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1

An Integrated Approach to the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate biochemistry laboratories traditionally expose students to biochemical techniques through a series of independent and usually unrelated laboratory exercises. Efforts to reorganize and update the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory at Texas Tech University have centered upon the development of a series of laboratory experiments that focus on a single biological system, the complex 11 (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) of Escherichia coli. Students are provided a computer-aided research environment in which to gain practical training in molecular biology, protein purification and enzyme kinetics. The laboratory schedule includes exercises on the succinate dehydrogenase operon (sdh) DNA sequence, and experiments that deal with isolation and characterization of sdh operon DNA, extraction and purification of complex 11 and characterization of complex 11 subunit structure and kinetic parameters. This unified approach to the biochemistry teaching laboratory is specifically designed to impact undergraduate student preparation for future studies, providing exposure to fundamental techniques of biochemistry experimentation and simulating the focused, single system, environment of a research laboratory.

Harman, James G.; Anderson, John A.; Nakashima, Richard A.; Shaw, Robert W.

1995-07-01

2

Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase Investigations for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (RpiA) has many features that make it attractive as a focal point of a semester-long, advanced biochemistry laboratory for undergraduate students. The protein can easily and inexpensively be isolated from spinach using traditional purification techniques. Characterization of RpiA enzyme activity can be…

Jewett, Kathy; Sandwick, Roger K.

2011-01-01

3

A Curriculum Skills Matrix for Development and Assessment of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have designed a skills matrix to be used for developing and assessing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula. We prepared the skills matrix for the Project Kaleidoscope Summer Institute workshop in Snowbird, Utah (July 2001) to help current and developing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology program…

Caldwell, Benjamin; Rohlman, Christopher; Benore-Parsons, Marilee

2004-01-01

4

Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 5850 College Street ............................................................................................................................. 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs .............................................................................................................. 4 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Dellaire, Graham

5

Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 5850 College Street.............................................................................................................................. 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs .............................................................................................................. 4 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Dellaire, Graham

6

Undergraduate Programs BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Programs in BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Dalhousie University 9B1 - 5850 College........................................................................................................................................................ 3 1. Biochemistry Degree Programs ............................................................................................................................. 5 Minor in Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Dellaire, Graham

7

An Experiment Using Sucrose Density Gradients in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment to be performed in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory that is based on a gradient centrifugation system employing a simple bench top centrifuge, a freezer, and frozen surcose gradient solution to separate macromolecules and subcellular components. (CW)

Turchi, Sandra L.; Weiss, Monica

1988-01-01

8

Purification and Characterization of Taq Polymerase: A 9-Week Biochemistry Laboratory Project for Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have developed a 9-week undergraduate laboratory series focused on the purification and characterization of "Thermus aquaticus" DNA polymerase (Taq). Our aim was to provide undergraduate biochemistry students with a full-semester continuing project simulating a research-like experience, while having each week's procedure focus on a single…

Bellin, Robert M.; Bruno, Mary K.; Farrow, Melissa A.

2010-01-01

9

Forensic Analysis of Canine DNA Samples in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent advances in canine genomics have allowed the development of highly distinguishing methods of analysis for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify hypervariable regions of DNA from dog hair and saliva…

Carson, Tobin M.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Fekete, Brenda L.; Millard, Julie T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

2009-01-01

10

DNA Topology Analysis in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability of a cell to control precisely and regulate DNA winding and topology is critical for many intracellular processes, such as replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. A set of complementary experiments is described which are useful in teaching the principles of DNA topology to undergraduate biochemistry students. In one experiment, a copper-o-phenanthroline complex is used to oxidatively cleave closed circular supercoiled DNA and generate nicked and linear forms. In the second experiment, the antitumor agent cis-diamminedichloroplatinum is used to gradually remove supercoils by unwinding the DNA helix. In a third experiment, DNA topoisomerase I is used to generate a set of topoisomers of covalently closed circular DNA. In all experiments, the results are readily analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Together, these experiments greatly facilitate the students' understanding of the basic principles of DNA topology and provide an interesting backdrop for teaching agarose gel electrophoresis methodology. They also serve to introduce topics such as small molecule-DNA interactions and DNA damage and repair.

Keck, Michael V.

2000-11-01

11

Vesicle Stability and Dynamics: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory exercise is described that helps students learn about lipid self-assembly by making vesicles under different solution conditions. Concepts covering the chemical properties of different lipids, the dynamics of lipids, and vesicle stability are explored. Further, the described protocol is easy and cheap to implement. One to two…

Del Bianco, Cristina; Torino, Domenica; Mansy, Sheref S.

2014-01-01

12

Identification of Forensic Samples via Mitochondrial DNA in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A recent forensic approach for identification of unknown biological samples is mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify a 440 base pair hypervariable region of human mtDNA from a variety of "crime scene" samples (e.g., teeth, hair, nails, cigarettes, envelope flaps, toothbrushes, and chewing gum). Amplification is verified via agarose gel electrophoresis and then samples are subjected to cycle sequencing. Sequence alignments are made via the program CLUSTAL W, allowing students to compare samples and solve the "crime."

Millard, Julie T.; Pilon, André M.

2003-04-01

13

Glycobiology, How to Sugar-Coat an Undergraduate Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A second semester biochemistry laboratory has been implemented as an independent projects course at California State University, Sacramento since 1999. To incorporate aspects of carbohydrate biochemistry, or glycobiology, into our curriculum, projects in lectin isolation and purification were undertaken over the course of two semesters. Through…

McReynolds, Katherine D.

2006-01-01

14

Purification of Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase by Affinity Chromatography: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a rapid and inexpensive experiment utilizing affinity chromatography to isolate carbonic anhydrase (CA) from bovine blood. The more specific an affinity gel is the better the purification, but the greater the cost. Some costs would be prohibitive in the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. Less specific resins may be more affordable but may bind a number of closely related proteins. One alternative would be to couple a specific ligand to an inexpensive resin such as an ion exchanger. We describe a simple procedure for preparing a sulfonamide-coupled resin which specifically binds CA from a blood hemolysate. The CA is eluted and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). It was found that only a single band of 31 kD was obtained. The instructor can readily prepare the affinity gel prior to the lab, and the students, beginning with packed red blood cells can carry out the lysis, binding to the gel, elution, enzymatic assays, and electrophoresis.

Bering, C. Larry; Kuhns, Jennifer J.; Rowlett, Roger

1998-08-01

15

A Static Method as an Alternative to Gel Chromatography: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a static method as an alternative to gel chromatography, which may be used as an undergraduate laboratory experiment. In this method, a constant mass of Sephadex gel is swollen in a series of protein solutions. UV-vis spectrophotometry is used to find a partition coefficient, KD, that indicates the fraction of the interior…

Burum, Alex D.; Splittgerber, Allan G.

2008-01-01

16

An Inexpensive, Relatively Green, and Rapid Method to Purify Genomic DNA from "Escherichia Coli": An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A method to purify genomic DNA from "Escherichia coli" is presented. The method is an amalgam of published methods but has been modified and optimized for use in the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. Specifically, the method uses Tide Free 2x Ultra laundry detergent, which contains unspecified proteases and lipases, "n"-butanol, 2-propanol,…

Sims, Paul A.; Branscum, Katie M.; Kao, Lydia; Keaveny, Virginia R.

2010-01-01

17

A Kinetic Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the use of specific reactions of metabolic pathways to make measurements in the laboratory. Describes an adaptation of an experiment used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories involving the induction of an enzyme in E. coli, as well as its partial purification and characterization. (TW)

Palmer, Richard E.

1986-01-01

18

An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of

Adele J. Wolfson Mona L. Hall; Thomas R. Branham

1996-01-01

19

Environmental regulation of plant gene expression: an RT-qPCR laboratory project for an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology course.  

PubMed

We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the FLOWERING LOCUS C gene, a key regulator of floral timing in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate students in biochemistry or molecular biology courses. The project provides students with hands-on experience with RT-qPCR, the current "gold standard" for gene expression analysis, including detailed data analysis using the common 2-??CT method. Moreover, it provides a convenient starting point for many inquiry-driven projects addressing diverse questions concerning ecological biochemistry, naturally occurring genetic variation, developmental biology, and the regulation of gene expression in nature. PMID:24038665

Eickelberg, Garrett J; Fisher, Alison J

2013-01-01

20

Equilibrium Gel Filtration Chromatography for the Measurement of Protein-Ligand Binding in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory exercise used in the senior biochemistry course at the University of Winnipeg for three years is discussed. It combines liquid chromatography and absorbance spectroscopy and also allows the students to produce a quantitative result within a single three-hour period.

Craig, Douglas B.

2005-01-01

21

A Metabolic Murder Mystery: A Case-Based Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1990, a woman was wrongly convicted of poisoning her infant son and was sentenced to life in prison. Her conviction was based on laboratory work that wrongly identified ethylene glycol as present in her son's blood and in the formula he drank prior to his death. The actual cause of the infant's death, a metabolic disease, was eventually…

Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Kauffmann, Andrew D.; Poplawski, Shane G.; Lysiak, Daniel R.; Stewart, Robert J.; Arcadi, Jane K.; Dinan, Frank J.

2010-01-01

22

The introduction of metagenomics into an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course yielded a predicted reductase that decreases triclosan susceptibility in Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

Traditional undergraduate science classes often include a laboratory component aimed at enabling the students to experience the classroom topics firsthand. Typically, these experiments are chosen because they have known outcomes that will clearly demonstrate particular aspects of scientific theory. While this approach has its benefits in skill development and concept reinforcement, the lack of novelty inherent in repeating experiments that have been repeated for many years does not accurately convey the feeling of true scientific discovery to the students. In this work, we have designed and implemented a series of experiments into an undergraduate biochemistry curriculum that incorporates the opportunity for scientific discovery, while simultaneously creating an environment for learning routine laboratory techniques. Through this set of experiments, students enrolled in the course were successful in identifying and beginning to characterize an unknown bacterial gene that confers increased tolerance to triclosan on its host. PMID:22339268

Donato, Justin J; Klimstra, Mikhail A; Byrnes, James R; White, Robert J; Marsh, Thomas C

2012-06-01

23

The Biochemistry of the Muscle Contraction Process: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Using Viscosity to Follow the Progress of a Reaction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment using viscosity to follow the progress of the contractile process in muscles. This simple, short experiment illustrates the action of ATP as the source of energy in the contractile process and the catalytic effect of calcium ions as a control in the energy producing process. (CS)

Belliveau, James F.; And Others

1981-01-01

24

Using an ePortfolio system as an electronic laboratory notebook in undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology practical classes.  

PubMed

Despite many apparent advantages, including security, back-up, remote access, workflow, and data management, the use of electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) in the modern research laboratory is still developing. This presents a challenge to instructors who want to give undergraduate students an introduction to the kinds of data curation and notebook keeping skills that will inevitably be required as ELNs penetrate normal laboratory practice. An additional problem for the teacher is that ELNs do not generally have student-administrative functions and are prohibitively expensive. In this report, we describe the use and impact of an ePortfolio system as a surrogate ELN. Introduction of the system led to several pedagogic outcomes, namely: increased preparedness of students for class, encouragement of creativity and reflection with respect to experimental methods, greatly enhanced engagement between students and tutors, and it gave instructors the ability to scrutinize original data files and monitor student-tutor feedback cycles. However, implementation led to a disruption of tutor workloads and incurred new levels of accountability that threatened to undermine the initiative. Through course evaluations and other reflective processes, we reached an appreciation of how an ELN should be introduced into practical class teaching so that it not only becomes an appropriate aid for teaching the laboratory experience, but also becomes a life-long resource for students. PMID:24376052

Johnston, Jill; Kant, Sashi; Gysbers, Vanessa; Hancock, Dale; Denyer, Gareth

2014-01-01

25

An "in Silico" DNA Cloning Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory exercise introduces students to concepts in recombinant DNA technology while accommodating a major semester project in protein purification, structure, and function in a biochemistry laboratory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students. It is also suitable for forensic science courses focused in DNA biology and advanced…

Elkins, Kelly M.

2011-01-01

26

An Analysis of the Involvement of Purine Ribonucleotides in Eukaryotic Protein Synthesis: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article presents an interesting and timely experiment that allows students in junior/senior level biochemistry to investigate the purine nucleotide requirements for protein synthesis in a relatively short time frame. The methods do not require any unusual equipment, though the use of radionucleotides (entirely warranted by the nature of the experiment) does require special care.

Lawson, T. Glen

1995-11-01

27

Cogenerative Dialogue: Improving Undergraduate Biochemistry Teaching and Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students entering undergraduate biochemistry courses are usually already committed to studies in biochemistry or a related field. These students have excelled, in general, in biology, organic chemistry, and physics before starting the biochemistry two-semester sequence. Most of the publications on college science teaching focus on the introductory science courses, and few and far between are the publications on upper-level science

Penny J. Gilmer; Mohammed Al-humiari; Donald D. Bratton

2008-01-01

28

Immobilized Lactase in the Biochemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Immobilized enzymes have many practical applications. They may be used in clinical, industrial, and biotechnological laboratories and in many clinical diagnostic kits. For educational purposes, use of immobilized enzymes can easily be taught at the undergraduate or even secondary level. We have developed an immobilized enzyme experiment that combines many practical techniques used in the biochemistry laboratory and fits within a three-hour time frame. In this experiment, lactase from over-the-counter tablets for patients with lactose intolerance is immobilized in polyacrylamide, which is then milled into small beads and placed into a chromatography column. A lactose solution is added to the column and the eluant is assayed using the glucose oxidase assay, available as a kit. We have determined the optimal conditions to give the greatest turnover of lactose while allowing the immobilized enzymes to be active for long periods at room temperature.

Allison, Matthew J.; Bering, C. Larry

1998-10-01

29

An Undergraduate Investigation into the 10-23 DNA Enzyme that Cleaves RNA: DNA Can Cut It in the Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A low-cost biochemistry experiment is described that demonstrates current techniques in the use of catalytic DNA molecules and introduces a nonradioactive, nonfluorescent, inexpensive, fast, and safe method for monitoring these nucleic acid reactions. The laboratory involves the exploration of the 10-23 DNA enzyme as it cleaves a specific RNA…

Flynn-Charlebois, Amber; Burns, Jamie; Chapelliquen, Stephanie; Sanmartino, Holly

2011-01-01

30

Environmental Regulation of Plant Gene Expression: An Rt-qPCR Laboratory Project for an Upper-Level Undergraduate Biochemistry or Molecular Biology Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the "FLOWERING LOCUS C" gene, a key regulator of floral timing in "Arabidopsis thaliana" plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate

Eickelberg, Garrett J.; Fisher, Alison J.

2013-01-01

31

Incorporation of Bioinformatics Exercises into the Undergraduate Biochemistry Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field of bioinformatics is developing faster than most biochemistry textbooks can adapt. Supplementing the undergraduate biochemistry curriculum with data-mining exercises is an ideal way to expose the students to the common databases and tools that take advantage of this vast repository of biochemical information. An integrated collection of…

Feig, Andrew L.; Jabri, Evelyn

2002-01-01

32

A Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a biochemistry laboratory course in which the curriculum revolves around a single theme: the purification, characterization, and molecular biology of threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) from Escherechia coli. Lists examples of related class research projects. Contains 41 references. (WRM)

Craig, Paul A.

1999-01-01

33

Raising environmental awareness through applied biochemistry laboratory experiments.  

PubMed

Our environment is under constant pressure and threat from various sources of pollution. Science students, in particular chemistry students, must not only be made aware of these issues, but also be taught that chemistry (and science) can provide solutions to such real-life issues. To this end, a newly developed biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that guides students to learn about the applicability of peroxidase enzymes to degrade organic dyes (as model pollutants) in simulated waste water. In addition to showing how enzymes can potentially be used for waste water remediation, various factors than can affect enzyme-based reactions such as pH, temperature, concentration of substrates/enzymes, and denaturants can also be tested. This "applied biotechnology" experiment was successfully implemented in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course to enhance students' learning of environmental issues as well important biochemistry concepts. Student survey confirmed that this laboratory experiment was successful in achieving the objectives of raising environmental awareness in students and illustrating the usefulness of chemistry in solving real-life problems. This experiment can be easily adopted in an introductory biochemistry laboratory course and taught as an inquiry-guided exercise. PMID:24078356

Salman Ashraf, S

2013-01-01

34

Assessing Undergraduate Laboratory Performance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The lab notebook is one element for assessing student laboratory performance. However, it is also important to be able to communicate research results in a journal article format and a visual poster format. Another key aspect to scientific research is the ability to present a research plan. This article describes four assessment tools that can be used in conjunction with undergraduate lab courses that provide the opportunity for the students to practice each of these essential communication skills.

Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Associate Editor of Science's STKE REV); Nancy R. Gough (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Editor of Science's STKE REV)

2006-09-05

35

A Streamlined Molecular Biology Module for Undergraduate Biochemistry Labs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Site-directed mutagenesis and other molecular biology techniques, including plasmid manipulation and restriction analysis, are commonly used tools in the biochemistry research laboratory. In redesigning our biochemistry lab curricula, we sought to integrate these techniques into a term-long, project-based course. In the module presented here,…

Muth, Gregory W.; Chihade, Joseph W.

2008-01-01

36

Teaching Receptor Theory to Biochemistry Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Receptor:ligand interactions account for numerous reactions critical to biochemistry and molecular biology. While students are typically exposed to some examples, such as hemoglobin binding of oxygen and signal transduction pathways, the topic could easily be expanded. Theory and kinetic analysis, types of receptors, and the experimental assay…

Benore-Parsons, Marilee; Sufka, Kenneth J.

2003-01-01

37

UCSD Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Teaching Laboratories LABORATORY REGULATIONS  

E-print Network

a splash hazard. Safety glasses are designed for use in normal laboratory operations but offer only minimal & textbooks, in the laboratories, in the Science & Engineering Library and in the Chemistry Teaching LabUCSD Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Teaching Laboratories LABORATORY REGULATIONS

Aluwihare, Lihini

38

Thermodynamic Exploration of Eosin-Lysozyme Binding: A Physical Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We developed a modular pair of experiments for use in the undergraduate physical chemistry and biochemistry laboratories. Both experiments examine the thermodynamics of the binding of a small molecule, eosin Y, to the protein lysozyme. The assay for binding is the quenching of lysozyme fluorescence by eosin through resonant energy transfer. In…

Huisman, Andrew J.; Hartsell, Lydia R.; Krueger, Brent P.; Pikaart, Michael J.

2010-01-01

39

Kinetics of Carboxylesterase: An Experiment for Biochemistry and Physical Chemistry Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a convenient, inexpensive experiment in enzyme kinetics developed for the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory at the University of Virginia. Required are a single beam visible spectrophotometer with output to a recorder, a constant temperature, a commercially available enzyme, substrates, and buffers. (BT)

Nichols, C. S.; Cromartie, T. H.

1979-01-01

40

The Kinetics and Inhibition of Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses an enzyme kinetics laboratory experiment involving a two substrate system for undergraduate biochemistry. Uses the enzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase as this enzyme in blood serum is of clinical significance. Notes elevated levels are seen in liver disease, alcoholism, and epilepsy. Uses a spectrophotometer for the analysis. (MVL)

Splittgerber, A. G.; Sohl, Julie

1988-01-01

41

Integrating Internet Assignments into a Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Laboratory Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A main challenge in educating undergraduate students is to introduce them to the Internet and to teach them how to effectively use it in research. To this end, an Internet assignment was developed that introduces students to websites related to biomedical research at the beginning of a biochemistry/molecular biology laboratory course. The basic…

Kaspar, Roger L.

2002-01-01

42

A Biochemistry of Human Disease Course for Undergraduate and Graduate Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the experiences of a medical school faculty who have been offering for more than 10 years a two-course series in the biochemistry of human disease to undergraduate students majoring in biochemistry, biology, or chemistry. Recommends the teaching of specialized, advanced courses to undergraduate, pre-professional students. (DDR)

Glew, Robert H.; VanderJagt, David L.

2001-01-01

43

A focused assignment encouraging deep reading in undergraduate biochemistry.  

PubMed

Encouraging undergraduate students to access, read, and analyze current primary literature can positively impact learning, especially in advanced courses. The incorporation of literature into coursework typically involves reading and responding to full research reports. Such exercises have clear value as students make connections between experiments and are able to probe and critique scientific logic. The exclusive use of full papers, though, may reinforce certain students' tendencies to rely on textual clues rather than a critical analysis of the actual data presented. I propose that structured activities requiring students to focus on individual parts of research papers, even on a single figure, are beneficial in a literature-centered advanced undergraduate course, because they promote the deep reading that is critical to scientific discourse. In addition, I describe how one such focused assignment boosted learning and was well received by students in a second-semester biochemistry course. PMID:24243802

Spiegelberg, Bryan D

2014-01-01

44

A Research-Inspired Biochemistry Laboratory Module  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This helpful set of materials is part of the "Cool Science" initiative at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). It comes from a research-inspired biochemistry laboratory course at MIT developed by professor Catherine Drennan, who also happens to be a fellow at HHMI. The intention is that these materials will introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a current research topic. The resources here include detailed student and instructor laboratory manuals, equipment lists, and lecture slides and notes for accompanying background and technique lectures. There is a complete syllabus available, along with an extensive gallery of relevant images. The site also contains links to related resources, such as a classroom video on researching microorganisms that live on greenhouse gases.

2013-01-25

45

78 FR 4170 - License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia...issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc. (the...authorized by law will not endanger life, property, or the common...are: 1. Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc.,...

2013-01-18

46

Teaching Structure: Student Use of Software Tools for Understanding Macromolecular Structure in an Undergraduate Biochemistry Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of…

Jaswal, Sheila S.; O'Hara, Patricia B.; Williamson, Patrick L.; Springer, Amy L.

2013-01-01

47

A Laboratory Course in Clinical Biochemistry Emphasizing Interest and Relevance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ten laboratory experiments are described which are used in a successful clinical biochemistry laboratory course (e.g. blood alcohol, glucose tolerance, plasma triglycerides, coronary risk index, gastric analysis, vitamin C and E). Most of the experiments are performed on the students themselves using simple equipment with emphasis on useful…

Schwartz, Peter L.

1975-01-01

48

Purification and Characterization of Enzymes from Yeast: An Extended Undergraduate Laboratory Sequence for Large Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providing a project-based experience in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory class can be complex with large class sizes and limited resources. We have designed a 6-week curriculum during which students purify and characterize the enzymes invertase and phosphatase from bakers yeast. Purification is performed in two stages via ethanol…

Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.; McIntyre, Neil R.; Thompson, Marleesa

2013-01-01

49

A Proposal for Teaching Undergraduate Chemistry Students Carbohydrate Biochemistry by Problem-Based Learning Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching elementary biochemistry to undergraduate students. The activity was based on "the foods we eat." It was used to engage students' curiosity and to initiate learning about a subject that could be used by the future teachers in the high school. The experimental…

Figueira, Angela C. M.; Rocha, Joao B. T.

2014-01-01

50

A Course Designed for Undergraduate Biochemistry Students to Learn about Cultural Diversity Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Biology, biochemistry, and other science students are well trained in science and familiar with how to conduct and evaluate scientific experiments. They are less aware of cultural issues or how these will impact their careers in research, education, or as professional health care workers. A course was developed for advanced undergraduate science…

Benore-Parsons, Marilee

2006-01-01

51

Raising Environmental Awareness through Applied Biochemistry Laboratory Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our environment is under constant pressure and threat from various sources of pollution. Science students, in particular chemistry students, must not only be made aware of these issues, but also be taught that chemistry (and science) can provide solutions to such real-life issues. To this end, a newly developed biochemistry laboratory experiment…

Salman Ashraf, S.

2013-01-01

52

Fluid Flow Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The undergraduate fluid mechanics laboratory at Clarkson University consists of three experiments: mixing; drag measurements; and fluid flow and pressure drop measurements. The latter experiment is described, considering equipment needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained. (JN)

Vilimpochapornkul, Viroj; Obot, Nsima T.

1986-01-01

53

Synthesis of Vitamin K Expoxide: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides procedures for synthesizing and purifying a vitamin K metabolite (2,3-epoxide) to introduce many of the techniques used in lipid biochemistry. Includes typical results obtained as well as an optional experiment designed to test the purity of the epoxide obtained. (JM)

Thierry-Palmer, M.

1984-01-01

54

Teaching structure: student use of software tools for understanding macromolecular structure in an undergraduate biochemistry course.  

PubMed

Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of structural representation tools into both laboratory and homework activities. First, early in the course we introduce the use of readily available open-source software for visualizing protein structure, coincident with modules on amino acid and peptide bond properties. Second, we use these same software tools in lectures and incorporate images and other structure representations in homework tasks. Third, we require a capstone project in which teams of students examine a protein-nucleic acid complex and then use the software tools to illustrate for their classmates the salient features of the structure, relating how the structure helps explain biological function. To ensure engagement with a range of software and database features, we generated a detailed template file that can be used to explore any structure, and that guides students through specific applications of many of the software tools. In presentations, students demonstrate that they are successfully interpreting structural information, and using representations to illustrate particular points relevant to function. Thus, over the semester students integrate information about structural features of biological macromolecules into the larger discussion of the chemical basis of function. Together these assignments provide an accessible introduction to structural representation tools, allowing students to add these methods to their biochemical toolboxes early in their scientific development. PMID:24019219

Jaswal, Sheila S; O'Hara, Patricia B; Williamson, Patrick L; Springer, Amy L

2013-01-01

55

Synthesis, Characterization, and Secondary Structure Determination of a Silk-Inspired, Self-Assembling Peptide: A Laboratory Exercise for Organic and Biochemistry Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory experiment gives upper-division organic or biochemistry undergraduate students a comprehensive look at the synthesis, chemical characterization, self-assembly, and secondary structure determination of small, N-acylated peptides inspired by the protein structure of silkworm silk. All experiments can be completed in one 4 h lab…

Albin, Tyler J.; Fry, Melany M.; Murphy, Amanda R.

2014-01-01

56

Utilizing Isolation, Purification, and Characterization of Enzymes as Project-Oriented Labs for Undergraduate Biochemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Senior-level biochemistry labs are mostly verification-type laboratories with little chance for exploration. We have developed a project-based biochemistry laboratory which gives them a chance to carry out a major biochemistry project. In the first quarter it is based on the purification of the enzyme lysozyme. The students are given some basic information, and then work out the details of their own procedures, make up their own solutions, and work at their own pace. Students use centrifugation, ion-exchange chromatography, spectral enzyme assays, and SDS-gel electrophoresis to purify and characterize the protein. In the second quarter students are given acid phosphatase and the basic assay for the enzyme, and then develop and carry out a method for determining the kinetic parameters of the enzyme. These experiments continue the development of laboratory independence of the students which steadily progresses in most curriculum

Deal, S. Todd; Hurst, Michael O.

1997-02-01

57

DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships at Oak Ridge National Laboratory-- Description: Opportunities to participate in research in a broad range of science and engineering activities related to basic sciences, energy, and the environment. Discipline(s): Computer Science; Earth, Environmental, and Marine Sciences; Engineering; Life Sciences; Mathematics; Physical Sciences Eligibility: U.S. Citizens and Legal Permanent Residents. Undergraduate Students Location(s): Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) Duration: Summer Term 10 Weeks; Fall/Spring Term 16 weeks Frequency: Spring, Summer, and Fall How to apply: http://www.scied.science.doe.gov Deadline(s): http://www.scied.science.doe.gov/scied/erulf/dates.html

58

Environmental Chemistry in the Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of environmental chemistry and the use of laboratory exercises in analytical and general chemistry courses. Notes the importance of lab work in heightening student interest in coursework including problem-based learning in undergraduate curricula, ready adaptability of environmental coursework to existing curricula, and…

Wenzel, Thomas J.; Austin, Rachel N.

2001-01-01

59

Colorimetric Titration Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a colorimetric titration instrument usable in the undergraduate laboratory that fulfills the objectives of ruggedness, freedom from ambient light interference, and low cost. Although accessories can be added (raising the price), the basic instrument is low priced and can be used manually with a simple voltmeter. (JN)

Lopez, Edwin; Vassos, Basil H.

1984-01-01

60

Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

2014-01-01

61

A Fast and Inexpensive Western Blot Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Western blotting is an important, modern technique for transferring proteins from a gel onto nitrocellulose or other suitable support and then detecting a protein of interest using antibodies. We have developed an experiment and optimized the conditions for the undergraduate laboratory. The experiment can be done quickly using an electrophoretic blotter or more cheaply using passive transfer. This experiment allows the student to learn valuable procedures currently used in biochemistry and other biological sciences.

Farrell, Shawn O.; Farrell, Lynn E.

1995-08-01

62

Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Each organic chemistry student should become familiar with the educational and governmental laboratory safety requirements. One method for teaching laboratory safety is to assign each student to locate safety resources for a specific class laboratory experiment. The student should obtain toxicity and hazardous information for all chemicals used or produced during the assigned experiment. For example, what is the LD50 or LC50 for each chemical? Are there any specific hazards for these chemicals, carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen, neurotixin, chronic toxin, corrosive, flammable, or explosive agent? The school's "Chemical Hygiene Plan", "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in the Laboratory" (National Academy Press), and "Laboratory Standards, Part 1910 - Occupational Safety and Health Standards" (Fed. Register 1/31/90, 55, 3227-3335) should be reviewed for laboratory safety requirements for the assigned experiment. For example, what are the procedures for safe handling of vacuum systems, if a vacuum distillation is used in the assigned experiment? The literature survey must be submitted to the laboratory instructor one week prior to the laboratory session for review and approval. The student should then give a short presentation to the class on the chemicals' toxicity and hazards and describe the safety precautions that must be followed. This procedure gives the student first-hand knowledge on how to find and evaluate information to meet laboartory safety requirements.

Luckenbaugh, Raymond W.

1996-11-01

63

Structural Analysis and Modeling of Proteins on the Web: An Investigation for Biochemistry Undergraduates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Teaching computer analysis and modeling of proteins at undergraduate universities can prepare students for their anticipated careers as future biochemists. Although there are a variety of software packages that researchers use for structural analyses of protein and nucleic acid sequences, these packages may be too complicated for undergraduates to learn within a few weeks, or they require an expensive graphics workstation to be useful. One manner to overcome such limitations is to access databases and structural analytical tools via the World Wide Web (WWW). This approach was used successfully in teaching an advanced biochemistry course (protein structure and folding) and was investigated further as an undergraduate research project. Presented here is the method used and an example where a student predicted the tertiary structure of a fragment from a DNA-binding protein after first acquiring the skills necessary to utilize the information from the Internet. This paper documents that undergraduates who do not have access to expensive modeling tools can gain some experience in protein structure determination through a computer.

León, Darryl; Uridil, Sarah; Miranda, James

1998-06-01

64

Undergraduate Biochemistry  

E-print Network

major challenges in biochemical research: protein, DNA interactions, membrane trafficking within cells? molecules, computer-aided protein modelling and drug design. Our school has a large number of researchers

Bristol, University of

65

The Arizona State University electrical engineering undergraduate open laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the undergraduate electrical engineering laboratories at Arizona State University, For the past few years, the laboratory exercises associated with 11 electrical engineering courses have been conducted in a single large room and, mostly, on an unscheduled basis. This open laboratory is available 74 h each week and contains the equipment necessary for most of the undergraduate electrical

J. C. Palais; C. G. Javurek

1996-01-01

66

A Virtual Laboratory Model for Encouraging Undergraduate Research  

E-print Network

A Virtual Laboratory Model for Encouraging Undergraduate Research Thomas P. Way Applied Computing thomas.way@villanova.edu ABSTRACT Undergraduate students who perform research benefit greatly from undergraduates to actively pursue collaborative research with faculty and other students. As an extension

Way, Thomas

67

An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

2012-01-01

68

A Pharmacy Practice Laboratory Exercise to Apply Biochemistry Concepts  

PubMed Central

Objectives To develop exercises that allow pharmacy students to apply foundational knowledge discussed in a first-professional year (P1) biochemistry course to specific disease states and patient scenarios. Design A pharmacy practice laboratory exercise was developed to accompany a lecture sequence pertaining to purine biosynthesis and degradation. The assignment required students to fill a prescription, provide patient counseling tips, and answer questions pertaining to the disease state, the underlying biochemical problem, and the prescribed medication. Assessment Students were graded on the accuracy with which they filled the prescription, provided patient counseling, and answered the questions provided. Overall, students displayed mastery in all of these areas. Additionally, students completed a course survey on which they rated this exercise favorably, noting that it helped them to integrate basic science concepts and pharmacy practice. Conclusion A laboratory exercise provided an opportunity for P1 students to apply foundational pharmacy knowledge to a patient case and can serve as a template for the design of additional exercises. PMID:21179255

McFalls, Marsha A.

2010-01-01

69

Design and Implementation of an Undergraduate Laboratory Course in Psychophysiology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most psychology curricula require the completion of coursework on the physiological bases of behavior. However, delivery of this critical content in a laboratory format is somewhat rare at the undergraduate level. To fill this gap, this article describes the design and implementation of an undergraduate laboratory course in psychophysiology at a…

Thibodeau, Ryan

2011-01-01

70

Undergraduate research and new laboratory practices in power engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent NSF Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) grant supported the adaptation and creation of activities that connect power engineering theory to actual scaled-implementations at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM). To this end, laboratory practices and undergraduate research projects were conducted at the new Energy Systems Instrumentation Laboratory (ESIL). Activities at ESIL include: traditional laboratory practices; laboratory practices

Efraín O'Neill-Carrillo; Tania Martínez-Navedo; José Ramos; Miguel Vélez-Reyes; Eddie Marrero

2002-01-01

71

Kinetics of Papain: An Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Enzyme kinetics experiments are popular in the undergraduate laboratory. These experiments have pedagogic value because they reinforce the concepts of Michaelis-Menten kinetics covered in the lecture portion of the course and give students the experience of calculating kinetic constants from data they themselves have generated. In this experiment, we investigate the kinetics of the thiol protease papain. The source of the papain is commercially available papaya latex. A specific substrate, Na-benzoyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA), is used, which takes advantage of the fact that papain interacts with a phenylalanine residue two amino acids away from the peptide bond cleaved. Upon hydrolysis by papain, a bright yellow product is released, p-nitroaniline. This allows the reaction to be monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the rate of formation of the p-nitroaniline product as a function of the increase in absorbance of the solution at the lmax of p-nitroaniline (400 nm) over time at various substrate concentrations. These data are used to plot a Lineweaver-Burk plot from which the vmax and KM are obtained. If time permits, students carry out additional investigations in which e of p-nitroaniline is measured, the enzyme solution protein concentration is measured, the enzyme purity is evaluated by SDS-PAGE, and a pH-rate profile is constructed from experimental data.

Cornely, Kathleen; Crespo, Eric; Earley, Michael; Kloter, Rachel; Levesque, Aime; Pickering, Mary

1999-05-01

72

College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-print Network

cheMistry College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 907, and biochemistry. Undergraduate research leading to publications is strongly encouraged and many of the laboratory an optional concentration, or students can opt for an additional focus in biochemistry, environmental chemis

Hartman, Chris

73

A Virtual Laboratory Model for Encouraging Undergraduate Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Undergraduate students who perform research benefit greatly from the experience, yet achieving high levels of voluntary participation remains an elusive goal. This paper describes the implementation of an innovative laboratory model designed to encourage computer science undergraduates to actively pursue collaborative research with faculty and other students. As an extension of earlier research into team-based software engineering education, the Applied

2006-01-01

74

Quantum Optics Experiments with Single Photons for Undergraduate Laboratories  

E-print Network

Quantum Optics Experiments with Single Photons for Undergraduate Laboratories Enrique J. Galvez of interference experiments for undergraduates that underscore the quantum nature of the light. The experiments use parametric down-conversion to generate pairs of correlated photons. The experiments involve one

Galvez, Enrique J. "Kiko"

75

A proposal for teaching undergraduate chemistry students carbohydrate biochemistry by problem-based learning activities.  

PubMed

This article presents a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching elementary biochemistry to undergraduate students. The activity was based on "the foods we eat." It was used to engage students' curiosity and to initiate learning about a subject that could be used by the future teachers in the high school. The experimental activities (8-12 hours) were related to the questions: (i) what does the Benedict's Reagent detect? and (ii) What is determined by glucose oxidase (GOD)? We also ask the students to compare the results with those obtained with the Lugol reagent, which detects starch. Usually, students inferred that the Benedict reagent detects reducing sugars, while GOD could be used to detect glucose. However, in GOD assay, an open question was left, because the results could be due to contamination of the sugars (particularly galactose) with glucose. Though not stressed, GOD does not oxidize the carbohydrates tested and all the positive results are due to contamination. The activities presented here can be easily done in the high school, because they are simple and non-expensive. Furthermore, in the case of Benedict reaction, it is possible to follow the reduction of Cu (II) "macroscopically" by following the formation of the brick-orange precipitate. The concrete observation of a chemical reaction can motivate and facilitate students understanding about chemistry of life. PMID:24265175

Figueira, Angela C M; Rocha, Joao B T

2014-01-01

76

479Program of Medical Laboratory Sciences Undergraduate Catalogue 201314  

E-print Network

, antigens, antibodies, and complement system, as well as basic principles in blood banking and transfusion medicine. First semester. #12;480 Program of Medical Laboratory Sciences Undergraduate Catalogue 2013

Shihadeh, Alan

77

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships  

E-print Network

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact Endowment Fund To provide support for undergraduate biomedical research in the Department of Chemistry/Biochemistry and biochemistry undergraduate majors. Deadline is based on University Awards Day deadline. Virginia Rogers 803

Almor, Amit

78

Commentary: Why Abandoning Undergraduate Laboratories Is Not an Option  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory exercises (labs) are sometimes regarded as dispensable in biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) education for various reasons including a combination of increased class costs and small budget allocations, pressing demands for more time to lecture to fit in new BMB discoveries within constant time span of courses, and the fact that…

Costa, Manuel Joao

2010-01-01

79

Introducing Undergraduates to a Research Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a student project which is intended to teach undergraduates concepts and techniques of nuclear physics, experimental methods used in particle detection, and provide experience in a functioning research environment. Included are detailed procedures for carrying out the project. (CC)

Weinberg, Robert

1974-01-01

80

Undergraduate Skills Laboratories at Sonoma State University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the current economic climate, funding sources for many laboratory courses have been cut from university budgets. However, it is still necessary for undergraduates to master laboratory skills to be prepared and competitive applicants when entering the professional world and/or graduate school. In this context, student-led programs may be able to compensate for this lack of formal instruction and reinforce concepts from lecture by applying research techniques to develop hands-on comprehension. The Sonoma State University Chapter of Society of Physics Students has established a peer-led skills lab to teach research techniques in the fields of astronomy and physics. The goal is to alleviate the pressures of both independently learning and efficiently applying techniques to junior and senior-level research projects. These skill labs are especially valuable for nontraditional students who, due to work or family duties, may not get a chance to fully commit to research projects. For example, a topic such as Arduino programming has a multitude of applications in both astronomy and physics, but is not taught in traditional university courses. Although some programming and electronics skills are taught in (separate) classes, they are usually not applied to actual research projects, which combined expertise is needed. For example, in astronomy, there are many situations involving programming telescopes and taking data with electronic cameras. Often students will carry out research using these tools but when something goes wrong, the students will not have the skills to trouble shoot and fix the system. Another astronomical topic to be taught in the skills labs is the analysis of astronomical data, including running remote telescopes, analyzing photometric variability, and understanding the concepts of star magnitudes, flat fields, and biases. These workshops provide a setting in which the student teacher may strengthen his or her understanding of the topic by presenting it to peers. Students teaching fellow peers is an ideal method of furthering understanding for all participants, and the skills lab established by the SPS has begun this process at SSU.

Gill, Amandeep; Zack, K.; Mills, H.; Cunningham, B.; Jackowski, S.

2014-01-01

81

Teaching PCR Through Inquiry in an Undergraduate Biology Laboratory Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of an inquiry-based laboratory unit on the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). This unit was designed and taught for the undergraduate Eukaryotic Genetics Laboratory class (Bio105L) at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Our activity utilizes an authentic molecular biology research question to teach the underlying molecular mechanisms and experimental technique of

K. M. Dorighi; J. Betancourt; J. Sapp; T. K. Quan; J. Lee

2010-01-01

82

Measuring Stellar Temperatures: An Astrophysical Laboratory for Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While astrophysics is a fascinating subject, it hardly lends itself to laboratory experiences accessible to undergraduate students. In this paper, we describe a feasible astrophysical laboratory experience in which the students are guided to take several stellar spectra, using a telescope, a spectrograph and a CCD camera, and perform a full data…

Cenadelli, D.; Zeni, M.

2008-01-01

83

Web Camera Use in Developing Biology, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of a network-ready color camera is described which is primarily marketed as a security device and is used for experiments in developmental biology, genetics and biochemistry laboratories and in special student research projects. Acquiring and analyzing project and archiving images is very important in microscopy, electrophoresis and…

Ogren, Paul J.; Deibel, Michael; Kelly, Ian; Mulnix, Amy B.; Peck, Charlie

2004-01-01

84

Use of Solid Phase Extraction in the Biochemistry Laboratory to Separate Different Lipids  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was used to demonstrate how various lipids and lipid classes could be separated in a biochemistry laboratory setting. Three different SPE methods were chosen on their ability to separate a lipid mixture, consisting of a combination of a either a fatty acid, a triacylglycerol, a mono- or diacylglycerol, phospholipid,…

Flurkey, William H.

2005-01-01

85

Teaching Protein Purification and Characterization Techniques: A Student-Initiated, Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes a biochemistry laboratory that is completely project-oriented. Upper-level biology and chemistry majors work in teams to purify a protein of their choice. After the student groups have completed literature searches, ordered reagents, and made buffers they continue to learn basic protein purification and biochemical techniques…

MacDonald, Gina

2008-01-01

86

Laboratory Exercises for an Undergraduate Personality Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This series of exercises is designed to provide undergraduate students with some experiences to deepen and clarify their understanding of the various approaches to personality. The exercises include the semantic differential, modeling, systematic desensitization, shaping, role construct repertory, free association, and approach-avoidance…

Catlin, George; Halgin, Richard P.

87

Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: A laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.  

PubMed

Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 43(1):52-59, 2015. PMID:25395254

Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

2015-01-01

88

Working with Enzymes - Where Is Lactose Digested? An Enzyme Assay for Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Georgia Southern University, we offer a sophomore-level introductory biochemistry course that is aimed at nutrition and chemistry education majors. The laboratory portion of this course has long lacked an experimental introduction to enzymes. We have developed a simple enzyme assay utilizing lactase enzyme from crushed LactAid tablets and a 5% lactose solution ("synthetic milk"). In the experiment, the students assay the activity of the enzyme on the "synthetic milk" at pHs of approximately 1, 6, and 8 with the stated goal of determining where lactose functions in the digestive tract. The activity of the lactase may be followed chromatographically or spectrophotometrically. The experiment, which is actually a simple pH assay, is easily implemented in allied health chemistry laboratory courses and readily lends itself to adaptation for more complex kinetic assays in upper-level biochemistry laboratory courses. The experimental details, including a list of required supplies and hints for implementation, are provided.

Pope, Sandi R.; Tolleson, Tonya D.; Williams, R. Jill; Underhill, Russell D.; Deal, S. Todd

1998-06-01

89

Purification and characterization of enzymes from yeast: an extended undergraduate laboratory sequence for large classes.  

PubMed

Providing a project-based experience in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory class can be complex with large class sizes and limited resources. We have designed a 6-week curriculum during which students purify and characterize the enzymes invertase and phosphatase from bakers yeast. Purification is performed in two stages via ethanol precipitation and anion exchange chromatography, and students perform both direct and coupled enzyme assays. By completion of the experimental series, students are able to identify which enzymes they have purified and have obtained kinetic parameters for one. This experimental series requires minimal instructor preparation time, is cost effective, and works with multiple sections of large groups of students. Students participating in this sequence showed increases in conceptual understanding of biochemical concepts as measured through in-class assessments and anonymous surveys. PMID:23868379

Johanson, Kelly E; Watt, Terry J; McIntyre, Neil R; Thompson, Marleesa

2013-01-01

90

A MODERN UNDERGRADUATE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The senior mechanical engineering laboratory curriculum at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) has been upgraded primarily through renovation of existing laboratories systems. This process was completed using engineering faculty and staff and funding from state and industrial sponsors. Computer data acquisition, analysis, presentation, and control using LabVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench) (1) were added to all of

Charles Knight; Gary McDonald

91

Measurement of Phosphorylated Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1 and 2 in an Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory with ALPHAscreen Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaching the practical aspects of signal transduction to large undergraduate classes can be challenging when there is only a finite time frame in which to engage in laboratory activities. This teaching resource describes the use of bead-based ALPHAscreen technology for a class of 300 second-year biochemistry students, exposing the next generation of researchers to cutting-edge technology. Although in this case phosphorylated extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1 and 2 were measured, this technology is applicable to the measurement of many different signaling components. This resource provides a practical guide for instructors and exemplifies how such traditionally high-throughput research technologies can be used as teaching tools.

Debbie L. Hay (University of Auckland; School of Biological Sciences; REV)

2009-03-17

92

Reaction Kinetics: An Experiment for Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment to examine the kinetics of carbamate decomposition and the effect of buffer catalysis on the reaction. Includes background information, laboratory procedures, evaluation of data, and teaching suggestions. (Author/JN)

Ewing, Sheila

1982-01-01

93

Magnetic Braking Revisited: Activities for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper revisits the demonstration of Lenz by dropping magnets down a non-magnetic tube. Recent publications are reviewed and ideas for undergraduate laboratory investigations are suggested. Finally, an example of matching theory to observation is presented. (Contains 4 tables, 5 figures and 3 footnotes.)

Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

2008-01-01

94

Ultrasound imaging as an undergraduate physics laboratory exercise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrasound imaging provides an interesting and accessible example of the intersection between biology, medicine, and physics. This article provides a review of the physics and technology currently available and discusses two recent methods that have expanded the diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound imaging. We also describe two undergraduate physics laboratory exercises involving ultrasound imaging.

Stiles, Timothy A.

2014-05-01

95

Safety Concepts for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Safety procedures used by Department of Chemistry at the University of Akron are discussed. These include policy that no chemicals are stored in the teaching laboratories. Instead, dispensing stockrooms are used to service the laboratories. Other aspects discussed include ventilation procedures and development of microprocessor use in stockrooms.…

Chlad, Frank L.; Hardy, James K.

1983-01-01

96

Making Connections in the Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a strategy used in a meteorology course to increase its relevance to students' lives. Involves combining the lecture and laboratory portions of the course and including a Connections section in the lab report in which students comment on the connections they saw between the coursework, the laboratory exercises, and their own experience.…

Poole, Bobbie J.; Kidder, Stanley Q.

1996-01-01

97

Undergraduate Laboratory Module on Skin Diffusion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To introduce students to an application of chemical engineering directly related to human health, we developed an experiment for the unit operations laboratory at Georgia Tech examining diffusion across cadaver skin in the context of transdermal drug delivery. In this laboratory module, students prepare mouse skin samples, set up diffusion cells…

Norman, James J.; Andrews, Samantha N.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

2011-01-01

98

Rapid and Adaptable Measurement of Protein Thermal Stability by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry: Updating a Common Biochemical Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Measurement of protein denaturation and protein folding is a common laboratory technique used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring protein thermal stability in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the thermal…

Johnson, R. Jeremy; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Hoops, Geoffrey C.

2014-01-01

99

Biochemistry Why biochemistry?  

E-print Network

Biochemistry Why biochemistry? Biochemistry seeks to understand and explain living systems? Biochemistry is central to genetics, development, ageing and disease. Practical applications range from genetic, the development of personalised medicine, and drug discovery. Essentials What biochemistry courses are there

Sussex, University of

100

PLANNING YOUR BIOCHEMISTRY AND  

E-print Network

PLANNING YOUR BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY MAJOR #12;Outline · Course changes · New Pre in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology BCMB499-1-6 Independent Study BCMB430-6 Undergraduate Thesis #12;New pre-requisites · BCMB340-3 Physical Biochemistry (CHEM330) ­ Pre-requisites: PHYS 101 or PHYS 111, and CHEM 204

Northern British Columbia, University of

101

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships  

E-print Network

Chemistry and Biochemistry Scholarships Complete Scholarship Name Application Deadline Date Contact to Chemistry and Biochemistry entering graduate students who have asked for consideration to serve as research senior in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry based on faculty recommendation for undergraduate

Almor, Amit

102

A laboratory course for teaching laboratory techniques, experimental design, statistical analysis, and peer review process to undergraduate science students.  

PubMed

This article describes a 13-week laboratory course called Human Toxicology taught at the University of Otago, New Zealand. This course used a guided inquiry based laboratory coupled with formative assessment and collaborative learning to develop in undergraduate students the skills of problem solving/critical thinking, data interpretation and written discussion of results. The laboratory practices were a guided inquiry based around retinol's ability to potentiate acetaminophen-mediated hepatotoxicity. To induce critical thinking, students were given a choice as to which assay they could use to determine how retinol affected acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Short summaries were handed in following each assay and formed the bases of the formative assessment. To complete the feedback loop, a summative assessment that consisted of all the graphs and concepts from the short summaries were combined into a manuscript. To give the students exposure to science communication, the manuscript had to be written in accordance to the submission guidelines for Toxicological Sciences. Evaluation of this course was determined by a student questionnaire using a Likert scale and students' responses were very favorable. While the subject matter was toxicological centric, the content could be easily modified to suit another subject matter in biochemistry and molecular biology. PMID:23166024

Gliddon, C M; J Rosengren, R

2012-01-01

103

Microcomputers in an Undergraduate Optics Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a junior-level, one-year optics laboratory course for physics and engineering students. The course offers a range of experiments from conventional geometric optics to contemporary spatial filtering and fiber optics. Presents an example of an experiment with pictures. (Author/YP)

Tomaselli, V. P.; And Others

1990-01-01

104

Analysis of a p53 Mutation Associated with Cancer Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have devised and implemented a module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of a p53 polymorphism associated with cancer susceptibility. First, students collected a drop of peripheral blood cells using a sterile sting and then used FTA cards to extract the genomic DNA. The p53 region is then PCR…

Soto-Cruz, Isabel; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha

2009-01-01

105

Protein Biomarker Research in UK Hospital Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories: A Survey of Current Practice and Views  

PubMed Central

Background: With the increasing drive for more and better disease biomarkers to underpin the stratified or personalised medicine agenda, clinical biochemistry laboratories should be ideally placed to play a major role in their translation into clinical practice. However, little is known about the current extent of biomarker-related research activity in UK National Health Service clinical biochemistry departments. Methods: In December 2010, an online questionnaire was sent to active UK members of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry (ACB) to determine the extent of their current research activity and involvement in protein biomarker discovery and translation, including an assessment of the awareness of proteomics. Results: A total of 198 eligible responses (19% response rate) was received from across the UK. Of a further 50 eligible people who responded to a follow-up for initial non-responders, most cited insufficient knowledge about the topic as the reason for non-response (24% total response rate). The results illustrate the highly skilled nature of the workforce with many having experience in a research environment (75%) with postgraduate qualifications. However, more than half spend <10% of their time undertaking research in their current role, and many (61%) would like to be more research active. Encouragingly, approximately a third were involved in biomarker discovery activities, even though for <10% of their time, with slightly more reporting involvement in biomarker translation. Conclusions: Although there are people with the necessary skills and desire to be involved in biomarker research in clinical biochemistry departments, their involvement is small, predominantly due to issues with capacity and resources. It is likely that the majority of biomarker programmes will therefore continue to be carried out by a small number of academic groups, hopefully with collaborative input from hospital laboratories. PMID:25210209

Hepburn, Sophie; Banks, Rosamonde E; Thompson, Douglas

2014-01-01

106

Experiences of Mentors Training Underrepresented Undergraduates in the Research Laboratory  

PubMed Central

Successfully recruiting students from underrepresented groups to pursue biomedical science research careers continues to be a challenge. Early exposure to scientific research is often cited as a powerful means to attract research scholars with the research mentor being critical in facilitating the development of an individual's science identity and career; however, most mentors in the biological sciences have had little formal training in working with research mentees. To better understand mentors’ experiences working with undergraduates in the laboratory, we conducted semistructured interviews with 15 research mentors at a public university in the Midwest. The interviewed mentors were part of a program designed to increase the number of American Indians pursuing biomedical/biobehavioral research careers and represented a broad array of perspectives, including equal representation of male and female mentors, mentors from underrepresented groups, mentors at different levels of their careers, and mentors from undergraduate and professional school departments. The mentors identified benefits and challenges in being an effective mentor. We also explored what the term underrepresented means to the mentors and discovered that most of the mentors had an incomplete understanding about how differences in culture could contribute to underrepresented students’ experience in the laboratory. Our interviews identify issues relevant to designing programs and courses focused on undergraduate student research. PMID:24006389

Prunuske, Amy J.; Wilson, Janelle; Walls, Melissa; Clarke, Benjamin

2013-01-01

107

Case-Study Investigation of Equine Maternity via PCR-RFLP: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment  

PubMed Central

A simple and robust biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that uses restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products to verify the identity of a potentially valuable horse. During the first laboratory period, students purify DNA from equine samples and amplify two loci of mitochondrial DNA. During the second laboratory period, students digest PCR products with restriction enzymes and analyze the fragment sizes through agarose gel electrophoresis. An optional step of validating DNA extracts through realtime PCR can expand the experiment to three weeks. This experiment, which has an engaging and versatile scenario, provides students with exposure to key principles and techniques of molecular biology, bioinformatics, and evolution in a forensic context. PMID:24363455

Millard, Julie T.; Chuang, Edward; Lucas, James S.; Nagy, Erzsebet E.; Davis, Griffin T.

2013-01-01

108

Case-Study Investigation of Equine Maternity via PCR-RFLP: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment.  

PubMed

A simple and robust biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that uses restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products to verify the identity of a potentially valuable horse. During the first laboratory period, students purify DNA from equine samples and amplify two loci of mitochondrial DNA. During the second laboratory period, students digest PCR products with restriction enzymes and analyze the fragment sizes through agarose gel electrophoresis. An optional step of validating DNA extracts through realtime PCR can expand the experiment to three weeks. This experiment, which has an engaging and versatile scenario, provides students with exposure to key principles and techniques of molecular biology, bioinformatics, and evolution in a forensic context. PMID:24363455

Millard, Julie T; Chuang, Edward; Lucas, James S; Nagy, Erzsebet E; Davis, Griffin T

2013-11-12

109

9/9/09 2:40 PMAdvanced Biochemistry Laboratory CHEM 4700 Page 1 of 6http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~joneil/CHEM4700.Course.outline.htm  

E-print Network

sequences. This course is required for all final year Honours students in Biochemistry. Prerequisite9/9/09 2:40 PMAdvanced Biochemistry Laboratory CHEM 4700 Page 1 of 6http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~joneil/CHEM4700.Course.outline.htm CHEM 4700 Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory CHEM 4700 Advanced Biochemistry

O'Neil, Joe

110

What Skills Should Students of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Programs Have Upon Graduation?  

PubMed Central

Biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) students should demonstrate proficiency in the foundational concepts of the discipline and possess the skills needed to practice as professionals. To ascertain the skills that should be required, groups of BMB educators met in several focused workshops to discuss the expectations with the ultimate goal of clearly articulating the skills required. The results of these discussions highlight the critical importance of experimental, mathematical, and interpersonal skills including collaboration, teamwork, safety, and ethics. The groups also found experimental design, data interpretation and analysiand the ability to communicate findings to diverse audience to be essential skills. To aid in the development of appropriate assessments these skills are grouped into three categories, 1) Process of Science, 2) Communication and Comprehension of Science, and 3) Community of Practice Aspects of Science. Finally, the groups worked to align these competencies with the best practices in both teaching and in skills assessment. PMID:24019246

White, Harold B.; Benore, Marilee A.; Sumter, Takita F.; Caldwell, Benjamin D.; Bell, Ellis

2014-01-01

111

What skills should students of undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology programs have upon graduation?  

PubMed

Biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) students should demonstrate proficiency in the foundational concepts of the discipline and possess the skills needed to practice as professionals. To ascertain the skills that should be required, groups of BMB educators met in several focused workshops to discuss the expectations with the ultimate goal of clearly articulating the skills required. The results of these discussions highlight the critical importance of experimental, mathematical, and interpersonal skills including collaboration, teamwork, safety, and ethics. The groups also found experimental design, data interpretation and analysiand the ability to communicate findings to diverse audience to be essential skills. To aid in the development of appropriate assessments these skills are grouped into three categories, 1) Process of Science, 2) Communication and Comprehension of Science, and 3) Community of Practice Aspects of Science. Finally, the groups worked to align these competencies with the best practices in both teaching and in skills assessment. PMID:24019246

White, Harold B; Benore, Marilee A; Sumter, Takita F; Caldwell, Benjamin D; Bell, Ellis

2013-01-01

112

Observing the quantum behavior of light in an undergraduate laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While the classical, wavelike behavior of light (interference and diffraction) has been easily observed in undergraduate laboratories for many years, explicit observation of the quantum nature of light (i.e., photons) is much more difficult. For example, while well-known phenomena such as the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering strongly suggest the existence of photons, they are not definitive proof of their existence. Here we present an experiment, suitable for an undergraduate laboratory, that unequivocally demonstrates the quantum nature of light. Spontaneously downconverted light is incident on a beamsplitter and the outputs are monitored with single-photon counting detectors. We observe a near absence of coincidence counts between the two detectorsâa result inconsistent with a classical wave model of light, but consistent with a quantum description in which individual photons are incident on the beamsplitter. More explicitly, we measured the degree of second-order coherence between the outputs to be g(2)(0) = 0.0177±0.0026, which violates the classical inequality g(2)(0)>=1 by 377 standard deviations.

Beck, Mark

2009-05-20

113

Oxygen Uptake by a Cobalt(II) Complex: An Undergraduate Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental procedure is described for studying oxygen uptake by a transition metal. This procedure is designed for use with undergraduates and may be used in organic or biochemistry laboratories. Diagrams of the apparatus are included. (MR)

Appleton, Trevor G.

1977-01-01

114

Appeal Process for Appeals on Academic Standing for Undergraduate Medicine, Undergraduate Medical Laboratory Sciences and  

E-print Network

- 1 - Appeal Process for Appeals on Academic Standing for Undergraduate Medicine, Undergraduate the appeal process for appeals on Academic Standing for students in undergraduate medicine; undergraduate to decide student appeals under this policy in a timely manner. 1. Initiating an Appeal 1.1. All appeals

Michelson, David G.

115

Status of Undergraduate Pharmacology Laboratories in Colleges of Pharmacy in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

U.S. colleges of pharmacy were surveyed in 1976 to determine whether a trend exists in continuing, discontinuing, or restructuring laboratory time in pharmaceutical education. Data regarding core undergraduate pharmacology courses, undergraduate pharmacology laboratory status, and pharmacology faculty are presented. (LBH)

Katz, Norman L.; And Others

1978-01-01

116

Microcomputer Applications in Biochemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A lecture/workshop course for teaching microcomputer applications in biochemistry has been developed. It is aimed at teaching undergraduate chemistry and biochemistry students with the appreciation and skill for using microcomputer to solve biochemical problems. It can be used either as complementary teaching material for general biochemistry or as an independent course offering. The course is organized into modules that use application programs of selected commercial software and freeware from the Internet. The implementation of lectures and workshop topics is described.

Tsai, C. Stan

2000-02-01

117

Investigation of Model Cell Membranes with Raman Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New developments that extend the usefulness of Raman spectroscopy for the investigation of biological systems are described. One of these methods, excitation with a near-infrared laser at 1064 nm and detection with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, is applied to the investigation of temperature profiles of dispersions of phospholipids in water. These dispersions are models of biomembranes. This experiment for the undergraduate biochemisty laboratory gives students experience applying vibrational spectroscopy to the investigation of the molecular properties of biomembranes. The basis of the Raman effect is reviewed.

Craig, Norman C.; Fuchsman, William H.; Lacuesta, Nanette N.

2003-11-01

118

Experiments at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory for the undergraduate physics curriculum  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are being developed at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory to offer advanced undergraduate physics students laboratory experiences in the atmosphere of a frontier accelerator facility. These experiments differ from projects done by Undergraduate Research Assistants in that they are designed specifically for integration into the undergraduate curriculum as part of a structured laboratory course. The immediate goal of the program is to develop four accelerator-based experiments for use in the undergraduate Advanced Laboratory course at Duke University. Two newly developed experiments, Carbon-Carbon Mott Scattering and Lifetime Measurements of an Auger Emitter, will be described. In addition, the logistics of conducting undergraduate laboratory course work in an active research facility will be discussed.

Howell, C. R. [Department of Physics, Duke University and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

1999-06-10

119

Experiments at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory for the undergraduate physics curriculum  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are being developed at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory to offer advanced undergraduate physics students laboratory experiences in the atmosphere of a frontier accelerator facility. These experiments differ from projects done by Undergraduate Research Assistants in that they are designed specifically for integration into the undergraduate curriculum as part of a structured laboratory course. The immediate goal of the program is to develop four accelerator-based experiments for use in the undergraduate Advanced Laboratory course at Duke University. Two newly developed experiments, {ital Carbon-Carbon Mott Scattering} and {ital Lifetime Measurements of an Auger Emitter}, will be described. In addition, the logistics of conducting undergraduate laboratory course work in an active research facility will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

1999-06-01

120

College of Medicine BCH Biochemistry  

E-print Network

College of Medicine BCH Biochemistry KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 BCH 395 INDEPENDENT WORK IN BIOCHEMISTRY. (3 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOCHEMISTRY. (3) Descriptive chemistry of amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids

MacAdam, Keith

121

Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine: national recommendations for venous blood sampling  

PubMed Central

Phlebotomy is one of the most complex medical procedures in the diagnosis, management and treatment of patients in healthcare. Since laboratory test results are the basis for a large proportion (60–80%) of medical decisions, any error in the phlebotomy process could have serious consequences. In order to minimize the possibility of errors, phlebotomy procedures should be standardised, well-documented and written instructions should be available at every workstation. Croatia is one of the few European countries that have national guidelines for phlebotomy, besides the universally used CLSI (Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute) H3-A6 Procedures for the Collection of Diagnostic Blood Specimens by Venipuncture; approved Standard-Sixth Edition (CLSI, 2007) and WHO (World Health Organization) guidelines on drawing blood: best practices in phlebotomy (WHO, 2010). However, the growing body of evidence in importance of preanalytical phase management resulted in a need for evidence based revision and expansion of existing recommendations. The Croatian Society for Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase issued this recommendation. This document is based on the CLSI guideline H3-A6, with significant differences and additional information. PMID:24266294

Nikolac, Nora; Šupak-Smol?i?, Vesna; Šimundi?, Ana-Maria; ?elap, Ivana

2013-01-01

122

Biochemistry Major Research Report Updated February 2014  

E-print Network

Biochemistry Major Research Report Updated February 2014 Biochemistry majors who use their year, hard copy of the report should be turned in to the mailbox for Ken Prehoda (Biochemistry Division Spokesperson) at the UO Chemsitry and Biochemistry office. Students for whom their undergraduate research

Cina, Jeff

123

Session 1626 Undergraduate Design Projects in a Laboratory for Real-Time Signal  

E-print Network

Session 1626 Undergraduate Design Projects in a Laboratory for Real-Time Signal Processing for undergraduate student design projects. Parameters are varied easily in both the simulation and the real-time interface provides an integrated environment for simulation and real-time implementation of signal

Kozick, Richard J.

124

Undergraduate Research Opportunity The Upper Ocean Dynamics Laboratory has an opening for an energetic and bright  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Research Opportunity The Upper Ocean Dynamics Laboratory has an opening in hurricane intensity forecasting; in-situ ocean-atmosphere profilers deployed from research aircraft for an energetic and bright undergraduate student who can assist a dynamic research group in processing

Miami, University of

125

Biochemistry for dietetic students: course content and format.  

PubMed

This article presents the results of a survey of the 251 undergraduate dietetic programs for course content and level of the biochemistry course most frequently used to satisfy competencies in biochemistry under Plan IV of the ADA in 1979-80. It showed that a common core of information was stressed by all biochemistry instructors, but there was great variability in content and level of material covered and the textbook chosen, depending on whether the biochemistry course was offered to dietetic majors only, in classes with other nonchemistry majors, or in classes with chemistry majors. Variability was also seen in the time allotted for biochemistry--39 to 280 hours (total lecture and required laboratory hours); laboratory requirements--only 71%; and departmental affiliation of the instructor--17 different departments, primarily of chemistry (80%), biology (8%), and home economics (4%). Topics given greatest emphasis were descriptive ones, such as definitions, simple structures, and reactions of intermediary metabolism in general terms. Topics given least emphasis were those involving mechanistic and quantitative biochemistry, such as respiratory quotient (RQ), enzyme kinetics, calculations of energy from fat and carbohydrates, and specific structures of vitamins, ketones, and metabolic intermediates. The lack of communication between biochemistry and nutrition instructors and the great differences in the preparation of dietetic majors in biochemistry are sources of concern. PMID:6501757

Sirota, L H

1984-12-01

126

Chemical Analysis of Soils: An Environmental Chemistry Laboratory for Undergraduate Science Majors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a laboratory exercise for undergraduate science students in which they evaluate soil samples for various parameters related to suitability for crop production and capability for retention of contaminants. (Contains 18 references.) (WRM)

Willey, Joan D.; Avery, G. Brooks, Jr.; Manock, John J.; Skrabal, Stephen A.; Stehman, Charles F.

1999-01-01

127

The Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectrum of Methyl 7-Cycloheptatrienylacetate: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment designed to give the senior chemistry student an opportunity to apply several synthetic and purification techniques as well as possibilities for the application of NMR spectroscopy. (CS)

Jurch, G. R., Jr.; And Others

1980-01-01

128

Screening for Saponins Using the Blood Hemolysis Test. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment for undergraduate chemistry laboratories involving a chemical found in plants and some sea animals. Discusses collection and identification of material, a hemolysis test, preparation of blood-coated agar plates, and application of samples. (CW)

Sotheeswaran, Subramaniam

1988-01-01

129

Development of sensorial experiments and their implementation into undergraduate laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Visualization" of chemical phenomena often has been limited in the teaching laboratories to the sense of sight. We have developed chemistry experiments that rely on senses other than eyesight to investigate chemical concepts, make quantitative determinations, and familiarize students with chemical techniques traditionally designed using only eyesight. Multi-sensory learning can benefit all students by actively engaging them in learning through stimulation or an alternative way of experiencing a concept or ideas. Perception of events or concepts usually depends on the information from the different sensory systems combined. The use of multi-sensory learning can take advantage of all the senses to reinforce learning as each sense builds toward a more complete experience of scientific data. Research has shown that multi-sensory representations of scientific phenomena is a valuable tool for enhancing understanding of chemistry as well as displacing misconceptions through experience. Multi-sensory experiences have also been shown to enrich memory performance. There are few experiments published which utilize multiple senses in the teaching laboratory. The sensorial experiments chosen were conceptually similar to experiments currently performed in undergraduate laboratories; however students collect different types of data using multi-sensory observations. The experiments themselves were developed by using chemicals that would provide different sensory changes or capitalizing on sensory observations that were typically overlooked or ignored and obtain similar and precise results as in traditional experiments. Minimizing hazards and using safe practices are especially essential in these experiments as students utilize senses traditionally not allowed to be used in the laboratories. These sensorial experiments utilize typical equipment found in the teaching laboratories as well as inexpensive chemicals in order to aid implementation. All experiments are rigorously tested for accuracy and all chemicals examined for safety prior to implementation. The pedagogical objectives were established of to provide the ability to develop and stimulate students' conceptual understanding. The educational assessments of these experiments are are fashioned using the framework chosen (Marzano and Kendall). All the experiments are designed as collaborative, inquiry-based experiments in aims of enhancing the students understanding of the subject and promote critical thinking skills. These experiments use an investigative approach rather than verification methods. Terminology and misconceptions of the experiment were evaluated to prevent misunderstanding or confusion during the experiment. Interventions to address these misconceptions and learning problems associated with the experiment were developed. We have developed the Learning Lab Report, LLR, as an alternative model for the traditional laboratory reports, with the goal of transforming the traditional reports into something more useful for both students and instructors. The educational strategies are employed to develop this format in order to promote students to think critically about the concepts and take an active involvement in learning. From the results of the LLR, all experiments were reviewed and re-written to address any learning problems. The sensorial experiments study several topics usually covered in the first 2 years of the chemistry curriculum (general and organic chemistry courses). The experiments implemented, organic qualitative analysis, esterification kinetics, Le Chatelier equilibrium, thermometric titrations and ASA kinetics, worked effectively as students were able to draw correct conclusions about the concepts from the data obtained. An olfactory titration using the smell of the rutabaga vegetable has been developed and thoroughly tested. The LLR was utilized with the equilibrium, titration and acetyl salicylic acid experiments. The details of the development, implementation of these sensorial experiments and the LLR and student results are discussed.

Bromfield Lee, Deborah Christina

130

A Laboratory Course for Teaching Laboratory Techniques, Experimental Design, Statistical Analysis, and Peer Review Process to Undergraduate Science Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a 13-week laboratory course called Human Toxicology taught at the University of Otago, New Zealand. This course used a guided inquiry based laboratory coupled with formative assessment and collaborative learning to develop in undergraduate students the skills of problem solving/critical thinking, data interpretation and…

Gliddon, C. M.; Rosengren, R. J.

2012-01-01

131

DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

2006-01-01

132

An inquiry-based biochemistry laboratory structure emphasizing competency in the scientific process: a guided approach with an electronic notebook format.  

PubMed

The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students through their laboratory work at a steady pace that encourages them to focus on quality observations, careful data collection and thought processes surrounding the chemistry involved. It motivates students to work in a collaborative manner with frequent opportunities for feedback, reflection, and modification of their ideas. Each laboratory activity has four stages to keep the students' efforts on track: pre-lab work, an in-lab discussion, in-lab work, and a post-lab assignment. Students are guided at each stage by an instructor created template that directs their learning while giving them the opportunity and flexibility to explore new information, ideas, and questions. These templates are easily transferred into an electronic journal (termed the E-notebook) and form the basic structural framework of the final lab reports the students submit electronically, via a learning management system. The guided-inquiry based approach presented here uses a single laboratory activity for undergraduate Introductory Biochemistry as an example. After implementation of this guided learning approach student surveys reported a higher level of course satisfaction and there was a statistically significant improvement in the quality of the student work. Therefore we firmly believe the described format to be highly effective in promoting student learning and engagement. PMID:24376181

L Hall, Mona; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

2014-01-01

133

4,5-Diphenyl-1-methylimidazole: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information and procedures used are provided for the synthesis of 4,5-diphenyl-methylimidazole. This experiment on the chemistry of heterocycles is ideally suited for beginning undergraduate organic chemistry students. (JN)

Anastas, Paul T.; And Others

1985-01-01

134

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement, 2013 Course: Biochemistry 301, Biochemistry Laboratory Number of Positions: It is anticipated the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of B

Strynadka, Natalie

135

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 301, Biochemistry Laboratory Number of Positions: It is anticipated the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of B

Strynadka, Natalie

136

Planning an Objective and Need Based Curriculum: The Logistics with Reference to the Undergraduate Medical Education in Biochemistry  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The medical education is recently being transformed into several domains in order to adapt to the need and the value based academics which is required for the quality doctors who serve the community. Presently, the biochemistry curricula for the graduate students of medicine have been questioned by as many experts, because of their multiple lacunae. In this review, we would like to highlight the scenario which is related to the existing biochemistry curricula for graduate medical students, which have been followed in several medical schools and universities and we also hope to share our ideas for implementing objective and pragmatic curricula. Evidence based research, wherein the articles which are related to innovative teaching-learning tools are collected and the pros and cons which are related to the different methods analyzed in biochemistry point of view. Conclusion: Rapid changes in the content of the curriculum may not be required, but a gradual introduction of the novel approach and the methods of teaching biochemistry can be adopted into the curriculum. PMID:23634431

Ramasamy, Ramesh; Gopal, Niranjan; Srinivasan, A R; Murugaiyan, Sathish Babu

2013-01-01

137

A Coastal Environment Field and Laboratory Activity for an Undergraduate Geomorphology Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A field and laboratory exercise for an undergraduate geomorphology class is described that focuses on the beach. The project requires one day of fieldwork and two laboratory sessions. In the field, students measure water surface fluctuations (waves) with a pressure sensor, survey beach profiles, collect sediment samples, and observe the beach…

Ellis, Jean T.; Rindfleisch, Paul R.

2006-01-01

138

An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment in Bioinorganic Chemistry: Ligation States of Myoglobin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there are numerous inorganic model systems that are readily presented as undergraduate laboratory experiments in bioinorganic chemistry, there are few examples that explore the inorganic chemistry of actual biological molecules. We present a laboratory experiment using the oxygen-binding protein myoglobin that can be easily incorporated…

Bailey, James A.

2011-01-01

139

Development of Hands-On CFD Educational Interface for Undergraduate Engineering Courses and Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development described of an educational interface for hands-on student experience with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for undergraduate engineering courses and laboratories. Project part of a three-year National Science Foundation sponsored Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement - Educational Materials Development project with faculty partners from colleges of engineering at Iowa, Iowa State, Cornell and Howard universities along with industrial (commercial CFD

Fred Stern; Tao Xing; Don Yarbrough; Alric Rothmayer; Ganesh Rajagopalan; Prakash Otta; David Caughey; Rajesh Bhaskaran; Sonya Smith; Barbara Hutchings; Shane Moeykens

2004-01-01

140

A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

2014-01-01

141

Green Chemistry Decision-Making in an Upper-Level Undergraduate Organic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A self-directed independent synthesis experiment was developed for a third-year undergraduate organic laboratory. Students were provided with the CAS numbers of starting and target compounds and devised a synthetic plan to be executed over two 4.5 h laboratory periods. They consulted the primary literature in order to develop and carry out an…

Edgar, Landon J. G.; Koroluk, Katherine J.; Golmakani, Mehrnaz; Dicks, Andrew P.

2014-01-01

142

A Survey of the Practices, Procedures, and Techniques in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Teaching Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey was conducted of four-year institutions that teach undergraduate organic chemistry laboratories in the United States. The data include results from over 130 schools, describes the current practices at these institutions, and discusses the statistical results such as the scale of the laboratories performed, the chemical techniques applied,…

Martin, Christopher B.; Schmidt, Monica; Soniat, Michael

2011-01-01

143

Problem based learning via open ended projects in Carnegie Mellon University's Chemical Engineering undergraduate laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following an extensive physical renovation of our undergraduate Chemical Engineering laboratory, revisions in the philosophy and practice of the laboratory courses were made. We sought to add flexibility and variety to the experiments that can be performed in our lab space while using space more efficiently. Further, problem-based learning (PBL) methods were applied to experiments so students could hone skills

Matt Cline; Gary J. Powers

1997-01-01

144

Biochemistry MSci (Hons) in Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Biochemistry Essentials Courses MSci (Hons) in Biochemistry MSci (Hons) in Biochemistry (research placement) BSc (Hons) in Biochemistry BSc (Hons) in Biochemistry (with an industrial placement year information, refer to page 136-138) Typical A level offer for the MSci in Biochemistry (research placement

Sussex, University of

145

Optical Sensors for Manual and Automatic Titration in Undergraduate Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The classic undergraduate titration analysis is upgraded using instrumental detection of end point with color indicators. Several color sensors (CCD-based spectrophotometer, video camera with RGB digitalization, photodiode with appropriate filters) were tested in order to replace the visual indication of the end point with different indicators. The developed procedures show adequate characteristics such as a short titration time and accuracy

Alexander Y. Nazarenko

2010-01-01

146

Enhancing Undergraduate Agro-Ecological Laboratory Employment through Experiential Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We piloted an educational model, the Sustainable Agriculture Scholars Program, linking research in organic agriculture to experiential learning activities for summer undergraduate employees in 2007 and 2008. Our objectives were to: (1) further student understanding of sustainable agriculture research, (2) increase student interest in sustainable…

Grossman, J. M.; Patel, M.; Drinkwater, L. E.

2010-01-01

147

Integrated Laboratories: Laying the Foundation for Undergraduate Research Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interest in undergraduate student research has grown in response to initiatives from various professional societies and educational organizations. Participation in research changes student attitudes towards courses as they realize the utility and relevance of what they are learning. At the U.S. Naval Academy, the chemistry majors' curriculum was…

Dillner, Debra K.; Ferrante, Robert F.; Fitzgerald, Jeffrey P.; Schroeder, Maria J.

2011-01-01

148

A Project-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Promoting the Understanding and Uses of Fluorescence Spectroscopy in the Study of Biomolecular Structures and Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory project for a first semester biochemistry course is described, which integrates the traditional classroom study of the structure and function of biomolecules with the laboratory study of these molecules using fluorescence spectroscopy. Students are assigned a specific question addressing the stability/function of lipids, proteins, or…

Briese, Nicholas; Jakubowsk, Henry V.

2007-01-01

149

Preparative Protein Production from Inclusion Bodies and Crystallization: A Seven-Week Biochemistry Sequence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We describe how to produce and purify proteins from "Escherichia coli" inclusion bodies by adapting versatile, preparative-scale techniques to the undergraduate laboratory schedule. This 7-week sequence of experiments fits into an annual cycle of research activity in biochemistry courses. Recombinant proteins are expressed as inclusion bodies,…

Peterson, Megan J.; Snyder, W. Kalani; Westerman, Shelley; McFarland, Benjamin J.

2011-01-01

150

ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

2008-01-01

151

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-print Network

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry Department Head.S. in Chemistry Chemistry (Professional) Option Biochemistry Option Teaching Option #12;Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Undergraduate Assessment Plan Assessment Contact Dr. Martin Teintze, Chair Undergraduate Program

Dyer, Bill

152

BrighamYoungUniversitySummerInternships DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-print Network

BrighamYoungUniversitySummerInternships DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY EIGHT WEEK SUMMER UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH INTERNSHIPS The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry programs. Summer Term 2013: June 24 through August 12 Requirements: Registered chemistry or biochemistry

Seamons, Kent E.

153

BrighamYoungUniversitySummerInternships DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-print Network

BrighamYoungUniversitySummerInternships DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY EIGHT WEEK SUMMER UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH INTERNSHIPS The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry programs. Summer Term 2012: June 18 through August 10 Requirements: Registered chemistry or biochemistry

Seamons, Kent E.

154

Validating the Collision-Dominated Child-Langmuir Law for a DC Discharge Cathode Sheath in an Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we propose a simple method of observing the collision-dominated Child-Langmuir law in the course of an undergraduate laboratory work devoted to studying the properties of gas discharges. To this end we employ the dc gas discharge whose properties are studied in sufficient detail. The undergraduate laboratory work itself is reduced…

Lisovskiy, V.; Yegorenkov, V.

2009-01-01

155

A Capstone Experimental Learning Exercise for Undergraduate Physiology Laboratory Courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Description of a physiology laboratory course with a learning opportunity designed to extend the individual lessons performed in the laboratory course with self-directed learning through the contextual application of information in a clinical setting

PhD Carissa M. Krane (University of Dayton Department of Biology)

2005-12-01

156

A Modern Compressible Flow Laboratory Experience for Undergraduates  

E-print Network

measurements course is then followed consecutively by an aero-structures and an aerodynamics laboratory will have taken an incompressible aerodynamics course. They will be enrolled in the compressible aerodynamics course concurrently with the aerodynamics laboratory. Thus, a compressible laboratory experience

Texas at Arlington, University of

157

Structural Studies of Phycobiliproteins from Spirulina: Combining Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, and Molecular Modeling in an Undergraduate Biochemistry Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Molecular modeling provides a powerful mechanism for students to connect molecular-level structural changes with macroscopically observable properties. We describe an experiment that integrates spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and molecular modeling into a single activity examining structural changes in phycobiliproteins upon denaturation with urea. Phycobiliproteins contain a covalently attached chromophore, phycocyanobilin, which is constrained in a planar conformation by the folded protein. Upon denaturation of the protein, the chromophore undergoes a conformational change, leading to a significant alteration of the absorption spectrum. By measuring the absorbance at 625 nm as a function of urea concentration, the free energy of unfolding can be determined. Students determine the dihedral angles in the chromophore and map the contacts between protein and chromophore using Protein Explorer, a structure visualization program freely available on the Internet. The change in absorption wavelength can be related to the difference between the LUMO and HOMO energies, obtained using PC Spartan Pro, for the chromophore in the folded and unfolded phycobiliprotein. This experiment could be used in a physical chemistry class in a curriculum that integrates biochemistry throughout the course work as well as in a traditional biochemistry course.

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Taylor, Ann T. S.; Feller, Scott E.

2002-12-01

158

Undergraduate Introductory Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory Course: Interdisciplinary Group Projects in Phytoremediation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The laboratory course around the phytoremediation is designed to develop both individual skills and promote cooperative learning while starting students work on projects in a specific area of environmental chemistry and analysis. Many research-active undergraduate institutions have developed courses, which are interdisciplinary in nature that…

Van Engelen, Debra L.; Suljak, Steven W.; Hall, J. Patrick; Holmes, Bert E.

2007-01-01

159

An Advanced Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Exploring NIR Spectroscopy and Chemometrics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An advanced undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment to study the advantages and hazards of the coupling of NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics is described. The combination is commonly used for analysis and process control of various ingredients used in agriculture, petroleum and food products.

Wanke, Randall; Stauffer, Jennifer

2007-01-01

160

The Impact of Collaborative Groups versus Individuals in Undergraduate Inquiry-Based Astronomy Laboratory Learning Exercises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the long-standing general undergraduate education requirements common to many colleges and universities is a science course with a laboratory experience component. One of the objectives frequently included in the description of most of these courses is that a student will understand the nature and processes of scientific inquiry. However,…

Sibbernsen, Kendra J.

2010-01-01

161

Gunshot Residue Analysis in the Undergraduate Laboratory Using Toy Cap Guns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors developed an experiment for the undergraduate analytical or forensic chemistry laboratory in which gunshot residues (GSRs) produced from toy cap guns are analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Alternatively, the experiment is readily adaptable to any emission spectroscopy technique. This project allows students to investigate the development of a forensic method while addressing proper sampling techniques used in

Christopher R. Dockery; Julie Turner; Matthew B. Rosenberg; Kimberly Kammerdiener; Susan W. Mungai

2010-01-01

162

A Measure of the Effectiveness of Incorporating 3D Human Anatomy into an Online Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a study designed to determine the effectiveness of implementing three-dimensional (3D) stereo images of a human skull in an undergraduate human anatomy online laboratory were gathered and analysed. Mental model theory and its applications to 3D relationships are discussed along with the research results. Quantitative results on 62 pairs…

Hilbelink, Amy J.

2009-01-01

163

Simple & Rapid Generation of Complex DNA Profiles for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiles can be generated by a variety of techniques incorporating different types of DNA markers. Simple methods are commonly utilized in the undergraduate laboratory, but with certain drawbacks. In this article, the author presents an advancement of the "Alu" dimorphism technique involving two tetraplex polymerase…

Kass, David H.

2007-01-01

164

Microfluidic Gel Electrophoresis in the Undergraduate Laboratory Applied to Food Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A microfluidics-based laboratory experiment for the analysis of DNA fragments in an analytical undergraduate course is presented. The experiment is set within the context of food species identification via amplified DNA fragments. The students are provided with berry samples from which they extract DNA and perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR)…

Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Bhattacharya, Sanchari; Ros, Alexandra

2012-01-01

165

Glucose Transport in Cultured Animal Cells: An Exercise for the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Membrane transport is a fundamental concept that undergraduate students of cell biology understand better with laboratory experience. Formal teaching exercises commonly used to illustrate this concept are unbiological, qualitative, or intricate and time consuming to prepare. We have developed an exercise that uses uptake of radiolabeled nutrient…

Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

2002-01-01

166

Testing Plastic Deformations of Materials in the Introductory Undergraduate Mechanics Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for…

Romo-Kroger, C. M.

2012-01-01

167

An Integrated Visualization and Basic Molecular Modeling Laboratory for First-Year Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 3D model visualization and basic molecular modeling laboratory suitable for first-year undergraduates studying introductory medicinal chemistry is presented. The 2 h practical is embedded within a series of lectures on drug design, target-drug interactions, enzymes, receptors, nucleic acids, and basic pharmacokinetics. Serving as a teaching aid…

Hayes, Joseph M.

2014-01-01

168

Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: XCVIII. Experiments Involving Thermal Methods of Analysis for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains some experiments involving thermal methods of analysis for undergraduate chemistry laboratories. Some experiments are: (1) the determination of the density and degree of crystallinity of a polymer; and (2) the determination of the specific heat of a nonvolatile compound. (HM)

Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

1978-01-01

169

Thermodynamics of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) Micellization: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An undergraduate laboratory experiment is presented that allows a thermodynamic characterization of micelle formation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solutions. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the degree of micelle ionization (alpha) are obtained at different temperatures by conductimetry. The molar standard free energy…

Marcolongo, Juan P.; Mirenda, Martin

2011-01-01

170

Computation of Chemical Shifts for Paramagnetic Molecules: A Laboratory Experiment for the Undergraduate Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A computational experiment investigating the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of molecules with unpaired electrons has been developed and implemented. This experiment is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory course in computational, physical, or inorganic chemistry. The…

Pritchard, Benjamin P.; Simpson, Scott; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

2014-01-01

171

Computer Based Learning in an Undergraduate Physics Laboratory: Interfacing and Instrument Control Using Matlab  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we describe the recent changes to the curriculum of the second year practical laboratory course in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Nottingham. In particular, we describe how Matlab has been implemented as a teaching tool and discuss both its pedagogical advantages and disadvantages in teaching undergraduate

Sharp, J. S.; Glover, P. M.; Moseley, W.

2007-01-01

172

Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

2013-01-01

173

High-Performance Liquid Chromatography in the Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the assembly of a simple, low-cost, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system and its use in the undergraduate chemical engineering laboratory course to perform simple experiments. By interpreting the results from these experiments students are able to gain significant experience in the general method of…

Frey, Douglas D.; Guo, Hui; Karnik, Nikhila

2013-01-01

174

Borohydride Reduction of Estrone: Demonstration of Diastereoselectivity in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This experiment presents a guided-inquiry approach to the demonstration of diastereoselectivity in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Chiral hindered ketones such as estrone, undergo facile reduction with sodium borohydride in a highly diastereoselective manner. The diastereomeric estradiols produced in the reaction can be analyzed and…

Aditya, Animesh; Nichols, David E.; Loudon, G. Marc

2008-01-01

175

Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

2012-01-01

176

The Performance of Taiwan's Undergraduates in Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to investigate the students' learning outcomes in Organic Chemistry Laboratory, a performance-based assessment was developed and implemented to a group of 222 chemistry-majored sophomores from a research university in Taiwan. A multi-step organic synthesis experiment was chosen, and the basic organic manipulative skills, such as reflux, distillation, extraction, filtration, and recrystallization were incorporated in the laboratory activities. According

Jui-Lin She; Yeun-Min Tsai; Mei-Hung Chiu; Hui-Jung Chen

177

What Are Undergraduates Doing at Biological Field Stations and Marine Laboratories?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Biological field stations and marine laboratories (FSMLs) serve as places to study the natural environment in a variety of ways, from the level of the molecule to the globe. Undergraduate opportunities at FSMLs reflect the diversity of study optionsâÂÂformal courses, research and service internships, and field-trip experiencesâÂÂand students are responding to those opportunities: More than half of the FSMLs that responded to an informal survey indicated an increase in their undergraduate enrollment in the past 10 years. Many programs are residential in nature, which facilitates the development of a community of scholars in which undergraduates can interact not just with their peers but also with graduate students, research assistants, postdoctoral fellows, and resident and visiting faculty. With respect to undergraduates, challenges for FSMLs include maintaining relevance in curricular offerings, attracting rigorous and well-trained instructors, providing adequate numbers of mentors for research experiences, and providing funding to assist undergraduates who want to study at a FSML.

Janet Hodder (University of Oregon;Institute of Marine Biology)

2009-09-01

178

AFHRL/FT [Air Force Human Resources Laboratory/Flight Training] Capabilities in Undergraduate Pilot Training Simulation Research: Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document presents a summary description of the Air Force Human Resource Laboratory's Flying Training Division (AFHRL/FT) research capabilities for undergraduate pilot training. One of the research devices investigated is the Advanced Simulator for Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT). The equipment includes the ASUPT, the instrumented T-37…

Matheny, W. G.; And Others

179

Two Crystallographic Laboratory and Computational Exercises for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two introductory exercises designed to teach the fundamental ideas and methods of crystallography, and to convey some important features of inorganic and organic crystal structures to students in an advanced laboratory course. Exercises include "The Crystal Structure of NiO" and "The Crystal Structure of Beta-Fumaric Acid." (CW)

Lessinger, Leslie

1988-01-01

180

Glycosidation of Methanol with Ribose: An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exercise provides students hands-on experience with the topics of glycosidation, hemiacetal and acetal formation, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ([superscript 1]H NMR) spectroscopy, and kinetic and thermodynamic product formation. In this laboratory experiment, the methyl acetal of ribose is synthesized, and the kinetic and thermodynamic…

Simon, Erin; Cook, Katie; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Stripe, Wayne; Bruch, Martha; Bendinskas, Kestutis

2010-01-01

181

Development of Sensorial Experiments and Their Implementation into Undergraduate Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Visualization" of chemical phenomena often has been limited in the teaching laboratories to the sense of sight. We have developed chemistry experiments that rely on senses other than eyesight to investigate chemical concepts, make quantitative determinations, and familiarize students with chemical techniques traditionally designed using only…

Bromfield Lee, Deborah Christina

2009-01-01

182

An Enzyme Kinetics Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment using [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy to observe the kinetics of the acylase 1-catalyzed hydrolysis of "N"-acetyl-DL-methionine has been developed for the organic laboratory. The L-enantiomer of the reactant is hydrolyzed completely in less than 2 h, and [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopic data from a single sample can be worked up…

Olsen, Robert J.; Olsen, Julie A.; Giles, Greta A.

2010-01-01

183

Vectors and Fomites: An Investigative Laboratory for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory model system for introductory microbiology students that involves hands-on studies of bacteria vectored in soil nematodes. Describes a series of experiments designed to demonstrate vector-fomite transmission, bacterial survival, and disinfectant activity. Introduces the concept of genetically engineered microorganisms and the…

Adamo, Joseph A.; Gealt, Michael A.

1996-01-01

184

Bean Beetles A Model Organism for Undergraduate Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Each classroom-tested experiment (in the Laboratory Activities part of the website), has a student handout, instructor notes, and sample data. All these materials may be viewed on the website and are downloadable (MS word and pdf formats). Additional downloadable materials include graphs of sample data (PowerPoint slides), and images for identifying the sexes and recognizing eggs on a bean (PowerPoint slides).

Lawrence S. Blumer (Morehouse College;); Christopher W. Beck (Emory University;)

2005-05-31

185

Identifying a Protein by MALDI TOF Mass Spectrometry: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) mass spectrometry has become a valuable tool for performing routine biochemical analyses. A common procedure for protein identification involves using tryptic digestion to obtain masses of individual peptides derived from the protein. The masses are compared against an online database, and probability-based scoring systems are used to determine the closest protein matches. This article describes an experiment we have developed for an undergraduate honors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to state-of-the-art mass spectrometric methods. Students are given an overview of the theory and instrumentation associated with MALDI TOF, and gain hands-on experience with Internet tools for protein identification using mass spectral data. The experiment would be suitable for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses as well; appropriate modifications for this purpose are also described.

Counterman, Anne E.; Thompson, Matthew S.; Clemmer, David E.

2003-02-01

186

Developing Computer-Based Laboratory Instruments in a New Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Program—a Summary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the culmination of a two-year project which had two aims: (1) development of computer-based laboratory instruments (CLIs) consisting of LabVIEW virtual- instrument programs coupled with custom external hardware; (2) integration of these CLIs into the undergraduate curriculum. Students were brought into the design process wherever possible, giving them first- hand experience with open-ended design problems. Project TUNA

David M. Beams

187

Isolation and Culture of Bovine Oviductal Epithelial Cells for Use in the Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory and Undergraduate Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Methods for isolation and culture of epithelial cells from bovine oviduct for use in both research and teaching laboratory. Also provides examples of ways that an oviductal cell culture can be incorporated into an undergraduate research program

Amy L. Way (Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania Clearfield Campus)

2006-12-01

188

The Scanning Electron Microscope As An Accelerator For The Undergraduate Advanced Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator for the undergraduate, advanced physics laboratory, the SEM is an excellent substitute for an ion accelerator. Although there are no nuclear physics experiments that can be performed with a typical 30 kV SEM, there is an opportunity for experimental work on accelerator physics, atomic physics, electron-solid interactions, and the basics of modern e-beam lithography.

Peterson, Randolph S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of the South, 735 University Avenue, Sewanee TN 37383 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge MA 01239 (United States); Berggren, Karl K.; Mondol, Mark [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge MA 01239 (United States)

2011-06-01

189

B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated March 2010 Bachelor of Science Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Requirements (BIOC)  

E-print Network

B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated March 2010 Bachelor of Science ­ Biochemistry ­ Organic Chemistry Lab I* CHEM 351; 352 (pre-/co-req) 2 FS Biochemistry (12 credits; all upper-level) CHEM 437 ­ Comprehensive Biochemistry I* CHEM 352 4 F CHEM 437L ­Biochemistry Laboratory* CHEM 300; CHEM

Adali, Tulay

190

Green, Enzymatic Syntheses of Divanillin and Diapocynin for the Organic, Biochemistry, or Advanced General Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Environmentally benign chemistry is an increasingly important topic both in the classroom and the laboratory. In this experiment, students synthesize divanillin from vanillin or diapocynin from apocynin, using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in water. The dimerized products form rapidly at ambient temperature and are isolated by…

Nishimura, Rachel T.; Giammanco, Chiara H.; Vosburg, David A.

2010-01-01

191

ELISA and GC-MS as Teaching Tools in the Undergraduate Environmental Analytical Chemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An undergraduate experiment for the analysis of potential water pollutants is described. Students are exposed to two complementary techniques, ELISA and GC-MS, for the analysis of a water sample containing atrazine, desethylatrazine, and simazine. Atrazine was chosen as the target analyte because of its wide usage in North America and its utility for students to predict environmental degradation products. The water sample is concentrated using solid-phase extraction for GC-MS, or diluted and analyzed using a competitive ELISA test kit for atrazine. The nature of the water sample is such that students generally find that ELISA gives an artificially high value for the concentration of atrazine. Students gain an appreciation for problems associated with measuring pollutants in the aqueous environment: sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and ease of analysis. This undergraduate laboratory provides an opportunity for students to learn several new analysis and sample preparation techniques and to critically evaluate these methods in terms of when they are most useful.

Wilson, Ruth I.; Mathers, Dan T.; Mabury, Scott A.; Jorgensen, Greg M.

2000-12-01

192

Genesis of "Biochemistry: A Problems Approach"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When the author began teaching as a young assistant professor at Caltech in 1966, his assignment was to take over the undergraduate biochemistry course taught for many years by Henry Borsook, who was about to retire. Students dreaded this course. Having delighted in biochemistry during his graduate training at Stanford, he was determined to put…

Wood, William B.

2002-01-01

193

ILIS--An integrated laboratory information system. I. Biochemistry and hematology.  

PubMed

IBM System 34 (central processing unit, 128 kilobytes; fixed disks, 128.4 megabytes) with seven cathode-ray tubes has been used by our clinical laboratories for the last 30 months. All data-entry programs are in a conversational mode, for on-line corrections of possible errors in patient identification and results. Daily reports are removed from the medical records after temporary and permanent cumulative weekly reports are received, which keep a three-month track of the results. The main advantages of the system are: (a) the increasing laboratory work load can be handled with the same staff; (b) the volume of the medical record files on the patients is decreased; (c) an easily retrievable large data base of results is formed for research purposes; (d) faster billing; and (e) the computer system is run without engaging any additional staff. PMID:7055947

Deshpande, S U

1982-02-01

194

The design, enactment, and impact of an undergraduate, inquiry-based, astronomy laboratory learning environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the design, enactment, and impact of an undergraduate, inquiry-based astronomy laboratory learning environment. The professor, Richard, adopted laboratory materials from the Center for Astronomy and Physics Education Research [CAPER] which were described by the group as inquiry-based. Students worked through these laboratory materials under the supervision of teaching assistants [TAs], and Richard led weekly TA meetings to monitor and instruct the TAs on his expectations. This study suggests that Richard was unsure of laboratory materials' learning goals and had received limited guidance on how to use and implement CAPER's materials. TAs also received limited guidance on how to interact with their students while they worked through the laboratory materials. TAs gave introductions during laboratory sessions that were similar to Richard's introductions given during weekly TA meetings. Data from this study suggests that most students were able to easily complete the laboratory materials without the assistance of their TA. When students did ask questions, questions were focused on obtaining the correct answer which TAs normally supplied though direct responses or questioning. This laboratory learning environment was found to have no impact on students' understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry, as measured by VOSI, which contradicts previous research findings associated with the materials. I suggest that professors should be cautious when adopting curriculum materials. Curriculum designers should provide information related to the design of their materials, the learning goals of those materials, sample student responses, and effective implementation strategies.

Stewart, Steven A.

195

Texas Tech University | Whitacre College of Engineering | Box 43103 | Lubbock, Texas 79409-3103 | 806.742.3451| www.coe.ttu.edu Undergraduate Laboratory Renovation Initiative  

E-print Network

as part of their curricular programs. An emphasis on laboratory-based team learning is consistent Telecommunications and RF Laboratory Robotics, Controls & Mechatronics Laboratory Undergraduate Fabrication Facility Engineering and Engineering Technology Computer Labs Department of Industrial Engineering Advanced

Gelfond, Michael

196

Biochemistry Is Biochemistry right for me?  

E-print Network

Biochemistry Is Biochemistry right for me? A keen interest in the biological and chemical sciences or `life sciences' is a good sign that Biochemistry or a Medical Biochemistry degree will be suitable is the difference between Biochemistry and Medical Biochemistry? In the first year of study Biochemistry and Medical

Harman, Neal.A.

197

CHEMISTRY 474/674 STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-print Network

1 CHEMISTRY 474/674 STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY Fall 2013 J. C. Dabrowiak Office: 2-016D.syr.edu The Course: CHE 474/674 covers basic physical chemistry for the undergraduate biochemistry/physical science. Resource Texts. Biochemistry, Berg, J. M., et al. W. H. Freeman and Co., New York, latest edition

Mather, Patrick T.

198

CHEMISTRY 474/674 STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-print Network

1 CHEMISTRY 474/674 STRUCTURAL AND PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY Fall 2012 J. C. Dabrowiak Office: 2-016D.syr.edu The Course: CHE 474/674 covers basic physical chemistry for the undergraduate biochemistry/physical science Texts. Biochemistry, Berg, J. M., Tymoczko, J. L., & Stryer, L., W. H. Freeman and Co., New York, 2006

Mather, Patrick T.

199

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program College of Science and Management  

E-print Network

FACH06-11 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program College of Science and Management Senior, in conjunction with the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program, invites applications for a full-time eight support for undergraduate courses in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major. Duties include

Northern British Columbia, University of

200

UNLV B.S. Biochemistry 2008-2010 Catalog  

E-print Network

UNLV B.S. Biochemistry 2008-2010 Catalog Log-in to your student account at UNLV to access your Chemistry I 3 CHEM472 Biochemistry Laboratory 2 Course CHEM347 Laboratory Techniques of Organic Chemistry I 1 CHEM474 Biochemistry I 3 Requirements CHEM242 Organic Chemistry II 3 CHEM475 Biochemistry II 3

Walker, Lawrence R.

201

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia  

E-print Network

(over) DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia SUMMER/Eight-time: Undergraduate Biochemistry Training and Previous Experience (please see reverse) Degree(s) Obtained (Discipline outline of the University of B.C. Biochemistry 303 course is given below. Please outline all undergraduate

Strynadka, Natalie

202

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia  

E-print Network

(over) DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia SUMMER-time: Undergraduate Biochemistry Training and Previous Experience (please see reverse) Degree(s) Obtained (Discipline outline of the University of B.C. Biochemistry 303 course is given below. Please outline all undergraduate

Strynadka, Natalie

203

So These Numbers Really Mean Something? A Role Playing Scenario-Based Approach to the Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new curricular approach in our undergraduate second-year instrumental analysis laboratory was implemented. Students work collaboratively on scenarios in diverse fields including pharmaceuticals, forensics, gemology, art conservation, and environmental chemistry. Each laboratory section (approximately 12 students) is divided into three groups…

Grannas, Amanda M.; Lagalante, Anthony F.

2010-01-01

204

Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

2010-01-01

205

Chromatin Isolation and DNA Sequence Analysis in Large Undergraduate Laboratory Sections  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A pair of exercises that introduce undergraduate students to basic techniques and concepts of molecular biology and that are appropriate for classes with large enrollments are described. One exercise is a simple laboratory experiment in which chromatin is isolated from chicken liver and is resolved into histone proteins and DNA by ion-exchange chromatography. The other is a series of computer simulations that introduce DNA sequencing, mapping, and sequence analysis to the students. The final step of the simulation is submission of a sequence to a database on the World Wide Web for identification of the protein product of the gene.

Hagerman, Ann E.

1999-10-01

206

Clinical biochemistry laboratory rejection rates due to various types of preanalytical errors  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Preanalytical errors, along the process from the beginning of test requests to the admissions of the specimens to the laboratory, cause the rejection of samples. The aim of this study was to better explain the reasons of rejected samples, regarding to their rates in certain test groups in our laboratory. Materials and methods: This preliminary study was designed on the rejected samples in one-year period, based on the rates and types of inappropriateness. Test requests and blood samples of clinical chemistry, immunoassay, hematology, glycated hemoglobin, coagulation and erythrocyte sedimentation rate test units were evaluated. Types of inappropriateness were evaluated as follows: improperly labelled samples, hemolysed, clotted specimen, insufficient volume of specimen and total request errors. Results: A total of 5,183,582 test requests from 1,035,743 blood collection tubes were considered. The total rejection rate was 0.65 %. The rejection rate of coagulation group was significantly higher (2.28%) than the other test groups (P < 0.001) including insufficient volume of specimen error rate as 1.38%. Rejection rates of hemolysis, clotted specimen and insufficient volume of sample error were found to be 8%, 24% and 34%, respectively. Total request errors, particularly, for unintelligible requests were 32% of the total for inpatients. Conclusions: The errors were especially attributable to unintelligible requests of inappropriate test requests, improperly labelled samples for inpatients and blood drawing errors especially due to insufficient volume of specimens in a coagulation test group. Further studies should be performed after corrective and preventive actions to detect a possible decrease in rejecting samples. PMID:25351356

Atay, Aysenur; Demir, Leyla; Cuhadar, Serap; Saglam, Gulcan; Unal, Hulya; Aksun, Saliha; Arslan, Banu; Ozkan, Asuman; Sutcu, Recep

2014-01-01

207

Affordable Hands-On DNA Sequencing and Genotyping: An Exercise for Teaching DNA Analysis to Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this report, we describe a 5-week laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology and biochemistry students in which students learn to sequence DNA and to genotype their DNA for selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Students use miniaturized DNA sequencing gels that require approximately 8 min to run. The students perform G, A, T, C…

Shah, Kushani; Thomas, Shelby; Stein, Arnold

2013-01-01

208

Immunoprecipitation of Serum Albumin with Protein A-Sepharose: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An exercise has been designed and optimized to acquaint students with the simple yet powerful technique of immunoprecipitation. Protein A-Sepharose (PA-S) is used as a solid-phase precipitant to recover bovine serum albumin (BSA, the antigen) recognized by anti-BSA antibody (Ab). The high degree of binding specificity between antigen and antibody is illustrated by recovery of BSA from a complex mixture of proteins obtained from wheat germ and chicken breast. Various controls are included for a thorough data analysis. The solid phase of Ag/Ab/PA-S is recovered by centrifugation, thoroughly washed, and treated to dissociate the BSA antigen. Samples are examined by discontinuous denaturing gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with Coomassie blue staining. The supernatants, containing proteins that are not precipitated, are also analyzed. Antigenic cross-reactivity, ranging from strong to none, is demonstrated in a second part by using serum albumins from seven different sources. Systems can be set up, shaken, and prepared for electrophoresis in a single lab period with time for laboratory lecture and discussion about antibody structure and function, antibody-based methods in general, and immunoprecipitation in particular.

Bohinski, Robert C.

2000-11-01

209

Biochemistry and metabolism of lake trout: laboratory and field studies on the effects of contaminants  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To evaluate the effects of ambient and higher concentrations of PCB's (Aroclor 1254) and DDE in food and water on fry of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Michigan, I measured several biochemical indicators of stress in exposed and unexposed (control) fry. No differences between treatments were observed in oxygen consumption rates or lactate concentrations of unexercised fry, but apparent differences in specific swimming speed and lactate response in fry that swam to exhaustion suggested that exposed fry had lower stamina. Observed differences between biochemical profiles of 1-day-old sac fry reared from eggs originating from lake trout collected off Saugatuck and those originating from eggs of brood stock at the Marquette (Michigan) hatchery may have been caused by organochlorine contamination or by genetic and dietary differences between the parental stocks. Activity of the enzyme allantoinase was measured in juvenile and adult lake trout as an indicator of sublethal effects of Great Lakes contaminants. The 50% inhibition of allantoinase in vitro occurred at 6.0 mg/L Cu++, 6.7 mg/L Cd++, 34 mg/L Hg++, and 52 mg/L Pb++. Allantoinase was not affected by in vitro exposure to PCB's up to 7 ?g/g, or DDE or DDT up to 10 ?g/g; however, in vivo exposure resulting in 2.6 ?g/g PCB's in the whole fish activated allantoinase slightly (10% significance level). Allantoinase activity was negatively correlated with total length for fish from Lake Michigan but not for fish from Lake Superior or from laboratory stocks. Mercury, PCB's, and DDT, possibly acting in combination with each other and with additional contaminants, may be the cause of the negative correlation of allantoinase activity with size in Lake Michigan lake trout.

Passino, Dora R. May

1981-01-01

210

Activation of Wnt Signaling Using Lithium Chloride: Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises  

PubMed Central

Abstract Zebrafish provide researchers and students alike with an excellent model of vertebrate nervous system development due to a high degree of conserved developmental mechanisms and transparent embryos that develop in synchrony. In these laboratory exercises, undergraduate students explore cell biological concepts while performing hypothesis-driven novel research utilizing methodologies such as immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, image analysis, pharmacology, and basic statistics. In the first block of exercises, students perform anti-acetylated tubulin (anti-AT) immunofluorescence, identify spinal tracts and neuronal subtypes, and perform conventional and confocal microscopy. Building on knowledge acquired in the first block of exercises, during the second block, students subsequently perform pharmacological activation of Wnt signaling through lithium chloride treatments, and assess nervous system integrity through anti-AT immunofluorescence. Students perform various quantitative methods and apply statistics to determine outcomes of Wnt activation. In their final laboratory report, students contextualize their results with foundations of molecular mechanisms of nervous system development. In sum, these exercises offer undergraduate students a model of independent research at the graduate level. PMID:23098089

Ross, Andrew William

2012-01-01

211

Developing Laboratory Facilities for Graduate Research and Undergraduate Studies in Surface Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report current progress and results in an ongoing laboratory development project. This project provides instruments for graduate thesis research in physics and materials science, and training in surface science for advanced undergraduates majoring in the physical sciences and engineering. Two laboratories have been in preparation. One of these labs is now complete, containing an upgraded Phi 560 ESCA/SAMS system for materials surface analysis using Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The other lab is an ultrahigh vacuum system for low energy diffraction and temperature programmed desorption; it is under development, to be completed upon delivery of a differentially pumped sample manipulator that allows for in situ sample heating to 1200 ^oC and cooling to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The success of the project so far is reflected in the fact that the demand for the use of the upgraded Phi 560 system has exceeded expectations. We give brief descriptions of ongoing research and training involving both graduate and undergraduate students, some results obtained to date, and our aspirations for the future.

Durrer, William; Lopez, Jorge

2003-10-01

212

Analysis of the Essential Nutrient Strontium in Marine Aquariums by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Exercise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An undergraduate atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) laboratory experiment is presented involving the analysis of the essential nutrient strontium in a real-life sample, sea water. The quantitative analysis of strontium in sea water is a problem well suited for an undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. Sea water contains numerous components which prevent the direct quantitative determination of strontium. Students learn first hand about the role of interferences in analytical measurements, and about the method of standard addition which is used to minimize these effects. This laboratory exercise also introduces undergraduate students to practical problems associated with AAS. We encourage students as a part of this experiment to collect and analyze marine water samples from local pet shops.

Gilles de Pelichy, Laurent D.; Adam, Carl; Smith, Eugene T.

1997-10-01

213

Computer based learning in an undergraduate physics laboratory: interfacing and instrument control using Matlab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we describe the recent changes to the curriculum of the second year practical laboratory course in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Nottingham. In particular, we describe how Matlab has been implemented as a teaching tool and discuss both its pedagogical advantages and disadvantages in teaching undergraduate students about computer interfacing and instrument control techniques. We also discuss the motivation for converting the interfacing language that is used in the laboratory from LabView to Matlab. We describe an example of a typical experiment the students are required to complete and we conclude by briefly assessing how the recent curriculum changes have affected both student performance and compliance.

Sharp, J. S.; Glover, P. M.; Moseley, W.

2007-05-01

214

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: An Undergraduate Chemical Laboratory Safety Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a two-quarter hour college chemistry course focusing on laboratory safety. Includes lists of topics/assignments, problem sets (toxicology, storage, and energy) and videotapes, films, and slide sets used in the course. (JN)

Nicholls, L. Jewel

1982-01-01

215

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Learning How to Run Safer Undergraduate Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses responsibilities for providing safe experiments and for teaching about safety. Provides lists of references on chemical safety and regulated/potential carcinogens. Also discusses general laboratory safety procedures including waste disposal and recycling of solvents. (JM)

Mohrig, Jerry R.

1983-01-01

216

A Response to "BIO 2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists," from the Perspective of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major Program at Kenyon College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Research Council completed a major study of undergraduate biology education, "BIO 2010-Transforming Undergraduate Education For Future Research Biologists (BIO 2010)," funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Institutes of Health. The "BIO 2010" report recommends that biology pedagogy should use an…

Slonczewski, Joan L.; Marusak, Rosemary

2004-01-01

217

Demand for interdisciplinary laboratories for physiology research by undergraduate students in biosciences and biomedical engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Physiology as a discipline is uniquely positioned to engage undergraduate students in interdisciplinary research in response to the 2006ÃÂ2011 National Science Foundation Strategic Plan call for innovative transformational research, which emphasizes multidisciplinary projects. To prepare undergraduates for careers that cross disciplinary boundaries, students need to practice interdisciplinary communication in academic programs that connect students in diverse disciplines. This report surveys policy documents relevant to this emphasis on interdisciplinary training and suggests a changing role for physiology courses in bioscience and engineering programs. A role for a physiology course is increasingly recommended for engineering programs, but the study of physiology from an engineering perspective might differ from the study of physiology as a basic science. Indeed, physiology laboratory courses provide an arena where biomedical engineering and bioscience students can apply knowledge from both fields while cooperating in multidisciplinary teams under specified technical constraints. Because different problem-solving approaches are used by students of engineering and bioscience, instructional innovations are needed to break down stereotypes between the disciplines and create an educational environment where interdisciplinary teamwork is used to bridge differences.

Kari L Clase (Bindley Bioscience Center-Purdue University Industrial Technology); Patrick W Hein (Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering- Purdue University Basic Medical Sciences)

2008-12-01

218

The Transect Program: Undergraduate Research at Sea and in the Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active participation in independent research that begins with data collection at sea has been shown to significantly increase undergraduate interest toward pursuing a career in ocean science. Thirty-five undergraduate students have recently enrolled in one of four NSF-sponsored Transect Programs at the College of Charleston. Each multi-disciplinary program consisted of an intensive 5-day research cruise, followed by a rigorous semester Oceanographic Research course in which students learned laboratory techniques for analyzing the biological, physical and geological samples collected. Students also conducted individual research, presented their results at both a poster and oral session, and prepared a manuscript following journal guidelines. Students showed significant comprehension of their research results and interest in continuing their research. Student applications to jobs, graduate schools, scholarships and internships have shown greater than 90% acceptance rate. The program's next phase will include expansion to numerous institutions in the southeast and elsewhere, coordinating with coastal and ocean observatory networks while training a new generation of oceanographers.

Sautter, L. R.; Sancho, G.

2005-12-01

219

The ATLAS project: The effects of a constructionist digital laboratory project on undergraduate laboratory performance.  

PubMed

Anatomical education is a dynamic field where developments in the implementation of constructive, situated-learning show promise in improving student achievement. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an individualized, technology heavy project in promoting student performance in a combined anatomy and physiology laboratory course. Mixed-methods research was used to compare two cohorts of anatomy laboratories separated by the adoption of a new laboratory atlas project, which were defined as preceding (PRE) and following the adoption of the Anatomical Teaching and Learning Assessment Study (ATLAS; POST). The ATLAS project required the creation of a student-generated, photographic atlas via acquisition of specimen images taken with tablet technology and digital microscope cameras throughout the semester. Images were transferred to laptops, digitally labeled and photo edited weekly, and compiled into a digital book using Internet publishing freeware for final project submission. An analysis of covariance confirmed that student final examination scores were improved (P < 0.05) following the implementation of the laboratory atlas project (PRE, n = 75; POST, n = 90; means ± SE; 74.9 ± 0.9 versus 78.1 ± 0.8, respectively) after controlling for cumulative student grade point average. Analysis of questionnaires collected (n = 68) from the post group suggested students identified with atlas objectives, appreciated the comprehensive value in final examination preparation, and the constructionism involved, but recommended alterations in assignment logistics and the format of the final version. Constructionist, comprehensive term-projects utilizing student-preferred technologies could be used to improve performance toward student learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 8: 12-20. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:24678042

Shoepe, Todd C; Cavedon, Dana K; Derian, Joseph M; Levy, Celine S; Morales, Amy

2015-01-01

220

Gold Electrodes Modified with Self-Assembled Monolayers for Measuring L-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes an undergraduate electrochemistry laboratory experiment in which the students measure the L-ascorbic acid content of a real sample. Gold electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thioctic acid and cysteamine are prepared to study the effects of surface modification on the electrode reaction of L-ascorbic…

Ito, Takashi; Perera, D. M. Neluni T.; Nagasaka, Shinobu

2008-01-01

221

An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise to Study the Effect of Darkness on Plant Gene Expression Using DNA Microarray  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

DNA microarrays are microscopic arrays on a solid surface, typically a glass slide, on which DNA oligonucleotides are deposited or synthesized in a high-density matrix with a predetermined spatial order. Several types of DNA microarrays have been developed and used for various biological studies. Here, we developed an undergraduate laboratory

Chang, Ming-Mei; Briggs, George M.

2007-01-01

222

The Cyclohexanol Cycle and Synthesis of Nylon 6,6: Green Chemistry in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A one-term synthesis project that incorporates many of the principles of green chemistry is presented for the undergraduate organic laboratory. In this multistep scheme of reactions, students react, recycle, and ultimately convert cyclohexanol to nylon 6,6. The individual reactions in the project employ environmentally friendly methodologies, and…

Dintzner, Matthew R.; Kinzie, Charles R.; Pulkrabek, Kimberly; Arena, Anthony F.

2012-01-01

223

COED Transactions, Vol. XI, No. 12, December 1979. Some Alternate Applications of Microprocessor Trainers in Support of Undergraduate Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ways are described for the use of a microprocessor trainer in undergraduate laboratories. Listed are microcomputer applications that have been used as demonstrations and which provide signals for other experiments which are not related to microprocessors. Information and figures are provided for methods to do the following: direct generation of…

Mitchell, Eugene E., Ed.

224

Validating the Goldstein-Wehner Law for the Stratified Positive Column of DC Discharge in an Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we suggest a simple technique for validating the Goldstein-Wehner law for a stratified positive column of dc glow discharge while studying the properties of gas discharges in an undergraduate laboratory. To accomplish this a simple device with a pre-vacuum mechanical pump, dc source and gas pressure gauge is required. Experiments may…

Lisovskiy, V. A.; Koval, V. A.; Artushenko, E. P.; Yegorenkov, V. D.

2012-01-01

225

Red Seaweed Enzyme-Catalyzed Bromination of Bromophenol Red: An Inquiry-Based Kinetics Laboratory Experiment for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Haloperoxidase enzymes are of interest for basic and applied bioscientists because of their increasing importance in pharmaceutical industry and environmental cleanups. In a guided inquiry-based laboratory experiment for life-science, agricultural science, and health science undergraduates, the bromoperoxidase from a red seaweed was used to…

Jittam, Piyachat; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Promptmas, Chamras; Sriwattanarothai, Namkang; Archavarungson, Nattinee; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

2009-01-01

226

Ab Initio Determinations of Photoelectron Spectra Including Vibronic Features: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present a first-principles determination of the photoelectron spectra of water and hypochlorous acid as a laboratory exercise accessible to students in an undergraduate physical chemistry course. This paper demonstrates the robustness and user-friendliness of software developed for the Franck-Condon factor calculation. While the calculator is…

Lord, Richard L.; Davis, Lisa; Millam, Evan L.; Brown, Eric; Offerman, Chad; Wray, Paul; Green, Susan M. E.

2008-01-01

227

Qualitative Analysis of Herbs by Gas Chromatography\\/Mass Spectrometry (GC\\/MS). An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory Exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

A laboratory exercise to be used in an undergraduate instrumental methods course is presented for the qualitative analysis of interesting real-world herbal extracts. The objective of this experiment is to familiarize students with a modern experimental method gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS).

JEREMY TIPTON; TICIA BARNICKI; EUGENE T. SMITH

1998-01-01

228

Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when…

Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

2011-01-01

229

Fitting It All In: Adapting a Green Chemistry Extraction Experiment for Inclusion in an Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several principles of green chemistry are introduced through this experiment designed for use in the undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. An established experiment of liquid CO2 extraction of D-limonene has been adapted to include a quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. This facilitates drop-in incorporation of an exciting…

Buckley, Heather L.; Beck, Annelise R.; Mulvihill, Martin J.; Douskey, Michelle C.

2013-01-01

230

B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated 09/06 Bachelor of Science Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Requirements (BIOC)  

E-print Network

B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated 09/06 Bachelor of Science Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry (12 credits; all upper-level) CHEM 437 Comprehensive Biochem I* BIOL 100, CHEM 352 4 F CHEM 437L Biochemistry Laboratory* CHEM 352L; 437 (pre- or co-req) 4 FS CHEM 438 Comprehensive Biochem II* CHEM 437 4

Adali, Tulay

231

Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

2005-01-01

232

Transposing from the laboratory to the classroom to generate authentic research experiences for undergraduates.  

PubMed

Large lecture classes and standardized laboratory exercises are characteristic of introductory biology courses. Previous research has found that these courses do not adequately convey the process of scientific research and the excitement of discovery. Here we propose a model that provides beginning biology students with an inquiry-based, active learning laboratory experience. The Dynamic Genome course replicates a modern research laboratory focused on eukaryotic transposable elements where beginning undergraduates learn key genetics concepts, experimental design, and molecular biological skills. Here we report on two key features of the course, a didactic module and the capstone original research project. The module is a modified version of a published experiment where students experience how virtual transposable elements from rice (Oryza sativa) are assayed for function in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. As part of the module, students analyze the phenotypes and genotypes of transgenic plants to determine the requirements for transposition. After mastering the skills and concepts, students participate in an authentic research project where they use computational analysis and PCR to detect transposable element insertion site polymorphism in a panel of diverse maize strains. As a consequence of their engagement in this course, students report large gains in their ability to understand the nature of research and demonstrate that they can apply that knowledge to independent research projects. PMID:23172853

Burnette, James M; Wessler, Susan R

2013-02-01

233

Impact Of Collaborative Groups Versus Individuals In Undergraduate Inquiry-Based Astronomy Laboratory Learning Exercises  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mixed-method quasi-experimental study was designed to determine how 130 undergraduates in an introductory astronomy survey course laboratory changed their understanding of scientific inquiry working as individuals in relative isolation compared to working in small, collaborative learning groups when using specially designed astronomy curricula based on a backwards faded scaffolding approach (Slater, Slater, & Lyons, 2010). The results of this two-group comparison study were determined by examining the change in responses from the pretest to the posttest administration of the Views of Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) survey (Schwartz, Lederman, & Lederman, 2008), the increase in scores on laboratory exercises, and analysis of field notes from the instructor. Analysis suggests that all students increased their understanding of scientific inquiry and astronomy when using the specially designed course materials regardless if the students were working in groups or individually in the learning laboratories. However, qualitative analysis yields further insight that there exists a qualitative difference in the complexity of research questions students working in groups elect to pursue over those students working independently.

Sibbernsen, Kendra J.

2014-12-01

234

Designing Laboratory Exercises for the Undergraduate Molecular Biology/Biochemistry Student: Techniques and Ethical Implications Involved in Personalized Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Personalized medicine refers to medical care that involves genetically screening patients for their likelihood to develop various disorders. Commercial genome screening only involves identifying a consumer's genotype for a few single nucleotide polymorphisms. A phenotype (such as an illness) is greatly influenced by three factors: genes, gene…

Weinlander, Kenneth M.; Hall, David J.

2010-01-01

235

Curriculum modules, software laboratories, and an inexpensive hardware platform for teaching computational methods to undergraduate computer science students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational methods are increasingly important to 21st century research and education; bioinformatics and climate change are just two examples of this trend. In this context computer scientists play an important role, facilitating the development and use of the methods and tools used to support computationally-based approaches. The undergraduate curriculum in computer science is one place where computational tools and methods can be introduced to facilitate the development of appropriately prepared computer scientists. To facilitate the evolution of the pedagogy, this dissertation identifies, develops, and organizes curriculum materials, software laboratories, and the reference design for an inexpensive portable cluster computer, all of which are specifically designed to support the teaching of computational methods to undergraduate computer science students. Keywords. computational science, computational thinking, computer science, undergraduate curriculum.

Peck, Charles Franklin

236

Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry  

PubMed Central

Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for biochemistry was modeled on extensive work related to TCs across a range of disciplines and included faculty workshops and student interviews. Using an iterative process, we prioritized five concepts on which to focus future development of instructional materials. Broadly defined, the concepts are steady state, biochemical pathway dynamics and regulation, the physical basis of interactions, thermodynamics of macromolecular structure formation, and free energy. The working list presented here is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather is meant to identify a subset of TCs for biochemistry for which instructional and assessment tools for undergraduate biochemistry will be developed. PMID:25185234

Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

2014-01-01

237

Identification of threshold concepts for biochemistry.  

PubMed

Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for biochemistry was modeled on extensive work related to TCs across a range of disciplines and included faculty workshops and student interviews. Using an iterative process, we prioritized five concepts on which to focus future development of instructional materials. Broadly defined, the concepts are steady state, biochemical pathway dynamics and regulation, the physical basis of interactions, thermodynamics of macromolecular structure formation, and free energy. The working list presented here is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather is meant to identify a subset of TCs for biochemistry for which instructional and assessment tools for undergraduate biochemistry will be developed. PMID:25185234

Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

2014-01-01

238

Biochemistry Biochemist 6 years  

E-print Network

Biochemistry Biochemist ­ 6 years Objective To train professionals of a high scientific of studies has the following orientations: Vegetal and Ground Biochemistry; Microbiology and Inmunobiology ; Basic Biochemistry, Biotechnology; Clinic Biochemistry; Food Science and Nutrition. Besides, students

Groisman, Pablo

239

Argument-Driven Inquiry: Using the Laboratory to Improve Undergraduates' Science Writing Skills through Meaningful Science Writing, Peer-Review, and Revision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents preliminary evidence supporting the use of peer review in undergraduate science as a means to improve student writing and to alleviate barriers, such as lost class time, by incorporation of the peer-review process into the laboratory component of the course. The study was conducted in a single section of an undergraduate

Walker, Joi Phelps; Sampson, Victor

2013-01-01

240

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology -Bachelor of Science (SMBCUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Major Requirements -62 credits Concentration Requirements -29 credits  

E-print Network

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology - Bachelor of Science (SMBCUG) Total Credits Required: 128 Major University Chemistry II AND 3 CH4995 Undergraduate Research in Biochemistry OR 6 CH1161 University Chemistry

241

UBC Biochemistry Comprehensive Exam Guidelines Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

E-print Network

UBC Biochemistry Comprehensive Exam Guidelines Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Comprehensive Examination Guidelines 20132014 #12;UBC Biochemistry Comprehensive Exam Guidelines Table #12;UBC Biochemistry Comprehensive Exam Guidelines

Strynadka, Natalie

242

Developing a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise to teach theories of visuomotor learning.  

PubMed

Humans have a flexible motor ability to adapt their movements to changes in the internal/external environment. For example, using arm-reaching tasks, a number of studies experimentally showed that participants adapt to a novel visuomotor environment. These results helped develop computational models of motor learning implemented in the central nervous system. Despite the importance of such experimental paradigms for exploring the mechanisms of motor learning, because of the cost and preparation time, most students are unable to participate in such experiments. Therefore, in the current study, to help students better understand motor learning theories, we developed a simple finger-reaching experimental system using commonly used laptop PC components with an open-source programming language (Processing Motor Learning Toolkit: PMLT). We found that compared to a commercially available robotic arm-reaching device, our PMLT accomplished similar learning goals (difference in the error reduction between the devices, P = 0.10). In addition, consistent with previous reports from visuomotor learning studies, the participants showed after-effects indicating an adaptation of the motor learning system. The results suggest that PMLT can serve as a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise of motor learning theories with minimal time and cost for instructors. PMID:25565915

Kasuga, Shoko; Ushiba, Junichi

2014-01-01

243

Testing plastic deformations of materials in the introductory undergraduate mechanics laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for the complete loading-unloading cycle is to subject a tubular object to torsion. This paper suggests simple experiments for studying properties concerning elasticity and plasticity in elements of common use, subjected to stretching or compression, and also torsion reinforcing. The experiments use plastic binders, rubber bands and metal springs under a moderate load. This paper discusses an experiment with an original device to measure torsion deformations as a function of applied torques, which permitted construction of the hysteresis cycle for a rubber hose and various tubes. Another experiment was designed to define the temporal recovery of a plastic spring with initial stretching. A simple mathematical model was developed to explain this phenomenon.

Romo-Kröger, C. M.

2012-05-01

244

Structured inquiry-based learning: Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap characterization in an undergraduate laboratory course.  

PubMed

We have developed and tested two linked but separable structured inquiry exercises using a set of Drosophila melanogaster GAL4 enhancer trap strains for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory methods course at Bucknell University. In the first, students learn to perform inverse PCR to identify the genomic location of the GAL4 insertion, using FlyBase to identify flanking sequences and the primary literature to synthesize current knowledge regarding the nearest gene. In the second, we cross each GAL4 strain to a UAS-CD8-GFP reporter strain, and students perform whole mount CNS dissection, immunohistochemistry, confocal imaging, and analysis of developmental expression patterns. We have found these exercises to be very effective in teaching the uses and limitations of PCR and antibody-based techniques as well as critical reading of the primary literature and scientific writing. Students appreciate the opportunity to apply what they learn by generating novel data of use to the wider research community. PMID:25549104

Dunne, Christopher R; Cillo, Anthony R; Glick, Danielle R; John, Katherine; Johnson, Cody; Kanwal, Jaspinder; Malik, Brian T; Mammano, Kristina; Petrovic, Stefan; Pfister, William; Rascoe, Alexander S; Schrom, Diane; Shapiro, Scott; Simkins, Jeffrey W; Strauss, David; Talai, Rene; Tomtishen, John P; Vargas, Josephine; Veloz, Tony; Vogler, Thomas O; Clenshaw, Michael E; Gordon-Hamm, Devin T; Lee, Kathryn L; Marin, Elizabeth C

2014-12-01

245

Developing a New Experimental System for an Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise to Teach Theories of Visuomotor Learning  

PubMed Central

Humans have a flexible motor ability to adapt their movements to changes in the internal/external environment. For example, using arm-reaching tasks, a number of studies experimentally showed that participants adapt to a novel visuomotor environment. These results helped develop computational models of motor learning implemented in the central nervous system. Despite the importance of such experimental paradigms for exploring the mechanisms of motor learning, because of the cost and preparation time, most students are unable to participate in such experiments. Therefore, in the current study, to help students better understand motor learning theories, we developed a simple finger-reaching experimental system using commonly used laptop PC components with an open-source programming language (Processing Motor Learning Toolkit: PMLT). We found that compared to a commercially available robotic arm-reaching device, our PMLT accomplished similar learning goals (difference in the error reduction between the devices, P = 0.10). In addition, consistent with previous reports from visuomotor learning studies, the participants showed after-effects indicating an adaptation of the motor learning system. The results suggest that PMLT can serve as a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise of motor learning theories with minimal time and cost for instructors.

Kasuga, Shoko; Ushiba, Junichi

2014-01-01

246

Design and evaluation of an undergraduate laboratory course in atmospheric science research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An atmospheric science research laboratory course was created based on the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) model. CASPiE was designed to provide first and second-year chemistry students with an opportunity to be an integral part of authentic research projects. The CASPiE model was adapted to atmospheric science and renamed Earth and Atmospheric Science-CASPiE (EAS-CASPiE). Students engaged in learning activities such as those normally included in introductory atmospheric science courses, as well as working as part of a research team, and presenting scientific knowledge to colleagues. Undergraduate research experiences have been shown to benefit students by increasing ability in the science discipline itself, by helping students develop a better understanding of the nature of science, and by clarifying their career choice. This study evaluated the EAS-CASPiE course through the experience of the students using interviews, surveys and student performance on course assignments. The conclusions of this study found that EAS-CASPiE students were able to perform authentic research due to the scaffolding structure of the course, the collaboration in research teams and engagement in the research project; furthermore students' career choice appeared to be clarified after completing the course.

Quardokus, Kathleen M.

247

Structured Inquiry-Based Learning: Drosophila GAL4 Enhancer Trap Characterization in an Undergraduate Laboratory Course  

PubMed Central

We have developed and tested two linked but separable structured inquiry exercises using a set of Drosophila melanogaster GAL4 enhancer trap strains for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory methods course at Bucknell University. In the first, students learn to perform inverse PCR to identify the genomic location of the GAL4 insertion, using FlyBase to identify flanking sequences and the primary literature to synthesize current knowledge regarding the nearest gene. In the second, we cross each GAL4 strain to a UAS-CD8-GFP reporter strain, and students perform whole mount CNS dissection, immunohistochemistry, confocal imaging, and analysis of developmental expression patterns. We have found these exercises to be very effective in teaching the uses and limitations of PCR and antibody-based techniques as well as critical reading of the primary literature and scientific writing. Students appreciate the opportunity to apply what they learn by generating novel data of use to the wider research community. PMID:25549104

Dunne, Christopher R.; Cillo, Anthony R.; Glick, Danielle R.; John, Katherine; Johnson, Cody; Kanwal, Jaspinder; Malik, Brian T.; Mammano, Kristina; Petrovic, Stefan; Pfister, William; Rascoe, Alexander S.; Schrom, Diane; Shapiro, Scott; Simkins, Jeffrey W.; Strauss, David; Talai, Rene; Tomtishen, John P.; Vargas, Josephine; Veloz, Tony; Vogler, Thomas O.; Clenshaw, Michael E.; Gordon-Hamm, Devin T.; Lee, Kathryn L.; Marin, Elizabeth C.

2014-01-01

248

Experimental determination of the Boltzmann constant: An undergraduate laboratory exercise for molecular physics or physical chemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes an undergraduate laboratory exercise that uses optical spectroscopy to determine the magnitude and the uncertainty of the Boltzmann constant kb. The more accurate approach uses photoacoustic spectroscopy to measure the Doppler-broadened line profile of individual spectral lines of N2O to extract kb. Measurements and estimates of the uncertainties in the quantities needed to calculate kb from the line profiles are then used to estimate the uncertainty in kb. This experiment is unusual in that it uses advanced laser-based spectroscopy techniques to emphasize standard practices of uncertainty analysis. The core instrumentation is modular and relatively affordable; it requires a tunable single-mode laser, photoreceiver, optical cell, and vacuum pump. If this instrumentation is not available, an alternate approach can be performed which uses the intensity of each rotational transition of an infrared band to measure kb. Although there is more uncertainty using the alternate approach, low concentrations of CO2, DCl, or N2O give reasonable results for the magnitude of kb. Student assessment results indicate retention and mastery of the concept of combined measurement uncertainty.

Campbell, H. M.; Boardman, B. M.; DeVore, T. C.; Havey, D. K.

2012-12-01

249

New Ideas for an Old Enzyme: A Short, Question-Based Laboratory Project for the Purification and Identification of an Unknown LDH Isozyme  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Enzyme purification projects are an excellent way to introduce many aspects of protein biochemistry, but can be difficult to carry out under the constraints of a typical undergraduate laboratory course. We have designed a short laboratory project for the purification and identification of an "unknown" lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozyme that can…

Coleman, Aaron B.

2010-01-01

250

Synthesis and Kinetics of Hydrolysis of 3,5-Dimethyl-N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone Imine: An Undergraduate Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The synthesis of the title compound by a three-step procedure is described. The hydrolysis kinetics, which involve two consecutive psuedo-first-order processes, are also described. The synthesis and kinetics experiments described here are proposed for incorporation into undergraduate laboratory courses under a variety of formats. The compound described here is related to a toxic metabolite of the common analgesics acetaminophen and phenacetin.

Buccigross, Jeanne M.; Metz, Christa; Elliot, Lori; Becker, Pamela; Earley, Angela S.; Hayes, Jerry W.; Novak, Michael; Underwood, Gayl A.

1996-04-01

251

Design and use of a U.S. census data computer laboratory for teaching undergraduate research methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the design and development of an interdisciplinary social science computer laboratory for teaching undergraduate\\u000a research methods courses and research components of applied and theoretical courses. The U.S. Census of the Population, a\\u000a database commonly used in all of the social sciences, is used in order to give students research experience and to avoid ethical\\u000a problems involved in

M. Ann Drake; Jeanne M. Stahl

1995-01-01

252

Demand for Interdisciplinary Laboratories for Physiology Research by Undergraduate Students in Biosciences and Biomedical Engineering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Physiology as a discipline is uniquely positioned to engage undergraduate students in interdisciplinary research in response to the 2006-2011 National Science Foundation Strategic Plan call for innovative transformational research, which emphasizes multidisciplinary projects. To prepare undergraduates for careers that cross disciplinary…

Clase, Kari L.; Hein, Patrick W.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

2008-01-01

253

Self-Study Report Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics  

E-print Network

Self-Study Report Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics External Academic Program Review, April and Biophysics at Texas A&M as of March 2014. This report was prepared in the context of an Academic Program Review of the Graduate and Undergraduate programs offered by Biochemistry and Biophysics. Because the Ph

254

Incorporating Scanning Probe Microscopy into the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Through the support of an NSF-CCLI grant, scanning probe microscopy has been incorporated into the undergraduate chemistry curriculum at the University of Southern Colorado. The instrument, capable of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), is initially shown in a demonstration to beginning and general chemistry students. Chemistry majors then revisit the instrument by completing a hands-on experiment in the senior-level instrumental analysis laboratory. Over 150 undergraduates were shown the technology in the first year and 13 upper-division students have become proficient on the instrument. A third facet of curriculum enhancement includes the opportunity for undergraduates to perform research using scanning probe microscopy, which has resulted in four projects initiated. Currently, an experiment suitable for a biochemistry laboratory is being developed.

Lehmpuhl, David W.

2003-05-01

255

BIOCHEMISTRY Analytical Biochemistry 329 (2004) 91103  

E-print Network

ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY Analytical Biochemistry 329 (2004) 91­103 www Throck Watsona,b a Department of Biochemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA b of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA

Torng, Eric

256

The Florida State University Department of Biological Science and The Florida State University Coastal & Marine Laboratory The Undergraduate Research Program in Marine Biology and Living Marine Resource Ecology is designed for  

E-print Network

Coastal & Marine Laboratory The Undergraduate Research Program in Marine Biology and Living Marine's potential for a career in marine biological research. Name of Reference THE UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROGRAM IN MARINE BIOLOGY & LIVING MARINE RESOURCE ECOLOGY HTTP

Bass, Hank W.

257

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia WINTER SESSION.] Undergraduate Biochemistry Training and Previous Experience (please see reverse) Degree(s) Obtained (Discipline outlines for the University of B.C. Biochemistry 301 and 303 courses are given below. Please outline all

Strynadka, Natalie

258

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia SPRING 2015 Biochemistry Training and Previous Experience (please see reverse) Degree(s) Obtained (Discipline, Place, Date for the University of B.C. Biochemistry 301 and 303 courses are given below. Please outline all undergraduate

Strynadka, Natalie

259

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY The University of British Columbia WINTER SESSION. to Apr. Half-time TAs work both terms: Sep. to Apr.] Undergraduate Biochemistry Training and Previous;ONLY NEW APPLICANTS NEED COMPLETE THIS SECTION Brief outlines for the University of B.C. Biochemistry

Strynadka, Natalie

260

Monitoring Hammerhead Ribozyme-Catalyzed Cleavage with a Fluorescein-Labeled Substrate: Effects of Magnesium Ions and Antibiotic Inhibitors. A Biochemistry Laboratory: Part 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experiment is presented that demonstrates current techniques in modern RNA research and introduces a method for nonradioactive monitoring of RNA reactions. The laboratory involves the study of hammerhead ribozyme activity and the influence of metal ions and antibiotics on these important RNA-based reactions. The ribozyme class of RNA catalysts has current applications in both biotechnology and medicine and therefore should be of great interest to upper-level undergraduate students who anticipate careers in these areas. The students gain hands-on experience in working with RNA on a picomole level and also learn about gel electrophoresis, the use of fluorescent tagging, RNA-small molecule interactions, and the role of metal ions in biological systems. This laboratory offers students an opportunity to work with molecules that have direct applications in drug therapy and RNA catalysis.

Chow, Christine S.; Somne, Smita; Llano-Sotelo, Beatriz

1999-05-01

261

Successful Mentoring of Undergraduate Researchers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Prompted by the growing presence of undergraduates in research laboratories and the increased number of programs that encourage undergraduates to pursue research, the authors conducted a survey of undergraduate researchers at the University of California,

Mueller-Solger, Anke; Shellito, Cindy; Weissmann, Gary; Shea, Kalyn; Davis, William

2001-05-01

262

Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

2014-01-01

263

The genomics education partnership: successful integration of research into laboratory classes at a diverse group of undergraduate institutions.  

PubMed

Genomics is not only essential for students to understand biology but also provides unprecedented opportunities for undergraduate research. The goal of the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), a collaboration between a growing number of colleges and universities around the country and the Department of Biology and Genome Center of Washington University in St. Louis, is to provide such research opportunities. Using a versatile curriculum that has been adapted to many different class settings, GEP undergraduates undertake projects to bring draft-quality genomic sequence up to high quality and/or participate in the annotation of these sequences. GEP undergraduates have improved more than 2 million bases of draft genomic sequence from several species of Drosophila and have produced hundreds of gene models using evidence-based manual annotation. Students appreciate their ability to make a contribution to ongoing research, and report increased independence and a more active learning approach after participation in GEP projects. They show knowledge gains on pre- and postcourse quizzes about genes and genomes and in bioinformatic analysis. Participating faculty also report professional gains, increased access to genomics-related technology, and an overall positive experience. We have found that using a genomics research project as the core of a laboratory course is rewarding for both faculty and students. PMID:20194808

Shaffer, Christopher D; Alvarez, Consuelo; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bhalla, Satish; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Dorer, Douglas R; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T; Poet, Jeff L; Frohlich, Donald; Goodman, Anya L; Gosser, Yuying; Hauser, Charles; Hoopes, Laura L M; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J; Kaehler, Marian; Kokan, Nighat; Kopp, Olga R; Kuleck, Gary A; McNeil, Gerard; Moss, Robert; Myka, Jennifer L; Nagengast, Alexis; Morris, Robert; Overvoorde, Paul J; Shoop, Elizabeth; Parrish, Susan; Reed, Kelynne; Regisford, E Gloria; Revie, Dennis; Rosenwald, Anne G; Saville, Ken; Schroeder, Stephanie; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher; Smith, Mary; Spana, Eric P; Spratt, Mary; Stamm, Joyce; Thompson, Jeff S; Wawersik, Matthew; Wilson, Barbara A; Youngblom, Jim; Leung, Wilson; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R; Lopatto, David; Elgin, Sarah C R

2010-01-01

264

75 FR 8147 - Notice of Consideration of Amendment Request for Decommissioning of Analytical Bio-Chemistry...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Decommissioning of Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc. Sanitary...issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc. (the...Evaluation Report and an Environmental Assessment and/or an Environmental Impact Statement. If...

2010-02-23

265

Undergraduates at Sea and in the Laboratory Conducting Habitat Mapping Using Multibeam and Sidescan Sonar  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last five years, undergraduate students at the College of Charleston have had numerous opportunities to take part in the college's Transect Program and sail aboard research vessels on 2-5 day cruises to study the continental shelf. The program's purpose is to train students in oceanographic research while developing a long-term information geodatabase to characterize and monitor essential fish

L. R. Sautter; M. S. Harris

2008-01-01

266

Verification of Compton Collision and Klein-Nishina Formulas--An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment to verify the Compton collision formula and the angular dependance of the Klein-Nishina formula. Equipment used is a 1-mCi(137)Cs source, 2x2 in. NaI detector and a multichannel analyzer. Suitable for honor undergraduates. (Author/GA)

Singhal, R. P.; Burns, A. J.

1978-01-01

267

Student Perceptions of an Upper-Level, Undergraduate Human Anatomy Laboratory Course without Cadavers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several programs in health professional education require or are considering requiring upper-level human anatomy as prerequisite for their applicants. Undergraduate students are confronted with few institutions offering such a course, in part because of the expense and logistical issues associated with a cadaver-based human anatomy course. This…

Wright, Shirley J.

2012-01-01

268

Physico-Geometrical Kinetics of Solid-State Reactions in an Undergraduate Thermal Analysis Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An undergraduate kinetic experiment of the thermal decomposition of solids by microscopic observation and thermal analysis was developed by investigating a suitable reaction, applicable techniques of thermal analysis and microscopic observation, and a reliable kinetic calculation method. The thermal decomposition of sodium hydrogen carbonate is…

Koga, Nobuyoshi; Goshi, Yuri; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki

2014-01-01

269

Aligning the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory Experience with Professional Work: The Centrality of Reliable and Meaningful Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many traditional organic chemistry lab courses do not adequately help students to develop the professional skills required for creative, independent work. The overarching goal of the new organic chemistry lab series at Seattle University is to teach undergraduates to think, perform, and behave more like professional scientists. The conversion of…

Alaimo, Peter J.; Langenhan, Joseph M.; Suydam, Ian T.

2014-01-01

270

Rapid Multistep Synthesis of a Bioactive Peptidomimetic Oligomer for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Peptidomimetic compounds are increasingly important in drug-discovery applications. We introduce the synthesis of an N-substituted glycine oligomer, a bioactive "peptoid" trimer. The six-step protocol is conducted on solid-phase resin, enabling the synthesis to be performed by undergraduate organic chemistry students. This synthesis lab was…

Utku, Yeliz; Rohatgi, Abhinav; Yoo, Barney; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Pohl, Nicola L.

2010-01-01

271

Teaching Raman Spectroscopy in Both the Undergraduate Classroom and the Laboratory with a Portable Raman Instrument  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have evaluated a small portable Raman instrument on loan from B&W Tek, Inc., and have determined that it can successfully be used in the classroom both as a visual aid for teaching the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy and for a variety of undergraduate experiments as a normal component of an instrumental analysis class. Having portable Raman instrumentation would allow

Evan D. Hudspeth; Danielle Cleveland; Kathleen L. Batchler; Phuong A. Nguyen; Tracey L. Feaser; Lauren E. Quattrochi; Jesse Morenz; Shrimati A. Balram; Robert G. Michel; Jack Zhou; Daniel Lombardi

2006-01-01

272

A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

2010-01-01

273

A Computer-Interfaced O2 Probe: Instrumentation for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes interfacing a hand-held oxygen probe with a microcomputer and suggests experiments for undergraduate chemistry courses that could facilitate student understanding of aquatic environmental processes which involve dissolved oxygen. Data can be analyzed through the program or exported into other software. Presents results of an experiment…

Adamson, Gary E.; Nakhleh, Mary B.; Zimmerman, James R.

1997-01-01

274

Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

2012-01-01

275

carleton.ca Biochemistry  

E-print Network

carleton.ca Biochemistry #12;The science of biochemistry seeks to understand how organisms function techniques to produce valuable products like vitamins and antibiotics. Not surprisingly, biochemistry is fueling one of the fastest growing sectors of the new economy. Biochemistry brings researchers together

Dawson, Jeff W.

276

ACADEMIC PROGRAM Biochemistry  

E-print Network

ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Program in Biochemistry #12;Biochemistry Ph.D. Program Guidelines Biochemistry Ph.D. Program at Washington University in St. Louis Program Director: Dr. Peter Burgers office Washington University has a century-long tradition of excellence in biochemistry research and education

Stormo, Gary

277

BachelorofScience Biochemistry  

E-print Network

BachelorofScience Biochemistry N a m e : ______________________________________ I DL website at www.uleth.ca/ross/ppgs/ppg.html About the Biochemistry Major The Biochemistry major and Biochemistry. The program provides background for a wide range of careers in science. It also provides

Seldin, Jonathan P.

278

Biochemistry BS DEGREE PROGRAM  

E-print Network

207 Biochemistry BS DEGREE PROGRAM The biochemistry program is the result of a joint effort in the interdiscipli- nary science of biochemistry. The program, strengthened by mathematics and physics, attempts. Administration of the program is by the biochemistry committee, composed of members of the departments

Suzuki, Masatsugu

279

Faculty of Science Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Faculty of Science Biochemistry Biochemistry is the study of the structure and function. #12;Biochemistry We look forward to meeting you! What You Will Take First Year What follows. Students in the Biochemistry program enjoy both a broad range of courses--from Pharmacology for Health

280

Faculty of Science Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Faculty of Science Biochemistry Biochemistry is the study of the structure and function and living organisms, you will find this program most fascinating. #12;Biochemistry We look forward Experiential Learning Experience is vital in becoming a skilled biochemist. Students in the Biochemistry

281

ACADEMIC PROGRAM Biochemistry  

E-print Network

ACADEMIC PROGRAM GUIDELINES Program in Biochemistry (REVISED AUGUST, 2014) #12;Biochemistry Ph.D. Program Guidelines Biochemistry Ph.D. Program Washington University in St. Louis Program Director: Dr a century-long tradition of excellence in biochemistry research and education. A number of faculty, students

Kornfeld, S. Kerry

282

Automated scanning probe lithography with n-alkanethiol self assembled monolayers on Au(111): Application for teaching undergraduate laboratories  

PubMed Central

Controllers for scanning probe instruments can be programmed for automated lithography to generate desired surface arrangements of nanopatterns of organic thin films, such as n-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In this report, atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods of lithography known as nanoshaving and nanografting are used to write nanopatterns within organic thin films. Commercial instruments provide software to control the length, direction, speed, and applied force of the scanning motion of the tip. For nanoshaving, higher forces are applied to an AFM tip to selectively remove regions of the matrix monolayer, exposing bare areas of the gold substrate. Nanografting is accomplished by force-induced displacement of molecules of a matrix SAM, followed immediately by the surface self-assembly of n-alkanethiol molecules from solution. Advancements in AFM automation enable rapid protocols for nanolithography, which can be accomplished within the tight time restraints of undergraduate laboratories. Example experiments with scanning probe lithography (SPL) will be described in this report that were accomplished by undergraduate students during laboratory course activities and research internships in the chemistry department of Louisiana State University. Students were introduced to principles of surface analysis and gained “hands-on” experience with nanoscale chemistry. PMID:21483651

Brown, Treva T.; LeJeune, Zorabel M.; Liu, Kai; Hardin, Sean; Li, Jie-Ren; Rupnik, Kresimir; Garno, Jayne C.

2010-01-01

283

Red seaweed enzyme-catalyzed bromination of bromophenol red: An inquiry-based kinetics laboratory experiment for undergraduates.  

PubMed

Haloperoxidase enzymes are of interest for basic and applied bioscientists because of their increasing importance in pharmaceutical industry and environmental cleanups. In a guided inquiry-based laboratory experiment for life-science, agricultural science, and health science undergraduates, the bromoperoxidase from a red seaweed was used to brominate bromophenol red, a novel starting substrate. Substrate and enzyme concentration dependence of this enzyme-catalyzed reaction as followed colorimetrically yielded initial rates of reaction that the students compared with those of their peers. The students worked as collaborative groups partially designing their own experiments and carrying them out. In performing the laboratory experiment, they were minimally guided by the instructor and teaching assistants. To engage the students before the laboratory, a short activity involving the enzyme-induced color change was carried out. At the end of the laboratory session, student groups discussed their results in front of the class and reached their own conclusions. Most students had better understanding of important concepts in enzyme kinetics and showed good attitude toward the overall student-centered laboratory exercise. PMID:21567713

Jittam, Piyachat; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Promptmas, Chamras; Sriwattanarothai, Namkang; Archavarungson, Nattinee; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

2009-03-01

284

Synthesis and Purification of a Hammerhead Ribozyme and a Fluorescein-Labeled RNA Substrate. A Biochemistry Laboratory: Part 1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The applications of in vitro transcription and chemical synthesis of RNA are discussed. This laboratory describes the in vitro synthesis of a 38-nucleotide hammerhead ribozyme and the synthesis of a 17-nucleotide fluorescein-labeled RNA substrate by using standard phosphoramidite methodologies, two widely used methods in modern RNA research. The synthesis and purification procedures outlined allow students to develop an understanding of RNA handling procedures, synthesis of modified nucleic acids, gel electrophoresis, visualization of RNA by nonradioactive techniques, and quantitation of nucleic acids. The RNAs that are synthesized have applications in biotechnology and medicine; thus the students gain access to current problems in chemical and clinical research.

Chow, Christine S.; Somne, Smita

1999-05-01

285

On the Integration of Remote Experimentation into Undergraduate Laboratories--Pedagogical Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents an Internet-based open approach to laboratory instruction. In this article, the author talks about an open laboratory approach using a multi-user multi-device remote facility. This approach involves both the direct contact with the computer-controlled laboratory setup of interest with the students present in the laboratory

Esche, Sven K.

2005-01-01

286

Ion Exchange and Thin Layer Chromatographic Separation and Identification of Amino Acids in a Mixture: An Experiment for General Chemistry and Biotechnology Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A multiday laboratory exercise is described that is suitable for first-year undergraduate chemistry, biochemistry, or biotechnology students. Students gain experience in performing chromatographic separations of biomolecules, in both a column and thin layer chromatography (TLC) format. Students chromatographically separate amino acids (AA) in an…

Brunauer, Linda S.; Caslavka, Katelyn E.; Van Groningen, Karinne

2014-01-01

287

Physics 433: Undergraduate laboratory in Biological Physics at Simon Fraser University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk, I will describe our senior undergraduate lab course in Biological Physics at Simon Fraser University. Unique in Canada, this course combines modules that teach the students basic molecular and cell biology and leading-edge biophysical techniques with independent student projects. I'll outline the structure and components of the course, provide an overview of each experimental module, and describe student interest and feedback.

Forde, Nancy

2012-10-01

288

Bringing the Excitement and Motivation of Research to Students; Using Inquiry and Research-Based Learning in a Year-Long Biochemistry Laboratory: Part II--Research-Based Laboratory--A Semester-Long Research Approach Using Malate Dehydrogenase as a Research Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research-based learning in a teaching environment is an effective way to help bring the excitement and experience of independent bench research to a large number of students. The program described here is the second of a two-semester biochemistry laboratory series. Here, students are empowered to design, execute and analyze their own experiments…

Knutson, Kristopher; Smith, Jennifer; Nichols, Paul; Wallert, Mark A.; Provost, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

289

Hormones and antibiotics in nature: a laboratory module designed to broaden undergraduate perspectives on typically human-centered topics.  

PubMed

Bringing discovery-based research into undergraduate laboratory courses increases student motivation and learning gains over traditional exercises that merely teach technique or demonstrate well-documented phenomena. Laboratory experiences are further enhanced when they are designed to challenge student perspectives on topics relevant to their lives. To this end, a laboratory module on antibiotics and hormones, which are generally discussed in the context of human health, was developed for students to explore the multifaceted roles of antibiotics and hormones in nature (e.g. interspecies communication) via reading primary scientific literature and performing discovery-based experiments. The main objective of this module was to increase the general biological literacy of students as determined by their ability to connect the Five Core Concepts of Biological Literacy (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Vision and Change in Undergraduate Education: A Call to Action, 2011) to the topics "hormones" and "antibiotics" in pre- and postmodule surveys. After discussing unpublished research findings, cell biology students performed experiments demonstrating that: 1) fungi may promote fern growth via hormone production, 2) novel bacterial isolates in the genus Streptomyces produce antifungal compounds, and 3) subinhibitory antibiotic concentrations may enhance soil bacterial growth. The third finding provided evidence supporting a hypothesis framed in a scientific article that students read and discussed. Student perspectives on premodule surveys focused on roles of hormones and antibiotics in the human body (e.g. development, fighting infection), but their broadened postmodule perspectives encompassed the roles of these molecules in organismal communication and possibly the evolution of multicellularity. PMID:25574294

Weber, Carolyn F

2014-12-01

290

Hormones and Antibiotics in Nature: A Laboratory Module Designed to Broaden Undergraduate Perspectives on Typically Human-Centered Topics†  

PubMed Central

Bringing discovery-based research into undergraduate laboratory courses increases student motivation and learning gains over traditional exercises that merely teach technique or demonstrate well-documented phenomena. Laboratory experiences are further enhanced when they are designed to challenge student perspectives on topics relevant to their lives. To this end, a laboratory module on antibiotics and hormones, which are generally discussed in the context of human health, was developed for students to explore the multifaceted roles of antibiotics and hormones in nature (e.g. interspecies communication) via reading primary scientific literature and performing discovery-based experiments. The main objective of this module was to increase the general biological literacy of students as determined by their ability to connect the Five Core Concepts of Biological Literacy (American Association for the Advancement of Science, Vision and Change in Undergraduate Education: A Call to Action, 2011) to the topics “hormones” and “antibiotics” in pre- and postmodule surveys. After discussing unpublished research findings, cell biology students performed experiments demonstrating that: 1) fungi may promote fern growth via hormone production, 2) novel bacterial isolates in the genus Streptomyces produce antifungal compounds, and 3) subinhibitory antibiotic concentrations may enhance soil bacterial growth. The third finding provided evidence supporting a hypothesis framed in a scientific article that students read and discussed. Student perspectives on premodule surveys focused on roles of hormones and antibiotics in the human body (e.g. development, fighting infection), but their broadened postmodule perspectives encompassed the roles of these molecules in organismal communication and possibly the evolution of multicellularity. PMID:25574294

Weber, Carolyn F.

2014-01-01

291

Measurement of cAMP in an undergraduate teaching laboratory, using ALPHAscreen technology.  

PubMed

Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is a cellular second messenger with central relevance to pharmacology, cell biology, and biochemistry teaching programs. cAMP is produced from adenosine triphosphate by adenylate cyclase, and its production is reduced or enhanced upon activation of many G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, the measurement of cAMP serves as an indicator of receptor activity. Although there are many assays available for measuring cAMP, few are suitable for large class teaching, and even fewer seem to have been adapted for this purpose. Here, we describe the use of bead-based ALPHAscreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogenous Assay) technology for teaching a class of more than 300 students the practical aspects of detecting signal transduction. This technology is applicable to the measurement of many different signaling pathways. This resource is designed to provide a practical guide for instructors and a useful model for developing other classes using similar technologies. PMID:22337811

Bartho, Joseph D; Ly, Kien; Hay, Debbie L

2012-02-14

292

The Doctoral Program in Biochemistry Department of Biochemistry and  

E-print Network

The Doctoral Program in Biochemistry Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics Texas A&M University..............................................................................................................3 A. Welcome to the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics..............................3 B Members in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics ..................12 F. Relationship

293

Zebrafish development and genetics: introducing undergraduates to developmental biology and genetics in a large introductory laboratory class.  

PubMed

We have taken advantage of the strengths of the zebrafish model system to introduce developmental biology and genetics to undergraduates in their second semester of the Introductory Biology course at Emory. We designed a 6-week laboratory module based on research being undertaken by faculty in the department, and incorporated experiments that used current research methods including bioinformatics. Students undertook a range of experiments including direct observation of live wild-type zebrafish at different stages of embryogenesis, whole-mount in situ hybridization of mutant and wild-type embryos, vital dye staining of mutant and wild-type embryos, and pharmacological treatments to perturb normal development. These laboratories engaged the students by providing a hands-on, research-centered experience, while also enhancing their written (worksheets and laboratory reports) and oral (group presentation) communication skills. We describe the proceedings of each lab and the logistics of preparing and running these labs for 400-500 students (120 students taking lab each day), and provide a preliminary assessment of the success of the laboratories data based on student evaluations. PMID:19537943

D'Costa, Allison; Shepherd, Iain T

2009-06-01

294

Promoting Science for All by Way of Student Interest in a Transformative Undergraduate Microbiology Laboratory for Nonmajors†  

PubMed Central

In this study, we investigated a pedagogical innovation in an undergraduate microbiology course, Microbes and Society, for non-microbiology majors and education majors. The aim was to improve students’ understanding by connecting their science experience to their areas of interest. Based on this idea of teaching, we redesigned the laboratory portion of a microbiology course. We had students in the laboratory component choose their areas of interest and use the areas as a framework for understanding science and how it influences and shapes the world around them. This course was part of a longitudinal project (Project Nexus) which prepares, supports, and sustains upper elementary and middle-level specialist science teachers. We used a battery of data collection instruments. We analyzed all data in several dimensions including using active-learning techniques, forming linkages between science and teaching, and connecting science and society. Our hypothesis was that we could promote science for all by connecting the diverse students’ areas of interest in science to the laboratory’s curriculum. We assessed the success of achieving our goal by using researchers’ observations, the instructors’ perspectives, and students’ feedback. Our findings suggested that this course was appreciated by the students, especially education majors, who recognized the innovations as engaging and worthwhile. PMID:23653691

Marbach-Ad, Gili; McGinnis, J. Randy; Dai, Amy H.; Pease, Rebecca; Schalk, Kelly A.; Benson, Spencer

2009-01-01

295

Innovations in Inquiry-Based Laboratory Exercises for Non-Majors Astronomy Courses: Connecting Undergraduates with the Enterprise of Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Connecting Undergraduates to the Enterprise of Science (CUES) is an NSF-funded program which aims to help instructors towards inquiry based laboratory experiences for students. While many science instructors want to move away from the traditional cookbook laboratories, there are many challenges to executing such a change. The CUES program provides an opportunity for instructors to incorporate inquiry, using "minijournals". The basic idea behind the minijournal format is to present students with a simulated journal article about an experiment or investigation. The article outlines the question, methods used, and conclusions and suggests further scientific questions that might be of interest. The students are expected to devise their own experiments or investigations to answer said questions, and to produce their own paper/article describing it. In this way, the students will be engaged in inquiry-based science labs which encompass doing, thinking, and communicating, while the minijournal allows the instructor to contain lines of inquiry within the limits posed by existing resources. Here we present both the rationale for and concept of using minijournals and specific examples of such laboratory exercises we are currently employing in our introductory (non-science majors) astronomy laboratory. In addition, we explore the difficulties implementing such a technique, when the potential astronomy experiments available to students may be limited.

Speck, Angela; Ruzhitskaya, L.; Weaver, J. C.

2009-01-01

296

Peer Assessment in Large Undergraduate Classes: An Evaluation of a Procedure for Marking Laboratory Reports and a Review of Related Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides evidence that peer marking can be a reliable tool for assessing laboratory reports in large cohorts. It was conducted over a 4-yr period with first-year undergraduates ([asymptotically equivalent to]180 students/cohort) taking a mammalian physiology course, but the procedure adopted would be applicable to any other…

Harris, Judy R.

2011-01-01

297

Virtual and Traditional Slides for Teaching Cellular Morphology to Medical Laboratory Science Undergraduates: A Comparative Study of Performance Outcomes, Retention, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a result of massive retirement and educational program expense and closure, the field of Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) is facing a critical workforce shortage. Combatting this issue by increasing undergraduate class size is a difficult proposition due to the intense psychomotor curricular requirements of MLS programs. Technological advances…

Solberg, Brooke L.

2011-01-01

298

A Simplified Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment to Evaluate the Effect of the Ionic Strength on the Equilibrium Concentration Quotient of the Bromcresol Green Dye  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A modified laboratory experiment for undergraduate students is presented to evaluate the effects of the ionic strength, "I", on the equilibrium concentration quotient, K[subscript c], of the acid-base indicator bromcresol green (BCG). The two-step deprotonation of the acidic form of the dye (sultone form), as it is dissolved in water, yields…

Rodriguez, Hernan B.; Mirenda, Martin

2012-01-01

299

Ligand-Free Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling Reactions Using an Inexpensive Aqueous Palladium Source: A Synthetic and Computational Exercise for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An inexpensive procedure for introducing the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction into a high-enrollment undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course is described. The procedure employs an aqueous palladium solution as the catalyst and a range of para-substituted aryl bromides and arylboronic acids as substrates. The coupling reactions proceed…

Hill, Nicholas J.; Bowman, Matthew D.; Esselman, Brian J.; Byron, Stephen D.; Kreitinger, Jordan; Leadbeater, Nicholas E.

2014-01-01

300

Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Ruthenium-Indenylidene Complexes for Olefin Metathesis: Microscale Experiments for the Undergraduate Inorganic or Organometallic Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of experiments for undergraduate laboratory courses (e.g., inorganic, organometallic or advanced organic) have been developed. These experiments focus on understanding the design and catalytic activity of ruthenium-indenylidene complexes for olefin metathesis. Included in the experiments are the syntheses of two ruthenium-indenylidene…

Pappenfus, Ted M.; Hermanson, David L.; Ekerholm, Daniel P.; Lilliquist, Stacie L.; Mekoli, Megan L.

2007-01-01

301

Volumetric Titrations Using Electrolytically Generated Reagents for the Determination of Ascorbic Acid and Iron in Dietary Supplement Tablets: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An undergraduate laboratory experiment for the volumetric quantitative analysis of ascorbic acid and iron in dietary supplement tablets is presented. Powdered samples of the dietary supplement tablets were volumetrically titrated against electrolytically generated reagents, and the mass of dietary reagent in the tablet was determined from the…

Scanlon, Christopher; Gebeyehu, Zewdu; Griffin, Kameron; Dabke, Rajeev B.

2014-01-01

302

Synthesis and Characterization of Aldol Condensation Products from Unknown Aldehydes and Ketones: An Inquiry-Based Experiment in the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment for the undergraduate chemistry laboratory in which students perform the aldol condensation on an unknown aldehyde and an unknown ketone is described. The experiment involves the use of techniques such as TLC, column chromatography, and recrystallization, and compounds are characterized by [to the first power]H NMR, GC-MS, and FTIR.…

Angelo, Nicholas G.; Henchey, Laura K.; Waxman, Adam J.; Canary, James W.; Arora, Paramjit S.; Wink, Donald

2007-01-01

303

Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of a Natural Insecticide on Basic Montmorillonite K10 Clay. Green Chemistry in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A detailed investigation of the clay-catalyzed condensation of sesamol and other phenols with 3-methyl-2-butenal to give methylenedioxyprecocene (MDP) and other chromenes is presented. The clay-catalyzed microwave-assisted condensation of sesamol with 3-methyl-2-butenal is appropriate for incorporation into undergraduate organic laboratory

Dintzner, Matthew R.; Wucka, Paul R.; Lyons, Thomas W.

2006-01-01

304

A Research-Based Undergraduate Organic Laboratory Project: Investigation of a One-Pot, Multicomponent, Environmentally Friendly Prins-Friedel-Crafts-Type Reaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in the undergraduate organic laboratory synthesize tetrahydro-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-4-phenyl-2"H"-pyran via the Montmorillonite K10 clay-catalyzed reaction of p-nitrobenzaldehye with methanol, 3-buten-1-ol, and benzene. The synthesis comprises an environmentally friendly tandem Prins-Friedel-Crafts-type multicomponent reaction (MCR) and sets…

Dintzner, Matthew R.; Maresh, Justin J.; Kinzie, Charles R.; Arena, Anthony F.; Speltz, Thomas

2012-01-01

305

Using Mole Ratios of Electrolytic Products of Water for Analysis of Household Vinegar: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simple 3-h physical chemistry undergraduate experiment for the quantitative analysis of acetic acid in household vinegar is presented. The laboratory experiment combines titration concept with electrolysis and an application of the gas laws. A vinegar sample was placed in the cathode compartment of the electrolysis cell. Electrolysis of water…

Dabke, Rajeev B.; Gebeyehu, Zewdu

2012-01-01

306

An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment that Utilizes a Glass Fiber Filter Assay to Determine the Steroid Specificity and Equilibrium Binding Properties of Glucocorticoid Receptors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two complementary laboratory exercises that use the glass fiber assay to assess receptor specificity and hormone binding affinity in rat liver cytoplasmic extracts. Details the methods, materials and protocol of the experiments. Discusses the basic concepts illustrated and the feasibility of using the experiments at the undergraduate

John, Nancy J.; Firestone, Gary L.

1987-01-01

307

A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

2008-01-01

308

A Solvent-Free Baeyer-Villiger Lactonization for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory: Synthesis of Gamma-T-Butyl-Epsilon-Caprolactone  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The solvent-free or solid-state reaction systems like the Baeyer-Villiger rearrangement have become popular in the synthetic organic community and viable option for undergraduate laboratory series to reduce waste and cost and simplify reaction process. The reaction is an efficient method to transform ketones to esters and lactones.

Esteb, John J.; Hohman, Nathan J.; Schlamandinger, Diana E.; Wilson, Anne M.

2005-01-01

309

Peer Assessment in Large Undergraduate Classes: An Evaluation of a Procedure for Marking Laboratory Reports and a Review of Related Practices  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study provides evidence that peer marking can be a reliable tool for assessing laboratory reports in large cohorts. It was conducted over a 4-yr period with first-year undergraduates taking a mammalian physiology course, but the procedure adopted would be applicable to any other laboratory-based discipline. The process was found to be efficient in staff time, enabling a summative practical report to be marked in <1 h, facilitating rapid feedback to students on their performance.

2011-06-01

310

Parallel Combinatorial Synthesis of Azo Dyes: A Combinatorial Experiment Suitable for Undergraduate Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment in the parallel synthesis of azo dyes that demonstrates the concepts of structure-activity relationships and chemical diversity with vivid colors is described. It is seen that this experiment is suitable for the second-semester organic chemistry laboratory and also for the one-semester organic laboratory.

Gung, Benjamin W.; Taylor, Richard T.

2004-01-01

311

Synthesis and Biological Testing of Penicillins: An Investigative Approach to the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and implementation of a research-based organic chemistry laboratory experiment is presented. The experiment was designed to simulate a scientific research environment, involve students in critical thinking, and develop the student's ability to analyze and present research-based data. In this experiment, a laboratory class…

Whitaker, Ragnhild D.; Truhlar, Laura M.; Yksel, Deniz; Walt, David R.; Williams, Mark D.

2010-01-01

312

Using Model Organisms in an Undergraduate Laboratory to Link Genotype, Phenotype, and the Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We developed laboratory exercises using zebrafish ("Danio rerio") and nematodes ("Caenorhabditis elegans") for a sophomore-level Integrative Biology Laboratory course. Students examined live wildtype zebrafish at different stages of development and noted shifts occurring in response to "fgf8a" deficiency. Students were introduced to development in…

Jacobs-McDaniels, Nicole L.; Maine, Eleanor M.; Albertson, R. Craig; Wiles, Jason R.

2013-01-01

313

Successful implementation of inquiry-based physiology laboratories in undergraduate major and nonmajor courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular modifications were to improve the teaching of physiological concepts, teach students the scientific approach, and promote creative and critical thinking. We assessed our modifications using formative (laboratory exams, oral presentations, and laboratory reports) and summative evaluations (surveys, laboratory notebook, and an end of semester project). Students appreciated the freedom offered by the new curriculum and the opportunity to engage in the inquiry process. Results from both forms of evaluation showed a marked improvement due to the curricular revisions. Our analyses indicate an increased confidence in students' ability to formulate questions and hypotheses, design experiments, collect and analyze data, and make conclusions. Thus, we have successfully incorporated inquiry-based laboratories in both major and nonmajor courses.

G Casotti (West Chester University of Pennsylvania Biology); L Rieser-Danner (West Chester University of Pennsylvania Psychology); Dr. Maureen Knabb (West Chester University)

2008-12-01

314

Predictors of performance of students in biochemistry in a doctor of chiropractic curriculum.  

PubMed

Objective : This study investigated the effect of completion of course prerequisites, undergraduate grade point average (GPA), undergraduate degree, and study habits on the performance of students in the biochemistry course at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida. Methods : Students self-reported information regarding academic preparation at the beginning of the semester using a questionnaire. Final exam grade and final course grade were noted and used as measures of performance. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine if number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate GPA, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program were associated significantly with the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course. Results : The number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program did not significantly affect the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course, but undergraduate GPA did. Subsequent univariate analysis and Tukey's post hoc comparisons revealed that students with an undergraduate GPA in the 3.5 to 3.99 range earned significantly higher final course grades than students with an undergraduate GPA in the 2.5 to 2.99 range. Conclusion : No single variable was determined to be a factor that determines student success in biochemistry. The interrelationship between the factors examined warrants further investigation to understand fully how to predict the success of a student in the biochemistry course. PMID:24295362

Shaw, Kathy; Rabatsky, Ali; Dishman, Veronica; Meseke, Christopher

2014-01-01

315

Undergraduates at Sea and in the Laboratory Conducting Habitat Mapping Using Multibeam and Sidescan Sonar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last five years, undergraduate students at the College of Charleston have had numerous opportunities to take part in the college's Transect Program and sail aboard research vessels on 2-5 day cruises to study the continental shelf. The program's purpose is to train students in oceanographic research while developing a long-term information geodatabase to characterize and monitor essential fish habitats, and to map seafloor geomorphology. During these cruises students take the lead to conduct a variety of research investigations which include hydrographic surveys of the seafloor using sidescan sonar, multibeam bathymetry, and video collected using a remotely operated vehicle and during SCUBA dives. Following the data collection cruises, students have enrolled in semester-long research courses to analyze data and document results through poster and oral presentations. More than 60 students have taken part in at least one of 6 programs. In the past two years, the NOAA Ship NANCY FOSTER has provided invaluable sea time to conduct multibeam surveys of the mid- and outer continental shelf off Charleston, so that the 22 participating Transect students have focused their work on seafloor mapping, and have become trained in state-of-the art CARIS multibeam and sidescan sonar processing software. Most of these students have presented their results at professional meetings, and manuscripts are currently in preparation. Students have had numerous post-program opportunities to conduct further research at sea and in the lab. They have collaborated with NOAA scientists and other investigators, conducting bathymetry data processing and analysis from other regions. Most recently, two program graduates worked with University of Washington investigators to map sites for the Ocean Observatory Initiative Regional Scale Nodes. Several students have been contracted or hired as hydrographic survey technicians, while others have gone to graduate school to continue their work using these invaluable skills learned as undergraduates.

Sautter, L. R.; Harris, M. S.

2008-12-01

316

Biochemistry 448 Course Coordinator  

E-print Network

Biochemistry 448 Course Coordinator Dr Scott Covey scott.covey@ubc.ca 604-822-1949 Course Description This is an independent biochemistry driven research project performed under the supervision independent research and lab work. Although biochemistry honours students have priority majors student can

Strynadka, Natalie

317

Biochemistry 482 Spring 2009  

E-print Network

1 Biochemistry 482 Spring 2009 Instructor: Dr. Stephen Lodmell Class time/place: MWF 10:10-11:00am, to be arranged Phone: 243-6393 email: stephen.lodmell@umontana.edu Text: Garrett and Grisham Biochemistry, 3rd ed. (updated) Overview: The second semester of biochemistry builds on the foundation laid by BIOC481

Vonessen, Nikolaus

318

Biochemistry Career Options  

E-print Network

Biochemistry Career Options · applied researcher · pharmaceutical researcher · research chemist · Testing and inspection professional MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Biochemistry College of Sciences www Program: M.S. in Biochemistry Our graduate programs offer exceptional research opportunities for advanced

Walker, Lawrence R.

319

Laboratory exercises incorporating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) encourage undergraduate students to  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT Laboratory exercises incorporating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) encourage-pressure scanning electron microscopes (SEM) that can be equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and Electron Backscatter Diffractometer (EBSD), has been used

Beane, Rachel J.

320

The scanning electron microscope as an accelerator for the undergraduate advanced physics laboratory  

E-print Network

Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator ...

Peterson, Randolph S.

321

Gamma-Nonanoic Lactone: Synthesis of a Fragrance and Flavor Enhancer in the Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is an experiment in which students are able to synthesize an unnatural compound having the odor and flavor of coconuts. Laboratory equipment, procedures, and analysis of the product are discussed. (CW)

Bunce, Richard A.; Reeves, Henry D.

1990-01-01

322

The microcomputer in the undergraduate physics laboratory - System, hardware, student reaction, evaluation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A system of ten computers has been used for 2 years in a general physics laboratory. This article lists the experiments in which standard laboratory equipment is replaced by on-line use of the computers. The durability of the computers and student reaction to the system are evaluated. In addition, hardware, software, and books found helpful in setting up and running the system are described.

Karcher, T.; Burch, T. J.; Ruddick, James; Backman, J.; Caravella, J.

2005-10-27

323

Preparation, Purification, and Secondary Structure Determination of Bacillus Circulans Xylanase. A Molecular Laboratory Incorporating Aspects of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysical Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project module designed for biochemistry or cellular and molecular biology student which involves determining the secondary structure of Bacillus circulans xylanase (BCX) by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy under conditions that compromise its stabilizing intramolecular forces is described. The lab model enhanced students knowledge of the…

Russo, Sal; Gentile, Lisa

2006-01-01

324

COURSE NAME TERM CR COURSE NAME TERM CR BC 401 Comprehensive Biochemistry I F 3 CHEM 334 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory F, S 1  

E-print Network

Physiology of Exercise F,S,SS 4 BIOM 533 Biomolecular Tools for Engineers F 3 HES 405 Exercise Testing,S,SS 3 BC 411 Physical Biochemistry F 4 CHEM 433& Clinical Chemistry S 3 BC 463 Molecular Genetics F 3 Clinical Practicum (formerly BIOM 486) F,S,SS 2, 4 ERHS 502 Fundamentals of Toxicology F 3 BIOM 504

325

An undergraduate laboratory exercise to study the effect of darkness on plant gene expression using DNA microarray.  

PubMed

DNA microarrays are microscopic arrays on a solid surface, typically a glass slide, on which DNA oligonucleotides are deposited or synthesized in a high-density matrix with a predetermined spatial order. Several types of DNA microarrays have been developed and used for various biological studies. Here, we developed an undergraduate laboratory exercise using an Arabidopsis DNA microarray to study the gene expression of Brassica rapa, Wisconsin Fast Plant. Genes involved in senescence, cell wall loosening/degradation, and sugar transport were the most upregulated, while those involved in photosynthesis, the elimination of reactive oxygen intermediates associated with photooxidative stress and auxin synthesis, were the most downregulated. Students were able to complete the experiment successfully. Throughout the exercise, they learned various important molecular techniques including RNA isolation, quantification, reverse transcription, cRNA synthesis, labeling and purification, and microarray hybridization, washing, scanning, and feature extraction. The exercise can be integrated into a college-level molecular biology laboratory. The procedure used can be adapted to examine other effects on other organisms. PMID:21591140

Chang, Ming-Mei; Briggs, George M

2007-11-01

326

Successful implementation of inquiry-based physiology laboratories in undergraduate major and nonmajor courses.  

PubMed

Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular modifications were to improve the teaching of physiological concepts, teach students the scientific approach, and promote creative and critical thinking. We assessed our modifications using formative (laboratory exams, oral presentations, and laboratory reports) and summative evaluations (surveys, laboratory notebook, and an end of semester project). Students appreciated the freedom offered by the new curriculum and the opportunity to engage in the inquiry process. Results from both forms of evaluation showed a marked improvement due to the curricular revisions. Our analyses indicate an increased confidence in students' ability to formulate questions and hypotheses, design experiments, collect and analyze data, and make conclusions. Thus, we have successfully incorporated inquiry-based laboratories in both major and nonmajor courses. PMID:19047505

Casotti, G; Rieser-Danner, L; Knabb, M T

2008-12-01

327

Partnership in Undergraduate Research Experience  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Practical laboratory and work experience has been helpful in reinforcing the undergraduate educational experience. With limited resources, individual organizations may struggle to give a student a well rounded opportunity. Most undergraduates work within internships or cooperative educational fram...

328

Studying epigenetic DNA modifications in undergraduate laboratories using complementary bioinformatic and molecular approaches.  

PubMed

Epigenetic inheritance is the inheritance of genetic information that is not based on DNA sequence alone. One type of epigenetic information that has come to the forefront in the last few years is modified DNA bases. The most common modified DNA base in nature is 5-methylcytosine. Herein, we describe a laboratory experiment that combines bioinformatic and molecular approaches to study the presence and abundance of 5-methylcytosine in different organisms. Students were originally provided with the protein sequence of the Xenopus laevis DNMT1 cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and used BLASTP searches to detect the presence of protein orthologs in the genomes of several organisms including Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Plasmodium falciparum, Drosophila melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Students generated hypotheses regarding the presence and abundance of 5-methylcytosine in these organisms based on their bioinformatics data, and directly tested their predictions on a subset of DNAs using restriction enzyme isoschizomer assays. A southern blotting assay to answer the same question is also presented. In addition to exposure to the field of epigenetics, the strengths of the laboratory are students are able to make predictions using bioinformatic tools and quickly test them in the laboratory. In addition, students are exposed to two potential misinterpretations of bioinformatic search data. The laboratory is easily modified to incorporate outside research interests in epigenetics. PMID:24022990

Militello, Kevin T

2013-01-01

329

Successful Implementation of Inquiry-Based Physiology Laboratories in Undergraduate Major and Nonmajor Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular…

Casotti, G.; Rieser-Danner, L.; Knabb, M. T.

2008-01-01

330

Demonstrating Chemical and Analytical Concepts in the Undergraduate Laboratory Using Capillary Electrophoresis and Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes instrumental analysis laboratory exercises that utilize capillary electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography to demonstrate several analytical and chemical principles. Alkyl parabens (4-hydroxy alkyl benzoates), which are common ingredients in cosmetic formulations, are separated by capillary electrophoresis. The electrophoretic mobilities of the parabens can be explained on the basis of their relative size. 3-Hydroxy ethylbenzoate is also separated

Christopher P. Palmer

1999-01-01

331

Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction in an Undergraduate Laboratory to Produce "DNA Fingerprints."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory exercise that demonstrates the sensitivity of the Polymerase Chain Reaction as well as its potential application to forensic analysis during a criminal investigation. Can also be used to introduce, review, and integrate population and molecular genetics topics such as genotypes, multiple alleles, allelic and genotypic…

Phelps, Tara L.; And Others

1996-01-01

332

Dehydration of 2-Methyl-1-Cyclohexanol: New Findings from a Popular Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mineral acid-catalyzed dehydration of 2-methyl-1-cyclohexanol has been a popular laboratory exercise in second-year organic chemistry for several decades. The dehydration experiment is often performed by organic chemistry students to illustrate Zaitsev's rule. However, sensitive analytical techniques reveal that the results do not entirely…

Friesen, J. Brent; Schretzman, Robert

2011-01-01

333

The effectiveness and user perception of 3-dimensional digital human anatomy in an online undergraduate anatomy laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of implementing desktop 3-dimensional (3D) stereo images of human anatomy into an undergraduate human anatomy distance laboratory. User perceptions of 2D and 3D images were gathered via questionnaire in order to determine ease of use and level of satisfaction associated with the 3D software in the online learning environment. Mayer's (2001, p. 184) principles of design were used to develop the study materials that consisted of PowerPoint presentations and AVI files accessed via Blackboard. The research design employed a mixed-methods approach. Volunteers each were administered a demographic survey and were then stratified into groups based upon pre-test scores. A total sample size of 62 pairs was available for combined data analysis. Quantitative research questions regarding the effectiveness of 2D versus the 3D treatment were analyzed using a doubly-multivariate repeated measures (Doubly-MANOVA) design. Paired test scores achieved by undergraduates on a laboratory practical of identification and spatial relationships of the bones and features of a human skull were used in the analysis. The questionnaire designed to gather user perceptions consisted of quantitative and qualitative questions. Response frequencies were analyzed for the two groups and common themes were noted. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in group means for the main effect of the treatment groups 2D and 3D and for the variables of identification and relationship with the 3D group outperforming the 2D group on both dependent variables. Effect sizes were determined to be small, 0.215 for the identification variable and 0.359 for the relationship variable. Overall, all students liked the convenience of using PowerPoint and AVI files online. The 3D group felt their PowerPoint was more realistic than did the 2D group and both groups appreciated the detailed labeling of the online images. One third of the volunteers in the 3D group indicated that "eye strain" was what they liked least about working with the 3D images. Results indicate that desktop, stereo imaging may be incorporated effectively into online anatomy and physiology courses, but that more work needs to be done to ensure less eye strain.

Hilbelink, Amy Joanne

2007-12-01

334

Climate-Literacy Laboratory Exercises for Undergraduate Students in an Introductory Weather and Climate Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A suite of NASA-sponsored, Web-based exercises are in development for an introductory weather and climate course at Georgia State University (GSU) to improve climate literacy among undergraduate students. An extremely small percentage of the students are STEM majors. The exercises make extensive use of NASA resources and are guided in part by the concepts in Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science. At least two thousand undergraduate students have completed a majority of the exercises over the past two years. Nine of the twelve exercises in the course are connected strongly to climate literacy. The topics of those nine exercises are as follows: (1) Solar Irradiance, (2) Stratospheric Ozone, (3) Tropospheric Air, (4) The Carbon Cycle, (5) Global Surface Temperature, (6) Glacial-Interglacial Cycles, (7) Temperature Changes during the Past Millennium, (8) Climate & Ecosystems, and (9) Current & Future Climate Change. Two of the exercises (Tropospheric Air and The Carbon Cycle) make use of carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements made by students themselves and by a stationary CO2 monitor at GSU. The three remaining exercises, The Hadley Cell, Atlanta Weather, and Air Pollution, are less connected to multiple climate-literacy concepts; nonetheless, they provide a more complete experience for the students in the understanding of climate processes, differences between weather and climate, and human impacts on the atmosphere. All exercises are based on an inquiry-based learning cycle (i.e. 7 Es) and require substantial amounts of engagement, applied thinking, and critical thinking by the students. Not only do students become knowledgeable about the essential principles of climate change, especially global warming, but extensive use of geographical-information software and hand-held measurement devices has provided students with training in geography and technology. Student attitudes towards the labs were gathered via an on-line, anonymous survey from hundreds of students in Geography 1112 during the Fall semester of 2010. Students liked the use of high-quality imagery and animations, using Google™ earth, using Microsoft® Excel for calculations and chart production, going outside to collect data, and working in groups. Students did not like the large number of questions in some of the labs, not receiving a "lecture" in the beginning lab exercise, and improperly working Web links. Students suggested having a small lecture at the beginning in addition to having the topics be presented in the lecture sessions before doing the lab exercises as way to improve the labs. Therefore, students desired a more traditional approach to instruction. Seven lab instructors, all of whom were graduate students in the Department of Geosciences, were interviewed by the project evaluator in April of 2011. The main findings were as follows: the instructors viewed themselves as facilitators of the student-centered exercises; the students are uncomfortable with an inquiry-based approach; and there is disconnection between the lecture and lab portions of the course. Future work involves major pedagogical renovations to the exercises, training the lab instructors in the leading of inquiry-based exercises, and assessing student learning of climate-change concepts using pre- and post-tests.

Diem, J.; Elliott, W.; Criswell, B.; Morrow, C. A.

2012-12-01

335

Exploring the Structure Function Relationship of Macromolecules at the Undergraduate Level  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The undergraduate teaching initiatives discussed in this manuscript take advantage of a state-of-the-art visualization center devoted to teaching and research activities. These initiatives enabled the revision of an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory, where students have a "hands-on" approach in the use of molecular modeling to study biological molecules. These students learn to use the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) method, homology, and energy minimization routines on a biological molecule. This course is not limited to virtual studies but also uses Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize a model peptide or phospholipid. A creative Web page is used as a primary reference by undergraduate and graduate students. A portfolio is employed as a nontraditional evaluation method. This nontraditional multidisciplinary approach helps students understand that proteins are dynamic in both structure and function and that proteins interact with other cellular components to produce a cellular response.

Pastrana-Rios, Belinda

2004-06-01

336

Biochemical View: A Web Site Providing Material for Teaching Biochemistry Using Multiple Approaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational resources are valuable tools for teaching biochemistry. Often, however, the necessary information is dispersed throughout several Web sites and many of the biochemistry software programs are only available commercially. Considering the difficulties of understanding abstract biochemical concepts, a Web site, Biochemical View (accessed Aug 2007) has been developed at the University of Brasília (UnB), Brazil. Its main goals are to complement course instruction and materials already in use, provide material to teachers preparing conventional and online courses, and—because free, full access is allowed—popularize the use of these resources in undergraduate courses. The contents, which include the usual metabolic pathways explaining the metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleic acids, are presented in two and three-dimensional formats, complemented with objective texts, schematics, and a description of regulation points. In this work, a new approach to metabolic pathways is employed, namely metabolic participation diagrams. In addition, experimental protocols for laboratory classes, study material, and detailed information about each molecule taking part in a specific metabolic pathway have been also made available in the Web site. The process of constructing the site is described and the results of students using this Web site are evaluated based on exam scores and survey forms, which show a significant improvement in students' success in learning biochemistry.

Dórea, Fernanda C.; Rodrigues, Higor S.; Lapouble, Oscar M. M.; Pereira, Márcio R.; Castro, Mariana S.; Fontes, Wagner

2007-11-01

337

Clinical biochemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the biochemical studies conducted for the Apollo program were (1) to provide routine laboratory data for assessment of preflight crew physical status and for postflight comparisons; (2) to detect clinical or pathological abnormalities which might have required remedial action preflight; (3) to discover as early as possible any infectious disease process during the postflight quarantine periods following certain missions; and (4) to obtain fundamental medical knowledge relative to man's adjustment to and return from the space flight environment. The accumulated data presented suggest that these requirements were met by the program described. All changes ascribed to the space flight environment were subtle, whereas clinically significant changes were consistent with infrequent illnesses unrelated to the space flight exposure.

Alexander, W. C.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.

1975-01-01

338

Can random mutation mimic design?: a guided inquiry laboratory for undergraduate students.  

PubMed

Complex biological structures, such as the human eye, have been interpreted as evidence for a creator for over three centuries. This raises the question of whether random mutation can create such adaptations. In this article, we present an inquiry-based laboratory experiment that explores this question using paper airplanes as a model organism. The main task for students in this investigation is to figure out how to simulate paper airplane evolution (including reproduction, inheritance, mutation, and selection). In addition, the lab requires students to practice analytic thinking and to carefully delineate the implications of their results. PMID:16951065

Kalinowski, Steven T; Taper, Mark L; Metz, Anneke M

2006-11-01

339

Solvent-Free Synthesis and Fluorescence of a Thiol-Reactive Sensor for Undergraduate Organic Laboratories.  

PubMed

A green organic laboratory experiment was developed in which students synthesize a sensor for thiols using a microscale, solventless Diels-Alder reaction at room temperature or 37 °C. The molecular probe is easily purified by column chromatography in a Pasteur pipet and characterized by thin-layer chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. The thiol-reactive sensor becomes intensely fluorescent upon exposure to thiols from N-acetylcysteine, bovine serum albumin, or human hair (pretreated with a reducing agent to reveal cysteine thiols in ?-keratin). This fluorescence is observable even with micrograms of probe. PMID:24415795

Patterson, Anastasia L; May, Mary D; Visser, Bryan J; Kislukhin, Alexander A; Vosburg, David A

2013-12-10

340

Integrating a Discovery-Based Laboratory to Teach Supply Chain Management Fundamentals in an Undergraduate Management Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using experiential simulation games is a commonly used pedagogical method to enrich classroom discussions and to facilitate students' learning in supply chain management education at both undergraduate and graduate levels. However, existing games are inappropriate for undergraduate students that are first-time learners of the subject. In this…

Zeng, Amy; Johnson, Sharon

2009-01-01

341

Biodegradation as a biotechnological model for the teaching of biochemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Review: Biodegradation as a biotechnological model for the teaching of biochemistry. A knowledge of waste treatment and the biodegradation processes involved is necessary for undergraduates in agriculture, chemistry, biology, food technology, etc. Courses in these subjects must make adequate provision for such instruction. In this article, we suggest a theoretical and practical study of composting, which stimulates the interest of

Maria De Lourdes Bellinaso; João Antônio Pêgas Henriques; Christine Claire Gaylarde

2002-01-01

342

Concepts and Skills in the Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Lab  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most colleges and universities throughout the world now offer a Biochemistry/Molecular Biology (BMB) lab course that is designed for undergraduate students in the molecular life sciences, chemistry, and related fields. To best serve our students, we must introduce them to the most current concepts, skills, and methods available. Suggestions for…

Boyer, Rodney

2003-01-01

343

The Use of Multiple Tools for Teaching Medical Biochemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using…

Se, Alexandre B.; Passos, Renato M.; Ono, Andre H.; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

2008-01-01

344

An analysis of cognitive growth of undergraduate students in a problem-centered general chemistry laboratory curriculum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study explored how undergraduate students in a new problem-centered General Chemistry Laboratory curriculum achieved cognitive growth. The new curriculum had three instructional segments: the highly-structured, semi-structured, and open-ended segments. The pedagogical approaches adopted were expository, guided-inquiry, and open-inquiry styles, respectively. Sixty-seven first-year undergraduate students who enrolled in the course in Spring semester, 2000, at Columbia University and three Ph.D.-level chemistry experts were included in the study. A qualitative approach was used including data collection through "think-aloud" problem solving; however, quantitative data such as test scores were also used. The findings from this study confirmed that chemistry experts possessed sophisticated and domain-specific conceptual knowledge structures; they mobilized and applied conceptual knowledge in conjunction with use of heuristics, tacit knowledge, and experience in authentic problem solving. They validated the new curriculum design in preparing students for inquiry-type of problem solving. For novices, solving of semi-structured before ill-structured problems had a positive effect on the solvers' chance of success in solving the latter type of problems as their abilities to mobilize and apply conceptual knowledge and use effective strategies appeared to be critical for successful problem solving. Students in the new course curriculum had grown cognitively as evidenced by their performance on the Case Study projects and Final Examination. High academic achievers were found to perform well independently while the medium and relatively low academic achievers should benefit from sustained and intensive instruction. It is proposed that ill-structured problems should be used to assess and identify the best from the better students. Finally, it was found that no significant change in students' attitudes had resulted from their curriculum experience. Gender and cognitive style preferences may explain the preliminary signs of a bilateral change. Since students in chemistry courses are coming from increasingly diverse backgrounds, courses adopting a pedagogical approach that includes, (1) sequencing from the more expository to guided- and open-inquiry learning experiences for students, and (2) emphasizing a balance between content, context, concepts, and science processes, seem to be of the type that is more conducive to produce students of the qualities which chemistry educators have described as "ideal."

Szeto, Alan Ka-Fai

345

Seeding the Physical and Analytical Laboratory Curriculum with Interdisciplinary Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the past five years, the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Maryland at College Park has worked to modernize all facets of the undergraduate laboratory experience. Students in the first-year biochemistry laboratory now utilize modern techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology to isolate and characterize the bacterial enzyme alkaline phosphatase. Organic chemistry laboratories are now conducted exclusively with microware. New laboratory-intensive introductory chemistry courses have been developed for out chemistry majors. This Highlight describes innovations in three upper-division laboratories, Physical Chemistry Laboratories I and II and Instrumental Methods of Analysis. Beyond serving as an experimental practicum, an important goal of these laboratories is that students begin to gain an appreciation for the power of chemical measurements to probe the properties of more complex chemical systems. Since physical and analytical methods are increasingly applied to biochemical systems in research, in industrial processes, and in health and environmental regulation, it is appropriate to introduce experiments involving biochemical, environmental, and materials systems to these upper-division laboratories.

Reutt-Robey, Janice; Blough, Neil; Rebbert, Richard

1999-02-01

346

Demonstrating Chemical and Analytical Concepts in the Undergraduate Laboratory Using Capillary Electrophoresis and Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes instrumental analysis laboratory exercises that utilize capillary electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography to demonstrate several analytical and chemical principles. Alkyl parabens (4-hydroxy alkyl benzoates), which are common ingredients in cosmetic formulations, are separated by capillary electrophoresis. The electrophoretic mobilities of the parabens can be explained on the basis of their relative size. 3-Hydroxy ethylbenzoate is also separated to demonstrate the effect of substituent position on the acid dissociation constant and the effect this has on electrophoretic mobility. Homologous series of alkyl benzoates and alkyl phthalates (common plasticizers) are separated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography at four surfactant concentrations. This exercise demonstrates the separation mechanism of micellar electrokinetic chromatography, the concept of chromatographic phase ratio, and the concepts of micelle formation. A photodiode array detector is used in both exercises to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of the detector and to demonstrate the effect of pH and substituent position on the spectra of the analytes.

Palmer, Christopher P.

1999-11-01

347

Papers from U.S. Department of Energy Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program (SULI) 2005  

SciTech Connect

Polarization measurements at X-ray and gamma-ray energies can provide crucial information on the emission region around massive compact objects such as black holes and neutron stars. The Polarized Gamma-ray Observer (PoGO) is a new balloon-borne instrument designed to measure polarization from such astrophysical objects in the 30-100 keV range, under development by an international collaboration with members from United States, Japan, Sweden and France. The PoGO instrument has been designed by the collaboration and several versions of prototype models have been built at SLAC. The purpose of this experiment is to test the latest prototype model with a radioactive gamma-ray source. For this, we have to polarize gamma-rays in a laboratory environment. Unpolarized gamma-rays from Am241 (59.5 keV) were Compton scattered at around 90 degrees for this purpose. Computer simulation of the scattering process in the setup predicts a 86% polarization. The polarized beam was then used to irradiate the prototype PoGO detector. The data taken in this experiment showed a clear polarization signal, with a measured azimuthal modulation factor of 0.35 {+-} 0.02. The measured modulation is in very close agreement with the value expected from a previous beam test study of a polarized gamma-ray beam at the Argonne National Laboratories Advanced Photon Source. This experiment has demonstrated that the PoGO instrument (or any other polarimeter in the energy range) can be tested in a libratory with a simple setup to a similar accuracy.

Quinn, Helen, (ed.); /SLAC

2005-12-16

348

Two Successful Outreach Programs at Storm Peak Laboratory: GRASP for Undergraduates and Partnership for 5th Grade Science Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Desert Research Institute operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the Steamboat Springs Ski Resort at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term atmospheric research. The SPL mission statement is to ensure that the laboratory will continue to integrate climate research and education by advancing discovery and understanding within the field of pollution, aerosol and cloud interactions. During the last year, SPL has created two successful outreach programs reaching very different audiences. First, to engage students from local elementary schools, SPL established a 5th grade climate education program. This program is based on a partnership between SPL and Yampatika's&penvironmental educators. Yampatika is a non-profit outdoor environmental education organization. The program spans three days for each school and includes five elementary schools. During the first day, educators from Yampatika visit each classroom to introduce the concepts of climate and weather as well as teach students how to use scientific equipment. During the field program on the second day, students measure and record information about temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed, and particle concentration while they travel to SPL via the gondola (in winter) or Suburban (in fall). Once at the laboratory, students tour the facility, discuss SPL research activities, and explore application of these activities to their curriculum. Following the field trip, Yampatika educators and SPL scientists will visit the school for a follow-up to help children explore concepts, answer questions, and evaluate students" learning. The second program, Geoscience Research at Storm Peak (GRASP), was designed to engage students from underrepresented groups and created a partnership between three Minority Serving Institutions and the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). Undergraduate students from Tennessee State University, Howard University, Colorado State at Pueblo, and UNR will gather at SPL in the summer of 2008, via funding from the National Science Foundation. Throughout the year-long GRASP program, students encounter the scientific process - from creating a hypothesis, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting their results. Beginning in April, GRASP students will be presented with a short course in atmospheric science at their local institutions. The students will then begin formulating research questions for their time at SPL. In June, students will travel to SPL and work in small groups measuring cloud properties and trace gases with the guidance of an individual instructor. Data collected will be the basis for continuing student research projects. GRASP students and mentors will communicate regarding the progress of student research projects during the fall semester. All GRASP participants will meet at the campus of Howard University the following winter for a reunion workshop.

Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.; Wright, J.

2007-12-01

349

Institutional practices and policies in acid-base testing: a self reported Croatian survey study on behalf of the Croatian society of medical biochemistry and laboratory medicine Working Group for acid-base balance  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The aim of this survey study was to assess the current practices and policies in use related to the various steps in the blood gas testing process, across hospital laboratories in Croatia. Materials and methods: First questionnaire was sent by email to all medical biochemistry laboratories (N = 104) within general, specialized and clinical hospitals and university hospital centres to identify laboratories which perform blood gas analysis. Second questionnaire with detailed questions about sample collection, analysis and quality control procedures, was sent only to 47 laboratories identified by the first survey. Questionnaire was designed as combination of questions and statements with Likert scale. Third questionnaire was sent to all participating laboratories (N=47) for additional clarification for either indeterminate or unclear answers. Results: Blood gas analysis is performed in 47/104 hospital laboratories in Croatia. In 25/41 (0.61) of the laboratories capillary blood gas sampling is the preferred sample type for adult patient population, whereas arterial blood sample is preferentially used in only 5/44 laboratories (0.11). Blood sampling and sample processing for capillary samples is done almost always by laboratory technicians (36/41 and 37/44, respectively), whereas arterial blood sampling is almost always done by the physician (24/29) and only rarely by a nurse (5/28). Sample acceptance criteria and sample analysis are in accordance with international recommendations for majority of laboratories. 43/44 laboratories participate in the national EQA program. POCT analyzers are installed outside of the laboratory in 20/47 (0.43) institutions. Laboratory staff is responsible for education and training of ward personnel, quality control and instrument maintenance in only 12/22, 11/20 and 9/20 institutions, respectively. Conclusions: Practices related to collection and analysis for blood gases in Croatia are not standardised and vary substantially between laboratories. POCT analyzers are not under the direct supervision by laboratory personnel in a large proportion of surveyed institutions. Collective efforts should be made to harmonize and improve policies and procedures related to blood gas testing in Croatian laboratories. PMID:24969922

Duki?, Lora; Šimundi?, Ana-Maria

2014-01-01

350

Reproduction, Physiology and Biochemistry  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This chapter focuses on the reproduction, physiology, and biochemistry of the root-knot nematodes. The extensive amount of information on the reproduction and cytogenetics of species of Meloidogyne contrasts with the limited information on physiology, biochemistry, and biochemical pathways. In commo...

351

Detergent-Based Isolation of Yeast Membrane Rafts: An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Series for the Undergraduate Cell Biology or Biochemistry Lab  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lipid rafts have been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell signaling, endocytosis, and even viral infection. Isolation of these lipid rafts often involves detergent treatment of the membrane to dissolve nonraft components followed by separation of raft regions in a density gradient. We present here an inquiry-based lab series…

Willhite, D. Grant; Wright, Stephen E.

2009-01-01

352

1 Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR  

E-print Network

1 Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE GRADUATE Master's program · Master of Science in the field of molecular biochemistry and bioinformatics (http://bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/ biochemistry-molecular-medicine/ms) FACULTY University Professor F. Murad Professors P. Berg, V. Hu, A. Kumar

Vertes, Akos

353

Impact of a Backwards Faded Scaffolding (BFS) Approach to Inquiry-Based Astronomy Laboratory Experiences on Undergraduate Non-Science Majors' Views of Scientific Inquiry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an effort to support effective instruction in undergraduate astronomy, the Center for Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) team introduced an inquiry-based laboratory curriculum designed using Backwards Faded Scaffolding (BFS) inquiry teaching framework. A major goal of the curriculum design was to enhance student learning beyond content knowledge alone toward more informed understandings of scientific inquiry through authentic astronomy inquiry experiences using astronomical data sets available online. This study explored the impact of that curriculum on undergraduate non-science majors’ views of the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI). Over 200 introductory astronomy students’ were surveyed using the VOSI-4 questionnaire pre and post intervention. These data were analyzed for significant shifts in understanding of two aspects of NOSI; Distinction Between Data and Evidence (DvE) and Multiple Methods of Science (MMS). These results informed an investigation of lab instructors’ observations of students’ interactions with the intervention curriculum compared to traditional labs. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests showed significant shifts in the distributions of Fall (n=112) and Spring (n=98) samples toward more informed understandings of DvE (Fall, z=-3.811, p<.00 Spring, z=-3.698, p<.001) , while there was no significant change for understanding of MMS (Fall, z=-.112, p=.910; Spring, z=-.607, p=.544). Instructor interview analysis suggested that the curriculum provided multiple opportunities for students to evaluate and determine the relevance of data with respect to specific research questions, however they may not have realized they were exclusively engaged in observational rather than experimental inquiries possibly leading students to accommodate their astronomy inquiry experiences within persistent misconceptions of "The Scientific Method” as the only valid method for inquiry. The results of the study suggest that a purposefully scaffolded, inquiry-based, introductory astronomy laboratory curriculum may be effective in enhancing undergraduate non-science majors’ understanding of scientific inquiry and may prove to be a valuable resource for undergraduate astronomy instructors.

Lyons, Daniel Jonathan

2012-01-01

354

Bringing the Excitement and Motivation of Research to Students; Using Inquiry and Research-Based Learning in a Year-Long Biochemistry Laboratory: Part I--Guided Inquiry--Purification and Characterization of a Fusion Protein--Histidine Tag, Malate Dehydrogenase, and Green Fluorescent Protein  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A successful laboratory experience provides the foundation for student success, creating active participation in the learning process. Here, we describe a new approach that emphasizes research, inquiry and problem solving in a year-long biochemistry experience. The first semester centers on the purification, characterization, and analysis of a…

Knutson, Kristopher; Smith, Jennifer; Wallert, Mark A.; Provost, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

355

Aligning Biochemistry to the Interests of Biology Students Using Haloperoxidase to Illustrate Reactions of Environmental and Biomedical Importance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate degree programs in the biosciences almost always include elements of biochemistry. In the United Kingdom, biosciences programs often have optional pathways to accommodate students of diverse interests. These programs rarely require students to demonstrate any school-level chemistry knowledge, and many students find biochemistry

Jervis, Les; Jervis, Loretta M.; Giovannelli, Donato

2005-01-01

356

Electrospray and tandem mass spectrometry in biochemistry.  

PubMed Central

Over the last 20 years, biological MS has changed out of all recognition. This is primarily due to the development in the 1980s of 'soft ionization' methods that permit the ionization and vaporization of large, polar, and thermally labile biomolecules. These developments in ionization mode have driven the design and manufacture of smaller and cheaper mass analysers, making the mass spectrometer a routine instrument in the biochemistry laboratory today. In the present review the revolutionary 'soft ionization' methods will be discussed with particular reference to electrospray. The mass analysis of ions will be described, and the concept of tandem MS introduced. Where appropriate, examples of the application of MS in biochemistry will be provided. Although the present review will concentrate on the MS of peptides/proteins and lipids, all classes of biomolecules can be analysed, and much excellent work has been done in the fields of carbohydrate and nucleic acid biochemistry. PMID:11311115

Griffiths, W J; Jonsson, A P; Liu, S; Rai, D K; Wang, Y

2001-01-01

357

Teaching Undergraduate Research: The One-Room Schoolhouse Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate research in the biochemistry, cell, and molecular biology program at Drake University uses apprenticeship, cooperative-style learning, and peer mentoring in a cross-disciplinary and cross-community educational program. We call it the one-room schoolhouse approach to teaching undergraduate research. This approach is cost effective,…

Henderson, LaRhee; Buising, Charisse; Wall, Piper

2008-01-01

358

Curricular Changes in Accredited Undergraduate Programmes in Argentina  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper assesses the impact on the curricula of undergraduate programmes in Argentina of the quality assurance mechanism implemented by the National Commission for University Evaluation and Accreditation (CONEAU). The paper examines curricula changes in pharmacy, biochemistry and agriculture undergraduate programmes to show the major…

Coria, Maria Marta; Deluca, Monica; Martinez, Maria Eugenia

2010-01-01

359

University of Alabama Biochemistry recommended University of South Alabama Biochemistry recommended  

E-print Network

Alabama University of Alabama Biochemistry recommended University of South Alabama Biochemistry recommended Arkansas University of Arkansas Biochemistry, genetics, Biology/Zoology are recommended California Loma Linda Biochemistry is recommended Stanford Biochemistry, genetics recommended UC Davis genetics

Hone, James

360

Analysis of Bromination of Ethylbenzene Using a 45 MHz NMR Spectrometer: An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 45 MHz benchtop NMR spectrometer is used to identify the structures and determine the amount of 1-bromoethylbenzene and 1,1-dibromoethylbenzene produced from free-radical bromination of ethylbenzene. The experiment is designed for nonchemistry majors, specifically B.S. Biology students, in a predominantly undergraduate institution with…

Isaac-Lam, Meden F.

2014-01-01

361

Comparing the Effectiveness of Verification and Inquiry Laboratories in Supporting Undergraduate Science Students in Constructing Arguments around Socioscientific Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This quasi-experimental study uses a pre-/post-intervention approach to investigate the quality of undergraduate students' arguments in the context of socioscientific issues (SSI) based on experiencing a semester of traditional "cookbook" instruction (N?=?79) or a semester of argument-based instruction (N?=?73) in the context of an…

Grooms, Jonathon; Sampson, Victor; Golden, Barry

2014-01-01

362

Modeling Stretching Modes of Common Organic Molecules with the Quantum Mechanical Harmonic Oscillator: An Undergraduate Vibrational Spectroscopy Laboratory Exercise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An introductory undergraduate physical organic chemistry exercise that introduces the harmonic oscillator's use in vibrational spectroscopy is developed. The analysis and modeling exercise begins with the students calculating the stretching modes of common organic molecules with the help of the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator (QMHO) model.

Parnis, J. Mark; Thompson, Matthew G. K.

2004-01-01

363

Becoming a scientist: A qualitative study of the educational experience of undergraduates working in an American and a Brazilian research laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Because the production of scientific and technological innovations has been at the center of debates for economic growth, scientists are recognized as important actors in the current global market. In this study, I will examine the undergraduate education of future scientists by focusing on students working in research projects of faculty members. This research activity has been promoted by American and Brazilian public agencies as an attempt to attract more college students to scientific careers as well as to improve their future performance in science. Evaluations of these programs have focused on important quantitative indicators focusing mainly on the amount of students that later choose to pursue scientific careers. However, these studies fail to address important educational aspects of undergraduates' experience. In this research, I explore the educational processes taking place as students are introduced to the making of science in order to understand how and what they are learning. Three bodies of literature illuminates the formulation and the analysis of the research questions: (1) theories of globalization situate the education of scientists within the dynamics of a broader social, economic, cultural, and historical framework; (2) the critical pedagogy of Paulo Freire is the basis for the understanding of the pedagogical processes shaping undergraduate students' experiences within the research site; (3) Critical and Cultural Studies of Science and Technology illuminate the analysis of the complex interactions and practices constructed within the laboratory. In order to understand the educational processes shaping the experiences of undergraduate students engaged in research activities, I conducted a qualitative investigation based on participant-observation and in-depth interviews in an American and a Brazilian laboratories. The two sites constituted insightful case studies that illuminated the understanding of inquires about the training of students in science. In addition, the study of two countries enriched the research inquiry, adding to the findings reflections on the ways differences in national contexts affects scientific training and scientific practices. Mainly, this qualitative research of students in laboratories offers some concrete recommendations and illuminating reflections for science educators, science policy makers, and for those working in the understanding of science epistemologies.

Pascoa, Maria Beatriz Amorim

364

Foundational concepts and underlying theories for majors in "biochemistry and molecular biology".  

PubMed

Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members and science educators from around the country that focused on identifying: 1) core principles of biochemistry and molecular biology, 2) essential concepts and underlying theories from physics, chemistry, and mathematics, and 3) foundational skills that undergraduate majors in biochemistry and molecular biology must understand to complete their major coursework. Using information gained from these workshops, as well as from the ASBMB accreditation working group and the NSF Vision and Change report, the Core Concepts working group has developed a consensus list of learning outcomes and objectives based on five foundational concepts (evolution, matter and energy transformation, homeostasis, information flow, and macromolecular structure and function) that represent the expected conceptual knowledge base for undergraduate degrees in biochemistry and molecular biology. This consensus will aid biochemistry and molecular biology educators in the development of assessment tools for the new ASBMB recommended curriculum. PMID:24019234

Tansey, John T; Baird, Teaster; Cox, Michael M; Fox, Kristin M; Knight, Jennifer; Sears, Duane; Bell, Ellis

2013-01-01

365

Concept mapping enhances learning of biochemistry  

PubMed Central

Background Teaching basic science courses is challenging in undergraduate medical education because of the ubiquitous use of didactic lectures and reward for recall of factual information during examinations. The purpose of this study is to introduce concept maps with clinical cases (the innovative program) to improve learning of biochemistry course content. Methods Participants were first year medical students (n=150) from Saveetha Medical College and Hospital (India); they were randomly divided into two groups of 75, one group attending the traditional program, the other the innovative program. Student performance was measured using three written knowledge tests (each with a maximum score of 20). The students also evaluated the relevance of the learning process using a 12-item questionnaire. Results Students in the innovative program using concept mapping outperformed those in the traditional didactic program (means of 7.13–8.28 vs. 12.33–13.93, p<0.001). The students gave high positive ratings for the innovative course (93–100% agreement). Conclusion The new concept-mapping program resulted in higher academic performance compared to the traditional course and was perceived favorably by the students. They especially valued the use of concept mapping as learning tools to foster the relevance of biochemistry to clinical practice, and to enhance their reasoning and learning skills, as well as their deeper understanding for biochemistry. PMID:23464600

Surapaneni, Krishna M.; Tekian, Ara

2013-01-01

366

Biochemistry Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 37 (2007) 891902  

E-print Network

Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 37 (2007) 891,Ã? a CSIRO Entomology, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia b Department of Entomology and Cancer

Hammock, Bruce D.

367

Research Experience for Undergraduates Wayne State University  

E-print Network

Research Experience for Undergraduates Wayne State University Detroit, Michigan June 3 ­ August 9 National Accelerator Laboratory. Programs: Promising undergraduates will participate in basic research, 2013 Spend a part of your summer doing research in Physics! the National Science Foundation

Cinabro, David

368

Undergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide  

E-print Network

areas, coastal and ocean law, and marine cultural resources Marine Science/Biology Marine biologists interested in these latter areas should also consider Marine Science/Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyUndergraduate Marine Science Program Student Advising Guide 2014-2015 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

Miami, University of

369

MBiochem (Single Honours Degree) Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Biology modules) Cell Biology Ecology and Conservation Evolutionary Biology Marine Biology Molecular58 Biology MBiochem (Single Honours Degree) Biochemistry BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Behavioural Biology Biochemistry Biology Biomolecular Science (offered by the School of Chemistry, includes some

Brierley, Andrew

370

Using an international p53 mutation database as a foundation for an online laboratory in an upper level undergraduate biology class.  

PubMed

A two-part laboratory exercise was developed to enhance classroom instruction on the significance of p53 mutations in cancer development. Students were asked to mine key information from an international database of p53 genetic changes related to cancer, the IARC TP53 database. Using this database, students designed several data mining activities to look at the changes in the p53 gene from a number of perspectives, including potential cancer-causing agents leading to particular changes and the prevalence of certain p53 variations in certain cancers. In addition, students gained a global perspective on cancer prevalence in different parts of the world. Students learned how to use the database in the first part of the exercise, and then used that knowledge to search particular cancers and cancer-causing agents of their choosing in the second part of the exercise. Students also connected the information gathered from the p53 exercise to a previous laboratory exercise looking at risk factors for cancer development. The goal of the experience was to increase student knowledge of the link between p53 genetic variation and cancer. Students also were able to walk a similar path through the website as a cancer researcher using the database to enhance bench work-based experiments with complementary large-scale database p53 variation information. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 43(1):28-32, 2015. PMID:25395068

Melloy, Patricia G

2015-01-01

371

Spring 2015 Biochemistry Department Courses  

E-print Network

Spring 2015 Biochemistry Department Courses Course Number CRN Title Instructor Credits Days Time:00-10:50 5150 Elective Required GBCH-7520 24367 Human Medical Metabolic Biochemistry Franklin 5 T Th 3:30 - 5 GBCH-6110 26581 Basic Medical Biochemistry Landry 3 MWF 3:00-3:50 6065 Elective Master's Research

Vaccaro, Joe

372

Investigations of Polymorphic Germylene Structures, Experimental Calculations of a New Boron-Sulfur Heterocycle and Assessment of a Safety Curriculum in an Undergraduate Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic interaction between chemistry and humankind is explored via investigations with benign substrates and the incorporation of proper laboratory technique instruction to a general audience. This intersection will be discussed in further detail in the introductory chapter of this thesis. The second chapter of this thesis describes the determination of two polymorphic structures from relatively non-toxic Cp*GeCl. The investigation of the polymorphic stability led to discovery of a solution equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric or higher oligomeric species. These experiments revealed the conversion of polymorphic structures in solid state and solution, allowing a thorough exploration of the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of each of the polymorphic structures. The third chapter of this dissertation describes computational analysis of the aromaticity of the recently prepared boron heterocycle, 2-diiosopropylamino-2 H-1,2-thiaborin. The importance and potential utility of aromatic boron-containing heterocycles in electronic devices and hydrogen storage is discussed. The theory behind computational chemistry and the analysis of the aromaticity, HOMO/LUMO, and nuclear magnetic resonance shifts of 2-diiosopropylamino-2 H-1,2-thiaborin are also reported. NICS (1) calculations determined that external pi-interactions of the external amino substituent greatly decrease the aromaticity of the parent ring. The fourth chapter describes the development and analysis of the effectiveness of a chemical hygiene-based laboratory curriculum incorporated in the University of Michigan undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course, Chemistry 211. There is a great need to educate the general population of undergraduates enrolled in lower-division organic chemistry courses at the University of Michigan and in other universities in chemical hygiene. Previous laboratory curricula lacked in-depth discussions on proper laboratory practices. Through weekly reading assignments, quizzes, colorful posters and other educational materials, the students were exposed to information about chemical safety. Surveys and in-class observations were used to analyze the effectiveness of the newly instituted curriculum. The results from this study indicate that teaching the students and the graduate student instructors chemical hygiene can decrease the overall number of laboratory accidents and increase awareness of chemical safety.

Rohr Daniel, Ahleah

373

An Inquiry-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Structure Emphasizing Competency in the Scientific Process: A Guided Approach with an Electronic Notebook Format  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students…

Hall, Mona L.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

2014-01-01

374

Synthesis and Application of Ratiometric and "Turn-On" Fluorescent pH Sensors: An Advanced Organic Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An upper-division organic chemistry laboratory experiment exploring fluorescent sensing over two laboratory periods and part of a third is described. Two functionally distinct pH-responsive sensors are prepared through a dehydrative three-component coupling reaction. During the abbreviated (<1 h) first laboratory period, students set up…

Hutt, Johnathon T.; Aron, Zachary D.

2014-01-01

375

Biochemistry Off the Shelf.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides sources of nonanimal biochemical materials (which are relatively inexpensive, readily available, and require no special storage) suitable for use in biochemistry experiments. They are presented under these headings: (1) enzymes and other proteins; (2) carbohydrates; (3) lipids; (4) nucleic acids; and (5) metabolism. (JN)

Wilson, Jerry L.

1985-01-01

376

Structural Biology and Biochemistry  

Cancer.gov

Although mutant HRAS and NRAS are drivers of some human cancers, mutant KRAS is the most frequent offender. However, much of what we know about RAS structures and biochemistry is derived from HRAS. Several projects in the RAS Initiative are designed to expand what we know about KRAS.

377

Extracellular Enzymes Lab Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Extracellular Enzymes Lab Biochemistry · All organisms convert small organic compounds shown here: All of these reactions, of which there are more than 1000, are catalyzed by enzymes. Glucose Phosphate PathwayEMP Pathway #12;Amino Acids #12;More Complete Metabolic Network TOP #12;#12;Enzymes

Vallino, Joseph J.

378

Extracellular Enzymes Lab Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Extracellular Enzymes Lab Biochemistry · All organisms convert small organic compounds by enzymes. Glucose (C6) Pentose (C5) Triose (C3) Pyruvate (C3) AcetylCoA (C2) Citrate (C6) Oxoglutarate (C5 Cycle Pentose Phosphate PathwayEMP Pathway #12;More Complete Metabolic Network TOP #12;#12;Enzymes

Vallino, Joseph J.

379

Extracellular Enzymes Lab Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Extracellular Enzymes Lab Biochemistry · All organisms convert small organic compounds, of which there are more than 1000, are catalyzed by enzymes. Glucose (C6) Pentose (C5) Triose (C3) Pyruvate Complete Metabolic Network TOP #12;#12;Enzymes · Enzymes are large proteins that all organisms synthesize

Vallino, Joseph J.

380

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Graphical Kinetic Data Analysis of the Dopamine Neurotransmitter System: An Exercise for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course  

PubMed Central

Neuroimaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET), are widely used in clinical settings and in basic neuroscience research. Education in these methods and their applications may be incorporated into curricula to keep pace with this expanding field. Here, we have developed pedagogical materials on the fundamental principles of PET that incorporate a hands-on laboratory activity to view and analyze human brain scans. In this activity, students will use authentic PET brain scans generated from original research at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Volkow et al., 2009) to explore the neurobiological effects of a drug on the dopamine system. We provide lecture and assignment materials (including a 50-minute PowerPoint presentation introducing PET concepts), written background information for students and instructors, and explicit instructions for a 4-hour, computer-based laboratory to interested educators. Also, we discuss our experience implementing this exercise as part of an advanced undergraduate laboratory course at Stony Brook University in 2010 and 2011. Observing the living human brain is intriguing, and this laboratory is designed to illustrate how PET neuroimaging techniques are used to directly probe biological processes occurring in the living brain. Laboratory course modules on imaging techniques such as PET can pique the interest of students potentially interested in neuroscience careers, by exposing them to current research methods. This activity provides practical experience analyzing PET data using a graphical analysis method known as the Logan plot, and applies core neuropharmacology concepts. We hope that this manuscript inspires college instructors to incorporate education in PET neuroimaging into their courses. PMID:24693258

Mirrione, Martine M.; Ruth, Nora; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Fowler, Joanna; Kernan, Maurice

2014-01-01

381

Study Abroad in Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Study Abroad in Chemistry and Biochemistry Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry York Hall for courses that may fulfill Chemistry and/or Biochemistry & other requirements to add to your Academic Planning Form Meet with your Chemistry and/or Biochemistry & college advisors Study Abroad as a Chemistry/Biochemistry

Gleeson, Joseph G.

382

Biochemistry (by Jochanan Stenesh)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plenum: New York, 1998. Hardcover, ISBN 0 306-45732-6. 95. Paperback, ISBN 0 306 45733 4. 55 (set of 3). Solutions manual and transparencies available. According to the promotional materials accompanying this text, its intended audience is students in one-semester undergraduate biochemistry courses. At just over 500 pages, the book is shorter than the norm of well over 1000 pages. The challenge, then, is to present the subject in a coherent and compelling fashion while necessarily omitting a large fraction of the material that one normally finds in more inclusive texts. That kind of editing is obviously going to lead to squawking from some quarters, so I should put my prejudices on the table. I teach a one-semester course in biochemical structure, and I have a long-standing interest in using molecular models to explain biochemical behavior, both in research and in teaching. The editing performed by Professor Stenesh is likely to trouble someone with a structural or mechanistic background. Rather than selectively excluding some topics, Stenesh has created a table of contents that looks like it's from a much longer text. The usual chapters on biochemical structure, catalysis, metabolism and molecular genetics are included here. The ax fell elsewhere, and most obvious to my eye are the omissions of structure and chemical mechanism beyond those few chapters that are dedicated to them. A brief presentation on the structure and function of hemoglobin is given in the chapter on proteins, and the catalytic mechanism of chymotrypsin is briefly presented in the chapter on catalysis. But in chapters on metabolism, the structures of substrates and products are shown while mechanisms of conversion are omitted. For example, in the description of aldolase, we're informed that the enzyme catalyzes a reverse aldol condensation, but the reader isn't shown how the aldol condensation relates to the chemical conversion we see in the figure. (Part of the problem may be that the text assumes only one semester of preparation in organic chemistry, which might not be adequate for a discussion of biochemical mechanism.) In the section on gene regulation, no mention is made of the atomic-level interactions between regulatory proteins and DNA that lead to specific, high-affinity binding. The helix-turn-helix motif isn't even mentioned. Obviously, in a 500-page text, something had to go. It's too bad, though, that the omitted material includes the structural and mechanistic explanations for the chemical transformations and cellular processes being described. These complaints shouldn't overshadow the fact that this is a thoughtfully constructed text. The writing is both clear and simple. Broken into subsections, topics are presented in brief synopses that carefully identify key terms and ideas, and the problems at the back of the chapters are plentiful and appropriate. Stenesh's presentation is logically sound. I appreciated the presentation of thermodynamics in a chapter that directly precedes metabolism, rather than the more common brief review that appears in the earliest chapters. Likewise, the inclusion of enzyme catalysis directly after protein structure works in the context of this text. I noted a few small errors, but nothing that would cause distractions for the student. Unfortunately, the two-color graphics that accompany the text are less than compelling by current standards (also, a relatively greater number of errors appear in the figures). In drawing chemical structures, little effort is made to show molecular shape. For example, the figures use Fischer projections (without definition before Chapter 5) to define stereoisomers, and only in the appendix are dashes and wedges used to define them. This is particularly problematic in the chapter on amino acids, where their chirality is described but never illustrated. It is difficult to see the three-dimensional concepts being presented in the two-dimensional format being used. In topics where good visuals would be most useful (such as protein and DNA structure), the figures are reminiscent o

Glasfeld, Arthur

1999-06-01

383

Undergraduate Scholarships  

E-print Network

Continuing Undergraduate Scholarships 2011-2012 GUIDELINES Apply on-line through Triton June 2011 Questions: scholarships@ucsd.edu (858) 534-1067 Undergraduate Scholarship Program Scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis, selected by the Faculty Committee on Undergraduate

Hampton, Randy

384

Undergraduate Researchers  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Researchers are invited to submit abstracts to present their research at the Undergraduate Research Poster Reception that will be part of the University of Pittsburgh's 11th annual.edu/posters.htm Undergraduate Research Poster Reception 5:00 p.m., Thursday, 6 October Connolly Ballroom, Alumni Hall

Sibille, Etienne

385

A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory  

PubMed Central

The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in two distinct steps of protein secretion were differentiated using a genetic reporter designed specifically to identify defects in the first step of the pathway, the insertion of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (Vallen, 2002). We have developed two versions of a Western blotting assay that serves as a second way of distinguishing the two secretory mutants, which we pair with the genetic assay in a 3-wk laboratory module. A quiz administered before and after students participated in the lab activities revealed significant postlab gains in their understanding of the secretory pathway and experimental techniques used to study it. A second survey administered at the end of the lab module assessed student perceptions of the efficacy of the lab activities; the results of this survey indicated that the experiments were successful in meeting a set of educational goals defined by the instructor. PMID:18316814

2008-01-01

386

Assessing student perspectives of the laboratory, self-efficacy in chemistry, and attitudes towards science in an undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research is lacking in the general chemistry laboratory that explores the concerted affective predictor variables of student perspectives of the laboratory, self-efficacy in chemistry, and student attitudes towards science. There is little research on the assessment of variables in the affective domain to determine student experiences in the chemistry laboratory. Student experiences in this study were assessed by determining congruence between student perspectives of their actual and preferred general chemistry laboratory environment using the SLEI, and student attitudes towards careers as a scientist using the SAI II. Correlations between scales from the SLEI, SAI II along with the CCSS that measures self-efficacy in college chemistry were identified. A sample of eighty college students enrolled in a first-semester general chemistry laboratory responded to the SLEI, SAI II, and CCSS. A t test indicated there were no significant differences with student cohesiveness, integration, material environment, and rule clarity between the actual and preferred SLEI signifying congruence. There were significant differences between students actual and preferred perception of open-endedness (t = -3.59, df = 28, p = 0.00). Student attitudes towards careers as a scientist could not be determined using pretests and posttests of the SAI II due to a ceiling effect. There were positive significant correlations found between the scales of material environment, integration from the SLEI and the scale of student attitudes towards careers as a scientist using the SAI II. There were also positive significant correlations between self-efficacy for everyday applications, and self-efficacy for cognitive skills from the CCSS with the scale of student attitudes towards careers as a scientist. This study is of significance since it is the first study exploring congruence between the actual and preferred student perspectives of the laboratory using the SLEI in a first semester general chemistry laboratory. It is also the first to report correlations between combined affective variables of student perspectives of the laboratory using the SLEI, student attitudes towards careers as a scientist with the SAI II, and self-efficacy in chemistry with the CCSS. Understanding student experiences through the assessment of these affective variables can help educators modify first-semester general chemistry laboratory activities to create a positive experience for students.

Olave, Marcella

387

Using student-generated UV-induced Escherichia coli mutants in a directed inquiry undergraduate genetics laboratory.  

PubMed

We report a thematic sequence of directed inquiry-based labs taking students from bacterial mutagenesis and phenotypic identification of their own self-created mutant, through identification of mutated genes by biochemical testing, to verification of mutant alleles by complementation, and finally to mutant allele characterization by DNA sequence analysis. The lab utilizes UV mutagenesis with wild-type Escherichia coli and a UV-sensitive isogenic derivative optimized for undergraduate use. The labs take advantage of the simplicity of E. coli in a realistic genetic investigation using safe UV irradiation methods for creation and characterization of novel mutants. Assessment data collected over three offerings of the course suggest that the labs, which combine original investigation in a scientifically realistic intellectual environment with learned techniques and concepts, were instrumental in improving students' learning in a number of areas. These include the development of critical thinking skills and understanding of concepts and methods. Student responses also suggest the labs were helpful in improving students' understanding of the scientific process as a rational series of experimental investigations and awareness of the interdisciplinary nature of scientific inquiry. PMID:20592259

Healy, Frank G; Livingstone, Kevin D

2010-09-01

388

The use of multiple tools for teaching medical biochemistry.  

PubMed

In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using topics of applied biochemistry); 2) a true/false applied biochemistry exam (written by peer tutors); 3) a 9-h exam on metabolism (based in real publications); 4) the Advanced Biochemistry course (directed to peer tutors, where students learn how to read and criticize real medical papers); 5) experiments about nutrition and metabolism, using students as volunteers, and about free radicals (real science for students); 6) the BioBio blog (taking advantage of the "web age," this enhances out of class exchanges of information between the professor, students, and peer tutors); 7) student lectures on public health issues and metabolic disorders directed to the community and lay people; and 8) the BioBio quiz show. The main objective of these activities is to provide students with a more practical and interesting approach to biochemistry, such as the application of theoretical knowledge to real situations (diseases, experiments, media information, and scientific discoveries). In addition, we emphasize the importance of peer tutor activities for optimized learning of both students and peer tutors, the importance of a closer interaction between students and teaching staff, and the necessity to initiate students precociously in two broad fields of medical activity: "real" basic science and contact with the public (also helping students--future doctors and nutritionists--to be able to communicate with lay people). Most activities were evaluated by the students through written questionnaires and informal conversations, along various semesters, indicating good acceptance and approval of these methods. Good student scores in the biochemistry exams and seminars indicated that these activities are also working as valid educational tools. PMID:18334567

Sé, Alexandre B; Passos, Renato M; Ono, André H; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

2008-03-01

389

Undergraduate Student Attitudes and Perceptions toward Low- and High-Level Inquiry Exercise Physiology Teaching Laboratory Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to compare student attitudes toward two different science laboratory learning experiences, specifically, traditional, cookbook-style, low-inquiry level (LL) activities and a high-inquiry level (HL) investigative project. In addition, we sought to measure and compare students' science-related attitudes and…

Henige, Kim

2011-01-01

390

A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

Chinni, Rosemarie C.

2012-01-01

391

Cooperative and Active Learning in Undergraduate Biological Laboratories at FIU--Implications to TA Teaching and Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There were several changes in the laboratory teaching program in the Biological Sciences at Florida International University (FIU) between 1993-1994. The underlying goal was the improvement of the amount of material learned and retained by the student, but these changes showed little positive improvement. It was deemed necessary for FIU to…

Penwell, Rebecca A.; Elsawa, Sherine F.; Pitzer, Thomas

2004-01-01

392

Determination of Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Time Using (Super 13)C NMR: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment designed for the physical chemistry laboratory where (super 13)C NMR is applied to determine the spin-lattice relaxation time for carbon atoms in n-hexanol is proposed. It is concluded that students learn the principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy as well as dynamic NMR experiments.

Gasyna, Zbigniew L.; Jurkiewicz, Antoni

2004-01-01

393

Use of the Herb Gymnema sylvestre to Illustrate the Principles of Gustatory Sensation: An Undergraduate Neuroscience Laboratory Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a laboratory exercise used to illustrate the principles of gustatory sensation. The Indian herb, gymnema sylvestre, is used in this experiment to impair the ability of tasting sugar. As a result the impairment alters the perception of sweetness, which leaves a profound and lasting impression on students and gives them a better comprehension of gustation.

Joseph Schroeder, Ellen Flannery-Schroeder (Conneticut College, University of Rhode Island; )

1999-11-30

394

Hands-On Experiences of Undergraduate Students in Automatics and Robotics Using a Virtual and Remote Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Automatics and Robotics subjects are always greatly improved when classroom teaching is supported by adequate laboratory courses and experiments following the "learning by doing" paradigm, which provides students a deep understanding of theoretical lessons. However, expensive equipment and limited time prevent teachers having sufficient…

Jara, Carlos A.; Candelas, Francisco A.; Puente, Santiago T.; Torres, Fernando

2011-01-01

395

Undergraduate Student Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Low- and High-Level Inquiry Exercise Physiology Teaching Laboratory Experiences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes findings on student attitudes toward two different science laboratory learning experiences, traditional, cookbook-style, low-inquiry level (LL) activities and a high-inquiry level (HL) investigative project. In addition, students' science-related attitudes and attitudes toward science were measured.

2011-06-01

396

Thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present studies have shown that GSH metabolism arose in the purple bacteria and cyanobacteria where it functions to protect against oxygen toxicity. Evidence was obtained indicating that GSH metabolism was incorporated into eucaryotes via the endosymbiosis giving rise to mitochrondria and chloroplasts. Aerobic bacteria lacking GSH utilize other thiols for apparently similar functions, the thiol being coenzyme A in Gram positive bacteria and chi-glutamylcysteine in the halobacteria. The thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes is thus seen to be much more highly diversified than that of eucaryotes and much remains to be learned about this subject.

Fahey, Robert C.

1986-01-01

397

The College of Natural Sciences invites you to apply for the MARILYN & RON TUTTLE UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH  

E-print Network

The College of Natural Sciences invites you to apply for the MARILYN & RON TUTTLE UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP Students meeting the following criteria are strongly encouraged to apply: Undergraduate student in the College of Natural Sciences majoring in either biology or biochemistry

Barnes, Elizabeth A.

398

Biosciences Biochemistry and Cell Biology  

E-print Network

111 Biosciences Biochemistry and Cell Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences Chair George N Biology The Wiess School of Natural Sciences Chair Ronald L. Sass Professors Paul A. Harcombe David C of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. This curriculum offers

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

399

A Council on Undergraduate Research Workshop Initiative to Establish, Enhance, and Institutionalize Undergraduate Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The value of undergraduate research workshop to significantly enhance the quality of undergraduate science education was cited as one of the goals by the National Science Foundations (NSF) Strategic Plan. To address this strategic national need, the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) has granted an NSF course, curriculum, and laboratory

Karukstis, Kerry K.

2006-01-01

400

Biochemistry of the Gene Laboratory Manual  

E-print Network

. B. Day 2: Harvesting and Fixing Cells Note: When resuspending cells, disrupt the pellet by gently ml of Hank's solution. 14. Resuspend cells by gently pipetting fluid up and down over pellet becomes amber, the caps will be loosened to release CO2 that accumulates during cell growth. 8. Two hours

Ronquist, Fredrik

401

Using a PyMOL Activity to Reinforce the Connection between Genotype and Phenotype in an Undergraduate Genetics Laboratory  

PubMed Central

With the purpose of developing an activity that would help clarify genetic concepts related to the connection between genotype and phenotype and the nature of mutations, we designed a three hour teaching module using the PyMol software. The activity starts with two pre-laboratory assignments, one to learn how to use PyMol and the other to read about a specific protein or protein family. During the laboratory students are given instructions where and how to find additional information on a specific disease and its causal mutations in order to prepare a 10-minute, in-class presentation. Using a post activity, anonymous quiz, we found a statistically significant different grade distribution in students that participated in the PyMol activity relative to a control group. We also found a significant improvement in the student’s comprehension when answering questions regarding the nature of mutations and protein structure. This demonstrates the utility of this simulation activity as a vehicle to improve student’s understanding of specific key genetic concepts. PMID:25461967

Simmons, Alexandra D.; Nguyen, Thao K. T.; Follis, Jack L.; Ribes-Zamora, Albert

2014-01-01

402

School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Safety Orientation & Training Plan  

E-print Network

sensor function, and training requirements. Biological Safety Cabinet(s): Demonstration of proper useSchool of Chemistry and Biochemistry Safety Orientation & Training Plan Prior to completing this site safety orientation and training, all laboratory personnel must have successfully completed the GT

Sherrill, David

403

Estimating leaf biochemistry using the PROSPECT leaf optical properties model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biophysical, biochemical, and optical properties of 63 fresh leaves and 58 dry leaves were measured to investigate the potential of remote sensing to estimate the leaf biochemistry from space. Almost 2000 hemispherical reflectance and transmittance spectra were acquired from 400 nm to 2500 nm using a laboratory spectrophotometer. The amount of chlorophyll, water, protein, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and starch

S. Jacquemoud; S. L. Ustin; J. Verdebout; G. Schmuck; G. Andreoli; B. Hosgood

1996-01-01

404

Information DEPARTMENT OF AGROCHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-print Network

Information DEPARTMENT OF AGROCHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY The Department of Agrochemistry and biochemistry of the University of Alicante, is made up of two areas of knowledge, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Edaphology and agricultural chemistry. NEWS Course of initiation to research in Biochemistry

Escolano, Francisco

405

Course Syllabus Chem 451: General Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Course Syllabus Chem 451: General Biochemistry Course Name: Chem 451: General Biochemistry of Chemistry and Biochemistry Arctic Health Research Building Rm 228 Research: Arctic Health Research Building of Biochemistry 4th or 5th ed. Author: David L. Nelson and Michael M. Cox W.H. Freeman and Company ISBN: 0

Wagner, Diane

406

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION  

E-print Network

OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION RECOMMENDED PROGRAM (1) FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER CHEM 111 SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER CHEM 326 Biochemistry I 4.0 CHEM 327 Biochemistry II 4.0 CHEM 487 Chemistry Seminar 0.5 CHEM 328 Anal Biochemistry Lab 1.0 CHEM ____ Chemistry Elective*** 2.0 CHEM 465 Analytical

Hardy, Christopher R.

407

Biochemistry by design.  

PubMed

Creationists are attempting to use biochemistry to win acceptance for their doctrine in the public mind and especially in state-funded schools. Biochemist Michael Behe is a major figure in this effort. His contention that certain cellular structures and biochemical processes - bacterial flagella, the blood-clotting cascade and the vertebrate immune system - cannot be the products of evolution has generated vigorous opposition from fellow scientists, many of whom have refuted Behe's claims. Yet, despite these refutations and a decisive defeat in a US federal court case, Behe and his associates at the Discovery Institute continue to cultivate American supporters. They are also stepping up their efforts abroad and, worryingly, have achieved some success. Should biochemists (and other scientists) be concerned? We think they should be. PMID:17570673

Forrest, Barbara C; Gross, Paul R

2007-07-01

408

Update: Biochemistry of Genetic Manipulation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various topics on the biochemistry of genetic manipulation are discussed. These include genetic transformation and DNA; genetic expression; DNA replication, repair, and mutation; technology of genetic manipulation; and applications of genetic manipulation. Other techniques employed are also considered. (JN)

Barker, G. R.

1983-01-01

409

Biochemistry SchoolofMedicalSciences  

E-print Network

afflictions such as diabetes and obesity. Biochemistry graduates have always been, and continue to be, and in the transferable skills associated with mastering statistics, graphics and word processing software packages

Levi, Ran

410

Spiral progression of Biochemistry in an integrated medical school  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biochemistry, a vital component of the medical science, is taught in medical schools to: a) explain the biochemical basis\\u000a of diseases; b) understand the basis of laboratory investigations; c) interpret and apply results of the laboratory investigations\\u000a in diagnosis and management of diseases. The curriculum of this medical school is a community oriented problem based approach\\u000a with the basic concept

Geetha Arumainayagam; Izam Mujir

1990-01-01

411

Preparation of Buffers. An Experiment for Quantitative Analysis Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In our experience, students who have a solid grounding in the theoretical aspects of buffers, buffer preparation, and buffering capacity are often at a loss when required to actually prepare a buffer in a research setting. However, there are very few published laboratory experiments pertaining to buffers. This laboratory experiment for the undergraduate quantitative analysis lab gives students hands-on experience in the preparation of buffers. By preparing a buffer to a randomly chosen pH value and comparing the theoretical pH to the actual pH, students apply their theoretical understanding of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, activity coefficients, and the effect of adding acid or base to a buffer. This experiment gives students experience in buffer preparation for research situations and helps them in advanced courses such as biochemistry where a fundamental knowledge of buffer systems is essential.

Buckley, P. T.

2001-10-01

412

The Relevance of Student Seminars on Clinically Related Subjects in a Biochemistry Course for Medical and Nutrition Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to determine the value of a system of seminars on clinically related biochemistry topics for undergraduate students in medicine and nutrition at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. During the second semester of 1998 (1998-2), the teaching staff decided to establish new and stricter rules for the seminar method and to…

Hermes-Lima, Marcelo; Muniz, Karinne C.; Coutinho, Iracema S.

2002-01-01

413

Undergraduate Syllabi.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents sample undergraduate syllabi for seven addiction counseling courses. Courses include: Group Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction; Recovery and Relapse Prevention Methods; Group Counseling I and II; and Co-Occurring Disorders. (GCP)

Journal of Teaching in the Addictions, 2003

2003-01-01

414

UNDERGRADUATE POSTGRADUATE  

E-print Network

..............................12 PATHWAYS TO UNIVERSITY..........................14 UNIVERSITY OF CANBERRA COllARSHIPS........................................................ 19 UNDERGRADUATE COURSE lIST................20 CANBERRAE................74 Australian Government Higher Education (CRICOS) Provider; University of Canberra #00212k

Canberra, University of

415

ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE  

E-print Network

ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK Fall 2013 #12;Name: ____________________________________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________________________ College of Engineering Cornell University ABET Accredited Programs for 2013­14 ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology

Walter, M.Todd

416

University of South Carolina Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry  

E-print Network

University of South Carolina Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Chemical Hygiene Plan & Biochemistry Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Safety Committee Faculty members: Stephen L. Morgan@email.sc.edu) Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Safety Information web site: http

Morgan, Stephen L.

417

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement 12, 2013 Course: Biochemistry 302, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www.biochem.ubc.ca) and should be submitted

Strynadka, Natalie

418

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 410, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: one quarter time Qualifications-II: $2,839.00 Application: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www

Strynadka, Natalie

419

Revised 6/5/13 CH369: Fundamentals of Biochemistry  

E-print Network

1 Revised 6/5/13 CH369: Fundamentals of Biochemistry Summer 2013 Syllabus and Course Policies What is biochemistry? Biochemistry is a branch of science biochemistry is its own distinctive discipline with regard to its emphasis

420

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 202, Introductory Medical Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated-II: $2,839.00 Application: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www

Strynadka, Natalie

421

Land plant biochemistry.  

PubMed Central

Biochemical studies have complemented ultrastructural and, subsequently molecular genetic evidence consistent with the Charophyceae being the closest extant algal relatives of the embryophytes. Among the genes used in such molecular phylogenetic studies is that rbcL) for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (RUBISCO). The RUBISCO of the embryophytes is derived, via the Chlorophyta. from that of the cyanobacteria. This clade of the molecular phylogeny of RUBISCO shows a range of kinetic characteristics, especially of CO2 affinities and of CO2/O2 selectivities. The range of these kinetic values within the bryophytes is no greater than in the rest of the embryophytes; this has implications for the evolution of the embryophytes in the high atmospheric CO2 environment of the late Lower Palaeozoic. The differences in biochemistry between charophycean algae and embryophytes can to some extent be related functionally to the structure and physiology of embryophytes. Examples of components of embryophytes, which are qualitatively or quantitatively different from those of charophytes, are the water repellent/water resistant extracellular lipids, the rigid phenolic polymers functional in water-conducting elements and mechanical support in air, and in UV-B absorption, flavonoid phenolics involved in UV-B absorption and in interactions with other organisms, and the greater emphasis on low Mr organic acids. retained in the plant as free acids or salts, or secreted to the rhizosphere. The roles of these components are discussed in relation to the environmental conditions at the time of evolution of the terrestrial embryophytes. A significant point about embryophytes is the predominance of nitrogen-free extracellular structural material (a trait shared by most algae) and UV-B screening components, by contrast with analogous components in many other organisms. An important question, which has thus far been incompletely addressed, is the extent to which the absence from bryophytes of the biochemical pathways which produce components found only in tracheophytes is the result of evolutionary loss of these functions. PMID:10905612

Raven, J A

2000-01-01

422

Biochemistry 1994,33, 7505-7509 7505 Perspectives in Biochemistry  

E-print Network

reach an apparent equilibrium. A Biochemistry perspectives article in 1990 reviewed experi- mental workBiochemistry 1994,33, 7505-7509 7505 Perspectives in Biochemistry Kinetics versus Thermodynamics of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143

Agard, David

423

B.S. in Biochemistry Requirements for the B.S. in Biochemistry degree program  

E-print Network

B.S. in Biochemistry Requirements for the B.S. in Biochemistry degree program General Chemistry CHM; 4130 & 4130L Organic Chemistry CHM 2210; 2211, 2211L Biochemistry BCH 4053; 4054 Physical Chemistry CHM) #12;BCH 4605 Mammalian Biochemistry and Genetics No required course with a grade below C- can

McQuade, D. Tyler

424

Chemistry & Biochemistry 2013 Departmental Graduation Ceremony  

E-print Network

Chemistry & Biochemistry 2013 Departmental Graduation Ceremony When and where will it be held and Biochemistry Commencement Ceremony. You may order ten (10) additional tickets for $12 each. You MUST RSVP

Levine, Alex J.

425

Summer Research Opportunities for Undergraduates--Students in Life and  

E-print Network

Summer Research Opportunities for Undergraduates--Students in Life and Physical Sciences for Undergraduates · National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) · Amgen Scholars · Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Summer Internships · And many more

Lathrop, Daniel P.

426

Sergei N. Smirnov Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Sergei N. Smirnov Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Las Cruces, NM 88003 Office: 575 and Biochemistry, New Mexico State University 1998-2003 Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, New Mexico State University 1995 ­ 1998 Research Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College 1991

Johnson, Eric E.

427

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-print Network

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK............................................................................................................. 24 #12;3 INTRODUCTION TO THE DEPARTMENT Welcome to the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at The University of Chicago. Our Department offers training for careers in biochemistry

Sosnick, Tobin R.

428

Biochemistry as a Programming Language Full Presentation  

E-print Network

Biochemistry as a Programming Language Full Presentation Saurabh Srivastava Tim Hsiau, Sarah reactions within the cell, i.e., the biochemistry, to produce non-native compounds of commercial interest. In this talk, we present our lessons learnt, future av- enues and open problems, in formalizing biochemistry. 1

Seshia, Sanjit A.

429

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-print Network

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 130 Chemistry & Physics Building · Box 19065 · 817 and Biochemistry offers four programs of study leading to the bachelor's degree and one leading to both in Chemistry - American Chemical Society certified, the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry - American Chemical

Texas at Arlington, University of

430

Craig R. Stumpf Department of Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Craig R. Stumpf Department of Biochemistry University of Wisconsin--Madison 433 Babcock Drive University B.S. Biology (April 26, 1999) Minor, Biochemistry · Magna Cum Laude Research Experience 2000-present: University of Wisconsin--Madison Department of Biochemistry Graduate Student Supervisor: Marvin

Wickens, Marv

431

Graduates of 2007 Richard Byrd---Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Graduates of 2007 Richard Byrd---Biochemistry Katherine Boone---Music Education Christina Bowley----Communications Dariel Karweta----Biochemistry Elena Koceva----English Leeann Lassiter----Communications Andrew Linke James Pritchard-----Economics James Pritchard----Information Systems Pooja Rajani-----Biochemistry

432

STRATEGIC PLAN Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-print Network

1 STRATEGIC PLAN Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland, College Park 1. Executive Summary The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry implements the missions of the College. These efforts encompass chemistry and biochemistry as traditionally defined, but are increasingly becoming

Rubloff, Gary W.

433

Montana State University 1 Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Montana State University 1 Chemistry and Biochemistry Note: MSU's programs of Biology. For additional options see Biological Sciences at MSU. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers programs that are certified by the American Chemical Society

Maxwell, Bruce D.

434

LifeMEETSscience Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics  

E-print Network

LifeMEETSscience Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics Science Meets Life. Minnesota with the guidance of internationally-renowned scientists in the Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (BMBB that is a hallmark of the Twin Cities and Minnesota. The Biochemistry, Molecular Biology & Biophysics Graduate

Thomas, David D.

435

BIOCHEMISTRY 302-202 : GENERAL BIOCHEMISTRY COURSE OUTLINE  

E-print Network

302 - General Biochemistry (3 credits): Metabolic reactions of lipids, steroids, amino acids Anabolism, Amino Acid Catabolism, Urea cycle, Molecules derived from amino acids. Dr. Maurus: January 27, 30 fixation, Amino Acid Anabolism, Amino Acid Catabolism, Urea cycle, Molecules derived from amino acids (Dr

Strynadka, Natalie

436

An Investigation into the Creation, Stability, and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis of Early Photographic Processes: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Photography is one of the few fine art forms that were initially developed by scientists such as Herschel and Talbot; however, in the modern chemistry curriculum, photography has become divorced from its scientific beginnings and resides in the studio arts department of most universities. An upper-level undergraduate experiment is described in…

Rogge, Corina E.; Bezur, Aniko

2012-01-01

437

Teaching Cardiac Electrophysiology Modeling to Undergraduate Students: Laboratory Exercises and GPU Programming for the Study of Arrhythmias and Spiral Wave Dynamics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a 3-wk intersession workshop funded by a National Science Foundation Expeditions in Computing award, 15 undergraduate students from the City University of New York collaborated on a study aimed at characterizing the voltage dynamics and arrhythmogenic behavior of cardiac cells for a broad range of physiologically relevant conditions…

Bartocci, Ezio; Singh, Rupinder; von Stein, Frederick B.; Amedome, Avessie; Caceres, Alan Joseph J.; Castillo, Juan; Closser, Evan; Deards, Gabriel; Goltsev, Andriy; Ines, Roumwelle Sta.; Isbilir, Cem; Marc, Joan K.; Moore, Diquan; Pardi, Dana; Sadhu, Sandeep; Sanchez, Samuel; Sharma, Pooja; Singh, Anoopa; Rogers, Joshua; Wolinetz, Aron; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Zhao, Kai; Filipski, Andrew B.; Gilmour, Robert F., Jr.; Grosu, Radu; Glimm, James; Smolka, Scott A.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Clarke, Edmund M.; Griffeth, Nancy; Fenton, Flavio H.

2011-01-01

438

New challenges in computational biochemistry  

SciTech Connect

The new challenges in computational biochemistry to which the title refers include the prediction of the relative binding free energy of different substrates to the same protein, conformational sampling, and other examples of theoretical predictions matching known protein structure and behavior.

Honig, B. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1996-12-31

439

Structural Biochemistry I General Information  

E-print Network

& Tooze (1999) Introduction to Protein Structure. 2nd Edition Available at the University Book StoreStructural Biochemistry I Fall 2007 General Information Lectures: Room 147, Nanaline Duke Building is required to earn a "B". A final project investigating a structural topic of the student's choice

Richardson, David

440

A High School Biochemistry Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an advanced, senior-level biochemistry course designed for students planning to pursue careers in nursing, engineering, and agriculture. The course follows a college-type format to expose students to college level course work. Course description, outline, and supplementary materials are included. (JM)

Powers, George B.

1984-01-01

441

Promising New Directions in Biochemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Biochemistry," by Lubert Stryer, has become one of the standard textbooks for the field. The Fifth Edition has two new authors: Jeremy Berg, Professor and Director of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and John Tymoczko, the Towsley Professor of Biology at Carleton College. The new edition does,…

Olivera, Baldomero M.

2003-01-01

442

Undergraduate Neuroscience  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Neuroscience Faculty of Medical and Veterinary Sciences #12;bristol.ac.uk/study Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system. You will learn about discoveries that have transformed our of people. Neuroscience is one of the fastest-growing disciplines within science. Our neuroscience degree

Bristol, University of

443

Undergraduate Quantitative  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Quantitative Research Methods with: Childhood Studies | Geography | Politics | Social.ac.uk/study The University of Bristol is introducing a new quantitative research methods pathway to a range of social science new courses, work placements and pathways to Why enhance your degree with quantitative research

Bristol, University of

444

Undergraduate Pharmacology  

E-print Network

Undergraduate Pharmacology Faculty of Medical and Veterinary Sciences #12;bristol.ac.uk/study Pharmacology is the study of the action of `drugs' in the widest possible sense, encompassing many types and the relief of both human and animal suffering. Pharmacology is closely allied to related disciplines

Bristol, University of

445

The power of undergraduate research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the years, the power engineering program at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) has prepared engineers to deal successfully with industry challenges. An important strategy in a power engineering curriculum renovation has been to give a more prominent role to undergraduate research. A new Energy Systems Instrumentation Laboratory (ESIL) has been established at UPRM to support the integration of

E. O'Neill-Carrillo; M. Velez-Reyes; A. Irizarry-Rivera; E. Marrero

2003-01-01

446

A New GC-MS Experiment for the Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory in Environmental Chemistry: Methyl-t-butyl Ether and Benzene in Gasoline  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the recent ACS approval of an option in environmental chemistry at the undergraduate level, there is a need for new experiments that illustrate fundamental principles of instrumental analysis in the context of environmental chemistry. We describe an experiment that utilizes combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and benzene in

Dinh T. Quach; Nancy A. Ciszkowski; Barbara J. Finlayson-Pitts

1998-01-01

447

BSc/MSci Biochemistry (C700/C703) Module Information  

E-print Network

BSc/MSci Biochemistry (C700/C703) Module Information This overview also covers modules studied, and in the specialist degree labels in Medical Biochemistry (C720), Biochemistry with Molecular Cell Biology (C700), Biochemistry with Genetics (CC74) and Biochemistry with Biotechnology (C700). The Fundamentals Each academic

Birmingham, University of

448

BSc/MSci Biochemistry (C700/C703) Module Information  

E-print Network

BSc/MSci Biochemistry (C700/C703) Module Information This overview also covers modules studied on our specialist degree labels in Medical Biochemistry (C720), Biochemistry with Molecular Cell Biology (C700), Biochemistry with Genetics (CC74) and Biochemistry with Biotechnology (C700). Each academic

Miall, Chris

449

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY MASTER OF SCIENCE WITH SPECIALTY IN  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY MASTER OF SCIENCE WITH SPECIALTY IN BIOCHEMISTRY (M.S.) TOTAL CREDIT-HOURS: 33 First Year: 24 Credit-Hours BCHM 8500 Biochemistry 6 BCHM 8551 Methods in Protein and Nucleic Acid Biochemistry 2 BCHM 8552 Methods in Lipid and Carbohydrates Biochemistry, Nutrition, and Biochemical

Quirk, Gregory J.

450

Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

Leach, Carolyn S.

1991-01-01

451

Physics Illinois Undergraduate Programs  

E-print Network

Physics Illinois Undergraduate Programs Department of Physics College of Engineering University to undergraduate education. Over the last 15 years, in collaboration with our nationally recognized Physics Education Research Group, our faculty has reinvented the way undergraduate physics courses are taught

Gilbert, Matthew

452

4204 Biochemistry 1991, 30, 4204-4212 McLean, L. R., & Phillips, M. C. (1984) Biochemistry 23,  

E-print Network

4204 Biochemistry 1991, 30, 4204-4212 McLean, L. R., & Phillips, M. C. (1984) Biochemistry 23) Biochemistry 20, Nichols, J. W., & Pagano, R. E. (1982) Biochemistry 21, Ohki, S., Duzgunes, N., & Leonards, K. (1982) Biochemistry Parsegian, V. A. (1975) in Physical Chemistry: Enriching Topics From Colloid

Brown, Michael F.

453

Undergraduates as Colleagues: Using Undergraduates as Teaching Assistants in the Basic Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the use of undergraduate teaching assistants in a basic communication course in order to provide a workable method for large numbers of entering students to learn about communication in small laboratory settings. (PD)

Baisinger, Wilbur H.; And Others

1984-01-01

454

Common student misconceptions in exercise physiology and biochemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The present study represents a preliminary investigationdesigned to identify common misconceptions in students' understanding of physiological and biochemical topics within the academic domain of sport and exercise sciences. A specifically designed misconception inventory (consisting of 10 multiple-choice questions) was administered to a cohort of level 1, 2, and 3 undergraduate students enrolled in physiology and biochemistry-related modules of the BSc Sport Science degree at the authors' institute. Of the 10 misconceptions proposed by the authors, 9 misconceptions were confirmed. Of these nine misconceptions, only one misconception appeared to have been alleviated by the current teaching strategy employed during the progression from level 1 to 3 study. The remaining eight misconceptions prevailed throughout the course of the degree program, suggesting that students enter and leave university with the same misconceptions in certain areas of exercise physiology and biochemistry. The possible origins of these misconceptions are discussed, as are potential teaching strategies to prevent and/or remediate them for future years.

James P. Morton (Liverpool John Moores University Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences)

2008-01-28

455

Ethanol Metabolism and the Transition from Organic Chemistry to Biochemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To ease the transition from organic chemistry at the beginning of a biochemistry course or at the beginning of the metabolism section of the organic course, an early presentation of the oxidation of ethanol is proposed. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase reactions can smooth the introduction to biochemistry, since they involve three of the simplest compounds: ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetic acid. Using these reactions as a model encourages the study of metabolic pathways by a systematic approach rather than by rote memorization. Reactions that can be presented as variations on a theme include methanol poisoning, the polyol reaction, and, most important, the sequence glycerol-3-phosphate to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 3-phosphoglyceric acid. This last sequence integrates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and, by comparison with the model reaction, brings out the principles of substrate-level phosphorylation. The method has evoked favorable verbal feedback from students and, in addition to medical and graduate courses, has been successfully used in the biochemical section of an undergraduate organic course.

Feinman, Richard D.

2001-09-01

456

Teaching Biochemistry to Medical Technology Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the biochemistry component of study to become a medical technologist in a Chilean university. Provides details of program structure, course content descriptions, and teaching strategies. (DDR)

Gomez-Silva, Benito; And Others

1997-01-01

457

pubs.acs.org/Biochemistry Published on Web 02/17/2010 r 2010 American Chemical Society 2464 Biochemistry 2010, 49, 24642474  

E-print Network

Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z1, § Department of Chemistry, Emory University, 1515 Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z1, ^ Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3, # Michael Smith Laboratory

McIntosh, Lawrence P.

458

Revised 9/28/2011 CH369: Fundamentals of Biochemistry  

E-print Network

1 Revised 9/28/2011 CH369: Fundamentals of Biochemistry Spring 2012 Syllabus and Course Policies What is biochemistry? Study of the structure and properties down. "Organic chemistry is the chemistry of carbon compounds. Biochemistry

459

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems  

E-print Network

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Department of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems Program Requirement Checklists Fall 2007 ­ Summer 2008 Master of Science ­ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.............................................................2 Doctor of Philosophy ­ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Chapman, Michael S.

460

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Lecturer Pool The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Santa Cruz, invites applications specialty within chemistry and biochemistry (including general chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic

California at Santa Cruz, University of

461

Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This sharp looking website is for the Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education (JUNE) which "publishes peer-reviewed reports of innovations in undergraduate neuroscience education...[and] serves as a mechanism for faculty to exchange information...such as laboratory exercises, new media, curricular considerations, and teaching methods." Visitors will find the "Supplementary Materials" tab near the top of any page to contain movies, lab instructions, papers, and images. Some of the movies include an adult and juvenile "Crayfish Brain Movie," "Larval Dissection Movie" of a drosophila mutant, and "Leg Prep and Spine Stimulation" of a cockroach. The "Previous Issues" tab gives visitors the opportunity to read issues published since 2002. Recent pieces featured in JUNE include "Integrating Community Outreach into the Undergraduate Neuroscience Classroom", "Design Plans for an Inexpensive Tail Flick Analgesia Meter", and "Unquenchable Neuroscience."

2012-01-06

462

Research and Teaching: Blooming, SOLO Taxonomy, and Phenomenography as Assessment Strategies in Undergraduate Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three alternative approaches to assessment of exam responses were applied in an undergraduate biochemistry course. First, phenomenography was used to categorize written exam responses into an inclusive hierarchy. Second, responses to the same question were similarly categorized according to the Structure of Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO)…

Newton, Genevieve; Martin, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

463

A Comparison of Tutor and Student Conceptions of Undergraduate Research Project Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tutor and student conceptions of undergraduate research project work were evaluated following the distribution of questionnaires to 85 members of academic staff and 136 final?year (honours) students in the Schools of Biology and Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen's University of Belfast (QUB). The percentage of individuals submitting a return was 52% for staff and 38% for students. The issues considered

L. A. J. Stefani; D. J. A. Heylings; A. C. Butcher

1997-01-01

464

Hypothetical Biotechnology Companies: A Role-Playing Student Centered Activity for Undergraduate Science Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science students leaving undergraduate programs are entering the biotechnology industry where they are presented with issues which require integration of science content. Students find this difficult as through-out their studies, most content is limited to a single subdiscipline (e.g., biochemistry, immunology). In addition, students need…

Chuck, Jo-Anne

2011-01-01

465

Biochemistry Co-op Program Students from the Biochemistry Co-op Program have conducted work terms in the fields of biochemistry, molecular  

E-print Network

Biochemistry Co-op Program Students from the Biochemistry Co-op Program have conducted work terms in the fields of biochemistry, molecular biology, biotechnology, genetic engineering, toxicology, pharmacology of Biochemistry Co-op Work Terms Duties: Expressed and characterized proteins/enzymes, developed enzymatic

Hitchcock, Adam P.

466

Allison Kraus Department of Biochemistry  

E-print Network

with misfolded proteins contributing to a number of diseases including prion disease, Cystic Fibrosis, Alzheimer, Saskatchewan, I first came to the University of Alberta to pursue my undergraduate degree in 2001. During the course of my studies, I had the opportunity to work in a research lab and discovered that I enjoyed

MacMillan, Andrew

467

201320132013 Undergraduate Research,  

E-print Network

201320132013 Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, & Creativity Showcase March 1, 2013 Earl K. Long of Chemistry Pierre Champagne #12;Undergraduate Research Program Mission: To improve undergraduate student Programs has created UNO's Undergraduate Research Program. The goals of this program are: 1) to introduce

Kulp, Mark

468

Special-Study Modules in a Problem-Based Learning Medical Curriculum: An Innovative Laboratory Research Practice Supporting Introduction to Research Methodology in the Undergraduate Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We describe the organization of wet-lab special-study modules (SSMs) in the Central Research Laboratory of Dokuz Eylul Medical School, Izmir, Turkey with the aim of discussing the scientific, laboratory, and pedagogical aspects of this educational activity. A general introduction to the planning and functioning of these SSMs is given, along with…

Guner, Gul Akdogan; Cavdar, Zahide; Yener, Nilgun; Kume, Tuncay; Egrilmez, Mehtap Yuksel; Resmi, Halil

2011-01-01

469

Using Castration Surgery in Male Rats to Demonstrate the Physiological Effects of Testosterone on Seminal Vesicle Anatomy in an Undergraduate Laboratory Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rats can be used as a model organism to teach physiological concepts in a laboratory setting. This article describes a two-part laboratory that introduces students to hypothesis testing, experimental design, the appropriate use of controls and surgical techniques. Students perform both a castration and sham-control surgery on male rats and test…

Belanger, Rachelle M.; Conant, Stephanie B.; Grabowski, Gregory M.

2013-01-01

470

An inquiry-based practical for a large, foundation-level undergraduate laboratory that enhances student understanding of basic cellular concepts and scientific experimental design.  

PubMed

Student-centered education involving research experiences or inquiry have been shown to help undergraduate students understand, and become excited about, the process of scientific investigation. These benefits are particularly important for students in the early stages of their degree (Report and Kenny, http://naplesccsunysbedu/Pres/boyernsf/1998). However, embedding such experiences into the curriculum is particularly difficult when dealing with early stage students, who are in larger cohorts and often lack the background content knowledge necessary to engage with primary research literature and research level methods and equipment. We report here the design, delivery, assessment, and subsequent student learning outcomes of a 4-week practical module for 120 students at the beginning of their second year of university, which successfully engages students in designing cell culture experiments and in understanding the molecular processes and machinery involved in the basic cellular process of macropinocytosis. PMID:22615225

Bugarcic, A; Zimbardi, K; Macaranas, J; Thorn, P

2012-01-01

471

Teaching foundational topics and scientific skills in biochemistry within the conceptual framework of HIV protease.  

PubMed

HIV protease has served as a model protein for understanding protein structure, enzyme kinetics, structure-based drug design, and protein evolution. Inhibitors of HIV protease are also an essential part of effective HIV/AIDS treatment and have provided great societal benefits. The broad applications for HIV protease and its inhibitors make it a perfect framework for integrating foundational topics in biochemistry around a big picture scientific and societal issue. Herein, I describe a series of classroom exercises that integrate foundational topics in biochemistry around the structure, biology, and therapeutic inhibition of HIV protease. These exercises center on foundational topics in biochemistry including thermodynamics, acid/base properties, protein structure, ligand binding, and enzymatic catalysis. The exercises also incorporate regular student practice of scientific skills including analysis of primary literature, evaluation of scientific data, and presentation of technical scientific arguments. Through the exercises, students also gain experience accessing computational biochemical resources such as the protein data bank, Proteopedia, and protein visualization software. As these HIV centered exercises cover foundational topics common to all first semester biochemistry courses, these exercises should appeal to a broad audience of undergraduate students and should be readily integrated into a variety of teaching styles and classroom sizes. PMID:24652697

Johnson, R Jeremy

2014-01-01

472

Chemistry and Biochemistry Department Computer Management Policy  

E-print Network

Chemistry and Biochemistry Department Computer Management Policy 1 Table of Contents 1. Need;Chemistry and Biochemistry Department Computer Management Policy 2 Home Equipment Policy Computer policy 3.4. Sharing of data 3.5. Wireless data 3.6. Connection of non-BYU computers to Chemistry network

Seamons, Kent E.

473

Use of General Principles in Teaching Biochemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents Principles of Biochemistry for use as main focus of a biochemistry course. The nine guiding ideas are the principles of continual turnover, macromolecular organization, molecular recognition, multiplicity of utilization, maximum efficiency, gradual change, interrelationship, transformational reciprocity, and information transfer. In use…

Fernandez, Rolando Hernandez; Tomey, Agustin Vicedo

1991-01-01

474

NMR spectroscopy based metabonomic studies on the comparative biochemistry of the kidney and urine of the bank vole ( Clethrionomys glareolus), wood mouse ( Apodemus sylvaticus), white toothed shrew ( Crocidura suaveolens) and the laboratory rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The metabolic profiles of three wild mammals that vary in their trophic strategies, the herbivorous bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus), the granivorous wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), and the insectivorous white-toothed shrew (Crocidura suaveolens), were compared with that of a widely used strain of laboratory rat (Sprague Dawley). In conjunction with NMR spectroscopic investigations into the urine and blood plasma composition for

J. L Griffin; L. A Walker; S Garrod; E Holmes; R. F Shore; J. K Nicholson

2000-01-01

475

Physical Models Enhance Molecular Three-Dimensional Literacy in an Introductory Biochemistry Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports the results of a recent study to evaluate the usefulness of physical models of molecular structures as a new tool with which to teach concepts of molecular structure and function. Of seven different learning tools used by students in this introductory biochemistry class, the use of the physical models in a laboratory was rated…

Roberts, Jacqueline R.; Hagedorn, Eric; Dillenburg, Paul; Patrick, Michael; Herman, Timothy

2005-01-01

476

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 21382149 Heterogeneity of soil nutrients and subsurface biota  

E-print Network

Author's personal copy Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 2138­2149 Heterogeneity of soil Laboratory, 999-W, Aiken, SC 29808, USA f Department of Plant & Soil Science, University of Vermont, Hills to have a highly heterogeneous distribution of nutrients and soil biota, with greater concentrations

Neher, Deborah A.

477

Comprehensive Experiment--Clinical Biochemistry: Determination of Blood Glucose and Triglycerides in Normal and Diabetic Rats  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For second year medical students, we redesigned an original laboratory experiment and developed a combined research-teaching clinical biochemistry experiment. Using an established diabetic rat model to detect blood glucose and triglycerides, the students participate in the entire experimental process, which is not normally experienced during a…

Jiao, Li; Xiujuan, Shi; Juan, Wang; Song, Jia; Lei, Xu; Guotong, Xu; Lixia, Lu

2015-01-01

478

Use of Molecular Models for Active Learning in Biochemistry Lecture Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The pedagogical value of having biochemistry and organic chemistry students build and manipulate physical models of chemical species is well established in the literature. Nevertheless, for the most part, the use of molecular models is generally limited to several laboratory exercises or to demonstrations in the classroom setting. A simple…

Hageman, James H.

2010-01-01

479

of Endocrinology;2Labotatory of Nutritional and General Biochemistry, hpital Purpan,  

E-print Network

;3Laboratory of Biochemistry lit, hôpi- tal La Grave, 31052 Toulouse cedex, France) Serum sex hormone binding), body composition (body fat mass and trunk fat mass) and dietary intake in a group of 33 premenopausal and BMI, body fat mass, trunk fat mass and percent intake of lipids as covari- ates showed that the SHBG

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

480

Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 34:203221 (1997) 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc.  

E-print Network

Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 34:203­221 (1997) ARCH 876 © 1997 Wiley-Liss, Inc Shiotsuki is now at Laboratory of Active Substances, Department of Insect Physiology and Behavior, National associated with isozyme Est-2 (Stauffer, 1994). The polymorphism may reflect the physiological range

Hammock, Bruce D.

481

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 203, Fundamentals of Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated,835.50 GTA-II: $2,728.50 Application: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www

Strynadka, Natalie

482

B.S. in Biochemistry Typical Program of Study  

E-print Network

B.S. in Biochemistry Typical Program of Study: First Semester Second Semester 1st Year CHEM 1211K Biochemistry I Organic Chemistry Lab CHEM 4512 (3) CHEM 4581 (3) Biology Elective (3) Core Elective (3) Core Elective (3) Biochemistry II Biochemistry Lab I 4th Year CHEM 4582 (3) CHEM 4521 (3) Biology Elective (3

Houston, Paul L.

483

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 302, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated that the equivalent from Biochemistry website (www.biochem.ubc.ca) and should be submitted to Sabrina Cheng by February 28

Strynadka, Natalie

484

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Assistant Professor in Biochemistry/Biophysical Chemistry The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California level in the general areas of biochemistry, biophysical chemistry, and/or structural biology. We

California at Santa Cruz, University of

485

Graduate Student Handbook 2013-14 Department of Biochemistry 1  

E-print Network

Graduate Student Handbook 2013-14 Department of Biochemistry 1 9/5/2013 Department of Biochemistry Student Handbook 2013-14 Department of Biochemistry 2 9/5/2013 FACULTY Emeritus Professors: Robert L Advisor: Pehr Harbury The Department of Biochemistry is located in the Beckman Center for Molecular

Puglisi, Joseph

486

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 302, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated that the equivalent from Biochemistry website (www.biochem.ubc.ca) and should be submitted to Sabrina Cheng by March 11

Strynadka, Natalie

487

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 203, Fundamentals of Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated-I: $2,950.36 GTA-II: $2,839.00 Application: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website

Strynadka, Natalie

488

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-print Network

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Announcement Course: Biochemistry 302, General Biochemistry Number of Positions: It is anticipated that the equivalent: Application forms are available from Biochemistry website (www.biochem.ubc.ca) and should be submitted

Strynadka, Natalie

489

Promoting Inquiry-Based Teaching in Laboratory Courses: Are We Meeting the Grade?  

PubMed Central

Over the past decade, repeated calls have been made to incorporate more active teaching and learning in undergraduate biology courses. The emphasis on inquiry-based teaching is especially important in laboratory courses, as these are the courses in which students are applying the process of science. To determine the current state of research on inquiry-based teaching in undergraduate biology laboratory courses, we reviewed the recent published literature on inquiry-based exercises. The majority of studies in our data set were in the subdisciplines of biochemistry, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics, and molecular biology. In addition, most exercises were guided inquiry, rather than open ended or research based. Almost 75% of the studies included assessment data, with two-thirds of these studies including multiple types of assessment data. However, few exercises were assessed in multiple courses or at multiple institutions. Furthermore, assessments were rarely based on published instruments. Although the results of the studies in our data set show a positive effect of inquiry-based teaching in biology laboratory courses on student learning gains, research that uses the same instrument across a range of courses and institutions is needed to determine whether these results can be generalized. PMID:25185228

Butler, Amy; Burke da Silva, Karen

2014-01-01

490

Promoting inquiry-based teaching in laboratory courses: are we meeting the grade?  

PubMed

Over the past decade, repeated calls have been made to incorporate more active teaching and learning in undergraduate biology courses. The emphasis on inquiry-based teaching is especially important in laboratory courses, as these are the courses in which students are applying the process of science. To determine the current state of research on inquiry-based teaching in undergraduate biology laboratory courses, we reviewed the recent published literature on inquiry-based exercises. The majority of studies in our data set were in the subdisciplines of biochemistry, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics, and molecular biology. In addition, most exercises were guided inquiry, rather than open ended or research based. Almost 75% of the studies included assessment data, with two-thirds of these studies including multiple types of assessment data. However, few exercises were assessed in multiple courses or at multiple institutions. Furthermore, assessments were rarely based on published instruments. Although the results of the studies in our data set show a positive effect of inquiry-based teaching in biology laboratory courses on student learning gains, research that uses the same instrument across a range of courses and institutions is needed to determine whether these results can be generalized. PMID:25185228

Beck, Christopher; Butler, Amy; da Silva, Karen Burke

2014-01-01

491

Searching for Alien Life Having Unearthly Biochemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The search for alien life in the solar system should include exploring unearth-like environments for life having an unearthly biochemistry. We expect alien life to conform to the same basic chemical and ecological constraints as terrestrial life, since inorganic chemistry and the laws of ecosystems appear to be universal. Astrobiologists usually assume alien life will use familiar terrestrial biochemistry and therefore hope to find alien life by searching near water or by supplying hydrocarbons. The assumption that alien life is likely to be based on carbon and water is traditional and plausible. It justifies high priority for missions to search for alien life on Mars and Europa, but it unduly restricts the search for alien life. Terrestrial carbon-water biochemistry is not possible on most of the bodies of our solar system, but all alien life is not necessarily based on terrestrial biochemistry. If alien life has a separate origin from Earth life, and if can survive in an environment extremely different from Earth's, then alien life may have unearthly biochemistry. There may be other solvents than water that support alien life and other elements than carbon that form complex life enabling chain molecules. Rather than making the exploration-restricting assumption that all life requires carbon, water, and terrestrial biochemistry, we should make the exploration-friendly assumption that indigenous, environmentally adapted, alien life forms might flourish using unearthly biochemistry in many places in the solar system. Alien life might be found wherever there is free energy and a physical/chemical system capable of using that energy to build living structures. Alien life may be discovered by the detection of some general non-equilibrium chemistry rather than of terrestrial biochemistry. We should explore all the potential abodes of life in the solar system, including those where life based on terrestrial biochemistry can not exist.

Jones, Harry

2003-01-01

492

Stephen L. Morgan, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 2014. 1 Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry  

E-print Network

Stephen L. Morgan, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 2014. 1 Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry The University of South Carolina USC Chemistry & Biochemistry Safety Email: morgan@mail.chem.sc.edu Stephen L. Morgan, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University

Morgan, Stephen L.

493

Combining content and elements of communication into an upper-level biochemistry course.  

PubMed

This report describes how a science communication module was incorporated into an advanced biochemistry course. Elements of communication were taught synergistically with biochemistry content in this course in an effort to expose students to a variety of effective oral communication strategies. Students were trained to use these established techniques and incorporated them into various presentations throughout the course. Three students describe their use of specific resources and how the skills learned relate to their future career. The importance and relevance of science communication are receiving unprecedented national attention. The academic scientific community must respond by incorporating more communication-centered instruction and opportunities in the classroom and laboratory. PMID:24375847

Whittington, Carli P; Pellock, Samuel J; Cunningham, Rebecca L; Cox, James R

2014-01-01

494

Using an International p53 Mutation Database as a Foundation for an Online Laboratory in an Upper Level Undergraduate Biology Class  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A two-part laboratory exercise was developed to enhance classroom instruction on the significance of p53 mutations in cancer development. Students were asked to mine key information from an international database of p53 genetic changes related to cancer, the IARC TP53 database. Using this database, students designed several data mining activities…

Melloy, Patricia G.

2015-01-01

495

A One-Pot Self-Assembly Reaction to Prepare a Supramolecular Palladium(II) Cyclometalated Complex: An Undergraduate Organometallic Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory experiment for students in advanced inorganic chemistry is described. Students prepare palladium(II) cyclometalated complexes. A terdentate [C,N,O] Schiff base ligand is doubly deprotonated upon reaction with palladium(II) acetate in a self-assembly process to give a palladacycle with a characteristic tetranuclear structure. This…

Fernandez, Alberto; Lopez-Torres, Margarita; Fernandez, Jesus J.; Vazquez-Garcia, Digna; Vila, Jose M.

2012-01-01

496

The Synthesis and Isolation of N-Tert-Butyl-2-Phenylsuccinamic Acid and N-Tert-Butyl-3-Phenylsuccinamic Acid: An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The facile, high yielding synthesis of phenylsuccinamic acids is described and one of these syntheses, the reaction of phenylsuccinic anhydride with tert-butylamine, is successfully modified and adapted for use in the second-semester organic chemistry laboratory at St. John's University. Succinamic acids are compounds that contain both the amide…

Cesare, Victor; Sadarangani, Ishwar; Rollins, Janet; Costello, Dennis

2004-01-01

497

Using Structured Chemistry Examinations (SCHemEs) as an Assessment Method to Improve Undergraduate Students' Generic, Practical, and Laboratory-Based Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increase in tuition fees means there will be renewed pressure on universities to provide "value for money" courses that provide extensive training in both subject-specific and generic skills. For graduates of chemistry this includes embedding the generic, practical, and laboratory-based skills associated with industrial research as an…

Kirton, Stewart B.; Al-Ahmad, Abdullah; Fergus, Suzanne

2014-01-01

498

Introducing Education for Sustainable Development in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Quantitative Analysis of Bioethanol Fuel and Its Blends with Gasoline by Using Solvatochromic Dyes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concept of "Education for Sustainable Development", ESD, has been introduced in a period where chemistry education is undergoing a major change, both in emphasis and methods of teaching. Studying an everyday problem, with an important socio-economic impact in the laboratory is a part of this approach. Presently, the students in many countries…

Galgano, Paula D.; Loffredo, Carina; Sato, Bruno M.; Reichardt, Christian; El Seoud, Omar A.

2012-01-01

499

Synthesis and Small Molecule Exchange Studies of a Magnesium Bisformate Metal-Organic Framework: An Experiment in Host-Guest Chemistry for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

concepts of host-guest chemistry and size exclusion in porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The experiment has been successfully carried out in both introductory and advanced-level inorganic chemistry laboratories. Students synthesized the porous MOF, alpha-Mg[subscript…

Rood, Jeffrey A.; Henderson, Kenneth W.

2013-01-01

500

What Is the True Color of Fresh Meat? A Biophysical Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Effects of Ligand Binding on Myoglobin Using Optical, EPR, and NMR Spectroscopy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With an increased focus on integrated upper-level laboratories, we present an experiment integrating concepts from inorganic, biological, and physical chemistry content areas. Students investigate the effects of ligand strength on the spectroscopic properties of the heme center in myoglobin using UV-vis, [superscript 1]H NMR, and EPR…

Linenberger, Kimberly; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Crowder, Michael W.; McCarrick, Robert; Lorigan, Gary A.; Tierney, David L.

2011-01-01