1.07-3.00)], and preterm delivery <37 weeks [aOR=1.56, 95%CI(1.33-1.83)]. Asians had the lowest odds of primary cesarean [aOR=0.75, 95%CI(0.69-0.82)], large for gestational age infants [aOR=0.40, 95%CI(0.33-0.48)], and neonatal RDS [aOR=0.54, 95%CI(0.40-0.73)]. CONCLUSION Perinatal outcomes among women with GDM differ by race/ethnicity and may be attributed to inherent sociocultural differences that may impact glycemic control, the development of chronic co-morbidities, genetic variability, and variation in access to as well as quantity and quality of prenatal care. PMID:22818875

  7. Risk for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Adverse Birth Outcomes in Chinese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qing; Cui, Yong-Yi; Lu, Jine; Zhang, Guo-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine the association of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in early pregnancy with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and adverse birth outcomes. Methods. In this retrospective cohort study including 2389 pregnant women, the medical records of 352 women diagnosed with PCOS were evaluated. Outcomes included GDM, preterm birth, low birth weight, macrosomia, and being small and large for gestational age. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the association of the risk for GDM and adverse birth outcomes with PCOS after adjusting for confounders. Results. Women previously diagnosed with PCOS had a higher risk of GDM (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14–2.09). A strong association was seen between PCOS and preterm birth (adjusted OR 1.69, 95% CI: 1.08–2.67). On stratified analysis, the adjusted OR for GDM among women with PCOS undergoing assisted reproductive technology was 1.44 (95% CI: 1.03–1.92) and among women with PCOS who conceived spontaneously was 1.60 (1.18–2.15). No increased risk for other adverse birth outcomes was observed. Conclusions. Women with PCOS were more likely to experience GDM and preterm birth. PMID:27066074

  8. Possible contribution of (pro)renin receptor to development of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bokuda, Kanako; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    (Pro)renin receptor [(P)RR], a receptor for renin and prorenin, was first cloned in 2002. Since then, the pathophysiological roles of (P)RR have been growing concerns. (P)RR binds renin and prorenin, with two important consequences, nonproteolytic activation of prorenin, leading to the tissue renin-angiotensin system activation and the intracellular signalings. It is now also known to play an important role as vacuolar H+-ATPase associated protein, involving in Wnt signaling, main component of embryonic development. Extracellular domain of full-length (P)RR is cleaved in golgi-complex forming soluble (P)RR [s(P)RR]. The s(P)RR is now possible to be measured in human blood and urine. It is now measured in different pathophysiological states, and recent study showed that elevated plasma s(P)RR levels in the early stage of pregnancies are associated with higher incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus later in the pregnancies. Plasma s(P)RR levels of neonates are known to be higher than that of adults. It was also shown that, increased s(P)RR concentrations in cord blood, associated with a lower small for gestational age birth likelihood. These data suggests the involvement of (P)RR in embryo’s growth. In this review article, we attempt to figure out the possible pathophysiological roles of the (P)RR in maternal glucose intolerance and embryo’s growth, through reviewing previous studies. PMID:25512796

  9. A Case-Cohort Study of Cadmium Body Burden and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in American Women

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Simpson, Christopher D.; Checkoway, Harvey; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure is associated with type 2 diabetes. However, the association of Cd and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is unknown. Objectives We examined the association between body burden of Cd and GDM risk. Methods We used 140 GDM cases and 481 randomly selected noncase subcohort members from the Omega Study to conduct a case-cohort study. Creatinine (Cr)–corrected Cd in early pregnancy urine (U-Cd) was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Tertiles (< 0.29; 0.29–0.42; ≥ 0.43 μg/g Cr) were defined using the subcohort’s U-Cd distribution. GDM was diagnosed using the 2004 American Diabetes Association guidelines. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results GDM cases had higher geometric mean U-Cd (0.39 μg/g Cr; 95% CI: 0.37, 0.41) than noncases (0.31 μg/g Cr; 95% CI: 0.29, 0.33). Odds ratios for GDM increased with increasing U-Cd tertile (OR = 1.64; 95% CI: 0.88, 3.05 for middle vs. low tertile; OR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.15, 3.73 for high vs. low tertile; p-trend = 0.015). Overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2) did not modify the association between U-Cd and GDM (p = 0.26). Conclusions Our findings suggest that body burden of Cd increases risk of GDM in a dose-dependent manner. Improved understanding of environmental factors influencing GDM may facilitate early identification of women at high risk of GDM. Citation Romano ME, Enquobahrie DA, Simpson CD, Checkoway H, Williams MA. 2015. A case-cohort study of cadmium body burden and gestational diabetes mellitus in American women. Environ Health Perspect 123:993–998; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408282 PMID:25712731

  10. Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors in Turkish women: the Trabzon GDM Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Ufuk B.; Deger, Orhan; Can, Gamze

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Turkish pregnant women in the Trabzon Region and further to identify population-specific risk factors for GDM. Material and methods In this prospective cross-sectional survey, universal screening for GDM was performed in 815 pregnant women. Screening was done with a 50-g oral glucose challenge test (GCT) with a 140 mg/dl cut-off point, then a diagnostic 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed according to Carpenter and Coustan (CC) criteria. Results The GCT was positive in 182 (22.3%) cases. The OGTT was performed on the 182 screen-positive pregnant women. Thirty-five were diagnosed with GDM on the basis of their results for a prevalence of 4.3% (35/815). Of the pregnancies with negative GCT but having high risk factors for GDM (n = 31), 4 were diagnosed with GDM (0.5%). Prevalence of GDM was found to be 4.8% (n = 39) for all pregnant women. Gestational diabetes mellitus was positively associated with advanced maternal age (p < 0.001), prepregnancy body mass index (p < 0.001), cessation of cigarette smoking (p < 0.001), excessive weight gain during pregnancy (p = 0.003), previous history of GDM (p < 0.001), history of selected medical conditions (p = 0.018), family history of diabetes (FHD) (p < 0.001), and existence of at least one high risk factor for GDM (p < 0.001). In multiple logistic regression analysis, independent predictors for GDM were maternal age, cessation of cigarette smoking, increasing prepregnancy body mass index, weight gain of more than 8 kg during pregnancy, GDM history in previous pregnancies and a history of diabetes in first-degree relatives of pregnant women. Conclusions The prevalence of GDM in Trabzon province was found as moderate. Commonly recognized risk factors including older age, prepregnancy obesity, FHD and past history of GDM, are valid for our urban Turkish population. Also, excessive weight gain in pregnancy and cigarette cessation were observed to be nontradional risk factors of GDM. It was concluded that all pregnant women should be screened for GDM if prevalence was not low. PMID:26322083

  11. Early Pregnancy Maternal Hepatocyte Growth Factor and Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dishi, Michal; Hevner, Karin; Qiu, Chunfang; Fida, Neway G.; Abetew, Dejene F.; Williams, Michelle A.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We investigated associations of serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) with risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We also examined whether pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity status or leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) modify these associations. Methods In a nested case-control study (173 GDM cases and 187 controls) among participants of a pregnancy cohort, early pregnancy (16 weeks of gestation, on average) serum HGF was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassay. GDM was diagnosed using American Diabetes Association guidelines. Logistic regression was used to calculate odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Effect modifications by pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity status or LTPA during pregnancy were examined using stratified analyses and interaction terms. Results Overall, we did not find significant associations of serum HGF with GDM risk (p-value> 0.05). However, compared with women who had low serum HGF concentrations (<2.29 ng/ml), women with high serum HGF concentrations (≥ 2.29 ng/ml) had 3.8-fold (95%CI: 1.30–10.98) and 4.5-fold (95%CI: 1.28–15.80) higher GDM risk among women who were overweight/obese, pre-pregnancy (body mass index≥25 kg/m2), or did not report LTPA, respectively. These associations were not present among women who were not overweight/obese (interaction p=0.05) or reported LTPA (interaction p=0.05). Conclusion Overweight/obesity status and LTPA may modify associations of early pregnancy serum HGF with subsequent GDM risk.

  12. Carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in pregnancy: normal compared with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Butte, N F

    2000-05-01

    This article reviews maternal metabolic strategies for accommodating fetal nutrient requirements in normal pregnancy and in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Pregnancy is characterized by a progressive increase in nutrient-stimulated insulin responses despite an only minor deterioration in glucose tolerance, consistent with progressive insulin resistance. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamp technique and intravenous-glucose-tolerance test have indicated that insulin action in late normal pregnancy is 50-70% lower than in nonpregnant women. Metabolic adaptations do not fully compensate in GDM and glucose intolerance ensues. GDM may reflect a predisposition to type 2 diabetes or may be an extreme manifestation of metabolic alterations that normally occur in pregnancy. In normal pregnant women, basal endogenous hepatic glucose production (R(a)) was shown to increase by 16-30% to meet the increasing needs of the placenta and fetus. Total gluconeogenesis is increased in late gestation, although the fractional contribution of total gluconeogenesis to R(a), quantified from (2)H enrichment on carbon 5 of glucose (65-85%), does not differ in pregnant women after a 16-h fast. Endogenous hepatic glucose production was shown to remain sensitive to increased insulin concentration in normal pregnancy (96% suppression), but is less sensitive in GDM (80%). Commensurate with the increased rate of glucose appearance, an increased contribution of carbohydrate to oxidative metabolism has been observed in late pregnancy compared with pregravid states. The 24-h respiratory quotient is significantly higher in late pregnancy than postpartum. Recent advances in carbohydrate metabolism during pregnancy suggest that preventive measures should be aimed at improving insulin sensitivity in women predisposed to GDM. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms and consequences of alterations in lipid metabolism during pregnancy. PMID:10799399

  13. Maternal dietary patterns and gestational diabetes mellitus: a large prospective cohort study in China.

    PubMed

    He, Jian-Rong; Yuan, Ming-Yang; Chen, Nian-Nian; Lu, Jin-Hua; Hu, Cui-Yue; Mai, Wei-Bi; Zhang, Rui-Fang; Pan, Yong-Hong; Qiu, Lan; Wu, Ying-Fang; Xiao, Wan-Qing; Liu, Yu; Xia, Hui-Min; Qiu, Xiu

    2015-04-28

    Few studies have explored the relationship between dietary patterns and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Evidence from non-Western areas is particularly lacking. In the present study, we aimed to examine the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of GDM in a Chinese population. A total of 3063 pregnant Chinese women from an ongoing prospective cohort study were included. Data on dietary intake were collected using a FFQ at 24-27 weeks of gestation. GDM was diagnosed using a 75 g, 2 h oral glucose tolerance test. Dietary patterns were determined by principal components factor analysis. A log-binomial regression model was used to examine the associations between dietary pattern and the risk of GDM. The analysis identified four dietary patterns: vegetable pattern; protein-rich pattern; prudent pattern; sweets and seafood pattern. Multivariate analysis showed that the highest tertile of the vegetable pattern was associated with a decreased risk of GDM (relative risk (RR) 0·79, 95% CI 0·64, 0·97), compared with the lowest tertile, whereas the highest tertile of the sweets and seafood pattern was associated with an increased risk of GDM (RR 1·23, 95% CI 1·02, 1·49). No significant association was found for either the protein-rich or the prudent pattern. The protective effect of a high vegetable pattern score was more evident among women who had a family history of diabetes (P for interaction=0·022). These findings suggest that the vegetable pattern was associated with a decreased risk of GDM, while the sweets and seafood pattern was associated with an increased risk of GDM. These findings may be useful in dietary counselling during pregnancy. PMID:25821944

  14. Heterogeneity of maternal characteristics and impact on gestational diabetes (GDM) risk-Implications for universal GDM screening?

    PubMed

    Huvinen, Emilia; Grotenfelt, Nora Elisabeth; Eriksson, Johan Gunnar; Rönö, Kristiina; Klemetti, Miira Marjuska; Roine, Risto; Pöyhönen-Alho, Maritta; Tiitinen, Aila; Andersson, Sture; Laivuori, Hannele; Knip, Mikael; Valkama, Anita; Meinilä, Jelena; Kautiainen, Hannu; Stach-Lempinen, Beata; Koivusalo, Saila Birgitta

    2016-02-01

    Objective To study the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in relation to phenotypic characteristics and gestational weight gain (GWG) among women at high risk for GDM. Materials and methods This is a secondary analysis of a GDM prevention study (RADIEL), a randomized controlled trial conducted in Finland. 269 women with a history of GDM and/or a pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2) were enrolled before 20 weeks of gestation and divided into four groups according to parity, BMI and previous history of GDM. The main outcome was incidence of GDM. Results There was a significant difference in incidence of GDM between the groups (p < 0.001). Women with a history of GDM and BMI <30 kg/m(2) showed the highest incidence (35.9%). At baseline they had fewer metabolic risk factors and by the second trimester they gained more weight. There was no interaction between GWG and GDM outcome and no significant difference in the prevalence of diabetes-associated antibodies. Conclusion Despite a healthier metabolic profile at baseline the non-obese women with a history of GDM displayed a markedly higher cumulative incidence of GDM. GWG and the presence of diabetes-associated antibodies were not associated with GDM occurrence among these high-risk women. Key message Despite a healthier metabolic profile at baseline the non-obese women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus display a markedly higher cumulative incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:26745028

  15. Association of polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene with gestational diabetes mellitus in Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Parul; Agarwal, Nutan; Das, Nibhriti; Dalal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous genes have been reported in relation with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but the findings were not consistently replicated across populations, or there have been no detailed studies on them. Previous literatures suggested that, out of all angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms, only ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism has a strong association with GDM in Asian Indian women. Aim: This study was devoted to evaluate the association of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A and I/D with GDM and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This study recruited 105 GDM cases, 119 Type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects and 120 controls. PCR-RFLP was used for identifying genotypes of ACE A240T, C1237T and G2350A and PCR was performed in the case of ACE I/D. Results: Significant associations of ACE SNP's, C1237T, and G2350A with GDM were observed. Haplotype analysis revealed the remarkably significant evidence of association with SNP combination ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A, and I/D with GDM patients (P = 0.024). Individuals possessing haplotype “TTAI” (frequency 30% in GDM and 0 in controls) derived from these SNPs had 185 fold increased risk of developing GDM (95% of confidence interval: 11.13–3102.15), which was highest when compared with other 15 haplotypes. Conclusion: Shorter-range haplotypes were also significant, but the only consistently associated alleles were found to be in ACE C1237T, G2350A, and I/D. These results suggested that the variant in close proximity to ACE C1237T, G2350A and/or I/D modulates susceptibility to GDM and noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Indian women. PMID:26958520

  16. The Role of Maternal Gestational Diabetes in Inducing Fetal Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Samar A; Liu, Wanting; Peng, Yonghong; Roberts, W; Whitelaw, Donald; Graham, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is known to be associated with fetal endothelial dysfunction, however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. This study examines the effect of maternal diabetes on fetal endothelial function and gene expression under physiological glucose conditions (5?mM). Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) isolated from diabetic mothers (d.HUVEC) grew more slowly than HUVEC isolated from healthy mothers (c.HUVEC) and had delayed doubling time despite increased levels of total vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and protein production as determined by real-time PCR and ELISA respectively. Using western blot, the levels of antiproliferative VEGF165b isoform were increased in d.HUVEC relative to c.HUVEC. Successful VEGF165b knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in increased proliferation of d.HUVEC measured by MTT, compared with negative siRNA control, to similar levels measured in c.HUVEC. In addition, d.HUVEC generated excess levels of ROS as revealed by 2',7' Dichlorodihydrofluorescein Diacetate (DCFH-DA) and Nitrotetrazolium blue (NBT). Using microarray, 102 genes were differentially overexpressed between d.HUVEC versus c.HUVEC (>1.5-fold change; P?diabetes induces persistent alterations in fetal endothelial function and gene expression following glucose normalization and antioxidant treatment could help reverse endothelium dysfunction. PMID:25808705

  17. Verification of the antidiabetic effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) using insulin-uncontrolled type 1 diabetic rats and cultured adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Fukushima, Misato; Ito, Yoshimasa; Muraki, Etsuko; Hosono, Takashi; Seki, Taiichiro; Ariga, Toyohiko

    2010-01-01

    It has long been believed that an intake of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) alleviates diabetic pathological conditions. However, it is still controversial whether the beneficial effect is insulin-dependent or insulin-mimetic. This study was aimed at determining the insulin-independent effect of cinnamon. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were divided into four groups and orally administered with an aqueous cinnamon extract (CE) for 22 d. The diabetic rats that had taken CE at a dose of more than 30 mg/kg/d were rescued from their hyperglycemia and nephropathy, and these rats were found to have upregulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in their brown adipose tissues as well as in their muscles. This was verified by using 3T3-L1 adipocytes in which CE upregulates GLUT4 translocation and increases the glucose uptake. CE exhibited its anti-diabetic effect independently from insulin by at least two mechanisms: i) upregulation of mitochondrial UCP-1, and ii) enhanced translocation of GLUT4 in the muscle and adipose tissues. PMID:21150113

  18. Fetal growth in relation to gestational weight gain in women with Type 2 diabetes: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Parellada, C B; Ásbjörnsdóttir, B; Ringholm, L; Damm, P; Mathiesen, E R

    2014-01-01

    Aims To evaluate fetal growth in relation to gestational weight gain in women with Type 2 diabetes. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 142 consecutive pregnancies in 28 women of normal weight, 39 overweight women and 75 obese women with Type 2 diabetes (pre-pregnancy BMI  < 25, 25–29.9,  ≥ 30 kg/m2, respectively). Gestational weight gain was categorized as excessive (exceeding the US Institute of Medicine recommendations) or as non-excessive (within or below the Institute of Medicine recommendations). Results Excessive and non-excessive gestational weight gain were seen in 61 (43%) and 81 women (57%) with a median (range) gestational weight gain of 14.3 (9–32) vs 7.0 (−5–16) kg (P < 0.001), respectively. Infants of women with excessive gestational weight gain were characterized by higher birth weight (3712 vs 3258 g; P = 0.001), birth weight z-score (1.14 vs -0.01, P = 0.001) and prevalence of large-for-gestational-age infants (48 vs 20%; P < 0.001). In normal weight, overweight and obese women with non-excessive gestational weight gain, the median weight gain in the first half of pregnancy was 371, 114 and 81 g/week, and in the second half of pregnancy 483, 427 and 439 g/week, respectively. In multiple linear regression analysis, gestational weight gain was associated with a higher infant birth weight z-score independent of pre-pregnancy BMI, smoking, HbA1c and insulin dose at last visit, ethnicity and parity [β=0.1 (95% CI 0.06–0.14), P < 0.001]. Conclusions Infant birth weight was almost 0.5 kg higher in women with Type 2 diabetes and excessive gestational weight gain than in women with Type 2 diabetes and non-excessive weight gain. PMID:25081349

  19. Prevention of Gestational Diabetes: Design of a Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial and One-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Annual prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is 12.5% among Finnish pregnant women. The prevalence is expected to rise with the increasing overweight among women before pregnancy. Physical activity and diet are both known to have favourable effects on insulin resistance and possibly on the risk of GDM. We aimed to investigate, whether GDM can be prevented by counseling on diet, physical activity and gestational weight gain during pregnancy. Methods/Design A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 14 municipalities in the southern part of Finland. Pairwise randomization was performed in order to take into account socioeconomic differences. Recruited women were at 8-12 weeks' gestation and fulfilled at least one of the following criteria: body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2, history of earlier gestational glucose intolerance or macrosomic newborn (> 4500 g), age ≥ 40 years, first or second degree relative with history of type 1 or 2 diabetes. Main exclusion criterion was pathological oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 8-12 weeks' gestation. The trial included one counseling session on physical activity at 8-12 weeks' gestation and one for diet at 16-18 weeks' gestation, and three to four booster sessions during other routine visits. In the control clinics women received usual care. Information on height, weight gain and other gestational factors was obtained from maternity cards. Physical activity, dietary intake and quality of life were followed by questionnaires during pregnancy and at 1-year postpartum. Blood samples for lipid status, hormones, insulin and OGTT were taken at 8-12 and 26-28 weeks' gestation and 1 year postpartum. Workability and return to work were elicited by a questionnaire at 1- year postpartum. Linkage to the national birth register of years 2007-2009 will provide information on perinatal complications and GDM incidence among the non-participants of the study. Cost-effectiveness evaluation will be based on quality-adjusted life years. This study has received ethical approval from the Ethical board of Pirkanmaa Hospital District. Discussion The study will provide information on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of gestational physical activity and dietary counseling on prevention of GDM in a risk group of women. Also information on the prevalence of GDM and postpartum metabolic syndrome will be gained. Results on maintaining the possible health behaviour changes are important in order to prevent chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Trial registration The trial is registered ISRCTN 33885819 PMID:20682023

  20. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dayeon; Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O

    2015-11-01

    Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16-41 years) included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice", "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese", and "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood". GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation <24 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GDM, after controlling for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP). All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14%) had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4-17.0) for "high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice" pattern, 7.5 (1.8-32.3) for "high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese" pattern, and 22.3 (3.9-127.4) for "high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood" pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake and log-transformed CRP. These findings suggest that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with risk of GDM after controlling for potential confounders. The observed connection between a high consumption of refined grains, fat, added sugars and low intake of fruits and vegetables during pregnancy with higher odds for GDM, are consistent with general health benefits of healthy diets, but warrants further research to understand underlying pathophysiology of GDM associated with dietary behaviors during pregnancy. PMID:26569302

  1. Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy Are Associated with Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dayeon; Lee, Kyung Won; Song, Won O.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal dietary patterns before and during pregnancy play important roles in the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We aimed to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy that are associated with GDM risk in pregnant U.S. women. From a 24 h dietary recall of 253 pregnant women (16–41 years) included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2012, food items were aggregated into 28 food groups based on Food Patterns Equivalents Database. Three dietary patterns were identified by reduced rank regression with responses including prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), dietary fiber, and ratio of poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acid: “high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice”, “high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese”, and “high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood”. GDM was diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose levels ≥5.1 mmol/L for gestation <24 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for GDM, after controlling for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, family poverty income ratio, marital status, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake, physical activity, and log-transformed C-reactive protein (CRP). All statistical analyses accounted for the appropriate survey design and sample weights of the NHANES. Of 249 pregnant women, 34 pregnant women (14%) had GDM. Multivariable AOR (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons between the highest vs. lowest tertiles were 4.9 (1.4–17.0) for “high refined grains, fats, oils and fruit juice” pattern, 7.5 (1.8–32.3) for “high nuts, seeds, fat and soybean; low milk and cheese” pattern, and 22.3 (3.9–127.4) for “high added sugar and organ meats; low fruits, vegetables and seafood” pattern after controlling for maternal sociodemographic variables, prepregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, energy intake and log-transformed CRP. These findings suggest that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with risk of GDM after controlling for potential confounders. The observed connection between a high consumption of refined grains, fat, added sugars and low intake of fruits and vegetables during pregnancy with higher odds for GDM, are consistent with general health benefits of healthy diets, but warrants further research to understand underlying pathophysiology of GDM associated with dietary behaviors during pregnancy. PMID:26569302

  2. Ultrasonographic visceral fat thickness in the first trimester can predict metabolic syndrome and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gur, Esra Bahar; Ince, Ozlem; Turan, Guluzar Arzu; Karadeniz, Muammer; Tatar, Sumeyra; Celik, Esin; Yalcin, Murat; Guclu, Serkan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether ultrasonographic visceral fat thickness measurement in the early gestational period is useful for predicting the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and metabolic syndrome (MS). The visceral fat thickness and subcutaneous fat thickness were measured via ultrasound at the first prenatal visit. The correlation between visceral and subcutaneous fat thickness and MS parameters, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, was assessed. We also compared the use of visceral fat thickness measurement with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) measurements for predicting the development of GDM. The subcutaneous fat thickness was found to be similar in the normal glucose metabolism and GDM groups at the first visit, whereas the visceral fat thickness was found to be considerably higher in the GDM groups (p = 0.04). The visceral fat thickness in the early stage of the gestation was correlated with hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, high diastolic blood pressure, and insulin resistance. In contrast to subcutaneous fat thickness, BMI, and WC, only the visceral fat thickness was correlated with insulin resistance. The subcutaneous and visceral fat thicknesses at the first visit were significantly higher in the MS group (p = 0.02). There was a good correlation between visceral and subcutaneous fat thicknesses (r = 0.492, p < 0.001); however, there were poor correlations between visceral fat thickness and BMI and WC (r = 0.338, p = 0.01; r = 0.312, p = 0.02). The visceral fat thickness seemed to be a more sensitive predictor of GDM than WC and BMI. The optimal cutoff points for predicting GDM were visceral fat thickness 19.5 mm [area under curve (AUC) = 0.66, p = 0.043], WC 103.5 cm (AUC = 0.64, p = 0.079), and BMI 34.5 (AUC = 0.64, p = 0.069). Ultrasonographic visceral fat thickness measurement in the early period of gestation may be an easy, safe, and cost-effective scan test for predicting the development of metabolic diseases and GDM. PMID:24452873

  3. Pregnancy Glycemia in Mexican-American Women Without Diabetes or Gestational Diabetes and Programming for Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Rosas, Lisa G.; Ferrara, Assiamira; King, Janet C.; Abrams, Barbara; Harley, Kim G.; Hedderson, Monique M.; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we estimated the association between pregnancy glucose levels and offspring body mass index (BMI) z scores at 2, 3.5, 5, and 7 years of age, as well as z score trajectories across this age range, among Mexican-American women without diabetes or gestational diabetes. Beginning in 19992000, the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas prospectively followed women from Monterey County, California (52 obese and 214 nonobese women) and their children. Plasma glucose values obtained 1 hour after a 50-g oral glucose load comprised the exposure. Offspring BMIs were compared with national data to calculate z scores. Increasing pregnancy glucose levels were associated with increased offspring BMI z scores at 7 years of age; a 1-mmol/L increase in glucose corresponded to an increase of 0.11 (standard deviation = 0.044) z-score units (P < 0.05). In nonobese women only, the mean z score over this age range increased with increasing glucose levels. The average BMI z score at 4.5 years of age increased by 0.12 (standard error, 0.059) units for each 1-mmol/L increase in glucose (P = 0.04). In obese women only, increasing glucose was associated with increases in BMI z score over time (P = 0.07). Whether interventions to reduce glucose values in women free of disease could mitigate childhood obesity remains unknown. PMID:23504745

  4. The stool microbiota of insulin resistant women with recent gestational diabetes, a high risk group for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fugmann, Marina; Breier, Michaela; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Banning, Friederike; Ferrari, Uta; Sacco, Vanessa; Grallert, Harald; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Seissler, Jochen; Clavel, Thomas; Lechner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked to metabolic diseases. However, information on the microbiome of young adults at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) is lacking. The aim of this cross-sectional analysis was to investigate whether insulin resistant women with previous gestational diabetes (pGDM), a high risk group for T2D, differ in their stool microbiota from women after a normoglycemic pregnancy (controls). Bacterial communities were analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing using fecal samples from 42 pGDM and 35 control subjects 3–16 months after delivery. Clinical characterization included a 5-point OGTT, anthropometrics, clinical chemistry markers and a food frequency questionnaire. Women with a Prevotellaceae-dominated intestinal microbiome were overrepresented in the pGDM group (p < 0.0001). Additionally, the relative abundance of the phylum Firmicutes was significantly lower in women pGDM (median 48.5 vs. 56.8%; p = 0.013). Taxa richness (alpha diversity) was similar between the two groups and with correction for multiple testing we observed no significant differences on lower taxonomic levels. These results suggest that distinctive features of the intestinal microbiota are already present in young adults at risk for T2D and that further investigations of a potential pathophysiological role of gut bacteria in early T2D development are warranted. PMID:26279179

  5. The Role of Untimed Blood Glucose in Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in a High Prevalent Diabetic Population

    PubMed Central

    Cuschieri, Sarah; Craus, Johann; Savona-Ventura, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Global prevalence increase of diabetes type 2 and gestational diabetes (GDM) has led to increased awareness and screening of pregnant women for GDM. Ideally screening for GDM should be done by an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT), which is laborious and time consuming. A randomized glucose test incorporated with anthropomorphic characteristics may be an appropriate cost-effective combined clinical and biochemical screening protocol for clinical practice as well as cutting down on oGTTs. A retrospective observational study was performed on a randomized sample of pregnant women who required an OGTT during their pregnancy. Biochemical and anthropomorphic data along with obstetric outcomes were statistically analyzed. Backward stepwise logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics curves were used to obtain a suitable predictor for GDM without an oGTT and formulate a screening protocol. Significant GDM predictive variables were fasting blood glucose (p = 0.0001) and random blood glucose (p = 0.012). Different RBG and FBG cutoff points with anthropomorphic characteristics were compared to carbohydrate metabolic status to diagnose GDM without oGTT, leading to a screening protocol. A screening protocol incorporating IADPSG diagnostic criteria, BMI, and different RBG and FBG criteria would help predict GDM among high-risk populations earlier and reduce the need for oGTT test. PMID:26998382

  6. The stool microbiota of insulin resistant women with recent gestational diabetes, a high risk group for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Marina; Breier, Michaela; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Banning, Friederike; Ferrari, Uta; Sacco, Vanessa; Grallert, Harald; Parhofer, Klaus G; Seissler, Jochen; Clavel, Thomas; Lechner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked to metabolic diseases. However, information on the microbiome of young adults at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) is lacking. The aim of this cross-sectional analysis was to investigate whether insulin resistant women with previous gestational diabetes (pGDM), a high risk group for T2D, differ in their stool microbiota from women after a normoglycemic pregnancy (controls). Bacterial communities were analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing using fecal samples from 42 pGDM and 35 control subjects 3-16 months after delivery. Clinical characterization included a 5-point OGTT, anthropometrics, clinical chemistry markers and a food frequency questionnaire. Women with a Prevotellaceae-dominated intestinal microbiome were overrepresented in the pGDM group (p < 0.0001). Additionally, the relative abundance of the phylum Firmicutes was significantly lower in women pGDM (median 48.5 vs. 56.8%; p = 0.013). Taxa richness (alpha diversity) was similar between the two groups and with correction for multiple testing we observed no significant differences on lower taxonomic levels. These results suggest that distinctive features of the intestinal microbiota are already present in young adults at risk for T2D and that further investigations of a potential pathophysiological role of gut bacteria in early T2D development are warranted. PMID:26279179

  7. Effects of gestational and overt diabetes on human placental cytochromes P450 and glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    McRobie, D J; Glover, D D; Tracy, T S

    1998-04-01

    The placenta possesses the ability to metabolize a number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds by processes similar to those seen in the liver. Animal and in vivo studies have observed that the presence of diabetes alters the expression of hepatic metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase); however, it is unknown whether similar alterations occur in the human placenta. To evaluate whether diabetes has any effect of placental xenobiotic metabolizing activity, the catalytic activities of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD, CYP1A1), chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation (CYP2E1), dextromethorphan N-demethylation (CYP3A4), dextromethorphan O-demethylation (CYP2D6), and 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) conjugation with glutathione (glutathione S-transferase, GST) from placentas of diet (class A1) and insulin-dependent (class A2) gestational diabetics and overt diabetics were compared with matched controls. EROD activity (CYP1A1) ranged from 0.29 to 2.67 pmol/min/mg protein. However, no differences were observed among overt or gestational diabetics and their respective matched controls. CDNB conjugation (GST) ranged from 0.275 to 1.65 units/min/mg protein. In contrast to that observed with CYP1A1, a small but statistically significant reduction in GST activity was noted in overt diabetics as compared with their matched controls and gestational diabetics. CYP2E1, 2D6, and 3A4 enzymatic activities were not detected in human placental tissue. GST protein was detectable in all tissues studied, but no CYP protein could be detected in any of the tissues. Thus, it seems that pregnant women with overt diabetes have reduced GST activity in the placenta, which could potentially result in the exposure of the fetus to harmful electrophiles. However, the full clinical significance of this finding remains to be elucidated. PMID:9531526

  8. Elevated extracellular glucose and uncontrolled type 1 diabetes enhance NFAT5 signaling and disrupt the transverse tubular network in mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hernndez-Ochoa, Erick O; Robison, Patrick; Contreras, Minerva; Shen, Tiansheng; Zhao, Zhiyong; Schneider, Martin F

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5) is a key protector from hypertonic stress in the kidney, but its role in skeletal muscle is unexamined. Here, we evaluate the effects of glucose hypertonicity and hyperglycemia on endogenous NFAT5 activity, transverse tubular system morphology and Ca2+ signaling in adult murine skeletal muscle fibers. We found that exposure to elevated glucose (2550 mmol/L) increased NFAT5 expression and nuclear translocation, and NFAT-driven transcriptional activity. These effects were insensitive to the inhibition of calcineurin A, but sensitive to both p38a mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase inhibition. Fibers exposed to elevated glucose exhibited disrupted transverse tubular morphology, characterized by swollen transverse tubules and an increase in longitudinal connections between adjacent transverse tubules. Ca2+ transients elicited by a single, brief electric field stimuli were increased in amplitude in fibers challenged by elevated glucose. Muscle fibers from type 1 diabetic mice exhibited increased NFAT5 expression and transverse tubule disruptions, but no differences in electrically evoked Ca2+ transients. Our results suggest the hypothesis that these changes in skeletal muscle could play a role in the pathophysiology of acute and severe hyperglycemic episodes commonly observed in uncontrolled diabetes. PMID:22966145

  9. Gestational diabetes mellitus: An update on the current international diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mukesh M

    2015-01-01

    The approach to screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) around the world is disorderly. The protocols for diagnosis vary not only in-between countries, but also within countries. Furthermore, in any country, this disparity occurs in-between its hospitals and often exists within a single hospital. There are many reasons for these differences. There is the lack of an international consensus among preeminent health organizations (e.g., American College of Gynecologists and World Health Organization). Often there is a disagreement between the country’s national diabetes organization, its local health society and its regional obstetric organization with each one recommending a different option for approaching GDM. Sometimes the causes for following an alternate approach are very obvious, e.g., a resource strapped hospital is unable to follow the ivory-tower demanding recommendation of its obstetric organization. But more often than not, the rationale for following or not following a guideline, or following different guideline within the same geographic area is without any perceivable explanation. This review is an attempt to understand the problems afflicting the screening and diagnosis of GDM globally. It traces the major temporal changes in the diagnostic criteria of (1) some respected health organizations; and (2) a few selected countries. With an understanding of the reasons for this disparity, a way forward can be found to reach the ultimate goal: a single global guideline for GDM followed worldwide. PMID:26131321

  10. The Human Colostrum Whey Proteome Is Altered in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of human milk has been used to identify the comprehensive cargo of proteins involved in immune and cellular function. Very little is known about the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on lactation and breast milk components. The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of GDM on the expression of proteins in the whey fraction of human colostrum. Colostrum was collected from women who were diagnosed with (n = 6) or without (n = 12) GDM at weeks 24–28 in pregnancy. Colostral whey was analyzed for protein abundances using high-resolution, high-mass accuracy liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 601 proteins were identified, of which 260 were quantified using label free spectral counting. Orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis identified 27 proteins that best predict GDM. The power law global error model corrected for multiple testing was used to confirm that 10 of the 27 proteins were also statistically significantly different between women with versus without GDM. The identified changes in protein expression suggest that diabetes mellitus during pregnancy has consequences on human colostral proteins involved in immunity and nutrition. PMID:25338220

  11. Does Maternal BMI Influence Treatment Effect in Women with Mild Gestational Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Brian M.; Mele, Lisa; Landon, Mark B.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Ramin, Susan M.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Thorp, John M.; Catalano, Patrick; Harper, Margaret; Saade, George; Sorokin, Yoram; Peaceman, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether maternal body mass index (BMI) influences the beneficial effects of diabetes treatment in women with gestational diabetes (GDM). Study Design Secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized treatment trial of women with GDM. Outcomes of interest were elevated umbilical cord c-peptide levels (>90th percentile 1.77 ng/mL), LGA birth weight (>90th percentile), and neonatal fat mass (g). Women were grouped into five BMI categories adapted from the WHO International Classification of normal, overweight, and obese adults. Outcomes were analyzed according to treatment group assignment. Results A total of 958 women were enrolled (485 treated and 473 controls). Maternal BMI at enrollment was not related to umbilical cord c-peptide levels. However, treatment of women in the overweight, Class I, and Class II obese categories was associated with a reduction in both LGA birth weight and neonatal fat mass. Neither measure of excess fetal growth was reduced with treatment in normal weight (BMI <25) or Class III (BMI ≥ 40) obese women. Conclusion There was a beneficial effect of treatment on fetal growth in women with mild GDM who were overweight or Class I and II obese. These effects were not apparent for normal weight and very obese women. PMID:24839145

  12. The human colostrum whey proteome is altered in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Grapov, Dmitry; Lemay, Danielle G; Weber, Darren; Phinney, Brett S; Azulay Chertok, Ilana R; Gho, Deborah S; German, J Bruce; Smilowitz, Jennifer T

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of human milk has been used to identify the comprehensive cargo of proteins involved in immune and cellular function. Very little is known about the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on lactation and breast milk components. The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of GDM on the expression of proteins in the whey fraction of human colostrum. Colostrum was collected from women who were diagnosed with (n = 6) or without (n = 12) GDM at weeks 24-28 in pregnancy. Colostral whey was analyzed for protein abundances using high-resolution, high-mass accuracy liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 601 proteins were identified, of which 260 were quantified using label free spectral counting. Orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis identified 27 proteins that best predict GDM. The power law global error model corrected for multiple testing was used to confirm that 10 of the 27 proteins were also statistically significantly different between women with versus without GDM. The identified changes in protein expression suggest that diabetes mellitus during pregnancy has consequences on human colostral proteins involved in immunity and nutrition. PMID:25338220

  13. Gestational diabetes - metabolic risks of adult women with respect to birth weight.

    PubMed

    Vejrazkova, D; Lukasova, P; Vankova, M; Bradnova, O; Vacinova, G; Vcelak, J; Cirmanova, V; Andelova, K; Krejci, H; Bendlova, B

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disorders such as obesity, insulin resistance and other components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) are connected with birth weight. Low and high birth weight is associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, the mechanism is not clear. In this study, we evaluated the association between birth weight and anthropometric as well as biochemical components of MetS in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in comparison with control women. In part of the GDM group, we re-evaluated metabolic changes over 5-8 years. Anthropometry, blood pressure, glucose metabolism during the 3-h oGTT, lipid profile, uric acid, thyroid hormones, and liver enzymes were assessed. From the analyzed components of MetS in adult women we proved the association of low birth weight (birth weight <25th percentile) with glucose processing, in particular among women with a history of GDM. Low birth weight GDM women revealed significantly higher postchallenge insulin secretion and lower peripheral insulin sensitivity. Re-examinations indicate this association persists long after delivery. PMID:26680474

  14. Experimental Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Induces Blunted Vasoconstriction and Functional Changes in the Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Tufiño, Cecilia; Villanueva-López, Cleva; Ibarra-Barajas, Maximiliano; Bracho-Valdés, Ismael; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa Amalia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic conditions increase vascular reactivity to angiotensin II in several studies but there are scarce reports on cardiovascular effects of hypercaloric diet (HD) induced gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), so the objective of this work was to determine the effects of HD induced GDM on vascular responses. Angiotensin II as well as phenylephrine induced vascular contraction was tested in isolated aorta rings with and without endothelium from rats fed for 7 weeks (4 before and 3 weeks during pregnancy) with standard (SD) or hypercaloric (HD) diet. Also, protein expression of AT1R, AT2R, COX-1, COX-2, NOS-1, and NOS-3 and plasma glucose, insulin, and angiotensin II levels were measured. GDM impaired vasoconstrictor response (P < 0.05 versus SD) in intact (e+) but not in endothelium-free (e−) vessels. Losartan reduced GDM but not SD e− vasoconstriction (P < 0.01 versus SD). AT1R, AT2R, and COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression were significantly increased in GDM vessels (P < 0.05 versus SD). Results suggest an increased participation of endothelium vasodilator mediators, probably prostaglandins, as well as of AT2 vasodilator receptors as a compensatory mechanism for vasoconstrictor changes generated by experimental GDM. Considering the short term of rat pregnancy findings can reflect early stage GDM adaptations. PMID:25610861

  15. Relationship between High Serum Cystatin C Levels and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huaping; Huang, Yajuan; Liu, Fang; Tao, Minfang; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Aims Serum cystatin C (CysC) has recently been shown to be associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and progression to the pre-diabetic state. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between serum CysC and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Chinese pregnant women. Methods This cross-sectional study consisted of 400 pregnant women including111 with GDM and 289 with normal glucose tolerance at 24–28 weeks of gestation. The subjects were further divided into four groups according to the CysC quartiles, and their clinical characteristics were compared. The serum CysC concentration was measured using immunoturbidimetry and the degree of insulin resistance was assessed by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results Serum CysC levels were significantly higher in pregnant women with GDM than in the healthy pregnant women[1.0(0.8–1.8) vs 0.7(0.6–1.0), P<0.01). The Spearman’s correlation analysis showed that serum CysC was positively associated with HOMA-IR(r = 0.118, P<0.05) and the occurrence of GDM(r = 0.348, P<0.01). The pregnant women were divided into quartiles according to their serum CysC concentrations. Compared to the first quartile, pregnant women in Q2 (OR, 2.441; P = 0.025), Q3 (OR, 3.383; P = 0.001) and Q4 (OR, 5.516; P<0.001) had higher risk of GDM after adjusted for age, BMI, HbA1c and HOMA-IR. Further, with a rise in the serum CysC, there was an increasing trend in the HOMA-IR levels (P<0.05). A binary logistic regression analysis after adjusting for other confounding variables revealed a significant and independent association between serum CysC and GDM [OR = 14.269; 95% confidence interval, 4.977–40.908, P<0.01].The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the optimal cutoff point for serum CysC to indicate GDM was 0.95mg/L. Conclusions Serum CysC is significantly and independently associated with insulin resistance and GDM. It may be a helpful biomarker to identify the risk of GDM in Chinese pregnant women. PMID:26849560

  16. Exposure to Maternal Gestational Diabetes Is Associated With Higher Cardiovascular Responses to Stress in Adolescent Indians

    PubMed Central

    Veena, Sargoor R.; Jones, Alexander; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Osmond, Clive; Karat, Samuel C.; Kurpad, Anura V.; Fall, Caroline H. D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Altered endocrinal and autonomic nervous system responses to stress may link impaired intra-uterine growth with later cardiovascular disease. Objective: To test the hypothesis that offspring of gestational diabetic mothers (OGDM) have high cortisol and cardiosympathetic responses during the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C). Design: Adolescents from a birth cohort in India (n = 213; mean age, 13.5 y), including 26 OGDM, 22 offspring of diabetic fathers (ODF), and 165 offspring of nondiabetic parents (controls) completed 5 minutes each of public speaking and mental arithmetic tasks in front of two unfamiliar “evaluators” (TSST-C). Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured at baseline and at regular intervals after the TSST-C. Heart rate, blood pressure (BP), stroke volume, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance were measured continuously at baseline, during the TSST-C, and for 10 minutes after the test using a finger cuff; the beat-to-beat values were averaged for these periods. Results: Cortisol and cardiosympathetic parameters increased from baseline during stress (P < .001). OGDM had greater systolic BP (mean difference, 5.6 mm Hg), cardiac output (0.5 L/min), and stroke volume (4.0 mL) increases and a lower total peripheral resistance rise (125 dyn · s/cm5) than controls during stress. ODF had greater systolic BP responses than controls (difference, 4.1 mm Hg); there was no difference in other cardiosympathetic parameters. Cortisol responses were similar in all three groups. Conclusions: Maternal diabetes during pregnancy is associated with higher cardiosympathetic stress responses in the offspring, which may contribute to their higher cardiovascular disease risk. Further research may confirm stress-response programming as a predictor of cardiovascular risk in OGDM. PMID:25478935

  17. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus is Strongly Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, Veeral H.; Gunderson, Erica P.; VanWagner, Lisa B.; Lewis, Cora E.; Carr, John J.; Terrault, Norah A.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is central to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an early marker of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that a history of GDM would identify women at higher risk of NAFLD in middle age. Women from the multicenter Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) cohort study who delivered ≥ 1 birth, were free of diabetes prior to pregnancy(ies), and underwent CT quantification of hepatic steatosis 25 years following cohort entry (Y25: 2010–2011) were included (n = 1115). History of GDM by self-report, validated in a subsample by review of antenatal glucose testing, and metabolic risk factors were assessed prospectively. NAFLD was defined by liver attenuation (LA) ≤ 40 Hounsfield Units on CT scan after exclusion of other causes of hepatic steatosis. Of 1,115 women meeting selection criteria (57% black, 43% white, median age 25 years at baseline), 124 (11%) reported a history of GDM and 75 (7%) met the CT definition for NAFLD at year 25. The crude risk of NAFLD at the 25-year visit was significantly higher in women with GDM compared to those without (14% vs. 5.8%, OR: 2.56, 95% CI: 1.44–4.55, p<0.01). History of GDM remained associated with NAFLD (OR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.23–4.27, p=0.01) after adjustment for covariates in multivariable logistic regression. Addition of incident diabetes mellitus (DM) into the final model attenuated the association between GDM and NAFLD (OR: 1.48, 95% CI: 0.73 – 3.02, p=0.28). Conclusion GDM is a risk marker for NAFLD and represents an opportunity to identify women at risk for NAFLD at a young age and may be mediated by the development of incident DM. PMID:27002796

  18. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus recurrence--effect of ethnicity and parity: a metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Naama; Nachum, Zohar; Green, Manfred S

    2015-09-01

    Reports on the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) recurrence rate have been highly variable. Our objectives were to examine the possible causes of GDM recurrence rate variability and to obtain pooled estimates in subgroups. We have carried out a systematic review and metaanalysis based on the Metaanalysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement. We identified papers published from 1973 to September 2014. We identified papers using Medline (PubMed and Ovid), ClinicalTrials.gov and Google Scholar databases, and published references. We included only English-language, population-based studies that reported specified GDM criteria and GDM recurrence rate. A total of 18 eligible studies with 19,053 participants were identified. We used the Cochrane's Q test of heterogeneity to choose the model for estimating the pooled GDM recurrence rate. Metaregression was also used to explore the possible causes of variability between studies. The pooled GDM recurrence rate was 48% (95% confidence interval, 41-54%). A significant association between ethnicity and GDM recurrence rate was found (P = .02). Non-Hispanic whites had lower recurrence rate compared with other ethnicities (39% and 56%, respectively). Primiparous women had a lower recurrence rate compared with multiparous women (40% and 73%, respectively; P < .0001) No evidence for association between family history of diabetes and GDM recurrence was found. The overall GDM recurrence rate is high. Non-Hispanic whites and primiparous women have substantially lower GDM recurrence rates, which contributes to the variability between studies. Because no association between family history of diabetes and GDM recurrence was found, the large differences between ethnic groups may have also resulted from nongenetic factors. Thus, intervention programs could reduce the GDM recurrence rates. PMID:25757637

  19. Combined use of basal insulin analog and acarbose reduces postprandial glucose in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Ahn, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Dae-Ho; Kim, Hye-Soon; Shon, Ho-Sang; Jeon, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Tae-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jae-Taek; Han, Sung-Min; Chung, Choon-Hee; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Min; Lee, Soon-Hee; Kwon, Min-Jeong; Kim, Tae-kyun; Namgoong, Il-Seong; Kim, Eun-Sook; Jung, In-Kyung; Moon, Sung-Dae; Han, Je-Ho; Kim, Chong-Hwa; Cho, Eun-Hee; Kim, Ki-Young; Park, Hee-Baek; Lee, Ki-Sang; Lee, Sung-Woo; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kang, Cheol-Min; Jeon, Byung-Sook; Song, Min-Seop; Yun, Seung-Baik; Chung, Hyung-Keun; Seong, Jong-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Yi; Cha, Bong-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Early initiation of basal insulin therapy is recommended for normalizing fasting blood glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, basal insulin treatment might not adequately control postprandial glucose levels. The present study evaluated whether the combination of the α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose, and basal insulin improved blood glucose control under daily-life treatment conditions in a large sample of Korean patients. Materials and Methods The present study was a multicenter, prospective, observational study under daily-life treatment conditions. A total of 539 patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with basal insulin and additional acarbose were enrolled and followed up for 20 weeks. Changes in hemoglobin A1c, fasting and postprandial blood glucose were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the observation period. The physician and patient satisfaction of the combination treatment and safety were assessed. Results Hemoglobin A1c decreased by 0.55 ± 1.05% from baseline (P < 0.0001). Fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels were reduced by 0.89 ± 3.79 and 2.59 ± 4.77 mmol/L (both P < 0.0001). The most frequently reported adverse drug reactions were flatulence (0.37%) and abnormal gastrointestinal sounds (0.37%), and all were mild in intensity and transient. In the satisfaction evaluation, 79.0% of physicians and 77.3% of patients were ‘very satisfied’ or ‘satisfied’ with the combined basal insulin and acarbose therapy. Conclusions Combination therapy of basal insulin and acarbose in patients with type 2 diabetes improved glucose control, and had no drug-specific safety concerns, suggesting that the treatment might benefit individuals who cannot control blood glucose with basal insulin alone. PMID:25802730

  20. Social Support Modifies the Association Between Household Food Insecurity and Depression Among Latinos with Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Julie; Damio, Grace; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Chhabra, Jyoti; Vega-López, Sonia; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of depression is high among individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). The objective of the current study was to identify the socio-demographic, psychosocial, cultural, and clinical risk factors that predispose to depression, and resources that protect from depression among low income Latinos with T2D. Participants (N = 211) were interviewed in their homes upon enrollment. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with depressive symptoms based on a score of ≥21 on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Lower household income, interference of diabetes with daily activities, and more T2D clinical symptoms were associated with depression risk in the multivariate analyses. At each level of food insecurity the risk of depression was lower the higher the level of social support (P < 0.05). Findings suggest that social support buffers against the negative influence of household food insecurity on depression risk. A comprehensive approach is necessary to address the mental health needs of low income Latinos with T2D. PMID:21789561

  1. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule and Endogenous NOS Inhibitor: Asymmetric Dimethylarginine in Pregnant Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Poniedziałek-Czajkowska, Elżbieta; Mierzyński, Radzisław; Szymula, Dariusz; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bożena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM-1) and endogenous NOS inhibitor, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), as markers of endothelium dysfunction in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Patients and Methods. The levels of s-ICAM-1 and ADMA were analysed in the group of 56 patients with GDM and compared to 25 healthy pregnant women. The concentrations of s-ICAM-1 and ADMA were measured in serum using ELISA tests. Results. The groups did not differ by baseline descriptors: age (30.75 ± 6.32 versus 28.50 ± 4.95 years, NS) and gestational age (28.96 ± 2.85 versus 29.12 ± 2.96 hbd, NS). The patients with GDM were more obese (BMI 27.93 ± 7.02 versus 22.34 ± 4.21 kg/m2, p = 0.032) and had higher concentration of C-reactive protein (6.46 ± 6.03 versus 3.18 ± 3.83 mg/L, p = 0.029). In the GDM group the level of ADMA was lower (0.38 ± 0.17 versus 0.60 ± 0.28 μmol/L, p = 0.001) and the level of s-ICAM-1 was significantly higher (289.95 ± 118.12 versus 232.56 ± 43.31 ng/mL, p = 0.036) compared to controls. Conclusions. The pregnant women with GDM are characterized by higher concentration of s-ICAM-1 that reflects the activation and dysfunction of the endothelial cells. The decreased ADMA level in GDM patients seems to be preventive in the limitation of NO synthesis caused by the impaired insulin action and the endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26981539

  2. Effect of an Exercise Intervention on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Carrie; Marcus, Bess H.; Stanek, Edward J.; Braun, Barry; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Solomon, Caren G.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of an individually-tailored, motivationally-matched prenatal exercise intervention on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and other measures of glucose intolerance among ethnically diverse prenatal care patients at increased risk for GDM. Methods The Behaviors Affecting Baby and You Study randomized eligible women at a mean (SD) of 18.2 (4.1) weeks gestation to a 12-week individually tailored, motivationally matched exercise intervention or a comparison health and wellness intervention. The goal of the exercise intervention was to achieve the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines for physical activity during pregnancy. Diagnosis of GDM, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), abnormal glucose screen, and screening glucose values (mg/dL) were abstracted from medical records. A sample size of 352 women (176 per group) was planned to have 80% power to detect reductions in risk of 35% or larger. Results From July, 2007 to December, 2012, a total of 251 (86.5%) women completed the intervention; n=124 and 127 in the exercise and comparison interventions, respectively. Based on an intention-to-treat analysis, no statistically significant differences between the intervention groups were observed; the relative odds of GDM in the exercise group was 0.61 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.28–1.32) as compared to the health and wellness comparison group. Odds ratios for IGT and abnormal glucose screen were 0.68 (95% CI 0.35–1.34) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.51–1.47), respectively. The intervention had no effect on birth outcomes. Conclusion In this randomized trial among ethnically diverse pregnant women at increased risk for GDM, we found that a prenatal exercise intervention implemented in the second trimester did not result in a statistically significant reduction in relative odds for GDM, IGT, or abnormal glucose screen. PMID:25932848

  3. Biological and biochemical characteristics of a Mediterranean population with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Savona-Ventura, Charles; Vassallo, Josanne; Craus, Johann; Anastasiou, Eleni; Jotic, Aleksandra; Lalic, Nebojsa M; Slama, Claude Ben; Loscos, Adele Rovira; Napoli, Angela; Roma, Giona

    2016-05-01

    The interplay of various nutrients provided to the developing foetus determines the growth potential of the conceptus. This study assessed the inter-relationship between these nutrients in a Mediterranean population including 1062 pregnant, previously non-diabetic women. These underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) and were accordingly classified into gestational hyperglycaemic and normoglycaemic groups. Fasting insulin, HbA1c, and lipid profiles were further assessed, and the anthropomorphic characteristics of the mother and child at birth were measured. Lipid profiles were compared between the two groups and related to the biological characteristics of the mother and child at birth. Gestational hyperglycaemia was significantly associated with elevated triglycerides (P<0.0001) and decreased low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (P=0.02). There were no significant changes in total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Maternal BMI correlated positively with the various glycaemic indices (P<0.0001) and triglycerides (P<0.0001), but inversely with cholesterol (P<0.0001), HDL-C (P<0.0001) and LDL-C (P<0.0001). The infant birth weight correlated positively with maternal body weight (P<0.0001), LDL-C (P<0.0001) and the glycaemic indices (P<0.0001), but negatively with cholesterol (P<0.0001), triglycerides (P<0.0001), HDL-C (P<0.0001) and FBG (P<0.0001). This study confirms that the maternal body mass index (BMI), insulin resistance, and LDL-C levels positively contribute towards foetal growth, whereas a negative correlation was noted with cholesterol, triglycerides, and HDL-C. PMID:26021548

  4. Maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and overweight and obesity in offspring: a study in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y L; Ma, R M; Lao, T T; Chen, Z; Du, M Y; Liang, K; Huang, Y K; Zhang, L; Yang, M H; Sun, Y H; Li, H; Ding, Z B

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and breast feeding on childhood overweight and obesity in a mainland Chinese population. The incidence of and factors associated with overweight and obesity were compared between children of mothers with (n=1068) and without (n=1756) GDM. The independent roles of the associated factors were examined by multiple logistic regression analysis. The incidence of overweight was higher (16.6 v. 12.6%, P=0.002) in the GDM group, but that of obesity was not different (10.7 v. 12.0%, P=0.315). At age 1-2 and 2-5 years, no difference in overweight (11.0 v. 12.0%, P=0.917, and 15.7 v. 14.6%, P=0.693, respectively) was found, while obesity (8.0 v. 13.6%, P=0.019, and 8.4 v. 13.4%, P=0.014, respectively) was less frequent in the GDM offspring. At age 5-10 years, increased overweight (22.2 v. 12.1%, P<0.001) and obesity (15.9 v. 9.0%, P=0.001) were found in the GDM group, which was associated with maternal obesity, being born large-for-gestational age, male gender and formula feeding. After adjusting for confounding factors, GDM remained an independent determinant of offspring overweight and obesity (aOR 2.28, 95% CI 1.61-3.22), suggesting that the effects of GDM were independent of breast feeding, as well as of maternal obesity and birth size. PMID:26496961

  5. Identifying postpartum intervention approaches to prevent type 2 diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Despite this "window of opportunity," few intervention studies have targeted postpartum women with a history of GDM. We sought perspectives of women with a history of GDM to identify a) barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum, and b) specific intervention approaches that would facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle intervention program. Methods We used mixed methods to gather data from women with a prior history of GDM, including focus groups and informant interviews. Analysis of focus groups relied on grounded theory and used open-coding to categorize data by themes, while frequency distributions were used for the informant interviews. Results Of 38 women eligible to participate in focus groups, only ten women were able to accommodate their schedules to attend a focus group and 15 completed informant interviews by phone. We analyzed data from 25 women (mean age 35, mean pre-pregnancy BMI 28, 52% Caucasian, 20% African American, 12% Asian, 8% American Indian, 8% refused to specify). Themes from the focus groups included concern about developing type 2 diabetes, barriers to changing diet, and barriers to increasing physical activity. In one focus group, women expressed frustration about feeling judged by their physicians during their GDM pregnancy. Cited barriers to lifestyle change were identified from both methods, and included time and financial constraints, childcare duties, lack of motivation, fatigue, and obstacles at work. Informants suggested facilitators for lifestyle change, including nutrition education, accountability, exercise partners/groups, access to gyms with childcare, and home exercise equipment. All focus group and informant interview participants reported access to the internet, and the majority expressed interest in an intervention program delivered primarily via the internet that would include the opportunity to work with a lifestyle coach. Conclusion Time constraints were a major barrier. Our findings suggest that an internet-based lifestyle intervention program should be tested as a novel approach to prevent type 2 diabetes in postpartum women with a history of GDM. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01102530 PMID:21435246

  6. Prevention of gestational diabetes through lifestyle intervention: study design and methods of a Finnish randomized controlled multicenter trial (RADIEL)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal overweight, obesity and consequently the incidence of gestational diabetes are increasing rapidly worldwide. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a combined diet and physical activity intervention implemented before, during and after pregnancy in a primary health care setting for preventing gestational diabetes, later type 2 diabetes and other metabolic consequences. Methods RADIEL is a randomized controlled multi-center intervention trial in women at high risk for diabetes (a previous history of gestational diabetes or prepregnancy BMI ≥30 kg/m2). Participants planning pregnancy or in the first half of pregnancy were parallel-group randomized into an intervention arm which received lifestyle counseling and a control arm which received usual care given at their local antenatal clinics. All participants visited a study nurse every three months before and during pregnancy, and at 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months postpartum. Measurements and laboratory tests were performed on all participants with special focus on dietary and exercise habits and metabolic markers. Of the 728 women [mean age 32.5 years (SD 4.7); median parity 1 (range 0-9)] considered to be eligible for the study 235 were non-pregnant and 493 pregnant [mean gestational age 13 (range 6 to 18) weeks] at the time of enrollment. The proportion of nulliparous women was 29.8% (n = 217). Out of all participants, 79.6% of the non-pregnant and 40.4% of the pregnant women had previous gestational diabetes and 20.4% of the non-pregnant and 59.6% of the pregnant women were recruited because of a prepregnancy BMI ≥30 kg/m2. Mean BMI at first visit was 30.1 kg/m2 (SD 6.2) in the non-pregnant and 32.7 kg/m2 (SD 5.6) in the pregnant group. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first randomized lifestyle intervention trial, which includes, besides the pregnancy period, both the prepregnancy and the postpartum period. This study design also provides an opportunity to focus upon the health of the next generation. The study is expected to produce novel information on the optimal timing and setting of interventions and for allocating resources to prevent obesity and diabetes in women of reproductive age. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01698385 PMID:24524674

  7. Association of Atmospheric Particulate Matter and Ozone with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui; Ha, Sandie; Henderson, Barron H.; Warner, Tamara D.; Roth, Jeffrey; Kan, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Background Ambient air pollution has been linked to the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However, evidence of the association is very limited, and no study has estimated the effects of ozone. Objective Our aim was to determine the association of prenatal exposures to particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) with GDM. Methods We used Florida birth vital statistics records to investigate the association between the risk of GDM and two air pollutants (PM2.5 and O3) among 410,267 women who gave birth in Florida between 2004 and 2005. Individual air pollution exposure was assessed at the woman’s home address at time of delivery using the hierarchical Bayesian space–time statistical model. We further estimated associations between air pollution exposures during different trimesters and GDM. Results After controlling for nine covariates, we observed increased odds of GDM with per 5-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (ORTrimester1 = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.21; ORTrimester2 = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.20; ORPregnancy = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.26) and per 5-ppb increase in O3 (ORTrimester1 = 1.09; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.11; ORTrimester2 = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.14; ORPregnancy = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.21) during both the first trimester and second trimester as well as the full pregnancy in single-pollutant models. Compared with the single-pollutant model, the ORs for O3 were almost identical in the co-pollutant model. However, the ORs for PM2.5 during the first trimester and the full pregnancy were attenuated, and no association was observed for PM2.5 during the second trimester in the co-pollutant model (OR = 1.02; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.07). Conclusion This population-based study suggests that exposure to air pollution during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of GDM in Florida, USA. Citation Hu H, Ha S, Henderson BH, Warner TD, Roth J, Kan H, Xu X. 2015. Association of atmospheric particulate matter and ozone with gestational diabetes mellitus. Environ Health Perspect 123:853–859; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408456 PMID:25794412

  8. AB031. Standardizing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus diagnostic criteria and systematic management in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huixia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes has been dramatically increasing and becoming a major public issue in China. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common complications during pregnancy causing severe complications both for the gravida and offspring without systematic management. Furthermore, GDM can also increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome for the mother and offspring in the long-term. However, several issues regarding GDM are still controversial such as systematical screening, diagnosis strategy and management as well as postpartum follow up issues. Our study aimed to standardize GDM diagnostic criteria and systematic management in China. Methods We have conducted multiple studies to verify the adverse outcome of GDM and establish suitable screening and diagnostic criteria for GDM of our country. Such as Prospective case control study and large clinical researches, large clinical multicenter study and randomized controlled trial. Results Through a prospective case control study and large clinical researches, we confirmed it is beneficial to monitor and control blood glucose level during pregnancy. As early as 1993 we have reported blood glucose management playing important role in reducing adverse outcome, also proposed full term GDM patients can not routinely to promote fetal lung maturity before termination of pregnancy. After standardized management of GDM, the perinatal mortality and incidence of macrosomia had been significantly decreased. Through the research of threshold on 50 g Glucose Challenge Test (GCT) and the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), we gradually established suitable screening and diagnostic criteria for GDM of our country. We proposed to cancel 75 g OGTT 3 h value based on 535 GDM cases before the international new recommendation in 2010. According to the research of more than 16,000 cases of GDM multicenter study, principal investigator composed the national GDM clinical recommendations and published it in 2007. Ministry of health in China finally approved the new GDM diagnostic guideline we drafted. We initially cooperated with endocrinologists and pediatricians and opened the GDM postpartum follow up clinic as well as did early interventions to the offspring in order to decrease the Type 2 diabetes incidence later in their life. Furthermore, we opened GDM one-day clinic in 2011 and ultimately achieved national extension. Conclusions It is important to standardize GDM diagnostic criteria and systematic management in China. Controlled the incidence of GDM could reduce the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in China and decrease the adverse effects on the offspring. It is instant for the obstetrician, nutrition doctor, endocrinologist, and pediatrician making joint efforts to systematically manage GDM in China.

  9. Health system and societal barriers for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) services - lessons from World Diabetes Foundation supported GDM projects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality and morbidity remains high in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) represents an underestimated and unrecognised impediment to optimal maternal health in LMIC; left untreated – it also has severe consequences for the offspring. A better understanding of the barriers hindering detection and treatment of GDM is needed. Based on experiences from World Diabetes Foundation (WDF) supported GDM projects this paper seeks to investigate societal and health system barriers to such efforts. Methods Questionnaires were filled out by 10 WDF supported GDM project partners implementing projects in eight different LMIC. In addition, interviews were conducted with the project partners. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. Results Barriers to improving maternal health related to GDM nominated by project implementers included lack of trained health care providers - especially female doctors; high staff turnover; lack of standard protocols, consumables and equipment; financing of health services and treatment; lack of or poor referral systems, feedback mechanisms and follow-up systems; distance to health facility; perceptions of female body size and weight gain/loss in relation to pregnancy; practices related to pregnant women’s diet; societal negligence of women’s health; lack of decision-making power among women regarding their own health; stigmatisation; role of women in society and expectations that the pregnant woman move to her maternal home for delivery. Conclusions A number of barriers within the health system and society exist. Programmes need to consider and address these barriers in order to improve GDM care and thereby maternal health in LMIC. PMID:23217159

  10. Identifying Postpartum Intervention Approaches to Reduce Cardiometabolic Risk Among American Indian Women With Prior Gestational Diabetes, Oklahoma, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Peercy, Michael; Woods, J. Cedric; Parker, Stephany P.; Jackson, Teresa; Mata, Sara A.; McCage, Shondra; Levkoff, Sue E.; Nicklas, Jacinda M.; Seely, Ellen W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Innovative approaches are needed to reduce cardiometabolic risk among American Indian women with a history of gestational diabetes. We assessed beliefs of Oklahoma American Indian women about preventing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease after having gestational diabetes. We also assessed barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum and intervention approaches that facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle program. Methods In partnership with a tribal health system, we conducted a mixed-method study with American Indian women aged 19 to 45 years who had prior gestational diabetes, using questionnaires, focus groups, and individual interviews. Questionnaires were used to identify women’s cardiometabolic risk perceptions and feasibility and acceptability of Internet or mobile phone technology for delivery of a postpartum lifestyle modification program. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted to identify key perspectives and preferences related to a potential program. Results Participants were 26 women, all of whom completed surveys; 11 women participated in focus group sessions, and 15 participated in individual interviews. Most women believed they would inevitably develop diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or both; however, they were optimistic that they could delay onset with lifestyle change. Most women expressed enthusiasm for a family focused, technology-based intervention that emphasizes the importance of delaying disease onset, provides motivation, and promotes accountability while accommodating women’s competing priorities. Conclusions Our findings suggest that an intervention that uses the Internet, text messaging, or both and that emphasizes the benefits of delaying disease onset should be tested as a novel, culturally relevant approach to reducing rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this high-risk population. PMID:25837258

  11. Transient gestational diabetes insipidus diagnosed in successive pregnancies: review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and management of delivery.

    PubMed

    Kalelioglu, Ibrahim; Kubat Uzum, Ayse; Yildirim, Alkan; Ozkan, Tulay; Gungor, Funda; Has, Recep

    2007-01-01

    Gestational diabetes insipidus (GDI) is a rare disorder characterised by polyuria, polydypsia, and excessive thirst usually manifesting in the third trimester of pregnancy. The etiology is thought to depend on excessive vasopressinase activity, a placental enzyme that degrades arginine-vasopressin (AVP), but not 1-deamino-8-D: -arginine vasopressin (dDAVP), which is a synthetic form. This is a transient syndrome and may be associated with acute fatty liver of pregnancy and preeclampsia. The use of dDAVP in symptomatic cases has been proven as a safe method for both the mother and the fetus during the pregnancy. We report a case of recurrent gestational diabetes insipidus in successive pregnancies, which responded to dDAVP and subsided after delivery. PMID:17308961

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adherence and Depression (CBT-AD) in Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S.; Wexler, Deborah J.; Psaros, Christina; Delahanty, Linda M.; Blashill, Aaron J.; Margolina, Aleksandra I.; Cagliero, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test cognitive behavioral therapy for adherence and depression (CBT-AD) in type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that CBT-AD would improve adherence; depression; and, secondarily, hemoglobin A1c (A1C). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eighty-seven adults with unipolar depression and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes received enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU), including medication adherence, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), and lifestyle counseling; a provider letter documented psychiatric diagnoses. Those randomized to the intervention arm also received 9–11 sessions of CBT-AD. RESULTS Immediately after acute treatment (4 months), adjusting for baseline, CBT-AD had 20.7 percentage points greater oral medication adherence on electronic pill cap (95% CI −31.14 to −10.22, P = 0.000); 30.2 percentage points greater SMBG adherence through glucometer downloads (95% CI −42.95 to −17.37, P = 0.000); 6.44 points lower depression scores on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (95% CI 2.33–10.56, P = 0.002); 0.74 points lower on the Clinical Global Impression (95% CI 0.16–1.32, P = 0.01); and 0.72 units lower A1C (95% CI 0.29–1.15, P = 0.001) relative to ETAU. Analyses of 4-, 8-, and 12-month follow-up time points indicated that CBT-AD maintained 24.3 percentage points higher medication adherence (95% CI −38.2 to −10.3, P = 0.001); 16.9 percentage points greater SMBG adherence (95% CI −33.3 to −0.5, P = 0.043); and 0.63 units lower A1C (95% CI 0.06–1.2, P = 0.03) after acute treatment ended. For depression, there was some evidence of continued improvement posttreatment, but no between-group differences. CONCLUSIONS CBT-AD is an effective intervention for adherence, depression, and glycemic control, with enduring and clinically meaningful benefits for diabetes self-management and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes and depression. PMID:24170758

  13. Through the looking glass: gestational diabetes as a predictor of maternal and offspring long-term health.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Janine

    2012-05-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is gaining in importance as a predictor of future health risks for women and their offspring. In women, it is associated with increased long-term risks of diabetes, metabolic syndrome and increased cardiovascular disorders. For offspring of mothers with GDM, risks of GDM include abnormal glucose tolerance, obesity and metabolic syndrome. This review presents the evidence for GDM as a predictor of long-term health risks for mothers and their offspring. We highlight GDM as an opportune time to screen for and possibly intervene to prevent adverse health outcomes for both women and their offspring. PMID:22228678

  14. Gestational diabetes mellitus epigenetically affects genes predominantly involved in metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Houde, Andrée-Anne; Voisin, Grégory; St-Pierre, Julie; Perron, Patrice; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Gaudet, Daniel; Hivert, Marie-France; Brisson, Diane; Bouchard, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    Offspring exposed to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk for chronic diseases, and one promising mechanism for fetal metabolic programming is epigenetics. Therefore, we postulated that GDM exposure impacts the offspring's methylome and used an epigenomic approach to explore this hypothesis. Placenta and cord blood samples were obtained from 44 newborns, including 30 exposed to GDM. Women were recruited at first trimester of pregnancy and followed until delivery. GDM was assessed after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy. DNA methylation was measured at>485,000 CpG sites (Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was conducted to identify metabolic pathways epigenetically affected by GDM. Our results showed that 3,271 and 3,758 genes in placenta and cord blood, respectively, were potentially differentially methylated between samples exposed or not to GDM (p-values down to 1 × 10(-06); none reached the genome-wide significance levels), with more than 25% (n = 1,029) being common to both tissues. Mean DNA methylation differences between groups were 5.7 ± 3.2% and 3.4 ± 1.9% for placenta and cord blood, respectively. These genes were likely involved in the metabolic diseases pathway (up to 115 genes (11%), p-values for pathways = 1.9 × 10(-13)diabetes mellitus p = 4.3 × 10(-11)). Among the differentially methylated genes, 326 in placenta and 117 in cord blood were also associated with newborn weight. Our results therefore suggest that GDM has epigenetic effects on genes preferentially involved in the metabolic diseases pathway, with consequences on fetal growth and development, and provide supportive evidence that DNA methylation is involved in fetal metabolic programming. PMID:23975224

  15. Genetic determinants for gestational diabetes mellitus and related metabolic traits in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Vázquez-Cárdenas, Paola; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Tapia-Maruri, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; López-Vite, Erika; García-Escalante, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Aguirre, Fernando; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Cordero-Brieño, Roberto; Manzo-Carrillo, Lizette; Zacarías-Castillo, Rogelio; Vargas-García, Carlos; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Tusié-Luna, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI), as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs), in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16 x 10(-06); OR=2.95) and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98 x 10(-05); OR=0.55). In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60' OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727) and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358). Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM. PMID:25973943

  16. Gestational Diabetes and Subsequent Growth Patterns of Offspring: The National Collaborative Perinatal Project

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Wanda K.; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Brancati, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to test the hypothesis that intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes [GDM] predicts childhood growth independent of the effect on infant birthweight. We conducted a prospective analysis of 28,358 mother-infant pairs who enrolled in the National Collaborative Perinatal Project between 1959 and 1965. The offspring were followed until age 7. Four hundred and eighty-four mothers (1.7%) had GDM. The mean birthweight was 3.2 kg (range 1.15.6 kg). Maternal characteristics (age, education, race, family income, pre-pregnancy body mass index and pregnancy weight gain) and measures of childhood growth (birthweight, weight at ages 4, and 7) differed significantly by GDM status (all P < 0.05). As expected, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, mothers with GDM gave birth to offspring that had higher weights at birth. The offspring of mothers with GDM were larger at age 7 as indicated by greater weight, BMI and BMI z-score compared to the offspring of mothers without GDM at that age (all P < 0.05). These differences at age 7 persisted even after adjustment for infant birthweight. Furthermore, the offspring of mothers with GDM had a 61% higher odds of being overweight at age 7 compared to the offspring of mothers without GDM after adjustment for maternal BMI, pregnancy weight gain, family income, race and birthweight [OR = 1.61 (95%CI:1.07, 1.28)]. Our results indicate that maternal GDM status is associated with offspring overweight status during childhood. This relationship is only partially mediated by effects on birthweight. PMID:21327952

  17. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Relation to Maternal Dietary Heme Iron and Nonheme Iron Intake

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chunfang; Zhang, Cuilin; Gelaye, Bizu; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Frederick, Ihunnaya O.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Higher heme iron intake is associated with increased type 2 diabetes risk. However, no previous study has evaluated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) risk in relation to heme iron intake during pregnancy. We investigated associations of maternal preconceptional and early pregnancy heme and nonheme iron intake with subsequent GDM risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a prospective cohort study of 3,158 pregnant women. A food frequency questionnaire was used to assess maternal diet. Multivariable generalized linear regression models were used to derive estimates of relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs. RESULTS Approximately 5.0% of the cohort developed GDM (n = 158). Heme iron intake was positively and significantly associated with GDM risk (Ptrend = 0.04). After adjusting for confounders, women reporting the highest heme iron intake levels (≥1.52 vs. <0.48 mg per day) experienced a 3.31-fold–increased GDM risk (95% CI 1.02–10.72). In fully adjusted models, we noted that a 1-mg per day increase in heme iron was associated with a 51% increased GDM risk (RR 1.51 [95% CI 0.99–2.36]). Nonheme iron was inversely, though not statistically significantly, associated with GDM risk, and the corresponding RRs were 1.00, 0.83, 0.62, and 0.61 across quartiles of nonheme iron intake (Ptrend = 0.08). CONCLUSIONS High levels of dietary heme iron intake during the preconceptional and early pregnancy period may be associated with increased GDM risk. Associations of GDM risk with dietary nonheme iron intake are less clear. Confirmation of these findings by future studies is warranted. PMID:21709295

  18. Poor sleep quality is associated with impaired glucose tolerance in women after gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, U; Künzel, H; Tröndle, K; Rottenkolber, M; Kohn, D; Fugmann, M; Banning, F; Weise, M; Sacco, V; Hasbargen, U; Hutter, S; Parhofer, K G; Kloiber, S; Ising, M; Seissler, J; Lechner, A

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed the association of sleep quality and glucose metabolism in women after gestational diabetes (pGDM) and in women after normoglycemic pregnancy (controls). Data during pregnancy and a visit within the first 15 months after delivery were collected from 61 pGDM and 30 controls in a prospective cohort study. This included a medical history, physical examination, questionnaires (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)), and 5-point oral glucose tolerance test with insulin measurements to determine indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. We used Spearman correlation coefficients and multivariate regression models for analysis.9.3 ± 3.2 months after delivery, pGDM had significantly higher fasting and 2 h glucose levels and lower insulin sensitivity than controls. There was no significant difference in age, BMI and sleep quality as assessed with the PSQI between the two groups. The PSQI score correlated with the ogtt-2 h plasma glucose in pGDM (δ = 0.41; p = 0.0012), but not in controls. This association was confirmed with a multivariate linear regression model with adjustment for age, BMI and months post-delivery. Perceived stress was an independent risk factor (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.02-1.23) for impaired sleep. Our findings suggest that post-delivery sleep quality significantly influences glucose tolerance in women after GDM and that impaired sleep is associated with increased stress perception. Measures to improve of sleep quality and reduce perceived stress should therefore be tested as additional strategies to prevent progression to type 2 diabetes after GDM. PMID:25930074

  19. Prevalence and Predictors of Overweight and Insulin Resistance in Offspring of Mothers With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Boerschmann, Heike; Pflüger, Maren; Henneberger, Lydia; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Hummel, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with high birth weight in the offspring. This may lead to overweight and insulin resistance during childhood. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of GDM on overweight risk and insulin resistance in offspring. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS BMI measurements were collected at age 2, 8, and 11 years from 232 offspring of mothers with GDM (OGDM) and compared with those from 757 offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes (OT1D) and 431 offspring of nondiabetic mothers (ONDM) born between 1989 and 2000. Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) was determined at age 8 and 11 years in 751 children (74 OGDM). Overweight was defined as BMI percentile ≥90; insulin resistance was defined by HOMA-IR. RESULTS Overweight prevalence was increased in OGDM compared with OT1D and to ONDM throughout childhood (age 11 years 31.1, 15.8, and 15.5%; P = 0.005). Maternal obesity was an important predictor of overweight risk in children (age 11 years odds ratio 7.0 [95% CI 1.8–27.7]; P = 0.006); birth size and maternal smoking during pregnancy were inconsistently associated with and treatment of GDM during pregnancy did not affect overweight risk. HOMA-IR was increased in OGDM compared with offspring of ONDM mothers (P = 0.01, adjusted for sex and age) and was associated with the child's BMI (P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS Overweight and insulin resistance in children is increased in OGDM compared with OT1D or ONDM. The finding that overweight risk is associated mainly with maternal obesity suggests that familial predisposition contributes to childhood growth in these offspring. PMID:20435793

  20. Trends in Gestational Diabetes Among Hospital Deliveries in 19 U.S. States, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Bardenheier, Barbara H.; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Geiss, Linda S.; Saydah, Sharon H.; Devlin, Heather M.; Kim, Shin Y.; Gregg, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is one of the most common and fastest-growing comorbidities of pregnancy. Temporal trends in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have not been examined at the state level. This study examines GDM prevalence trends overall and by age, state, and region for 19 states, and by race/ethnicity for 12 states. Sub-analysis assesses trends among GDM deliveries by insurance type and comorbid hypertension in pregnancy. Methods Using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s National and State Inpatient Databases, deliveries were identified using diagnosis-related group codes for GDM and comorbidities using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes among all community hospitals. General linear regression with a log-link and binomial distribution was used in 2014 to assess annual change in GDM prevalence from 2000 through 2010. Results The age-standardized prevalence of GDM increased from 3.71 in 2000 to 5.77 per 100 deliveries in 2010 (relative increase, 56%). From 2000 through 2010, GDM deliveries increased significantly in all states (p < 0.01), with relative increases ranging from 36% to 88%. GDM among deliveries in 12 states reporting race and ethnicity increased among all groups (p < 0.01), with the highest relative increase in Hispanics (66%). Among GDM deliveries in 19 states, those with pre-pregnancy hypertension increased significantly from 2.5% to 4.1% (relative increase, 64%). The burden of GDM delivery payment shifted from private insurers (absolute decrease of 13.5 percentage points) to Medicaid/Medicare (13.2–percentage point increase). Conclusions Results suggest that GDM deliveries are increasing. The highest rates of increase are among Hispanics and among GDM deliveries complicated by pre-pregnancy hypertension. PMID:26094225

  1. Genetic Determinants for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Related Metabolic Traits in Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Vázquez-Cárdenas, Paola; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Tapia-Maruri, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; López-Vite, Erika; García-Escalante, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Aguirre, Fernando; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Cordero-Brieño, Roberto; Manzo-Carrillo, Lizette; Zacarías-Castillo, Rogelio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Tusié-Luna, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI), as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs), in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16x10-06; OR=2.95) and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98x10-05; OR=0.55). In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60’ OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727) and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358). Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM. PMID:25973943

  2. Current practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus in India (WINGS-5)

    PubMed Central

    Mahalakshmi, Manni Mohanraj; Bhavadharini, Balaji; Maheswari, Kumar; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Jebarani, Saravanan; Ninov, Lyudmil; Kayal, Arivudainambi; Malanda, Belma; Belton, Anne; Uma, Ram; Mohan, Viswanathan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To obtain information on existing practices in the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/GYNs) in India. Methods: Details regarding diagnostic criteria used, screening methods, management strategies, and the postpartum follow-up of GDM were obtained from physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs across 24 states of India using online/in-person surveys using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 3841 doctors participated in the survey of whom 68.6% worked in private clinics. Majority of OB/GYNs (84.9%) preferred universal screening for GDM, and screening in the first trimester was performed by 67% of them. Among the OB/GYNs, 600 (36.7%) reported using the nonfasting 2 h criteria for diagnosing GDM whereas 560 (29.4%) of the diabetologists/endocrinologists reported using the same. However, further questioning on the type of blood sample collected and the glucose load used revealed that, in reality, only 208 (12.7%) and 72 (3.8%), respectively, used these criteria properly. The survey also revealed that the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria was followed properly by 299 (18.3%) of OB/GYNs and 376 (19.7%) of physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists. Postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing was advised by 56% of diabetologists and 71.6% of OB/GYNs. Conclusion: More than half of the physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India do not follow any of the recommended guidelines for the diagnosis of GDM. This emphasizes the need for increased awareness about screening and diagnosis of GDM both among physicians/diabetologists/endocrinologists and OB/GYNs in India.

  3. Clinical Recommendations for the Use of Islet Cell Autoantibodies to Distinguish Autoimmune and Non-Autoimmune Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Haller-Kikkatalo, Kadri; Uibo, Raivo

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as carbohydrate intolerance that begins or is first recognized during pregnancy. The prevalence of GDM is highly variable, depending on the population studied, and reflects the underlying pattern of diabetes in the population. GDM manifests by the second half of pregnancy and disappears following delivery in most cases, but is associated with the risk of subsequent diabetes development. Normal pregnancy induces carbohydrate intolerance to favor the availability of nutrients for the fetus, which is compensated by increased insulin secretion from the maternal pancreas. Pregnancy shares similarities with adiposity in metabolism to save energy, and both conditions favor the development of insulin resistance (IR) and low-grade inflammation. A highly complicated network of modified regulatory mechanisms may primarily affect carbohydrate metabolism by promoting autoimmune reactions to pancreatic β cells and affecting insulin function. As a result, diabetes development during pregnancy is facilitated. Depending on a pregnant woman's genetic susceptibility to diabetes, autoimmune mechanisms or IR are fundamental to the development autoimmune or non-autoimmune GDM, respectively. Pregnancy may facilitate the identification of women at risk of developing diabetes later in life; autoimmune and non-autoimmune GDM may be early markers of the risk of future type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. The most convenient and efficient way to discriminate GDM types is to assess pancreatic β-cell autoantibodies along with diagnosing diabetes in pregnancy. PMID:25392235

  4. Obesity and diabetes genes are associated with being born small for gestational age: Results from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Individuals born small for gestational age (SGA) are at increased risk of rapid postnatal weight gain, later obesity and diseases in adulthood such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Environmental risk factors for SGA are well established and include smoking, low pregnancy weight, maternal short stature, maternal diet, ethnic origin of mother and hypertension. However, in a large proportion of SGA, no underlying cause is evident, and these individuals may have a larger genetic contribution. Methods In this study we tested the association between SGA and polymorphisms in genes that have previously been associated with obesity and/or diabetes. We undertook analysis of 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 546 samples from the Auckland Birthweight Collaborative (ABC) study. 227 children were born small for gestational age (SGA) and 319 were appropriate for gestational age (AGA). Results and Conclusion The results demonstrated that genetic variation in KCNJ11, BDNF, PFKP, PTER and SEC16B were associated with SGA and support the concept that genetic factors associated with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes are more prevalent in those born SGA compared to those born AGA. We have previously determined that environmental factors are associated with differences in birthweight in the ABC study and now we have demonstrated a significant genetic contribution, suggesting that the interaction between genetics and the environment are important. PMID:20712903

  5. Inflammation and impaired endothelium-dependant vasodilatation in non obese women with gestational diabetes mellitus: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether abnormal endothelial function, a common finding in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) pregnancies, can be explained by inflammatory cytokines. Methods Forearm skin blood flow (FSBF), into response to acetylcholine (Ach) (endothelium-dependent vasodilatation), were measured in 24 pregnant control subjects and 28 gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) women, in the third trimester of gestation. A fasting glycemic and lipidic panel was obtained, and inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and adiponectin were also determined. Results FSBF is significantly reduced in GDM group compared with control subjects (344.59 ± 57.791 vs.176.38 ± 108.52, P < 0.05). Among all subjects, FSBF showed a strong negative correlation with TNF-α and IL-6 (r = −0.426, P < 0.0001 and r = −0.564, P < 0.0001, respectively) and positive correlation with adiponectin (r = 0.468, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Endothelial function, an early marker of macrovascular disease, is present in non-obese pregnancies complicated by GDM. This alteration seems to be directly related to inflammatory status, which may represent a patho-physiological link between GDM and type 2 diabetes and, later on, metabolic syndrome. PMID:23805905

  6. The effect of gestational diabetes on proliferation capacity and viability of human umbilical cord-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Nadia; Naseem, Rashida; Anwar, Sanam Saiqa; Awan, Sana Javaid; Ali, Muhammad; Javed, Sara; Ali, Fatima

    2015-09-01

    Stomal cells derived from Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cord (WJMSCs) are considered as the potential therapeutic agents for regeneration and are getting famous for stem cell banking. Our study aims to evaluate the effects of gestational diabetes on proliferation capacity and viability of WJMSCs. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cords from normal and gestational diabetic (DWJMSCs) mothers. Growth patterns of both types of cells were analyzed through MTT assay and population doubling time. Cell survival, cell death and glucose utilization were estimated through trypan blue exclusion assay, LDH assay and glucose detection assay respectively. Angiogenic ability was evaluated by immunocytochemistry and ELISA for VEGF A. Anti-cancerous potential was analyzed on HeLa cells. DWJMSCs exhibited low proliferative rate, increased population doubling time, reduced cell viability and increased cell death. Interestingly, DWJMSCs were found to have a reduced glucose utilization and anti-cancerous ability while enhanced angiogenic ability. Gestational diabetes induces adverse effects on growth, angiogenic and anti-cancerous potential of WJMSCs. PMID:25407535

  7. Elevated serum squalene and cholesterol synthesis markers in pregnant obese women with gestational diabetes mellitus1

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Helena E.; Rönö, Kristiina; Koivusalo, Saila; Stach-Lempinen, Beata; Pöyhönen-Alho, Maritta; Eriksson, Johan G.; Hiltunen, Timo P.; Gylling, Helena

    2014-01-01

    We examined serum cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers and their association with neonatal birth weight in obese pregnancies affected by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Pregnant women at risk for GDM (BMI >30 kg/m2) were enrolled from maternity clinics in Finland. GDM was determined from the results of an oral glucose tolerance test. Serum samples were collected at six time-points, one in each trimester of pregnancy, and at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months postpartum. Analysis of serum squalene and noncholesterol sterols by gas-liquid chromatography revealed that in subjects with GDM (n = 22), the serum Δ8-cholestenol concentration and lathosterol/sitosterol ratio were higher (P < 0.05) than in the controls (n = 30) in the first trimester, reflecting increased cholesterol synthesis. Also, subjects with GDM had an increased ratio of squalene to cholesterol (100 × μmol/mmol of cholesterol) in the second (11.5 ± 0.5 vs. 9.1 ± 0.5, P < 0.01) and third (12.1 ± 0.8 vs. 10.0 ± 0.7, P < 0.05) trimester. In GDM, the second trimester maternal serum squalene concentration correlated with neonatal birth weight (r = 0.70, P < 0.001). In conclusion, in obesity, GDM associated with elevated serum markers of cholesterol synthesis. Correlation of maternal serum squalene with neonatal birth weight suggests a potential contribution of maternal cholesterol synthesis to newborn weight in GDM. PMID:25301963

  8. Metabolic programming of MEST DNA methylation by intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Nady; Pliushch, Galyna; Schneider, Eberhard; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Korenkov, Michael; Aretz, Melanie; Zechner, Ulrich; Lehnen, Harald; Haaf, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Epigenetic processes are primary candidates when searching for mechanisms that can stably modulate gene expression and metabolic pathways according to early life conditions. To test the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the epigenome of the next generation, cord blood and placenta tissue were obtained from 88 newborns of mothers with dietetically treated GDM, 98 with insulin-dependent GDM, and 65 without GDM. Bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to compare the methylation levels of seven imprinted genes involved in prenatal and postnatal growth, four genes involved in energy metabolism, one anti-inflammatory gene, one tumor suppressor gene, one pluripotency gene, and two repetitive DNA families. The maternally imprinted MEST gene, the nonimprinted glucocorticoid receptor NR3C1 gene, and interspersed ALU repeats showed significantly decreased methylation levels (4-7 percentage points for MEST, 1-2 for NR3C1, and one for ALUs) in both GDM groups, compared with controls, in both analyzed tissues. Significantly decreased blood MEST methylation (3 percentage points) also was observed in adults with morbid obesity compared with normal-weight controls. Our results support the idea that intrauterine exposure to GDM has long-lasting effects on the epigenome of the offspring. Specifically, epigenetic malprogramming of MEST may contribute to obesity predisposition throughout life. PMID:23209187

  9. DNA methylation profiles in placenta and its association with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rong, C; Cui, X; Chen, J; Qian, Y; Jia, R; Hu, Y

    2015-05-01

    Emerging evidences indicate that placenta plays a critical role in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). DNA methylation could be associated with altered placental development and functions. This study is to uncover the genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in this disorder. DNA methylation was measured at >385,000 CpG sites using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) and a huamn CpG island plus promoter microarray. We totally identified 6,641 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) targeting 3,320 genes, of which 2,729 DMRs targeting 1,399 genes, showed significant hypermethylation in GDM relative to the controls, whereas 3,912 DMRs targeting 1,970 genes showed significant hypomethylation. Functional analysis divided these genes into different functional networks, which mainly involved in the pathways of cell growth and death regulation, immune and inflammatory response and nervous system development. In addition, the methylation profiles and expressions of 4 loci (RBP4, GLUT3, Resistin and PPARα) were validated by BSP for their higher log2 ratio and potential functions with energy metabolism. This study demonstrates aberrant patterns of DNA methylation in GDM which may be involved in the pathophysiology of GDM and reflect the fetal development. Future work will assess the potential prognostic and therapeutic value for these findings in GDM. PMID:25962407

  10. Ethnic differences in the association between gestational diabetes and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Mocarski, M; Savitz, D A

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine ethnic variation in the impact of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) on birth outcome. The authors examined the association between GDM and pregnancy-induced hypertension, macrosomia, primary Cesarean delivery, and preterm birth, using New York City Birth Certificate data from 2001-2006. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the crude and adjusted odds ratios of GDM with each adverse perinatal event, stratified by ethnicity. GDM was associated with increased risk of adverse perinatal events among all ethnic groups, with modest variation by ethnicity. Across ethnic groups, adjusted odds ratios comparing women with and without GDM ranged from 1.4-2.9 for pregnancy-induced hypertension, 1.0-2.2 for macrosomia, 1.1-1.8 for primary Cesarean delivery, and 1.3-1.8 for preterm birth. Overall, Caribbean, Sub-Saharan African, and African American women tended to show a larger relative impact of GDM, while North African, South Central Asian, and Chinese women showed a comparatively smaller impact of GDM. Although some ethnic variation was seen, differences in effect size were not large enough to support ethnic-specific thresholds for GDM diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21365298

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Smartphone Application for Managing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an application (app) that provides tailored recommendations based on lifestyle and clinical data entered by the user. Methods Knowledge and functions required for the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) management app were extracted from clinical practice guidelines and evaluated through an online survey. Common and tailored recommendations were developed and evaluated with a content validity index. Algorithms to link tailored recommendations with a patient's data were developed and evaluated by experts. An Android-based app was developed and evaluated by comparing the process of data entry and recommendation retrieval and the usability of the app. After the app was revised, the user acceptance of the app was evaluated. Results Six domains of knowledge and 14 functions were extracted. Seven common and 49 tailored recommendations were developed. Nine lifestyle and clinical data elements were modeled. Eight algorithms with 18 decision nodes presenting tailored recommendations based on patient's data and 12 user interface screens were developed. All recommendations obtained from the use of app concurred with recommendations derived by algorithms. The average usability score was 69.5 out of 100. The user acceptance score with behavioral intention to use was 5.5, intrinsic motivation 4.3, the perceived ease of use score was 4.6, and the perceived usefulness score was 5.0 out of 7, respectively. Conclusions The GDM management knowledge and tailored recommendations obtained in this study could be of help in managing GDM. PMID:26893946

  12. Simple lifestyle recommendations and the outcomes of gestational diabetes. A 2 × 2 factorial randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Bo, S; Rosato, R; Ciccone, G; Canil, S; Gambino, R; Poala, C B; Leone, F; Valla, A; Grassi, G; Ghigo, E; Cassader, M; Menato, G

    2014-10-01

    The benefits of exercise and behavioural recommendations in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are controversial. In a randomized trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design, we examined the effect of exercise and behavioural recommendations on metabolic variables, and maternal/neonatal outcomes in 200 GDM patients. All women were given the same diet: group D received dietary recommendations only; group E was advised to briskly walk 20-min/day; group B received behavioural dietary recommendations; group BE was prescribed the same as B + E. Dietary habits improved in all groups. In a multivariable regression model, fasting glucose did not change. Exercise, but not behavioural recommendations, was associated with the reduction of postprandial glucose (p < 0001), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c; p < 0.001), triglycerides (p = 0.02) and C-reactive protein (CRP; p < 0.001) and reduced any maternal/neonatal complications (OR = 0.50; 95%CI=0.28-0.89;p = 0.02). In GDM patients a simple exercise programme reduced maternal postprandial glucose, HbA1c, CRP, triglycerides and any maternal/neonatal complications, but not fasting glucose values. PMID:24646172

  13. Insulin receptor isoforms: an integrated view focused on gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Westermeier, F; Sáez, T; Arroyo, P; Toledo, F; Gutiérrez, J; Sanhueza, C; Pardo, F; Leiva, A; Sobrevia, L

    2016-05-01

    The human insulin receptor (IR) exists in two isoforms that differ by the absence (IR-A) or the presence (IR-B) of a 12-amino acid segment encoded by exon 11. Both isoforms are functionally distinct regarding their binding affinities and intracellular signalling. However, the underlying mechanisms related to their cellular functions in several tissues are only partially understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge in this field regarding the alternative splicing of IR isoform, tissue-specific distribution and signalling both in physiology and disease, with an emphasis on the human placenta in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Furthermore, we discuss the clinical relevance of IR isoforms highlighted by findings that show altered insulin signalling due to differential IR-A and IR-B expression in human placental endothelium in GDM pregnancies. Future research and clinical studies focused on the role of IR isoform signalling might provide novel therapeutic targets for treating GDM to improve the adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26431063

  14. Secular Trends of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Changes in Its Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Geum Joon; Kim, Log Young; Sung, Ye Na; Kim, Jee Ae; Hwang, Soon Young; Hong, Hye-Ri; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the secular trends of incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and insulin treatment for GDM in a Korean population and to determine the factors that contribute to the trends in the incidence of GDM. Study Design We used data collected by the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service of Korea and analyzed data from women who had given birth from 2006 to 2010. We evaluated the trends in the incidence of GDM and GDM requiring insulin treatment and the changes in risk factors. Results There were 1,824,913 births during the study period, which included 129,666 cases of GDM, an incidence of 7.11% over this period. The incidence of GDM increased from 3.86% in 2007 to 11.83% in 2010, with a continuous increase after adjustment for age. However, the number of GDM cases that required insulin treatment decreased significantly from 13.87% in 2007 to 5.94% in 2010. The proportion of patients who were at an older age and multiparity, 2 GDM risk factors, increased during the study period. Conclusions In Korea, the incidence of GDM, especially mild GDM, increased dramatically during the period from 2006 to 2010. Further efforts are needed to monitor this trend and to identify associated factors. PMID:26292282

  15. Lipid Fingerprinting in Mild versus Severe Forms of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gueuvoghlanian-Silva, Bárbara Yasmin; Cordeiro, Fernanda Bertuccez; Lobo, Thalita Frutuoso; Cataldi, Thaís Regiani; Lo Turco, Edson Guimarães; Bertolla, Ricardo Pimenta; Mattar, Rosiane; Torloni, Maria Regina; Daher, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The blood serum lipid profile of women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is still under study. There are no data on the serum lipid profile of GDM patients with more severe (insulin treated) compared to milder forms (diet treated) GDM. The aim of our study was to analyze the blood serum lipid profile of patients with milder versus more severe forms of GDM and to compare these findings with those of healthy pregnant women. This cross-sectional analytical study included 30 insulin-treated GDM, 30 diet-only GDM and 30 healthy pregnant women. Serum lipid was extracted from the 90 participants and their lipid profiles were analyzed by lipid fingerprinting using liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 143 parent ions were differentially represented in each of the three groups, belonging to the following classes: Glycerophospholipids, Sterol Lipids, Sphingolipids, Prenol Lipids, Fatty Acyls and Glycerolipids. There were significant differences in the lipid profiles of healthy pregnant women compared to GDM patients and also between milder versus more severe forms of GDM. There are marked differences in lipid fingerprinting between healthy pregnant women compared to those with GDM in the third trimester. Moreover, the lipid profile of women with more severe forms of GDM differs considerably from that of women with milder forms of GDM. These findings may be useful to help clarify the pathogenesis of milder and more severe forms of GDM. PMID:26633694

  16. Toxic effects of glibenclamide in fetuses of normoglycemic rats: an alternative therapy for gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aguillar-Gomes, L.; Lopes, C.M.; Barbieri, D.S.; Rocha, T.; Randazzo-Moura, P.

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance first diagnosed during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. The treatment aims at glycemic control through changes in the patient’s diet with or without exercise, but some patients need insulin therapy. An alternative would be to use oral hypoglycemic agents such as glibenclamide (GLIB). The present study aims to analyze the toxic effects of GLIB in fetuses of pregnant rats which received 5 or 20mg/kg doses of GLIB. Glycemic dosage reveals no significant difference between control (deionized water) and treated groups, showing that these concentrations of GLIB were not effective to cause hypoglycemia in rats. The vitality of the fetuses in all groups was 100%. GLIB administration promoted increase in weight and significant changes in measures of external morphological parameters of treated fetuses. Histological analysis revealed that liver lobes, lobules and central lobular veins were well defined for all treatments. However, GLIB animals presented a light brownish precipitate into the center-lobular veins and in the liver parenchyma among the hepatocytes. These results indicated a possible passage of the drug through the blood-placental membrane, without serious changes that impair the development of neither bone tissue, nor the liver of these animals. PMID:26623340

  17. Insulin Is a Key Modulator of Fetoplacental Endothelium Metabolic Disturbances in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sobrevia, Luis; Salsoso, Rocío; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Barros, Eric; Toledo, Lilian; Silva, Luis; Pizarro, Carolina; Subiabre, Mario; Villalobos, Roberto; Araos, Joaquín; Toledo, Fernando; González, Marcelo; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Farías, Marcelo; Chiarello, Delia I.; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a disease of the mother that associates with altered fetoplacental vascular function. GDM-associated maternal hyperglycaemia result in fetal hyperglycaemia, a condition that leads to fetal hyperinsulinemia and altered L-arginine transport and synthesis of nitric oxide, i.e., endothelial dysfunction. These alterations in the fetoplacental endothelial function are present in women with GDM that were under diet or insulin therapy. Since these women and their newborn show normal glycaemia at term, other factors or conditions could be altered and/or not resolved by restoring normal level of circulating D-glucose. GDM associates with metabolic disturbances, such as abnormal handling of the locally released vasodilator adenosine, and biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol lipoproteins, or metabolic diseases resulting in endoplasmic reticulum stress and altered angiogenesis. Insulin acts as a potent modulator of all these phenomena under normal conditions as reported in primary cultures of cells obtained from the human placenta; however, GDM and the role of insulin regarding these alterations in this disease are poorly understood. This review focuses on the potential link between insulin and endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypercholesterolemia, and angiogenesis in GDM in the human fetoplacental vasculature. Based in reports in primary culture placental endothelium we propose that insulin is a factor restoring endothelial function in GDM by reversing ERS, hypercholesterolaemia and angiogenesis to a physiological state involving insulin activation of insulin receptor isoforms and adenosine receptors and metabolism in the human placenta from GDM pregnancies. PMID:27065887

  18. Disparities in the risk of gestational diabetes by race-ethnicity and country of birth.

    PubMed

    Hedderson, Monique M; Darbinian, Jeanne A; Ferrara, Assiamira

    2010-09-01

    Little information exists on the association between maternal country of birth and risk of gestational diabetes (GDM). We examined within each race-ethnicity group whether the risk of GDM differs between women born inside and outside the US. The study was a cohort study of 216 089 women who delivered an infant between 1995 and 2004 with plasma glucose data from the screening 50-g glucose challenge test and the diagnostic 100-g, 3-h oral glucose tolerance test. The age-adjusted prevalence of GDM varied by race-ethnicity and was lowest for non-Hispanic white (4.1%) and highest among Asian Indians (11.1%). In multivariable models, being born outside of the US was associated with an increased risk of GDM among black, Asian Indian, Filipina, Pacific Islanders, Chinese, Mexicans and non-Hispanic white women, whereas, Japanese and Korean foreign-born women had a decreased risk of GDM. Clinicians should be aware that among certain race-ethnicity groups women born outside the US may be at increased risk of GDM and may warrant special preventive and culturally sensitive care. PMID:20670225

  19. Metabolic Programming of MEST DNA Methylation by Intrauterine Exposure to Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj, Nady; Pliushch, Galyna; Schneider, Eberhard; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Korenkov, Michael; Aretz, Melanie; Zechner, Ulrich; Lehnen, Harald; Haaf, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic processes are primary candidates when searching for mechanisms that can stably modulate gene expression and metabolic pathways according to early life conditions. To test the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the epigenome of the next generation, cord blood and placenta tissue were obtained from 88 newborns of mothers with dietetically treated GDM, 98 with insulin-dependent GDM, and 65 without GDM. Bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to compare the methylation levels of seven imprinted genes involved in prenatal and postnatal growth, four genes involved in energy metabolism, one anti-inflammatory gene, one tumor suppressor gene, one pluripotency gene, and two repetitive DNA families. The maternally imprinted MEST gene, the nonimprinted glucocorticoid receptor NR3C1 gene, and interspersed ALU repeats showed significantly decreased methylation levels (4–7 percentage points for MEST, 1–2 for NR3C1, and one for ALUs) in both GDM groups, compared with controls, in both analyzed tissues. Significantly decreased blood MEST methylation (3 percentage points) also was observed in adults with morbid obesity compared with normal-weight controls. Our results support the idea that intrauterine exposure to GDM has long-lasting effects on the epigenome of the offspring. Specifically, epigenetic malprogramming of MEST may contribute to obesity predisposition throughout life. PMID:23209187

  20. Return for Postpartum Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Following Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mohd Suan, Mohd Azri

    2015-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence and characteristics of women who received a postpartum oral glucose tolerance test and to examine barriers as reported by women who failed to return for the test. Data were collected using a mobile phone-based short messaging service. Only 352 (81.9%) women returned for the test. Women who failed to return for the test were younger (30.1 vs 32.1, P = .003) and did not have a previous history of gestational diabetes (93.6% vs 84.9%, P = .043) compared to women who returned for the test. The commonest reasons given for not returning for the test was "Still waiting for the appointment date for the test" (37.2%), "had family/health problems" (11.5%), and "busy/no time" (10.3%). Flexible time for the test, active involvement from health care staff, and strengthening continuous care system were among the interventions needed to improve the return rate for this screening test. PMID:26041835

  1. Gestational diabetes screening with the new IADPSG guidelines: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    MISSION, John F.; OHNO, Mika S.; CHENG, Yvonne W.; CAUGHEY, Aaron B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigates the cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening using the new IADPSG guidelines. Study Design A decision analytic model was built comparing routine screening with the 2h OGTT vs. the 1-hour GCT. All probabilities, costs, and benefits were derived from the literature. Base-case, sensitivity analyses, and a Monte Carlo simulation were performed. Results Screening with the 2h GTT was more expensive, more effective, and cost-effective at $61,503/QALY. In a one-way sensitivity analysis, the more inclusive IADPSG diagnostic approach remained cost-effective as long an additional 2.0% or more of patients were diagnosed and treated for GDM. Conclusion Screening at 24-28 weeks GA under the new IADPSG guidelines with the 2h GTT is expensive but cost-effective in improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. How the health care system will provide expanded care to this group of women will need to be examined. PMID:22840972

  2. Gestational diabetes reduces adenosine transport in human placental microvascular endothelium, an effect reversed by insulin.

    PubMed

    Salomón, Carlos; Westermeier, Francisco; Puebla, Carlos; Arroyo, Pablo; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) courses with increased fetal plasma adenosine concentration and reduced adenosine transport in placental macrovascular endothelium. Since insulin modulates human equilibrative nucleoside transporters (hENTs) expression/activity, we hypothesize that GDM will alter hENT2-mediated transport in human placental microvascular endothelium (hPMEC), and that insulin will restore GDM to a normal phenotype involving insulin receptors A (IR-A) and B (IR-B). GDM effect on hENTs expression and transport activity, and IR-A/IR-B expression and associated cell signalling cascades (p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44(mapk)) and Akt) role in hPMEC primary cultures was assayed. GDM associates with elevated umbilical whole and vein, but not arteries blood adenosine, and reduced hENTs adenosine transport and expression. IR-A/IR-B mRNA expression and p42/44(mapk)/Akt ratios ('metabolic phenotype') were lower in GDM. Insulin reversed GDM-reduced hENT2 expression/activity, IR-A/IR-B mRNA expression and p42/44(mapk)/Akt ratios to normal pregnancies ('mitogenic phenotype'). It is suggested that insulin effects required IR-A and IR-B expression leading to differential modulation of signalling pathways restoring GDM-metabolic to a normal-mitogenic like phenotype. Insulin could be acting as protecting factor for placental microvascular endothelial dysfunction in GDM. PMID:22808198

  3. Women's Views on Their Diagnosis and Management for Borderline Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shanshan; Middleton, Philippa F.; Bubner, Tanya K.; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Little is known about women's views relating to a diagnosis of borderline gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and the subsequent management. This study aimed to explore women's experiences after being diagnosed with borderline GDM, their attitudes about treatment, and factors important to them for achieving any lifestyle changes. Methods. We conducted face-to-face, semistructured interviews with women diagnosed with borderline GDM. Results. A total of 22 women were interviewed. After a diagnosis of borderline GDM, 14 (64%) women reported not being concerned or worried. Management of borderline GDM was thought by 21 (95%) women to be very important or important. Eighteen (82%) women planned to improve their diet and/or exercise to manage their borderline GDM. The most frequently mentioned enabler for achieving intended lifestyle change was being more motivated to improve the health of their baby and/or themselves (15 women). The most frequent barrier was tiredness and/or being physically unwell (11 women). Conclusions. A diagnosis of borderline GDM caused some concern to one-third of women interviewed. The majority of women believed managing their borderline GDM was important and they planned to improve their lifestyle. Women's own and their babies' future health were powerful motivators for lifestyle change. PMID:25785278

  4. Could gestational diabetes mellitus be managed through dietary bioactive compounds? Current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Carmela; Zicari, Alessandra; Mandosi, Elisabetta; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Mari, Emanuela; Morano, Susanna; Masella, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a serious problem growing worldwide that needs to be addressed with urgency in consideration of the resulting severe complications for both mother and fetus. Growing evidence indicates that a healthy diet rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts, extra-virgin olive oil and fish has beneficial effects in both the prevention and management of several human diseases and metabolic disorders. In this review, we discuss the latest data concerning the effects of dietary bioactive compounds such as polyphenols and PUFA on the molecular mechanisms regulating glucose homoeostasis. Several studies, mostly based on in vitro and animal models, indicate that dietary polyphenols, mainly flavonoids, positively modulate the insulin signalling pathway by attenuating hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, reducing inflammatory adipokines, and modifying microRNA (miRNA) profiles. Very few data about the influence of dietary exposure on GDM outcomes are available, although this approach deserves careful consideration. Further investigation, which includes exploring the 'omics' world, is needed to better understand the complex interaction between dietary compounds and GDM. PMID:26879600

  5. The Belgian Diabetes in Pregnancy Study (BEDIP-N), a multi-centric prospective cohort study on screening for diabetes in pregnancy and gestational diabetes: methodology and design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) recommends universal screening with a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) using stricter criteria for gestational diabetes (GDM). This may lead to important increases in the prevalence of GDM and associated costs, whereas the gain in health is unclear. The goal of ‘The Belgian Diabetes in Pregnancy Study’ (BEDIP-N) is to evaluate the best screening strategy for pregestational diabetes in early pregnancy and GDM in an ethnically diverse western European population. The IADPSG screening strategy will be followed, but in addition risk questionnaires and a 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) will be performed, in order to define the most practical and most cost effective screening strategy in this population. Methods BEDIP-N is a prospective observational cohort study in 6 centers in Belgium. The aim is to enroll 2563 pregnant women in the first trimester with a singleton pregnancy, aged 18–45 years, without known diabetes and without history of bariatric surgery. Women are universally screened for overt diabetes and GDM in the first trimester with a fasting plasma glucose and for GDM between 24–28 weeks using the 50 g GCT and independently of the result of the GCT, all women will receive a 75 g OGTT using the IADPSG criteria. Diabetes and GDM will be treated according to a standardized routine care protocol. Women with GDM, will be reevaluated three months postpartum with a 75 g OGTT. At each visit blood samples are collected, anthropometric measurements are obtained and self-administered questionnaires are completed. Recruitment began in April 2014. Discussion This is the first large, prospective cohort study rigorously assessing the prevalence of diabetes in early pregnancy and comparing the impact of different screening strategies with the IADPSG criteria on the detection of GDM later in pregnancy. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02036619. Registered 14-1-2014. PMID:25015413

  6. Discrepancy in Insulin Regulation between Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) Platelets and Placenta.

    PubMed

    Li, Yicong; Cooper, Anthonya; Odibo, Imelda N; Ahmed, Asli; Murphy, Pamela; Koonce, Ruston; Dajani, Nafisa K; Lowery, Curtis L; Roberts, Drucilla J; Maroteaux, Luc; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-04-29

    Earlier findings have identified the requirement of insulin signaling on maturation and the translocation of serotonin (5-HT) transporter, SERT to the plasma membrane of the trophoblast in placenta. Because of the defect on insulin receptor (IR) in the trophoblast of the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-associated placenta, SERT is found entrapped in the cytoplasm of the GDM-trophoblast. SERT is encoded by the same gene expressed in trophoblast and platelets. Additionally, alteration in plasma 5-HT levels and the 5-HT uptake rates are associated with the aggregation rates of platelets. Therefore, here, we investigated a novel hypothesis that GDM-associated defects in platelet IR should change their 5-HT uptake rates, and this should be a leading factor for thrombosis in GDM maternal blood. The maternal blood and the placentas were obtained at the time of cesarean section from the GDM and non-diabetic subjects (n = 6 for each group), and the platelets and trophoblasts were isolated to determine the IR activity, surface level of SERT, and their 5-HT uptake rates.Interestingly, no significant differences were evident in IR tyrosine phosphorylation or the downstream elements, AKT and S6K in platelets and their aggregation rates in both groups. Furthermore, insulin stimulation up-regulated 5-HT uptake rates of GDM-platelets as it does in the control group. However, the phosphorylation of IR and the downstream elements were significantly lower in GDM-trophoblast and showed no response to the insulin stimulation while they showed 4-fold increase to insulin stimulation in control group. Similarly, the 5-HT uptake rates of GDM-trophoblast and the SERT expression on their surface were severalfold lower compared with control subjects. IR is expressed in all tissues, but it is not known if diabetes affects IR in all tissues equally. Here, for the first time, our findings with clinical samples show that in GDM-associated defect on IR is tissue type-dependent. While IR is impaired in GDM-placenta, it is unaffected in GDM-platelet. PMID:26921319

  7. Possibility to predict early postpartum glucose abnormality following gestational diabetes mellitus based on the results of routine mid-gestational screening

    PubMed Central

    Bartáková, Vendula; Malúšková, Denisa; Mužík, Jan; Bělobrádková, Jana; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have increased risk of developing glucose abnormality, but current diagnostic criteria are evidence-based for adverse pregnancy outcome. The aims of our study were: (i) to ascertain a frequency of early conversion of GDM into permanent glucose abnormality, (ii) to determine predictive potential of current GDM diagnostic criteria for prediction of postpartum glucose abnormality and (iii) to find optimal cut-off values of oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) to stratify GDM population according to postpartum risk. Materials and methods Electronic medical records of an ethnically homogenous cohort of women diagnosed and treated for GDM in a single medical centre during the period 2005–2011 who completed postpartum oGTT up to 1 year after the index delivery were retrospectively analysed (N = 305). Results Postpartum glucose abnormality was detected in 16.7% subjects. Mid-trimester oGTT values, respective area under the curve and HbA1c were significantly associated with early postpartum glucose abnormality (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney) and exhibited significant predictive potential for postpartum glucose abnormality risk assessment. Optimal cut-off values for discrimination of at-risk sub-population were identified using ROC analysis and their comparison with WHO and IADPSG criteria exhibited superiority of IADPSG for risk-stratification of GDM population. Conclusion Risk-based stratification at the time of GDM diagnosis could improve efficiency of the post-gestational screening for diabetes. IADPSG criteria seem to optimally capture both perinatal and maternal metabolic risks and are therefore medically and economically justified. PMID:26526166

  8. Variants in Vitamin D Binding Protein Gene Are Associated With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Ou; Li, Wei; Ma, Liangkun; Ping, Fan; Chen, Limeng; Nie, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 4 representative genes (VDR, GC, CYP2R1, and CYP24A1) encoding the core proteins involved in vitamin D production, degradation, and ligand-dependent signaling pathway are associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a Chinese population. A total of 1494 pregnant Han Chinese women (692 women with GDM and 802 women with normal glucose served as controls) were recruited through a 2-step approach. Participants were further divided into 2 groups according to body mass index before gestation (pre-BMI) (25?kg/m2). Nine SNPs (rs3733359, rs2282679, and rs16847024 in GC, rs2060793 and rs10741657 in CYP2R1, rs2248359 and rs6013897 in CYP24A1, rs11574143 and rs739837 in VDR) were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. The relationships between genotypes/alleles of a single locus as well as haplotypes of each gene and GDM were analyzed. We did not observe a significant difference in genotype frequency of each SNP between cases and controls. However, in the obese subgroup (pre-BMI ? 25?kg/m2), the risk allele-A of rs3733359 showed an association with increased risk of GDM (OR?=?1.739, 95% CI?=?1.0662.837, P?=?0.027). The GG-haplotype frequency of rs3733359 and rs2282679 in GC was modestly lower in the GDM group (OR?=?0.848, 95% CI?=?0.7190.999, P?=?0.048). Rs2060793 and rs10741657 were associated with insulin area under the curve (P?=?0.028, P?=?0.042, respectively), while rs739837 and rs6013897 demonstrated a correlation with fasting glucose (P?=?0.019, P?=?0.049, respectively). Additionally, rs2248359 displayed an association with leukocyte counts (B?=?0.063 P?=?0.033) and rs16847024 was related to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (B?=?0.086, P?=?0.005). Our results indicate an association between GC variants and GDM, as well as a relation between a subset of loci in CYP2R1, CYP24A1, and VDR and clinical parameters related to GDM. Our findings may provide information for identifying biomarkers for early risk prediction of GDM and the pathways involved in disease progression. PMID:26448018

  9. Variants in Vitamin D Binding Protein Gene Are Associated With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Ou; Li, Wei; Ma, Liangkun; Ping, Fan; Chen, Limeng; Nie, Min

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 4 representative genes (VDR, GC, CYP2R1, and CYP24A1) encoding the core proteins involved in vitamin D production, degradation, and ligand-dependent signaling pathway are associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a Chinese population. A total of 1494 pregnant Han Chinese women (692 women with GDM and 802 women with normal glucose served as controls) were recruited through a 2-step approach. Participants were further divided into 2 groups according to body mass index before gestation (pre-BMI) (25 kg/m2). Nine SNPs (rs3733359, rs2282679, and rs16847024 in GC, rs2060793 and rs10741657 in CYP2R1, rs2248359 and rs6013897 in CYP24A1, rs11574143 and rs739837 in VDR) were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. The relationships between genotypes/alleles of a single locus as well as haplotypes of each gene and GDM were analyzed. We did not observe a significant difference in genotype frequency of each SNP between cases and controls. However, in the obese subgroup (pre-BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), the risk allele-A of rs3733359 showed an association with increased risk of GDM (OR = 1.739, 95% CI = 1.066-2.837, P = 0.027). The GG-haplotype frequency of rs3733359 and rs2282679 in GC was modestly lower in the GDM group (OR = 0.848, 95% CI = 0.719-0.999, P = 0.048). Rs2060793 and rs10741657 were associated with insulin area under the curve (P = 0.028, P = 0.042, respectively), while rs739837 and rs6013897 demonstrated a correlation with fasting glucose (P = 0.019, P = 0.049, respectively). Additionally, rs2248359 displayed an association with leukocyte counts (B = 0.063 P = 0.033) and rs16847024 was related to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (B = 0.086, P = 0.005). Our results indicate an association between GC variants and GDM, as well as a relation between a subset of loci in CYP2R1, CYP24A1, and VDR and clinical parameters related to GDM. Our findings may provide information for identifying biomarkers for early risk prediction of GDM and the pathways involved in disease progression. PMID:26448018

  10. HbA1c Test as a Tool in the Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Renz, Paula Breitenbach; Cavagnolli, Gabriela; Weinert, Letícia Schwerz; Silveiro, Sandra Pinho; Camargo, Joíza Lins

    2015-01-01

    Aims Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a prevalent and potentially serious condition which may put both mothers and neonates at risk. The current recommendation for diagnosis is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). This study aimed to determine the usefulness of HbA1c test as a diagnostic tool for GDM as compared to the traditional criteria based on the OGTT. Methods This was a diagnostic test accuracy study. We performed OGTT and HbA1c test in women attending prenatal visits at a tertiary hospital. GDM was defined according to WHO1999 or ADA/WHO 2013 criteria. ROC curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of HbA1c. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for different HbA1c cut-off points were calculated. Results Of the 262 women in the third trimester of gestation enrolled in the study, 86 (33%) were diagnosed with GDM. Only five of these women presented HbA1c ≥48 mmol/mol (6.5%). This cut-off point presented 100% specificity but very low sensitivity (7%). Based on ROC curve, and considering OGTT as the reference criterion, HbA1c ≥40 mmol/mol (5.8%) showed adequate specificity in diagnosing GDM (94.9%) but low sensitivity (26.4%). Unlike, HbA1c values of 31 mmol/mol (5.0%) presented adequate sensitivity (89.7%) but low specificity (32.6%) to detect GDM. For women with HbA1c ≥40 mmol/mol (5.8%), the positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.14 (95%CI 2.49–10.63) and 0.78 (0.68–0.88), respectively. The post-test probability of GDM was about 40%, representing a 4.0-fold increase in the mean pre-test probability. This cut-off point could eliminate the need for the unpleasant and laborious OGTT tests in almost one third of cases, as 38% of patients with GDM may be diagnosable by HbA1c test alone. Conclusions Our results show that combined HbA1c and OGTT measurements may be useful in diagnosing GDM. PMID:26292213

  11. Genetic Risk of Progression to Type 2 Diabetes and Response to Intensive Lifestyle or Metformin in Prediabetic Women With and Without a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Shannon D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Florez, Jose C.; Dabelea, Dana; Franks, Paul W.; Dagogo-Jack, Sam; Kim, Catherine; Knowler, William C.; Christophi, Costas A.; Ratner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) trial investigated rates of progression to diabetes among adults with prediabetes randomized to treatment with placebo, metformin, or intensive lifestyle intervention. Among women in the DPP, diabetes risk reduction with metformin was greater in women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared with women without GDM but with one or more previous live births. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We asked if genetic variability could account for these differences by comparing β-cell function and genetic risk scores (GRS), calculated from 34 diabetes-associated loci, between women with and without histories of GDM. RESULTS β-Cell function was reduced in women with GDM. The GRS was positively associated with a history of GDM; however, the GRS did not predict progression to diabetes or modulate response to intervention. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that a diabetes-associated GRS is associated with development of GDM and may characterize women at risk for development of diabetes due to β-cell dysfunction. PMID:24271189

  12. Mothers After Gestational Diabetes in Australia Diabetes Prevention Program (MAGDA-DPP) post-natal intervention: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance with its onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Post-GDM women have a life-time risk exceeding 70% of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Lifestyle modifications reduce the incidence of T2DM by up to 58% for high-risk individuals. Methods/Design The Mothers After Gestational Diabetes in Australia Diabetes Prevention Program (MAGDA-DPP) is a randomized controlled trial aiming to assess the effectiveness of a structured diabetes prevention intervention for post-GDM women. This trial has an intervention group participating in a diabetes prevention program (DPP), and a control group receiving usual care from their general practitioners during the same time period. The 12-month intervention comprises an individual session followed by five group sessions at two-week intervals, and two follow-up telephone calls. A total of 574 women will be recruited, with 287 in each arm. The women will undergo blood tests, anthropometric measurements, and self-reported health status, diet, physical activity, quality of life, depression, risk perception and healthcare service usage, at baseline and 12 months. At completion, primary outcome (changes in diabetes risk) and secondary outcome (changes in psychosocial and quality of life measurements and in cardiovascular disease risk factors) will be assessed in both groups. Discussion This study aims to show whether MAGDA-DPP leads to a reduction in diabetes risk for post-GDM women. The characteristics that predict intervention completion and improvement in clinical and behavioral measures will be useful for further development of DPPs for this population. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ANZCTRN 12610000338066 PMID:24135085

  13. Beneficial effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated Fatty acids in gestational diabetes: consequences in macrosomia and adulthood obesity.

    PubMed

    Yessoufou, Akadiri; Nekoua, Magloire P; Gbankoto, Adam; Mashalla, Yohana; Moutairou, Kabirou

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are increasingly being used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and obesity. In this paper, we report data on the observed effects of omega-3 PUFA on major metabolic disorders and immune system disruption during gestational diabetes and their consequences on macrosomia. While controversies still exist about omega-3 PUFA effects on antioxidant status regarding the level of omega-3 PUFA in diet supplementation, their lipid-lowering effects are unanimously recognized by researchers. Animal studies have shown that omega-3 PUFA contributes to the maintenance of the immune defense system by promoting the differentiation of T helper (Th) cell to a Th2 phenotype in diabetic pregnancy and by shifting the Th1/Th2 ratio from a deleterious proinflammatory Th1 phenotype to a protective anti-inflammatory Th2 phenotype in macrosomia and in adulthood obesity that results from macrosomia at birth. Based on the available evidence, international nutritional and food agencies recommend administration of omega-3 PUFA as triglyceride-lowering agents, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease risk and during human pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, studies targeting humans are still required to explore application of the fatty acids as supplement in the management of gestational diabetes and inflammatory and immune diseases. PMID:25961055

  14. Beneficial Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Gestational Diabetes: Consequences in Macrosomia and Adulthood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yessoufou, Akadiri; Nekoua, Magloire P.; Gbankoto, Adam; Moutairou, Kabirou

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are increasingly being used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, including diabetes and obesity. In this paper, we report data on the observed effects of omega-3 PUFA on major metabolic disorders and immune system disruption during gestational diabetes and their consequences on macrosomia. While controversies still exist about omega-3 PUFA effects on antioxidant status regarding the level of omega-3 PUFA in diet supplementation, their lipid-lowering effects are unanimously recognized by researchers. Animal studies have shown that omega-3 PUFA contributes to the maintenance of the immune defense system by promoting the differentiation of T helper (Th) cell to a Th2 phenotype in diabetic pregnancy and by shifting the Th1/Th2 ratio from a deleterious proinflammatory Th1 phenotype to a protective anti-inflammatory Th2 phenotype in macrosomia and in adulthood obesity that results from macrosomia at birth. Based on the available evidence, international nutritional and food agencies recommend administration of omega-3 PUFA as triglyceride-lowering agents, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease risk and during human pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, studies targeting humans are still required to explore application of the fatty acids as supplement in the management of gestational diabetes and inflammatory and immune diseases. PMID:25961055

  15. Serum Magnesium Level Is Associated with Type 2 Diabetes in Women with a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: The Korea National Diabetes Program Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sae Jeong; Hwang, Soon Young; Baik, Sei Hyun; Lee, Kwan Woo; Nam, Moon Suk; Park, Yong Soo; Woo, Jeong Taek; Kim, Young Seol; Park, Sunmin; Park, So-Young; Yim, Chang Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Koo

    2014-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a strong predictor of postpartum prediabetes and transition to overt type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Although many reports indicate that low magnesium is correlated with deteriorated glucose tolerance, the association between postpartum serum magnesium level and the risk for T2DM in women with a history of GDM has not been evaluated. We analyzed postpartum serum magnesium levels and development of prediabetes and T2DM in women with prior GDM according to American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria using the Korean National Diabetes Program (KNDP) GDM cohort. During a mean follow-up of 15.6±2.0 months after screening, 116 women were divided into three groups according to glucose tolerance status. Ultimately, eight patients (6.9%) were diagnosed with T2DM, 59 patients (50.9%) with prediabetes, and 49 patients (42.2%) with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) after follow-up. The T2DM group had the lowest serum magnesium level (0.65 [0.63-0.68] mM/L) in the postpartum period, but there was no significant difference between the prediabetes group (0.70 [0.65-0.70] mM/L) and the NGT group (0.70 [0.65-0.70] mM/L) (P=0.073) Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that postpartum HOMA-IR was a significant predictor of both prediabetes and T2DM. Moreover, we found that postpartum serum magnesium level was also a possible predictor for T2DM development. Serum magnesium level in the postpartum period may be a possible predictor for T2DM development in women with a history of GDM. PMID:24431910

  16. An elevated blood glucose level and increased incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women with latent toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Kankova, Sarka; Flegr, Jaroslav; Calda, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    About 30-50% of the world human population are infected with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (Nicolle et Manceaux, 1908). Latent toxoplasmosis has many specific behavioural and physiological effects on the human body and influences the course of pregnancy, including secondary sex ratio of children of infected mothers. It was suggested that an increased concentration of glucose could be the proximate cause of increased sex ratio. There are some indirect indications of possible association between toxoplasmosis and certain forms of diabetes. Here we searched for a possible link between latent toxoplasmosis and the level of glucose in the blood. In a cross-sectional study, we found that pregnant women with latent toxoplasmosis had significantly higher blood glucose levels during the oral glucose tolerance test (n = 191, p = 0.010; the level of fasting plasma glucose: mean = 5.04 mmol/l vs mean = 4.88 mmol/l; blood glucose level at 1 hour mean = 7.73 mmol/l vs mean = 6.89 mmol/l and blood glucose level at two hours mean = 6.43 mmol/l vs mean = 5.74 mmol/l) and higher prevalence (19.5 %) of gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 532, p = 0.033, odds ratio = 1.78) in the 24-28th gestational weeks than T. gondii-free women (12.0 %). Increased level of glucose and increased incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus could have considerable clinical impact as contributors to the development of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in T. gondii-infected women. Our results also brought the first empirical support for the hypothesis that the glucose concentration may play a role in T. gondii-associated offspring sex ratio shifts. PMID:26447941

  17. Gestational diabetes mellitus prevalence in Maela refugee camp on the ThaiMyanmar Border: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Gilder, Mary Ellen; Zin, Thet Wai; Wai, Nan San; Ner, Ma; Say, Paw Si; Htoo, Myint; Say, Say; Htay, Win Win; Simpson, Julie A.; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Nosten, Francois; McGready, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals in conflict-affected areas rarely get appropriate care for chronic or non-infectious diseases. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide, and new evidence shows conclusively that the negative effects of hyperglycemia occur even at mild glucose elevations and that these negative effects can be attenuated by treatment. Scientific literature on gestational diabetes in refugee camp settings is critically limited. Methods A 75 g 2-hour glucose tolerance test was administered to 228 women attending the antenatal care (ANC) clinic in Maela refugee camp on the ThaiMyanmar border. Prevalence of GDM was determined using the HAPO trial cut-offs [?92 mg/dL (fasting),?180 (1 hour), and?153 (2 hour)] and the WHO criteria [?126 mg/dL (fasting), and 140 mg/dL (2 hour)]. Results From July 2011 to March 2012, the prevalence of GDM was 10.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.214.0] when the cut-off determined by the HAPO trial was applied. Applying the older WHO criteria yielded a prevalence of 6.6% (95% CI 3.39.8). Age, parity, and BMI emerged as characteristics that may be significantly associated with GDM in this population. Other risk factors that are commonly used in screening guidelines were not applicable in this diabetes-nave population. Discussion The prevalence of GDM is lower in this population compared with other populations, but still complicates 10% of pregnancies. New evidence regarding gestational diabetes raises new dilemmas for healthcare providers in resource-poor settings. Efforts to identify and treat patients at risk for adverse outcomes need to be balanced with awareness of the risks and burdens associated with over diagnosis and unnecessary interventions. Screening approaches based on risk factors or using higher cut-off values may help minimize this burden and identify those most likely to benefit from intervention. PMID:24824580

  18. The Effect of 17-alpha Hydroxyprogesterone Caproate on the Risk of Gestational Diabetes in Singleton or Twin Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Gyamfi, Cynthia; Horton, Amanda L.; Momirova, Valerija; Rouse, Dwight J.; Caritis, Steve N.; Peaceman, Alan M.; Sciscione, Anthony; Meis, Paul J.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Dombrowski, Mitchell; Sibai, Baha; Varner, Michael W.; Iams, Jay D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Carpenter, Marshall W.; Lo, Julie; Ramin, Susan M.; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Miodovnik, Menachem; Conway, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the rates of gestational diabetes (GDM) among women who received serial doses of 17 alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC) versus placebo. Study Design Secondary analysis of two double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials of 17-OHPC given to women at risk for preterm delivery. The incidence of GDM was compared between women who received 17-OHPC or placebo. Results We included 1094 women; 441 had singleton and 653 had twin gestations. Combining the two studies, 616 received 17-OHPC and 478 received placebo. Among singleton and twin pregnancies, rates of GDM were similar in women receiving 17-OHPC versus placebo (5.8% vs. 4.7%, p= 0.64 and 7.4% vs 7.6%, p =0.94, respectively). In the multivariable model, progesterone was not associated with GDM (adjusted odds ratio (adj OR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62 to 1.73). Conclusion Weekly administration of 17-OHPC is not associated with higher rates of gestational diabetes in either singleton or twin pregnancies. PMID:19716543

  19. Relationship between Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and Subsequent Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Lien; Chen, Li-Ru; Tsao, Hsiao-Mei; Chen, Kuo-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective This nationwide population-based study aims to explore the relationship between polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and subsequent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods Data from 1998–2012 Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were used for this study. ICD9-CM codes 256.4X and 648.X were used separately for the diagnoses of PCOS and GDM, which were further confirmed by records of blood tests or ultrasonography to ensure the accuracy of the diagnoses. Women diagnosed at < 15 or > 45 years of age, and those diagnosed with overt diabetes mellitus or GDM prior to PCOS were excluded. During pregnancy, each woman with a previous diagnosis of PCOS was age-matched to 10 women without PCOS. Odds ratios (ORs) for risk of GDM were calculated by logistic regression analysis with adjustment for economic status and co-morbidities. Results Among 7,629 eligible women with a valid PCOS diagnosis, 3,109 (42.87%) had subsequent pregnancies. GDM occurred frequently among women with a history of PCOS as compared to those without PCOS (20.46% vs. 10.54%, p<0.0001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that PCOS was associated with GDM (adjusted OR = 2.15; 95% CI:1.96–2.37). Among 3,109 affected patients, 1,160 (37.31%) had used medications for PCOS and 261 (8.39%) were treated with an oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA). There was no significant difference in development of GDM between the medication and no medication sub-groups (p>0.05). If not used after conception, OHAs did not reduce the risk of GDM (adjusted OR = 1.20; 95% CI:0.88–1.62). Conclusions A history of PCOS is a significant and independent risk factor for development of GDM. Medication for PCOS or pre-pregnancy use of OHAs does not reduce the risk of GDM. When at-risk women become pregnant, they require closer surveillance for maternal and fetal well-being, and should follow a strict diet and adhere to weight gain control to avoid obstetric complications due to GDM. PMID:26488176

  20. International migration and gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Anita J; McDermott, Sarah; Rigol-Chachamovich, Juliana; Bandyopadhyay, Mridula; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Stewart, Donna

    2011-11-01

    Influxes of migrant women of childbearing age to receiving countries have made their perinatal health status a key priority for many governments. The international research collaboration Reproductive Outcomes And Migration (ROAM) reviewed published studies to assess whether migrants in countries of resettlement have a greater risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) than women in receiving countries. A systematic review of the literature from Medline, Embase, PsychInfo and CINAHL from 1990 to 2009 included studies of migrant women and GDM. Studies were excluded if there was no cross-border movement or comparison group or if the receiving country was not the country of resettlement. Studies were assessed for quality, analysed descriptively and meta-analysed. Twenty-four reports (representing >120,000 migrants) met our inclusion criteria. Migrants were described primarily by geographic origin; other relevant aspects (e.g. time in country, language fluency) were rarely studied. Migrants' results for GDM were worse than those for receiving-country women in 79% of all studies. Meta-analyses showed that, compared with receiving-country women, Caribbean, African, European and Northern European women were at greater risk of GDM, while North Africans and North Americans had risks similar to receiving-country women. Although results of the 31 comparisons of Asians, East Africans or non-Australian Oceanians were too heterogeneous to provide a single GDM risk estimate for migrant women, only one comparison was below the receiving-country comparison group, all others presented a higher risk estimate. The majority of women migrants to resettlement countries are at greater risk for GDM than women resident in receiving countries. Research using clear, specific migrant definitions, adjusting for relevant risk factors and including other aspects of migration experiences is needed to confirm and understand these findings. PMID:21980947

  1. A study of snack consumption, night-eating habits, and nutrient intake in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Jin; Lee, Jinju; Kim, Ji-Myung; Lee, Hyun Ah; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to identify dietary behavior such as snack consumption, night-eating and nutrients intake associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The study was conducted on 219 normal glucose tolerance (NGT) subjects and 44 GDM subjects by using a questionnaire including dietary behavior, food frequency and 3-day food record. The mean age, OGTT, and delivery weight of GDM subjects were statistically higher than those in NGT. A larger proportion of NGT subjects consumed black coffee (49.8%) while the majority of GDM subjects (61.4%) drank mixed coffee with sugar and cream. Dairy products were the most frequently consumed snack item in NGT subjects (40.7%), while fruits were most frequently consumed food item in GDM subjects (34.4%). Many of NGT subjects (49.8%) answered that they hardly took night-eating snacks whereas most of GDM subjects (61.4%) took night-eating snacks more than once a week. For change of taste preference, the proportion of NGT subjects who showed less preference for salty taste (33.3%) or greasy taste (16.9%) was higher than that of GDM subjects (11.4%). Nutrient intakes of energy, fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acid (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), carbohydrate, vitamin B(1), vitamin B(2), vitamin C, and vitamin E in GDM group were significantly higher than those in NGT group. Nutrient densities of SFA and vitamin C in GDM group were higher and nutrient density of calcium was lower than those in NGT group. Taken together, it is recommended to reduce night-eating snack and choose less salty and fatty foods, black-coffee rather than coffee with cream and sugar, and more dairy products to prevent GDM. PMID:23431085

  2. Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lekva, Tove; Bollerslev, Jens; Norwitz, Errol R.; Aukrust, Pål; Henriksen, Tore; Ueland, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and arterial stiffness (as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV)), in women with and without a history of GDM, using both the old WHO and new IADPSG diagnostic criteria, at 5 years after the index pregnancy. Dyslipidemia and PWV were used as surrogate markers for CVD risk. The population-based prospective cohort included 300 women from the original STORK study. All participants had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy. Five years later, the OGTT was repeated along with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid analysis, and PWV analysis. Measurements were compared between those women who did and did not have GDM based on both the WHO and IADPSG criteria. We found that women with GDM based on the old WHO criteria had higher CVD risk at 5 years than those without GDM, with markedly elevated PWV and more severe dyslipidemia (higher triglycerides (TG)/HDL cholesterol ratio). After adjusting for known risk factors, the most important predictors for elevated PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio at 5-year follow-up were maternal age, BMI, GDM, systolic blood pressure, and indices of glucose metabolism in the index pregnancy. In conclusion, we found a higher risk for CVD, based on the surrogate markers PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio, at 5-year follow-up in women diagnosed with GDM in the index pregnancy when using the old WHO diagnostic criteria. PMID:26309121

  3. Aortic Stiffness and Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lekva, Tove; Bollerslev, Jens; Norwitz, Errol R; Aukrust, Pål; Henriksen, Tore; Ueland, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life, but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate indices of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and arterial stiffness (as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV)), in women with and without a history of GDM, using both the old WHO and new IADPSG diagnostic criteria, at 5 years after the index pregnancy. Dyslipidemia and PWV were used as surrogate markers for CVD risk. The population-based prospective cohort included 300 women from the original STORK study. All participants had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during pregnancy. Five years later, the OGTT was repeated along with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, lipid analysis, and PWV analysis. Measurements were compared between those women who did and did not have GDM based on both the WHO and IADPSG criteria. We found that women with GDM based on the old WHO criteria had higher CVD risk at 5 years than those without GDM, with markedly elevated PWV and more severe dyslipidemia (higher triglycerides (TG)/HDL cholesterol ratio). After adjusting for known risk factors, the most important predictors for elevated PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio at 5-year follow-up were maternal age, BMI, GDM, systolic blood pressure, and indices of glucose metabolism in the index pregnancy. In conclusion, we found a higher risk for CVD, based on the surrogate markers PWV and TG/HDL-C ratio, at 5-year follow-up in women diagnosed with GDM in the index pregnancy when using the old WHO diagnostic criteria. PMID:26309121

  4. Patient-oriented Computerized Clinical Guidelines for Mobile Decision Support in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rigla, Mercedes; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Shalom, Erez; Peleg, Mor; Broens, Tom; Pons, Belén; Caballero-Ruíz, Estefanía; Gómez, Enrique J.; Hernando, M. Elena

    2014-01-01

    The risks associated with gestational diabetes (GD) can be reduced with an active treatment able to improve glycemic control. Advances in mobile health can provide new patient-centric models for GD to create personalized health care services, increase patient independence and improve patients’ self-management capabilities, and potentially improve their treatment compliance. In these models, decision-support functions play an essential role. The telemedicine system MobiGuide provides personalized medical decision support for GD patients that is based on computerized clinical guidelines and adapted to a mobile environment. The patient’s access to the system is supported by a smartphone-based application that enhances the efficiency and ease of use of the system. We formalized the GD guideline into a computer-interpretable guideline (CIG). We identified several workflows that provide decision-support functionalities to patients and 4 types of personalized advice to be delivered through a mobile application at home, which is a preliminary step to providing decision-support tools in a telemedicine system: (1) therapy, to help patients to comply with medical prescriptions; (2) monitoring, to help patients to comply with monitoring instructions; (3) clinical assessment, to inform patients about their health conditions; and (4) upcoming events, to deal with patients’ personal context or special events. The whole process to specify patient-oriented decision support functionalities ensures that it is based on the knowledge contained in the GD clinical guideline and thus follows evidence-based recommendations but at the same time is patient-oriented, which could enhance clinical outcomes and patients’ acceptance of the whole system. PMID:24876573

  5. Impact of a Telemedicine System with Automated Reminders on Outcomes in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Larry C.; Rohrbacher, Kimberly; Mulla, Wadia; Mastrogiannis, Dimtrios; Gaughan, John; Santamore, William P.; Bove, Alfred A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Health information technology has been proven to be a successful tool for the management of patients with multiple medical conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an enhanced telemedicine system on glucose control and pregnancy outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Subjects and Methods We used an Internet-based telemedicine system to also allow interactive voice response phone communication between patients and providers and to provide automated reminders to transmit data. Women with GDM were randomized to either the telemedicine group (n=40) or the control group (n=40) and asked to monitor their blood glucose levels four times a day. Women in the intervention group transmitted those values via the telemedicine system, whereas women in the control group maintained paper logbooks, which were reviewed at prenatal visits. Primary outcomes were infant birth weight and maternal glucose control. Data collection included blood glucose records, transmission rates for the intervention group, and chart review. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups (telemedicine vs. controls) in regard to maternal blood glucose values or infant birth weight. However, adding telephone access and reminders increased transmission rates of data in the intervention group compared with the intervention group in our previous study (35.6±32.3 sets of data vs.17.4±16.9 sets of data; P<0.01). Conclusions Our enhanced telemedicine monitoring system increased system utilization and contact between women with GDM and their healthcare providers but did not impact upon pregnancy outcomes. PMID:22512287

  6. Dysregulation of Placental Endothelial Lipase in Obese Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gauster, Martin; Hiden, Ursula; van Poppel, Mireille; Frank, Sasa; Wadsack, Christian; Hauguel-de Mouzon, Sylvie; Desoye, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study addressed the hypothesis that placental endothelial lipase (EL) expression is affected by pregnancies complicated by obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS EL expression in placental tissues from pregnancies complicated by obesity, GDM, or obesity combined with GDM (obese-GDM) was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Moreover, primary placental cells were isolated and treated with insulin, glucose, leptin, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, and EL expression was measured. Inhibitors of nuclear factor (NF)-?B or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling were used to detect potential pathways of EL regulation in primary placental endothelial cells (ECs). RESULTS In placentas from obese-GDM pregnancies, EL expression was upregulated by 1.9-fold (P < 0.05) compared with lean pregnancies, whereas obesity or GDM alone had no significant effect. Analyses of metabolic parameters in maternal venous and umbilical venous plasma revealed significantly increased insulin and leptin as well as slightly increased glucose and TNF-? values in the obese and obese-GDM groups. Cell culture experiments identified TNF-? and leptin, but not glucose or insulin, as regulators of EL expression in ECs. Induction of EL expression by these mediators occurred in a para/endocrine manner, since only leptin and TNF-? receptors, but not the cytokines themselves, were expressed in ECs. Inhibitor experiments suggested that TNF-? and leptin-mediated upregulation of EL may occur via two different routes. Whereas TNF-? induced EL upregulation in ECs by activation of the NF-?B pathway, leptin did not stimulate NF-?B or MAPK signaling pathways in these cells. CONCLUSIONS Metabolic inflammation with high leptin and locally increased TNF-? concentrations at the fetal-placental interface regulates placental EL expression. PMID:21852675

  7. Genetic variants and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuilin; Bao, Wei; Rong, Ying; Yang, Huixia; Bowers, Katherine; Yeung, Edwina; Kiely, Michele

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several studies have examined associations between genetic variants and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However, inferences from these studies were often hindered by limited statistical power and conflicting results. We aimed to systematically review and quantitatively summarize the association of commonly studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with GDM risk and to identify important gaps that remain for consideration in future studies. METHODS Genetic association studies of GDM published through 1 October 2012 were searched using the HuGE Navigator and PubMed databases. A SNP was included if the SNP–GDM associations were assessed in three or more independent studies. Two reviewers independently evaluated the eligibility for inclusion and extracted the data. The allele-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random effects models accounting for heterogeneity. RESULTS Overall, 29 eligible articles capturing associations of 12 SNPs from 10 genes were included for the systematic review. The minor alleles of rs7903146 (TCF7L2), rs12255372 (TCF7L2), rs1799884 (−30G/A, GCK), rs5219 (E23K, KCNJ11), rs7754840 (CDKAL1), rs4402960 (IGF2BP2), rs10830963 (MTNR1B), rs1387153 (MTNR1B) and rs1801278 (Gly972Arg, IRS1) were significantly associated with a higher risk of GDM. Among them, genetic variants in TCF7L2 showed the strongest association with GDM risk, with ORs (95% CIs) of 1.44 (1.29–1.60, P < 0.001) per T allele of rs7903146 and 1.46 (1.15–1.84, P = 0.002) per T allele of rs12255372. CONCLUSIONS In this systematic review, we found significant associations of GDM risk with nine SNPs in seven genes, most of which have been related to the regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:23690305

  8. Screening in high-risk group of gestational diabetes mellitus with its maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nilofer, Angadi Rajasab; Raju, V. S.; Dakshayini, B. R.; Zaki, Syed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a metabolic disorder defined as glucose intolerance with the onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Women with GDM are at increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The complications associated with GDM can be prevented by early recognition, intense monitoring and proper treatment. Aims: The present study was done to screen the high-risk pregnancy group for GDM, to find the incidence of abnormal results on screening and to correlate the abnormal results with the maternal and fetal outcomes. The study was done in a tertiary care hospital and teaching institute. It was a prospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: Selective screening for GDM was done in 150 pregnant women with high-risk factors. Screening was done with 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT) after 18 weeks, and if GCT was negative then the test was repeated after 28 weeks of pregnancy. The patients who were having an abnormal GCT were subjected to 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). All GDM patients were followed up and treated with diet and/or insulin therapy till delivery to know maternal and fetal outcomes. The period of study was from April 2008 to March 2009. Results: 7.3% of study population was OGCT positive. 6% of the study population was OGTT positive. Age >25 years, obesity, family history of DM, and past history of GDM were the risk factors significantly associated with GDM. One newborn had hypoglycemia and one had hyperbilirubinemia. The fetal and maternal outcome in GDM patients was good in our study due to early diagnosis and intervention. Conclusion: Women with GDM are at an increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The increased morbidity in GDM is preventable by meticulous antenatal care. PMID:22701851

  9. Association of Retinol Binding Protein 4 with Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abetew, Dejene F.; Qiu, Chunfang; Fida, Neway G.; Dishi, Michal; Hevner, Karin; Williams, Michelle A.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim We investigated association of maternal retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) with risk of gestational diabetes (GDM). Methods GDM cases (N=173) and controls (N=187) were selected from among participants of a cohort study of risk factors of pregnancy complications. Early pregnancy (16 weeks on average) serum RBP4 concentration was measured using an ELISA-based immunoassay. Logistic regression was used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs/aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Results Mean serum RBP4 was significantly higher among GDM cases compared with controls (47.1 vs. 41.1 μg/ml, respectively; p-value<0.05). Participants in the highest quartile for serum RBP4 had a 1.89-fold higher risk of GDM compared with participants in the lowest quartile (95%CI: 1.05-3.43). However, this relationship did not reach statistical significance after adjustment for confounders (aOR: 1.54; 95%CI: 0.82-2.90). Women who were ≥35 years old and who had high RBP4 (≥38.3 μg/ml, the median) had a 2.31-fold higher risk of GDM compared with women who were < 35 years old and had low RBP4 (<38.3 μg/ml) (aOR: 2.31; 95%CI: 1.26-4.23; p-value for interaction=0.021). Conclusion Overall, there is modest evidence of a positive association of early pregnancy elevated RBP4 concentration with increased GDM risk, particularly among women with advanced age. PMID:23153527

  10. The association of maternal adult weight trajectory with preeclampsia and gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mary Lou; Ananth, Cande V.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Miller, Raymond S.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia (PE) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) adversely affect pregnancy outcomes and the subsequent health of both mother and infant. It is known that elevated pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of these obstetrical complications. However, little is known about the role of adult weight patterns prior to pregnancy. Methods Self-reported weight at ages prior to the current pregnancy was recorded in a prospective cohort study of 3567 pregnant women, allowing assessment of longitudinal pre-pregnancy weight trajectories and their association with subsequent PE and GDM in the study pregnancy. Results Women who would subsequently experience PE or GDM in the study pregnancy experienced on average almost double the rate of adult weight gain than other women (PE: additional 0.67 lbs/year, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.20, 1.13 and GDM: additional 0.76 lbs/year, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.06). Women with mean adult annual weight gain above the 90th percentile (3.1 lbs/ year) had elevated risk of subsequent PE and GDM independent of their BMI at age 18 and of their obesity status at the time of the study pregnancy. Finite mixture trajectory modelling identified four monotonely ordered, increasing mean weight trajectories. Relative to the second lowest (most common) weight trajectory, women in the highest trajectory were at greater risk of PE (odds ratio [OR] 5.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9, 8.8) and GDM (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.7, 4.5). Conclusions These results indicate that higher adult weight gain trajectories prior to pregnancy may play a role in predisposing women to PE or GDM. PMID:24842329

  11. Gestational diabetes mellitus modulates neonatal high-density lipoprotein composition and its functional heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Sreckovic, Ivana; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Besenboeck, Carolin; Miljkovic, Milica; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Marsche, Gunther; Lang, Uwe; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana; Desoye, Gernot; Wadsack, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is related to neonatal macrosomia and an increased risk of vascular events. We hypothesized that GDM exerts qualitative effects on neonatal high-density lipoprotein (HDL). HDL was isolated from control (n=11) and GDM maternal/neonatal donors (n=9) and subjected to shotgun proteomics. Differences in HDL mobility were assessed by FPLC and native gel-electrophoresis. Paraoxonase (PON1) activity, cholesterol ester-transfer protein (CETP) mass and activity, phospholipid, triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were quantified with commercial kits. Total anti-oxidative capacity and cholesterol efflux capability of HDLs were measured. Four proteins involved in lipid metabolism, inflammation and innate immunity were differentially expressed between controls and GDM neonates. ApoM (decreased, p<0.05) and SAA1 (increased, p<0.05) showed the same differences on both, maternal and neonatal GDM HDL. Lower PON1 protein expression was corroborated by lower activity (p<0.05) which in turn was associated with attenuated anti-oxidant capacity of GDM HDL. Protein changes were accompanied by increased levels of triglycerides and decreased levels of cholesterol esters, respectively. The observed differences in GDM HDL lipid moiety may be related to CETP mass and activity alterations. The rate of cholesterol efflux from term trophoblasts to maternal and from placental endothelial cells to neonatal GDM HDL was impaired (p<0.05). In conclusion, GDM causes changes in HDL composition and is intimately associated with impaired cholesterol efflux capability as well as diminished anti-oxidative particle properties. Remodeling of neonatal GDM HDL in utero supports the hypothesis that maternal conditions in pregnancy impact neonatal lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:25130684

  12. Gestational diabetes mellitus enhances arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids in placental phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bitsanis, Demetris; Ghebremeskel, Kebreab; Moodley, Therishnee; Crawford, Michael A; Djahanbakhch, Ovrang

    2006-04-01

    In previous studies, we reported that neonates of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have reduced blood levels of arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) that were unrelated to maternal status. Since both AA and DHA are selectively transferred from maternal to fetal circulation by the placenta, we have investigated whether the FA composition of the placenta is altered by GDM. Thirty-six women, 11 with and 25 without GDM, were recruited from Newham General Hospital, London. The women with GDM had higher levels of di-homo-gamma-linolenic (P < 0.05), docosatetraenoic (n-6 DTA; P< 0.0001), docosapentaenoic n-6 (P< 0.005), total n-6 (P < 0.005), docosapentaenoic (n-3 DPA; P < 0.005), and total n-3 (P < 0.01) FA, as well as higher levels of AA (P < 0.05) and DHA (P < 0.01), in placental choline phosphoglycerides (CPG) compared with the healthy women who served as controls. Similarly, the women with GDM had elevated n-6 DTA (P < 0.005), AA, total n-6 metabolites (P < 0.05), DHA, total n-3 metabolites, and total n-3 FA (P < 0.005) in ethanolamine phosphoglycerides (EPG). In contrast to CPG and EPG, the placental TG of the women with GDM had higher linoleic acid (P< 0.05) and lower AA, n-6 metabolites, and n-3 DPA (P < 0.01). The placenta is devoid of desaturase activity, and it is thought to be reliant on maternal circulation for both AA and DHA. Hence, the enhanced levels of the two FA in the placenta of the GDM group suggests that these FA are taken up from the maternal circulation and retained after esterification into phosphoglycerides instead of being transferred to the fetus. Further study is needed to elucidate the mechanism involved and the effect of the phenomenon on postnatal growth and development of the offspring. PMID:16808147

  13. Prepregnancy Dietary Protein Intake, Major Dietary Protein Sources, and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Bowers, Katherine; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Hu, Frank B.; Zhang, Cuilin

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dietary protein is an important modulator of glucose metabolism. However, studies regarding the association between dietary protein intake and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) risk are sparse. This study was to examine the association. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our study included 21,457 singleton pregnancies reported among 15,294 participants of the Nurses' Health Study II cohort between 1991 and 2001. Included pregnancies were free of chronic diseases before pregnancy or previous GDM. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate the relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs. RESULTS After adjustment for age, parity, nondietary and dietary factors, and BMI, multivariable RRs (95% CIs) comparing the highest with lowest quintiles were 1.49 (1.032.17) for animal protein intake and 0.69 (0.500.97) for vegetable protein intake. The substitution of 5% energy from vegetable protein for animal protein was associated with a 51% lower risk of GDM (RR [95% CI], 0.49 [0.290.84]). For major dietary protein sources, multivariable RRs (95% CIs) comparing the highest with the lowest quintiles were 2.05 (1.552.73) for total red meat and 0.73 (0.560.95) for nuts, respectively. The substitution of red meat with poultry, fish, nuts, or legumes showed a significantly lower risk of GDM. CONCLUSIONS Higher intake of animal protein, in particular red meat, was significantly associated with a greater risk of GDM. By contrast, higher intake of vegetable protein, specifically nuts, was associated with a significantly lower risk. Substitution of vegetable protein for animal protein, as well as substitution of some healthy protein sources for red meat, was associated with a lower risk of GDM. PMID:23378620

  14. The independent effects of maternal obesity and gestational diabetes on the pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity and gestational diabetes (GDM) in pregnancy are recognized risk factors for adverse outcomes, including cesarean section (CS), macrosomia and preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to investigate the independent effect of GDM and obesity on the adverse pregnancy outcomes at term. Methods A retrospective cohort of postpartum women, in King Khalid University Hospital, were stratified according to body mass index (obese ≥30 kg/m2, non-obese <30 kg/m2) and the results of GDM screening into the following groups, women with no obesity and no GDM (reference group), women with no obesity but with GDM, women with obesity but no GDM and women with both GDM and obesity. Adverse pregnancy outcomes included high birth weight, macrosomia, CS delivery and preeclampsia. Multiple logistic regression used to examine independent associations of GDM and obesity with macrosomia and CS. Results 2701 women were included, 44% of them were obese and 15% had GDM. 63% of the women with GDM were obese. There was significant increase in the percentage of macrosomia, P < 0.001, high birth weight, P < 0.001, CS, P < 0.001 and preeclampsia, P < 0.001 in women with GDM and obesity compared to the reference group. Obesity increased the estimated risk of CS delivery, odds ratio (OR) 2.16, confidence intervals (CI) 1.74-2.67. The combination of GDM and obesity increased the risk of macrosomia OR 3.45, CI 2.05-5.81 and the risk of CS delivery OR 2.26, CI 1.65-3.11. Conclusion Maternal obesity and GDM were independently associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The combination of both conditions further increase the risk. PMID:24923207

  15. Effect of a CGMS and SMBG on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    WEI, Qiong; SUN, Zilin; YANG, Yue; YU, Hong; DING, Hongjuan; WANG, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the effects of a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) on maternal and neonatal outcomes. A total of 106 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in gestational weeks 24–28 were randomly allocated to the antenatal care plus CGMS group or the self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) group. The CGMS group was subdivided into early and late subgroups. There were no significant differences in prenatal or obstetric outcomes, e.g., caesarean delivery rate, Apgar score at 5 min, macrosomia or neonatal hypoglycaemia, between the CGMS and SMBG groups. The CGMS group had lower glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C) levels than the SMBG group; however, the difference was not statistically significant. The proportion of GDM women with excessive gestational weight gain was lower in the CGMS group than in the SMBG group (33.3% vs. 56.4%, P = 0.039), and women who initiated CGMS earlier gained less weight (P = 0.017). The mode of blood glucose monitoring (adjusted OR 2.40; 95% CI 1.030–5.588; P = 0.042) and pre-pregnancy BMI (adjusted OR 0.578; 95% CI 0.419–0.798; P = 0.001) were independent factors for weight gain. In conclusion, early CGMS for GDM mothers reduces gestational weight gain. A follow-up study with a large cohort is needed. PMID:26814139

  16. The DIAMIND study: postpartum SMS reminders to women who have had gestational diabetes mellitus to test for type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Postpartum follow up of women who have been found to have gestational diabetes during pregnancy is essential because of the strong association of gestational diabetes with subsequent type 2 diabetes. Postal reminders have been shown to increase significantly attendance for oral glucose tolerance testing postpartum. It is possible that a short message service (text) reminder system may also be effective. This trial aims to assess whether a text message reminder system for women who have experienced gestational diabetes in their index pregnancy will increase attendance for oral glucose tolerance testing within six months after birth. Methods/Design Design: Single centre (Womens and Childrens Hospital, South Australia), parallel group randomised controlled trial. Inclusion criteria: Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes in their index pregnancy (oral glucose tolerance test with fasting glucose ? 5.5 mmol/L and/or two hour glucose ? 7.8 mmol/L), with access to a mobile phone, whose capillary blood glucose profile measurements prior to postnatal discharge are all normal (fasting glucose < 6.0 mmol/L, postprandial glucoses < 8.0 mmol/L). Exclusion criteria: Pregestational diabetes mellitus, triplet/higher order multiple birth or stillbirth in the index pregnancy, requirement for interpreter. Trial entry and randomisation: Allocation to intervention will be undertaken using a telephone randomisation service (computer-generated random number sequence generation, with balanced variable blocks, and stratification by insulin requirement). Study groups: Women in the intervention group will receive a text reminder to attend for an oral glucose tolerance test at 6 weeks postpartum, with further reminders at 3 months and 6 months if they do not respond to indicate test completion. Women in the control group will receive a single text message reminder at 6 months postpartum. Blinding: Baseline data collection will be undertaken blinded. Blinding of participants and blinded collection of primary outcome data will not be possible for this study. Primary study outcome: Attendance for the oral glucose tolerance test within 6 months postpartum. Sample size: 276 subjects will be required to show an 18% absolute increase in the rate of attendance (?=0.05 two tailed, ?=80%, 5% loss to follow up) from 37% to 55% in the intervention group. Discussion Given the heightened risk of impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes in women who have had gestational diabetes, ensuring the highest possible rate of attendance for postpartum glucose tolerance testing, so that early diagnosis and intervention can occur, is important. A text message reminder system may prove to be an effective method for achieving improved attendance for such testing. This randomised controlled trial will assess whether such a system will increase rates of attendance for postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing in women who have experienced gestational diabetes. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12612000621819 PMID:23587090

  17. Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with TCF7L2 gene polymorphisms independent of HLA-DQB1*0602 genotypes and islet cell autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, A.; Lynch, K. F.; Shaat, N.; Håkansson, R.; Ivarsson, S. A.; Berntorp, K.; Agardh, C. D.; Lernmark, Å

    2011-01-01

    Aims To test whether the TCF7L2 gene was associated with gestational diabetes, whether the association between TCF7L2 and gestational diabetes was independent of HLA-DQB1*0602 and islet cell autoantibodies, as well as maternal age, number of pregnancies, family history of diabetes and the HLA-DQB1 genotypes, and to test whether the distribution of HLA-DQB1 alleles was affected by country of birth. Methods We genotyped the rs7903146, rs12255372 and rs7901695 single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TCF7L2 gene in 826 mothers with gestational diabetes and in 1185 healthy control subjects in the Diabetes Prediction in Skåne Study. The mothers were also typed for HLA-DQB1 genotypes and tested for islet cell autoantibodies against GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen-2 and insulin. Results The heterozygous genotypes CT, GT and TC of the rs7903146 (T is risk for Type 2 diabetes), rs12255372 (T is risk for Type 2 diabetes) and rs7901695 (C is risk for Type 2 diabetes), respectively, as well as the homozygous genotypes TT, TT and CC of the rs7903146, rs12255372 and rs7901695, respectively, were strongly associated with gestational diabetes (P < 0.0001). These associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for maternal age, number of pregnancies, family history of diabetes and HLA-DQ genotypes and were independent of the presence of islet cell autoantibodies. No interaction was observed between TCF7L2 and HLA-DQB1*0602, which was shown to be negatively associated with gestational diabetes in mothers born in Sweden (P = 0.010). Conclusions The TCF7L2 was associated with susceptibility for gestational diabetes independently of the presence of HLA-DQB1*0602 and islet cell autoantibodies and other factors such as maternal age, number of pregnancies, family history of diabetes and other HLA-DQ genotypes. The HLA-DQB1*0602 was negatively associated with gestational diabetes in mothers born in Sweden. PMID:21672010

  18. High-saturated-fat diet induces gestational diabetes and placental vasculopathy in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chengya; DeCourcy, Kristi; Prater, Mary R

    2010-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a commonly encountered disorder of mid to late pregnancy that is characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. Gestational diabetes mellitus is thought to be multifactorial in origin and derives from both genetic and environmental factors. However, the mechanisms underlying GDM are incompletely understood; and current GDM animal models do not appear to closely mimic the clinical situation in humans. The present study used environmental exposure to high-saturated-fat diet (HFD) in an effort to develop a GDM mouse model that closely simulates metabolic abnormalities seen in human GDM. This model was then used to determine the contributions of HFD-induced placental oxidative stress (OS) and vascular dysregulation, which are observed in GDM patients and are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Pathologic manifestations of the disease were quantified by evaluating the extent of placental lipid peroxidation and by determining protective effects of dietary antioxidant quercetin supplementation to reduce HFD-associated placental OS. In this study, female C57BL/6 mice were fed HFD for 1 month before conception and throughout gestation to mimic chronic maternal fast food consumption. Maternal body weight increased from gestation day (GD) 0 to GD19 by 41% with HFD, as compared with 23% in control dams; HFD dams also developed insulin resistance (66% increase in plasma insulin and 27% increase in plasma glucose levels by GD10) as compared with control dams. Placentas from HFD GD19 dams demonstrated loss of trophoblasts and OS-mediated labyrinthine endothelial cellular damage, the latter of which was prevented with quercetin supplementation. Our findings suggest that prenatal HFD alters glucose metabolism and elevates placental OS, which are believed to collectively relate to improper formation of the conceptus and impaired birth outcome. PMID:20022072

  19. Psychosocial deprivation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with poor fetomaternal prognoses: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Emmanuel; Bihan, Hélène; Reach, Gérard; Vittaz, Laurence; Carbillon, Lionel; Valensi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prognoses associated with psychosocial deprivation in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Design Observational study considering the 1498 multiethnic women with GDM who gave birth between January 2009 and February 2012. Setting Four largest maternity units in the northeastern suburban area of Paris. Participants The 994 women who completed the Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers (EPICES) questionnaire. Main outcome measure Main complications of GDM (large infant for gestational age (LGA), shoulder dystocia, caesarean section, pre-eclampsia). Results Psychosocial deprivation (EPICES score ≥30.17) affected 577 women (56%) and was positively associated with overweight/obesity, parity and non-European origin, and negatively associated with family history of diabetes, fruit and vegetable consumption and working status. The psychosocially deprived women were diagnosed with GDM earlier, received insulin treatment during pregnancy more often and were more likely to have LGA infants (15.1% vs 10.6%, OR=1.5 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.2), p<0.05) and shoulder dystocia (3.1% vs 1.2%, OR=2.7 (0.97 to 7.2), p<0.05). In addition to psychosocial deprivation, LGA was associated with greater parity, obesity, history of GDM, ethnicity, excessive gestational weight gain and insulin therapy. A multivariate analysis using these covariates revealed that the EPICES score was independently associated with LGA infants (per 10 units, OR=1.12 (1.03 to 1.20), p<0.01). Conclusions In our area, psychosocial deprivation is common in women with GDM and is associated with earlier GDM diagnoses and greater insulin treatment, an increased likelihood of shoulder dystocia and, independently of obesity, gestational weight gain and other confounders with LGA infants. PMID:25748416

  20. Primary Prevention of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Large-for-Gestational-Age Newborns by Lifestyle Counseling: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Luoto, Riitta; Kinnunen, Tarja I.; Aittasalo, Minna; Kolu, Päivi; Raitanen, Jani; Ojala, Katriina; Mansikkamäki, Kirsi; Lamberg, Satu; Vasankari, Tommi; Komulainen, Tanja; Tulokas, Sirkku

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to examine whether gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) or newborns' high birthweight can be prevented by lifestyle counseling in pregnant women at high risk of GDM. Method and Findings We conducted a cluster-randomized trial, the NELLI study, in 14 municipalities in Finland, where 2,271 women were screened by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at 8–12 wk gestation. Euglycemic (n = 399) women with at least one GDM risk factor (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2, glucose intolerance or newborn's macrosomia (≥4,500 g) in any earlier pregnancy, family history of diabetes, age ≥40 y) were included. The intervention included individual intensified counseling on physical activity and diet and weight gain at five antenatal visits. Primary outcomes were incidence of GDM as assessed by OGTT (maternal outcome) and newborns' birthweight adjusted for gestational age (neonatal outcome). Secondary outcomes were maternal weight gain and the need for insulin treatment during pregnancy. Adherence to the intervention was evaluated on the basis of changes in physical activity (weekly metabolic equivalent task (MET) minutes) and diet (intake of total fat, saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, saccharose, and fiber). Multilevel analyses took into account cluster, maternity clinic, and nurse level influences in addition to age, education, parity, and prepregnancy BMI. 15.8% (34/216) of women in the intervention group and 12.4% (22/179) in the usual care group developed GDM (absolute effect size 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71–2.62, p = 0.36). Neonatal birthweight was lower in the intervention than in the usual care group (absolute effect size −133 g, 95% CI −231 to −35, p = 0.008) as was proportion of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) newborns (26/216, 12.1% versus 34/179, 19.7%, p = 0.042). Women in the intervention group increased their intake of dietary fiber (adjusted coefficient 1.83, 95% CI 0.30–3.25, p = 0.023) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (adjusted coefficient 0.37, 95% CI 0.16–0.57, p<0.001), decreased their intake of saturated fatty acids (adjusted coefficient −0.63, 95% CI −1.12 to −0.15, p = 0.01) and intake of saccharose (adjusted coefficient −0.83, 95% CI −1.55 to −0.11, p  =  0.023), and had a tendency to a smaller decrease in MET minutes/week for at least moderate intensity activity (adjusted coefficient 91, 95% CI −37 to 219, p = 0.17) than women in the usual care group. In subgroup analysis, adherent women in the intervention group (n = 55/229) had decreased risk of GDM (27.3% versus 33.0%, p = 0.43) and LGA newborns (7.3% versus 19.5%, p = 0.03) compared to women in the usual care group. Conclusions The intervention was effective in controlling birthweight of the newborns, but failed to have an effect on maternal GDM. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN33885819 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21610860

  1. The Association of Restless Legs Syndrome to History of Gestational Diabetes in an Appalachian Primary Care Population

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kim E.; Kandati, Sahiti; Flack, Kathryn L.; Agarwal, Parul; Selfe, Terry Kit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a burdensome sensorimotor disorder that has been linked to diabetes and obesity. However, the relationship of RLS to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a common pregnancy complication strongly associated with obesity and a harbinger of diabetes, remains unknown. In this study, we examined the association of RLS to history of GDM in a sample of older female primary care patients. Methods: Participants were community-dwelling women aged ≥ 40 years drawn from an anonymous survey study of West Virginia adult primary care patients. Data gathered included detailed information on demographics, lifestyle factors, reproductive history, sleep patterns, and medical history; the survey also included an RLS diagnostic questionnaire. Women who were pregnant or had missing data on key variables were excluded from the analyses. Results: Of the 498 participants included in the final analytic sample, 24.5% met diagnostic criteria for RLS (17.9% with symptoms at least once/week). After adjustment for demographics, lifestyle characteristics, body mass index, diabetes and other comorbid conditions, parity, and other factors, those reporting history of GDM were almost three times as likely to meet criteria for RLS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3, 5.3). This association increased in magnitude with increasing symptom frequency (adjusted OR for RLS symptoms ≥ 3×/week = 4.8, CI 2.1, 11.2, p for trend = 0.004). Conclusions: History of GDM was strongly and positively related to RLS in this study of older female primary care patients, offering further support for a possible role of metabolic dysregulation in RLS development. Citation: Innes KE, Kandati S, Flack KL, Agarwal P, Selfe TK. The association of restless legs syndrome to history of gestational diabetes in an Appalachian primary care population. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1121–1130. PMID:26156957

  2. The Influence of Ethnicity on the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Women with Gestational Diabetes: A Prospective Study and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Christian M.; Gunton, Jenny E.; Cheung, N. Wah

    2012-01-01

    As the worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to rise at an alarming rate, the search for susceptible populations likely to benefit from preventative measures becomes more important. One such population is women with a previous history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In this prospective study of 101 women who had GDM in Australia, ethnicity was a major risk factor for the development of diabetes following a diagnosis of GDM. With a mean followup of 5.5 years after GDM, South Asian women had a significantly higher risk of developing abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) (69%) than women of all other ethnicities (P < 0.05). The prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance was also very high amongst other groups: South East and East Asian (11/27, 41%), Middle-Eastern (8/18, 44%), South European backgrounds (5/12, 42%), and Australian-born women 39% (11/28). A review of the literature supports the role of ethnicity in the development of diabetes amongst these women. These findings have implications for South Asian countries and countries such as Australia where there is a population from diverse ethnic backgrounds and where the implementation of targeted measures to stem the growing tide of diabetes is needed. PMID:22577574

  3. Maternal circulating levels of some metabolic syndrome biomarkers in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Khosrowbeygi, Ali; Shiamizadeh, Najmeh; Taghizadeh, Nima

    2016-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore serum levels of lipid profile, atherogenic indexes LDL-C/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C, and TC/HDL-C, bilirubin, adiponectin, pseudocholinesterase, activities of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), adenosine deaminase (ADA), and α-amylase, insulin resistance using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) formula, and assessment of correlations between them in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) compared with normal pregnancy. A cross-sectional study was designed. The patients consisted of 30 women with GDM. The normal group consisted of 30 healthy pregnant women. The Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's correlation analysis were used for statistical analysis. A p value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Serum activities of enzymes GGT (p = 0.001) and ADA (p = 0.02) were significantly higher in GDM compared with normal pregnancy, while pseudocholinesterase were significantly decreased (p = 0.02). However, activity of enzyme α-amylase did not show significant difference between two groups (p = 0.75). Serum levels of both HDL-C and adiponectin were significantly decreased in GDM group (p = 0.001). The atherogenic indexes and the HOMA-IR index were significantly higher in GDM (p = 0.001). Serum activity of ADA showed positive correlation with total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.46, p = 0.01) and CRP (r = 0.66, p = 0.001) in GDM group. Serum levels of total bilirubin correlated negatively with both ADA (r = -0.38, p = 0.04) and triglyceride (r = -0.45, p = 0.01) in women with GDM. Serum activity of GGT correlated positively with LDL-C (r = 0.48, p = 0.01) and TC (r = 0.52, p = 0.003) in GDM group. Increased atherogenic indexes, ADA, GGT, and decreased pseudocholinesterase might be risk factors for GDM. PMID:26219405

  4. The Relationship Between Body Iron Status, Iron Intake And Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fu1, Shimin; Li1, Feifei; Zhou, Jianguo; Liu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biological and epidemiological evidence have found that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) may be correlated with body iron status and dietary iron intake. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between dietary iron intake and body iron status and GDM risk. We conducted a systematic search in Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library up to April 2015. Prospective cohort studies or case-control studies which appraised the relationship between body iron status, dietary iron intake, and GDM risk were included. Relative risks (RRs), standard mean difference (SMD), and 95% confidence intervals [CIs] were used to measure the pooled data. A total of 8 prospective cohort studies and 7 case-control studies were in accordance with inclusive criteria, and 14 studies were included in meta-analysis. The overall RR comparing the highest and lowest levels of serum ferritin was 3.22 (95% CI: 1.73–6.00) for prospective cohort studies. Serum ferritin of GDM group is markedly higher than that of control (0.88 ng/mL; 95% CI: 0.40–1.35 ng/mL) for case-control studies. The comparison between the highest and the lowest serum ferritin levels and dietary total iron levels revealed pooled RRs of 1.53 (95% CI: 1.17–2.00) and 1.01 (95% CI: 1.00–1.01) for prospective cohort studies, respectively. The combined SMD comparing serum transferrin levels of cases and controls was −0.02 μmol/L (95% CI: −0.22 to 0.19 μmol/L) for case-control studies. Increased higher ferritin levels were significantly correlated with higher risk of GDM, and higher heme iron levels may be correlated with higher risk of GDM; however, the present conclusion did not constitute definitive proof that dietary total iron or serum transferrin have relation to GDM. PMID:26765415

  5. The role of regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Schober, L; Radnai, D; Spratte, J; Kisielewicz, A; Schmitt, E; Mahnke, K; Fluhr, H; Uhlmann, L; Sohn, C; Steinborn, A

    2014-07-01

    Physiological changes during normal pregnancy are characterized by an inflammatory immune response and insulin resistance. Therefore, we hypothesize that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) may be caused by an inappropriate adaption of the maternal immune system to pregnancy. In this study we examined the role of regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation for the development of GDM during pregnancy. We used six-colour flow cytometric analysis to demonstrate that the total CD4(+) CD127(low+/-) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+)) T(reg) pool consists of four different T(reg) subsets: naive CD45RA(+) T(regs), HLA-DR(-) CD45RA(-) memory T(regs) (DR(-) T(regs)) and the highly differentiated and activated HLA-DR(low+) CD45RA(-) and HLA-DR(high+) CD45RA(-) memory T(regs) (DR(low+) and DR(high+) T(regs)). Compared to healthy pregnancies, the percentage of CD4(+) CD127(low+/-) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T(regs) within the total CD4(+) T helper cell pool was not different in patients affected by GDM. However, the suppressive activity of the total CD4(+) CD127(low+/-) CD25(+) T(reg) pool was significantly reduced in GDM patients. The composition of the total T(reg) pool changed in the way that its percentage of naive CD45RA(+) T(regs) was decreased significantly in both patients with dietary-adjusted GDM and patients with insulin-dependent GDM. In contrast, the percentage of DR(-) -memory T(regs) was increased significantly in patients with dietary-adjusted GDM, while the percentage of DR(low+) and DR(high+) memory T(regs) was increased significantly in patients with insulin-dependent GDM. Hence, our findings propose that alterations in homeostatic parameters related to the development and function of naive and memory T(regs) may cause the reduction of the suppressive capacity of the total T(reg) pool in GDM patients. However, as this is an exploratory analysis, the results are only suggestive and require further validation. PMID:24547967

  6. Glycohemoglobin A1c: A promising screening tool in gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aldasouqi, Saleh A.; Solomon, David J.; Bokhari, Samia A.; Khan, Patan M.; Muneera, Shareef; Gossain, Ved V.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Current screening tests for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are inconvenient. Therefore, alternative screening tests for GDM are desirable. The use of glycohemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in screening for GDM remains controversial. AIM: We undertook this study to evaluate the utility of HbA1c in screening for GDM. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Retrospective study in a tertiary teaching hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Laboratory records were reviewed to identify pregnant women who underwent both oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA1c measurements over a 16-months period. The association of OGTT with HbA1c was evaluated. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Data were collected using SPSS software. Comparisons of the means and calculations of sensitivities were performed. RESULTS: Of 145 eligible patients, 124 had GDM and 21 patients did not, per OGTT. The percentages of patients with HbA1c values (reference range of 4.8%6.0%) equal to or above sequential cut-point values of 5.0%, 5.5%, 6.0%, 6.5% and 7.0% (i.e., sensitivity values) were 100%, 98.4%, 87.1%, 62.9% and 39.5%, respectively. The mean HbA1c of the patients with GDM was 6.9 + 0.8% compared to 6.4 + 0.6% for those without GDM (P< 0.006). At an arbitrary cut-off value of 6.0% (the upper limit of normal), HbA1c would have picked up 87.1% of patients with GDM. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that HbA1c is a reasonably sensitive screening measure of GDM in this high-risk population. Acknowledging limitations resulting from the study design, further prospective studies are warranted to verify this conclusion, and to evaluate the specificity of HbA1c as a screening test for GDM. PMID:20165599

  7. Pre-pregnancy care for women with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Wahabi HA; Alzeidan RA; Esmaeil SA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk for maternal and fetal adverse outcomes. This systematic review was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pre-pregnancy care in improving the rate of congenital malformations and perinatal mortality for women with pre-gestational diabetes mellitus.METHODS: We searched the following databases, MEDLINE, EMBASE, WEB OF SCIENCE, Cochrane Library, including the CENTRAL register of controlled trials and CINHAL up to December 2011, without language restriction, for any pre-pregnancy care aiming at health promotion, glycemic control and screening and treatment of diabetes complications in women with type I or type II diabetes mellitus. Study design were trials (randomized and non-randomized), cohort and case-control studies.RESULTS: Of the 2452 title scanned 54 full papers were retrieved of those 21 studies were included in this review. Twelve cohort studies at low and medium risk of bias, with 3088 women, were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis suggested that pre-pregnancy care is effective in reducing congenital malformation, Risk Ratio (RR) 0.25 (95% CI 0.16-0.37), number needed to treat (NNT) 19 (95% CI 14-24), and perinatal mortality RR 0.34 (95% CI 0.15-0.75), NNT = 46 (95% CI 28-115). Pre-pregnancy care lowers glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in the first trimester of pregnancy by an average of 1.92% (95% CI -2.05 to -1.79). However women who received pre-pregnancy care were at increased risk of hypoglycemia during the first trimester of pregnancy RR 1.51 (95% CI 1.15-1.99).CONCLUSION: Pre-pregnancy care for women with pre-gestational type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus is effective in improving rates of congenital malformations, perinatal mortality and in reducing maternal HbA1C in the first trimester of pregnancy. Pre-pregnancy care might cause maternal hypoglycemia in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  8. Trimester-specific reference intervals for IFCC standardised haemoglobin A(1c): new criterion to diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)?

    PubMed

    O'Shea, P; O'Connor, C; Owens, L; Carmody, L; Avalos, G; Nestor, L; Lydon, K; Dunne, F P

    2012-05-01

    We established trimester-specific reference intervals for IFCC standardised HbA(1c) in 311 non-diabetic Caucasian pregnant women (n = 246) and non-pregnant women (n = 65). A selective screening strategy based on risk factors for gestational diabetes was employed. Pregnancy trimester was defined as trimester 1 (T1, n = 40) up to 12 weeks + 6 days, trimester 2 (T2, n = 106) 13 to 27 weeks + 6 days, trimester 3 (T3, n = 100) > 28 weeks to delivery. The normal HbA(1c) reference interval for Caucasian non-pregnant women was 29-37 mmol/mol (DCCT: 4.8-5.5%), T1: 24-36 mmol/mol (DCCT: 4.3-5.4%), T2: 25-35 mmol/mol (DCCT: 4.4-5.4%), and T3: 28-39 mmol/mol (DCCT: 4.7-5.7%). HbA(1c) was significantly decreased in trimesters 1 (P < 0.01) and 2 (P < 0.001) compared to non-pregnant women. Retrospective application of selective screening to Caucasian women of the Atlantic DIP cohort determined that 5,208 met the criteria. 945 of those women (18.1%) were diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) using the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) glucose concentration thresholds. HbA(1c) measurement within 2 weeks of the diagnostic Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) was available in 622 of 945 (66%). Applying the decision threshold for T2: HbA(1c) > 35 mmol/mol (DCCT > 5.4%) identified 287 of 622 (46%) of those with GDM. HbA(1c) measurement in T2 (13 to 27 weeks) should be included in the diagnostic armamentarium for GDM. This would reduce the need for diagnostic OGTT in a significant number of women. PMID:22838107

  9. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Delay or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes: Walking for Exercise and Nutrition to Prevent Diabetes for You

    PubMed Central

    Bogossian, F. E.; Wilkinson, S. A.; Gibbons, K. S.; Kim, C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To develop a program to support behaviour changes for women with a history of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and a Body Mass Index (BMI) > 25 kg/m2 to delay or prevent Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Methods. Women diagnosed with GDM in the previous 6 to 24 months and BMI > 25 kg/m2 were randomized to an intervention (I) (n = 16) or a control (C) (n = 15) group. The intervention was a pedometer program combined with nutrition coaching, with the primary outcome increased weight loss in the intervention group. Secondary outcomes included decreased waist and hip measurements, improved insulin sensitivity and body composition, increased physical activity, and improved self-efficacy in eating behaviours. Results. Median (IQR) results were as follows: weight: I −2.5 (2.3) kg versus C +0.2 (1.6) kg (P = 0.009), waist: I −3.6 (4.5) cm versus C −0.1 (3.6) cm (P = 0.07), and hip: I −5.0 (3.3) cm versus C −0.2 (2.6) cm (P = 0.002). There was clinical improvement in physical activity and eating behaviours and no significant changes in glucose metabolism or body composition. Conclusion. A pedometer program and nutrition coaching proved effective in supporting weight loss, waist circumference, physical activity, and eating behaviours in women with previous GDM. PMID:26089886

  10. Impact on offspring methylation patterns of maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and intrauterine growth restraint suggest common genes and pathways linked to subsequent type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Quilter, Claire R; Cooper, Wendy N; Cliffe, Kerry M; Skinner, Benjamin M; Prentice, Philippa M; Nelson, LaTasha; Bauer, Julien; Ong, Ken K; Constância, Miguel; Lowe, William L; Affara, Nabeel A; Dunger, David B

    2014-11-01

    Size at birth, postnatal weight gain, and adult risk for type 2 diabetes may reflect environmental exposures during developmental plasticity and may be mediated by epigenetics. Both low birth weight (BW), as a marker of fetal growth restraint, and high birth weight (BW), especially after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), have been linked to increased risk of adult type 2 diabetes. We assessed DNA methylation patterns using a bead chip in cord blood samples from infants of mothers with GDM (group 1) and infants with prenatal growth restraint indicated by rapid postnatal catch-up growth (group 2), compared with infants with normal postnatal growth (group 3). Seventy-five CpG loci were differentially methylated in groups 1 and 2 compared with the controls (group 3), representing 72 genes, many relevant to growth and diabetes. In replication studies using similar methodology, many of these differentially methylated regions were associated with levels of maternal glucose exposure below that defined by GDM [the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study] or were identified as changes observed after randomized periconceptional nutritional supplementation in a Gambian cohort characterized by maternal deprivation. These studies provide support for the concept that similar epigenetic modifications may underpin different prenatal exposures and potentially increase long-term risk for diseases such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:25145626

  11. Global methylation in the placenta and umbilical cord blood from pregnancies with maternal gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoko; Lambertini, Luca; Rialdi, Alexander; Lee, MenJean; Mystal, Elana Ying; Grabie, Mordy; Manaster, Isaac; Huynh, Nancy; Finik, Jackie; Davey, Mia; Davey, Kei; Ly, Jenny; Stone, Joanne; Loudon, Holly; Eglinton, Gary; Hurd, Yasmin; Newcorn, Jeffrey H; Chen, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that maternal medical risk during pregnancy, such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and obesity, predisposes the offspring to suboptimal development. However, the underlying biological/epigenetic mechanism in utero is still unknown. The current pilot study (N = 50) compared the levels of global methylation in the placenta and umbilical cord blood among women with and without each risk condition (GDM, preeclampsia, and obesity) and explored whether the levels of global methylation were associated with fetal/infant growth. Results show that global methylation levels in the placenta were lower in patients with gestational diabetes (P = .003) and preeclampsia (P = .05) but higher with obesity (P = .01). Suggestive negative associations were found between global methylation level in the placenta and infant body length and head circumference. While preliminary, it is possible that the placenta tissue, but not umbilical cord blood, may be epigenetically programmed by maternal GDM, preeclampsia, and obesity to carry out its own specific functions that influence fetal growth. PMID:23765376

  12. Global Methylation in the Placenta and Umbilical Cord Blood From Pregnancies With Maternal Gestational Diabetes, Preeclampsia, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lambertini, Luca; Rialdi, Alexander; Lee, MenJean; Mystal, Elana Ying; Grabie, Mordy; Manaster, Isaac; Huynh, Nancy; Finik, Jackie; Davey, Mia; Davey, Kei; Ly, Jenny; Stone, Joanne; Loudon, Holly; Eglinton, Gary; Hurd, Yasmin; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Chen, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that maternal medical risk during pregnancy, such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preeclampsia, and obesity, predisposes the offspring to suboptimal development. However, the underlying biological/epigenetic mechanism in utero is still unknown. The current pilot study (N = 50) compared the levels of global methylation in the placenta and umbilical cord blood among women with and without each risk condition (GDM, preeclampsia, and obesity) and explored whether the levels of global methylation were associated with fetal/infant growth. Results show that global methylation levels in the placenta were lower in patients with gestational diabetes (P = .003) and preeclampsia (P = .05) but higher with obesity (P = .01). Suggestive negative associations were found between global methylation level in the placenta and infant body length and head circumference. While preliminary, it is possible that the placenta tissue, but not umbilical cord blood, may be epigenetically programmed by maternal GDM, preeclampsia, and obesity to carry out its own specific functions that influence fetal growth. PMID:23765376

  13. Diet plus insulin compared to diet alone in the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, F M A; Castro, A A; Atallah, A N; Dib, S A

    2003-10-01

    Fetuses of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus are at increased risk to develop perinatal complications mainly due to macrosomia. However, in view of the marked heterogeneity of this disease, it seems difficult to set guidelines for diagnosis and treatment. This complicates the choice of assigning patients either to diet or to insulin therapy. Also of concern is how much benefit could be expected from insulin therapy in preventing fetal complications in these patients. In a systematic review of the literature assessing the efficacy of insulin in preventing macrosomia in fetuses of mothers with gestational diabetes, we found six randomized controlled trials comparing diet alone to diet plus insulin. The studies included a total of 1281 patients (644 in the diet plus insulin group and 637 in the diet group), with marked differences among trials concerning diagnostic criteria, randomization process and treatment goals. Meta-analysis of the data resulted in a risk difference of -0.098 (95%CI: -0.168 to -0.028), and a number-necessary-to-treat of 11 (95%CI: 6 to 36), which means that it is necessary to treat 11 patients with insulin to prevent one case of macrosomia. This indicates a potential benefit of insulin, but not significantly enough to set treatment guidelines. Because of the heterogeneous evidence available in the literature about this matter, we conclude that larger trials addressing the efficacy of these two therapeutic modalities in preventing macrosomia are warranted. PMID:14502360

  14. Rapid screening test for gestational diabetes: public health need, market requirement, initial product design, and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Zwisler, Greg; Peck, Roger; Abu-Haydar, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Gestational diabetes is a global epidemic where many urban areas in Southeast Asia have found prevalence rates as high as 20%, exceeding the highest prevalence rates in the developed world. It can have serious and life-threatening consequences for mothers and babies. We are developing two variants of a new, simple, low-cost rapid test for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus for use primarily in low-resource settings. The pair of assays, both semiquantitative rapid diagnostic strip tests for glycated albumin, require neither fasting nor an oral glucose challenge test. One variant is an extremely simple strip test to estimate the level of total glycated albumin in blood. The other, which is slightly more complex and expensive, is a test that determines the ratio of glycated albumin to total albumin. The screening results can be used to refer women to receive additional care during delivery to avoid birth complications as well as counseling on diet and exercise during and after pregnancy. Results with the latter test may also be used to start treatment with glucose-lowering drugs. Both assays will be read visually. We present initial results of a preliminary cost-performance comparison model evaluating the proposed test versus existing alternatives. We also evaluated user needs and schematic paper microfluidics-based designs aimed at overcoming the challenge of visualizing relatively narrow differences between normal and elevated levels of glycated albumin in blood.

  15. Fetal cerebral hemodynamic in gestational diabetic versus normal pregnancies: a Doppler velocimetry of middle cerebral and umbilical arteries.

    PubMed

    Shabani Zanjani, Mansoureh; Nasirzadeh, Roya; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Yoonesi Asl, Ladan; Alemzadeh, Seyed-Amir Pooya; Askari, Sareh

    2014-03-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common complications in pregnancies. Evaluating other conditions, including intra uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia, some studies have shown significant changes in blood flow velocity of fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA). Our study is one of the few that has aimed to assess the effects of GDM on Doppler parameters of the fetal MCA and umbilical artery (UA) and to compare with normal pregnancies. This cross-sectional study was performed on 66 pregnant women, including 33 women with GDM and the others without it, in Akbar-Abadi University Hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2010-2011. Peak systolic and diastolic velocities, pulsatility index (PI), resistance index (RI) and systolic diastolic ratio (SD) were recorded in UA as well as both right and left fetal MCAs for every recruited pregnant women by means of Doppler ultrasonography. The mean gestational age at the time of examination was 34.45 (SD = 2.62) weeks in GDM group. Although all of the measured Doppler parameters had higher values in GDM pregnancies, the differences were not significant between two groups of study; except for the left fetal MCA-PI, which was significantly higher in GDM group [2.07 (SD = 0.07) vs. 1.85 (SD = 0.74), P = 0.03]. Our results show that gestational diabetes may contribute to an elevated PI in the fetal MCA. Although there is not yet strong proof for the effect of GDM on the fetal brain hemodynamics, the significant higher MCA-PI warrants more attention towards better controlling of the hyperglycemia during pregnancy. PMID:23797352

  16. Maternal Glucose during Pregnancy and after Delivery in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus on Overweight Status of Their Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Liu, Huikun; Zhang, Cuiping; Wang, Leishen; Li, Nan; Leng, Junhong; Li, Yi; Liu, Gongshu; Fan, Xiangwei; Yu, Zhijie; Yang, Xilin; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Hou, Lifang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine the association of maternal glycemia during pregnancy and after delivery with anthropometry in the offspring of mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. A total of 1,263 GDM mothers and their children finished the health survey at 15 years after delivery. Results. Offspring of GDM mothers who were diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy had higher prevalence of overweight, higher mean weight for height Z scores, and higher mean BMI for age Z scores at 15 years old than the offspring of GDM mothers who were diagnosed with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) during pregnancy. Offspring of GDM mothers who developed diabetes 15 years after delivery had higher mean values of Z scores for weight for height and BMI for age at 15 years old than the offspring of GDM mothers who had normal glucose or prediabetes after delivery. Conclusions. Offspring of GDM mothers who were diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy or after delivery had an increased risk of childhood overweight or weight gain at 15 years old compared with children of GDM mothers with IGT during pregnancy or with normal glucose or prediabetes after delivery. PMID:25802854

  17. Zinc-α2-Glycoprotein Is Unrelated to Gestational Diabetes: Anthropometric and Metabolic Determinants in Pregnant Women and Their Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Näf, Silvia; Escote, Xavier; Yañez, Rosa Elena; Ballesteros, Mónica; Simón, Inmaculada; Gil, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Context Zinc-α2-Glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with lipolytic action and is positively associated with adiponectin in adipose tissue. We hypothesize that ZAG may be related with hydrocarbonate metabolism disturbances observed in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Objective The aim of this study was to analyze serum ZAG concentration and its relationship with carbohydrate metabolism in pregnant women and its influence on fetal growth. Design 207 pregnant women (130 with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and 77 with GDM) recruited in the early third trimester and their offspring were studied. Cord blood was obtained at delivery and neonatal anthropometry was assessed in the first 48 hours. ZAG was determined in maternal serum and cord blood. Results ZAG concentration was lower in cord blood than in maternal serum, but similar concentration was observed in NGT and GDM pregnant women. Also similar levels were found between offspring of NGT and GDM women. In the bivariate analysis, maternal ZAG (mZAG) was positively correlated with adiponectin and HDL cholesterol, and negatively correlated with insulin and triglyceride concentrations, and HOMA index. On the other hand, cord blood ZAG (cbZAG) was positively correlated with fat-free mass, birth weight and gestational age at delivery. After adjusting for confounding variables, gestational age at delivery and HDL cholesterol emerged as the sole determinants of cord blood ZAG and maternal ZAG concentrations, respectively. Conclusion mZAG was not associated with glucose metabolism during pregnancy. ZAG concentration was lower in cord blood compared with maternal serum. cbZAG was independently correlated with gestational age at delivery, suggesting a role during the accelerated fetal growth during latter pregnancy. PMID:23272038

  18. Development of a Screening Tool for Predicting Adverse Outcomes of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee Soo; Kim, Deok Won; Kwon, Ja-Young; Park, Yong Won; Kim, Young Han; Cho, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common disease in pregnancy causing maternal and fetal complications. To prevent these adverse outcomes, optimal screening and diagnostic criteria must be adequate, timely, and efficient. This study suggests a novel approach that is practical, efficient, and patient- and clinician-friendly in predicting adverse outcomes of GDM. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study via medical record review of patients admitted between March 2001 and April 2013 at the Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. Patients diagnosed by a conventional 2-step method were evaluated according to the presence of adverse outcomes (neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and hyperinsulinemia; admission to the neonatal intensive care unit; large for gestational age; gestational insulin therapy; and gestational hypertension). Of 802 women who had an abnormal 50-g, 1-hour glucose challenge test, 306 were diagnosed with GDM and 496 did not have GDM (false-positive group). In the GDM group, 218 women (71.2%) had adverse outcomes. In contrast, 240 women (48.4%) in the false-positive group had adverse outcomes. Women with adverse outcomes had a significantly higher body mass index (BMI) at entry (P = 0.03) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) (P = 0.03). Our logistic regression model derived from 2 variables, BMI at entry and FBG, predicted GDM adverse outcome with an area under the curve of 0.642, accuracy of 61.3%, sensitivity of 57.2%, and specificity of 66.9% compared with the conventional 2-step method with an area under the curve of 0.610, accuracy of 59.1%, sensitivity of 47.6%, and specificity of 74.4%. Our model performed better in predicting GDM adverse outcomes than the conventional 2-step method using only BMI at entry and FBG. Moreover, our model represents a practical, inexpensive, efficient, reproducible, easy, and patient- and clinician-friendly approach. PMID:26735528

  19. Is bisphenol-A exposure during pregnancy associated with blood glucose levels or diagnosis of gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Robledo, Candace; Peck, Jennifer D; Stoner, Julie A; Carabin, Hlne; Cowan, Linda; Koch, Holger M; Goodman, Jean R

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic chemical used in production of epoxy, polycarbonate, and plastic may increase risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Exposure to BPA during pregnancy may contribute to development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a precursor to type 2 diabetes in women. This pilot study examined the association between BPA exposure, fasting blood glucose levels (FBG), and GDM diagnosis during pregnancy. Banked urine samples from 22 cases of GDM and 72 controls were analyzed for total (free BPA + conjugates) urinary BPA concentrations (?g/L). FBG levels (mg/dl) were obtained from 1-h 50-g glucose tolerance tests (GTT) that women underwent for routine GDM screening (mean gestational age = 26.6 weeks, SD = 3.8). Those with an initial screening value ? 135 mg/dl underwent 3-h 100 g oral GTT. GDM diagnoses were made when the initial screening value was ? 200 mg/dl or when values at ? 2 time points exceeded 3-h oral GTT thresholds. Among controls, median FBG levels (mg/dL) did not differ across exposure tertiles, defined according to the distribution of total specific-gravity-adjusted urinary BPA concentrations. Logistic regression models controlling for race/ethnicity did not provide evidence of association between BPA exposure and case status across increasing tertiles of BPA exposure (number of GDM cases/controls in tertile1: 13/24; in tertile 2: 6/24; in tertile 3: 3/24). Findings do not support a relationship between total urinary BPA concentrations and altered glucose metabolism during pregnancy. However, due to study limitations, findings need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:24053363

  20. Acceptability and User Satisfaction of a Smartphone-Based, Interactive Blood Glucose Management System in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mackillop, Lucy; Loerup, Lise; Kevat, Dev A.; Bartlett, Katy; Gibson, Oliver; Kenworthy, Yvonne; Levy, Jonathan C.; Tarassenko, Lionel; Farmer, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is challenging maternity services. We have developed an interactive, smartphone-based, remote blood glucose (BG) monitoring system, GDm-health. Aims: The objective was to determine women’s satisfaction with using the GDm-health system and their attitudes toward their diabetes care. Methods: In a service development program involving 52 pregnant women (September 2012 to June 2013), BG was monitored using GDm-health from diagnosis until delivery. Following birth, women completed a structured questionnaire assessing (1) general satisfaction, (2) equipment issues, and (3) relationship with the diabetes care team. Responses were scored on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were assessed using statistical methods. Results: Of 52 women, 49 completed the questionnaire; 32 had glucose tolerance test confirmed GDM (gestation at recruitment 29 ± 4 weeks (mean ± SD), and 17 women previous GDM recommended for BG monitoring (18 ± 6 weeks). In all, 45 of 49 women agreed their care was satisfactory and the best for them, 47 of 49 and 43 of 49 agreed the equipment was convenient and reliable respectively, 42 of 49 agreed GDm-health fitted into their lifestyle, and 46 of 49 agreed they had a good relationship with their care team. Written comments supported these findings, with very positive reactions from the majority of women. Cronbach’s alpha was .89 with factor analysis corresponding with question thematic trends. Conclusions: This pilot demonstrates that GDm-health is acceptable and convenient for a large proportion of women. Effects on clinical and economic outcomes are currently under investigation in a randomized trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01916694). PMID:25361643

  1. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePLUS

    ... leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements ... The slow twisting movements of muscles (athetosis) or jerky muscle ... including: Cerebral palsy Drug side effects Encephalitis ...

  2. Lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes prevention in women with prior gestational diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of behavioural, anthropometric and metabolic outcomes☆

    PubMed Central

    Gilinsky, A.S.; Kirk, A.F.; Hughes, A.R.; Lindsay, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review lifestyle interventions for women with prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) to report study characteristics, intervention design and study quality and explore changes in 1) diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviour; 2) anthropometric outcomes and; 3) glycaemic control and diabetes risk. Methods Databases (Web of Science, CCRCT, EMBASE and Science DIRECT) were searched (1980 to April 2014) using keywords for controlled or pre–post design trials of lifestyle intervention targeting women with previous GDM reporting at least one behavioural, anthropometric or diabetes outcome. Selected studies were narratively synthesized with anthropometric and glycaemic outcomes synthesized using meta-analysis. Results Three of 13 included studies were rated as low bias risk. Recruitment rates were poor but study retention good. Six of 11 studies reporting on physical activity reported favourable intervention effects. All six studies reporting on diet reported favourable intervention effects. In meta-analysis, significant weight-loss was attributable to one Chinese population study (WMD = − 1.06 kg (95% CI = − 1.68, − 0.44)). Lifestyle interventions did not change fasting blood glucose (WMD = − 0.05 mmol/L, 95% CI = − 0.21, 0.11) or type 2 diabetes risk. Conclusions Lack of methodologically robust trials gives limited evidence for the success of lifestyle interventions in women with prior GDM. Recruitment into trials is challenging. PMID:26844102

  3. Postpartum Lifestyle Interventions to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Among Women with History of Gestational Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Chen, Jyu-Lin; Whittemore, Robin; Whitaker, Evans

    2016-01-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Several postpartum lifestyle intervention studies have been conducted for this high-risk group; however, the randomized clinical trials have not been evaluated systematically. Thus, the aim of this article is to evaluate the outcomes of clinical trials that focus on diabetes prevention among women with DGM. This systematic review utilized Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Chinese and US databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials of postpartum lifestyle interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes in women with prior GDM were reviewed. Outcomes included in this review are type 2 diabetes incidences, insulin insistence, and weight-related measures. The effect size of these outcomes in each study was computed. Data on intervention components were extracted, including type (in-person vs. technology-based), content (diet or physical activity or both), form (individual session vs. group session), duration, intensity, evaluation time point, and program delivery. A total of 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. The mean annual type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) incidence of the intervention group was lower than that of the comparison group (6.0% vs. 9.3%), although there was no statistical difference between the two groups. About 50% of these studies and two-thirds of studies, respectively, reported a significant decrease in insulin resistance-related measures and weight-related measures in the intervention group compared with the comparison group. The median intervention duration and study length were 6 months. Postpartum lifestyle interventions can be effective in reducing T2DM development and insulin resistance, and decrease weight in women with GDM history, regardless of the intervention types (technology-based or in-person). Effective interventions typically include dietary changes while some physical activity changes can also improve outcomes. However, more interventions with long-term efficacy evaluation are warranted. PMID:26700931

  4. DALI: Vitamin D and lifestyle intervention for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) prevention: an European multicentre, randomised trial – study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an increasing problem world-wide. Lifestyle interventions and/or vitamin D supplementation might help prevent GDM in some women. Methods/design Pregnant women at risk of GDM (BMI≥29 (kg/m2)) from 9 European countries will be invited to participate and consent obtained before 19+6 weeks of gestation. After giving informed consent, women without GDM will be included (based on IADPSG criteria: fasting glucose<5.1mmol; 1 hour glucose <10.0 mmol; 2 hour glucose <8.5 mmol) and randomized to one of the 8 intervention arms using a 2×(2×2) factorial design: (1) healthy eating (HE), 2) physical activity (PA), 3) HE+PA, 4) control, 5) HE+PA+vitamin D, 6) HE+PA+placebo, 7) vitamin D alone, 8) placebo alone), pre-stratified for each site. In total, 880 women will be included with 110 women allocated to each arm. Between entry and 35 weeks of gestation, women allocated to a lifestyle intervention will receive 5 face-to-face, and 4 telephone coaching sessions, based on the principles of motivational interviewing. The lifestyle intervention includes a discussion about the risks of GDM, a weight gain target <5kg and either 7 healthy eating ‘messages’ and/or 5 physical activity ‘messages’ depending on randomization. Fidelity is monitored by the use of a personal digital assistance (PDA) system. Participants randomized to the vitamin D intervention receive either 1600 IU vitamin D or placebo for daily intake until delivery. Data is collected at baseline measurement, at 24–28 weeks, 35–37 weeks of gestation and after delivery. Primary outcome measures are gestational weight gain, fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, with a range of obstetric secondary outcome measures including birth weight. Discussion DALI is a unique Europe-wide randomised controlled trial, which will gain insight into preventive measures against the development of GDM in overweight and obese women. Trial registration ISRCTN70595832 PMID:23829946

  5. Gestational diabetes mellitus impairs Nrf2-mediated adaptive antioxidant defenses and redox signaling in fetal endothelial cells in utero.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinghua; Chapple, Sarah J; Patel, Bijal; Puszyk, William; Sugden, David; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Siow, Richard C M; Mann, Giovanni E

    2013-12-01

    In utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in later life, yet the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We examined the effects of GDM on the proteome, redox status, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant gene expression in human fetal endothelial cells. Proteomic analysis revealed that proteins involved in redox homeostasis were significantly altered in GDM and associated with increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, protein oxidation, DNA damage, and diminished glutathione (GSH) synthesis. In GDM cells, the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) failed to induce nuclear Nrf2 accumulation and mRNA and/or protein expression of Nrf2 and its target genes NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), Bach1, cystine/glutamate transporter, and glutamate cysteine ligase. Although methylation of CpG islands in Nrf2 or NQO1 promoters was unaltered by GDM, decreased DJ-1 and increased phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β levels may account for impaired Nrf2 signaling. HNE-induced increases in GSH and NQO1 levels were abrogated by Nrf2 small interfering RNA in normal cells, and overexpression of Nrf2 in GDM cells partially restored NQO1 induction. Dysregulation of Nrf2 in fetal endothelium may contribute to the increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in offspring. PMID:23974919

  6. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Impairs Nrf2-Mediated Adaptive Antioxidant Defenses and Redox Signaling in Fetal Endothelial Cells In Utero

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinghua; Chapple, Sarah J.; Patel, Bijal; Puszyk, William; Sugden, David; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Siow, Richard C.M.; Mann, Giovanni E.

    2013-01-01

    In utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in later life, yet the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We examined the effects of GDM on the proteome, redox status, and nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant gene expression in human fetal endothelial cells. Proteomic analysis revealed that proteins involved in redox homeostasis were significantly altered in GDM and associated with increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, protein oxidation, DNA damage, and diminished glutathione (GSH) synthesis. In GDM cells, the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) failed to induce nuclear Nrf2 accumulation and mRNA and/or protein expression of Nrf2 and its target genes NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), Bach1, cystine/glutamate transporter, and glutamate cysteine ligase. Although methylation of CpG islands in Nrf2 or NQO1 promoters was unaltered by GDM, decreased DJ-1 and increased phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β levels may account for impaired Nrf2 signaling. HNE-induced increases in GSH and NQO1 levels were abrogated by Nrf2 small interfering RNA in normal cells, and overexpression of Nrf2 in GDM cells partially restored NQO1 induction. Dysregulation of Nrf2 in fetal endothelium may contribute to the increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in offspring. PMID:23974919

  7. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios: are they useful for predicting gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Sargın, Mehmet Akif; Yassa, Murat; Taymur, Bilge Dogan; Celik, Ayhan; Ergun, Emrah; Tug, Niyazi

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate whether the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) could be utilized to screen for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Subjects and methods NLR and PLR were assessed by retrospective analysis of 762 healthy and pregnant women with GDM. The patients were stratified into four groups, as follows: GDM (n=144), impaired glucose tolerance (n=76), only screen positive (n=238), and control (n=304). Results The leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the control group (P=0.001; P<0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to the NLR and PLR (P>0.05). Conclusion We do not recommend that blood NLR and PLR can be used to screen for GDM. However, increase in the leukocyte count is an important marker for GDM as it provides evidence of subclinical inflammation. PMID:27217758

  8. Weighing the evidence of low glycemic index dietary intervention for the management of gestational diabetes mellitus: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mohd Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Firouzi, Somayyeh; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah; Mustafa, Norlaila; Mohamed Ismail, Nor Azlin; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2014-03-01

    This review aims to evaluate the effectiveness of low glycemic index (GI) dietary intervention for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), specifically from the Asian perspective. A systematic review of the literature using multiple databases without time restriction was conducted. Three studies were retrieved based upon a priori inclusion criteria. While there was a trend towards improvement, no significant differences were observed in overall glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in GDM women. However, a tendency for lower birth weight and birth centile if the intervention began earlier was noted. Low GI diets were well accepted and had identical macro-micronutrient compositions as the control diets. However, due to genetic, environment and especially food pattern discrepancies between Western countries and Asians, these results may not be contributed to Asian context. Clearly, there are limited studies focusing on the effect of low GI dietary intervention in women with GDM, particularly in Asia. PMID:24517860

  9. Effect of dietary and lifestyle factors on the risk of gestational diabetes: review of epidemiologic evidence1234

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuilin; Ning, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), defined as glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition in pregnancy, is a common pregnancy complication and a growing health concern. GDM has been related to significant short-term and long-term adverse health outcomes for both mothers and offspring. Importantly, this number is increasing with the increasing burden of obesity among women of reproductive age. Collectively, these data highlight the significance of understanding risk factors, in particular modifiable factors, for GDM and of preventing GDM among high-risk populations. Research in the past decade has identified a few diet and lifestyle factors that are associated with GDM risk. This review provides an overview of emerging diet and lifestyle factors that may contribute to the prevention of GDM. It also discusses major methodologic concerns about the available epidemiologic studies of GDM risk factors. PMID:21613563

  10. Metabolic Changes in Urine during and after Pregnancy in a Large, Multiethnic Population-Based Cohort Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Daniel; Sletner, Line; Mørkrid, Kjersti; Jenum, Anne Karen; Birkeland, Kåre I.; Rise, Frode; Piehler, Armin P.; Berg, Jens Petter

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to identify novel markers for gestational diabetes (GDM) in the biochemical profile of maternal urine using NMR metabolomics. It also catalogs the general effects of pregnancy and delivery on the urine profile. Urine samples were collected at three time points (visit V1: gestational week 8–20; V2: week 28±2; V3∶10–16 weeks post partum) from participants in the STORK Groruddalen program, a prospective, multiethnic cohort study of 823 healthy, pregnant women in Oslo, Norway, and analyzed using 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolites were identified and quantified where possible. PCA, PLS-DA and univariate statistics were applied and found substantial differences between the time points, dominated by a steady increase of urinary lactose concentrations, and an increase during pregnancy and subsequent dramatic reduction of several unidentified NMR signals between 0.5 and 1.1 ppm. Multivariate methods could not reliably identify GDM cases based on the WHO or graded criteria based on IADPSG definitions, indicating that the pattern of urinary metabolites above micromolar concentrations is not influenced strongly and consistently enough by the disease. However, univariate analysis suggests elevated mean citrate concentrations with increasing hyperglycemia. Multivariate classification with respect to ethnic background produced weak but statistically significant models. These results suggest that although NMR-based metabolomics can monitor changes in the urinary excretion profile of pregnant women, it may not be a prudent choice for the study of GDM. PMID:23285025

  11. A novel rat model of gestational diabetes induced by intrauterine programming is associated with alterations in placental signaling and fetal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Evangelina; Fornes, Daiana; Linenberg, Ivana; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas; Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2016-02-15

    A family history of diabetes predisposes to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We hypothesized that female offspring of rats with pre-gestational diabetes will develop GDM, a pathology associated with fetal overgrowth and altered placental signaling. We found normal glycemia and insulinemia in the offspring from pre-gestational diabetic rats at three months of age. However, consistent with GDM, maternal hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia and increased fetal weight were evident when compared to controls. In this intrauterine programmed GDM model, the placentas showed alterations in mTOR pathway: unchanged phosphorylation of 4EBP-1 and PKCα despite reduced total expression of 4EBP-1 and PKCα, and increased phosphorylation of SGK1. GDM placentas also showed reduced expression of PPARα and PPARγ, and increased lipoperoxidation, nitric oxide production and peroxynitrite-induced damage. We conclude that exposure of maternal diabetes in utero programs GDM in the female offspring, leading to a GDM model associated with impaired placental signaling pathways, increased pro-oxidant/pro-inflammatory environment and fetal overgrowth. PMID:26747729

  12. Innovation Practice Using Pervasive Mobile Technology Solutions to Improve Population Health Management: A Pilot Study of Gestational Diabetes Patient Care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini; Gururajan, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare service delivery is moving forward from individual care to population health management, because of the fast growth of health records. However, to improve population health performance, it is necessary to leverage relevant data and information using new technology solutions, such as pervasive diabetes mobile technology solution of Inet International Inc., which offers the potential to facilitate patient empowerment with gestational diabetic care. Hence, this article examines the pilot study outcomes of a small clinical trial focusing on pregnant patients affected by gestational diabetes mellitus, in an Australian not for profit healthcare context. The aims include establishing proof of concept and also assessing the usability, acceptability, and functionality of this mobile solution and thereby generate hypotheses to be tested in a large-scale confirmatory clinical trial. PMID:26918811

  13. Urinary Excretion of Myo-Inositol and D-Chiro-Inositol in Early Pregnancy Is Enhanced in Gravidas With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Aisling; Shamshirsaz, Amir; Markovic, Daniela; Ostlund, Richard; Koos, Brian

    2016-03-01

    The effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were determined on urinary excretion of putative components of insulin signaling. Random urine samples were collected from 375 gravidas at 6 to 14 weeks' gestation, 22 to 32 weeks' gestation, and ∼6 weeks' postpartum. Gestational diabetes mellitus developed in 35 women who were matched with 59 normal gravidas. Urinary concentrations of myo-inositol (MI) and D-chiro-inositol (DCI) were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and normalized to creatinine levels. Compared to postpartum values, urinary excretion of MI and DCI was increased 2.9-fold and 2-fold, respectively, in early pregnancy, and 5.5-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, in later gestation. Gravidas with GDM had significantly greater MI and DCI excretion than controls in the first trimester but not subsequently. The results suggest that gravidas destined to develop GDM have altered synthesis, metabolism, and/or renal excretion of MI and DCI in early pregnancy. PMID:26355118

  14. Plasma Levels of the Interleukin-1-Receptor Antagonist Are Lower in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Are Particularly Associated with Postpartum Development of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Katra, Pernilla; Dereke, Jonatan; Nilsson, Charlotta; Hillman, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia. Women who develops hyperglycemia for the first time during pregnancy receive the diagnosis gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Presently, there is no consensus about the diagnostic criteria for GDM. A majority of these women subsequently develop postpartum overt diabetes making it important to identify these patients as early as possible. In this study we investigated if plasma levels of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an endogenous inhibitor of IL-1 signaling, can be used as a complementary biomarker for diagnosing GDM and predicting postpartum development of overt diabetes mellitus. Patients participating in this study (n = 227) were diagnosed with their first GDM 2004-2013 at Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Healthy pregnant volunteers (n = 156) were recruited from women's welfare centers in the same region 2014-2015. Levels of IL-1Ra and C-peptide were analyzed in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-plasma or serum using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). GDM patients had significantly lower levels of IL-1Ra than the control group (p = 0.012). In addition, GDM patients that had developed impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or type 2 diabetes mellitus postpartum had significantly lower levels of IL-1Ra, and significantly higher levels of C-peptide than GDM patients that had not developed diabetes mellitus postpartum (p = 0.023) and (p = 0.0011) respectively. An inverse correlation was found between IL-1Ra and serum C-peptide levels in the control group (rs = -0.31 p = 0.0001). Our results show that IL-1Ra might be included in a future panel of biomarkers, both for diagnosing GDM to complement blood glucose, and also identifying GDM patients that are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus postpartum. However, the ROC curve analysis provided a sensitivity of 52.2% and specificity of 67.1%, which nonetheless may not be sufficient enough to use IL-1Ra as a sole biomarker. PMID:27223471

  15. Maternal gestational diabetes is associated with genome-wide DNA methylation variation in placenta and cord blood of exposed offspring.

    PubMed

    Finer, Sarah; Mathews, Chris; Lowe, Rob; Smart, Melissa; Hillman, Sara; Foo, Lin; Sinha, Ajay; Williams, David; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hitman, Graham A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure of a developing foetus to maternal gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to programme future risk of diabetes and obesity. Epigenetic variation in foetal tissue may have a mechanistic role in metabolic disease programming through interaction of the pregnancy environment with gene function. We aimed to identify genome-wide DNA methylation variation in cord blood and placenta from offspring born to mothers with and without GDM. Pregnant women of South Asian origin were studied and foetal tissues sampled at term delivery. The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip was used to assay genome-wide DNA methylation in placenta and cord blood from 27 GDM exposed and 21 unexposed offspring. We identified 1485 cord blood and 1708 placenta methylation variable positions (MVPs) achieving genome-wide significance (adjusted P-value <0.05) with methylation differences of >5%. MVPs were disproportionately located within first exons. A bioinformatic co-methylation algorithm was used to detect consistent directionality of methylation in 1000 bp window around each MVP was observed at 74% of placenta and 59% of cord blood MVPs. KEGG pathway analysis showed enrichment of pathways involved in endocytosis, MAPK signalling and extracellular triggers to intracellular metabolic processes. Replication studies should integrate genomics and transcriptomics with longitudinal sampling to elucidate stability, determine causality for translation into biomarker and prevention studies. PMID:25634562

  16. Indicators of the need for insulin treatment and the effect of treatment for gestational diabetes on pregnancy outcomes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuzuru; Shibuya, Makoto; Hosokawa, Saho; Motoki, Yoko; Nagata, Ryou; Konishi, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Takashi; Matsunaga, Tatsuya; Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Mihara, Takashi; Ito, Shihou; Sugiura, Ken; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-03-31

    This study assessed indicators of the need for insulin therapy and the effect of treatment on pregnancy outcomes in Japanese patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). All patients diagnosed with GDM were hospitalized for three days. Plasma glucose profiles in patients under strict dietary management and the characteristics of GDM patients with high daily glucose levels were investigated. Patients who failed to achieve glycemic targets were treated with insulin. Indicators of the need for insulin treatment were investigated. Pregnancy outcomes in patients prescribed dietary management and patients prescribed insulin treatment were compared. The study included 112 patients with GDM. GDM patients with high daily glucose levels in the hospital exhibited significantly higher 1-h and 2-h plasma glucose levels in oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) at diagnosis. In our hospital, 102 GDM patients with singleton pregnancies were followed until delivery; 32 (31.3%) were treated with insulin. Univariate analysis identified significant associations of insulin requirement with family history of diabetes and with 1-h and 2-h OGTT values at diagnosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the 1-h OGTT plasma glucose level at diagnosis was an independent predictor of the need for insulin. In perinatal outcomes, insulin treatment was associated with low birth weight. PMID:26606946

  17. Epigenetics of gestational diabetes mellitus and offspring health: the time for action is in early stages of life

    PubMed Central

    Lehnen, Harald; Zechner, Ulrich; Haaf, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The epidemic increase of type 2 diabetes and obesity in developed countries cannot be explained by overnutrition, physical inactivity and/or genetic factors alone. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that an adverse intrauterine environment, in particular a shortage or excess of nutrients is associated with increased risks for many complex diseases later in life. An impressive example for the ‘fetal origins of adult disease’ is gestational diabetes mellitus which usually presents in 1% to >10% of third trimester pregnancies. Intrauterine hyperglycemia is not only associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality, but also with increased lifelong risks of the exposed offspring for obesity, metabolic, cardiovascular and malignant diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that fetal overnutrition (and similarly undernutrition) lead to persistent epigenetic changes in developmentally important genes, influencing neuroendocrine functions, energy homeostasis and metabolism. The concept of fetal programming has important implications for reproductive medicine. Because during early development the epigenome is much more vulnerable to environmental cues than later in life, avoiding adverse environmental factors in the periconceptional and intrauterine period may be much more important for the prevention of adult disease than any (i.e. dietetic) measures in infants and adults. A successful pregnancy should not primarily be defined by the outcome at birth but also by the health status in later life. PMID:23515667

  18. Epigenetics of gestational diabetes mellitus and offspring health: the time for action is in early stages of life.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, Harald; Zechner, Ulrich; Haaf, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The epidemic increase of type 2 diabetes and obesity in developed countries cannot be explained by overnutrition, physical inactivity and/or genetic factors alone. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that an adverse intrauterine environment, in particular a shortage or excess of nutrients is associated with increased risks for many complex diseases later in life. An impressive example for the 'fetal origins of adult disease' is gestational diabetes mellitus which usually presents in 1% to >10% of third trimester pregnancies. Intrauterine hyperglycemia is not only associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality, but also with increased lifelong risks of the exposed offspring for obesity, metabolic, cardiovascular and malignant diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that fetal overnutrition (and similarly undernutrition) lead to persistent epigenetic changes in developmentally important genes, influencing neuroendocrine functions, energy homeostasis and metabolism. The concept of fetal programming has important implications for reproductive medicine. Because during early development the epigenome is much more vulnerable to environmental cues than later in life, avoiding adverse environmental factors in the periconceptional and intrauterine period may be much more important for the prevention of adult disease than any (i.e. dietetic) measures in infants and adults. A successful pregnancy should not primarily be defined by the outcome at birth but also by the health status in later life. PMID:23515667

  19. Rationale, design, and methodology for the optimizing outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and their infants study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at increased risk for developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To date, there have been few interdisciplinary interventions that target predominantly ethnic minority low-income women diagnosed with GDM. This paper describes the rationale, design and methodology of a 2-year, randomized, controlled study being conducted in North Carolina. Methods/Design Using a two-group, repeated measures, experimental design, we will test a 14- week intensive intervention on the benefits of breastfeeding, understanding gestational diabetes and risk of progression to prediabetes and T2DM, nutrition and exercise education, coping skills training, physical activity (Phase I), educational and motivational text messaging and 3 months of continued monthly contact (Phase II). A total of 100 African American, non-Hispanic white, and bilingual Hispanic women between 22–36 weeks of pregnancy who are diagnosed with GDM and their infants will be randomized to either the experimental group or the wait-listed control group. The first aim of the study is to determine the feasibility of the intervention. The second aim of study is to test the effects of the intervention on maternal outcomes from baseline (22–36 weeks pregnant) to 10 months postpartum. Primary maternal outcomes will include fasting blood glucose and weight (BMI) from baseline to 10 months postpartum. Secondary maternal outcomes will include clinical, adiposity, health behaviors and self-efficacy outcomes from baseline to 10 months postpartum. The third aim of the study is to quantify the effects of the intervention on infant feeding and growth. Infant outcomes will include weight status and breastfeeding from birth through 10 months of age. Data analysis will include general linear mixed-effects models. Safety endpoints include adverse event reporting. Discussion Findings from this trial may lead to an effective intervention to assist women diagnosed with GDM to improve maternal glucose homeostasis and weight as well as stabilize infant growth trajectory, reducing the burden of metabolic disease across two generations. Trial registration NCT01809431 PMID:24112417

  20. UNCONTROLLED COMBUSTION EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agency has recognized open and uncontrolled burning of waste and biomass as a significant source of poorly documented air toxics. Over the last 3 years, we have documented emissions from woodstoves; barrel burns of domestic waste; forest fires; wheat, grass, and rice straw fi...

  1. First trimester coffee and tea intake and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a study within a national birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hinkle, Stefanie N.; Laughon, S. Katherine; Catov, Janet M.; Olsen, Jorn; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2014-01-01

    Objective Coffee and tea consumption is associated with a decreased type 2 diabetes risk in non-pregnant adults. We examined the relation between first trimester coffee and tea consumption and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) risk. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark 1996-2002. Population Non-diabetic women with singleton pregnancies in the Danish National Birth Cohort (n=71,239). Methods Estimated adjusted relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for the association between first trimester coffee and tea or estimated total caffeine and GDM. Main outcome measures GDM ascertained from the National Hospital Discharge Register or maternal interview. Results Coffee or tea intake was reported in 81.2% (n=57,882) and GDM complicated 1.3% (n=912) of pregnancies. Among non-consumers, GDM complicated 1.5% of pregnancies. Among coffee drinkers, GDM was highest among women who drank ≥8 cups/d (1.8%) with no significant difference across intake levels (P=.10). Among tea drinkers, there was no difference in GDM across intake levels (1.2%) (P=.98). After adjustment for age, socio-occupational status, parity, prepregnancy body mass index, smoking, and cola, there was suggestion of a protective, but non-significant association with increasing coffee [RR ≥8 vs 0 cups/d=0.89 (95%CI 0.64-1.25)] and tea [RR ≥8 vs 0 cups/d=0.77 (95%CI 0.55-1.08)]. Results were similar by smoking status, except a non-significant 1.45-fold increased risk with ≥8 coffee cups/d for non-smokers. There was a non-significant reduced GDM risk with increasing total caffeine. Conclusions Our results suggest that moderate first trimester coffee and tea intake were not associated with GDM increased risk and possibly may have a protective effect. PMID:24947484

  2. Increased expression of immune-related genes in leukocytes of patients with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Marzena; Zieleniak, Andrzej; Zurawska-Klis, Monika; Cypryk, Katarzyna; Wozniak, Lucyna Alicja

    2016-03-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that the immune system is linked to metabolism in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but factors participating in these processes still are awaiting identification. Inducible nitric oxide synthase, encoded by the NOS2 gene, and surfactant protein D, encoded by the SFTPD gene, have been implicated in diabetes. We investigated NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in leukocytes obtained from 125 pregnant women with (n = 87) or without (control group; n = 38) GDM, and, in turn, correlated their expression with clinical parameters of subjects. Leukocytes were isolated from the blood of pregnant women and NOS2 and SFTPD expression in these cells was determined by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Univariate correlation analyses were performed to assess an association between leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD expression and clinical characteristics of patients. qRT-PCR experiments disclosed significantly increased leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNA levels in hyperglycemic GDM patients (P < 0.05). In the entire study group, there were significant positive associations of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD mRNAs with C-reactive protein. Additionally, transcript level of SFTPD also correlated positively with fasting glycemia and insulin resistance. This study demonstrates that an impaired glucose metabolism in GDM may be predominant predictor of leukocyte NOS2 and SFTPD overexpression in diabetic patients. Furthermore, alterations in the expression of these genes are associated with glucose metabolism dysfunction and/or inflammation during pregnancy. In addition, these findings support the utilization of leukocytes as good experimental model to study a relationship between immune-related genes and metabolic changes in women with GDM, as well as to assess the potential mechanisms underlying these alterations. PMID:26568332

  3. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  4. Is Uric Acid a Missing Link between Previous Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes at a Later Time of Life?

    PubMed Central

    Fronczyk, Aneta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Majkowska, Lilianna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A high level of uric acid (UA) is a strong, independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The relationship between UA levels and the development of type 2 diabetes in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) remains unclear. The aim of study was to evaluate the UA levels in pGDM women in relation to their current nutritional status and carbohydrate metabolism. Material and Methods 199 women with pGDM diagnoses based on oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) 5–12 years previously and a control group of 50 women without pGDM. The assessment included anthropometric parameters, body composition (Tanita SC-330S), current OGTT, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), β-cell function (HOMA-%B), HbA1c, lipids, and uric acid. Results No differences between groups were found in terms of age, time from the index pregnancy, anthropometric parameters, lipids or creatinine levels. The incidences of overweight and obesity were similar. Carbohydrate abnormalities were more frequent in the pGDM group than the control group (43.2% vs 12.0% p<0.001). The women with pGDM had significantly higher fasting glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin levels in the OGTTs, but similar HOMA-IR values. Their UA levels were significantly higher (258±58 vs 230±50 μmol/L, p<0.005) and correlated with BMI and the severity of carbohydrate disorders. The normal weight and normoglycemic pGDM women also demonstrated higher UA levels than a similar control subgroup (232±48 vs 208±48 μmol/L, p<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed significant correlations of UA level with BMI (β = 0.38, 95% CI 0.25–0.51, p<0.0001), creatinine level (β = 0.23, 95% CI 0.11–0.35, p<0.0005), triglycerides (β = 0.20, 95% CI 0.07–0.33, p<0.005) and family history of diabetes (β = 0.13, 95% CI 0.01–0.25, p<0.05). In logistic regression analysis, the association between higher UA level (defined as value ≥297 μmol/L) and presence of any carbohydrate metabolism disorder (IFG, IGT or diabetes) was statistically significant (odds ratio 3.62 [95% CI 1.8–7.3], p<0.001). Conclusions Higher UA levels may be associated with the development of type 2 diabetes in pGDM women, also in these with normal body weights. PMID:27166795

  5. Maternal Obesity, Overweight and Gestational Diabetes Affect the Offspring Neurodevelopment at 6 and 18 Months of Age – A Follow Up from the PREOBE Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Espinola, Francisco J.; Berglund, Staffan K; García-Valdés, Luz Mª; Segura, Mª Teresa; Jerez, Antonio; Campos, Daniel; Moreno-Torres, Rosario; Rueda, Ricardo; Catena, Andrés; Pérez-García, Miguel; Campoy, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain development in fetal life and early infancy is critical to determine lifelong performance in various neuropsychological domains. Metabolic pathologies such as overweight, obesity, and gestational diabetes in pregnant women are prevalent and increasing risk factors that may adversely affect long-term brain development in their offspring. Objective The objective of this research was to investigate the influence of maternal metabolic pathologies on the neurodevelopment of the offspring at 6 and 18 months of life. Design This was a prospective case-control study of 331 mother- and child pairs from Granada, Spain. The mothers were included during pregnancy into four groups according to their pre-gestational body mass index and their gestational diabetes status; overweight (n:56), obese (n:64), gestational diabetic (n:79), and healthy normal weight controls (n:132). At 6 months and 18 months we assessed the children with the Bayley III scales of neurodevelopment. Results At 6 months (n=215), we found significant group differences in cognition composite language, and expressive language. Post hoc test revealed unexpectedly higher scores in the obese group compared to the normal weight group and a similar trend in overweight and diabetic group. The effects on language remained significant after adjusting for confounders with an adjusted odds ratio for a value above median in composite language score of 3.3 (95% CI: 1.1, 10.0; p=0.035) for children of obese mothers. At 18 month (n=197), the offspring born to obese mothers had lost five points in language composite scores and the previous differences in language and cognition was replaced by a suggestive trend of lower gross motor scores in the overweight, obese, and diabetic groups. Conclusions Infants of obese mothers had a temporary accelerated development of cognition and language, followed by a rapid deceleration until 18 months of age, particularly of language scores. This novel observation prompts further confirmative studies to explore possible placental and neurodevelopmental mechanisms involved. PMID:26208217

  6. Fetal Male Gender and the Benefits of Treatment of Mild Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    BAHADO-SINGH, Ray O.; MELE, Lisa; LANDON, Mark B.; RAMIN, Susan M.; CARPENTER, Marshall W.; CASEY, Brian; WAPNER, Ronald J.; VARNER, Michael W.; ROUSE, Dwight J.; THORP, John M.; SCISCIONE, Anthony; CATALANO, Patrick; HARPER, Margaret; SAADE, George; CARITIS, Steve N.; PEACEMAN, Alan M.; TOLOSA, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We evaluated whether improvements in pregnancy outcomes after treatment of mild GDM differed in magnitude based on fetal gender. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a masked RCT of treatment for mild GDM. Outcomes included preeclampsia or gestational hypertension, birth weight, neonatal fat mass, and composite adverse outcomes for both neonate (preterm birth, SGA or NICU admission) and mother (labor induction, cesarean delivery, preeclampsia or gestational hypertension). After stratification according to fetal gender, the interaction of gender with treatment status was estimated for these outcomes. Results Of 469 pregnancies with male fetuses, 244 were randomized to treatment and 225 to routine care. For those with female fetuses, these numbers were 463, 233 and 230 respectively. The interaction of gender with treatment status was significant for fat mass (p=0.04) and birthweight centile (p = 0.02). Among women who were assigned to the treatment group, male offspring were significantly more likely to have both a lower birth weight centile (50.7 ± 29.2 vs 62.5 ± 30.2 centile, p < 0.0001) and less neonatal fat mass (487 ± 229.6 vs. 416.6 ± 172.8 g, p = 0.0005) whereas these differences were not significant among female offspring. There was no interaction between fetal gender and treatment group with regard to other outcomes. Conclusion The magnitude of the reduction of a newborn’s birth weight centile and neonatal fat mass related to the treatment of mild GDM appears greater for male neonates. PMID:22542118

  7. Placental lipoprotein lipase DNA methylation levels are associated with gestational diabetes mellitus and maternal and cord blood lipid profiles.

    PubMed

    Houde, A A; St-Pierre, J; Hivert, M F; Baillargeon, J P; Perron, P; Gaudet, D; Brisson, D; Bouchard, L

    2014-04-01

    Placental lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is crucial for placental lipid transfer. Impaired LPL gene expression and activity were reported in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and intra-uterine growth restriction. We hypothesized that placental LPL DNA methylation is altered by maternal metabolic status and could contribute to fetal programming. The objective of this study was thus to assess whether placental LPL DNA methylation is associated with GDM and both maternal and newborn lipid profiles. Placenta biopsies were sampled at delivery from 126 women including 27 women with GDM diagnosed following a post 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between weeks 24 and 28 of gestation. Placental LPL DNA methylation and expression levels were determined using bisulfite pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. DNA methylation levels within LPL proximal promoter region (CpG1) and intron 1 CpG island (CpGs 2 and 3) were lower in placenta of women with GDM. DNA methylation levels at LPL-CpG1 and CpG3 were also negatively correlated with maternal glucose (2-h post OGTT; r=-0.22; P=0.02) and HDL-cholesterol levels (third trimester of pregnancy; r=-0.20; p=0.03), respectively. Moreover, we report correlation between LPL-CpG2 DNA methylation and cord blood lipid profile. DNA methylation levels within intron 1 CpG island explained up to 26% (r⩽-0.51; P<0.001) of placental LPL mRNA expression variance. Overall, we showed that maternal metabolic profile is associated with placental LPL DNA methylation dysregulation. Our results suggest that site-specific LPL epipolymorphisms in the placenta are possibly functional and could potentially be involved in determining the future metabolic health of the newborn. PMID:24847699

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Comparison to Insulin in Treating Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poolsup, Nalinee; Suksomboon, Naeti; Amin, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in comparison to insulin. Methods A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted. The efficacy and safety of OADs in comparison to insulin in GDM patients were explored. Studies were identified by conducting a literature search using the electronic databases of Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Web of Science in addition to conducting hand search of relevant journals from inception until October 2013. Results Thirteen studies involving 2,151 patients met the inclusion criteria. These studies were randomized controlled trials of metformin and glyburide in comparison to insulin therapy. Our results indicated a significant increase in the risk for preterm births (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.04–2.19, p = 0.03) with metformin compared to insulin. However, a significant decrease in the risk for gestational hypertension (RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31–0.91, p = 0.02) was found. Postprandial glucose levels also decreased significantly in patients receiving metformin (MD, −2.47 mg/dL; 95% CI, −4.00, −0.94, p = 0.002). There was no significant difference between the two groups for the remaining outcomes. There were significant increases in the risks of macrosomia (RR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.18–4.63, p = 0.03) and neonatal hypoglycemia (RR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.27–3.34, p = 0.005) in the glyburide group compared to insulin whereas results for the other analyzed outcomes remained non-significant. Conclusion The available evidence suggests favorable effects of metformin in treating GDM patients. Metformin seems to be an efficacious alternative to insulin and a better choice than glyburide especially those with mild form of disease. PMID:25302493

  9. The Usefulness of the Glycosylated Hemoglobin Level for the Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ah Jeong; Moon, Hyuk Jin; Na, Joo Ok; Kim, Sang Jin; Mo, Sang Il; Byun, Jeong Ran

    2015-01-01

    Background An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is the current method used for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). OGTT is a relatively complicated procedure and is expensive. Thus, new strategies that do not require fasting or more than a single blood draw may improve the diagnosis of GDM and increase the rate of GDM testing. We investigated the utility of monitoring glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels for the diagnosis of GDM. Methods The data from 992 pregnant women with estimated gestational ages ranging from 24 to 28 weeks were retrospectively reviewed. There were 367 women with plasma glucose levels ≥140 mg/dL 1 hour after a 50-g OGTT. GDM was diagnosed according to the Carpenter-Coustan criteria for a 3-hour 100 g OGTT. A HbA1c assessment was performed at the same time. Results We enrolled 343 women in this study, and there were 109 women with GDM. The area under the curve the receiver operating characteristic curve for HbA1c detection of GDM was 0.852 (95% confidence interval, 0.808 to 0.897). A HbA1c cutoff value ≥5.35% had maximal points on the Youden index (0.581). The sensitivity was 87.2% and the specificity was 70.9% for diagnosing GDM. A threshold value ≥5.35% indicated that 163 patients had GDM and that 68 (41.7%) were false positive. The positive predictive value was 58.3% at this threshold value. Conclusion Despite substantial progress in methodology, HbA1c values cannot replace OGTT for the diagnosis of GDM. PMID:26616593

  10. Maternal obesity characterized by gestational diabetes increases the susceptibility of rat offspring to hepatic steatosis via a disrupted liver metabolome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Troy J; Fonseca, Mario A; Campbell, Kristyn E; Moyce, Brittany L; Cole, Laura K; Hatch, Grant M; Doucette, Christine A; Klein, Julianne; Aliani, Michel; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-07-15

    Maternal obesity is associated with a high risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which is a common complication of pregnancy. The influence of maternal obesity and GDM on the metabolic health of the offspring is poorly understood. We hypothesize that GDM associated with maternal obesity will cause obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in the offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat (45%) and sucrose (HFS) diet to cause maternal obesity and GDM. Lean control pregnant rats received low-fat (LF; 10%) diets. To investigate the interaction between the prenatal environment and postnatal diets, rat offspring were assigned to LF or HFS diets for 12 weeks, and insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis were evaluated. Pregnant GDM dams exhibited excessive gestational weight gain, hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia. Offspring of GDM dams gained more weight than the offspring of lean dams due to excess adiposity. The offspring of GDM dams also developed hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. The postnatal consumption of a LF diet did not protect offspring of GDM dams against these metabolic disorders. Analysis of the hepatic metabolome revealed increased diacylglycerol and reduced phosphatidylethanolamine in the offspring of GDM dams compared to offspring of lean dams. Consistent with altered lipid metabolism, the expression of CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase, and peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor-α mRNA was reduced in the livers of GDM offspring. GDM exposure programs gene expression and hepatic metabolite levels and drives the development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in young adult rat offspring. PMID:25922055

  11. Insulin resistance and lipid profile during an oral glucose tolerance test in women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zx; Wu, Y; Zhu, Xy; Fang, Q; Chen, Dq

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to compare changes in insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) during pregnancy and those with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Overall, 105 pregnant women between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation, 50 with NGT and 55 with GDM according to NDDG standard, were enrolled into the study. The levels of fasting blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) and the insulin levels, blood glucose levels at 1, 2 and 3 hours post oral glucose administration during an OGTT (5.8, 10.6, 9.2 and 8.1 mmol/L, respectively) were measured. Then, insulin resistance (IR) index was calculated. There was no significant difference in fasting, 3-h insulin levels and 3-h blood glucose levels between those with NGT and those with GDM (P > 0.05). However, 1-h and 2-h insulin levels, fasting and 1-h and 2-h blood glucose levels in women with GDM were significantly higher than those in the NGT group (P < 0.05). Fasting TC and TG levels in the GDM group were significantly higher than those with NGT (P = 0.031 and P = 0.025, respectively). Correlation analysis showed that TG and TC levels were positively correlated with homoeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) (r = 0.67 and r = 0.78, respectively; P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that insulin sensitivity in women with GDM was significantly lower than that observed in those with NGT. Reducing IR and blood lipids in women with GDM could potentially improve maternal and foetal outcomes. PMID:26466813

  12. Thr130Ile polymorphism of HNF4A gene is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus in Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Virginia Sánchez; Díaz, César Antonio González; Trenado, Lucila Maritza Lozano; Peralta, José Manuel Campos; Soto, Salvador Martín Polo

    2014-03-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4A) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes in the liver, pancreas, kidney, intestine, and other tissues. Previous studies in the Mexican population have shown a high frequency of the Thr130Ile polymorphism and have suggested its important role in the pathogenesis of early-onset type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether this variant also contributes to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a Mexican population. We studied 213 unrelated postpartum women and their neonates, who were divided into 2 groups: control and GDM. The control group was formed by 108 healthy postpartum women and their neonates, and the GDM group was formed by 105 postpartum women diagnosed with GDM and their neonates. All subjects were genotyped for the Thr130Ile polymorphism in HNF4A by Taqman allelic discrimination assays and sequencing. Our results showed a higher frequency of the minor allele of the Thr130Ile polymorphism in the GDM group compared with the control group (P = 0.0452; odds ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-6.59). With respect to offspring, the frequency of the polymorphism was higher in the offspring of the GDM group than in the offspring of the control group; however, no significant differences between the groups were observed (P = 0.2551; odds ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-3.64). The findings suggest that the Thr130Ile polymorphism is associated with GDM in the studied Mexican population. PMID:24448600

  13. A Prospective Cohort Study of Modifiable Risk Factors for Gestational Diabetes among Hispanic Women: Design and Baseline Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Gollenberg, Audra; Buonnaccorsi, John; Dole, Nancy; Markenson, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at high risk for future diabetes, with rates of GDM consistently higher in Hispanic than non-Hispanic white women. Currently recognized risk factors for GDM are absent in up to half of affected women, and studies addressing modifiable risk factors for GDM in Hispanic women are sparse. Methods Proyecto Buena Salud is an ongoing prospective cohort study of Hispanic women in Massachusetts designed to assess physical activity, psychosocial stress, and GDM risk. Bilingual interviewers recruit prenatal care patients early in pregnancy and assess activity, trait anxiety, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms using validated questionnaires. Results Baseline characteristics of the first 632 participants are presented. Women were predominantly young (69% <24 years), were unmarried (87%), and had low levels of education (48% had less than high school). Women with high acculturation were less likely to live with a partner (OR: 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) than women with low acculturation. Few participants met physical activity guidelines during pregnancy (5.2%). Levels of perceived stress (mean 26.9 ± 7.1), trait anxiety (mean 41.6 ± 10.4), and depressive symptoms (33.2%) were high. Conclusions Proyecto Buena Salud represents a high-risk population of pregnant Hispanic women who are predominantly inactive, with higher levels of perceived stress, trait anxiety, and depressive symptoms compared to predominantly non-Hispanic white cohorts studied earlier. Therefore, Proyecto Buena Salud provides a unique opportunity to prospectively evaluate modifiable risk factors for GDM. Findings will inform prenatal behavioral intervention programs designed to address modifiable GDM risk factors. PMID:20088667

  14. Relationship between the adoption of preventive practices and the metabolic profile of women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Véronique; Paradis, Ann-Marie; Tchernof, André; Weisnagel, S John; Robitaille, Julie

    2012-12-01

    Women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are encouraged to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviours to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. The objective was to examine the association between the adoption of preventive practices and the metabolic profile of women with prior GDM. Analyses included 181 women who had GDM between 2003 and 2010. The preventive practices examined included (i) regular physical activity (≥150 min·week(-1)) assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire; (ii) a healthy diet (score derived from the Alternate Healthy Eating Index and associated with a lower metabolic risk) evaluated from a food frequency questionnaire; and (iii) exclusive breastfeeding (≥6 months). Women were classified according to the number of preventive practices adopted. Waist circumference, weight, and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Fasting insulinemia and glycemia were obtained and Matsuda index for insulin sensitivity was calculated. Nearly one-third of women adopted none of the listed preventive practices. For each increase of 1 preventive practice adopted, women were 30% less likely to have a BMI ≥ 25 kg·m(-2) (odds ratio (OR): 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.50-0.98)), they were 34% less likely to have a waist circumference ≥ 88 cm (OR: 0.66, 95%CI (0.47-0.92)) and they were 33% less likely to have a Matsuda index for insulin sensitivity < 9.69 (OR: 0.67, 95%CI (0.48-0.94)). These results suggest that women with prior GDM who adopt the recommended preventive practices in the years following delivery are less likely to have lower insulin sensitivity, less likely to be overweight-obese, and less likely to be characterized by abdominal obesity. PMID:23176529

  15. Early Pregnancy Maternal Blood DNA Methylation in Repeat Pregnancies and Change in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Status—A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Moore, Amy; Muhie, Seid; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Lin, Shili; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-07-01

    Repeat pregnancies with different perinatal outcomes minimize underlying maternal genetic diversity and provide unique opportunities to investigate nongenetic risk factors and epigenetic mechanisms of pregnancy complications. We investigated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-related differential DNA methylation in early pregnancy peripheral blood samples collected from women who had a change in GDM status in repeat pregnancies. Six study participants were randomly selected from among women who had 2 consecutive pregnancies, only 1 of which was complicated by GDM (case pregnancy) and the other was not (control pregnancy). Epigenome-wide DNA methylation was profiled using Illumina HumanMethylation 27 BeadChips. Differential Identification using Mixture Ensemble and false discovery rate (<10%) cutoffs were used to identify differentially methylated targets between the 2 pregnancies of each participant. Overall, 27 target sites, 17 hypomethylated (fold change [FC] range: 0.77-0.99) and 10 hypermethylated (FC range: 1.01-1.09), were differentially methylated between GDM and control pregnancies among 5 or more study participants. Novel genes were related to identified hypomethylated (such as NDUFC1, HAPLN3, HHLA3, and RHOG) or hypermethylated sites (such as SEP11, ZAR1, and DDR). Genes related to identified sites participated in cell morphology, cellular assembly, cellular organization, cellular compromise, and cell cycle. Our findings support early pregnancy peripheral blood DNA methylation differences in repeat pregnancies with change in GDM status. Similar, larger, and repeat pregnancy studies can enhance biomarker discovery and mechanistic studies of GDM. PMID:25676578

  16. Vitamin D Deficiency Increases the Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng-Xi; Pan, Guo-Tao; Guo, Jian-Fen; Li, Bing-Yan; Qin, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Zeng-Li

    2015-01-01

    The results investigating the relationship between vitamin D levels and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are inconsistent. Thus, we focused on evaluating the association of vitamin D deficiency with GDM by conducting a meta-analysis of observed studies. A systematic literature search was conducted via PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane library to identify eligible studies before August 2015. The meta-analysis of 20 studies including 9209 participants showed that women with vitamin D deficiency experienced a significantly increased risk for developing GDM (odds ratio (OR) = 1.53; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.33, 1.75) with a little heterogeneity (I2 = 16.20%, p = 0.252). A noteworthy decrease of 4.93 nmol/L (95% CI, ?6.73, ?3.14) in serum 25(OH)D was demonstrated in the participants with GDM, and moderate heterogeneity was observed (I2 = 61.40%, p = 0.001). Subgroup analysis with study design showed that there were obvious heterogeneities in nested casecontrol studies (I2 > 52.5%, p < 0.07). Sensitivity analysis showed that exclusion of any single study did not materially alter the overall combined effect. In summary, the evidence from this meta-analysis indicates a consistent association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased risk of GDM. However, well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to elicit the clear effect of vitamin D supplementation on prevention of GDM. PMID:26437429

  17. A comparison on the prevalence and outcomes of gestational versus type 2 diabetes mellitus in 1718 Saudi pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Serehi, Amal Al; Ahmed, Amjad M; Shakeel, Farah; Alkhatani, Khadija; El-Bakri, Nahid K; Buhari, Badr Aldin M; Mohareb, Uhoud Al; Aljohani, Naji

    2015-01-01

    The presence of either diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) or GDM constitute a high-risk pregnancy. Given the high rate of DMT2 and GDM in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), no study has ever compared whether GDM outcomes are comparable to those with DMT2. The present study aims to compare for the first time, maternal and neonatal outcomes among Saudi patients with GDM, DMT2 and non-DM groups. This is a retrospective study covering data from 1718 pregnant patients admitted at King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, KSA from April 2011 to March 2013. The prevalence of GDM was 13.8%, DMT2 was 0.9%. DMT2 group had the highest mean parity and shortest mean gestational age as compared to other groups. Half of all the subjects in the DMT2 group also experienced preterm labor, as opposed to only 10% in GDM and 14% in the non-DM group, respectively. Finally, neonates delivered by DMT2 mothers had the highest percentage of admissions to NICU (33%) as compared to 10% in the non-DM group and only 5% in the GDM group. Outcomes of the GDM group are almost comparable with the non-DM group. While the results of the present study reflect the efficient management of GDM cases in Saudi patients, DMT2 complicated pregnancies, which are considered to be at a much higher risk for maternal and neonatal complications, should be given equally special attention. PMID:26379970

  18. The Preventive Effect of Zuogui Wan on Offspring Rats' Impaired Glucose Tolerance Whose Mothers Had Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qianjin; Niu, Xin; Xu, Kaixia; Wang, Yingli; Wang, Jinlong; Mao, Yingqiu; Gao, Shuangrong

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, we used streptozotocin (STZ) to establish a model of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) rats, where Zuogui Wan was given to GDM rats. After pregnancy, offspring rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, high fat and sugar as the control group, GDM group, and Zuogui Wan GDM group. Rats in high fat and sugar as the control group, GDM group, and Zuogui Wan GDM group were fed with high fat and sugar diet. Rats in control group were fed the basic diet. The means of 2hPG were higher than 7.8 mmol·L−1 and lower than 11.1 mmol·L−1 on the rats of GDM group on week 15, and IGT models were successful. Body weight, abdominal fat weight, the ratio of abdominal fat weight and body weight, fasting plasma glucose, 2hPG, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) of Zuogui Wan GDM group were significantly lower than GDM group. The level of adiponectin in Zuogui Wan GDM group was significantly higher than GDM group. And we concluded that giving Zuogui Wan to GDM rats can have a preventive effect on the offsprings' IGT induced by high fat and sugar diet. PMID:27034700

  19. Prepregnancy BMI and the risk of gestational diabetes: a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Torloni, M R; Betrán, A P; Horta, B L; Nakamura, M U; Atallah, A N; Moron, A F; Valente, O

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to assess and quantify the risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) according to prepregnancy maternal body mass index (BMI). The design is a systematic review of observational studies published in the last 30 years. Four electronic databases were searched for publications (1977-2007). BMI was elected as the only measure of obesity, and all diagnostic criteria for GDM were accepted. Studies with selective screening for GDM were excluded. There were no language restrictions. The methodological quality of primary studies was assessed. Some 1745 citations were screened, and 70 studies (two unpublished) involving 671 945 women were included (59 cohorts and 11 case-controls). Most studies were of high or medium quality. Compared with women with a normal BMI, the unadjusted pooled odds ratio (OR) of an underweight woman developing GDM was 0.75 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69 to 0.82). The OR for overweight, moderately obese and morbidly obese women were 1.97 (95% CI 1.77 to 2.19), 3.01 (95% CI 2.34 to 3.87) and 5.55 (95% CI 4.27 to 7.21) respectively. For every 1 kg m(-2) increase in BMI, the prevalence of GDM increased by 0.92% (95% CI 0.73 to 1.10). The risk of GDM is positively associated with prepregnancy BMI. This information is important when counselling women planning a pregnancy. PMID:19055539

  20. A new gestational diabetes mellitus model: hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation via inhibition of Pax6 in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tan, Rui-Rong; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Huang, Yi-Hua; Tang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Dan; Yao, Nan; Yang, Xuesong; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of fetal malformations. However, few models have been developed to study the underlying mechanisms of GDM-induced fetal eye malformation. In this study, a high concentration of glucose (0.2 mmol per egg) was injected into the air sac of chick embryos on embryo development day (EDD) 1 to develop a hyperglycemia model. Results showed that 47.3% of embryonic eye malformation happened on EDD 5. In this model, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, Six3 and Otx2, were downregulated by hyperglycemia. Among these genes, the expression of Pax6 was the most vulnerable to hyperglycemia, being suppressed by 70%. A reduction in Pax6 gene expression induced eye malformation in chick embryos. However, increased expression of Pax6 in chick embryos could rescue hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. Hyperglycemia stimulated O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation, which caused oxidative stress in chick embryos. Pax6 was found to be vulnerable to free radicals, but the antioxidant edaravone could restore Pax6 expression and reverse eye malformation. These results illustrated a successful establishment of a new chick embryo model to study the molecular mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. The suppression of the Pax6 gene is probably mediated by oxidative stress and could be a crucial target for the therapy of GDM-induced embryonic eye malformation. PMID:26744353

  1. Screening of mitochondrial mutations and insertion-deletion polymorphism in gestational diabetes mellitus in the Asian Indian population.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran Ali; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Pasupuleti, Nagarjuna; Chava, Srinivas; Jahan, Parveen; Hasan, Qurratulain; Rao, Pragna

    2015-05-01

    In this study we scrutinized the association between the A8344G/A3243G mutations and a 9-bp deletion polymorphism with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in an Asian Indian population. The A3243G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) causes mitochondrial encephalopathy myopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), while the A8344G mutation in tRNA(Lys) causes myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers (MERRF). We screened 140 pregnant women diagnosed with GDM and 140 non-GDM participants for these mutations by PCR-RFLP analysis. Both A3243G and A8344G were associated with GDM (A3243: OR-3.667, 95% CI = 1.001-13.43, p = 0.03; A8344G: OR-11.00, 95% CI = 0.6026-200.8, p = 0.04). Mitochondrial DNA mutations contribute to the development of GDM. Our results conclude that mitochondrial mutations are associated with the GDM women in our population. Thus it is important to screen other mitochondrial mutations in the GDM women. PMID:25972744

  2. Quality of life outcomes in pregnancy and postpartum complicated by hypertensive disorders, gestational diabetes, and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Mautner, Eva; Greimel, Eva; Trutnovsky, Gerda; Daghofer, Fedor; Egger, Josef W; Lang, Uwe

    2009-12-01

    Health problems can develop during a pregnancy, turning it into a high risk. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of hypertensive disorders, gestational diabetes, and preterm birth as risk factors for health-related quality of life (HRQL) and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy and postpartum. A prospective, longitudinal study was performed with three assessments. Ninety women were recruited in the study including 29 controls. HRQL was measured using the WHO-QOL-BREF questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and the chi-square test to explore HRQL and depressive symptoms between three pregnancy risk groups and controls. Women of the preterm group had statistically significant higher depression scores and lower HRQL scores on the physical domain during pregnancy than those without complications. Women with hypertensive disorders showed the second most depressive symptoms. Physical and global HRQL improved and depressive symptoms decreased significantly from late pregnancy and early postpartum period to late postpartum. Pregnant specific health problems, especially the risk for preterm delivery is associated with more depressive symptoms and decreased HRQL in pregnancy. Guidance and communication for these women is important. The counseling should be multi professional to reduce childbirth burdens. PMID:19845493

  3. The Preventive Effect of Zuogui Wan on Offspring Rats' Impaired Glucose Tolerance Whose Mothers Had Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Feng, Qianjin; Niu, Xin; Xu, Kaixia; Wang, Yingli; Wang, Jinlong; Li, Qiuju; Mao, Yingqiu; Gao, Shuangrong

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, we used streptozotocin (STZ) to establish a model of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) rats, where Zuogui Wan was given to GDM rats. After pregnancy, offspring rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, high fat and sugar as the control group, GDM group, and Zuogui Wan GDM group. Rats in high fat and sugar as the control group, GDM group, and Zuogui Wan GDM group were fed with high fat and sugar diet. Rats in control group were fed the basic diet. The means of 2hPG were higher than 7.8 mmol·L(-1) and lower than 11.1 mmol·L(-1) on the rats of GDM group on week 15, and IGT models were successful. Body weight, abdominal fat weight, the ratio of abdominal fat weight and body weight, fasting plasma glucose, 2hPG, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) of Zuogui Wan GDM group were significantly lower than GDM group. The level of adiponectin in Zuogui Wan GDM group was significantly higher than GDM group. And we concluded that giving Zuogui Wan to GDM rats can have a preventive effect on the offsprings' IGT induced by high fat and sugar diet. PMID:27034700

  4. Screening of mitochondrial mutations and insertiondeletion polymorphism in gestational diabetes mellitus in the Asian Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran Ali; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Pasupuleti, Nagarjuna; Chava, Srinivas; Jahan, Parveen; Hasan, Qurratulain; Rao, Pragna

    2014-01-01

    In this study we scrutinized the association between the A8344G/A3243G mutations and a 9-bp deletion polymorphism with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in an Asian Indian population. The A3243G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) causes mitochondrial encephalopathy myopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), while the A8344G mutation in tRNALys causes myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers (MERRF). We screened 140 pregnant women diagnosed with GDM and 140 non-GDM participants for these mutations by PCR-RFLP analysis. Both A3243G and A8344G were associated with GDM (A3243: OR-3.667, 95% CI=1.00113.43, p=0.03; A8344G: OR-11.00, 95% CI=0.6026200.8, p=0.04). Mitochondrial DNA mutations contribute to the development of GDM. Our results conclude that mitochondrial mutations are associated with the GDM women in our population. Thus it is important to screen other mitochondrial mutations in the GDM women. PMID:25972744

  5. A new gestational diabetes mellitus model: hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation via inhibition of Pax6 in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tan, Rui-Rong; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Huang, Yi-Hua; Tang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Dan; Yao, Nan; Yang, Xuesong; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of fetal malformations. However, few models have been developed to study the underlying mechanisms of GDM-induced fetal eye malformation. In this study, a high concentration of glucose (0.2 mmol per egg) was injected into the air sac of chick embryos on embryo development day (EDD) 1 to develop a hyperglycemia model. Results showed that 47.3% of embryonic eye malformation happened on EDD 5. In this model, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, Six3 and Otx2, were downregulated by hyperglycemia. Among these genes, the expression of Pax6 was the most vulnerable to hyperglycemia, being suppressed by 70%. A reduction in Pax6 gene expression induced eye malformation in chick embryos. However, increased expression of Pax6 in chick embryos could rescue hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. Hyperglycemia stimulated O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation, which caused oxidative stress in chick embryos. Pax6 was found to be vulnerable to free radicals, but the antioxidant edaravone could restore Pax6 expression and reverse eye malformation. These results illustrated a successful establishment of a new chick embryo model to study the molecular mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. The suppression of the Pax6 gene is probably mediated by oxidative stress and could be a crucial target for the therapy of GDM-induced embryonic eye malformation. PMID:26744353

  6. Influence of gestational diabetes on the stereoselective pharmacokinetics and placental distribution of metoprolol and its metabolites in parturients

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Natalícia de Jesus; Cavalli, Ricardo Carvalho; Marques, Maria Paula; Moisés, Elaine Christine Dantas; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the influence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the kinetic disposition and transplacental and amniotic fluid distribution of metoprolol and its metabolites O-desmethylmetoproloic acid and α-hydroxymetoprolol stereoisomers in hypertensive parturients receiving a single dose of the racemic drug. METHODS The study was conducted on hypertensive parturients with well-controlled GDM (n = 11) and non-diabetic hypertensive parturients (n = 24), all receiving a single 100 mg oral dose of racemic metoprolol tartrate before delivery. Serial maternal blood samples (0–24 h) and umbilical blood and amniotic fluid samples were collected for the quantitation of metoprolol and its metabolite stereoisomers using LC-MS/MS or fluorescence detection. RESULTS The kinetic disposition of metoprolol and its metabolites was stereoselective in the diabetic and control groups. Well-controlled GDM prolonged tmax for both enantiomers of metoprolol (1.5 vs. 2.5 h R-(+)-MET; 1.5 vs. 2.75 h S-(−)-MET) and O-desmethylmetoproloic acid (2.0 vs. 3.5 h R-(+)-AOMD; 2.0 vs. 3.0 h S-(−)-OAMD), and for the four stereoisomers of α-hydroxymetoprolol (2.0 vs. 3.0 h for 1′S,2R-, 1′R,2R- and 1′R,2S-OHM; 2.0 vs. 3.5 h for 1′S,2S-OHM) and reduced the transplacental distribution of 1′S,2S-, 1′R,2R-, and 1′R,2S-OHM by approximately 20%. CONCLUSIONS The kinetic disposition of metoprolol was enantioselective, with plasma accumulation of the S-(−)-MET eutomer. Well-controlled GDM prolonged the tmax of metoprolol and O-desmethylmetoproloic acid enantiomers and the α-hydroxymetoprolol stereoisomers and reduced by about 20% the transplacental distribution of 1′S,2S-, 1′R,2R-, and 1′R,2S-OHM. Thus, well-controlled GDM did not change the activity of CYP2D6 and CYP3A involved in metoprolol metabolism. PMID:25291152

  7. Insulin supersensitivity and normoinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus: clinical usefulness of 3 h assessment in the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Seigo; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Hieshima, Kunio; Jinnouchi, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old man with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) (glycated haemoglobin 11%) had the unusual symptoms of palpitations and sweating after drinking an excessive amount of soft drinks. Three-hour data in the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (75g-OGTT) repeatedly showed normoinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. His diabetic disorder was based on a delayed insulin secretory response to hyperglycaemia and daily excessive intake of glucose from a high caloric diet and soft drinks. However, we paradoxically observed increased insulin sensitivity evaluated by a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (glucose infusion rate: 64.83 μmol/kg/min). We considered that insulin supersensitivity might be involved in the pathogenic mechanisms of his clinical normoinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. He was successfully treated by diet and exercise therapy without any hypoglycaemic medications or insulin. Assessment after the 75g-OGTT is useful for investigating the pathogenesis of DM. Insulin supersensitivity and normoinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia might play a role in clinical manifestation and pathogenesis of type 2 DM. PMID:24713709

  8. Earlier Age of Onset of Chronic Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After a Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy or Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; van Rijn, Bas B; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Boer, Jolanda M A; Verschuren, Monique W M; Oudijk, Martijn A; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2015-12-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the impact of a history of hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on the risk and age of onset of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life, independent of hypertension and T2D. Between 1993 and 1997, 22 265 ever-pregnant women were included from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-NL study, aged 20 to 70 years at baseline. Details on complications of pregnancy and known hypertension were obtained by questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured at enrollment. Participants were followed for the occurrence of CVD events. Data were analyzed using ANCOVA, multivariable logistic regression, and Cox proportional hazard (with HDP and GDM as time-dependent variables for T2D and CVD) models. At enrollment, women with a HDP reported diagnosis of hypertension 7.7 years earlier (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.9-8.5) and women with GDM reported diagnosis of T2D 7.7 years earlier (95% CI 5.8-9.6) than women without pregnancy complications. After adjustment for potential confounders, HDP was associated with presence of hypertension at enrollment (odds ratio 2.12, 95% CI 1.98-2.28) and onset of CVD later in life (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.32). After including the intermediates hypertension and T2D in the model, the risk of CVD later in life decreased (hazard ratio 1.09, 95% CI 1.00-1.20). GDM was associated with an increased risk of developing T2D later in life (hazard ratio 3.68, 95% CI 2.77-4.90), but not with risk of CVD. HDP and GDM have a substantial impact on the risk of CVD and are potentially important indicators for preventive cardiovascular risk management. PMID:26459420

  9. Increased tissue kallikrein amidase activity in urine of patients with type 1 diabetes under insulin therapy, and in those with gestational diabetes mellitus not under insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Gilmar Machado; Magalhães, Carolina Antunes; Bosco, Adriana Aparecida; Reis, Janice Sepulveda; Ribeiro-Oliveira, Antônio; Nogueira, Anelise Impelizieri; Leite, Ricardo Barsaglini da Silva; Miranda, Paulo Augusto Carvalho; Figueiredo, Amintas Fabiano de Souza

    2011-03-01

    Human tissue kallikrein (hK1) is reduced in hypertension, cardiovascular and renal diseases. There is little information on the participation of hK1 in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM), type 2 DM, and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of insulin and hyperglycemia on urinary hK1 activity in type 1 DM and in GDM. Forty-three type 1 DM patients (5-35 years, disease duration ≤ 5years, receiving insulin, HbA(1c)>7.6%) were selected. Forty-three healthy individuals, paired according to gender and age, were used as controls. Thirty GDM patients (18-42 years, between the 24th and 37th week of pregnancy, recently diagnosed, not under insulin therapy) were also selected. Thirty healthy pregnant (18-42years, between the 24th and 37th week of pregnancy) and 30 healthy non-pregnant women (18-42years) were selected as controls. Random midstream urine was used. hK1 amidase activity was estimated with D-Val-Leu-Arg-Nan substrate. Creatinine was determined by Jaffe's method. hK1 specific amidase activity was expressed as μM/(minmg creatinine) to correct for differences in urine flow rate. hK1 specific amidase activity was significantly higher in the urine of type 1 DM than in controls, and in the urine of GDM patients than in healthy pregnant women and healthy non-pregnant women, respectively. The data suggest that hyperglycemia, rather than insulin, is involved in the mechanism of increased hK1 specific amidase activity in both type 1 DM and GDM patients, respectively. PMID:21303657

  10. Maternal Gestational Smoking, Diabetes, Alcohol Drinking, Pre-Pregnancy Obesity and the Risk of Cryptorchidism: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing-Huan; Zheng, Xin-Min; Liu, Tong-Zu; Zhang, Wei-Bin; Zheng, Hang; Chen, Mi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity are thought to increase the risk of cryptorchidism in newborn males, but the evidence is inconsistent. Method We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on the association between maternal gestational smoking, diabetes, alcohol drinking, and pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of cryptorchidism. Articles were retrieved by searching PubMed and ScienceDirect, and the meta-analysis was conducted using Stata/SE 12.0 software. Sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate the influence of confounding variables. Results We selected 32 articles, including 12 case—control, five nested case—control, and 15 cohort studies. The meta-analysis showed that maternal smoking (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.11–1.23) or diabetes (OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.00–1.46) during pregnancy were associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism. Overall, the association between maternal alcohol drinking (OR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.87–1.07), pre-pregnancy body mass index (OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95–1.09) and risk of cryptorchidism were not statistically significant. Additional analysis showed reduced risk (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.82–0.96) of cryptorchidism with moderate alcohol drinking during pregnancy. No dose—response relationship was observed for increments in body mass index in the risk of cryptorchidism. Sensitivity analysis revealed an unstable result for the association between maternal diabetes, alcohol drinking and cryptorchidism. Moderate heterogeneity was detected in studies of the effect of maternal alcohol drinking and diabetes. No publication bias was detected. Conclusion Maternal gestational smoking, but not maternal pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity, was associated with increased cryptorchidism risk in the offspring. Moderate alcohol drinking may reduce the risk of cryptorchidism while gestational diabetes may be a risk factor, but further studies are needed to verify this. PMID:25798927

  11. Healthful Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Hypertension Among Women With a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Zhu, Yeyi; Chavarro, Jorge E; Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K; Ley, Sylvia H; Forman, John P; Liu, Aiyi; Mills, James; Bowers, Katherine; Strøm, Marin; Hansen, Susanne; Hu, Frank B; Zhang, Cuilin

    2016-06-01

    Women who developed gestational diabetes mellitus represent a high-risk population for hypertension later in life. The role of diet in the progression of hypertension among this susceptible population is unknown. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 3818 women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus in the Nurses' Health Study II as part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women's Health Study. These women were followed-up from 1989 to 2011. Incident hypertension was identified through self-administered questionnaires that were validated previously by medical record review. Adherence scores for the alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010, the alternative Mediterranean diet, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension were computed for each participant. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the associations between dietary scores and hypertension while adjusting for major risk factors for hypertension. We documented 1069 incident hypertension cases during a median of 18.5 years of follow-up. After adjustment for major risk factors for hypertension, including body mass index, alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010, alternative Mediterranean diet, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension scores were significantly inversely associated with the risk of hypertension; hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval comparing the extreme quartiles (highest versus lowest) were 0.76 (0.61-0.94; P for linear trend =0.03) for AHEI score, 0.72 (0.58-0.90; P for trend =0.01) for Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension score, and 0.70 (0.56-0.88; P for trend =0.002) for alternative Mediterranean diet score. Adherence to a healthful dietary pattern was related to a lower subsequent risk of developing hypertension among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:27091899

  12. Nutritional Manipulation for the Primary Prevention of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of Randomised Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hitman, Graham A.; Khan, Khalid S.; Thangaratinam, Shakila

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rise in gestational diabetes (GDM), defined as first onset or diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, is a global problem. GDM is often associated with unhealthy diet and is a major contributor to adverse outcomes maternal and fetal outcomes. Manipulation of nutrition has the potential to prevent GDM. Methods We assessed the effects of nutritional manipulation in pregnancy on GDM and relevant maternal and fetal outcomes by a systematic review of the literature. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database from inception to March 2014 without any language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) of nutritional manipulation to prevent GDM were included. We summarised dichotomous data as relative risk (RR) and continuous data as standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results From 1761 citations, 20 RCTs (6,444 women) met the inclusion criteria. We identified the following interventions: diet-based (n = 6), mixed approach (diet and lifestyle) interventions (n = 13), and nutritional supplements (myo-inositol n = 1, diet with probiotics n = 1). Diet based interventions reduced the risk of GDM by 33% (RR 0.67; 95% CI 0.39, 1.15). Mixed approach interventions based on diet and lifestyle had no effect on GDM (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.89, 1.22). Nutritional supplements probiotics combined with diet (RR 0.40; 95% CI 0.20, 0.78) and myo-inositol (RR 0.40; 95% CI 0.16, 0.99) were assessed in one trial each and showed a beneficial effect. We observed a significant interaction between the groups based on BMI for diet-based intervention. The risk of GDM was reduced in obese and overweight pregnant women for GDM (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.18, 0.86). Conclusions Nutritional manipulation in pregnancy based on diet or mixed approach do not appear to reduce the risk of GDM. Nutritional supplements show potential as agents for primary prevention of GDM. PMID:25719363

  13. Prepregnancy low-carbohydrate dietary pattern and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study1234

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Bowers, Katherine; Tobias, Deirdre K; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Chavarro, Jorge; Vaag, Allan; Kiely, Michele; Zhang, Cuilin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low-carbohydrate diets (LCDs) have been vastly popular for weight loss. The association between a low-carbohydrate dietary pattern and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remains unknown. Objective: We aimed to prospectively examine the association of 3 prepregnancy low-carbohydrate dietary patterns with risk of GDM. Design: We included 21,411 singleton pregnancies in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Prepregnancy LCD scores were calculated from validated food-frequency questionnaires, including an overall LCD score on the basis of intakes of carbohydrate, total protein, and total fat; an animal LCD score on the basis of intakes of carbohydrate, animal protein, and animal fat; and a vegetable LCD score on the basis of intakes of carbohydrate, vegetable protein, and vegetable fat. A higher score reflected a higher intake of fat and protein and a lower intake of carbohydrate, and it indicated closer adherence to a low-carbohydrate dietary pattern. RRs and 95% CIs were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with log-binomial models. Results: We documented 867 incident GDM pregnancies during 10 y follow-up. Multivariable-adjusted RRs (95% CIs) of GDM for comparisons of highest with lowest quartiles were 1.27 (1.06, 1.51) for the overall LCD score (P-trend = 0.03), 1.36 (1.13, 1.64) for the animal LCD score (P-trend = 0.003), and 0.84 (0.69, 1.03) for the vegetable LCD score (P-trend = 0.08). Associations between LCD scores and GDM risk were not significantly modified by age, parity, family history of diabetes, physical activity, or overweight status. Conclusions: A prepregnancy low-carbohydrate dietary pattern with high protein and fat from animal-food sources is positively associated with GDM risk, whereas a prepregnancy low-carbohydrate dietary pattern with high protein and fat from vegetable food sources is not associated with the risk. Women of reproductive age who follow a low-carbohydrate dietary pattern may consider consuming vegetable rather than animal sources of protein and fat to minimize their risk of GDM. PMID:24717341

  14. Relationship of Early Pregnancy Waist-to-Hip Ratio versus Body Mass Index with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Basraon, Sanmaan K; Mele, Lisa; Myatt, Leslie; Roberts, James M; Hauth, John C; Leveno, Kenneth J; Varner, Michael W; Wapner, Ronald J; Thorp, John M; Peaceman, Alan M; Ramin, Susan M; Sciscione, Anthony; Tolosa, Jorge E; Sorokin, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and insulin resistance (IR) in obesity defined by body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), or both combined. Methods Secondary analysis of a randomized multicenter trial of antioxidant supplementation versus placebo in nulliparous low-risk women to prevent pregnancy associated hypertension. Women between 9 and 16 weeks with data for WHR and BMI were analyzed for GDM (n = 2,300). Those with fasting glucose and insulin between 22 and 26 weeks (n = 717) were analyzed for IR by homeostatic model assessment of IR (normal, ≤ 75th percentile). WHR and BMI were categorized as normal (WHR, < 0.80; BMI, < 25 kg/m(2)); overweight (WHR, 0.8-0.84; BMI, 25-29.9 kg/m(2)); and obese (WHR, ≥ 0.85; BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Receiver operating characteristic curves and logistic regression models were used. Results Compared with normal, the risks of GDM or IR were higher in obese by BMI or WHR. The subgroup with obesity by WHR but not by BMI had no increased risk of GDM. BMI was a better predictor of IR (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.71 [BMI], 0.65 [WHR], p = 0.03) but similar to WHR for GDM (AUC: 0.68 [BMI], 0.63 [WHR], p = 0.18). Conclusion Increased WHR and BMI in early pregnancy are associated with IR and GDM. BMI is a better predictor of IR compared with WHR. Adding WHR to BMI does not improve its ability to detect GDM or IR. PMID:26352680

  15. Maternal, amniotic fluid and cord blood metabolic profile in normal pregnant and gestational diabetics during recurrent withholding of food.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A K; al-Muhtaseb, N; Gumaa, K A; Mubarak, A; Shaker, M S

    1989-09-01

    In order to advise regarding the religious practice of withholding food, we studied the metabolic changes after successive 15 days of recurrent fasting of 13 hours every day in maternal plasma and liquor amnii of obese normal gravids and gestational diabetics in their third trimester. There were no significant differences between those who fasted that period for one day prior to elective cesarean section (CS) and those who fasted the same period repeatedly for 15 days. The fasted gravids had significant rises in glycerol, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) (P less than 0.0001, P less than 0.005 and P less than 0.01, respectively) in maternal plasma, compared to unfasted gravid groups and ungravid fasted group. No significant metabolic difference was found in the liquor amnii withdrawn from fasted and unfasted groups. The influence of such short term of starvation on the fetal metabolic profile was studied in the cord blood during cesarean section (CS). Glucose, glycerol and NEFA were significantly lower in arterial than in venous cord plasma (P less than 0.05, P less than 0.01 and P less than 0.01, respectively) indicating that the fetus could utilize these substrates. Positive correlation was found between the levels of BOHB in the mother and venous cord plasma on the one hand and their levels in the arterial cord plasma and liquor amnii on the other hand implying that this substrate passes unutilized through the fetus to the liquor amnii. A pregnant woman in the third trimester should not withhold food for long periods. PMID:2583675

  16. Prevalence Estimates of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the United States, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Y.; Sharma, Andrea J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The true prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is unknown. The objective of this study was 1) to provide the most current GDM prevalence reported on the birth certificate and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) questionnaire and 2) to compare GDM prevalence from PRAMS across 2007–2008 and 2009–2010. Methods We examined 2010 GDM prevalence reported on birth certificate or PRAMS questionnaire and concordance between the sources. We included 16 states that adopted the 2003 revised birth certificate. We also examined trends from 2007 through 2010 and included 21 states that participated in PRAMS for all 4 years. We combined GDM prevalence across 2-year intervals and conducted t tests to examine differences. Data were weighted to represent all women delivering live births in each state. Results GDM prevalence in 2010 was 4.6% as reported on the birth certificate, 8.7% as reported on the PRAMS questionnaire, and 9.2% as reported on either the birth certificate or questionnaire. The agreement between sources was 94.1% (percent positive agreement = 3.7%, percent negative agreement = 90.4%). There was no significant difference in GDM prevalence between 2007–2008 (8.1%) and 2009–2010 (8.5%, P = .15). Conclusion Our results indicate that GDM prevalence is as high as 9.2% and is more likely to be reported on the PRAMS questionnaire than the birth certificate. We found no statistical difference in GDM prevalence between the 2 phases. Further studies are needed to understand discrepancies in reporting GDM by data source. PMID:24945238

  17. The investigation of the role of proteoglycans and ADAMTS levels in fetal membranes in physiopathological process of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ozler, Sibel; Demircan, Kadir

    2014-07-01

    About 2-5% of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy and its prevalence has increased markedly within the last decade. GDM is a metabolic syndrome produced by various degrees of carbohydrate intolerance during pregnancy. Various risk factors such as obesity, genetics, environmental factors, and hypertension have been described previously. Maternal and fetal complications occur in around 7% of pregnant women with GDM. In these patients, a relation between proteoglycans and ADAMTS proteases located in extracellular matrix in fetal membranes (placenta, cord, amnion) and complicated pregnancies has already been determined by various animal experiments. Changes in expression, structure and function of ADAMTS proteases and proteoglycans in fetal membranes lead to alteration in the structure of extracellular matrix. If we can establish a balance between these proteoglycans and ADMTS proteases or determine the changes in their structure and functions, it will be possible to predict the risk in high risk pregnancies at early weeks and to initiate treatment early or to follow the target population regularly. In addition, prevention or reduction of maternal and fetal complications may be possible. For this purpose, ADAMTS and proteoglycans the synthesis of which is too much or less, may be targeted and if we would be able to determine and prevent the changes in their levels in the early period of pregnancy, the development of GDM and its complications may be prevented or decreased. Thus, we may identify a marker for early diagnosis and treatment and reduce prematurity, which is the most common cause of fetal death. Fetal and maternal complications, and especially treatment and care costs of prematurity, may also be decreased. PMID:25047995

  18. Pre-pregnancy fried food consumption and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Zhang, Cuilin

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Fried foods are frequently consumed in Western countries. However, the health effects of frequent fried food consumption in humans are not well understood. We aimed to prospectively examine the association between pre-pregnancy fried food consumption and risk of incident gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods We included 21,079 singleton pregnancies from 15,027 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II cohort. Since 1991 and every 4 years thereafter, we collected diet information, including consumption of fried foods at home and away from home, using a validated food frequency questionnaire. We used generalised estimating equations with log-binomial models to estimate the RRs and 95% CIs. Results We documented 847 incident GDM pregnancies during 10 years of follow-up. After adjustment for age, parity, dietary and non-dietary factors, the RRs (95% CIs) of GDM among women who consumed total fried foods 1–3, 4–6 and ≥ 7 times/week, compared with those who consumed it less than once/week, were 1.13 (0.97, 1.32), 1.31 (1.08, 1.59) and 2.18 (1.53, 3.09), respectively (p for trend < 0.001). The association persisted after further adjustment for BMI (p for trend = 0.01). When analysed separately, we found a significant association of GDM with fried food consumption away from home, but not with fried food consumption at home. Conclusions/interpretation Frequent fried food consumption, particularly away from home, was significantly associated with a greater risk of incident GDM. Our study indicates potential benefits of limiting fried food consumption in the prevention of GDM in women of reproductive age. PMID:25303998

  19. German gynecologists’ experience with a universal screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in daily practice: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Katharina; Schneider, Sven; Bock, Christina; Maul, Holger; Kleinwechter, Helmut; Görig, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Objective In March 2012, a universal screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was implemented in Germany. Despite international recommendations, a two-step approach was introduced [step 1: 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT); if GCT is suspicious, step 2 follows: 75-g oral glucose tolerance test with (OGTT)]. This qualitative study aimed at examining how gynecologists administer the screening for GDM in daily practice, whether they perceive any difficulties, and whether they have suggestions for improvement. Material and Methods Seventeen resident gynecologists were interviewed face-to-face in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed using qualitative content techniques. Results We revealed differences in the screening administration. Three gynecologists directly offered the second step of the two-step screening (OGTT) instead of completing the first step before offering the second step. These gynecologists only conducted GCT if the woman (with statutory health insurance) was not willing to pay for OGTT. Critique concerns the late introduction of billing codes, lack of information from official institutions, unavailability of readymade syrup with 50-g glucose, and lack of information material for pregnant women. Conclusion Our results reflect that not all gynecologists appear to conduct the screening conforming to the maternity directive. However, this has to be validated in larger quantitative surveys. That some gynecologists directly conducted OGTT may fuel the discussion regarding the screening procedure. The two-step approach was already highly controversial at the time of introducing the screening because national and international organizations recommend a one-step approach. Therefore, our results are also relevant for other countries who have implemented a two-step screening and for countries planning to implement a screening. PMID:27026773

  20. A Prospective Study of Pre-pregnancy Serum Concentrations of Perfluorochemicals and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuilin; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Maisog, José; Calafat, Antonia M.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Buck Louis, Germaine M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine preconception serum concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and six other PFCs in relation to gestational diabetes (GDM) risk. DESIGN Prospective cohort with longitudinal follow-up. SETTING 16 counties in Michigan and Texas, 2005-2009. PATIENT(S) Among 501 women recruited upon discontinuing contraception for purposes of becoming pregnant, 258 (51%) became pregnant and were eligible for the study of which 28 (11%) women reported having physician-diagnosed GDM during followup. INTERVENTION(S) None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of GDM associated with each standard deviation (SD) increment of preconception serum PFOA concentrations (ng/mL, log-transformed) and six other PFCs were estimated using logistic regression after adjusting for age, pre-pregnancy body mass index, smoking, and parity conditional on gravidity. RESULT(S) Preconception geometric mean (95% CI) PFOA concentrations (in ng/ml) were higher for women with than without GDM (3.94 (3.15-4.93) vs. 3.07 (2.83-3.12), respectively). Each SD increment in PFOA was associated with a 1.87 fold increased GDM risk (adjusted OR (95% CI): 1.86 (1.14, 3.02)). A slightly increased risk associated with each SD increment for the six other PFCs was observed as well (all ORs >1.0; range 1.06-1.27), although the associations were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggested that higher environmentally relevant concentrations of PFOA were significantly associated with an increased GDM risk. If corroborated, these findings may be suggestive of a possible environmental etiology for GDM. PMID:25450302

  1. Health care costs associated with gestational diabetes mellitus among high-risk women – results from a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The costs of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening have been frequently reported, but total GDM-related health care costs compared to the health care costs of women without GDM have not been reported. The aim of this study was to analyse GDM-related health care costs among women with an elevated risk of GDM. Methods The study was based on a cluster-randomised GDM prevention trial (N = 848) carried out at maternity clinics, combined with data from the Finnish Medical Birth Register and Care Registers for Social Welfare and Health Care. Costs of outpatient visits to primary and secondary care, cost of inpatient hospital care before and after delivery, the use of insulin, delivery costs and babies’ stay in the neonatal intensive care unit were analysed. Women who developed GDM were compared to those who were not diagnosed with GDM. Results Total mean health care costs adjusted for age, body mass index and education were 25.1% higher among women diagnosed with GDM (€6,432 vs. €5,143, p < 0.001) than among women without GDM. The cost of inpatient visits was 44% higher and neonatal intensive care unit use was 49% higher in the GDM group than among women without GDM. The delivery costs were the largest single component in both groups. Conclusions A confirmed GDM diagnosis was associated with a significant increase in total health care costs. Effective lifestyle counselling by primary health care providers may offer a means of reducing the high costs of secondary care. PMID:22827919

  2. Gestational Diabetes and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy Among Women Veterans Deployed in Service of Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Mattocks, Kristin; Zephyrin, Laurie; Reiber, Gayle; Yano, Elizabeth M.; Callegari, Lisa; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Goulet, Joseph; Shaw, Jonathan; Brandt, Cynthia; Haskell, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of gestational diabetes (GDM) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) among women Veterans using Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) maternity benefits previously deployed in service of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND), and whether pregnancy complications were associated with VA use following delivery. Methods: We identified the study population through linkage with the Department of Defense roster and VA administrative and clinical data. GDM and HDP were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes in VA inpatient or outpatient files. Similarly, we constructed a nationally representative sample of deliveries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) adjusted for age and year of delivery to compare rates of GDM and HDP. Proportional hazards regression was used to determine whether pregnancy complications were associated with use of VA following delivery. Results: Between 2001 and 2010, 2,288 women OEF/OIF/OND Veterans used VA maternity benefits; 5.2% had GDM and 9.6% had HDP. Compared with women delivering in the United States, women OEF/OIF/OND Veterans using VA maternity benefits had higher risk of developing GDM (SIR: 1.40; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16, 1.68) and HDP (SIR: 1.32; 95% CI 1.15, 1.51). Among women OEF/OIF/OND Veterans using VA maternity benefits, GDM (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.83, 1.24) and HDP (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.92, 1.25) were not associated with use of VA following delivery. Conclusions: Non-VA providers should be aware of their patients' Veteran status and the associated elevated risk for pregnancy complications. Within VA, focused efforts to optimize Veterans' preconception and postpartum health are needed. PMID:25090022

  3. Human Milk Secretory Immunoglobulin A and Lactoferrin N-Glycans Are Altered in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus123

    PubMed Central

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Totten, Sarah M.; Huang, Jincui; Grapov, Dmitry; Durham, Holiday A.; Lammi-Keefe, Carol J.; Lebrilla, Carlito; German, J. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the effects of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) on lactation and milk components. Recent reports suggested that hyperglycemia during pregnancy was associated with altered breast milk immune factors. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and N-glycans of milk immune-modulatory proteins are implicated in modulation of infant immunity. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of GDM on HMO and protein-conjugated glycan profiles in breast milk. Milk was collected at 2 wk postpartum from women diagnosed with (n = 8) or without (n = 16) GDM at week 24–28 in pregnancy. Milk was analyzed for HMO abundances, protein concentrations, and N-glycan abundances of lactoferrin and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). HMOs and N-glycans were analyzed by mass spectrometry and milk lactoferrin and sIgA concentrations were analyzed by the Bradford assay. The data were analyzed using multivariate modeling confirmed with univariate statistics to determine differences between milk of women with compared with women without GDM. There were no differences in HMOs between milk from women with vs. without GDM. Milk from women with GDM compared with those without GDM was 63.6% lower in sIgA protein (P < 0.05), 45% higher in lactoferrin total N-glycans (P < 0.0001), 36–72% higher in lactoferrin fucose and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.01), and 32–43% lower in sIgA total, mannose, fucose, and sialic acid N-glycans (P < 0.05). GDM did not alter breast milk free oligosaccharide abundances but decreased total protein and glycosylation of sIgA and increased glycosylation of lactoferrin in transitional milk. The results suggest that maternal glucose dysregulation during pregnancy has lasting consequences that may influence the innate immune protective functions of breast milk. PMID:24047700

  4. Postpartum Glucose Testing Rates Following