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1

Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase Investigations for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (RpiA) has many features that make it attractive as a focal point of a semester-long, advanced biochemistry laboratory for undergraduate students. The protein can easily and inexpensively be isolated from spinach using traditional purification techniques. Characterization of RpiA enzyme activity can be…

Jewett, Kathy; Sandwick, Roger K.

2011-01-01

2

A Curriculum Skills Matrix for Development and Assessment of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have designed a skills matrix to be used for developing and assessing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology laboratory curricula. We prepared the skills matrix for the Project Kaleidoscope Summer Institute workshop in Snowbird, Utah (July 2001) to help current and developing undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology program…

Caldwell, Benjamin; Rohlman, Christopher; Benore-Parsons, Marilee

2004-01-01

3

An Experiment Using Sucrose Density Gradients in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment to be performed in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory that is based on a gradient centrifugation system employing a simple bench top centrifuge, a freezer, and frozen surcose gradient solution to separate macromolecules and subcellular components. (CW)

Turchi, Sandra L.; Weiss, Monica

1988-01-01

4

Purification and Characterization of Taq Polymerase: A 9-Week Biochemistry Laboratory Project for Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have developed a 9-week undergraduate laboratory series focused on the purification and characterization of "Thermus aquaticus" DNA polymerase (Taq). Our aim was to provide undergraduate biochemistry students with a full-semester continuing project simulating a research-like experience, while having each week's procedure focus on a single…

Bellin, Robert M.; Bruno, Mary K.; Farrow, Melissa A.

2010-01-01

5

DNA Topology Analysis in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability of a cell to control precisely and regulate DNA winding and topology is critical for many intracellular processes, such as replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. A set of complementary experiments is described which are useful in teaching the principles of DNA topology to undergraduate biochemistry students. In one experiment, a copper-o-phenanthroline complex is used to oxidatively cleave closed circular supercoiled DNA and generate nicked and linear forms. In the second experiment, the antitumor agent cis-diamminedichloroplatinum is used to gradually remove supercoils by unwinding the DNA helix. In a third experiment, DNA topoisomerase I is used to generate a set of topoisomers of covalently closed circular DNA. In all experiments, the results are readily analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Together, these experiments greatly facilitate the students' understanding of the basic principles of DNA topology and provide an interesting backdrop for teaching agarose gel electrophoresis methodology. They also serve to introduce topics such as small molecule-DNA interactions and DNA damage and repair.

Keck, Michael V.

2000-11-01

6

Forensic Analysis of Canine DNA Samples in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent advances in canine genomics have allowed the development of highly distinguishing methods of analysis for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify hypervariable regions of DNA from dog hair and saliva…

Carson, Tobin M.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Fekete, Brenda L.; Millard, Julie T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

2009-01-01

7

The Determination of Vitamin D-Dependent Calcium Binding Protein in Chick Intesting: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is an experiment used in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory involving inducing rickets in chicks and correlating the disease to a reduction in vitamin D-dependent calcium binding protein. Techniques involved are hormone induction, protein isolation, and radioisotope methodology. (Author/DS)

Lessard, George M.

1980-01-01

8

HPLC of the Polypeptides in a Hydrolyzate of Egg-White Lysozyme. An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a simple high-performance liquid chromatography experiment for undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. The experiment illustrates the separation of polypeptides by a step gradient elution using a single pump instrument with no gradient attachments. Discusses instrumentation, analysis, a sample preparation, and results. (CW)

Richardson, W. S., III; Burns, L.

1988-01-01

9

Glycobiology, How to Sugar-Coat an Undergraduate Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A second semester biochemistry laboratory has been implemented as an independent projects course at California State University, Sacramento since 1999. To incorporate aspects of carbohydrate biochemistry, or glycobiology, into our curriculum, projects in lectin isolation and purification were undertaken over the course of two semesters. Through…

McReynolds, Katherine D.

2006-01-01

10

A Static Method as an Alternative to Gel Chromatography: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a static method as an alternative to gel chromatography, which may be used as an undergraduate laboratory experiment. In this method, a constant mass of Sephadex gel is swollen in a series of protein solutions. UV-vis spectrophotometry is used to find a partition coefficient, KD, that indicates the fraction of the interior…

Burum, Alex D.; Splittgerber, Allan G.

2008-01-01

11

An Inexpensive, Relatively Green, and Rapid Method to Purify Genomic DNA from "Escherichia Coli": An Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A method to purify genomic DNA from "Escherichia coli" is presented. The method is an amalgam of published methods but has been modified and optimized for use in the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. Specifically, the method uses Tide Free 2x Ultra laundry detergent, which contains unspecified proteases and lipases, "n"-butanol, 2-propanol,…

Sims, Paul A.; Branscum, Katie M.; Kao, Lydia; Keaveny, Virginia R.

2010-01-01

12

A Metabolic Murder Mystery: A Case-Based Experiment for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1990, a woman was wrongly convicted of poisoning her infant son and was sentenced to life in prison. Her conviction was based on laboratory work that wrongly identified ethylene glycol as present in her son's blood and in the formula he drank prior to his death. The actual cause of the infant's death, a metabolic disease, was eventually…

Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Kauffmann, Andrew D.; Poplawski, Shane G.; Lysiak, Daniel R.; Stewart, Robert J.; Arcadi, Jane K.; Dinan, Frank J.

2010-01-01

13

Equilibrium Gel Filtration Chromatography for the Measurement of Protein-Ligand Binding in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory exercise used in the senior biochemistry course at the University of Winnipeg for three years is discussed. It combines liquid chromatography and absorbance spectroscopy and also allows the students to produce a quantitative result within a single three-hour period.

Craig, Douglas B.

2005-01-01

14

An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of

Adele J. Wolfson Mona L. Hall; Thomas R. Branham

1996-01-01

15

A Kinetic Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the use of specific reactions of metabolic pathways to make measurements in the laboratory. Describes an adaptation of an experiment used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories involving the induction of an enzyme in E. coli, as well as its partial purification and characterization. (TW)

Palmer, Richard E.

1986-01-01

16

The Biochemistry of the Muscle Contraction Process: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Using Viscosity to Follow the Progress of a Reaction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment using viscosity to follow the progress of the contractile process in muscles. This simple, short experiment illustrates the action of ATP as the source of energy in the contractile process and the catalytic effect of calcium ions as a control in the energy producing process. (CS)

Belliveau, James F.; And Others

1981-01-01

17

Immobilized alpha-Galactosidase in the Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory experiment was designed to demonstrate the application of immobilized galactosidase in food industry to hydrolyze raffinose family oligosaccharides in soymilk. This laboratory experiment was conducted for postgraduate students of biochemistry and developed for graduate and undergraduate students of biochemistry, biotechnology,…

Mulimani, V. H.; Dhananjay, K.

2007-01-01

18

An "in Silico" DNA Cloning Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory exercise introduces students to concepts in recombinant DNA technology while accommodating a major semester project in protein purification, structure, and function in a biochemistry laboratory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students. It is also suitable for forensic science courses focused in DNA biology and advanced…

Elkins, Kelly M.

2011-01-01

19

Incorporation of Bioinformatics Exercises into the Undergraduate Biochemistry Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field of bioinformatics is developing faster than most biochemistry textbooks can adapt. Supplementing the undergraduate biochemistry curriculum with data-mining exercises is an ideal way to expose the students to the common databases and tools that take advantage of this vast repository of biochemical information. An integrated collection of…

Feig, Andrew L.; Jabri, Evelyn

2002-01-01

20

Differentiating Biochemistry Course Laboratories Based on Student Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Content and emphases in undergraduate biochemistry courses can be readily tailored to accommodate the standards of the department in which they are housed, as well as the backgrounds of the students in the courses. A more challenging issue is how to construct laboratory experiences for a class with both chemistry majors, who usually have little or…

Jakubowski, Henry V.

2011-01-01

21

Environmental Regulation of Plant Gene Expression: An Rt-qPCR Laboratory Project for an Upper-Level Undergraduate Biochemistry or Molecular Biology Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present a novel laboratory project employing "real-time" RT-qPCR to measure the effect of environment on the expression of the "FLOWERING LOCUS C" gene, a key regulator of floral timing in "Arabidopsis thaliana" plants. The project requires four 3-hr laboratory sessions and is aimed at upper-level undergraduate

Eickelberg, Garrett J.; Fisher, Alison J.

2013-01-01

22

Teaching Receptor Theory to Biochemistry Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Receptor:ligand interactions account for numerous reactions critical to biochemistry and molecular biology. While students are typically exposed to some examples, such as hemoglobin binding of oxygen and signal transduction pathways, the topic could easily be expanded. Theory and kinetic analysis, types of receptors, and the experimental assay…

Benore-Parsons, Marilee; Sufka, Kenneth J.

2003-01-01

23

Biochemistry in Undergraduate Health Courses: Structure and Organization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the following aspects of teaching biochemistry in undergraduate health courses: objectives, number of hours, time in which the subject is studied, selection of content, teaching strategies, and evaluation methodologies used. Fifty-three courses distributed in 13 areas within the health field and offered by 12 institutions…

Silva, Irani F.; Batista, Nildo A.

2003-01-01

24

Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty chemistry faculty from American Chemical Society-approved departments were interviewed to determine their goals for undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Faculty were stratified by type of institution, departmental success with regard to National Science Foundation funding for laboratory reform, and level of laboratory course. Interview…

Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Fay, Michael; Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

2013-01-01

25

A Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

A project-oriented laboratory course has been designed to introduce students to the study of biochemistry as it is practiced. The course is designed to be a capstone experience for students enrolled in a variety of majors at the Rochester Institute of Technology, including those who enter our new B.S. Biochemistry program. The experiments in this course enable the students to

Paul A. Craig

1999-01-01

26

A Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a biochemistry laboratory course in which the curriculum revolves around a single theme: the purification, characterization, and molecular biology of threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) from Escherechia coli. Lists examples of related class research projects. Contains 41 references. (WRM)

Craig, Paul A.

1999-01-01

27

An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay for lysozyme activity and a colorimetric one for protein concentration. Familiarity with the assay

Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

1996-11-01

28

Raising environmental awareness through applied biochemistry laboratory experiments.  

PubMed

Our environment is under constant pressure and threat from various sources of pollution. Science students, in particular chemistry students, must not only be made aware of these issues, but also be taught that chemistry (and science) can provide solutions to such real-life issues. To this end, a newly developed biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that guides students to learn about the applicability of peroxidase enzymes to degrade organic dyes (as model pollutants) in simulated waste water. In addition to showing how enzymes can potentially be used for waste water remediation, various factors than can affect enzyme-based reactions such as pH, temperature, concentration of substrates/enzymes, and denaturants can also be tested. This "applied biotechnology" experiment was successfully implemented in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course to enhance students' learning of environmental issues as well important biochemistry concepts. Student survey confirmed that this laboratory experiment was successful in achieving the objectives of raising environmental awareness in students and illustrating the usefulness of chemistry in solving real-life problems. This experiment can be easily adopted in an introductory biochemistry laboratory course and taught as an inquiry-guided exercise. PMID:24078356

Salman Ashraf, S

2013-01-01

29

Assessing Undergraduate Laboratory Performance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The lab notebook is one element for assessing student laboratory performance. However, it is also important to be able to communicate research results in a journal article format and a visual poster format. Another key aspect to scientific research is the ability to present a research plan. This article describes four assessment tools that can be used in conjunction with undergraduate lab courses that provide the opportunity for the students to practice each of these essential communication skills.

Elizabeth Adler (AAAS;); Nancy Gough (AAAS;)

2006-09-05

30

A Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A project-oriented laboratory course has been designed to introduce students to the study of biochemistry as it is practiced. The course is designed to be a capstone experience for students enrolled in a variety of majors at the Rochester Institute of Technology, including those who enter our new B.S. Biochemistry program. The experiments in this course enable the students to explore the protein chemistry, enzymology, and molecular biology of a single enzyme, threonine dehydrogenase, in a series of integrated experiments. The laboratory incorporates both traditional methods (centrifugation, UV-vis spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and chromatography) and more recent developments in the field (polymerase chain reaction). Students use a small computer network to prepare for experiments (using simulation software developed at RIT), to evaluate data, to access sequence homology databases over the Internet, and to visualize and model proteins and nucleic acids. The change in the biochemistry teaching lab from a sequence of unrelated experiments to an integrated series of experiments is a model that can be readily adapted by other educators, who can change their courses to focus on a single enzyme with which they are most familiar.

Craig, Paul A.

1999-08-01

31

Integrating Internet Assignments into a Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Laboratory Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A main challenge in educating undergraduate students is to introduce them to the Internet and to teach them how to effectively use it in research. To this end, an Internet assignment was developed that introduces students to websites related to biomedical research at the beginning of a biochemistry/molecular biology laboratory course. The basic…

Kaspar, Roger L.

2002-01-01

32

An SDS-PAGE Examination of Protein Quaternary Structure and Disulfide Bonding for a Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Electrophoresis is a valuable tool for biochemists, yet this technique is often not included in biochemistry laboratory curricula owing to time constraints or lack of equipment. Protein structure is also a topic of interest in many disciplines, yet most undergraduate lab experiments focus only on primary structure. In this experiment, students use…

Powers, Jennifer L.; Andrews, Carla S.; St. Antoine, Caroline C.; Jain, Swapan S.; Bevilacqua, Vicky L. H.

2005-01-01

33

The Kinetics and Inhibition of Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses an enzyme kinetics laboratory experiment involving a two substrate system for undergraduate biochemistry. Uses the enzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase as this enzyme in blood serum is of clinical significance. Notes elevated levels are seen in liver disease, alcoholism, and epilepsy. Uses a spectrophotometer for the analysis. (MVL)

Splittgerber, A. G.; Sohl, Julie

1988-01-01

34

Teaching Structure: Student Use of Software Tools for Understanding Macromolecular Structure in an Undergraduate Biochemistry Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of…

Jaswal, Sheila S.; O'Hara, Patricia B.; Williamson, Patrick L.; Springer, Amy L.

2013-01-01

35

A Combustion Laboratory for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a combustion laboratory facility and experiments for a senior-level (undergraduate) course in mechanical engineering. The experiment reinforces basic thermodynamic concepts and provides many students with their first opportunity to work with a combustion system. (DH)

Peters, James E.

1985-01-01

36

A Research-Inspired Biochemistry Laboratory Module  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This helpful set of materials is part of the "Cool Science" initiative at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). It comes from a research-inspired biochemistry laboratory course at MIT developed by professor Catherine Drennan, who also happens to be a fellow at HHMI. The intention is that these materials will introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a current research topic. The resources here include detailed student and instructor laboratory manuals, equipment lists, and lecture slides and notes for accompanying background and technique lectures. There is a complete syllabus available, along with an extensive gallery of relevant images. The site also contains links to related resources, such as a classroom video on researching microorganisms that live on greenhouse gases.

2013-01-25

37

78 FR 4170 - License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO...24-13365-01 issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc. (the licensee...accession numbers are: 1. Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Licensee...

2013-01-18

38

Synthesis of Vitamin K Expoxide: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides procedures for synthesizing and purifying a vitamin K metabolite (2,3-epoxide) to introduce many of the techniques used in lipid biochemistry. Includes typical results obtained as well as an optional experiment designed to test the purity of the epoxide obtained. (JM)

Thierry-Palmer, M.

1984-01-01

39

A Proposal for Teaching Undergraduate Chemistry Students Carbohydrate Biochemistry by Problem-Based Learning Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching elementary biochemistry to undergraduate students. The activity was based on "the foods we eat." It was used to engage students' curiosity and to initiate learning about a subject that could be used by the future teachers in the high school. The experimental…

Figueira, Angela C. M.; Rocha, Joao B. T.

2014-01-01

40

A Focused Assignment Encouraging Deep Reading in Undergraduate Biochemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Encouraging undergraduate students to access, read, and analyze current primary literature can positively impact learning, especially in advanced courses. The incorporation of literature into coursework typically involves reading and responding to full research reports. Such exercises have clear value as students make connections between…

Spiegelberg, Bryan D.

2014-01-01

41

A Laboratory Course in Clinical Biochemistry Emphasizing Interest and Relevance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ten laboratory experiments are described which are used in a successful clinical biochemistry laboratory course (e.g. blood alcohol, glucose tolerance, plasma triglycerides, coronary risk index, gastric analysis, vitamin C and E). Most of the experiments are performed on the students themselves using simple equipment with emphasis on useful…

Schwartz, Peter L.

1975-01-01

42

Raising Environmental Awareness through Applied Biochemistry Laboratory Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our environment is under constant pressure and threat from various sources of pollution. Science students, in particular chemistry students, must not only be made aware of these issues, but also be taught that chemistry (and science) can provide solutions to such real-life issues. To this end, a newly developed biochemistry laboratory experiment…

Salman Ashraf, S.

2013-01-01

43

Argumentation in undergraduate chemistry laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To address the need for reform in undergraduate science education a new instructional model called Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) was developed and then implemented in a undergraduate chemistry course at a community college in the southeastern United States (Sampson, Walker, & Grooms, 2009; Walker, Sampson, & Zimmerman, in press). The ADI instructional model is designed to give a more central place to argumentation and the role of argument in the social construction of scientific knowledge. This research investigated the growth in the quality of the student generated arguments and the scientific argumentation that took place over the course of a semester. Students enrolled in two sections of General Chemistry I laboratory at the community college participated in this study. The students worked in collaborative groups of three or four. The students were given a variation of the same performance task three times during the semester in order to measure individual ability to use evidence and justify their choice of evidence with appropriate rationale. Five ADI investigations took place during the semester and the laboratory reports for each were collected from each student and the argument section of each report was scored. All the student groups were video recorded five times during the semester as they generated and evaluated arguments and the quality of the group argumentation was assessed using an instrument called the Assessment of Scientific Argumentation in the Classroom (ASAC) observation protocol. As time was the independent variable in this study a repeated measure ANOVA was used to evaluate the significance of student improvement in each area (argumentation, written argument and performance task) over the course of the semester (Trochim, 1999). In addition, a multiple regression analysis was conducted to evaluate how well the ASAC scores predicted individual scores on both the performance task and the written arguments (Green & Salkind, 2005). There was significant growth over the course of the semester in all three measures, performance-based assessment, written argument and oral argumentation. There also was a significant correlation between written and oral arguments that was used to generate a linear model using oral argumentation as a predictor of written argument. The results of this suggest that the use of an integrated instructional model such as ADI can have a positive impact on the quality of the arguments students include in their investigation reports, the argumentation they engage in during lab activities, and their overall performance on tasks that require them to develop and support a valid conclusion with genuine evidence.

Walker, Joi Phelps

44

Argumentation in Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

To address the need for reform in undergraduate science education a new instructional model called Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) was developed and then implemented in a undergraduate chemistry course at a community college in the southeastern United States (Sampson, Walker, & Grooms, 2009; Walker, Sampson, & Zimmerman, in press). The ADI instructional model is designed to give a more central place

Joi Phelps Walker

2011-01-01

45

Fluid Flow Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The undergraduate fluid mechanics laboratory at Clarkson University consists of three experiments: mixing; drag measurements; and fluid flow and pressure drop measurements. The latter experiment is described, considering equipment needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained. (JN)

Vilimpochapornkul, Viroj; Obot, Nsima T.

1986-01-01

46

A survey validation and analysis of undergraduate medical biochemistry practical curriculum in maharashtra, India.  

PubMed

In order to review the strengths and weaknesses of medical biochemistry practical curriculum for undergraduates and to generate ideas to improve it, a questionnaire was sent to 50 biochemistry faculty members selected (through simple random sampling method) from 42 medical colleges of Maharashtra, India. 39 responded to the questionnaire, representing a 78% response rate. The internal consistency of the questionnaire sections was found to be satisfactory (>0.7). The respondents did not agree that the ongoing curriculum was in alignment with learning outcomes (8%), that it encouraged active learning (28%), helped to apply knowledge to clinical situations (18%) and promoted critical thinking and problem solving skills (28%). There were a number of qualitative experiments that were rated 'irrelevant'. Qualitative and quantitative experiments related to recent advances were suggested to be introduced by the respondents. Checklists for the practicals and new curriculum objectives provided in the questionnaire were also approved. The results of the curriculum evaluation suggest a need for re-structuring of practical biochemistry curriculum and introduction of a modified curriculum with more clinical relevance. PMID:23277713

Dandekar, Sucheta P; Maksane, Shalini N; McKinley, Danette

2012-01-01

47

Outcomes of a Research-Driven Laboratory and Literature Course Designed to Enhance Undergraduate Contributions to Original Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work describes outcomes of a research-driven advanced microbiology laboratory and literature research course intended to enhance undergraduate preparation for and contributions to original research. The laboratory section was designed to teach fundamental biochemistry and molecular biology techniques in the context of an original research…

Rasche, Madeline E.

2004-01-01

48

A Mechanical Resonance Apparatus for Undergraduate Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the use of a heavy duty hacksaw blade and a 1000 turn pick-up coil to form the basis of a mechanical oscillator for a laboratory exercise in mechanical resonance designed for either the elementary undergraduate course or in association with an upper level mechanics course. (LZ)

Jones, Christopher C.

1995-01-01

49

Laser Mode Structure Experiments for Undergraduate Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Experiments dealing with laser mode structure are presented which are suitable for an upper division undergraduate laboratory. The theory of cavity modes is summarized. The mode structure of the radiation from a helium-neon laser is measured by using a photodiode detector and spectrum analyzer to detect intermode beating. Off-axial modes can be…

Phillips, Richard A.; Gehrz, Robert D.

50

Environmental Chemistry in the Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of environmental chemistry and the use of laboratory exercises in analytical and general chemistry courses. Notes the importance of lab work in heightening student interest in coursework including problem-based learning in undergraduate curricula, ready adaptability of environmental coursework to existing curricula, and…

Wenzel, Thomas J.; Austin, Rachel N.

2001-01-01

51

An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Level Forensic Science, Biochemistry, or Molecular Biology Courses: Human DNA Amplification Using STR Single Locus Primers by Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green Detection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this laboratory experiment, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was conducted using published human TPOX single-locus DNA primers for validation and various student-designed short tandem repeat (STR) primers for Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) loci. SYBR Green was used to detect the amplification of the expected amplicons. The…

Elkins, Kelly M.; Kadunc, Raelynn E.

2012-01-01

52

A Fast and Inexpensive Western Blot Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Western blotting is an important, modern technique for transferring proteins from a gel onto nitrocellulose or other suitable support and then detecting a protein of interest using antibodies. We have developed an experiment and optimized the conditions for the undergraduate laboratory. The experiment can be done quickly using an electrophoretic blotter or more cheaply using passive transfer. This experiment allows the student to learn valuable procedures currently used in biochemistry and other biological sciences.

Farrell, Shawn O.; Farrell, Lynn E.

1995-08-01

53

An Experimental Undergraduate Laboratory Plasma Station  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plasma physics is an intimidating field to study and can be even a more daunting exercise to teach. At the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory we have created an all-inclusive undergraduate lab setup that encompasses three of the major experiments commonly seen in introductory graduate level plasma labs to improve upon the existing teaching tools available in the community and to expose undergraduates to the field. These experiments include Langmuir probe studies (single and double), spectroscopy, and Paschen curve analysis. The apparatus used to conduct the experiments is built upon a mobile station of a minimal footprint and maintenance requirements. The goal of the project was to create an easy to implement design that can be replicated by fledging undergraduate programs, community colleges, small liberal arts school or even established programs looking to streamline or build upon current curriculum.

Ross, Jerry; Zwicker, Andrew

2010-11-01

54

Preparing the Biochemistry Laboratory for the Next Outbreak: Lessons from SARS in Singapore  

PubMed Central

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an emerging disease characterised by fever and atypical pneumonia and caused by a novel coronavirus. Singapore was affected by the global pandemic in early 2003, with 238 cases and 33 deaths. Samples sent to the biochemistry laboratory made up the majority (69%) of all SARS samples, yet remained a minority (29%) of total biochemistry workload. This paper describes the problems encountered and solutions adopted by the biochemistry laboratory at the designated SARS hospital in coping with this epidemic. It provides practical advice for laboratories planning for the handling of samples from future outbreaks.

2005-01-01

55

Structure Leads To Function: An Integrated Biophysical Approach To Teaching a Biochemistry Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an integrated approach to teaching a biochemistry laboratory focusing on the relationship between the three-dimensional structure of a macromolecule and its function. RNA is chosen as the model system. Discusses curriculum and student assessment. (AIM)

And Others; deLannoy, Peter

1996-01-01

56

Kinetics of Papain: An Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Enzyme kinetics experiments are popular in the undergraduate laboratory. These experiments have pedagogic value because they reinforce the concepts of Michaelis-Menten kinetics covered in the lecture portion of the course and give students the experience of calculating kinetic constants from data they themselves have generated. In this experiment, we investigate the kinetics of the thiol protease papain. The source of the papain is commercially available papaya latex. A specific substrate, Na-benzoyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA), is used, which takes advantage of the fact that papain interacts with a phenylalanine residue two amino acids away from the peptide bond cleaved. Upon hydrolysis by papain, a bright yellow product is released, p-nitroaniline. This allows the reaction to be monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the rate of formation of the p-nitroaniline product as a function of the increase in absorbance of the solution at the lmax of p-nitroaniline (400 nm) over time at various substrate concentrations. These data are used to plot a Lineweaver-Burk plot from which the vmax and KM are obtained. If time permits, students carry out additional investigations in which e of p-nitroaniline is measured, the enzyme solution protein concentration is measured, the enzyme purity is evaluated by SDS-PAGE, and a pH-rate profile is constructed from experimental data.

Cornely, Kathleen; Crespo, Eric; Earley, Michael; Kloter, Rachel; Levesque, Aime; Pickering, Mary

1999-05-01

57

Digital storage oscilloscopes in the undergraduate laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Digital storage oscilloscopes (DSOs) are now easily available to undergraduate laboratories. In many cases, a DSO can replace a data-acquisition system. Seven such experiments/demonstrations are considered: (i) families of I-V characteristics of electronic devices (bipolar junction transistor), (ii) the V-I curve of a high-temperature superconductor (critical currents), (iii) the speed of electromagnetic waves and losses (in a coaxial cable), (iv) diffraction patterns (one and two slits), (v) the photoelectric effect (the Einstein equation), (vi) two variants of the Franck-Hertz experiment (with a Franck-Hertz tube from PHYWE and with a thyratron), and (vii) the structure of the video signal. All the experiments are performed without a computer or additional software. An exception is the experiment with a coaxial cable, where it is necessary to build graphs of the results obtained.

Kraftmakher, Yaakov

2012-11-01

58

A Multistep Synthesis for an Advanced Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multistep syntheses are often important components of the undergraduate organic laboratory experience and a three-step synthesis of 5-(2-sulfhydrylethyl) salicylaldehyde was described. The experiment is useful as a special project for an advanced undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course and offers opportunities for students to master a…

Chang Ji; Peters, Dennis G.

2006-01-01

59

What Skills Should Students of Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Programs Have upon Graduation?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) students should demonstrate proficiency in the foundational concepts of the discipline and possess the skills needed to practice as professionals. To ascertain the skills that should be required, groups of BMB educators met in several focused workshops to discuss the expectations with the ultimate goal of…

White, Harold B.; Benore, Marilee A.; Sumter, Takita F.; Caldwell, Benjamin D.; Bell, Ellis

2013-01-01

60

Application of a Differential Respirometer to the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an apparatus that can be used to measure low gas pressures over a range of temperature in the undergraduate teaching laboratory. Discusses an experimental procedure and theory for pressure temperature measurements with this apparatus. (CW)

Cummins, Ken; Stedman, Geoffrey

1988-01-01

61

Introducing Undergraduates to a Research Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a student project which is intended to teach undergraduates concepts and techniques of nuclear physics, experimental methods used in particle detection, and provide experience in a functioning research environment. Included are detailed procedures for carrying out the project. (CC)

Weinberg, Robert

1974-01-01

62

Mass Spectrometry for Large Undergraduate Laboratory Sections  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mass spectrometry is routinely covered in undergraduate organic chemistry courses and a number of valuable laboratory experiments featuring its use have been discussed (1-7). Although such experiments work well at institutions with limited laboratory enrollments, we typically teach laboratories with enrollments of 160 or more in which it is difficult to allow each student to carry out a meaningful "hands on" mass spectrometry experiment. Since we feel that some practical experience with this technique is important, we have designed a simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (gc/ms) exercise that allows each student to analyze the products of a simple synthesis that they have performed. The exercise starts with the microscale SN2 synthesis of 1-bromobutane from 1-butanol as described by Williamson (8). The students complete the synthesis and place one drop of the distilled product in a screw capped vial. The vials are then sealed, labeled with the students name and taken to the mass spectrometry laboratory by a teaching assistant. Students are instructed to sign up for a 20-min block of time over the next few days in order to analyze their sample. When the student arrives at the laboratory, he or she adds 1 ml CH2Cl2 to the sample and injects 0.3 microliters of the solution into the gas chromatograph. The samples typically contain the 1-butanol starting material and the 1-bromobutane product along with traces of dibutyl ether. The figure shows a mass chromatogram along with the mass spectra of the starting material and product from an actual student run. For this analysis to be applicable to large numbers of students, the gc separation must be as rapid as possible. We have been able to analyze each sample in 6 minutes on a 30 m DB-5 capillary column with the following temperature program: 70 oC for 1 min, 70-80 oC at 10 oC/min, 86-140 oC at 67.5 oC/min, 140-210 oC at 70 oC/min, and 210 oC for 1 min. A mass range of 20-200 amu is scanned with a solvent delay of 2 min. Under these conditions each analysis takes the student about 10 min and two students are scheduled per 20 min block. Since the instrument is under computer control, students operate the computer during the run. As the peaks appear on the mass chromatogram, their mass spectra are obtained and the student decides which corresponds to product and evaluates product purity and the structure of impurities. There is ample time to display all spectra, conduct library searches, and print data. This relatively simple laboratory exercise has the advantage of allowing each student to carry out an analysis on his or her own product. The fact that a brominated product is obtained introduces a discussion of isotopic patterns in mass spectrometry. The experiment is scheduled to coincide with the lecture discussion of spectroscopic structure determination and after SN2 reactions have been covered. One of our mass spectrometer satellite data stations is interfaced with a "3-gun" projector in a large lecture hall allowing the display of actual mass spectra from our instrument to lecture sections. AcknowlegementThis work was partially supported by a grant, DUE9350846, from the National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement Program. Literature Cited Brush, R. C.; Rice, G. W. J. Chem. Educ. 1994, 71, A293-A294. Asleson, G. L.; Doig, M. T.; Heldrich, F. J. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, A290. Novak, M.; Heinrich, J. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, A150. (b) Novak, M.; Heinrich, J.; Martin, K. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1993, 70, A103-104. Harman, C. S.; Myers, D. P.; Rittle, K. J. J. Chem. Educ. 1991, 68, 438-42. Mabbott, G. A. J. Chem. Educ. 1990, 67, 441-5. Hill, D. W.; McSharry, B. T.; Trzupek. J. Chem. Educ. 1988, 65, 907-10. Williamson, K. L. Macroscale and Microscale Organic Experiments, 2nd ed.; D. C. Heath: Lexington, MA, 1994; pp 247-51.

Illies, A.; Shevlin, P. B.; Childers, G.; Peschke, M.; Tsai, J.

1995-08-01

63

Commentary: Why Abandoning Undergraduate Laboratories Is Not an Option  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory exercises (labs) are sometimes regarded as dispensable in biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) education for various reasons including a combination of increased class costs and small budget allocations, pressing demands for more time to lecture to fit in new BMB discoveries within constant time span of courses, and the fact that…

Costa, Manuel Joao

2010-01-01

64

Web Camera Use in Developing Biology, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of a network-ready color camera is described which is primarily marketed as a security device and is used for experiments in developmental biology, genetics and biochemistry laboratories and in special student research projects. Acquiring and analyzing project and archiving images is very important in microscopy, electrophoresis and…

Ogren, Paul J.; Deibel, Michael; Kelly, Ian; Mulnix, Amy B.; Peck, Charlie

2004-01-01

65

Teaching Protein Purification and Characterization Techniques: A Student-Initiated, Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes a biochemistry laboratory that is completely project-oriented. Upper-level biology and chemistry majors work in teams to purify a protein of their choice. After the student groups have completed literature searches, ordered reagents, and made buffers they continue to learn basic protein purification and biochemical techniques…

MacDonald, Gina

2008-01-01

66

EDITORIAL: Student undergraduate laboratory and project work  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last decade 'labwork' courses at university level have changed significantly. The beginning of this development was indicated and partly initiated by the EU-project 'Labwork in Science Education' funded by the European Community (1999-2001). The present special issue of the European Journal of Physics focuses on a multitude of different aspects of this process. The aim of this publication is to improve the exchange of experience and to promote this important trend. In physics research labs a silent revolution has taken place. Today the personal computer is omnipresent. It controls the experiment via stepping motors, piezo-microdrives etc, it monitors all parameters and collects the experimental data with the help of smart sensors. In particular, computer-based modern scanning and imaging techniques open the possibility of creating really new types of experiments. The computer allows data storage and processing on the one hand and simulation and modelling on the other. These processes occur in parallel or may even be interwoven. The web plays an important role in modern science for inquiry, communication, cooperation and publication. Traditional labwork courses do not prepare students for the many resulting demands. Therefore it is necessary to redefine the learning targets and to reconsider the learning methods. Two contributions show exemplarily how modern experimental devices could find their way into students' labs. In the article 'Infrared thermal imaging as a tool in university physics education' by Klaus-Peter Möllmann and Michael Vollmer we can see that infrared thermal imaging is a valuable tool in physics education at university level. It can help to visualize and thereby enhance understanding of physical phenomena of mechanics, thermal physics, electromagnetism, optics and radiation physics. The contribution 'Using Peltier cells to study solid-liquid-vapor transitions and supercooling' by Giacomo Torzo, Isabella Soletta and Mario Branca proves that new experiments which illustrate both fundamental physics and modern technology can be realized even with a small budget. Traditional labwork courses often provide a catalogue of well known experiments. The students must first learn the theoretical background. They then assemble the setup from specified equipment, collect the data and perform the default data processing. However, there is no way to learn to swim without water. In order to achieve a constructivist access to learning, 'project labs' are needed. In a project labwork course a small group of students works as a team on a mini research project. The students have to specify the question of research, develop a suitable experimental setup, conduct the experiment and find a suitable way to evaluate the data. Finally they must present their results e.g. in the framework of a public poster session. Three contributions refer to this approach, however they focus on different aspects: 'Project laboratory for first-year students' by Gorazd Planinši?, 'RealTime Physics: active learning laboratories' by David Sokoloff et al and 'Labs outside labs: miniprojects at a spring camp for future physics teachers' by Leos Dvorák. Is it possible to prepare the students specifically for project labwork? This question is answered by the contribution 'A new labwork course for physics students: devices, methods and research projects' by Knut Neumann and Manuela Welzel. The two main parts of the labwork course cover first experimental devices (e.g. multimeters, oscilloscopes, different sensors, operational amplifiers, step motors, AD/DA-converters). Then subjects such as data processing, consideration of measurement uncertainties, keeping records or using tools like LABVIEW etc are focused on. Another concrete proposal for a new curriculum is provided by James Sharp et al, in 'Computer based learning in an undergraduate physics laboratory: interfacing and instrument control using MATLAB'. One can well imagine that project labs will be the typical learning environment for physics students in the future. However, the de

Schumacher, Dieter

2007-05-01

67

Reaction Kinetics: An Experiment for Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment to examine the kinetics of carbamate decomposition and the effect of buffer catalysis on the reaction. Includes background information, laboratory procedures, evaluation of data, and teaching suggestions. (Author/JN)

Ewing, Sheila

1982-01-01

68

The Importance of Undergraduate General and Organic Chemistry to the Study of Biochemistry in Medical School  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much literature has been devoted to the problems associated with teaching undergraduate chemistry courses. General chemistry reform has been called for by the Committee on Professional Training (1), the American Chemical Society (2), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (3), the National Science Foundation (4), Sigma Xi (5), the Worchester Polytechnic Institute (6), and individual authors (7 -

Anthony Scimone; Angelina A. Scimone

1996-01-01

69

Simulating a research environment in an undergraduate genetics laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

To address many of the recognized problems in undergraduate science education, we have developed a one-semester (15-week) undergraduate genetics laboratory course that focuses on the research process as opposed to recipe-style experiments. The course was designed to accommodate a total of 120–150 students with no more than 20 students in a single class. During the course of six experiments, each

Monte E Turner; Norman F. Paradise; Mark L. Johnson

1998-01-01

70

Working with Enzymes - Where Is Lactose Digested? An Enzyme Assay for Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Georgia Southern University, we offer a sophomore-level introductory biochemistry course that is aimed at nutrition and chemistry education majors. The laboratory portion of this course has long lacked an experimental introduction to enzymes. We have developed a simple enzyme assay utilizing lactase enzyme from crushed LactAid tablets and a 5% lactose solution ("synthetic milk"). In the experiment, the students assay the activity of the enzyme on the "synthetic milk" at pHs of approximately 1, 6, and 8 with the stated goal of determining where lactose functions in the digestive tract. The activity of the lactase may be followed chromatographically or spectrophotometrically. The experiment, which is actually a simple pH assay, is easily implemented in allied health chemistry laboratory courses and readily lends itself to adaptation for more complex kinetic assays in upper-level biochemistry laboratory courses. The experimental details, including a list of required supplies and hints for implementation, are provided.

Pope, Sandi R.; Tolleson, Tonya D.; Williams, R. Jill; Underhill, Russell D.; Deal, S. Todd

1998-06-01

71

Measuring Stellar Temperatures: An Astrophysical Laboratory for Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While astrophysics is a fascinating subject, it hardly lends itself to laboratory experiences accessible to undergraduate students. In this paper, we describe a feasible astrophysical laboratory experience in which the students are guided to take several stellar spectra, using a telescope, a spectrograph and a CCD camera, and perform a full data…

Cenadelli, D.; Zeni, M.

2008-01-01

72

An Undergraduate Nanotechnology Engineering Laboratory Course on Atomic Force Microscopy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, is home to North America's first undergraduate program in nanotechnology. As part of the Nanotechnology Engineering degree program, a scanning probe microscopy (SPM)-based laboratory has been developed for students in their fourth year. The one-term laboratory course "Nanoprobing and Lithography"…

Russo, D.; Fagan, R. D.; Hesjedal, T.

2011-01-01

73

The Importance of Undergraduate General and Organic Chemistry to the Study of Biochemistry in Medical School  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much literature has been devoted to the problems associated with teaching undergraduate chemistry courses. General chemistry reform has been called for by the Committee on Professional Training (1), the American Chemical Society (2), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (3), the National Science Foundation (4), Sigma Xi (5), the Worchester Polytechnic Institute (6), and individual authors (7 - 13). Organic chemistry reform is not as well documented, but does include proponents from some of the above authors (8, 14) and professional societies (2 - 5). In the early 1990s, the ACS established a task force to investigate the need for change in the general chemistry curriculum. No such task force currently exists to evaluate undergraduate organic chemistry course. A 1991 general chemistry curriculum survey was distributed to chemists and engineers (9). The present survey built on earlier efforts to reform undergraduate chemical curricula by both inquiring about a greater number of more specific topics and extending the list of topics to organic chemistry.

Scimone, Anthony; Scimone, Angelina A.

1996-12-01

74

Investigative Learning in Undergraduate Freshman Biology Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development and implementation of an investigative laboratory class. The new laboratory design has been determined to be a success by faculty, teaching assistants, and students. Includes a sample laboratory description. (DKM)

McKenzie, Woodrow L.; Glasson, George E.

1998-01-01

75

What skills should students of undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology programs have upon graduation?  

PubMed

Biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) students should demonstrate proficiency in the foundational concepts of the discipline and possess the skills needed to practice as professionals. To ascertain the skills that should be required, groups of BMB educators met in several focused workshops to discuss the expectations with the ultimate goal of clearly articulating the skills required. The results of these discussions highlight the critical importance of experimental, mathematical, and interpersonal skills including collaboration, teamwork, safety, and ethics. The groups also found experimental design, data interpretation and analysiand the ability to communicate findings to diverse audience to be essential skills. To aid in the development of appropriate assessments these skills are grouped into three categories, 1) Process of Science, 2) Communication and Comprehension of Science, and 3) Community of Practice Aspects of Science. Finally, the groups worked to align these competencies with the best practices in both teaching and in skills assessment. PMID:24019246

White, Harold B; Benore, Marilee A; Sumter, Takita F; Caldwell, Benjamin D; Bell, Ellis

2013-01-01

76

Application of indices cp and cpk to improve quality control capability in clinical biochemistry laboratories.  

PubMed

The traditional criteria for acceptability of analytic quality may not be objective in clinical laboratories. To establish quality control procedures intended to enhance Westgard multi-rules for improving the quality of clinical biochemistry tests, we applied the Cp and Cpk quality-control indices to monitor tolerance fitting and systematic variation of clinical biochemistry test results. Daily quality-control data of a large Taiwanese hospital in 2009 were analyzed. The test items were selected based on an Olympus biochemistry machine and included serum albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, cholesterol, glucose and potassium levels. Cp and Cpk values were calculated for normal and abnormal levels, respectively. The tolerance range was estimated with data from 50 laboratories using the same instruments and reagents. The results showed a monthly trend of variation for the five items under investigation. The index values of glucose were lower than those of the other items, and their values were usually <2. In contrast to the Cp value for cholesterol, Cpk of cholesterol was lower than 2, indicating a systematic error that should be further investigated. This finding suggests a degree of variation or failure to meet specifications that should be corrected. The study indicated that Cp and Cpk could be applied not only for monitoring variations in quality control, but also for revealing inter-laboratory qualitycontrol capability differences. PMID:24694196

Chen, Ming-Shu; Wu, Ming-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Ming

2014-04-30

77

Development of paediatric biochemistry centile charts as a complement to laboratory reference intervals.  

PubMed

Age-specific paediatric reference intervals are used in interpretation of laboratory results. However, interpretation may be problematic when a child just crosses an age bracket and the difference between the original and the subsequent age-specific reference interval is large. Moreover, details about the physiological changes with age may be masked. For the 12 months ending 30 September 2013, results of 16 common clinical biochemistry tests of ambulatory paediatric patients aged 0-19, requested by primary care physicians, were retrospectively collected in a large pathology service, and used to construct smoothed centile charts using a penalised maximum likelihood method. From the developed centile charts, the concentrations of sodium, bicarbonate, creatinine, urate, total protein, and albumin all increased with increasing age of the children. In contrast, the concentrations of potassium, chloride, anion gap, calcium, phosphate and lactate dehydrogenase decreased with increasing age of the children. Changes in the concentrations of urea, alkaline phosphatase, glucose, and total cholesterol varied by age. Generally, the boys and girls shared similar trend patterns until 10-15 years of age, when variations in the age of onset of puberty and development caused the trends of some biochemical measures to differ. The paediatric biochemistry centile charts are intuitive tools to use. They complement age-specific reference intervals in the tracking, interpretation and discussion of laboratory results. They also enhance the understanding of underlying physiological changes in biochemistry in children. PMID:24798150

Loh, Tze Ping; Antoniou, Georgia; Baghurst, Peter; Metz, Michael P

2014-06-01

78

Magnetic Braking Revisited: Activities for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper revisits the demonstration of Lenz by dropping magnets down a non-magnetic tube. Recent publications are reviewed and ideas for undergraduate laboratory investigations are suggested. Finally, an example of matching theory to observation is presented. (Contains 4 tables, 5 figures and 3 footnotes.)

Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

2008-01-01

79

An Introductory Demonstration Laboratory Produced Entirely by Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a student initiated experimental program, undergraduate students assumed full responsibility for planning, staffing, and running introductory psychology laboratories. They supervised six sessions demonstrating psychological principles. The results of post-session quizzes and questionnaires showed that students absorbed course material, enjoyed…

Kohn, Art; Brill, Max

1981-01-01

80

Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

2012-01-01

81

Fabrication of electrochromic devices in an undergraduate laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of variable transmittance electrochromic devices in an undergraduate laboratory. These devices consist of transparent conducting oxide and electrochromic thin films deposited on transparent silica substrates. Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is the transparent conductor, WO3 is the active electrochromic layer, and both materials are deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. Electrochromic darkening of the WO3 is

David J. Lawrence; John G. Stenger

2001-01-01

82

Ultrasound imaging as an undergraduate physics laboratory exercise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrasound imaging provides an interesting and accessible example of the intersection between biology, medicine, and physics. This article provides a review of the physics and technology currently available and discusses two recent methods that have expanded the diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound imaging. We also describe two undergraduate physics laboratory exercises involving ultrasound imaging.

Stiles, Timothy A.

2014-05-01

83

Dishonesty in the biochemistry classroom laboratory: A synthesis of causes and prevention.  

PubMed

Although reports of academic cheating are abundant, there are relatively few papers in the literature that focus on cheating in the context of science courses and even fewer that address dishonest practices, such as "cooking" or fudging data, within the classroom laboratory. This paper briefly reviews the existing literature on academic dishonesty and explores two theories that can be used to explain why cheating occurs: (1) classroom goal structure and (2) attitudes of neutralization. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of these theories within the context of a biochemistry and molecular biology teaching laboratory. PMID:21638711

Del Carlo, Dawn; Bodner, George

2006-09-01

84

Safety Concepts for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Safety procedures used by Department of Chemistry at the University of Akron are discussed. These include policy that no chemicals are stored in the teaching laboratories. Instead, dispensing stockrooms are used to service the laboratories. Other aspects discussed include ventilation procedures and development of microprocessor use in stockrooms.…

Chlad, Frank L.; Hardy, James K.

1983-01-01

85

Basic neuron model electrical equivalent circuit: an undergraduate laboratory exercise.  

PubMed

We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise for undergraduate students in which they can build and manipulate a neuron equivalent circuit. This exercise uses electrical circuit components that resemble neuron components and are easy to construct. We describe the methods for creating the equivalent circuit and how to observe different neuron properties through altering the structure of the equivalent circuit. We explain how this hands-on laboratory activity allows for the better understanding of this fundamental neuroscience concept. At the conclusion of this laboratory exercise, undergraduate students will be able to apply the principles of Ohm's law, cable theory with regards to neurons, and understand the functions of resistance and capacitance in a neuron. PMID:24319391

Dabrowski, Katie M; Castaño, Diego J; Tartar, Jaime L

2013-01-01

86

Down-under undergraduate optics and photonics laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our senior undergraduate laboratory offers 14 experiments in optics and photonics, including experiments on acousto- optics, properties of lasers, holography, optical fiber sensors and communications. Six of the experiments, and a mandatory assignment on laser safety, are individually completed by each student in a one semester course. A brief description of the experimental course and of each experiment is given, together with more detailed descriptions of the 'Fourier optics' and 'Photoluminescence of semiconductor quantum wells' experiments.

Perczuk, Barry; Gal, Michael

2002-05-01

87

A laboratory course for teaching laboratory techniques, experimental design, statistical analysis, and peer review process to undergraduate science students.  

PubMed

This article describes a 13-week laboratory course called Human Toxicology taught at the University of Otago, New Zealand. This course used a guided inquiry based laboratory coupled with formative assessment and collaborative learning to develop in undergraduate students the skills of problem solving/critical thinking, data interpretation and written discussion of results. The laboratory practices were a guided inquiry based around retinol's ability to potentiate acetaminophen-mediated hepatotoxicity. To induce critical thinking, students were given a choice as to which assay they could use to determine how retinol affected acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Short summaries were handed in following each assay and formed the bases of the formative assessment. To complete the feedback loop, a summative assessment that consisted of all the graphs and concepts from the short summaries were combined into a manuscript. To give the students exposure to science communication, the manuscript had to be written in accordance to the submission guidelines for Toxicological Sciences. Evaluation of this course was determined by a student questionnaire using a Likert scale and students' responses were very favorable. While the subject matter was toxicological centric, the content could be easily modified to suit another subject matter in biochemistry and molecular biology. PMID:23166024

Gliddon, C M; J Rosengren, R

2012-01-01

88

Experiences of Mentors Training Underrepresented Undergraduates in the Research Laboratory  

PubMed Central

Successfully recruiting students from underrepresented groups to pursue biomedical science research careers continues to be a challenge. Early exposure to scientific research is often cited as a powerful means to attract research scholars with the research mentor being critical in facilitating the development of an individual's science identity and career; however, most mentors in the biological sciences have had little formal training in working with research mentees. To better understand mentors’ experiences working with undergraduates in the laboratory, we conducted semistructured interviews with 15 research mentors at a public university in the Midwest. The interviewed mentors were part of a program designed to increase the number of American Indians pursuing biomedical/biobehavioral research careers and represented a broad array of perspectives, including equal representation of male and female mentors, mentors from underrepresented groups, mentors at different levels of their careers, and mentors from undergraduate and professional school departments. The mentors identified benefits and challenges in being an effective mentor. We also explored what the term underrepresented means to the mentors and discovered that most of the mentors had an incomplete understanding about how differences in culture could contribute to underrepresented students’ experience in the laboratory. Our interviews identify issues relevant to designing programs and courses focused on undergraduate student research.

Prunuske, Amy J.; Wilson, Janelle; Walls, Melissa; Clarke, Benjamin

2013-01-01

89

Laboratory Instructional Practices Inventory: A Tool for Assessing the Transformation of Undergraduate Laboratory Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the process of working through evaluation of efforts to transform undergraduate laboratory experiences at our institution, we developed a protocol for observing laboratory learning environments that could be used in varying institutional contexts. We began using the Instructional Practices Inventory and found many strengths in this protocol but…

Sadler, Troy D.; Puig, Ana; Trutschel, Brian K.

2011-01-01

90

ACP Broadsheet No 141: September 1993. Role of endocrine biochemistry laboratories in the investigation of infertility.  

PubMed Central

The staff and services of the endocrine biochemistry laboratory are essential to the efficient investigation of infertility. Each centre should adopt a detailed strategy for the investigation of the infertile couple which specifies the hormone analyses required at each stage. Appropriate first-line hormone tests should be selected after a thorough clinical history and physical examination of both partners. Second-line hormone testing should be determined from the results of the initial investigation and should be restricted to requests that either confirm or clarify an endocrine basis to infertility or monitor the response to treatment. The clinical biochemist should advise on specimen timing and collection, have responsibility for guaranteeing time and valid hormone results, and be part of the team that audits the overall strategy and the outcome for individual patients.

Beastall, G H

1993-01-01

91

University/industry cooperative teaching laboratory for undergraduate education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An undergraduate optics laboratory sponsored by the National Science Foundation of the United States was established to foster a link between local industry and academia. A series of innovative experiments was developed utilizing high-speed data acquisition equipment and signal processing software to demonstrate the fundamentals of diffraction, fiber optics, and physical optics principles. The experiments were performed in two complementary settings. The university experiments concentrated on basic optical principles and experimental techniques. A parallel industrial component was provided by local industry. Students were invited to industrial research laboratories to work on real-life optical problems of current interest. The students were able to see the relevance between fundamental optical principles and real industrial problems, use state-of-the-art equipment, and experience working in an industrial laboratory. Feedback was also solicited from industry management regarding improvements to academic training of students for the work force.

Leger, James R.

2002-05-01

92

Observing the quantum behavior of light in an undergraduate laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While the classical, wavelike behavior of light (interference and diffraction) has been easily observed in undergraduate laboratories for many years, explicit observation of the quantum nature of light (i.e., photons) is much more difficult. For example, while well-known phenomena such as the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering strongly suggest the existence of photons, they are not definitive proof of their existence. Here we present an experiment, suitable for an undergraduate laboratory, that unequivocally demonstrates the quantum nature of light. Spontaneously downconverted light is incident on a beamsplitter and the outputs are monitored with single-photon counting detectors. We observe a near absence of coincidence counts between the two detectorsâa result inconsistent with a classical wave model of light, but consistent with a quantum description in which individual photons are incident on the beamsplitter. More explicitly, we measured the degree of second-order coherence between the outputs to be g(2)(0) = 0.0177±0.0026, which violates the classical inequality g(2)(0)>=1 by 377 standard deviations.

Beck, Mark

2009-05-20

93

Atom trapping laboratory for upper level undergraduate students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an overview of experiments covered in two semester-length laboratory courses dedicated to laser spectroscopy and atom trapping. These courses constitute a powerful approach for teaching experimental physics in a manner that is both contemporary and capable of providing the background and skills relevant to a variety of research laboratories. The courses are designed to be accessible for all undergraduate streams in physics and applied physics as well as incoming graduate students. In the introductory course, students carry out several experiments in atomic and laser physics. In a follow up course, students trap atoms in a magneto-optical trap and carry out preliminary investigations of the properties of laser cooled atoms based on the expertise acquired in the first course. We discuss details of experiments, impact, possible course formats, budgetary requirements, and challenges related to long-term maintenance. The experiments described here have operated reliably for over five years.

Mok, C.; Winter, S.; Beica, H.; Barrett, B.; Berthiaume, R.; Vorozcovs, A.; Yachoua, F.; Afkhami-Jeddi, N.; Marants, R.; Aggarwal, M.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

2012-06-01

94

Teaching PCR Through Inquiry in an Undergraduate Biology Laboratory Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of an inquiry-based laboratory unit on the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). This unit was designed and taught for the undergraduate Eukaryotic Genetics Laboratory class (Bio105L) at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Our activity utilizes an authentic molecular biology research question to teach the underlying molecular mechanisms and experimental technique of PCR, as well as fundamental scientific process skills such as planning experiments, making predictions and interpreting data. In particular, the activity prompts students to use PCR to determine which gene has been deleted in a region of the Drosophila genome. During this activity, students also gained technical experience in common molecular biology techniques, learned about additional applications of PCR and used a hands-on approach to model each step of PCR.

Dorighi, K. M.; Betancourt, J.; Sapp, J.; Quan, T. K.; Lee, J.

2010-12-01

95

Planning an Objective and Need Based Curriculum: The Logistics with Reference to the Undergraduate Medical Education in Biochemistry  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The medical education is recently being transformed into several domains in order to adapt to the need and the value based academics which is required for the quality doctors who serve the community. Presently, the biochemistry curricula for the graduate students of medicine have been questioned by as many experts, because of their multiple lacunae. In this review, we would like to highlight the scenario which is related to the existing biochemistry curricula for graduate medical students, which have been followed in several medical schools and universities and we also hope to share our ideas for implementing objective and pragmatic curricula. Evidence based research, wherein the articles which are related to innovative teaching-learning tools are collected and the pros and cons which are related to the different methods analyzed in biochemistry point of view. Conclusion: Rapid changes in the content of the curriculum may not be required, but a gradual introduction of the novel approach and the methods of teaching biochemistry can be adopted into the curriculum.

Ramasamy, Ramesh; Gopal, Niranjan; Srinivasan, A R; Murugaiyan, Sathish Babu

2013-01-01

96

Utility of Self-Made Crossword Puzzles as an Active Learning Method to Study Biochemistry in Undergraduate Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To incorporate an active learning component in a one-semester biochemistry course, students were asked to create crossword puzzles using key concepts. Student observations on the use of self-made crossword puzzles as an active-learning instructional tool were collected using a 5-point Likert survey at the end of the semester. A majority of the…

Coticone, Sulekha Rao

2013-01-01

97

Integrating Computational Chemistry into a Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Experience: A New Twist on the Lysozyme Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biochemistry laboratory at many universities is becoming more focused on a project-oriented experience. For example, a single enzyme is chosen and studied throughout the entire semester. A project-oriented laboratory has been adapted and expanded to include computational and carbohydrate chemistry. Egg-white lysozyme was purified and characterized. To expand and update the experiment, a computational module was added in which

Rachel R. Peterson; James R. Cox

2001-01-01

98

Oxygen Uptake by a Cobalt(II) Complex: An Undergraduate Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental procedure is described for studying oxygen uptake by a transition metal. This procedure is designed for use with undergraduates and may be used in organic or biochemistry laboratories. Diagrams of the apparatus are included. (MR)

Appleton, Trevor G.

1977-01-01

99

Status of Undergraduate Pharmacology Laboratories in Colleges of Pharmacy in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

U.S. colleges of pharmacy were surveyed in 1976 to determine whether a trend exists in continuing, discontinuing, or restructuring laboratory time in pharmaceutical education. Data regarding core undergraduate pharmacology courses, undergraduate pharmacology laboratory status, and pharmacology faculty are presented. (LBH)

Katz, Norman L.; And Others

1978-01-01

100

Is the Undergraduate Research Experience (URE) Always Best? The Power of Choice in a Bifurcated Practical Stream for a Large Introductory Biochemistry Class  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science undergraduate courses typically cater to a mixed-learner cohort, with a diversity of motivations and skills. This diversity introduces pressure for designers of the practical laboratory curriculum. Students who are struggling with the course need a series of tasks that begin simply, and transition to more conceptually difficult material.…

Rowland, Susan L.; Lawrie, Gwen A.; Behrendorff, James B. Y. H.; Gillam, Elizabeth M. J.

2012-01-01

101

Improved Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories with A Modern Telescope Control System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are in the middle of a cooperative astronomy education project to improve undergraduate laboratories at RPI (a PhD granting institution) and Siena College (a nearby liberal arts college). We have completed an overhaul of a 40-year-old, 16" B&C telescope on the RPI campus, and have made it available for hundreds of students at both schools, and once per week to the public. We have written an assessment test which was distributed to the students at the beginning and end of the Fall 2006 semester, which will be used as a baseline to determine whether the laboratory activities, which are currently under development, improve student learning in the Fall 2007 semester next year. The studio-style, hands-on, inquiry-based laboratories will be designed to challenge student misconceptions. In order to handle a large number of students using the main telescope and a limited number of smaller telescopes, we will cycle students through concurrent activities. This is enabled by the rapid acquisition and imaging of targets made possible by the upgrade to the control system of our 16" telescope. We demonstrate the productivity of our newly refurbished telescope, show the baseline results of our assessment, and present samples of activities under development. This project is funded by an NSF CCLI grant, 05-11340.

Milano, Anthony J.; Broder, D.; Finn, R.; Newberg, H.; Weatherwax, A.; Whittet, D.

2006-12-01

102

Experiments at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory for the undergraduate physics curriculum  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are being developed at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory to offer advanced undergraduate physics students laboratory experiences in the atmosphere of a frontier accelerator facility. These experiments differ from projects done by Undergraduate Research Assistants in that they are designed specifically for integration into the undergraduate curriculum as part of a structured laboratory course. The immediate goal of the program is to develop four accelerator-based experiments for use in the undergraduate Advanced Laboratory course at Duke University. Two newly developed experiments, {ital Carbon-Carbon Mott Scattering} and {ital Lifetime Measurements of an Auger Emitter}, will be described. In addition, the logistics of conducting undergraduate laboratory course work in an active research facility will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

1999-06-01

103

Experiments at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory for the undergraduate physics curriculum  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are being developed at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory to offer advanced undergraduate physics students laboratory experiences in the atmosphere of a frontier accelerator facility. These experiments differ from projects done by Undergraduate Research Assistants in that they are designed specifically for integration into the undergraduate curriculum as part of a structured laboratory course. The immediate goal of the program is to develop four accelerator-based experiments for use in the undergraduate Advanced Laboratory course at Duke University. Two newly developed experiments, Carbon-Carbon Mott Scattering and Lifetime Measurements of an Auger Emitter, will be described. In addition, the logistics of conducting undergraduate laboratory course work in an active research facility will be discussed.

Howell, C. R. [Department of Physics, Duke University and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

1999-06-10

104

Structural Studies of Phycobiliproteins from Spirulina: Combining Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, and Molecular Modeling in an Undergraduate Biochemistry Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Molecular modeling provides a powerful mechanism for students to connect molecular-level structural changes with macroscopically observable properties. We describe an experiment that integrates spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and molecular modeling into a single activity examining structural changes in phycobiliproteins upon denaturation with urea. Phycobiliproteins contain a covalently attached chromophore, phycocyanobilin, which is constrained in a planar conformation by the folded protein. Upon denaturation of the protein, the chromophore undergoes a conformational change, leading to a significant alteration of the absorption spectrum. By measuring the absorbance at 625 nm as a function of urea concentration, the free energy of unfolding can be determined. Students determine the dihedral angles in the chromophore and map the contacts between protein and chromophore using Protein Explorer, a structure visualization program freely available on the Internet. The change in absorption wavelength can be related to the difference between the LUMO and HOMO energies, obtained using PC Spartan Pro, for the chromophore in the folded and unfolded phycobiliprotein. This experiment could be used in a physical chemistry class in a curriculum that integrates biochemistry throughout the course work as well as in a traditional biochemistry course.

Featured on the Cover

Taylor, Ann T. S.; Feller, Scott E.

2002-12-01

105

Research Opportunities for Undergraduate Students at Storm Peak Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GRASP (Geoscience Research at Storm Peak) is a program providing field research experiences for a diverse group of undergraduate students. GRASP is funded by the National Science Foundation. Its mission is to recruit students from underrepresented groups within the geoscience community allowing students to work and live at the Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL). Data previously collected at the facility forms the basis for continuing research projects that addresses climate change, atmospheric pollution, and cloud formation. Prior to arriving at SPL, students travel to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to learn about supercomputing, mathematical modeling, and scientific visualization. GRASP participants met at the campus of Howard University for a reunion workshop and presented their results in November 2008. This poster illustrates the given task and methods used to analyze an increased concentration of organic carbon detected between April 4 and 5, 2008 at SPL located at the summit of Mt. Warner in Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3,202 meters.

Vargas, W.; Hallar, G.

2009-12-01

106

DNA Fingerprint Analysis of Three Short Tandem Repeat (STR) Loci for Biochemistry and Forensic Science Laboratory Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have devised and implemented a DNA fingerprinting module for an upper division undergraduate laboratory based on the amplification and analysis of three of the 13 short tandem repeat loci that are required by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (FBI CODIS) data base. Students first collect human epithelial (cheek)…

McNamara-Schroeder, Kathleen; Olonan, Cheryl; Chu, Simon; Montoya, Maria C.; Alviri, Mahta; Ginty, Shannon; Love, John J.

2006-01-01

107

Screening for Saponins Using the Blood Hemolysis Test. An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment for undergraduate chemistry laboratories involving a chemical found in plants and some sea animals. Discusses collection and identification of material, a hemolysis test, preparation of blood-coated agar plates, and application of samples. (CW)

Sotheeswaran, Subramaniam

1988-01-01

108

A Green Starting Material for Electrophilic Aromatic Substitution for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) experiment is designed for the second-semester and undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. In the EAS experiment, the principles of green chemistry are discussed and illustrated in conjunction with the presentation of electrophilic aromatic substitution.

Jones-Wilson, T. Michelle; Burtch, Elizabeth A.

2005-01-01

109

The Quartz-Crystal Microbalance in an Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: I. Fundamentals and Instrumentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The fundamentals, as well as the instrumentation of the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique that is used in an undergraduate laboratory experiment are being described. The QCM response can be easily used to change the properties of any system.

Tsionsky, Vladimir

2007-01-01

110

Determination of Rate Constants for Ouabain Inhibition of Adenosine Triphosphatase: An Undergraduate Biological Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an undergraduate biological chemistry laboratory experiment which provides students with an example of pseudo-first-order kinetics with the cardiac glycoside inhibition of mammalism sodium and potassium transport. (SL)

Sall, Eri; And Others

1978-01-01

111

The Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectrum of Methyl 7-Cycloheptatrienylacetate: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment designed to give the senior chemistry student an opportunity to apply several synthetic and purification techniques as well as possibilities for the application of NMR spectroscopy. (CS)

Jurch, G. R., Jr.; And Others

1980-01-01

112

Cross-Disciplinary Thermoregulation and Sweat Analysis Laboratory Experiences for Undergraduate Chemistry and Exercise Science Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a qualitative evaluation of Cross-Disciplinary health sciences undergraduate laboratory experiences in which concepts and students from two distinct disciplines (chemistry and exercise physiology) combined to study exercise thermoregulation and sweat analysis.

2011-06-01

113

Development of sensorial experiments and their implementation into undergraduate laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Visualization" of chemical phenomena often has been limited in the teaching laboratories to the sense of sight. We have developed chemistry experiments that rely on senses other than eyesight to investigate chemical concepts, make quantitative determinations, and familiarize students with chemical techniques traditionally designed using only eyesight. Multi-sensory learning can benefit all students by actively engaging them in learning through stimulation or an alternative way of experiencing a concept or ideas. Perception of events or concepts usually depends on the information from the different sensory systems combined. The use of multi-sensory learning can take advantage of all the senses to reinforce learning as each sense builds toward a more complete experience of scientific data. Research has shown that multi-sensory representations of scientific phenomena is a valuable tool for enhancing understanding of chemistry as well as displacing misconceptions through experience. Multi-sensory experiences have also been shown to enrich memory performance. There are few experiments published which utilize multiple senses in the teaching laboratory. The sensorial experiments chosen were conceptually similar to experiments currently performed in undergraduate laboratories; however students collect different types of data using multi-sensory observations. The experiments themselves were developed by using chemicals that would provide different sensory changes or capitalizing on sensory observations that were typically overlooked or ignored and obtain similar and precise results as in traditional experiments. Minimizing hazards and using safe practices are especially essential in these experiments as students utilize senses traditionally not allowed to be used in the laboratories. These sensorial experiments utilize typical equipment found in the teaching laboratories as well as inexpensive chemicals in order to aid implementation. All experiments are rigorously tested for accuracy and all chemicals examined for safety prior to implementation. The pedagogical objectives were established of to provide the ability to develop and stimulate students' conceptual understanding. The educational assessments of these experiments are are fashioned using the framework chosen (Marzano and Kendall). All the experiments are designed as collaborative, inquiry-based experiments in aims of enhancing the students understanding of the subject and promote critical thinking skills. These experiments use an investigative approach rather than verification methods. Terminology and misconceptions of the experiment were evaluated to prevent misunderstanding or confusion during the experiment. Interventions to address these misconceptions and learning problems associated with the experiment were developed. We have developed the Learning Lab Report, LLR, as an alternative model for the traditional laboratory reports, with the goal of transforming the traditional reports into something more useful for both students and instructors. The educational strategies are employed to develop this format in order to promote students to think critically about the concepts and take an active involvement in learning. From the results of the LLR, all experiments were reviewed and re-written to address any learning problems. The sensorial experiments study several topics usually covered in the first 2 years of the chemistry curriculum (general and organic chemistry courses). The experiments implemented, organic qualitative analysis, esterification kinetics, Le Chatelier equilibrium, thermometric titrations and ASA kinetics, worked effectively as students were able to draw correct conclusions about the concepts from the data obtained. An olfactory titration using the smell of the rutabaga vegetable has been developed and thoroughly tested. The LLR was utilized with the equilibrium, titration and acetyl salicylic acid experiments. The details of the development, implementation of these sensorial experiments and the LLR and student results are discussed.

Bromfield Lee, Deborah Christina

114

Extreme Learning Assistants: Students' Perceptions of Their Undergraduate Laboratory Instructors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Several schools have implemented âLearning Assistantâ (LA) programs, in which upper-class undergraduates serve as teaching assistants in introductory courses. At UNCG, LAs are given an unusual degree of freedom. Working in teams, they serve as the primary instructors for lab sections of the two introductory calculus-based physics courses. They co-design the lab curriculum with the professor of the lecture section, conduct all lab classes, and grade all student work. In order to investigate how students taking the lab reacted to having undergraduates as lab instructors, we gave and analyzed a short anonymous Likert-type survey probing studentsâ opinions at the end of the first course. We found that overall, most students reacted favorably. They found the LAsâ content knowledge and pedagogic skills to be adequate, and saw some benefit to having undergraduates rather than faculty to interact with. They also perceived that the responded to questions with guiding questions rather than authoritative answers.

Grabow, Aaron J.; Beatty, Ian D.; Gerace, William J.

2014-01-30

115

Enhancing Undergraduate Agro-Ecological Laboratory Employment through Experiential Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We piloted an educational model, the Sustainable Agriculture Scholars Program, linking research in organic agriculture to experiential learning activities for summer undergraduate employees in 2007 and 2008. Our objectives were to: (1) further student understanding of sustainable agriculture research, (2) increase student interest in sustainable…

Grossman, J. M.; Patel, M.; Drinkwater, L. E.

2010-01-01

116

Cavity Ring down Spectroscopy Experiment for an Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simple experiment is described that permits advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of the cavity ring down spectroscopy technique. The apparatus is used for measurements of low concentrations of NO[subscript 2] produced in air by an electric discharge. We present the setup, experimental procedure, data analysis and some…

Stacewicz, T.; Wasylczyk, P.; Kowalczyk, P.; Semczuk, M.

2007-01-01

117

Coulometric Analysis Experiment for the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An undergraduate experiment on coulometric analysis of four commercial household products is presented. A special type of coulometry cell made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer is utilized. The PDMS cell consists of multiple analyte compartments and an internal network of salt bridges. Experimental procedure for the analysis of the acid in a…

Dabke, Rajeev B.; Gebeyehu, Zewdu; Thor, Ryan

2011-01-01

118

Integrated Laboratories: Laying the Foundation for Undergraduate Research Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interest in undergraduate student research has grown in response to initiatives from various professional societies and educational organizations. Participation in research changes student attitudes towards courses as they realize the utility and relevance of what they are learning. At the U.S. Naval Academy, the chemistry majors' curriculum was…

Dillner, Debra K.; Ferrante, Robert F.; Fitzgerald, Jeffrey P.; Schroeder, Maria J.

2011-01-01

119

A Laboratory Course for Teaching Laboratory Techniques, Experimental Design, Statistical Analysis, and Peer Review Process to Undergraduate Science Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a 13-week laboratory course called Human Toxicology taught at the University of Otago, New Zealand. This course used a guided inquiry based laboratory coupled with formative assessment and collaborative learning to develop in undergraduate students the skills of problem solving/critical thinking, data interpretation and…

Gliddon, C. M.; Rosengren, R. J.

2012-01-01

120

A Project-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Promoting the Understanding and Uses of Fluorescence Spectroscopy in the Study of Biomolecular Structures and Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory project for a first semester biochemistry course is described, which integrates the traditional classroom study of the structure and function of biomolecules with the laboratory study of these molecules using fluorescence spectroscopy. Students are assigned a specific question addressing the stability/function of lipids, proteins, or…

Briese, Nicholas; Jakubowsk, Henry V.

2007-01-01

121

Preparative Protein Production from Inclusion Bodies and Crystallization: A Seven-Week Biochemistry Sequence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We describe how to produce and purify proteins from "Escherichia coli" inclusion bodies by adapting versatile, preparative-scale techniques to the undergraduate laboratory schedule. This 7-week sequence of experiments fits into an annual cycle of research activity in biochemistry courses. Recombinant proteins are expressed as inclusion bodies,…

Peterson, Megan J.; Snyder, W. Kalani; Westerman, Shelley; McFarland, Benjamin J.

2011-01-01

122

Development, Implementation, and Analysis of a National Survey of Faculty Goals for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work reports the development of a survey for laboratory goals in undergraduate chemistry, the analysis of reliable and valid data collected from a national survey of college chemistry faculty, and a synthesis of the findings. The study used a sequential exploratory mixed-methods design. Faculty goals for laboratory emerged across seven…

Bruck, Aaron D.; Towns, Marcy

2013-01-01

123

A Survey of the Practices, Procedures, and Techniques in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Teaching Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey was conducted of four-year institutions that teach undergraduate organic chemistry laboratories in the United States. The data include results from over 130 schools, describes the current practices at these institutions, and discusses the statistical results such as the scale of the laboratories performed, the chemical techniques applied,…

Martin, Christopher B.; Schmidt, Monica; Soniat, Michael

2011-01-01

124

A Coastal Environment Field and Laboratory Activity for an Undergraduate Geomorphology Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A field and laboratory exercise for an undergraduate geomorphology class is described that focuses on the beach. The project requires one day of fieldwork and two laboratory sessions. In the field, students measure water surface fluctuations (waves) with a pressure sensor, survey beach profiles, collect sediment samples, and observe the beach…

Ellis, Jean T.; Rindfleisch, Paul R.

2006-01-01

125

Hairy Root as a Model System for Undergraduate Laboratory Curriculum and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hairy root transformation has been widely adapted in plant laboratories to rapidly generate transgenic roots for biochemical and molecular analysis. We present hairy root transformations as a versatile and adaptable model system for a wide variety of undergraduate laboratory courses and research. This technique is easy, efficient, and fast making…

Keyes, Carol A.; Subramanian, Senthil; Yu, Oliver

2009-01-01

126

Redesign of an undergraduate controls laboratory with an eye toward accommodating future upgrades  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a recent and very advantageous upgrade of the undergraduate controls laboratory in the Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department at Kansas State University. The current lab has been in use for about a decade. Details regarding the original hardware fundamental to the laboratory activities, including the embedded digital signal processor (DSP) and the brushless DC motor stand (called

Jacob Wieneke; Dale Schinstock; Warren N. White; Guoqiang Hu

2010-01-01

127

A Capstone Experimental Learning Exercise for Undergraduate Physiology Laboratory Courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Description of a physiology laboratory course with a learning opportunity designed to extend the individual lessons performed in the laboratory course with self-directed learning through the contextual application of information in a clinical setting

PhD Carissa M. Krane (University of Dayton Department of Biology)

2005-12-01

128

A Simple Laboratory Scale Model of Iceberg Dynamics and its Role in Undergraduate Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lab-scale models of geophysical phenomena have a long history in research and education. For example, at the University of Chicago, Dave Fultz developed laboratory-scale models of atmospheric flows. The results from his laboratory were so stimulating that similar laboratories were subsequently established at a number of other institutions. Today, the Dave Fultz Memorial Laboratory for Hydrodynamics (http://geosci.uchicago.edu/~nnn/LAB/) teaches general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans to hundreds of students each year. Following this tradition, we have constructed a lab model of iceberg-capsize dynamics for use in the Fultz Laboratory, which focuses on the interface between glaciology and physical oceanography. The experiment consists of a 2.5 meter long wave tank containing water and plastic "icebergs". The motion of the icebergs is tracked using digital video. Movies can be found at: http://geosci.uchicago.edu/research/glaciology_files/tsunamigenesis_research.shtml. We have had 3 successful undergraduate interns with backgrounds in mathematics, engineering, and geosciences perform experiments, analyze data, and interpret results. In addition to iceberg dynamics, the wave-tank has served as a teaching tool in undergraduate classes studying dam-breaking and tsunami run-up. Motivated by the relatively inexpensive cost of our apparatus (~1K-2K dollars) and positive experiences of undergraduate students, we hope to serve as a model for undergraduate research and education that other universities may follow.

Burton, J. C.; MacAyeal, D. R.; Nakamura, N.

2011-12-01

129

ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

2008-01-01

130

On the Way to the Virtual Laboratory: Integrating Chemical Information into the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of an undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum at Duke University (North Carolina) that integrates library instruction for chemical information sources. Highlights include network access, electronic journals, access to Web sites, and the need for increased user education. (LRW)

Porter, Katherine R.; Woerner, Todd

1997-01-01

131

Validating the Collision-Dominated Child-Langmuir Law for a DC Discharge Cathode Sheath in an Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we propose a simple method of observing the collision-dominated Child-Langmuir law in the course of an undergraduate laboratory work devoted to studying the properties of gas discharges. To this end we employ the dc gas discharge whose properties are studied in sufficient detail. The undergraduate laboratory work itself is reduced…

Lisovskiy, V.; Yegorenkov, V.

2009-01-01

132

A New Model for Transitioning Students from the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory to the Research Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The transformation of 346 chemistry courses into a training experience that could provide undergraduate students with a skill set essential for a research-based chemistry career is presented. The course has an innovative structure that connects undergraduate students with graduate research labs at the semester midpoint and also includes new,…

Hollenbeck, Jessica J.; Wixson, Emily N.; Geske, Grant D.; Dodge, Matthew W.; Tseng, T. Andrew; Clauss, Allen D.; Blackwell, Helen E.

2006-01-01

133

ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part I--Fundamentals and Examples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. Several examples of the use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in different undergraduate chemistry laboratory courses are presented here. These…

Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

2008-01-01

134

An Advanced Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Exploring NIR Spectroscopy and Chemometrics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An advanced undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment to study the advantages and hazards of the coupling of NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics is described. The combination is commonly used for analysis and process control of various ingredients used in agriculture, petroleum and food products.

Wanke, Randall; Stauffer, Jennifer

2007-01-01

135

Advanced Undergraduate-Laboratory Experiment on Electron Spin Resonance in Single-Crystal Ruby  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An electron-spin-resonance experiment which has been successfully performed in an advanced undergraduate physics laboratory is described. A discussion of that part of the theory of magnetic resonance necessary for the understanding of the experiment is also provided in this article. (DT)

Collins, Lee A.; And Others

1974-01-01

136

A Green Polymerization of Aspartic Acid for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The green polymerization of aspartic acid carried out during an organic-inorganic synthesis laboratory course for undergraduate students is described. The procedure is based on work by Donlar Corporation, a Peru, Illinois-based company that won a Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1996 in the Small Business category for preparing thermal…

Bennett, George D.

2005-01-01

137

Borohydride Reduction of Estrone: Demonstration of Diastereoselectivity in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This experiment presents a guided-inquiry approach to the demonstration of diastereoselectivity in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Chiral hindered ketones such as estrone, undergo facile reduction with sodium borohydride in a highly diastereoselective manner. The diastereomeric estradiols produced in the reaction can be analyzed and…

Aditya, Animesh; Nichols, David E.; Loudon, G. Marc

2008-01-01

138

Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

2013-01-01

139

The Quartz-Crystal Microbalance in an Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: Measuring Mass  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study explains the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique, which is often used as an undergraduate laboratory experiment for measuring the mass of a system. QCM can be used as a mass sensor only when the measured mass is rigidly attached to the surface.

Tsionsky, Vladimir

2007-01-01

140

A Measure of the Effectiveness of Incorporating 3D Human Anatomy into an Online Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a study designed to determine the effectiveness of implementing three-dimensional (3D) stereo images of a human skull in an undergraduate human anatomy online laboratory were gathered and analysed. Mental model theory and its applications to 3D relationships are discussed along with the research results. Quantitative results on 62 pairs…

Hilbelink, Amy J.

2009-01-01

141

Augmenting traditional undergraduate advanced laboratory experiments by automation using IEEE488 and RS232 interfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meaningful and effective use of the computer in undergraduate physics teaching has been unexpectedly and somewhat paradoxically slow. Some upper division laboratory experiments are described in which the computer is used in a way that preserves the traditional value and importance of classic experiments and minimizes the intrusion of the computer. Experiments and the equipment are chosen to minimize programming

S. Nornes; Y. Z. Tu

1989-01-01

142

Bacterial Production of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate): An Undergraduate Student Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a multidisciplinary course that is cross-listed between five departments, we developed an undergraduate student laboratory experiment for culturing, isolating, and purifying the biopolymer, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), PHB. This biopolyester accumulates in the cytoplasm of bacterial cells under specific growth conditions, and it has…

Burns, Kristi L.; Oldham, Charlie D.; May, Sheldon W.

2009-01-01

143

The Perceptions, Views and Opinions of University Students about Physics Learning during Undergraduate Laboratory Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The physics laboratory has long been a distinctive feature of physics education. It has been given a central role in the teaching and learning of physics at school and undergraduate levels in universities. The literature indicates that science educators have suggested that there are academically rich benefits in the learning and understanding of…

Hanif, M.; Sneddon, P. H.; Al-Ahmadi, F. M.; Reid, N.

2009-01-01

144

Simple & Rapid Generation of Complex DNA Profiles for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiles can be generated by a variety of techniques incorporating different types of DNA markers. Simple methods are commonly utilized in the undergraduate laboratory, but with certain drawbacks. In this article, the author presents an advancement of the "Alu" dimorphism technique involving two tetraplex polymerase…

Kass, David H.

2007-01-01

145

Microfluidic Gel Electrophoresis in the Undergraduate Laboratory Applied to Food Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A microfluidics-based laboratory experiment for the analysis of DNA fragments in an analytical undergraduate course is presented. The experiment is set within the context of food species identification via amplified DNA fragments. The students are provided with berry samples from which they extract DNA and perform polymerase chain reaction (PCR)…

Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Bhattacharya, Sanchari; Ros, Alexandra

2012-01-01

146

Computer Based Learning in an Undergraduate Physics Laboratory: Interfacing and Instrument Control Using Matlab  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we describe the recent changes to the curriculum of the second year practical laboratory course in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Nottingham. In particular, we describe how Matlab has been implemented as a teaching tool and discuss both its pedagogical advantages and disadvantages in teaching undergraduate

Sharp, J. S.; Glover, P. M.; Moseley, W.

2007-01-01

147

Glucose Transport in Cultured Animal Cells: An Exercise for the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Membrane transport is a fundamental concept that undergraduate students of cell biology understand better with laboratory experience. Formal teaching exercises commonly used to illustrate this concept are unbiological, qualitative, or intricate and time consuming to prepare. We have developed an exercise that uses uptake of radiolabeled nutrient…

Ledbetter, Mary Lee S.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

2002-01-01

148

Using a distributed control system (DCS) for distillation column control in an undergraduate unit operations laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the main advantages of using an industrial distributed control system (DCS) in the operation of a distillation column which is used in an undergraduate unit operations laboratory course at the University of Texas at Austin. Taking advantage of the resources of an industrial DCS (friendly display options, an alarm management system, historical databases and advanced control tools),

Ivan Castillo; Thomas F. Edgar

2009-01-01

149

Microfluidics in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Device Fabrication and an Experiment to Mimic Intravascular Gas Embolism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A method to fabricate microfluidic devices and an experimental protocol to model intravascular gas embolism for undergraduate laboratories are presented. The fabrication process details how to produce masters on glass slides; these masters serve as molds to pattern channels in an elastomeric polymer that can be adhered to a substrate, resulting in…

Jablonski, Erin L.; Vogel, Brandon M.; Cavanagh, Daniel P.; Beers, Kathryn L.

2010-01-01

150

On the Integration of Remote Experimentation into Undergraduate Laboratories-Technical Implementation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents how Stevens Institute of Technology (SIT) has adopted an Internet-based approach to implement its undergraduate student laboratories. The approach allowed student interaction with the experimental devices from remote locations at any time. Furthermore, it enabled instructors to include demonstrations of sophisticated…

Esche, Sven K.

2006-01-01

151

The Impact of Collaborative Groups versus Individuals in Undergraduate Inquiry-Based Astronomy Laboratory Learning Exercises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the long-standing general undergraduate education requirements common to many colleges and universities is a science course with a laboratory experience component. One of the objectives frequently included in the description of most of these courses is that a student will understand the nature and processes of scientific inquiry. However,…

Sibbernsen, Kendra J.

2010-01-01

152

Testing Plastic Deformations of Materials in the Introductory Undergraduate Mechanics Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for…

Romo-Kroger, C. M.

2012-01-01

153

Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: XCVIII. Experiments Involving Thermal Methods of Analysis for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains some experiments involving thermal methods of analysis for undergraduate chemistry laboratories. Some experiments are: (1) the determination of the density and degree of crystallinity of a polymer; and (2) the determination of the specific heat of a nonvolatile compound. (HM)

Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

1978-01-01

154

Creating a Research-Rich Chemistry Curriculum with an Integrated, Upper-Level-Undergraduate Laboratory Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new research-rich chemistry curriculum with an integrated, upper-level undergraduate laboratory program has recently been developed to impart better understanding to the students. The program is called Advanced techniques in Experimental Chemistry and helps prepare students for more real-world problems.

Gron, Liz U.; Hales, David A.; Teague, M. Warfield

2007-01-01

155

Merging of Research and Teaching in Developmental Biology: Adaptation of Current Scientific Research Papers for Use in Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two laboratory exercises adopted from current research papers for use in an undergraduate developmental biology course. Gives methods, summary of student results, and student comments. Lists lecture topics, text and reprint assignments, and laboratory exercises for course. (EB)

Lee, H. H.; and others

1970-01-01

156

Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

2012-01-01

157

Observing thermomigration of air bubbles in a fluid under gravity at an undergraduate research laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An educational experimental project in fluid mechanics for space science or physics honors undergraduates is presented. The motion of air bubbles in a viscous silicone oil in response to buoyancy and Marangoni convection is studied with an experimental setup adapted to the undergraduate laboratory. The Marangoni effect or thermocapillary convection occurs when a temperature gradient is present in the oil which generates a surface tension differential over the bubbles. Results of measured radii and temperature gradients necessary to balance the buoyancy and Marangoni forces, along with computed Marangoni velocities are in good agreement with previous terrestrial and space experiments.

Simard, J.-F.; Houdayer, A.; Boudreault, R.; Bélanger, S.; Laaouan, A.

1995-09-01

158

High Performance Liquid Chromatography Experiments to Undergraduate Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the principles of liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (LCEC), an analytical technique that incorporates the advantages of both liquids chromatography and electrochemistry. Also suggests laboratory experiments using this technique. (MLH)

Kissinger, Peter T.; And Others

1977-01-01

159

The Performance of Taiwan's Undergraduates in Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to investigate the students' learning outcomes in Organic Chemistry Laboratory, a performance-based assessment was developed and implemented to a group of 222 chemistry-majored sophomores from a research university in Taiwan. A multi-step organic synthesis experiment was chosen, and the basic organic manipulative skills, such as reflux, distillation, extraction, filtration, and recrystallization were incorporated in the laboratory activities. According

Jui-Lin She; Yeun-Min Tsai; Mei-Hung Chiu; Hui-Jung Chen

160

Genesis of "Biochemistry: A Problems Approach"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When the author began teaching as a young assistant professor at Caltech in 1966, his assignment was to take over the undergraduate biochemistry course taught for many years by Henry Borsook, who was about to retire. Students dreaded this course. Having delighted in biochemistry during his graduate training at Stanford, he was determined to put…

Wood, William B.

2002-01-01

161

An Enzyme Kinetics Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment using [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy to observe the kinetics of the acylase 1-catalyzed hydrolysis of "N"-acetyl-DL-methionine has been developed for the organic laboratory. The L-enantiomer of the reactant is hydrolyzed completely in less than 2 h, and [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopic data from a single sample can be worked up…

Olsen, Robert J.; Olsen, Julie A.; Giles, Greta A.

2010-01-01

162

A Green Enantioselective Aldol Condensation for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of laboratory exercises for the organic chemistry curriculum that emphasize enantioselective synthesis of the aldol condensation which involves the proline-catalyzed condensation between acetone and isobutyraldehyde are explored. The experiment illustrates some of the trade-offs involved in green chemistry like the use of acetone in large…

Bennett, George D.

2006-01-01

163

Vectors and Fomites: An Investigative Laboratory for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory model system for introductory microbiology students that involves hands-on studies of bacteria vectored in soil nematodes. Describes a series of experiments designed to demonstrate vector-fomite transmission, bacterial survival, and disinfectant activity. Introduces the concept of genetically engineered microorganisms and the…

Adamo, Joseph A.; Gealt, Michael A.

1996-01-01

164

Development of Sensorial Experiments and Their Implementation into Undergraduate Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Visualization" of chemical phenomena often has been limited in the teaching laboratories to the sense of sight. We have developed chemistry experiments that rely on senses other than eyesight to investigate chemical concepts, make quantitative determinations, and familiarize students with chemical techniques traditionally designed using only…

Bromfield Lee, Deborah Christina

2009-01-01

165

An Undergraduate Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectroscopy Laboratory at Georgia Tech.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Experimental techniques are taught in a laboratory course designed with some student options available. Eight experiments which use vacuum systems, radiation sources, dispersion and detection systems are outlined. A course outline and time table are given. The final examination is described as 30 minutes of individual practical work and dialogue…

Stevenson, James R.; Bartlett, Roger J.

166

Glycosidation of Methanol with Ribose: An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exercise provides students hands-on experience with the topics of glycosidation, hemiacetal and acetal formation, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ([superscript 1]H NMR) spectroscopy, and kinetic and thermodynamic product formation. In this laboratory experiment, the methyl acetal of ribose is synthesized, and the kinetic and thermodynamic…

Simon, Erin; Cook, Katie; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Stripe, Wayne; Bruch, Martha; Bendinskas, Kestutis

2010-01-01

167

Green, Enzymatic Syntheses of Divanillin and Diapocynin for the Organic, Biochemistry, or Advanced General Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Environmentally benign chemistry is an increasingly important topic both in the classroom and the laboratory. In this experiment, students synthesize divanillin from vanillin or diapocynin from apocynin, using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in water. The dimerized products form rapidly at ambient temperature and are isolated by…

Nishimura, Rachel T.; Giammanco, Chiara H.; Vosburg, David A.

2010-01-01

168

Bean Beetles A Model Organism for Undergraduate Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Each classroom-tested experiment (in the Laboratory Activities part of the website), has a student handout, instructor notes, and sample data. All these materials may be viewed on the website and are downloadable (MS word and pdf formats). Additional downloadable materials include graphs of sample data (PowerPoint slides), and images for identifying the sexes and recognizing eggs on a bean (PowerPoint slides).

Lawrence S. Blumer (Morehouse College;); Christopher W. Beck (Emory University;)

2005-05-31

169

The impact of collaborative groups versus individuals in undergraduate inquiry-based astronomy laboratory learning exercises  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the long-standing general undergraduate education requirements common to many colleges and universities is a science course with a laboratory experience component. One of the objectives frequently included in the description of most of these courses is that a student will understand the nature and processes of scientific inquiry. However, recent research has shown that learners in traditional undergraduate science laboratory environments are not developing a sufficiently meaningful understanding of scientific inquiry. Recently, astronomy laboratory activities have been developed that intentionally scaffold a student from guided activities to open inquiry ones and preliminary results show that these laboratories are successful for supporting students to understand the nature of scientific inquiry (Slater, S., Slater, T. F., & Shaner, 2008). This mixed-method quasi-experimental study was designed to determine how students in an undergraduate astronomy laboratory increase their understanding of inquiry working in relative isolation compared to working in small collaborative learning groups. The introductory astronomy laboratory students in the study generally increased their understanding of scientific inquiry over the course of the semester and this held true similarly for students working in groups and students working individually in the laboratories. This was determined by the examining the change in responses from the pretest to the posttest administration of the Views of Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) survey, the increase in scores on laboratory exercises, and observations from the instructor. Because the study was successful in determining that individuals in the astronomy laboratory do as well at understanding inquiry as those who complete their exercises in small groups, it would be appropriate to offer these inquiry-based exercises in an online format.

Sibbernsen, Kendra J.

170

Television Medical Dramas as Case Studies in Biochemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several case studies from popular television medical dramas are described for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. These cases, which illustrate fundamental principles of biochemistry, are used as the basis for problems that can be discussed further in small groups. Medical cases provide an interesting context for biochemistry with video…

Millard, Julie T.

2009-01-01

171

Standards of laboratory practice: cardiac drug monitoring. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry.  

PubMed

In this Standard of Laboratory Practice we recommend guidelines for therapeutic monitoring of cardiac drugs. Cardiac drugs are primarily used for treatment of angina, arrhythmias, and congestive heart failure. Digoxin, used in congestive heart failure, is widely prescribed and therapeutically monitored. Monitoring and use of antiarrhythmics such as disopyramide and lidocaine have been steadily declining. Immunoassay techniques are currently the most popular methods for measuring cardiac drugs. Several reasons make measurement of cardiac drugs in serum important: their narrow therapeutic index, similarity in clinical complications and presentation of under- and overmedicated patients, need for dosage adjustments, and confirmation of patient compliance. Monitoring may also be necessary in other circumstances, such as assessment of acetylator phenotypes. We present recommendations for measuring digoxin, quinidine, procainamide (and N-acetylprocainamide), lidocaine, and flecainide. We discuss guidelines for measuring unbound digoxin in the presence of an antidote (Fab fragments), for characterizing the impact of digoxin-like immunoreactive factor (DLIF) and other cross-reactants on immunoassays, and for moni-toring the unbound (free fraction) of drugs that bind to alpha1-acid glycoprotein. We also discuss logistic, clinical, hospital, and laboratory practice guidelines needed for implementation of a successful therapeutic drug monitoring service for cardiac drugs. PMID:9590394

Valdes, R; Jortani, S A; Gheorghiade, M

1998-05-01

172

CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessment of the health status of animals through measurement of cellular, biochemical, and macromolecular constituents in blood, secretions, and excretions has been variously referred to as clinical chemistry, clinical biochemistry, or clinical pathology. he genesis of this dis...

173

Rigorous Potentiometric Determination of Metal Complexes Stability Constants: An Undergraduate Laboratory Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present work an undergraduate laboratory practice is described corresponding to both experimental and computational methods used in potentiometric equilibrium constants determinations. As an example of these determinations the system formed by Cu(II) and D-galacturonic acid was selected. Both the deprotonation constant for the ligand and the equilibrium constants for the metal chelates were determined by using the program BEST.

Escandar, Graciela M.; Federico Sala, Luis

1997-11-01

174

An approach to Poiseuille's law in an undergraduate laboratory experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continuous growth of computer and sensor technology allows many researchers to develop simple modifications and/or refinements to standard educational experiments, making them more attractive and comprehensible to students and thus increasing their educational impact. In the framework of this approach, the present study proposes an alternative experimental setup, which allows the confirmation of Hagen-Poiseuille's law, governing the flow of real fluids through tubes, a law with numerous important applications in both technology and medicine. In the proposed educational procedure, experimental measurements of fluid outflow are performed with the use of a motion sensor and a suitable computer program, allowing the determination of both the hydrostatic pressure and the flow rate. The dependence of the flow rate on parameters such as viscosity of the fluid, length and radius of the tube and the pressure difference between the ends of the tube are also studied, providing a laboratory activity which is useful and attractive for first year students, especially those of technologically oriented departments.

Sianoudis, I. A.; Drakaki, E.

2008-05-01

175

Isolation and Culture of Bovine Oviductal Epithelial Cells for Use in the Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory and Undergraduate Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Methods for isolation and culture of epithelial cells from bovine oviduct for use in both research and teaching laboratory. Also provides examples of ways that an oviductal cell culture can be incorporated into an undergraduate research program

Amy L. Way (Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania Clearfield Campus)

2006-12-01

176

Biochemistry and metabolism of lake trout: laboratory and field studies on the effects of contaminants  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To evaluate the effects of ambient and higher concentrations of PCB's (Aroclor 1254) and DDE in food and water on fry of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Michigan, I measured several biochemical indicators of stress in exposed and unexposed (control) fry. No differences between treatments were observed in oxygen consumption rates or lactate concentrations of unexercised fry, but apparent differences in specific swimming speed and lactate response in fry that swam to exhaustion suggested that exposed fry had lower stamina. Observed differences between biochemical profiles of 1-day-old sac fry reared from eggs originating from lake trout collected off Saugatuck and those originating from eggs of brood stock at the Marquette (Michigan) hatchery may have been caused by organochlorine contamination or by genetic and dietary differences between the parental stocks. Activity of the enzyme allantoinase was measured in juvenile and adult lake trout as an indicator of sublethal effects of Great Lakes contaminants. The 50% inhibition of allantoinase in vitro occurred at 6.0 mg/L Cu++, 6.7 mg/L Cd++, 34 mg/L Hg++, and 52 mg/L Pb++. Allantoinase was not affected by in vitro exposure to PCB's up to 7 ?g/g, or DDE or DDT up to 10 ?g/g; however, in vivo exposure resulting in 2.6 ?g/g PCB's in the whole fish activated allantoinase slightly (10% significance level). Allantoinase activity was negatively correlated with total length for fish from Lake Michigan but not for fish from Lake Superior or from laboratory stocks. Mercury, PCB's, and DDT, possibly acting in combination with each other and with additional contaminants, may be the cause of the negative correlation of allantoinase activity with size in Lake Michigan lake trout.

Passino, Dora R. May

1981-01-01

177

In-depth treatment of discharge ignition data during undergraduate laboratory work  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we propose a technique of getting new information from conventional undergraduate laboratory work for observing dc gas breakdown. The laboratory work itself will consist in registering the breakdown curves of the dc discharge for different gas pressure values and subsequent processing of collected data. From this processing one can determine Stoletow’s point, the maximum ionization ability of electrons, the energy cost of an electron-ion pair, as well as the mean free path of electrons in a gas, and the total cross section of collisions between electrons and gas molecules under study; thus deepening our knowledge of the dc breakdown.

Lisovskiy, V.; Yegorenkov, V.

2014-07-01

178

The Scanning Electron Microscope As An Accelerator For The Undergraduate Advanced Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator for the undergraduate, advanced physics laboratory, the SEM is an excellent substitute for an ion accelerator. Although there are no nuclear physics experiments that can be performed with a typical 30 kV SEM, there is an opportunity for experimental work on accelerator physics, atomic physics, electron-solid interactions, and the basics of modern e-beam lithography.

Peterson, Randolph S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of the South, 735 University Avenue, Sewanee TN 37383 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge MA 01239 (United States); Berggren, Karl K.; Mondol, Mark [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge MA 01239 (United States)

2011-06-01

179

The THCME Medical Biochemistry Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Dr. Michael W. King of the Terre Haute Center for Medical Education, this stellar resource offers a wealth of biochemistry information, from the basic chemistry of biomolecules to Glycosaminoglycans and mucopolysaccharides. Designed with the undergraduate in mind, each section contains full-text descriptions of a particular subject with accompanying illustrations, tables, figures, and references. Users looking for further information on any topic can use the MedHunt search engine from the front page here to search multiple online medical sources. For any student of biochemistry, this resource will be a valuable asset.

180

Update on Improved Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories with a Modern Telescope Control System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are completing a cooperative astronomy education project designed to improve undergraduate laboratories at RPI (a PhD granting institution) and Siena College (a nearby liberal arts college). Following the overhaul of a 40-year-old, 16" B&C telescope on the RPI campus, we have made it available for use for hundreds of students at both schools and once per week to the public. This telescope has been integrated into studio-style, hands-on, inquiry-based laboratories designed to challenge student misconceptions. An assessment test was designed and distributed to the students taking the course at the beginning and end of the Fall 2007 semester, the results of which we compare to a baseline study undertaken in Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 to determine the efficacy of the laboratories in improving undergraduate astronomy education. In order to handle a large number of students using the main telescope and a limited number of smaller telescopes, we have cycled students through concurrent activites. This has been enabled by the rapid acquisition and imaging of targets made possible by the upgrade to the control system of our 16" telescope. We show preliminary results of the Fall 2007 assessments and comparisons to the baseline assessment. This project is funded by an NSF CCLI grant, 05-11340.

Jacobi, Ian; Broder, D.; Finn, R.; Milano, A. J.; Newberg, H.; Weatherwax, A.; Whittet, D.

2007-12-01

181

Inexpensive high-precision capacitance measurements and their applications in undergraduate laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An inexpensive system for precision capacitance measurement is presented. The system is appropriate for undergraduate laboratories is based on a newly available capacitance-to-digital integrated circuit that can measure picofarad capacitances to six significant figures. The circuitry software for controlling the integrated circuit with a personal computer via an I2C interface bus are described. Examples of experiments that make use of the circuitry are discussed, including a novel hydrostatic magnetometer that uses precision capacitance measurement to determine the magnetization of a small sample.

Clayhold, Jeffrey; Priest, Joseph

2008-12-01

182

Design for a Simple and Inexpensive Cylinder-within-a-Cylinder Gradient Maker for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A design for a simple and inexpensive gradient maker is described. The gradient maker is assembled by (i) cutting the tops off two plastic bottles of differing diameters to produce two cylinders with intact bottoms; (ii) drilling a small hole toward the bottom of the smaller diameter cylinder and plugging the hole with a size 00 cork stopper; and…

Sims, Paul A.; O'Mealey, Gary B.; Khan, Nabeel A.; Larabee, Chelsea M.

2011-01-01

183

Affordable Hands-On DNA Sequencing and Genotyping: An Exercise for Teaching DNA Analysis to Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this report, we describe a 5-week laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology and biochemistry students in which students learn to sequence DNA and to genotype their DNA for selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Students use miniaturized DNA sequencing gels that require approximately 8 min to run. The students perform G, A, T, C…

Shah, Kushani; Thomas, Shelby; Stein, Arnold

2013-01-01

184

"Anisakis Simplex" Infection in Mackerel: A Reliable Laboratory Exercise to Demonstrate Important Principles in Parasitology to Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Practical laboratory work in parasitology can be very limited, due to the difficulty in maintaining multi-host parasite life cycles, especially for a large, once-yearly undergraduate laboratory class for life science students. The use of mackerel, "Scomber scombrus," bought from a local fishmonger, is an ideal model to investigate important…

Coombs, I.; Tatner, M.; Paterson, V.

2013-01-01

185

Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

2010-01-01

186

Activation of Wnt Signaling Using Lithium Chloride: Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises  

PubMed Central

Abstract Zebrafish provide researchers and students alike with an excellent model of vertebrate nervous system development due to a high degree of conserved developmental mechanisms and transparent embryos that develop in synchrony. In these laboratory exercises, undergraduate students explore cell biological concepts while performing hypothesis-driven novel research utilizing methodologies such as immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, image analysis, pharmacology, and basic statistics. In the first block of exercises, students perform anti-acetylated tubulin (anti-AT) immunofluorescence, identify spinal tracts and neuronal subtypes, and perform conventional and confocal microscopy. Building on knowledge acquired in the first block of exercises, during the second block, students subsequently perform pharmacological activation of Wnt signaling through lithium chloride treatments, and assess nervous system integrity through anti-AT immunofluorescence. Students perform various quantitative methods and apply statistics to determine outcomes of Wnt activation. In their final laboratory report, students contextualize their results with foundations of molecular mechanisms of nervous system development. In sum, these exercises offer undergraduate students a model of independent research at the graduate level.

Ross, Andrew William

2012-01-01

187

Nutritional Biochemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

Smith, Scott M.

2010-01-01

188

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: An Undergraduate Chemical Laboratory Safety Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a two-quarter hour college chemistry course focusing on laboratory safety. Includes lists of topics/assignments, problem sets (toxicology, storage, and energy) and videotapes, films, and slide sets used in the course. (JN)

Nicholls, L. Jewel

1982-01-01

189

CO(2) rebreathing: an undergraduate laboratory to study the chemical control of breathing.  

PubMed

The Read CO2 rebreathing method (Read DJ. A clinical method for assessing the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide. Australas Ann Med 16: 20-32, 1967) provides a simple and reproducible approach for studying the chemical control of breathing. It has been widely used since the modifications made by Duffin and coworkers. Our use of a rebreathing laboratory to challenge undergraduate science students to investigate the control of breathing provided 8 yr of student-generated data for comparison with the literature. Students (age: 19-22 yr, Research Ethics Board approval) rebreathed from a bag containing 5% CO2 and 95% O2 (to suppress the peripheral chemoreflex to hypoxia). Rebreathing was performed, and ventilation measured, after hyperventilation to deplete tissue CO2 stores and enable the detection of the central chemoreflex threshold. We analyzed 43 data sets, of which 10 were rejected for technical reasons. The mean threshold and ventilatory sensitivity to CO2 were 43.3 ± 3.8 mmHg and 4.60 ± 3.04 l·min(-1)·mmHg(-1) (means ± SD), respectively. Threshold values were normally distributed, whereas sensitivity was skewed to the left. Both mean values agreed well with those in the literature. We conclude that the modified rebreathing protocol is a robust method for undergraduate investigation of the chemical control of breathing. PMID:24292914

Domnik, N J; Turcotte, S E; Yuen, N Y; Iscoe, S; Fisher, J T

2013-12-01

190

Demand for interdisciplinary laboratories for physiology research by undergraduate students in biosciences and biomedical engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Physiology as a discipline is uniquely positioned to engage undergraduate students in interdisciplinary research in response to the 2006ÃÂ2011 National Science Foundation Strategic Plan call for innovative transformational research, which emphasizes multidisciplinary projects. To prepare undergraduates for careers that cross disciplinary boundaries, students need to practice interdisciplinary communication in academic programs that connect students in diverse disciplines. This report surveys policy documents relevant to this emphasis on interdisciplinary training and suggests a changing role for physiology courses in bioscience and engineering programs. A role for a physiology course is increasingly recommended for engineering programs, but the study of physiology from an engineering perspective might differ from the study of physiology as a basic science. Indeed, physiology laboratory courses provide an arena where biomedical engineering and bioscience students can apply knowledge from both fields while cooperating in multidisciplinary teams under specified technical constraints. Because different problem-solving approaches are used by students of engineering and bioscience, instructional innovations are needed to break down stereotypes between the disciplines and create an educational environment where interdisciplinary teamwork is used to bridge differences.

Kari L Clase (Bindley Bioscience Center-Purdue University Industrial Technology); Patrick W Hein (Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering- Purdue University Basic Medical Sciences)

2008-12-01

191

Waste Treatment in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Let the Students Do It!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are numerous reports in this Journal that describe procedures for treating various types of wastes generated in research labs as well as in undergraduate teaching labs (1 - 11). However, relatively few reports describe direct student involvement in the waste treatment process (12 - 18). Including well-designed waste treatment "experiments" as natural addenda to laboratory experiments that generate hazardous waste could provide students additional opportunities to apply chemistry to "real" problems. Moreover, such waste treatment-type experiments might be used to stimulate discussions regarding the hazards and environmental issues associated with the disposal of chemical wastes at both the academic and industrial levels. We were prompted by the paper of Schneider and Wiskamp (18) to present the details of a waste treatment experiment that we have recently incorporated into our large (ca. 2400 students per year), second-semester general chemistry course.

Nash, John J.; Meyer, Jeanne A. R.; Nurrenbern, Susan C.

1996-12-01

192

Electroretinograms in Drosophila: A Robust and Genetically Accessible Electrophysiological System for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

PubMed Central

Laboratory courses in neurophysiology fulfill a critical need for inquiry-based training in undergraduate programs in neuroscience and biology. These courses typically use classical electrophysiological preparations to explore the basic features of neuronal function. However, current neuroscience research also focuses on elucidating the molecular and genetic mechanisms of neuronal function, using model systems that include mutant and transgenic animals. To bridge laboratory training in neurophysiology with modern molecular genetics, we describe a teaching model based on electroretinography of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a long-established model system for basic neuroscience research. Drosophila are easily maintained, economical, and have hundreds of neurophysiologically relevant mutant strains and genetic tools readily available. The Drosophila electroretinogram (ERG) is a simple and accessible extracellular recording of a neural signal in the fly eye in response to flashes of light. The signal is multifaceted and the response is sensitive to stimulation parameters such as intensity, duration and wavelength, thus forming a rich source of analysis for students. Most importantly, different mutations affecting key components of intracellular signaling, synaptic transmission or neuronal function can affect the ERG waveform in characteristic ways. Recording wild type and mutant ERGs allows students to examine firsthand the connection between genetics, biochemical pathways, and electrophysiology. This neurophysiology laboratory course can facilitate and enhance an understanding of the cellular and molecular contributions to neurophysiological recordings.

Vilinsky, Ilya; Johnson, Karl G.

2012-01-01

193

Transposing from the laboratory to the classroom to generate authentic research experiences for undergraduates.  

PubMed

Large lecture classes and standardized laboratory exercises are characteristic of introductory biology courses. Previous research has found that these courses do not adequately convey the process of scientific research and the excitement of discovery. Here we propose a model that provides beginning biology students with an inquiry-based, active learning laboratory experience. The Dynamic Genome course replicates a modern research laboratory focused on eukaryotic transposable elements where beginning undergraduates learn key genetics concepts, experimental design, and molecular biological skills. Here we report on two key features of the course, a didactic module and the capstone original research project. The module is a modified version of a published experiment where students experience how virtual transposable elements from rice (Oryza sativa) are assayed for function in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. As part of the module, students analyze the phenotypes and genotypes of transgenic plants to determine the requirements for transposition. After mastering the skills and concepts, students participate in an authentic research project where they use computational analysis and PCR to detect transposable element insertion site polymorphism in a panel of diverse maize strains. As a consequence of their engagement in this course, students report large gains in their ability to understand the nature of research and demonstrate that they can apply that knowledge to independent research projects. PMID:23172853

Burnette, James M; Wessler, Susan R

2013-02-01

194

Transposing from the Laboratory to the Classroom to Generate Authentic Research Experiences for Undergraduates  

PubMed Central

Large lecture classes and standardized laboratory exercises are characteristic of introductory biology courses. Previous research has found that these courses do not adequately convey the process of scientific research and the excitement of discovery. Here we propose a model that provides beginning biology students with an inquiry-based, active learning laboratory experience. The Dynamic Genome course replicates a modern research laboratory focused on eukaryotic transposable elements where beginning undergraduates learn key genetics concepts, experimental design, and molecular biological skills. Here we report on two key features of the course, a didactic module and the capstone original research project. The module is a modified version of a published experiment where students experience how virtual transposable elements from rice (Oryza sativa) are assayed for function in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. As part of the module, students analyze the phenotypes and genotypes of transgenic plants to determine the requirements for transposition. After mastering the skills and concepts, students participate in an authentic research project where they use computational analysis and PCR to detect transposable element insertion site polymorphism in a panel of diverse maize strains. As a consequence of their engagement in this course, students report large gains in their ability to understand the nature of research and demonstrate that they can apply that knowledge to independent research projects.

Burnette, James M.; Wessler, Susan R.

2013-01-01

195

Oxidation of Borneol to Camphor Using Oxone and Catalytic Sodium Chloride: A Green Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new green oxidation procedure was developed for the undergraduate organic teaching laboratories using Oxone and a catalytic quantity of sodium chloride for the conversion of borneol to camphor. This simple 1 h, room temperature reaction afforded high quality and yield of product, was environmentally friendly, and produced negligible quantities…

Lang, Patrick T.; Harned, Andrew M.; Wissinger, Jane E.

2011-01-01

196

The Cyclohexanol Cycle and Synthesis of Nylon 6,6: Green Chemistry in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A one-term synthesis project that incorporates many of the principles of green chemistry is presented for the undergraduate organic laboratory. In this multistep scheme of reactions, students react, recycle, and ultimately convert cyclohexanol to nylon 6,6. The individual reactions in the project employ environmentally friendly methodologies, and…

Dintzner, Matthew R.; Kinzie, Charles R.; Pulkrabek, Kimberly; Arena, Anthony F.

2012-01-01

197

Preparation of a D-Glucose-Derived Alkene. An E2 Reaction for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the carbohydrates continue to gain attention for their central role in numerous areas of chemistry and biology, there is a growing need for experiments at the undergraduate level that highlight these fascinating compounds. In this article we describe a simple two-step laboratory experiment that may be used to highlight several important concepts introduced in sophomore organic chemistry, as applied

Peter Norris; Andrew Fluxe

2001-01-01

198

Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when…

Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

2011-01-01

199

Ab Initio Determinations of Photoelectron Spectra Including Vibronic Features: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present a first-principles determination of the photoelectron spectra of water and hypochlorous acid as a laboratory exercise accessible to students in an undergraduate physical chemistry course. This paper demonstrates the robustness and user-friendliness of software developed for the Franck-Condon factor calculation. While the calculator is…

Lord, Richard L.; Davis, Lisa; Millam, Evan L.; Brown, Eric; Offerman, Chad; Wray, Paul; Green, Susan M. E.

2008-01-01

200

Red Seaweed Enzyme-Catalyzed Bromination of Bromophenol Red: An Inquiry-Based Kinetics Laboratory Experiment for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Haloperoxidase enzymes are of interest for basic and applied bioscientists because of their increasing importance in pharmaceutical industry and environmental cleanups. In a guided inquiry-based laboratory experiment for life-science, agricultural science, and health science undergraduates, the bromoperoxidase from a red seaweed was used to…

Jittam, Piyachat; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Promptmas, Chamras; Sriwattanarothai, Namkang; Archavarungson, Nattinee; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

2009-01-01

201

Validating the Goldstein-Wehner Law for the Stratified Positive Column of DC Discharge in an Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we suggest a simple technique for validating the Goldstein-Wehner law for a stratified positive column of dc glow discharge while studying the properties of gas discharges in an undergraduate laboratory. To accomplish this a simple device with a pre-vacuum mechanical pump, dc source and gas pressure gauge is required. Experiments may…

Lisovskiy, V. A.; Koval, V. A.; Artushenko, E. P.; Yegorenkov, V. D.

2012-01-01

202

SIPCAn (Separation, Isolation, Purification, Characterization, and Analysis): A One-Term, Integrated Project for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

SIPCAn, an acronym for separation, isolation, purification, characterization, and analysis, is presented as a one-term, integrated project for the first-term undergraduate organic laboratory course. Students are assigned two mixtures of unknown organic compounds--a mixture of two liquid compounds and a mixture of two solid compounds--at the…

Dintzner, Matthew R.; Kinzie, Charles R.; Pulkrabek, Kimberly A.; Arena, Anthony F.

2011-01-01

203

Fitting It All In: Adapting a Green Chemistry Extraction Experiment for Inclusion in an Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several principles of green chemistry are introduced through this experiment designed for use in the undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. An established experiment of liquid CO2 extraction of D-limonene has been adapted to include a quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. This facilitates drop-in incorporation of an exciting…

Buckley, Heather L.; Beck, Annelise R.; Mulvihill, Martin J.; Douskey, Michelle C.

2013-01-01

204

Gold Electrodes Modified with Self-Assembled Monolayers for Measuring L-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes an undergraduate electrochemistry laboratory experiment in which the students measure the L-ascorbic acid content of a real sample. Gold electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thioctic acid and cysteamine are prepared to study the effects of surface modification on the electrode reaction of L-ascorbic…

Ito, Takashi; Perera, D. M. Neluni T.; Nagasaka, Shinobu

2008-01-01

205

Predictors of performance of students in biochemistry in a doctor of chiropractic curriculum  

PubMed Central

Objective This study investigated the effect of completion of course prerequisites, undergraduate grade point average (GPA), undergraduate degree, and study habits on the performance of students in the biochemistry course at Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida. Methods Students self-reported information regarding academic preparation at the beginning of the semester using a questionnaire. Final exam grade and final course grade were noted and used as measures of performance. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine if number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate GPA, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program were associated significantly with the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course. Results The number of prerequisites completed, undergraduate degree, hours spent studying in undergraduate study, and hours spent studying in the first quarter of the chiropractic program did not significantly affect the biochemistry final exam grade or the final grade for the biochemistry course, but undergraduate GPA did. Subsequent univariate analysis and Tukey's post hoc comparisons revealed that students with an undergraduate GPA in the 3.5 to 3.99 range earned significantly higher final course grades than students with an undergraduate GPA in the 2.5 to 2.99 range. Conclusion No single variable was determined to be a factor that determines student success in biochemistry. The interrelationship between the factors examined warrants further investigation to understand fully how to predict the success of a student in the biochemistry course.

Shaw, Kathy; Rabatsky, Ali; Dishman, Veronica; Meseke, Christopher

2014-01-01

206

Chiral Compounds and Green Chemistry in Undergraduate Organic Laboratories: Reduction of a Ketone by Sodium Borohydride and Baker's Yeast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe an integrated set of experiments for the undergraduate organic laboratory that allows students to compare and contrast biological and chemical means of introducing chirality into a molecule. The racemic reduction of ethyl acetoacetate with sodium borohydride and the same reduction in the presence of a tartaric acid ligand are described, and a capillary gas chromatography column packed with a chiral material for product analysis is introduced. The results of these two hydride reactions are compared with the results of a common undergraduate experiment, the baker's yeast reduction of ethyl acetoacetate.

Pohl, Nicola; Clague, Allen; Schwarz, Kimberly

2002-06-01

207

An Upper-Division Astronomy Laboratory Course for Undergraduate Physics Majors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While the Pittsburg State University Physics Department has taught general education astronomy lectures and labs as well as an astrophysics lecture course for upper-division physics majors for years, the department has not offered an astronomy laboratory course for advanced physics undergraduates. In spring 2006, such a lab course was implemented and centered on the availability of the department’s research-grade observatory and associated equipment. The course was divided into three sections: Asteroid Astrometry, Cluster Photometry, and Stellar Spectroscopy. Approximately five weeks were spent on each project beginning with data collection at the 0.6-m telescope, data reduction/modeling, and a report written as a scientific paper. The course was useful to the students in that it sparked further interest and increased their depth of understanding of the covered topics. They also discovered some of the difficulties of observational astronomy, which can sometimes provide a more challenging research environment than the typical upper-division physics laboratory. Three of the students plan to go to astronomy graduate school and one is pursuing further research in molecular spectroscopy.

Kuehn, David M.; Davis, B. L.

2006-12-01

208

Glucose Transport in Cultured Animal Cells: An Exercise for the Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory  

PubMed Central

Membrane transport is a fundamental concept that undergraduate students of cell biology understand better with laboratory experience. Formal teaching exercises commonly used to illustrate this concept are unbiological, qualitative, or intricate and time consuming to prepare. We have developed an exercise that uses uptake of radiolabeled nutrient analogues by attachment-dependent animal cells cultured on multiwell trays. This system can readily be manipulated within a typical 3-h laboratory period to yield reproducible, biologically relevant, quantitative data regarding key aspects of membrane transport. Each 24-well tray of cultures allows a group of two to four students to compare eight conditions in triplicate. If different groups of students test different conditions or different types of cells, data can be shared for an even broader experience. The exercise is also readily adaptable for open-ended student projects. Here we illustrate the exercise measuring uptake of the nonmetabolizable glucose analogue [3H]-2-deoxy-d-glucose. Students successfully tested the effects of competing sugars, putative inhibitors of the GLUT1 transporter, and changes in cell physiology that might be expected to affect glucose transport in epithelial cells and fibroblasts. In this exercise students find the nutritional and medical implications of glucose transport and its regulation intriguing. They also learn to handle radioisotopes and cultured cells.

Ledbetter, Mary Lee S; Lippert, Malcolm J

2002-01-01

209

Predictors of Nursing Students' Performance in a One-Semester Organic and Biochemistry Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an effort to empower nursing students to successfully persist in chemistry, predictors of success for undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a one-semester organic and biochemistry course were identified. The sample consisted of 308 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in Chemistry 108 (Principles of Organic and Biochemistry) during a period of seven semesters. In this study, Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a

Robert J. van Lanen; Nancy M. Lockie; Thomas McGannon

2000-01-01

210

The light applications in science and engineering research collaborative undergraduate laboratory for teaching (LASER CULT)-relevant experiential learning in photonics  

Microsoft Academic Search

An integrative undergraduate photonics curriculum has been developed that utilizes three active learning methods: case studies, team learning, and project-based learning (PBL). This two-course sequence at Oklahoma State University's Light Applications in Science and Engineering Research Collaborative Undergraduate Laboratory for Teaching (LASER CULT), is designed as an introduction to optics and photonics for electrical engineering students. The LASER CULT has

R. Alan Cheville; Arthur McGovern; Kay S. Bull

2005-01-01

211

Argument-Driven Inquiry: Using the Laboratory to Improve Undergraduates' Science Writing Skills through Meaningful Science Writing, Peer-Review, and Revision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents preliminary evidence supporting the use of peer review in undergraduate science as a means to improve student writing and to alleviate barriers, such as lost class time, by incorporation of the peer-review process into the laboratory component of the course. The study was conducted in a single section of an undergraduate

Walker, Joi Phelps; Sampson, Victor

2013-01-01

212

Testing plastic deformations of materials in the introductory undergraduate mechanics laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Normally, a mechanics laboratory at the undergraduate level includes an experiment to verify compliance with Hooke's law in materials, such as a steel spring and an elastic rubber band. Stress-strain curves are found for these elements. Compression in elastic bands is practically impossible to achieve due to flaccidity. A typical experiment for the complete loading-unloading cycle is to subject a tubular object to torsion. This paper suggests simple experiments for studying properties concerning elasticity and plasticity in elements of common use, subjected to stretching or compression, and also torsion reinforcing. The experiments use plastic binders, rubber bands and metal springs under a moderate load. This paper discusses an experiment with an original device to measure torsion deformations as a function of applied torques, which permitted construction of the hysteresis cycle for a rubber hose and various tubes. Another experiment was designed to define the temporal recovery of a plastic spring with initial stretching. A simple mathematical model was developed to explain this phenomenon.

Romo-Kröger, C. M.

2012-05-01

213

Experimental determination of the Boltzmann constant: An undergraduate laboratory exercise for molecular physics or physical chemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes an undergraduate laboratory exercise that uses optical spectroscopy to determine the magnitude and the uncertainty of the Boltzmann constant kb. The more accurate approach uses photoacoustic spectroscopy to measure the Doppler-broadened line profile of individual spectral lines of N2O to extract kb. Measurements and estimates of the uncertainties in the quantities needed to calculate kb from the line profiles are then used to estimate the uncertainty in kb. This experiment is unusual in that it uses advanced laser-based spectroscopy techniques to emphasize standard practices of uncertainty analysis. The core instrumentation is modular and relatively affordable; it requires a tunable single-mode laser, photoreceiver, optical cell, and vacuum pump. If this instrumentation is not available, an alternate approach can be performed which uses the intensity of each rotational transition of an infrared band to measure kb. Although there is more uncertainty using the alternate approach, low concentrations of CO2, DCl, or N2O give reasonable results for the magnitude of kb. Student assessment results indicate retention and mastery of the concept of combined measurement uncertainty.

Campbell, H. M.; Boardman, B. M.; DeVore, T. C.; Havey, D. K.

2012-12-01

214

The effects of inquiry instruction on student learning in technology-based undergraduate chemistry laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to identify conceptual and attitudinal effects of inquiry learning in technology-based undergraduate chemistry laboratories. There were 428 participants who were registered in general chemistry laboratory at the University of Iowa in the Spring of 2002. Conceptual and attitudinal pretest and posttest results were quantitative in nature. Qualitative results were collected from questionnaires and focus groups. Quantitative data were analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance to identify differences between treatment groups. A high-inquiry treatment group was open-ended and required student decisions regarding data collection, data representation, and interpretation. The low-inquiry treatment involved collaboration and traditional learning strategies. Major findings of this study were: (1) Pretest to posttest conceptual gains were significant for both treatment groups. Low-inquiry students performed significantly better on exploration questions than high-inquiry students. (2) Process skills developed at higher levels for high-inquiry students than low-inquiry students. (3) Positive attitudes decreased significantly for all students from pretest to posttest. More favorable attitudes toward science enjoyment and the ability to do well in science were found for high-inquiry students. More favorable attitudes toward science enjoyment and the ability to do well in science were found for low-inquiry males and high-inquiry females. (4) More favorable attitudes toward the nature of science caused by use of the learning cycle were reported by high-inquiry students. (5) Low-inquiry students reported more favorable attitudes toward technologies in the laboratory than did high-inquiry students. Favorable attitudes toward the use of infrared spectrometers and unfavorable attitudes toward the use of pH meters were reported by both treatment groups. (6) More formal reasoning skills were reported by high-inquiry students. Both groups reported that looking for patterns was a common theme in the laboratories. Hypotheses were reported as rarely used by both treatment groups. These findings are significant because they indicate that inquiry activities positively affect attitudes toward science, gender equality, and contribute to the development of formal reasoning skills and process skills.

Meade, Karen Marie

215

Synthesis and Kinetics of Hydrolysis of 3,5-Dimethyl-N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone Imine: An Undergraduate Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The synthesis of the title compound by a three-step procedure is described. The hydrolysis kinetics, which involve two consecutive psuedo-first-order processes, are also described. The synthesis and kinetics experiments described here are proposed for incorporation into undergraduate laboratory courses under a variety of formats. The compound described here is related to a toxic metabolite of the common analgesics acetaminophen and phenacetin.

Buccigross, Jeanne M.; Metz, Christa; Elliot, Lori; Becker, Pamela; Earley, Angela S.; Hayes, Jerry W.; Novak, Michael; Underwood, Gayl A.

1996-04-01

216

Successful Mentoring of Undergraduate Researchers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Prompted by the growing presence of undergraduates in research laboratories and the increased number of programs that encourage undergraduates to pursue research, the authors conducted a survey of undergraduate researchers at the University of California,

Mueller-Solger, Anke; Shellito, Cindy; Weissmann, Gary; Shea, Kalyn; Davis, William

2001-05-01

217

Detection of an ABCA1 Variant Associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Susceptibility for Biochemistry and Genetic Laboratory Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We selected diabetes mellitus for this laboratory exercise to provide students with an explicit model for scientific research concerning the association between the R230C polymorphism and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is highly prevalent in the Mexican population. We used a collaborative project-based learning to engage…

Legorreta-Herrera, M.; Mosqueda-Romo, N. A.; Hernández-Clemente, F.; Soto-Cruz, I.

2013-01-01

218

Glycoprotein Biochemistry--Some Clinical Aspects of Interest to Biochemistry Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Authors describe some clinical features of glycoprotein biochemistry, including recognition, selected blood glycoproteins, glycated proteins, histochemistry, and cancer. The material presented has largely been taught to medical laboratory students; however, it can be used to teach premedical students and pure biochemistry students. Includes two…

Smith, Christopher A.; And Others

1991-01-01

219

75 FR 8147 - Notice of Consideration of Amendment Request for Decommissioning of Analytical Bio-Chemistry...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Amendment Request for Decommissioning of Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc. Sanitary Lagoon, Columbia, Missouri...Material License No. 24- 13365-01 issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc. (the Licensee) pursuant to 10 CFR...

2010-02-23

220

The Genomics Education Partnership: Successful Integration of Research into Laboratory Classes at a Diverse Group of Undergraduate Institutions  

PubMed Central

Genomics is not only essential for students to understand biology but also provides unprecedented opportunities for undergraduate research. The goal of the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), a collaboration between a growing number of colleges and universities around the country and the Department of Biology and Genome Center of Washington University in St. Louis, is to provide such research opportunities. Using a versatile curriculum that has been adapted to many different class settings, GEP undergraduates undertake projects to bring draft-quality genomic sequence up to high quality and/or participate in the annotation of these sequences. GEP undergraduates have improved more than 2 million bases of draft genomic sequence from several species of Drosophila and have produced hundreds of gene models using evidence-based manual annotation. Students appreciate their ability to make a contribution to ongoing research, and report increased independence and a more active learning approach after participation in GEP projects. They show knowledge gains on pre- and postcourse quizzes about genes and genomes and in bioinformatic analysis. Participating faculty also report professional gains, increased access to genomics-related technology, and an overall positive experience. We have found that using a genomics research project as the core of a laboratory course is rewarding for both faculty and students.

Shaffer, Christopher D.; Alvarez, Consuelo; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bhalla, Satish; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Dorer, Douglas R.; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Poet, Jeff L.; Frohlich, Donald; Goodman, Anya L.; Gosser, Yuying; Hauser, Charles; Hoopes, Laura L.M.; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J.; Kaehler, Marian; Kokan, Nighat; Kopp, Olga R.; Kuleck, Gary A.; McNeil, Gerard; Moss, Robert; Myka, Jennifer L.; Nagengast, Alexis; Morris, Robert; Overvoorde, Paul J.; Shoop, Elizabeth; Parrish, Susan; Reed, Kelynne; Regisford, E. Gloria; Revie, Dennis; Rosenwald, Anne G.; Saville, Ken; Schroeder, Stephanie; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher; Smith, Mary; Spana, Eric P.; Spratt, Mary; Stamm, Joyce; Thompson, Jeff S.; Wawersik, Matthew; Wilson, Barbara A.; Youngblom, Jim; Leung, Wilson; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Lopatto, David

2010-01-01

221

Rapid Multistep Synthesis of a Bioactive Peptidomimetic Oligomer for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Peptidomimetic compounds are increasingly important in drug-discovery applications. We introduce the synthesis of an N-substituted glycine oligomer, a bioactive "peptoid" trimer. The six-step protocol is conducted on solid-phase resin, enabling the synthesis to be performed by undergraduate organic chemistry students. This synthesis lab was…

Utku, Yeliz; Rohatgi, Abhinav; Yoo, Barney; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Pohl, Nicola L.

2010-01-01

222

A Gas-Sensor-Based Urea Enzyme Electrode: Its Construction and Use in the Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an undergraduate experiment for the potentiometric determination of urea based on the physical entrapment of urease on the tip of an ammonia gas sensor. An advantage of this technique is the ease with which the ammonia electrode can be converted to a urea electrode. (JN)

Riechel, Thomas L.

1984-01-01

223

A Writing-Intensive, Methods-Based Laboratory Course for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging undergraduate students in designing and executing original research should not only be accompanied by technique training but also intentional instruction in the critical analysis and writing of scientific literature. The course described here takes a rigorous approach to scientific reading and writing using primary literature as the model…

Colabroy, Keri L.

2011-01-01

224

Student Perceptions of an Upper-Level, Undergraduate Human Anatomy Laboratory Course without Cadavers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several programs in health professional education require or are considering requiring upper-level human anatomy as prerequisite for their applicants. Undergraduate students are confronted with few institutions offering such a course, in part because of the expense and logistical issues associated with a cadaver-based human anatomy course. This…

Wright, Shirley J.

2012-01-01

225

Analysis of Currently Available Analgesic Tablets by Modern Liquid Chromatography: An Undergraduate Laboratory Introduction to HPLC.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information, procedures, and results, are provided for an undergraduate experiment in which analgesic tablets are analyzed using liquid chromatography. The experiment, an improved, modified version of the Waters Associates Inc. experiment, is simple to prepare, requiring little glassware and minimal sample manipulation by students. (JN)

Kagel, R. A.; Farwell, S. O.

1983-01-01

226

Online Protocol Annotation: A Method to Enhance Undergraduate Laboratory Research Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A well-constructed, step-by-step protocol is a critical starting point for teaching undergraduates new techniques, an important record of a lab's standard procedures, and a useful mechanism for sharing techniques between labs. Many research labs use websites to archive and share their protocols for these purposes. Here we describe our experiences…

Ruble, Julie E.; Lom, Barbara

2008-01-01

227

Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

2012-01-01

228

A Computer-Interfaced O2 Probe: Instrumentation for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes interfacing a hand-held oxygen probe with a microcomputer and suggests experiments for undergraduate chemistry courses that could facilitate student understanding of aquatic environmental processes which involve dissolved oxygen. Data can be analyzed through the program or exported into other software. Presents results of an experiment…

Adamson, Gary E.; Nakhleh, Mary B.; Zimmerman, James R.

1997-01-01

229

Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

Elkins, Kelly M.

2011-01-01

230

Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation Using a Copper(I)/TEMPO Catalyst System: A Green, Catalytic Oxidation Reaction for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Modern undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks provide detailed discussion of stoichiometric Cr- and Mn-based reagents for the oxidation of alcohols, yet the use of such oxidants in instructional and research laboratories, as well as industrial chemistry, is increasingly avoided. This work describes a laboratory exercise that uses ambient air as…

Hill, Nicholas J.; Hoover, Jessica M.; Stahl, Shannon S.

2013-01-01

231

Physics 433: Undergraduate laboratory in Biological Physics at Simon Fraser University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk, I will describe our senior undergraduate lab course in Biological Physics at Simon Fraser University. Unique in Canada, this course combines modules that teach the students basic molecular and cell biology and leading-edge biophysical techniques with independent student projects. I'll outline the structure and components of the course, provide an overview of each experimental module, and describe student interest and feedback.

Forde, Nancy

2012-10-01

232

Molecular Models for Biochemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Carnegie Mellon University website uses Chime and RasMol images to provide students with many biochemistry tutorials and quizzes. Intended as a supplement to a standard biochemistry text, users can find numerous 3-D images of small molecules, amino acids, protein structures, and much more. The website offers extensive viewing suggestions and tutorials on Chime and RasMol. With countless interactive materials and quizzes, biochemistry students can find the help they need at this extraordinary website.

233

Automated scanning probe lithography with n-alkanethiol self assembled monolayers on Au(111): Application for teaching undergraduate laboratories.  

PubMed

Controllers for scanning probe instruments can be programmed for automated lithography to generate desired surface arrangements of nanopatterns of organic thin films, such as n-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In this report, atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods of lithography known as nanoshaving and nanografting are used to write nanopatterns within organic thin films. Commercial instruments provide software to control the length, direction, speed, and applied force of the scanning motion of the tip. For nanoshaving, higher forces are applied to an AFM tip to selectively remove regions of the matrix monolayer, exposing bare areas of the gold substrate. Nanografting is accomplished by force-induced displacement of molecules of a matrix SAM, followed immediately by the surface self-assembly of n-alkanethiol molecules from solution. Advancements in AFM automation enable rapid protocols for nanolithography, which can be accomplished within the tight time restraints of undergraduate laboratories. Example experiments with scanning probe lithography (SPL) will be described in this report that were accomplished by undergraduate students during laboratory course activities and research internships in the chemistry department of Louisiana State University. Students were introduced to principles of surface analysis and gained "hands-on" experience with nanoscale chemistry. PMID:21483651

Brown, Treva T; Lejeune, Zorabel M; Liu, Kai; Hardin, Sean; Li, Jie-Ren; Rupnik, Kresimir; Garno, Jayne C

2011-04-01

234

Automated scanning probe lithography with n-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111): application for teaching undergraduate laboratories.  

PubMed

Controllers for scanning probe instruments can be programmed for automated lithography to generate desired surface arrangements of nanopatterns of organic thin films, such as n-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In this report, atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods of lithography known as nanoshaving and nanografting are used to write nanopatterns within organic thin films. Commercial instruments provide software to control the length, direction, speed, and applied force of the scanning motion of the tip. For nanoshaving, higher forces are applied to an AFM tip to selectively remove regions of the matrix monolayer, exposing bare areas of the gold substrate. Nanografting is accomplished by force-induced displacement of molecules of a matrix SAM, followed immediately by the surface self-assembly of n-alkanethiol molecules from solution. Advancements in AFM automation enable rapid protocols for nanolithography, which can be accomplished within the tight time restraints of undergraduate laboratories. Example experiments with scanning probe lithography will be described in this report that were accomplished by undergraduate students during laboratory course activities and research internships in the chemistry department of Louisiana State University. Students were introduced to principles of surface analysis and gained "hands-on" experience with nanoscale chemistry. PMID:21609692

Brown, Treva T; LeJeune, Zorabel M; Liu, Kai; Hardin, Sean; Li, Jie-Ren; Rupnik, Kresimir; Garno, Jayne C

2011-04-01

235

Automated scanning probe lithography with n-alkanethiol self assembled monolayers on Au(111): Application for teaching undergraduate laboratories  

PubMed Central

Controllers for scanning probe instruments can be programmed for automated lithography to generate desired surface arrangements of nanopatterns of organic thin films, such as n-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In this report, atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods of lithography known as nanoshaving and nanografting are used to write nanopatterns within organic thin films. Commercial instruments provide software to control the length, direction, speed, and applied force of the scanning motion of the tip. For nanoshaving, higher forces are applied to an AFM tip to selectively remove regions of the matrix monolayer, exposing bare areas of the gold substrate. Nanografting is accomplished by force-induced displacement of molecules of a matrix SAM, followed immediately by the surface self-assembly of n-alkanethiol molecules from solution. Advancements in AFM automation enable rapid protocols for nanolithography, which can be accomplished within the tight time restraints of undergraduate laboratories. Example experiments with scanning probe lithography (SPL) will be described in this report that were accomplished by undergraduate students during laboratory course activities and research internships in the chemistry department of Louisiana State University. Students were introduced to principles of surface analysis and gained “hands-on” experience with nanoscale chemistry.

Brown, Treva T.; LeJeune, Zorabel M.; Liu, Kai; Hardin, Sean; Li, Jie-Ren; Rupnik, Kresimir; Garno, Jayne C.

2010-01-01

236

Student Reactions and Learning: Evaluation of a Biochemistry Course That Uses Web Technology and Student Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines student reactions and learning in an undergraduate biochemistry course taught in a studio classroom. Uses the criteria of student learning and reactions for evaluation. (Contains 12 references.) (Author/YDS)

Traver, Holly A.; Kalsher, Michael J.; Diwan, Joyce J.; Warden, Joseph

2001-01-01

237

Preparation, Purification, and Secondary Structure Determination of Bacillus Circulans Xylanase. A Molecular Laboratory Incorporating Aspects of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysical Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project module designed for biochemistry or cellular and molecular biology student which involves determining the secondary structure of Bacillus circulans xylanase (BCX) by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy under conditions that compromise its stabilizing intramolecular forces is described. The lab model enhanced students knowledge of the…

Russo, Sal; Gentile, Lisa

2006-01-01

238

Promoting Science for All by Way of Student Interest in a Transformative Undergraduate Microbiology Laboratory for Nonmajors†  

PubMed Central

In this study, we investigated a pedagogical innovation in an undergraduate microbiology course, Microbes and Society, for non-microbiology majors and education majors. The aim was to improve students’ understanding by connecting their science experience to their areas of interest. Based on this idea of teaching, we redesigned the laboratory portion of a microbiology course. We had students in the laboratory component choose their areas of interest and use the areas as a framework for understanding science and how it influences and shapes the world around them. This course was part of a longitudinal project (Project Nexus) which prepares, supports, and sustains upper elementary and middle-level specialist science teachers. We used a battery of data collection instruments. We analyzed all data in several dimensions including using active-learning techniques, forming linkages between science and teaching, and connecting science and society. Our hypothesis was that we could promote science for all by connecting the diverse students’ areas of interest in science to the laboratory’s curriculum. We assessed the success of achieving our goal by using researchers’ observations, the instructors’ perspectives, and students’ feedback. Our findings suggested that this course was appreciated by the students, especially education majors, who recognized the innovations as engaging and worthwhile.

Marbach-Ad, Gili; McGinnis, J. Randy; Dai, Amy H.; Pease, Rebecca; Schalk, Kelly A.; Benson, Spencer

2009-01-01

239

Undergraduates at Sea and in the Laboratory Conducting Habitat Mapping Using Multibeam and Sidescan Sonar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last five years, undergraduate students at the College of Charleston have had numerous opportunities to take part in the college's Transect Program and sail aboard research vessels on 2-5 day cruises to study the continental shelf. The program's purpose is to train students in oceanographic research while developing a long-term information geodatabase to characterize and monitor essential fish habitats, and to map seafloor geomorphology. During these cruises students take the lead to conduct a variety of research investigations which include hydrographic surveys of the seafloor using sidescan sonar, multibeam bathymetry, and video collected using a remotely operated vehicle and during SCUBA dives. Following the data collection cruises, students have enrolled in semester-long research courses to analyze data and document results through poster and oral presentations. More than 60 students have taken part in at least one of 6 programs. In the past two years, the NOAA Ship NANCY FOSTER has provided invaluable sea time to conduct multibeam surveys of the mid- and outer continental shelf off Charleston, so that the 22 participating Transect students have focused their work on seafloor mapping, and have become trained in state-of-the art CARIS multibeam and sidescan sonar processing software. Most of these students have presented their results at professional meetings, and manuscripts are currently in preparation. Students have had numerous post-program opportunities to conduct further research at sea and in the lab. They have collaborated with NOAA scientists and other investigators, conducting bathymetry data processing and analysis from other regions. Most recently, two program graduates worked with University of Washington investigators to map sites for the Ocean Observatory Initiative Regional Scale Nodes. Several students have been contracted or hired as hydrographic survey technicians, while others have gone to graduate school to continue their work using these invaluable skills learned as undergraduates.

Sautter, L. R.; Harris, M. S.

2008-12-01

240

The Use of Multiple Tools for Teaching Medical Biochemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this work, we describe the use of several strategies employing the philosophies of active learning and problem-based learning (PBL) that may be used to improve the teaching of metabolic biochemistry to medical and nutritional undergraduate students. The main activities are as follows: 1) a seminar/poster system in a mini-congress format (using…

Se, Alexandre B.; Passos, Renato M.; Ono, Andre H.; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

2008-01-01

241

Using Assessment to Improve Learning in the Biochemistry Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, major drivers of undergraduate science education reform including the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) have called on college and university instructors to take a more scientific approach to their teaching. Although many biochemistry instructors are gaining confidence in using…

Loertscher, Jennifer

2010-01-01

242

Biochemistry Companion Website  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Academic publishing company Addison-Wesley provides this online Companion Website for the textbook Biochemistry, by Mathews, van Holde, and Ahern (Third Edition). The Companion Website contains Outlines, Concepts, Terminology, and Quizzing sections intended to complement the textbook and to assist students in the learning process. A major contribution of this Website is its hyperlinked structure, allowing students to navigate easily between chapters, concepts, color images, and concise descriptions. For educators and students of biochemistry alike, this online resource will be a helpful tool for reviewing the important concepts of general biochemistry.

Ahern, Kevin G.; Mathews, Christopher K., 1937-; Van Holde, K. E. (Kensal Edward), 1928-

2000-01-01

243

Metabolic Pathways of Biochemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

George Washington University provides an online reference of the major metabolic pathways for biochemistry students and scientists. Students can learn about carbohydrate, lipid, and energy metabolism with the help of two- and three-dimensional graphics. The website offers representations of generalized organic reactions to illustrate how to convert one functional group to another group. Users can also find a list of over 250 common abbreviations used in biochemistry. Biochemistry students having difficulty conceiving the dimensionality of metabolic pathways will benefit from the materials at this web site.

244

Metabolic Pathways of Biochemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Nebraska provides an online reference of the major metabolic pathways for biochemistry students and scientists. Students can learn about carbohydrate, lipid, and energy metabolism with the help of two- and three-dimensional graphics. The website offers representations of generalized organic reactions to illustrate how to convert one functional group to another group. Users can also find a list of over 250 common abbreviations used in biochemistry. Biochemistry students having difficulty conceiving the dimensionality of metabolic pathways will benefit from the materials at this web site.

2007-05-12

245

A Research-Based Undergraduate Organic Laboratory Project: Investigation of a One-Pot, Multicomponent, Environmentally Friendly Prins-Friedel-Crafts-Type Reaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in the undergraduate organic laboratory synthesize tetrahydro-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-4-phenyl-2"H"-pyran via the Montmorillonite K10 clay-catalyzed reaction of p-nitrobenzaldehye with methanol, 3-buten-1-ol, and benzene. The synthesis comprises an environmentally friendly tandem Prins-Friedel-Crafts-type multicomponent reaction (MCR) and sets…

Dintzner, Matthew R.; Maresh, Justin J.; Kinzie, Charles R.; Arena, Anthony F.; Speltz, Thomas

2012-01-01

246

Synthesis and Characterization of Aldol Condensation Products from Unknown Aldehydes and Ketones: An Inquiry-Based Experiment in the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment for the undergraduate chemistry laboratory in which students perform the aldol condensation on an unknown aldehyde and an unknown ketone is described. The experiment involves the use of techniques such as TLC, column chromatography, and recrystallization, and compounds are characterized by [to the first power]H NMR, GC-MS, and FTIR.…

Angelo, Nicholas G.; Henchey, Laura K.; Waxman, Adam J.; Canary, James W.; Arora, Paramjit S.; Wink, Donald

2007-01-01

247

Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Ruthenium-Indenylidene Complexes for Olefin Metathesis: Microscale Experiments for the Undergraduate Inorganic or Organometallic Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of experiments for undergraduate laboratory courses (e.g., inorganic, organometallic or advanced organic) have been developed. These experiments focus on understanding the design and catalytic activity of ruthenium-indenylidene complexes for olefin metathesis. Included in the experiments are the syntheses of two ruthenium-indenylidene…

Pappenfus, Ted M.; Hermanson, David L.; Ekerholm, Daniel P.; Lilliquist, Stacie L.; Mekoli, Megan L.

2007-01-01

248

Peer Assessment in Large Undergraduate Classes: An Evaluation of a Procedure for Marking Laboratory Reports and a Review of Related Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides evidence that peer marking can be a reliable tool for assessing laboratory reports in large cohorts. It was conducted over a 4-yr period with first-year undergraduates ([asymptotically equivalent to]180 students/cohort) taking a mammalian physiology course, but the procedure adopted would be applicable to any other…

Harris, Judy R.

2011-01-01

249

Implementing POGIL in the Lecture and the Science Writing Heuristic in the Laboratory--Student Perceptions and Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the possible connection between effective laboratory activities and student performance on lecture exams. In a traditional undergraduate organic chemistry course for non-science majors, students could predict the products of organic reactions, but struggled to provide reaction mechanisms for those same reactions, despite…

Schroeder, Jacob D.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

2008-01-01

250

An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment that Utilizes a Glass Fiber Filter Assay to Determine the Steroid Specificity and Equilibrium Binding Properties of Glucocorticoid Receptors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two complementary laboratory exercises that use the glass fiber assay to assess receptor specificity and hormone binding affinity in rat liver cytoplasmic extracts. Details the methods, materials and protocol of the experiments. Discusses the basic concepts illustrated and the feasibility of using the experiments at the undergraduate

John, Nancy J.; Firestone, Gary L.

1987-01-01

251

A Solvent-Free Baeyer-Villiger Lactonization for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory: Synthesis of Gamma-T-Butyl-Epsilon-Caprolactone  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The solvent-free or solid-state reaction systems like the Baeyer-Villiger rearrangement have become popular in the synthetic organic community and viable option for undergraduate laboratory series to reduce waste and cost and simplify reaction process. The reaction is an efficient method to transform ketones to esters and lactones.

Esteb, John J.; Hohman, Nathan J.; Schlamandinger, Diana E.; Wilson, Anne M.

2005-01-01

252

Establishing a University's Undergraduate Engineering Laboratories in View of its Interaction with the Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates a case study in the state of Qatar to find the interaction effect between an engineering laboratory and the community. Presents the results of two questionnaires for faculty members and engineers. Reports awareness and willingness to participate in a cooperative program, current lack of communication and inadequate laboratory

Khedr, Safwan A.; El-Nawawy, Omar A.

1988-01-01

253

Using Model Organisms in an Undergraduate Laboratory to Link Genotype, Phenotype, and the Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We developed laboratory exercises using zebrafish ("Danio rerio") and nematodes ("Caenorhabditis elegans") for a sophomore-level Integrative Biology Laboratory course. Students examined live wildtype zebrafish at different stages of development and noted shifts occurring in response to "fgf8a" deficiency. Students were introduced to development in…

Jacobs-McDaniels, Nicole L.; Maine, Eleanor M.; Albertson, R. Craig; Wiles, Jason R.

2013-01-01

254

Successful implementation of inquiry-based physiology laboratories in undergraduate major and nonmajor courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular modifications were to improve the teaching of physiological concepts, teach students the scientific approach, and promote creative and critical thinking. We assessed our modifications using formative (laboratory exams, oral presentations, and laboratory reports) and summative evaluations (surveys, laboratory notebook, and an end of semester project). Students appreciated the freedom offered by the new curriculum and the opportunity to engage in the inquiry process. Results from both forms of evaluation showed a marked improvement due to the curricular revisions. Our analyses indicate an increased confidence in students' ability to formulate questions and hypotheses, design experiments, collect and analyze data, and make conclusions. Thus, we have successfully incorporated inquiry-based laboratories in both major and nonmajor courses.

G Casotti (West Chester University of Pennsylvania Biology); L Rieser-Danner (West Chester University of Pennsylvania Psychology); Dr. Maureen Knabb (West Chester University)

2008-12-01

255

Design, Implementation, and Assessment of an Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Watershed Research Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article discusses the establishment of Shippensburg University's Burd Run Interdisciplinary Watershed Research Laboratory and the advantages of linking disciplinary perspectives across courses in geology, geography, biology, and teacher education. The laboratory provides an easily adaptable conceptual model for improving environmental science education at teaching-oriented institutions nationwide. Its success is largely attributable to three factors: the project is student-centered and goal specific; the selected watershed is accessible, diverse, and at a manageable scale; and the Laboratory Advisory Board provides for continuous revision, adaptation, and improvement.

Woltemade, Christopher; Blewett, William

2002-09-01

256

Peer Assessment in Large Undergraduate Classes: An Evaluation of a Procedure for Marking Laboratory Reports and a Review of Related Practices  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study provides evidence that peer marking can be a reliable tool for assessing laboratory reports in large cohorts. It was conducted over a 4-yr period with first-year undergraduates taking a mammalian physiology course, but the procedure adopted would be applicable to any other laboratory-based discipline. The process was found to be efficient in staff time, enabling a summative practical report to be marked in <1 h, facilitating rapid feedback to students on their performance.

2011-06-01

257

Pure Rotational Spectroscopy of Asymmetric Tops in the Undergraduate Classroom or Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to concerns of complexity, the asymmetric top, for which ? = {(2B - A - C) / (A - C)} ? ± 1, is feared, or at least avoided, by many instructors when explaining the rigid rotor. However, the spectral patterns formed by cold} asymmetric rigid rotors in the centimeter-wave} region of the electromagnetic spectrum can be easily identified. We will present some techniques for spectral analyses that we have successfully employed with undergraduate students who are either ``pre-quantum mechanics" or are currently enrolled in a chemical quantum mechanics class. The activities are simple, requiring the students to first locate repeating patterns and then apply simple algebraic expressions in order to determine all three rotational constants. The method will be illustrated using the spectra of 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropyl trifluoroacetate (CF_3C(=O)OCH_2CF_2CHF_2), (E)-1,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (CF_3CH=CHF), 1H,1H,2H-perfluorocyclobutane (CF_2CF_2CHFCH_2), and 2H-nonafluorobutane (CF_3CHFCF_2CF_3). The first two of these species have predominantly a-type spectra, the third has a predominantly b-type spectrum, the fourth has a predominantly c-type spectrum.

Minei, A. J.; Cooke, S. A.

2013-06-01

258

Gamma-Nonanoic Lactone: Synthesis of a Fragrance and Flavor Enhancer in the Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is an experiment in which students are able to synthesize an unnatural compound having the odor and flavor of coconuts. Laboratory equipment, procedures, and analysis of the product are discussed. (CW)

Bunce, Richard A.; Reeves, Henry D.

1990-01-01

259

The microcomputer in the undergraduate physics laboratory - System, hardware, student reaction, evaluation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A system of ten computers has been used for 2 years in a general physics laboratory. This article lists the experiments in which standard laboratory equipment is replaced by on-line use of the computers. The durability of the computers and student reaction to the system are evaluated. In addition, hardware, software, and books found helpful in setting up and running the system are described.

Karcher, T.; Burch, T. J.; Ruddick, James; Backman, J.; Caravella, J.

2005-10-27

260

Detergent-Based Isolation of Yeast Membrane Rafts: An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Series for the Undergraduate Cell Biology or Biochemistry Lab  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lipid rafts have been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell signaling, endocytosis, and even viral infection. Isolation of these lipid rafts often involves detergent treatment of the membrane to dissolve nonraft components followed by separation of raft regions in a density gradient. We present here an inquiry-based lab series…

Willhite, D. Grant; Wright, Stephen E.

2009-01-01

261

Detection of Psilocybin Mushroom Analogs in Chocolate: Incorporating Current Events into the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this experiment, tryptamine is used as a psilocin analog and is dispersed onto a Fisher brand cellulose laboratory sponge to simulate dehydrated mushrooms. The resulting “mushroom” material is ground, molded into chocolate, and presented to student groups for real-world and applied analyses. Students isolate the tryptamine from the chocolate using their knowledge of drug chemistry, solubility, pH, extractions, etc.

Brandon Huskins; Christopher R. Dockery

2009-01-01

262

The Duffing oscillator: A precise electronic analog chaos demonstrator for the undergraduate laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple electronic circuit is described which can be used in the student laboratory to demonstrate and study nonlinear effects and chaos. The circuit shows the changes to the dynamical properties of the system with respect to three control parameters: the applied voltage amplitude and frequency and the circuit damping. The response voltage and its derivative can be displayed to

B. K. Jones; G. Trefan

2001-01-01

263

Microfluidics Meets Dilute Solution Viscometry: An Undergraduate Laboratory to Determine Polymer Molecular Weight Using a Microviscometer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a student laboratory experiment to determine the molecular weight of a polymer sample by measuring the viscosity of dilute polymer solutions in a PDMS microfluidic viscometer. Sample data are given for aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). A demonstration of shear thinning behavior using the microviscometer is…

Pety, Stephen J.; Lu, Hang; Thio, Yonathan S.

2011-01-01

264

Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction in an Undergraduate Laboratory to Produce "DNA Fingerprints."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory exercise that demonstrates the sensitivity of the Polymerase Chain Reaction as well as its potential application to forensic analysis during a criminal investigation. Can also be used to introduce, review, and integrate population and molecular genetics topics such as genotypes, multiple alleles, allelic and genotypic…

Phelps, Tara L.; And Others

1996-01-01

265

Successful Implementation of Inquiry-Based Physiology Laboratories in Undergraduate Major and Nonmajor Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular…

Casotti, G.; Rieser-Danner, L.; Knabb, M. T.

2008-01-01

266

Solid-Liquid and Liquid-Liquid Mixing Laboratory for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Solid-liquid and liquid-liquid mixing experiments have been developed to provide students with a practical experience on suspension and emulsification processes. The laboratory focuses on the characterization of the process efficiency, specifically the influence of the main operating parameters and the effect of the impeller type. (Contains 2…

Pour, Sanaz Barar; Norca, Gregory Benoit; Fradette, Louis; Legros, Robert; Tanguy, Philippe A.

2007-01-01

267

Studying Epigenetic DNA Modifications in Undergraduate Laboratories Using Complementary Bioinformatic and Molecular Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Epigenetic inheritance is the inheritance of genetic information that is not based on DNA sequence alone. One type of epigenetic information that has come to the forefront in the last few years is modified DNA bases. The most common modified DNA base in nature is 5-methylcytosine. Herein, we describe a laboratory experiment that combines…

Militello, Kevin T.

2013-01-01

268

Networked Digital Control and Data Acquisition for an Undergraduate Controls and Robotics Laboratory: A Progress Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the development status of a multidisciplinary controls and robotics engineering laboratory for undergaduate electrical and mechanical entineering majors based on an integrated computer network of automated data acquision, analysis and control tools. Personal computers, the heart of the student workstations, are interfaced to analog computers for simulaton, and to actual hardware for control and automation of typical

Philip D. Olivier; Lola Boyce

1993-01-01

269

Individualizing Instruction in Large Undergraduate Biology Laboratories. II. Computers and Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the following uses of computers in college biology laboratories: (1) to organize and analyze research data and (2) to simulate biological systems. Also being developed are computer simulations to systematically prepare students for independent investigations. (See also SE 515 092.) (LS)

Norberg, Ann Marie

1975-01-01

270

To what extent does A-level physics prepare students for undergraduate laboratory work?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is a summary of a small-scale research project carried out to investigate the transition from A-level to university physics, with a specific focus on practical or laboratory skills. A brief description of the methods used precedes the headline findings of the research. A non-evidential discussion of the possible reasons behind any shortcomings found and some ideas for A-level teachers to help with a smoother transition are also included.

Thompson, Alaric

2012-09-01

271

Advanced Laboratory at Texas State University: Error Analysis, Experimental Design, and Research Experience for Undergraduates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physics is an experimental science. In other words, all physical laws are based on experimentally observable phenomena. Therefore, it is important that all physics students have an understanding of the limitations of certain experimental techniques and the associated errors associated with a particular measurement. The students in the Advanced Laboratory class at Texas State perform three detailed laboratory experiments during the semester and give an oral presentation at the end of the semester on a scientific topic of their choosing. The laboratory reports are written in the format of a ``Physical Review'' journal article. The experiments are chosen to give the students a detailed background in error analysis and experimental design. For instance, the first experiment performed in the spring 2009 semester is entitled Measurement of the local acceleration due to gravity in the RFM Technology and Physics Building. The goal of this experiment is to design and construct an instrument that is to be used to measure the local gravitational field in the Physics Building to an accuracy of ±0.005 m/s^2. In addition, at least one of the experiments chosen each semester involves the use of the research facilities within the physics department (e.g., microfabrication clean room, surface science lab, thin films lab, etc.), which gives the students experience working in a research environment.

Ventrice, Carl

2009-04-01

272

Integrating a Discovery-Based Laboratory to Teach Supply Chain Management Fundamentals in an Undergraduate Management Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using experiential simulation games is a commonly used pedagogical method to enrich classroom discussions and to facilitate students' learning in supply chain management education at both undergraduate and graduate levels. However, existing games are inappropriate for undergraduate students that are first-time learners of the subject. In this…

Zeng, Amy; Johnson, Sharon

2009-01-01

273

Interactive Concepts in Biochemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interactive Concepts in Biochemistry is a nicely designed companion website to Dr. Rodney Boyer's _Concepts in Biochemistry, second edition_. Developed collaboratively by Science Technologies and others, this multimedia site is archived on the Wiley Publishers website. Site visitors will enjoy exploring the engaging and instructive collection of Interactive Animations. The collection includes Animations about DNA Replication, Signal Transduction, Photosynthesis, Cell Structure, Protein Synthesis, and more. The site also features a number of tutorials regarding Kinesin, Myoglobin & Hemoglobin, tRNA, and Protein-DNA Interactions, to name a few. In addition, the website offers reviews of such concepts as Logarithms, Thermodynamics, and Elementary Kinetics; quizzes that correspond to chapters in Boyer's book; and a collection of articles that consider the role of biochemistry in addressing issues like Lactose Intolerance, Alcohol Abuse, and using Methanol as Fuel.

Boyer, Rodney F.

274

Use of the Herb Gymnema sylvestre to Illustrate the Principles of Gustatory Sensation: An Undergraduate Neuroscience Laboratory Exercise.  

PubMed

The Indian herb Gymnema sylvestre has been used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine for 2000 years, most recently for the treatment of diabetes. Loose leaf Gymnema sylvestre can be prepared as a tea and will impair the ability to taste sugar by blocking sweet receptors on the tongue. This report describes a laboratory exercise easily applied to an undergraduate neuroscience course that can be used to illustrate the principles of gustatory sensation. Combined with a preceding lecture on the primary taste sensations, students experience and appreciate how the primary tastes are combined to produce overall taste. In addition, the exercises outlined here expand upon previously published demonstrations employing Gymnema sylvestre to include illustrations of the different sensory transduction mechanisms associated with each of the four or five primary taste modalities. Students compare their qualitative primary taste experiences to salt, sugar, aspartame, chocolate, and sweet-sour candy prior to and following exposure to Gymnema sylvestre. The herb's impairment of sweet sensation is profound and dramatically alters the perception of sweetness in sugar, chocolate, and candy without altering the perception of the other primary tastes. The exercise has an indelible effect on students because the herb's intense effect compels students to rely on their unique personal experiences to highlight the principles of gustatory sensation. PMID:23493970

Schroeder, Joseph A; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen

2005-01-01

275

University of Arizona: Biochemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This University of Arizona website provides numerous chemistry tutorials and problem sets primarily for biology students. The lessons are divided into two main categories: chemistry of life and energy reactions. Students can find clear, in-depth explanations of amino acids, pH levels, photosynthesis, metabolism, and more. Each section is filled with helpful, colorful images. The website provides outside resources which cover additional topics in biochemistry. Biochemistry students will surely find these tutorials to be a great addition to their classroom learning experience.

276

BOREAS TE-9 NSA Canopy Biochemistry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set contains canopy biochemistry data collected in 1994 in the NSA at the YJP, OJR, OBS, UBS, and OA sites, including biochemistry lignin, nitrogen, cellulose, starch, and fiber concentrations. These data were collected to study the spatial and temporal changes in the canopy biochemistry of boreal forest cover types and how a high-resolution radiative transfer model in the mid-infrared could be applied in an effort to obtain better estimates of canopy biochemical properties using remote sensing. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Charest, Martin; Sy, Mikailou

2000-01-01

277

An analysis of cognitive growth of undergraduate students in a problem-centered general chemistry laboratory curriculum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study explored how undergraduate students in a new problem-centered General Chemistry Laboratory curriculum achieved cognitive growth. The new curriculum had three instructional segments: the highly-structured, semi-structured, and open-ended segments. The pedagogical approaches adopted were expository, guided-inquiry, and open-inquiry styles, respectively. Sixty-seven first-year undergraduate students who enrolled in the course in Spring semester, 2000, at Columbia University and three Ph.D.-level chemistry experts were included in the study. A qualitative approach was used including data collection through "think-aloud" problem solving; however, quantitative data such as test scores were also used. The findings from this study confirmed that chemistry experts possessed sophisticated and domain-specific conceptual knowledge structures; they mobilized and applied conceptual knowledge in conjunction with use of heuristics, tacit knowledge, and experience in authentic problem solving. They validated the new curriculum design in preparing students for inquiry-type of problem solving. For novices, solving of semi-structured before ill-structured problems had a positive effect on the solvers' chance of success in solving the latter type of problems as their abilities to mobilize and apply conceptual knowledge and use effective strategies appeared to be critical for successful problem solving. Students in the new course curriculum had grown cognitively as evidenced by their performance on the Case Study projects and Final Examination. High academic achievers were found to perform well independently while the medium and relatively low academic achievers should benefit from sustained and intensive instruction. It is proposed that ill-structured problems should be used to assess and identify the best from the better students. Finally, it was found that no significant change in students' attitudes had resulted from their curriculum experience. Gender and cognitive style preferences may explain the preliminary signs of a bilateral change. Since students in chemistry courses are coming from increasingly diverse backgrounds, courses adopting a pedagogical approach that includes, (1) sequencing from the more expository to guided- and open-inquiry learning experiences for students, and (2) emphasizing a balance between content, context, concepts, and science processes, seem to be of the type that is more conducive to produce students of the qualities which chemistry educators have described as "ideal."

Szeto, Alan Ka-Fai

278

Papers from U.S. Department of Energy Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program (SULI) 2005  

SciTech Connect

Polarization measurements at X-ray and gamma-ray energies can provide crucial information on the emission region around massive compact objects such as black holes and neutron stars. The Polarized Gamma-ray Observer (PoGO) is a new balloon-borne instrument designed to measure polarization from such astrophysical objects in the 30-100 keV range, under development by an international collaboration with members from United States, Japan, Sweden and France. The PoGO instrument has been designed by the collaboration and several versions of prototype models have been built at SLAC. The purpose of this experiment is to test the latest prototype model with a radioactive gamma-ray source. For this, we have to polarize gamma-rays in a laboratory environment. Unpolarized gamma-rays from Am241 (59.5 keV) were Compton scattered at around 90 degrees for this purpose. Computer simulation of the scattering process in the setup predicts a 86% polarization. The polarized beam was then used to irradiate the prototype PoGO detector. The data taken in this experiment showed a clear polarization signal, with a measured azimuthal modulation factor of 0.35 {+-} 0.02. The measured modulation is in very close agreement with the value expected from a previous beam test study of a polarized gamma-ray beam at the Argonne National Laboratories Advanced Photon Source. This experiment has demonstrated that the PoGO instrument (or any other polarimeter in the energy range) can be tested in a libratory with a simple setup to a similar accuracy.

Quinn, Helen, (ed.); /SLAC

2005-12-16

279

Aligning Biochemistry to the Interests of Biology Students Using Haloperoxidase to Illustrate Reactions of Environmental and Biomedical Importance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate degree programs in the biosciences almost always include elements of biochemistry. In the United Kingdom, biosciences programs often have optional pathways to accommodate students of diverse interests. These programs rarely require students to demonstrate any school-level chemistry knowledge, and many students find biochemistry

Jervis, Les; Jervis, Loretta M.; Giovannelli, Donato

2005-01-01

280

Institutional practices and policies in acid-base testing: a self reported Croatian survey study on behalf of the Croatian society of medical biochemistry and laboratory medicine Working Group for acid-base balance  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The aim of this survey study was to assess the current practices and policies in use related to the various steps in the blood gas testing process, across hospital laboratories in Croatia. Materials and methods: First questionnaire was sent by email to all medical biochemistry laboratories (N = 104) within general, specialized and clinical hospitals and university hospital centres to identify laboratories which perform blood gas analysis. Second questionnaire with detailed questions about sample collection, analysis and quality control procedures, was sent only to 47 laboratories identified by the first survey. Questionnaire was designed as combination of questions and statements with Likert scale. Third questionnaire was sent to all participating laboratories (N=47) for additional clarification for either indeterminate or unclear answers. Results: Blood gas analysis is performed in 47/104 hospital laboratories in Croatia. In 25/41 (0.61) of the laboratories capillary blood gas sampling is the preferred sample type for adult patient population, whereas arterial blood sample is preferentially used in only 5/44 laboratories (0.11). Blood sampling and sample processing for capillary samples is done almost always by laboratory technicians (36/41 and 37/44, respectively), whereas arterial blood sampling is almost always done by the physician (24/29) and only rarely by a nurse (5/28). Sample acceptance criteria and sample analysis are in accordance with international recommendations for majority of laboratories. 43/44 laboratories participate in the national EQA program. POCT analyzers are installed outside of the laboratory in 20/47 (0.43) institutions. Laboratory staff is responsible for education and training of ward personnel, quality control and instrument maintenance in only 12/22, 11/20 and 9/20 institutions, respectively. Conclusions: Practices related to collection and analysis for blood gases in Croatia are not standardised and vary substantially between laboratories. POCT analyzers are not under the direct supervision by laboratory personnel in a large proportion of surveyed institutions. Collective efforts should be made to harmonize and improve policies and procedures related to blood gas testing in Croatian laboratories.

Dukic, Lora; Simundic, Ana-Maria

2014-01-01

281

Biochemistry Off the Shelf.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides sources of nonanimal biochemical materials (which are relatively inexpensive, readily available, and require no special storage) suitable for use in biochemistry experiments. They are presented under these headings: (1) enzymes and other proteins; (2) carbohydrates; (3) lipids; (4) nucleic acids; and (5) metabolism. (JN)

Wilson, Jerry L.

1985-01-01

282

Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory  

PubMed Central

A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. The current article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory providing students, within a framework of bone cell biology, with a modern approach to gene discovery. Students are introduced to the topics of bone cells, bone synthesis, bone resorption, and osteoporosis. They then review the theory of microchip gene arrays, and study microchip array data generated during the differentiation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts in vitro. The class selects genes whose expression increases during osteoclastogenesis, and researches them in small groups using web-based bioinformatics tools. Students then go to a biotechnology company website to find and order siRNAs designed to “knockdown” expression of the gene of interest. Students then learn to transfect these siRNAs into osteoclasts, stimulate the cells to differentiate, assay osteoclast differentiation in vitro, and measure specific gene expression using real-time PCR and immunoblotting. Specific siRNA knockdown resulting in a decrease in osteoclastogenesis is indicative of a gene's physiological relevance. The results are analyzed statistically, and presented to the class in groups. In the past two years, students identified several genes essential for optimal osteoclast differentiation, including Myo1d. The students hypothesize that the myo1d protein functions in osteoclasts to deliver important proteins to the cell surface via vesicular transport along microfilaments. Student response to the new course was overwhelmingly positive.

Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

2014-01-01

283

Two Successful Outreach Programs at Storm Peak Laboratory: GRASP for Undergraduates and Partnership for 5th Grade Science Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Desert Research Institute operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the Steamboat Springs Ski Resort at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term atmospheric research. The SPL mission statement is to ensure that the laboratory will continue to integrate climate research and education by advancing discovery and understanding within the field of pollution, aerosol and cloud interactions. During the last year, SPL has created two successful outreach programs reaching very different audiences. First, to engage students from local elementary schools, SPL established a 5th grade climate education program. This program is based on a partnership between SPL and Yampatika's&penvironmental educators. Yampatika is a non-profit outdoor environmental education organization. The program spans three days for each school and includes five elementary schools. During the first day, educators from Yampatika visit each classroom to introduce the concepts of climate and weather as well as teach students how to use scientific equipment. During the field program on the second day, students measure and record information about temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed, and particle concentration while they travel to SPL via the gondola (in winter) or Suburban (in fall). Once at the laboratory, students tour the facility, discuss SPL research activities, and explore application of these activities to their curriculum. Following the field trip, Yampatika educators and SPL scientists will visit the school for a follow-up to help children explore concepts, answer questions, and evaluate students" learning. The second program, Geoscience Research at Storm Peak (GRASP), was designed to engage students from underrepresented groups and created a partnership between three Minority Serving Institutions and the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). Undergraduate students from Tennessee State University, Howard University, Colorado State at Pueblo, and UNR will gather at SPL in the summer of 2008, via funding from the National Science Foundation. Throughout the year-long GRASP program, students encounter the scientific process - from creating a hypothesis, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting their results. Beginning in April, GRASP students will be presented with a short course in atmospheric science at their local institutions. The students will then begin formulating research questions for their time at SPL. In June, students will travel to SPL and work in small groups measuring cloud properties and trace gases with the guidance of an individual instructor. Data collected will be the basis for continuing student research projects. GRASP students and mentors will communicate regarding the progress of student research projects during the fall semester. All GRASP participants will meet at the campus of Howard University the following winter for a reunion workshop.

Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.; Wright, J.

2007-12-01

284

Bringing the Excitement and Motivation of Research to Students; Using Inquiry and Research-Based Learning in a Year-Long Biochemistry Laboratory: Part I--Guided Inquiry--Purification and Characterization of a Fusion Protein--Histidine Tag, Malate Dehydrogenase, and Green Fluorescent Protein  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A successful laboratory experience provides the foundation for student success, creating active participation in the learning process. Here, we describe a new approach that emphasizes research, inquiry and problem solving in a year-long biochemistry experience. The first semester centers on the purification, characterization, and analysis of a…

Knutson, Kristopher; Smith, Jennifer; Wallert, Mark A.; Provost, Joseph J.

2010-01-01

285

Teaching Undergraduate Research: The One-Room Schoolhouse Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate research in the biochemistry, cell, and molecular biology program at Drake University uses apprenticeship, cooperative-style learning, and peer mentoring in a cross-disciplinary and cross-community educational program. We call it the one-room schoolhouse approach to teaching undergraduate research. This approach is cost effective,…

Henderson, LaRhee; Buising, Charisse; Wall, Piper

2008-01-01

286

Foundational concepts and underlying theories for majors in "biochemistry and molecular biology".  

PubMed

Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members and science educators from around the country that focused on identifying: 1) core principles of biochemistry and molecular biology, 2) essential concepts and underlying theories from physics, chemistry, and mathematics, and 3) foundational skills that undergraduate majors in biochemistry and molecular biology must understand to complete their major coursework. Using information gained from these workshops, as well as from the ASBMB accreditation working group and the NSF Vision and Change report, the Core Concepts working group has developed a consensus list of learning outcomes and objectives based on five foundational concepts (evolution, matter and energy transformation, homeostasis, information flow, and macromolecular structure and function) that represent the expected conceptual knowledge base for undergraduate degrees in biochemistry and molecular biology. This consensus will aid biochemistry and molecular biology educators in the development of assessment tools for the new ASBMB recommended curriculum. PMID:24019234

Tansey, John T; Baird, Teaster; Cox, Michael M; Fox, Kristin M; Knight, Jennifer; Sears, Duane; Bell, Ellis

2013-01-01

287

Culture collections and biochemistry.  

PubMed

This review describes the relationships and links between culture collections, which act as sources of genomes, transcriptomes, proteome, and metabolomes, and fields of research biochemistry that demand their support and help. In addition, the invaluable but not always rewarded efforts of these organizations as a source and conservator of organism diversity is discussed. Biological waste-water treatment, ethanol as a non-finite source of energy, Rhodococcus fascians as the source of a citrus-juice debittering agent, the sporulation of filamentous fungi in liquid medium, and biotransformation with growing and resting cells are processes developed by the authors that demonstrate some of the applications of organisms from culture collections in the general field of biotechnology and related areas, including industrial biochemistry and biocatalytic synthesis. PMID:12739105

Cánovas, Manuel; Iborra, José L

2003-06-01

288

Culture collections and biochemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review describes the relationships and links between culture collections, which act as sources of genomes, transcriptomes,\\u000a proteome, and metabolomes, and fields of research biochemistry that demand their support and help. In addition, the invaluable\\u000a but not always rewarded efforts of these organizations as a source and conservator of organism diversity is discussed. Biological\\u000a waste-water treatment, ethanol as a non-finite

Manuel Cánovas; José L. Iborra

2003-01-01

289

Biochemistry and endocrinology results  

SciTech Connect

Blood (plasma or serum) biochemistry findings show postflight decreases below preflight findings for uric acid triglycerides, and AST. Postflight increases above preflight values were observed in glucose, cholesterol, BUN, calcium phosphate, angiotensin I, aldosterone, insulin, T3, T4, HGH, ACTH and GGTP. It is suggested that special attention should be given to the fluid and electrolyte intake in the astronauts so that homeostatic perturbations are not consequential.

Leach, C.S.

1981-12-01

290

Impact of a Backwards Faded Scaffolding (BFS) Approach to Inquiry-Based Astronomy Laboratory Experiences on Undergraduate Non-Science Majors' Views of Scientific Inquiry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an effort to support effective instruction in undergraduate astronomy, the Center for Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) team introduced an inquiry-based laboratory curriculum designed using Backwards Faded Scaffolding (BFS) inquiry teaching framework. A major goal of the curriculum design was to enhance student learning beyond content knowledge alone toward more informed understandings of scientific inquiry through authentic astronomy inquiry experiences using astronomical data sets available online. This study explored the impact of that curriculum on undergraduate non-science majors’ views of the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI). Over 200 introductory astronomy students’ were surveyed using the VOSI-4 questionnaire pre and post intervention. These data were analyzed for significant shifts in understanding of two aspects of NOSI; Distinction Between Data and Evidence (DvE) and Multiple Methods of Science (MMS). These results informed an investigation of lab instructors’ observations of students’ interactions with the intervention curriculum compared to traditional labs. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests showed significant shifts in the distributions of Fall (n=112) and Spring (n=98) samples toward more informed understandings of DvE (Fall, z=-3.811, p<.00 Spring, z=-3.698, p<.001) , while there was no significant change for understanding of MMS (Fall, z=-.112, p=.910; Spring, z=-.607, p=.544). Instructor interview analysis suggested that the curriculum provided multiple opportunities for students to evaluate and determine the relevance of data with respect to specific research questions, however they may not have realized they were exclusively engaged in observational rather than experimental inquiries possibly leading students to accommodate their astronomy inquiry experiences within persistent misconceptions of "The Scientific Method” as the only valid method for inquiry. The results of the study suggest that a purposefully scaffolded, inquiry-based, introductory astronomy laboratory curriculum may be effective in enhancing undergraduate non-science majors’ understanding of scientific inquiry and may prove to be a valuable resource for undergraduate astronomy instructors.

Lyons, Daniel Jonathan

2012-01-01

291

Immersing Undergraduate Students in the Research Experience: A Practical Laboratory Module on Molecular Cloning of Microbial Genes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Molecular cloning skills are an essential component of biological research, yet students often do not receive this training during their undergraduate studies. This can be attributed to the complexities of the cloning process, which may require many weeks of progressive design and experimentation. To address this issue, we incorporated an…

Wang, Jack T. H.; Schembri, Mark A.; Ramakrishna, Mathitha; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Fuerst, John A.

2012-01-01

292

Using a molecular-genetic approach to investigate bacterial physiology in a continuous, research-based, semester-long laboratory for undergraduates.  

PubMed

Designing investigative laboratory exercises that encourage critical thinking, problem solving, and independent thought for upper-division biology courses is a difficult but worthwhile task. In an effort to do so, we developed a semester-long, continuous, research-based investigative laboratory that integrates numerous genetic and molecular biology methods into the investigation of a bacterial physiological process. In this lab, students use random Tn5 transposon mutagenesis to create prodigiosin pigment mutants in the bacterium, Serratia marcescens. This is followed by phenotypic characterization, cloning, and sequencing the Tn insertion site to identify genes involved in pigment biosynthesis. During this lab, students gain ample experience performing basic lab techniques while learning about - and applying - methods for elucidating gene function. The approach to the laboratory and the outcomes are intimately integrated into the teaching of many fundamental physiological processes underlying prodigiosin production in bacteria. The result is a cohesive course that integrates the theory and application of molecular genetic techniques with the study of bacterial physiology. Assessments of student learning objectives demonstrated that students greatly improved their understanding of both physiological processes and the genetic techniques used to investigate them. In addition, students felt that this semester-long exercise provided the necessary laboratory experience they needed and desired in preparation for careers in molecular biology, microbiology, and biochemistry. PMID:23653763

Ault, Jeremiah Foster; Renfro, Betsey Marie; White, Andrea Kirsten

2011-01-01

293

Monitoring in Clinical Biochemistry  

PubMed Central

Monitoring tests form an increasing proportion of the workload in clinical biochemistry and biochemists can help by providing clinicians with information about the variability and precision of tests, the time frame for pharmacodynamic stabilisation after a treatment change, and the frequency of testing. This paper outlines the phases of monitoring, and how to decide if monitoring is beneficial, which test to use for monitoring, when a change in the test result indicates a need for the change in treatment and the length of testing intervals. We conclude with some recommendations for biochemists for future areas of research and advice that can be given to clinicians.

Doust, Jenny; Glasziou, Paul

2013-01-01

294

An Inquiry-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Structure Emphasizing Competency in the Scientific Process: A Guided Approach with an Electronic Notebook Format  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students…

Hall, Mona L.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

2014-01-01

295

Executive summary. The National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guideline: Evidence-based practice for point-of-care testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPoint-of-care testing (POCT) is clinical laboratory testing conducted close to the site of patient care. POCT has the potential to provide faster test results and therapeutic intervention with improved patient outcomes. However, when over-utilized or used inappropriately POCT results can be misleading and increase healthcare costs.

James H. Nichols; Robert H. Christenson; William Clarke; Ann Gronowski; Catherine A. Hammett-Stabler; Ellis Jacobs; Steve Kazmierczak; Kent Lewandrowski; Christopher Price; David B. Sacks; Robert L. Sautter; Gregg Shipp; Lori Sokoll; Ian D. Watson; William Winter; Marcia L. Zucker

2007-01-01

296

Ciliate telomerase biochemistry.  

PubMed

Telomerase is a cellular reverse transcriptase specialized for use of a template carried within the RNA component of the enzyme ribonucleoprotein complex. Substrates for telomerase are single-stranded oligonucleotides in vitro and chromosome ends in vivo. In vitro, a bound substrate is extended by an initial round of DNA synthesis on the internal RNA template and in some cases by multiple rounds of template copying before product dissociation. In vivo, de novo synthesis of one strand of a telomeric repeat sequence by telomerase balances the sequence loss resulting from incomplete replication of linear chromosome ends by RNA primer-requiring DNA polymerases. Telomerase biochemistry has been studied extensively by using partially purified cell extracts. Telomerase components are being identified and beginning to be produced in recombinant form. This review focuses on the enzyme mechanism of telomerases from ciliate species, thus far the most intensively studied systems. PMID:10872448

Collins, K

1999-01-01

297

Teaching of Biochemistry in Medical School: A Well-Trodden Pathway?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Biochemistry and molecular biology occupy a unique place in the medical school curriculum. They are frequently studied prior to medical school and are fundamental to the teaching of biomedical sciences in undergraduate medical education. These two circumstances, and the trend toward increased integration among the disciplines, have led to…

Mathews, Michael B.; Stagnaro-Green, Alex

2008-01-01

298

Investigations of Polymorphic Germylene Structures, Experimental Calculations of a New Boron-Sulfur Heterocycle and Assessment of a Safety Curriculum in an Undergraduate Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic interaction between chemistry and humankind is explored via investigations with benign substrates and the incorporation of proper laboratory technique instruction to a general audience. This intersection will be discussed in further detail in the introductory chapter of this thesis. The second chapter of this thesis describes the determination of two polymorphic structures from relatively non-toxic Cp*GeCl. The investigation of the polymorphic stability led to discovery of a solution equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric or higher oligomeric species. These experiments revealed the conversion of polymorphic structures in solid state and solution, allowing a thorough exploration of the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of each of the polymorphic structures. The third chapter of this dissertation describes computational analysis of the aromaticity of the recently prepared boron heterocycle, 2-diiosopropylamino-2 H-1,2-thiaborin. The importance and potential utility of aromatic boron-containing heterocycles in electronic devices and hydrogen storage is discussed. The theory behind computational chemistry and the analysis of the aromaticity, HOMO/LUMO, and nuclear magnetic resonance shifts of 2-diiosopropylamino-2 H-1,2-thiaborin are also reported. NICS (1) calculations determined that external pi-interactions of the external amino substituent greatly decrease the aromaticity of the parent ring. The fourth chapter describes the development and analysis of the effectiveness of a chemical hygiene-based laboratory curriculum incorporated in the University of Michigan undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course, Chemistry 211. There is a great need to educate the general population of undergraduates enrolled in lower-division organic chemistry courses at the University of Michigan and in other universities in chemical hygiene. Previous laboratory curricula lacked in-depth discussions on proper laboratory practices. Through weekly reading assignments, quizzes, colorful posters and other educational materials, the students were exposed to information about chemical safety. Surveys and in-class observations were used to analyze the effectiveness of the newly instituted curriculum. The results from this study indicate that teaching the students and the graduate student instructors chemical hygiene can decrease the overall number of laboratory accidents and increase awareness of chemical safety.

Rohr Daniel, Ahleah

299

Update: Biochemistry of Genetic Manipulation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various topics on the biochemistry of genetic manipulation are discussed. These include genetic transformation and DNA; genetic expression; DNA replication, repair, and mutation; technology of genetic manipulation; and applications of genetic manipulation. Other techniques employed are also considered. (JN)

Barker, G. R.

1983-01-01

300

Design and operation of an inexpensive far-field laser scanning microscope suitable for use in an undergraduate laboratory course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scanning microscope applications span the science disciplines yet their costs limit their use at educational institutions. The basic concepts of scanning microscopy are simple. The microscope probe - whether it produces a photon, electron or ion beam - moves relative to the surface of the sample object. The beam interacts with the sample to produce a detected signal that depends on the desired property to be measured at the probe location on the sample. The microscope transforms the signal for output in a form desired by the user. Undergraduate students can easily construct a far-field laser scanning microscope that illustrates each of these principles from parts available at local electronics and hardware stores and use the microscope to explore properties of devices such as light dependent resistors and biological samples such as leaves. Students can record, analyze and interpret results using a computer and free software.

Pallone, Arthur; Hawk, Eric

2013-03-01

301

Design and operation of an inexpensive far-field laser scanning microscope suitable for use in an undergraduate laboratory course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scanning microscope applications span the science disciplines yet their costs limit their use at educational institutions. The basic concepts of scanning microscopy are simple. The microscope probe - whether it produces a photon, electron or ion beam - moves relative to the surface of the sample object. The beam interacts with the sample to produce a detected signal that depends on the desired property to be measured at the probe location on the sample. The microscope transforms the signal for output in a form desired by the user. Undergraduate students can easily construct a far-field laser scanning microscope that illustrates each of these principles from parts available at local electronics and hardware stores and use the microscope to explore properties of devices such as light dependent resistors and biological samples such as leaves. Students can record, analyze and interpret results using a computer and free software.

Pallone, Arthur; Hawk, Eric

2012-02-01

302

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Graphical Kinetic Data Analysis of the Dopamine Neurotransmitter System: An Exercise for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course.  

PubMed

Neuroimaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET), are widely used in clinical settings and in basic neuroscience research. Education in these methods and their applications may be incorporated into curricula to keep pace with this expanding field. Here, we have developed pedagogical materials on the fundamental principles of PET that incorporate a hands-on laboratory activity to view and analyze human brain scans. In this activity, students will use authentic PET brain scans generated from original research at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Volkow et al., 2009) to explore the neurobiological effects of a drug on the dopamine system. We provide lecture and assignment materials (including a 50-minute PowerPoint presentation introducing PET concepts), written background information for students and instructors, and explicit instructions for a 4-hour, computer-based laboratory to interested educators. Also, we discuss our experience implementing this exercise as part of an advanced undergraduate laboratory course at Stony Brook University in 2010 and 2011. Observing the living human brain is intriguing, and this laboratory is designed to illustrate how PET neuroimaging techniques are used to directly probe biological processes occurring in the living brain. Laboratory course modules on imaging techniques such as PET can pique the interest of students potentially interested in neuroscience careers, by exposing them to current research methods. This activity provides practical experience analyzing PET data using a graphical analysis method known as the Logan plot, and applies core neuropharmacology concepts. We hope that this manuscript inspires college instructors to incorporate education in PET neuroimaging into their courses. PMID:24693258

Mirrione, Martine M; Ruth, Nora; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Fowler, Joanna; Kernan, Maurice

2014-01-01

303

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Graphical Kinetic Data Analysis of the Dopamine Neurotransmitter System: An Exercise for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course  

PubMed Central

Neuroimaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET), are widely used in clinical settings and in basic neuroscience research. Education in these methods and their applications may be incorporated into curricula to keep pace with this expanding field. Here, we have developed pedagogical materials on the fundamental principles of PET that incorporate a hands-on laboratory activity to view and analyze human brain scans. In this activity, students will use authentic PET brain scans generated from original research at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Volkow et al., 2009) to explore the neurobiological effects of a drug on the dopamine system. We provide lecture and assignment materials (including a 50-minute PowerPoint presentation introducing PET concepts), written background information for students and instructors, and explicit instructions for a 4-hour, computer-based laboratory to interested educators. Also, we discuss our experience implementing this exercise as part of an advanced undergraduate laboratory course at Stony Brook University in 2010 and 2011. Observing the living human brain is intriguing, and this laboratory is designed to illustrate how PET neuroimaging techniques are used to directly probe biological processes occurring in the living brain. Laboratory course modules on imaging techniques such as PET can pique the interest of students potentially interested in neuroscience careers, by exposing them to current research methods. This activity provides practical experience analyzing PET data using a graphical analysis method known as the Logan plot, and applies core neuropharmacology concepts. We hope that this manuscript inspires college instructors to incorporate education in PET neuroimaging into their courses.

Mirrione, Martine M.; Ruth, Nora; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Fowler, Joanna; Kernan, Maurice

2014-01-01

304

Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

2006-01-01

305

Land plant biochemistry.  

PubMed Central

Biochemical studies have complemented ultrastructural and, subsequently molecular genetic evidence consistent with the Charophyceae being the closest extant algal relatives of the embryophytes. Among the genes used in such molecular phylogenetic studies is that rbcL) for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (RUBISCO). The RUBISCO of the embryophytes is derived, via the Chlorophyta. from that of the cyanobacteria. This clade of the molecular phylogeny of RUBISCO shows a range of kinetic characteristics, especially of CO2 affinities and of CO2/O2 selectivities. The range of these kinetic values within the bryophytes is no greater than in the rest of the embryophytes; this has implications for the evolution of the embryophytes in the high atmospheric CO2 environment of the late Lower Palaeozoic. The differences in biochemistry between charophycean algae and embryophytes can to some extent be related functionally to the structure and physiology of embryophytes. Examples of components of embryophytes, which are qualitatively or quantitatively different from those of charophytes, are the water repellent/water resistant extracellular lipids, the rigid phenolic polymers functional in water-conducting elements and mechanical support in air, and in UV-B absorption, flavonoid phenolics involved in UV-B absorption and in interactions with other organisms, and the greater emphasis on low Mr organic acids. retained in the plant as free acids or salts, or secreted to the rhizosphere. The roles of these components are discussed in relation to the environmental conditions at the time of evolution of the terrestrial embryophytes. A significant point about embryophytes is the predominance of nitrogen-free extracellular structural material (a trait shared by most algae) and UV-B screening components, by contrast with analogous components in many other organisms. An important question, which has thus far been incompletely addressed, is the extent to which the absence from bryophytes of the biochemical pathways which produce components found only in tracheophytes is the result of evolutionary loss of these functions.

Raven, J A

2000-01-01

306

Nutritional Biochemistry of Space Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Adequate nutrition is critical for maintenance of crew health during and after extended-duration space flight. The impact of weightlessness on human physiology is profound, with effects on many systems related to nutrition, including bone, muscle, hematology, fluid and electrolyte regulation. Additionally, we have much to learn regarding the impact of weightlessness on absorption, mtabolism , and excretion of nutrients, and this will ultimately determine the nutrient requirements for extended-duration space flight. Existing nutritional requirements for extended-duration space flight have been formulated based on limited flight research, and extrapolation from ground-based research. NASA's Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratory is charged with defining the nutritional requirements for space flight. This is accomplished through both operational and research projects. A nutritional status assessment program is included operationally for all International Space Station astronauts. This medical requirement includes biochemical and dietary assessments, and is completed before, during, and after the missions. This program will provide information about crew health and nutritional status, and will also provide assessments of countermeasure efficacy. Ongoing research projects include studies of calcium and bone metabolism, and iron absorption and metabolism. The calcium studies include measurements of endocrine regulation of calcium homeostasis, biochemical marker of bone metabolism, and tracer kinetic studies of calcium movement in the body. These calcium kinetic studies allow for estimation of intestinal absorption, urinary excretion, and perhaps most importantly - deposition and resorption of calcium from bone. The Calcium Kinetics experiment is currently being prepared for flight on the Space Shuttle in 2001, and potentially for subsequent Shuttle and International Space Station missions. The iron study is intended to assess whether iron absorption is down-regulated dUl1ng space flight. This is critical due to the red blood cell changes which occur, and the increase in iron storage that has been observed after space flight. The Iron Absorption and Metabolism experiment is currently planned for long-term flights on the International Space Station.

Smith, Scott M.

2000-01-01

307

Estimating leaf biochemistry using the PROSPECT leaf optical properties model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biophysical, biochemical, and optical properties of 63 fresh leaves and 58 dry leaves were measured to investigate the potential of remote sensing to estimate the leaf biochemistry from space. Almost 2000 hemispherical reflectance and transmittance spectra were acquired from 400 nm to 2500 nm using a laboratory spectrophotometer. The amount of chlorophyll, water, protein, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and starch

S. Jacquemoud; S. L. Ustin; J. Verdebout; G. Schmuck; G. Andreoli; B. Hosgood

1996-01-01

308

Plant residue biochemistry regulates soil carbon cycling and carbon sequestration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Substrate composition is one of the most important factors influencing the decomposition of plant residues in soils. The interaction of organic residue biochemistry with residue decomposition rates, soil aggregation and soil humus composition was determined in a laboratory experiment. Addition of seven different organic residues (2% w\\/w alfalfa, oat, canola, clover, soybean, corn and prairie grasses) to a Webster soil

Dean A. Martens

2000-01-01

309

Unsteady-State Heat Transfer Involving a Phase Change: An Example of a 'Project-Oriented' Undergraduate Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the structure of an in-depth laboratory project chemical engineering. Provides modeling work to guide experimentation and experimental work on heat transfer analysis. Discusses the experimental results and evaluation of the project. (YP)

Sundberg, Donald C.; Someshwar, Arun V.

1989-01-01

310

A Council on Undergraduate Research Workshop Initiative to Establish, Enhance, and Institutionalize Undergraduate Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The value of undergraduate research workshop to significantly enhance the quality of undergraduate science education was cited as one of the goals by the National Science Foundations (NSF) Strategic Plan. To address this strategic national need, the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) has granted an NSF course, curriculum, and laboratory

Karukstis, Kerry K.

2006-01-01

311

Hands-On Experiences of Undergraduate Students in Automatics and Robotics Using a Virtual and Remote Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Automatics and Robotics subjects are always greatly improved when classroom teaching is supported by adequate laboratory courses and experiments following the "learning by doing" paradigm, which provides students a deep understanding of theoretical lessons. However, expensive equipment and limited time prevent teachers having sufficient…

Jara, Carlos A.; Candelas, Francisco A.; Puente, Santiago T.; Torres, Fernando

2011-01-01

312

A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

Chinni, Rosemarie C.

2012-01-01

313

Undergraduate Student Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Low- and High-Level Inquiry Exercise Physiology Teaching Laboratory Experiences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes findings on student attitudes toward two different science laboratory learning experiences, traditional, cookbook-style, low-inquiry level (LL) activities and a high-inquiry level (HL) investigative project. In addition, students' science-related attitudes and attitudes toward science were measured.

2011-06-01

314

Determination of Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Time Using (Super 13)C NMR: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment designed for the physical chemistry laboratory where (super 13)C NMR is applied to determine the spin-lattice relaxation time for carbon atoms in n-hexanol is proposed. It is concluded that students learn the principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy as well as dynamic NMR experiments.

Gasyna, Zbigniew L.; Jurkiewicz, Antoni

2004-01-01

315

Use of the Herb Gymnema sylvestre to Illustrate the Principles of Gustatory Sensation: An Undergraduate Neuroscience Laboratory Exercise  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a laboratory exercise used to illustrate the principles of gustatory sensation. The Indian herb, gymnema sylvestre, is used in this experiment to impair the ability of tasting sugar. As a result the impairment alters the perception of sweetness, which leaves a profound and lasting impression on students and gives them a better comprehension of gustation.

Joseph Schroeder, Ellen Flannery-Schroeder (Conneticut College, University of Rhode Island;)

1999-11-30

316

Undergraduate Student Attitudes and Perceptions toward Low- and High-Level Inquiry Exercise Physiology Teaching Laboratory Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to compare student attitudes toward two different science laboratory learning experiences, specifically, traditional, cookbook-style, low-inquiry level (LL) activities and a high-inquiry level (HL) investigative project. In addition, we sought to measure and compare students' science-related attitudes and…

Henige, Kim

2011-01-01

317

Searching for Alien Life Having Unearthly Biochemistry.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

NASA's astrobiology program should include a search for exotic life forms having an unearthly biochemistry in our solar system and beyond. Exotic life forms may have biochemistry totally unlike that of Earth organisms. Alien life forms may be disturbingly...

H. Jones

2004-01-01

318

Assessing student perspectives of the laboratory, self-efficacy in chemistry, and attitudes towards science in an undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research is lacking in the general chemistry laboratory that explores the concerted affective predictor variables of student perspectives of the laboratory, self-efficacy in chemistry, and student attitudes towards science. There is little research on the assessment of variables in the affective domain to determine student experiences in the chemistry laboratory. Student experiences in this study were assessed by determining congruence between student perspectives of their actual and preferred general chemistry laboratory environment using the SLEI, and student attitudes towards careers as a scientist using the SAI II. Correlations between scales from the SLEI, SAI II along with the CCSS that measures self-efficacy in college chemistry were identified. A sample of eighty college students enrolled in a first-semester general chemistry laboratory responded to the SLEI, SAI II, and CCSS. A t test indicated there were no significant differences with student cohesiveness, integration, material environment, and rule clarity between the actual and preferred SLEI signifying congruence. There were significant differences between students actual and preferred perception of open-endedness (t = -3.59, df = 28, p = 0.00). Student attitudes towards careers as a scientist could not be determined using pretests and posttests of the SAI II due to a ceiling effect. There were positive significant correlations found between the scales of material environment, integration from the SLEI and the scale of student attitudes towards careers as a scientist using the SAI II. There were also positive significant correlations between self-efficacy for everyday applications, and self-efficacy for cognitive skills from the CCSS with the scale of student attitudes towards careers as a scientist. This study is of significance since it is the first study exploring congruence between the actual and preferred student perspectives of the laboratory using the SLEI in a first semester general chemistry laboratory. It is also the first to report correlations between combined affective variables of student perspectives of the laboratory using the SLEI, student attitudes towards careers as a scientist with the SAI II, and self-efficacy in chemistry with the CCSS. Understanding student experiences through the assessment of these affective variables can help educators modify first-semester general chemistry laboratory activities to create a positive experience for students.

Olave, Marcella

319

Commentary: Biochemistry Re-Natured  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In his last commentary on "Biochemistry Denatured," this author dealt with his perception that college students today have spent too little of their childhood years playing outside in nature and as a consequence have not learned basic things about the world from personal experience. This "nature-deficit disorder" removes many opportunities for…

White, Harold B.

2010-01-01

320

An Integrated Organic Biochemistry Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a chemistry course designed for nursing students, but from which other majors might benefit, which integrates organic and biochemistry. Listed are the course's topics and with a description of how they are treated. Compares students' rank in this course with their rank in biology and general chemistry. Reports student results on the ACS…

Devor, Arthur W.

1970-01-01

321

New Edition of Chinese Biochemistry Textbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the four previous editions of the biochemistry medical textbooks called the "Nationwide Unified Textbooks." Notes the new (1989) edition is much smaller, is organized differently, has new material, has a reorganized Dynamic Biochemistry core, and shows great importance to clinical biochemistry. (MVL)

Jian-Chuan, Ma

1988-01-01

322

The Relevance of Student Seminars on Clinically Related Subjects in a Biochemistry Course for Medical and Nutrition Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to determine the value of a system of seminars on clinically related biochemistry topics for undergraduate students in medicine and nutrition at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. During the second semester of 1998 (1998-2), the teaching staff decided to establish new and stricter rules for the seminar method and to…

Hermes-Lima, Marcelo; Muniz, Karinne C.; Coutinho, Iracema S.

2002-01-01

323

Heterocycles and Reactive Intermediates in the Undergraduate Organic Lab.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for experiments involving the nitrile oxide cycloaddition with enamines. The experiment is suitable for advanced undergraduate organic laboratories or beginning undergraduate research. (JN)

Bowles, K. Dean; And Others

1985-01-01

324

Group-effort applied research: Expanding opportunities for undergraduate research through original, class-based research projects.  

PubMed

Undergraduate research clearly enriches the educational development of participating students, but these experiences are limited by the inherent inefficiency of the standard one student-one mentor model for undergraduate research. Group-effort applied research (GEAR) was developed as a strategy to provide substantial numbers of undergraduates with meaningful research experiences. The GEAR curriculum delivers concept-driven lecture material and provides hands-on training in the context of an active research project from the instructor's laboratory. Because GEAR is structured as a class, participating students benefit from intensive, supervised research training that involves a built-in network of peer support and abundant contact with faculty mentors. The class format also ensures a relatively standardized and consistent research experience. Furthermore, meaningful progress toward a research objective can be achieved more readily with GEAR than with the traditional one student-one mentor model of undergraduate research because sporadic mistakes by individuals in the class are overshadowed by the successes of the group as a whole. Three separate GEAR classes involving three distinct research projects have been offered to date. In this article, we provide an overview of the GEAR format and review some of the recurring themes for GEAR instruction. We propose GEAR can serve as a template to expand student opportunities for life science research without sacrificing the quality of the mentored research experience. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 42(4):331-338, 2014. PMID:24898007

Moore, Sean D; Teter, Ken

2014-07-01

325

Wanderings in biochemistry.  

PubMed

My Ph.D. thesis in the laboratory of Severo Ochoa at New York University School of Medicine in 1962 included the determination of the nucleotide compositions of codons specifying amino acids. The experiments were based on the use of random copolyribonucleotides (synthesized by polynucleotide phosphorylase) as messenger RNA in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system. At Yale University, where I joined the faculty, my co-workers and I first studied the mechanisms of protein synthesis. Thereafter, we explored the interferons (IFNs), which were discovered as antiviral defense agents but were revealed to be components of a highly complex multifunctional system. We isolated pure IFNs and characterized IFN-activated genes, the proteins they encode, and their functions. We concentrated on a cluster of IFN-activated genes, the p200 cluster, which arose by repeated gene duplications and which encodes a large family of highly multifunctional proteins. For example, the murine protein p204 can be activated in numerous tissues by distinct transcription factors. It modulates cell proliferation and the differentiation of a variety of tissues by binding to many proteins. p204 also inhibits the activities of wild-type Ras proteins and Ras oncoproteins. PMID:24867946

Lengyel, Peter

2014-07-11

326

Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to Earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated.

Leach, Carolyn S.

327

Metabolism and biochemistry in hypogravity.  

PubMed

The headward shift of body fluid and increase in stress-related hormones that occur in hypogravity bring about a number of changes in metabolism and biochemistry of the human body. Such alterations may have important effects on health during flight and during a recovery period after return to Earth. Body fluid and electrolytes are lost, and blood levels of several hormones that control metabolism are altered during space flight. Increased serum calcium may lead to an increased risk of renal stone formation during flight, and altered drug metabolism could influence the efficacy of therapeutic agents. Orthostatic intolerance and an increased risk of fracturing weakened bones are concerns at landing. It is important to understand biochemistry and metabolism in hypogravity so that clinically important developments can be anticipated and prevented or ameliorated. PMID:11537110

Leach, C S

1991-01-01

328

Gender Performance Differences in Biochemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the historical performance of students at Michigan State University in a two-part biochemistry series Biochem I (n = 5,900) and Biochem II (n = 5,214) for students enrolled from 1997 to 2009. Multiple linear regressions predicted 54.9-87.5% of the variance in student from Biochem I grade and 53.8-76.1% of the variance in…

Rauschenberger, Matthew M.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

2010-01-01

329

Teaching cardiac electrophysiology modeling to undergraduate students: laboratory exercises and GPU programming for the study of arrhythmias and spiral wave dynamics.  

PubMed

As part of a 3-wk intersession workshop funded by a National Science Foundation Expeditions in Computing award, 15 undergraduate students from the City University of New York(1) collaborated on a study aimed at characterizing the voltage dynamics and arrhythmogenic behavior of cardiac cells for a broad range of physiologically relevant conditions using an in silico model. The primary goal of the workshop was to cultivate student interest in computational modeling and analysis of complex systems by introducing them through lectures and laboratory activities to current research in cardiac modeling and by engaging them in a hands-on research experience. The success of the workshop lay in the exposure of the students to active researchers and experts in their fields, the use of hands-on activities to communicate important concepts, active engagement of the students in research, and explanations of the significance of results as the students generated them. The workshop content addressed how spiral waves of electrical activity are initiated in the heart and how different parameter values affect the dynamics of these reentrant waves. Spiral waves are clinically associated with tachycardia, when the waves remain stable, and with fibrillation, when the waves exhibit breakup. All in silico experiments were conducted by simulating a mathematical model of cardiac cells on graphics processing units instead of the standard central processing units of desktop computers. This approach decreased the run time for each simulation to almost real time, thereby allowing the students to quickly analyze and characterize the simulated arrhythmias. Results from these simulations, as well as some of the background and methodology taught during the workshop, is presented in this article along with the programming code and the explanations of simulation results in an effort to allow other teachers and students to perform their own demonstrations, simulations, and studies. PMID:22139782

Bartocci, Ezio; Singh, Rupinder; von Stein, Frederick B; Amedome, Avessie; Caceres, Alan Joseph J; Castillo, Juan; Closser, Evan; Deards, Gabriel; Goltsev, Andriy; Ines, Roumwelle Sta; Isbilir, Cem; Marc, Joan K; Moore, Diquan; Pardi, Dana; Sadhu, Sandeep; Sanchez, Samuel; Sharma, Pooja; Singh, Anoopa; Rogers, Joshua; Wolinetz, Aron; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Zhao, Kai; Filipski, Andrew B; Gilmour, Robert F; Grosu, Radu; Glimm, James; Smolka, Scott A; Cherry, Elizabeth M; Clarke, Edmund M; Griffeth, Nancy; Fenton, Flavio H

2011-12-01

330

Teaching foundational topics and scientific skills in biochemistry within the conceptual framework of HIV protease.  

PubMed

HIV protease has served as a model protein for understanding protein structure, enzyme kinetics, structure-based drug design, and protein evolution. Inhibitors of HIV protease are also an essential part of effective HIV/AIDS treatment and have provided great societal benefits. The broad applications for HIV protease and its inhibitors make it a perfect framework for integrating foundational topics in biochemistry around a big picture scientific and societal issue. Herein, I describe a series of classroom exercises that integrate foundational topics in biochemistry around the structure, biology, and therapeutic inhibition of HIV protease. These exercises center on foundational topics in biochemistry including thermodynamics, acid/base properties, protein structure, ligand binding, and enzymatic catalysis. The exercises also incorporate regular student practice of scientific skills including analysis of primary literature, evaluation of scientific data, and presentation of technical scientific arguments. Through the exercises, students also gain experience accessing computational biochemical resources such as the protein data bank, Proteopedia, and protein visualization software. As these HIV centered exercises cover foundational topics common to all first semester biochemistry courses, these exercises should appeal to a broad audience of undergraduate students and should be readily integrated into a variety of teaching styles and classroom sizes. © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 42(4):299-304, 2014. PMID:24652697

Johnson, R Jeremy

2014-07-01

331

Council on Undergraduate Research on the Web  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Council of Undergraduate Research (CUR) is to "support and promote high-quality undergraduate student-faculty collaborative research and scholarship." CUR disseminates some of its work and findings through the Council of Undergraduate Research Quarterly (CURQ) and this site provides access to some of the articles from that publication. Currently, visitors can search past articles back to 2008, and visitors can browse through articles like "Putting Undergraduate Research on the Map for Women," "Peer Mentoring in an Introductory Biology Laboratory," and "Undergraduate Research on Writing: Benefits to Faculty and Curriculum Development." All told, the site provides a cornucopia of articles related to making the undergraduate research experience a bit more meaningful, and educators will find much to enjoy here.

2012-02-06

332

Common student misconceptions in exercise physiology and biochemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The present study represents a preliminary investigationdesigned to identify common misconceptions in students' understanding of physiological and biochemical topics within the academic domain of sport and exercise sciences. A specifically designed misconception inventory (consisting of 10 multiple-choice questions) was administered to a cohort of level 1, 2, and 3 undergraduate students enrolled in physiology and biochemistry-related modules of the BSc Sport Science degree at the authors' institute. Of the 10 misconceptions proposed by the authors, 9 misconceptions were confirmed. Of these nine misconceptions, only one misconception appeared to have been alleviated by the current teaching strategy employed during the progression from level 1 to 3 study. The remaining eight misconceptions prevailed throughout the course of the degree program, suggesting that students enter and leave university with the same misconceptions in certain areas of exercise physiology and biochemistry. The possible origins of these misconceptions are discussed, as are potential teaching strategies to prevent and/or remediate them for future years.

James P. Morton (Liverpool John Moores University Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences); Dominic A Doran (John Moores University Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences); Don P.M. MacLaren (John Moores University Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences)

2008-01-28

333

Ethanol Metabolism and the Transition from Organic Chemistry to Biochemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To ease the transition from organic chemistry at the beginning of a biochemistry course or at the beginning of the metabolism section of the organic course, an early presentation of the oxidation of ethanol is proposed. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase reactions can smooth the introduction to biochemistry, since they involve three of the simplest compounds: ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetic acid. Using these reactions as a model encourages the study of metabolic pathways by a systematic approach rather than by rote memorization. Reactions that can be presented as variations on a theme include methanol poisoning, the polyol reaction, and, most important, the sequence glycerol-3-phosphate to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 3-phosphoglyceric acid. This last sequence integrates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and, by comparison with the model reaction, brings out the principles of substrate-level phosphorylation. The method has evoked favorable verbal feedback from students and, in addition to medical and graduate courses, has been successfully used in the biochemical section of an undergraduate organic course.

Feinman, Richard D.

2001-09-01

334

Use of General Principles in Teaching Biochemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents Principles of Biochemistry for use as main focus of a biochemistry course. The nine guiding ideas are the principles of continual turnover, macromolecular organization, molecular recognition, multiplicity of utilization, maximum efficiency, gradual change, interrelationship, transformational reciprocity, and information transfer. In use…

Fernandez, Rolando Hernandez; Tomey, Agustin Vicedo

1991-01-01

335

The Story of Biochemistry in Canada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The first practical course in biochemistry was probably given at McGill University by R. F. Ruttan and Sir Wm. Osler in 1883. The first Department of Biochemistry was established at the University of Toronto with A. B. Macallum as professor in 1907. Separ...

E. G. Young

1967-01-01

336

An Investigation into the Creation, Stability, and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis of Early Photographic Processes: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Photography is one of the few fine art forms that were initially developed by scientists such as Herschel and Talbot; however, in the modern chemistry curriculum, photography has become divorced from its scientific beginnings and resides in the studio arts department of most universities. An upper-level undergraduate experiment is described in…

Rogge, Corina E.; Bezur, Aniko

2012-01-01

337

BIO2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document provides the full text (26 pages in pdf) of a 2003 report from the National Research Council outlining some of the contributions of bioinformatics research and suggests ways to promote collaboration among the diverse disciplines within graduate and undergraduate programs. Recommendations from the report include courses, laboratory experience, and quantitative skills students in this field should have. Other issues addressed include instructional materials and approaches, project-based laboratories, and implementation of the Council's findings.

2008-01-15

338

Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This sharp looking website is for the Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education (JUNE) which "publishes peer-reviewed reports of innovations in undergraduate neuroscience education...[and] serves as a mechanism for faculty to exchange information...such as laboratory exercises, new media, curricular considerations, and teaching methods." Visitors will find the "Supplementary Materials" tab near the top of any page to contain movies, lab instructions, papers, and images. Some of the movies include an adult and juvenile "Crayfish Brain Movie," "Larval Dissection Movie" of a drosophila mutant, and "Leg Prep and Spine Stimulation" of a cockroach. The "Previous Issues" tab gives visitors the opportunity to read issues published since 2002. Recent pieces featured in JUNE include "Integrating Community Outreach into the Undergraduate Neuroscience Classroom", "Design Plans for an Inexpensive Tail Flick Analgesia Meter", and "Unquenchable Neuroscience."

2012-01-23

339

Hypobetalipoproteinemia: genetics, biochemistry, and clinical spectrum.  

PubMed

Hypobetalipoproteinemias (HBL) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by reduced plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (apoB) below the 5th percentile of the distribution in the population. HBL are defined as primary or secondary according to the underlying causes. Primary monogenic HBL are caused by mutations in several known genes (APOB, PCSK9, MTP, SARA2) or mutations in genes not yet identified. Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) is the most frequent monogenic form of HBL with a dominant mode of inheritance. It may be due to loss-of-function mutations in APOB or, less frequently, in PCSK9 genes. The rare recessive forms of primary monogenic HBL are represented by abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) and chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) due to mutations in MTP and SARA2 genes, respectively. The clinical phenotype of heterozygous FHBL is usually mild, being frequently characterized by fatty liver. The clinical phenotype of homozygous FHBL, ABL, and CMRD is usually severe being characterized by intestinal lipid malabsorption and fat-soluble vitamin deficiency. Secondary HBL are due to several nongenetic factors such as diet, drugs, and disease-related conditions. The aim of this review is to discuss the biochemistry, genetics, and clinical spectrum of HBL and to provide a clinical and laboratory diagnostic algorithm. PMID:21874758

Tarugi, Patrizia; Averna, Maurizio

2011-01-01

340

Useful Demonstrations for a Medial Biochemistry Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes six demonstrations used in a medical biochemistry course. These demonstrations focus on: (1) platelet aggregometry; (2) ion-transporting antibiotics; (3) glycosylated hemoglobin; (4) molecular models; (5) serum preparation; and (6) bioluminescence. (JN)

Ragatz, Barth H.; Modrak, Gina

1986-01-01

341

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute: Biochemistry of Metabolism  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute comes this incredibly comprehensive website of "studio-format" courses devoted to the Biochemistry of Metabolism. For the class, each section is divided into two hour sections which are comprised of lecture, exercises (called studio exercises) and discussion. Developed and maintained by Joyce Diwan, the course is designed for "a classroom with internet-connected computers, or network ports for student laptops. Preferably there should be at least one computer per two students. Equipment for projection from a networked instructor's computer or laptop is essential. A class size of 30-40 students is optimal, although a class with up to 60 students is feasible with competent teaching assistants." The three main topics covered are Molecular Biochemistry I (including Sugars and Polysaccharides, Lipids and Membranes, and may more), Molecular Biochemistry II (including Pentose Phosphate Pathway, the Calvin Cycle, and many more), and Cellular Biochemistry (including Actin cytoskeleton and others).

342

Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells?  

PubMed Central

Background The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. Scope of review A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. Major conclusions An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. General significance Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells.

Eckert, Richard L.; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A.; Vemuri, Mohan C.; Boucher, Shayne E.; Bickenbach, Jackie R.; Kerr, Candace

2014-01-01

343

Biochemistry of eukaryotic homologous recombination  

PubMed Central

The biochemistry of eukaryotic homologous recombination caught fire with the discovery that Rad51 is the eukaryotic homolog of the bacterial RecA and T4 UvsX proteins; and this field is still hot. The core reaction of homologous recombination, homology search and DNA strand invasion, along with the proteins catalyzing it, are conserved throughout evolution in principle. However, the increased complexity of eukaryotic genomes and the diversity of eukaryotic cell biology pose additional challenges to the recombination machinery. It is not surprising that this increase in complexity coincided with the evolution of new recombination proteins and novel support pathways, as well as changes in the properties of those eukaryotic recombination proteins that are evidently conserved in evolution. In humans, defects in homologous recombination lead to increased cancer predisposition, underlining the importance of this pathway for genomic stability and tumor suppression. This review will focus on the mechanisms of homologous recombination in eukaryotes as elucidated by the biochemical analysis of yeast and human proteins.

Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

2011-01-01

344

In memory of Professor Leonor Michaelis in Nagoya: great contributions to biochemistry in Japan in the first half of the 20th century.  

PubMed

Leonor Michaelis spent the years of 1922-1926 as Professor of Biochemistry of the Aichi Medical College (now Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University) in Nagoya, Japan. Michaelis succeeded in gathering many bright young biochemists from all over Japan into his laboratory, and made tremendous contributions to the promotion of biochemistry in Japan. Michaelis was invited to many places in Japan to present lectures over those years. Kunio Yagi, who was Professor of Biochemistry at Nagoya University in the second half of the 20th century, succeeded in crystallizing the "Michaelis" enzyme-substrate complex. Historically, Michelis has had an enormous impact on biochemistry in Japan. PMID:23628780

Nagatsu, Toshiharu Toshi

2013-09-01

345

Research and Teaching: Blooming, SOLO Taxonomy, and Phenomenography as Assessment Strategies in Undergraduate Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three alternative approaches to assessment of exam responses were applied in an undergraduate biochemistry course. First, phenomenography was used to categorize written exam responses into an inclusive hierarchy. Second, responses to the same question were similarly categorized according to the Structure of Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO)…

Newton, Genevieve; Martin, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

346

Hypothetical Biotechnology Companies: A Role-Playing Student Centered Activity for Undergraduate Science Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science students leaving undergraduate programs are entering the biotechnology industry where they are presented with issues which require integration of science content. Students find this difficult as through-out their studies, most content is limited to a single subdiscipline (e.g., biochemistry, immunology). In addition, students need…

Chuck, Jo-Anne

2011-01-01

347

The Biochemistry Tetrahedron and the Development of the Taxonomy of Biochemistry External Representations (TOBER)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Visual literacy, the ability to interpret and create external representations (ERs), is essential to success in biochemistry. Studies have been conducted that describe students' abilities to use and interpret specific types of ERs. However, a framework for describing ERs derived through a naturalistic inquiry of biochemistry classrooms has not…

Towns, Marcy H.; Raker, Jeffrey R.; Becker, Nicole; Harle, Marissa; Sutcliffe, Jonathan

2012-01-01

348

Council on Undergraduate Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Council on Undergraduate Research is a national professional organization with more than 3,500 members representing over 850 institutions in seven academic divisions. Serving faculty and administrators at primarily undergraduate institutions in the sciences, CUR encourages the development of undergraduate research programs by generating awareness and national support.

2003-10-10

349

Training Undergraduate Physics Peer Tutors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Wisconsin's Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program matches upper level undergraduate physics students in small study groups with students studying introductory algebra-based physics. We work with students who are potentially at-risk for having academic trouble with the course. They include students with a low exam score, learning disabilities, no high school physics, weak math backgrounds, and/or on academic probation. We also work with students from groups under represented in the sciences and who may be feeling isolated or marginal on campus such as minority, returning adult, and international students. The tutors provide a supportive learning environment, extra practice problems, and an overview of key concepts. In so doing, they help our students to build confidence and problem solving skills applicable to physics and other areas of their academic careers. The Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program is modeled after a similar program for chemistry created by the University of Wisconsin's Chemistry Learning Center. Both programs are now run in collaboration. The tutors are chosen for their academic strength and excellent communication skills. Our tutors are majoring in physics, math, and secondary-level science education. The tutors receive ongoing training and supervision throughout the year. They attend weekly discipline-specific meetings to discuss strategies for teaching the content currently being discussed in the physics course. They also participate in a weekly teaching seminar with science tutors from chemistry and biochemistry to discuss teaching methods, mentoring, and general information relating to the students with whom we work. We will describe an overview of the Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program with a focus on the teacher training program for our undergraduate tutors.

Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.

2004-05-01

350

Combining content and elements of communication into an upper-level biochemistry course.  

PubMed

This report describes how a science communication module was incorporated into an advanced biochemistry course. Elements of communication were taught synergistically with biochemistry content in this course in an effort to expose students to a variety of effective oral communication strategies. Students were trained to use these established techniques and incorporated them into various presentations throughout the course. Three students describe their use of specific resources and how the skills learned relate to their future career. The importance and relevance of science communication are receiving unprecedented national attention. The academic scientific community must respond by incorporating more communication-centered instruction and opportunities in the classroom and laboratory. PMID:24375847

Whittington, Carli P; Pellock, Samuel J; Cunningham, Rebecca L; Cox, James R

2014-01-01

351

Using Castration Surgery in Male Rats to Demonstrate the Physiological Effects of Testosterone on Seminal Vesicle Anatomy in an Undergraduate Laboratory Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rats can be used as a model organism to teach physiological concepts in a laboratory setting. This article describes a two-part laboratory that introduces students to hypothesis testing, experimental design, the appropriate use of controls and surgical techniques. Students perform both a castration and sham-control surgery on male rats and test…

Belanger, Rachelle M.; Conant, Stephanie B.; Grabowski, Gregory M.

2013-01-01

352

Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

2014-01-01

353

Laboratory Techniques for the Blind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes modifications of laboratory procedures for the BSCS Green Version biology, including dissection, microbiology, animal behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and genetics that make the methods suitable for direct experimentation by blind students. Discusses models as substitutes for microscopy. (AL)

Tombaugh, Dorothy

1972-01-01

354

Predictors of Nursing Students' Performance in a One-Semester Organic and Biochemistry Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an effort to empower nursing students to successfully persist in chemistry, predictors of success for undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a one-semester organic and biochemistry course were identified. The sample consisted of 308 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in Chemistry 108 (Principles of Organic and Biochemistry) during a period of seven semesters. In this study, Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a nonremedial academic support program offered for Chemistry 108 students. Placement tests in Mathematics, Reading, and English are required of all entering students. The English Placement Test assesses proficiency in analytical reading and writing; the Nelson Denny Reading Test (Form E) assesses the student's understanding of written vocabulary and the mastery of reading comprehension, and the Mathematics Placement Test measures the student's mastery of arithmetic and algebraic calculations. Both demographic and academic variables were examined. For the entire sample, five predictor variables were identified: Mathematics Placement Test score, Chemistry 107 grade (a prerequisite), total number of SI sessions attended, Nelson Denny Reading Test (Form E) score, and age. Predictors for various subpopulations of the sample were also identified. Predictors for students of traditional age were Mathematics Placement Test score, total number of SI sessions attended, and Chemistry 107 grade. The best predictors for continuing education students were Chemistry 107 grade and Nelson Denny Test score.

van Lanen, Robert J.; Lockie, Nancy M.; McGannon, Thomas

2000-06-01

355

The Physiology and Biochemistry of Receptors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The syllabus for a refresher course on the physiology and biochemistry of receptors (presented at the 1983 American Physiological Society meeting) is provided. Topics considered include receptor regulation, structural/functional aspects of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factors, calcium channel inhibitors, and role of lipoprotein…

Spitzer, Judy A., Ed.

1983-01-01

356

Rhetorical Structure of Biochemistry Research Articles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on the results of a move analysis [Swales, J. (1990). "Genre analysis." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] of 60 biochemistry research articles. First, a corpus was systematically compiled to ensure that it represents core journals in the focused discipline. Then, coding reliability analysis was conducted to demonstrate…

Kanoksilapatham, Budsaba

2005-01-01

357

Jmol-Enhanced Biochemistry Research Projects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We developed a protein research project for a one-semester biochemistry lecture class to enhance learning and more effectively train students to understand protein structure and function. During this semester-long process, students select a protein with known structure and then research its structure, sequence, and function. This project…

Saderholm, Matthew; Reynolds, Anthony

2011-01-01

358

A Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Course for Secondary School Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a course for reinforcing the knowledge of biochemistry in secondary school science teachers. The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Barcelona designed a course to bring these teachers up to date with this discipline. In addition to updating their knowledge of biochemistry and molecular…

Fernandez-Novell, J. M.; Cid, E.; Gomis, R.; Barbera, A.; Guinovart, J. J.

2004-01-01

359

Teachers as Learners in a Cooperative Learning Biochemistry Class  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Upper level college students majoring in biochemistry at the University of New Mexico have the opportunity to participate in an advanced biochemistry course entitled "Biochemistry Education." This course introduces theories of teaching and learning, provides opportunities for participation in course organization, design, and assessment strategies,…

Osgood, Marcy P.; Mitchell, Steve M.; Anderson, William L.

2005-01-01

360

Enhancing Undergraduate Teaching and Research with a "Drosophila" Virginizing System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory exercises using "Drosophila" crosses are an effective pedagogical method to complement traditional lecture and textbook presentations of genetics. Undergraduate thesis research is another common setting for using "Drosophila." A significant barrier to using "Drosophila" for undergraduate teaching or research is the time and skill…

Venema, Dennis R.

2006-01-01

361

An Undergraduate Course in Modeling and Simulation of Multiphysics Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An overview of a course on modeling and simulation offered at the Nanotechnology Engineering undergraduate program at the University of Waterloo. The motivation for having this course in the undergraduate nanotechnology curriculum, the course structure, and its learning objectives are discussed. Further, one of the computational laboratories

Ortiz-Rodriguez, Estanislao; Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.

2010-01-01

362

Biochemistry Online: An Approach Based on Chemical Logic  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an interactive web-based biochemistry text that I created for my upper division biochemistry class over the past five years. The book - Biochemistry Online: An Approach Basedon Chemical Logic - is based on a unique sequencing and approach to a one semester, or the first of a two semester, biochemistry course. I have published a manuscript describing this new approach. (Jakubowski, H. and Owen, W.G. The Teaching of Biochemistry: An Innovative Course Sequence Based on the Logic of Chemistry, Journal of Chemical Education, 75, 734-736, 1998).

Jakubowski, Henry

2012-02-20

363

Synthesis and Small Molecule Exchange Studies of a Magnesium Bisformate Metal-Organic Framework: An Experiment in Host-Guest Chemistry for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

concepts of host-guest chemistry and size exclusion in porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The experiment has been successfully carried out in both introductory and advanced-level inorganic chemistry laboratories. Students synthesized the porous MOF, alpha-Mg[subscript…

Rood, Jeffrey A.; Henderson, Kenneth W.

2013-01-01

364

Determination of Mercury in Fish: A Low-Cost Implementation of Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorbance for the Undergraduate Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mercury is a known neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to children and unborn fetuses. Consumption of contaminated fish is one major route of mercury exposure. This laboratory experiment gives students an opportunity to measure mercury concentrations in store-bought seafood and compare the results to suggested exposure limits. The U.S.…

Niece, Brian K.; Hauri, James F.

2013-01-01

365

What Is the True Color of Fresh Meat? A Biophysical Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Effects of Ligand Binding on Myoglobin Using Optical, EPR, and NMR Spectroscopy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With an increased focus on integrated upper-level laboratories, we present an experiment integrating concepts from inorganic, biological, and physical chemistry content areas. Students investigate the effects of ligand strength on the spectroscopic properties of the heme center in myoglobin using UV-vis, [superscript 1]H NMR, and EPR…

Linenberger, Kimberly; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Crowder, Michael W.; McCarrick, Robert; Lorigan, Gary A.; Tierney, David L.

2011-01-01

366

Introducing Education for Sustainable Development in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Quantitative Analysis of Bioethanol Fuel and Its Blends with Gasoline by Using Solvatochromic Dyes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concept of "Education for Sustainable Development", ESD, has been introduced in a period where chemistry education is undergoing a major change, both in emphasis and methods of teaching. Studying an everyday problem, with an important socio-economic impact in the laboratory is a part of this approach. Presently, the students in many countries…

Galgano, Paula D.; Loffredo, Carina; Sato, Bruno M.; Reichardt, Christian; El Seoud, Omar A.

2012-01-01

367

A One-Pot Self-Assembly Reaction to Prepare a Supramolecular Palladium(II) Cyclometalated Complex: An Undergraduate Organometallic Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory experiment for students in advanced inorganic chemistry is described. Students prepare palladium(II) cyclometalated complexes. A terdentate [C,N,O] Schiff base ligand is doubly deprotonated upon reaction with palladium(II) acetate in a self-assembly process to give a palladacycle with a characteristic tetranuclear structure. This…

Fernandez, Alberto; Lopez-Torres, Margarita; Fernandez, Jesus J.; Vazquez-Garcia, Digna; Vila, Jose M.

2012-01-01

368

The Synthesis and Isolation of N-Tert-Butyl-2-Phenylsuccinamic Acid and N-Tert-Butyl-3-Phenylsuccinamic Acid: An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The facile, high yielding synthesis of phenylsuccinamic acids is described and one of these syntheses, the reaction of phenylsuccinic anhydride with tert-butylamine, is successfully modified and adapted for use in the second-semester organic chemistry laboratory at St. John's University. Succinamic acids are compounds that contain both the amide…

Cesare, Victor; Sadarangani, Ishwar; Rollins, Janet; Costello, Dennis

2004-01-01

369

ERA-experiment ``space biochemistry''  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The general goal of the experiment was to study the response of anhydrobiotic (metabolically dormant) microorganisms (spores of Bacillus subtilis, cells of Deinococcus radiodurans, conidia of Aspergillus species) and cellular constituents (plasmid DNA, proteins, purple membranes, amino acids, urea) to the extremely dehydrating conditions of open space, in some cases in combination with irradiation by solar UV-light. Methods of investigation included viability tests, analysis of DNA damages (strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links) and analysis of chemical effects by spectroscopic, electrophoretic and chromatographic methods. The decrease in viability of the microorganisms was as expected from simulation experiments in the laboratory. Accordingly, it could be correlated with the increase in DNA damages. The purple membranes, amino acids and urea were not measurably effected by the dehydrating condition of open space (in the dark). Plasmid DNA, however, suffered a significant amount of strand breaks under these conditions. The response of these biomolecules to high fluences of short wavelength solar UV-light is very complex. Only a brief survey can be given in this paper. The data on the relatively good survival of some of the microorganisms call for strict observance of COSPAR Planetary Protection Regulations during interplanetary space missions.

Dose, K.; Bieger-Dose, A.; Dillmann, R.; Gill, M.; Kerz, O.; Klein, A.; Meinert, H.; Nawroth, T.; Risi, S.; Stridde, C.

370

Undergraduate spacecraft design projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

A problem associated with space education in undergraduate and graduate curricula is the very nature of space engineering. The history of space tells a story of thousands of engineers from a broad spectrum of engineering disciplines along with physicists, chemists, and so on involved from the beginning of space exploration. It is extremely difficult to introduce design into the undergraduate

A. Helfrick

2006-01-01

371

Favorite Demonstration: A Fruity Biochemistry Demonstration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Inquiry, high-order thinking, reasoning skills, and critical thinking are buzzwords for the outcomes for which college science instructors strive. They can all be succinctly summarized as "get students thinking about what they are learning." Classroom demonstrations are a great vechicle for getting students to apply information they have heard in a lecture. A good example of this type of application is a demonstration that uses simple fruit and vegetable spoilage biochemistry principles to teach scientific reasoning skills.

Shmaefsky, Brian R.

2005-05-01

372

UT Austin Chemistry & Biochemistry: Resources & Movies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Texas at Austin Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry has an excellent chemical reaction movie site. This site is broken down into three areas: Organic Chemical Reactions, Periodic Table, and Welch Scholar Program movies. In Organic Chemical Reactions various QuickTime movies can be viewed through either a standard or a UT Virtual Campus version. The MPEG Periodic Table is an interactive table; users may choose from several reaction movies for each element.

373

Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Portland Press, this online version of David Glick's glossary of over 3,000 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology terms offers concise (usually one sentence) definitions of both common and more obscure words. The glossary may be browsed alphabetically or searched by keyword. Definitions assume users have a basic familiarity with the biosciences, and the glossary is probably most useful to advanced students and professionals in related fields. Users are invited to submit useful terms they feel should be included.

Glick, David M.

374

Biochemistry (Moscow): Telomere, Telomerase, Cancer, and Aging  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Special Issue of Biochemistry (Moscow), (Volume 62 (1997), Number 11) includes several technical review articles on telomere, telomerase, cancer and aging. There has been a recent finding regarding telomerase, a gene which affects the mechanisms controlling human cell replication. The site above provides general information on telomerase, current telomere research, and the use of telemorase in medical practice. Telomerase increases the life-span of a cell, and is thus central to both aging and cancer.

1997-01-01

375

Can Polyphosphate Biochemistry Affect Biological Apatite Saturation?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phosphorus (P) is an important and limiting element for life. One strategy for storing ortho phosphates (Pi) is polymerization. Polymerized Pi's (polyphosphates: (PO3-)n: polyPs) serve as a Pi bank, as well as a catiion chelator, energy source, & regulator of responses to stresses in the stationary phase of culture growth and development1. PolyP biochemistry has been investigated in yeasts, bacteria

S. J. Omelon; N. Matsuura; I. Gorelikov; C. Wynnyckyj; M. D. Grynpas

2010-01-01

376

Centrifugal Pump Experiment for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to describe a Centrifugal Pump Experiment that provided an experiential learning experience to chemical engineering undergraduates at the University of Missouri in the spring of 2010 in the Unit Operations Laboratory course. Lab equipment was used by senior students with computer-based data and control technology. In…

Vanderslice, Nicholas; Oberto, Richard; Marrero, Thomas R.

2012-01-01

377

Itineraries of Identity in Undergraduate Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on recent linguistic-anthropological work that investigates the temporalities of educational processes, the article examines how a marginalized classroom identity is interactionally formed over time in an undergraduate chemistry laboratory. The analysis demonstrates how social marginalization is enacted along multiple temporal scales via…

Bucholtz, Mary; Barnwell, Brendan; Skapoulli, Elena; Lee, Jung-Eun Janie

2012-01-01

378

Student authoring of kinemages in biochemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study compares the attitudes and achievement of students who construct annotated three-dimensional computer generated molecular images, kinemages, to students who use pre-constructed images. Achievement variables that were investigated include secondary, tertiary, and quaternary protein structure along with the nature of a protein's active site. Attitudinal topics were motivation to learn biochemistry, if the time investment for the projects was worthwhile, future career benefits from participating in the project, and what was learned about protein structure. Students from five biochemistry classes at four universities were participants in this study. Two classes were placed in the experimental group and two classes were in the control group. The remaining class was randomly divided into the experimental and the control groups. The control group students visualized three-dimensional computer images during class and for homework assignments. In addition to these visualizations, the experimental group participants authored their own annotated three-dimensional computer images. A survey assessed the attitudes of all students who participated at all locations. The randomly divided class was also assessed with student interviews and with achievement on their final exam. Experimental group students responded with significantly higher differences to questionnaire items pertaining to what was learned about protein structure, future career benefits, and motivation to learn biochemistry. There were no significant differences in responses associated with the time investment, learning about the nature of a protein's active site, improvements in learning because of the images, or in achievement on the final exam.

Booth, Deborah Beech

379

Alpha-fetoprotein: Biochemistry, Clinical Usefulness, and Laboratory Considerations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

AFP (alpa-fetoprotein) is an substance found in amniotic fluid and maternal serum during pregnancy. Originally used as a tumor marker, the determination of AFP has dramatically increased in the past years as its value in the prenatal detection of neural t...

D. A. Armbruster

1990-01-01

380

A Clinically Oriented Bioengineering Program for Undergraduates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The well-documented emergence of Bioengineering from independent research into clinical problem-solving has influenced the development of Bioengineering education at Carnegie-Mellon. Offered as an option to undergraduates, Bioengineering supplements the basic curriculum of an Engineering department with courses in the life sciences, clinical and instrumentation laboratories, and a hospital internship. These laboratories and internship, which are described here in detail, have

John S. Detwiler; Arthur C. Sanderson; Ran Vas

1975-01-01

381

Hematology for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a five-week introductory medical science course designed for both science and nonscience majors through integration of physiology, organic chemistry, anatomy, and biochemistry. Suggests its use as a quarter-semester, a tri-semester, or a regular semester course for students including premed and medical technicians. (CC)

Navari, Rudolph M.

1972-01-01

382

Electrochemistry "Discovery" Course for Undergraduates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed a chemistry selected topics course at Central State University, "Introduction to Laboratory Techniques in Electrochemistry" to: (1) give undergraduates hands-on experience with electrochemical measurements, (2) prepare students for summer research in Fuel Cell and Battery technology. Since students "learn by doing", the course is suitable for undergraduates from sophomore to senior levels. Students complete 6 laboratories, based on a "less is more" philosophy which emphasizes analytic and creative process rather than mandatory topical coverage. Eight electrochemical experiments are available: Construction of Zinc-Copper battery stacks, Lead Acid Battery discharge-charge cycles, Conductimetric titration of aspirin with Ammonium Hydroxide, Ion Selective Electrode determination of Fluoride in water, Cyclic Voltammetry of Potassium Ferricyanide solution, Cyclic Voltammetry of Sulfuric acid on Platinum working electrode, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Lead ion in solution, Differential Pulse Polarography of Lead ion in solution. Topics discussed in lecture include: chemical definitions, electrical definitions, Oxidation-Reduction reactions, Electrochemical series, Electrodes, Electrochemical Cells, direct Coulometry, electrolysis, electrochemical process efficiency, equilibrium Potentiometry, real Cell Voltages, Ion Selective Electrode types and designs, reference electrode designs, working electrode materials, pH buffers, Cyclic Voltammetry, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry, Polarography, differential pulse Polarography, and simple electrochemical instrumentation circuits.

May, Michael Alan; Gupta, Vijay K.

1997-07-01

383

A Model for an Introductory Undergraduate Research Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An introductory, multidisciplinary lecture-laboratory course linked with a summer research experience has been established to provide undergraduate biology and chemistry majors with the skills needed to be successful in the research laboratory. This three-credit hour course was focused on laboratory skills and was designed to reinforce and develop…

Canaria, Jeffrey A.; Schoffstall, Allen M.; Weiss, David J.; Henry, Renee M.; Braun-Sand, Sonja B.

2012-01-01

384

Accreditation standards for undergraduate forensic science programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate forensic science programs are experiencing unprecedented growth in numbers of programs offered and, as a result, student enrollments are increasing. Currently, however, these programs are not subject to professional specialized accreditation. This study sought to identify desirable student outcome measures for undergraduate forensic science programs that should be incorporated into such an accreditation process. To determine desirable student outcomes, three types of data were collected and analyzed. All the existing undergraduate forensic science programs in the United States were examined with regard to the input measures of degree requirements and curriculum content, and for the output measures of mission statements and student competencies. Accreditation procedures and guidelines for three other science-based disciplines, computer science, dietetics, and nursing, were examined to provide guidance on accreditation processes for forensic science education programs. Expert opinion on outcomes for program graduates was solicited from the major stakeholders of undergraduate forensic science programs-forensic science educators, crime laboratory directors, and recent graduates. Opinions were gathered by using a structured Internet-based survey; the total response rate was 48%. Examination of the existing undergraduate forensic science programs revealed that these programs do not use outcome measures. Of the accreditation processes for other science-based programs, nursing education provided the best model for forensic science education, due primarily to the balance between the generality and the specificity of the outcome measures. From the analysis of the questionnaire data, preliminary student outcomes, both general and discipline-specific, suitable for use in the accreditation of undergraduate forensic science programs were determined. The preliminary results were reviewed by a panel of experts and, based on their recommendations, the outcomes identified were revised and refined. The results of this study were used to identify student outcomes and to suggest accreditation standards and an accreditation process for undergraduate forensic science programs based on those outcomes.

Miller, Marilyn Tebbs

385

Undergraduate Research Centers (URC)  

NSF Publications Database

... Research Centers (URC) Synopsis of Program: The Undergraduate Research Center (URC) Program seeks ... nation?s research enterprise. The research underlying an URC should provide exposure to research of ...

386

Undergraduate Research Centers  

NSF Publications Database

... Research Centers (URC) Synopsis of Program: This pilot program of Undergraduate Research Centers ... research to include first- and second-year college students; and (2) to enhance the research ...

387

Chemistry and Biochemistry of Dietary Polyphenols  

PubMed Central

Polyphenols are the biggest group of phytochemicals, and many of them have been found in plant-based foods. Polyphenol-rich diets have been linked to many health benefits. This paper is intended to review the chemistry and biochemistry of polyphenols as related to classification, extraction, separation and analytical methods, their occurrence and biosynthesis in plants, and the biological activities and implications in human health. The discussions are focused on important and most recent advances in the above aspects, and challenges are identified for future research.

Tsao, Rong

2010-01-01

388

A Phytase Enzyme-Based Biochemistry Practical Particularly Suited to Students Undertaking Courses in Biotechnology and Environmental Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Courses in introductory biochemistry invariably encompass basic principles of enzymology, with reinforcement of lecture-based material in appropriate laboratory practicals. Students undertaking practical classes are more enthusiastic, and generally display improved performance, when the specific experiments undertaken show direct relevance to…

Boyce, Angela; Casey, Anne; Walsh, Gary

2004-01-01

389

Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

2013-01-01

390

Face the Fats The Biochemistry of Lipids  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This clicker case introduces students to the biochemistry of lipids through the story of Pete, a college student who begins to consider his nutritional fat intake after watching a commercial for the cholesterol-lowering drug Vytorin. In this case, students learn to differentiate the chemical composition of steroids, phospholipids, and fats as well as how lipids affect our health, both in positive and negative ways. Additionally, students learn how trans fats are manufactured and why they can have negative health side-effects. The case is designed for use in an introductory biology course either for science majors or non-majors. It could potentially be further modified for use in an upper-level biochemistry or cell biology class. The case is called a clicker case because it combines the use of PowerPoint slides (~3.74MB) and student response systems ("clickers") with a case storyline and questions. The case could be modifed however for use without these technologies.

Rice, Nancy A.

2011-01-01

391

Using Pamphlets to Teach Biochemistry: A Service-Learning Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A service-learning project appropriate for a biochemistry or advanced biochemistry course was designed and implemented. The project involved students partnering with a homeless shelter to design informational pamphlets to be displayed at the shelter for the clients' use. The pamphlet topics were based on diseases studied within the course.…

Harrison, Melinda A.; Dunbar, David; Lopatto, David

2013-01-01

392

Blended Learning in Biochemistry Education: Analysis of Medical Students' Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to analyze first-year UFRJ medical students' perceptions about the implementation of a blended learning (BL) experience in their Biochemistry I course. During the first semester of 2009, three Biochemistry professors used the Constructore course management system to develop virtual learning environments (VLEs) for…

Wardenski, Rosilaine de Fatima; de Espindola, Marina Bazzo; Struchiner, Miriam; Giannella, Tais Rabetti

2012-01-01

393

Enhanced Podcasts for Teaching Biochemistry to Veterinary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teaching of biochemistry within medical disciplines presents certain challenges; firstly to relay a large body of complex facts and abstract concepts, and secondly to motivate students that this relatively difficult topic is worth their time to study. Here, nutrient biochemistry was taught within a multidisciplinary module as part of an…

Gough, Kevin C.

2011-01-01

394

On Teaching Biochemistry: A Heuristic-Teleonomic Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues against the merely descriptive presentation frequently used in teaching biochemistry and in favor of a constructivist approach called heuristic-teleonomic, which unites the process of discovery with adaptation to functional ends. Discusses difficulties inherent to the nature of biochemistry, including the conflict between acquiring…

Mantovani, Bernardo

1995-01-01

395

Ethanol Metabolism and the Transition from Organic Chemistry to Biochemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

To ease the transition from organic chemistry at the beginning of a biochemistry course or at the beginning of the metabolism section of the organic course, an early presentation of the oxidation of ethanol is proposed. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase reactions can smooth the introduction to biochemistry, since they involve three of the simplest compounds: ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetic

Richard D. Feinman

2001-01-01

396

The Sweetness of Aspartame: A Biochemistry Lab for Health Science Chemistry Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laboratory exercise for Health Science Biochemistry students to study the effect of aspartame concentration on sweetness has been developed. The concentration dependence of the absorbance of aspartame at 257 nm is also studied. Data from all members of the class are averaged and plotted on the same graph as absorbance and taste rating vs. [aspartame]. The absorbance plot follows Beer's law while the taste rating plot displays the typical hyperbolic response of protein-ligand binding plots. This laboratory exercise illustrates the concept of binding saturation to students.

Stein, Paul J.

1997-09-01

397

Funding Undergraduate Neuroscience Education: CCLI Yesterday and Today  

PubMed Central

For over 20 years, the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) has been supporting undergraduate curricula in the sciences, including neuroscience. NSF’s priorities in undergraduate education, however, have evolved during that period, and the competition for grants has increased. This history and overview of the current Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement program (CCLI) illustrates the changing philosophy of DUE with regard to its curricular programs. It is hoped that understanding the current emphasis on assessing the outcomes of curricular changes and disseminating their results will help interested science faculty write better proposals and compete more effectively for funds.

Pruitt, Nancy L.; Small, Jeanne R.; Woodin, Terry

2006-01-01

398

Using the Discussion Board in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Classroom: Some Lessons Learned  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The discussion board feature that is included with most course management software packages is a potentially valuable tool to augment instructor-student interactions in science lecture courses and increase student motivation. However, many teachers seem to have been frustrated that students do not readily make use of this feature when it is added…

Markwell, John

2005-01-01

399

Insulin Mediated 14C-Glucose Incorporation Into Adipose Tissue: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment in which rat adipose tissue samples are exposed to labeled glucose; insulin is added to one sample. Subsequent scintillation counting demonstrates the ability of insulin to facilitate the entry of glucose into the tissue. (MLH)

Landman, A. D.; Eskin, N. A. M.

1975-01-01

400

Laboratory Experiments for Undergraduate Instruction in Economics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the generation and use of experimental data in teaching economics. Includes a double oral auction experiment and a monopoly pricing experiment. Concludes that such experiments allow the instructor to see what the students have learned, how they reason, and what parts of the material have proved difficult. (DK)

Wells, Donald A.

1991-01-01

401

DNA Sequencing in Undergraduate Laboratory Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses strategies to duplicate current research protocols using biochemical methods of analysis. Describes the use of the Silver Sequence kit that provides a technically simple and relatively inexpensive DNA sequencing exercise. (JRH)

Hamilton, Robert G.

1997-01-01

402

Cardiovascular Simulator for the Undergraduate Physics Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is a cardiovascular simulator which illustrates the use of a catheter-coupled external transducer for dynamic pressure measurements in the circulatory system. With the simulator, students can observe the effects of stroke volume and rate upon maximum, minimum, and mean arterial pressure. (Author/GA)

Bruner, L. J.

1979-01-01

403

Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratory Software: Planetary Atmosphere Evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A computer simulation software package has been developed to evolve planetary atmospheres from their formation through whatever time period the user inputs. Required initial inputs are the spectral class of the star (main sequence stars are assumed) and its chemical abundance, the distance that the planet is from the star, along with the radius, mass, and albedo of the planet. Characteristics of the Earth and Sun are loaded as defaults upon start-up. Once the input is complete, the user clicks on the ``EVOLVE'' button to start the calculations. As the calculations progress, a bar chart shows the relative abundance of important molecules (eg., H2, CO2, etc.) and the thickness of the atmosphere is continually updated. Should conditions warrant, a box will indicate if lifeforms have come into existence. The user can ``PAUSE'' the evolution at any time through the maximum inputed time. The goal of this program is to teach students that the structure of planetary atmospheres result from their initial conditions, change over time, and that the formation of life is a natural occurrence without need for magic. Two versions of this software exist, one written in Visual Basic and the other in IDL. Both will be freely available off of the Web at http://www.etsu.edu/physics/.

Luttermoser, D. G.

1999-12-01

404

Cosmic collaboration in an undergraduate astrophysics laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lessons learned during the first offering of a lab component of an intermediate astrophysics course at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls are discussed. The course enrolled students from a variety of majors. Students worked in mixed-gender, mixed-major collaborative groups. They explored cosmic rays through hands-on, inquiry-based activities that took them from classic, fundamental discoveries to open-ended questions of their own design. We find that students divided their labor and brought the various parts of their research project together with little or no discussion regarding the various pieces and how they inform each other. Aspects of the lab design helped disrupt some typical gender dynamics in that men did not dominate group discussions. However, men did dominate the hands-on activities of the lab.

Gunter, Ramona; Spiczak, Glenn; Madsen, James

2010-10-01

405

Materials Laboratory Classes for First Year Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a combined demonstration and student experiment course to illustrate fundamental techniques, instrumentation, and concise report writing. Describes experiments including tensile tests, heat treatment, equilibrium diagram, microexamination, strain measurement, and recrystallization. (GH)

Fahy, F. W.

1975-01-01

406

Biochemistry of fruit softening: an overview.  

PubMed

Softening is a developmentally programmed ripening process, associated with biochemical changes in cell wall fractions involving hydrolytic processes resulting in breakdown of cell-wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectin etc. Various hydrolytic reactions are brought about by polygalacturonase, pectin methyl esterase, pectate lyase, rhamnogalacturonase, cellulase and ?-galactosidase etc. Besides these enzymes, expansin protein also plays an important role in softening. Textural changes during ripening help in determining the shelf life of a fruit. An understanding of these changes would help in formulating procedures for controlling fruit softening vis-à-vis enhancing shelf life of fruits. In the present review an attempt has been made to coalesce recent findings on biochemistry of fruit softening. PMID:23572919

Payasi, Anurag; Mishra, Nagendra Nath; Chaves, Ana Lucia Soares; Singh, Randhir

2009-04-01

407

Conducting Mathematical Research with Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The notion that undergraduates are capable of making profound and original contributions to mathematical research is rapidly gaining acceptance. Undergraduates bring their enthusiasm, creativity, curiosity, and perseverance to bona fide research problems. This article discusses some of the key issues concerning undergraduate mathematical research:…

Roberts, Gareth E.

2013-01-01

408

Who's Washing the Dishes? Undergraduate Research Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When I was originally asked to give a talk at the DUE CCLIconference concerning undergraduate education, I agreedwith some trepidation; to be candid, I didn't even know howto correctly pronounce "pedagogy" until a couple of yearsago. I tried to talk a little about my history as a first-generationcollege student who, after earning a PhD, had a veryunique educational outreach experience and found her nichein undergraduate research and teaching. Writing up this talkproved to be even more challenging than giving it.Nonetheless, I hope I've managed to provide some insightinto my background and how, as a brand-new facultymember, I'm trying to integrate the best practices of myresearch career toward teaching science to undergraduatestudents. This is a chapter in the Preparing Undergraduates for Research and the Workforce section of the Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) April 2004 conference proceedings published under the title Invention and Impact: Building Excellence in Undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education.

Hazel A. Barton (;)

2004-12-01

409

Upgrading Undergraduate Biology Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On many campuses throughout the country, undergraduate biology education is in serious need of an upgrade. During the past few decades, the body of biological knowledge has grown exponentially, and as a research endeavor, the practice of biology has evolved. Education research has also made great strides, revealing many new insights into how…

Musante, Susan

2011-01-01

410

Working with Jewish Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Jewish student population has received little attention on campuses and has indicated their disappointment with college administrators and faculty who do not understand their identity. Jewish undergraduates face many identity issues related to being Jewish, yet they have limited opportunities to learn about the impact of religion on their…

Blumenfeld, Warren J.; Klein, Jacqueline R.

2009-01-01

411

Undergraduate Program: New Orleans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Undergraduate chemical science students---join us in New Orleans on April 6-7, 2008 for an educational program designed specifically for you. Attend symposia on chemistry in sports and health and learn how it impacts your life everyday; meet with graduate school recruiters. Focus on your professional future in chemistry by learning more about careers in public health and how to communicate

Lori Betsock

2008-01-01

412

TCAP Undergraduate Community  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Undergraduate Students in TCAPClick on the map below to see where TCAP students are located across the country.  Once the map opens in a new tab you can click on the red dots to learn more. Undergraduate Research Internships in Plant Genetics and Plant BreedingThe Plant Breeder Training Network for Undergraduate Students (PBTN – US) provides an excellent experience for students who wish to understand the science of plant genetics and plant breeding and acquire training in research. Students will gain knowledge and skills by assisting a graduate student with research and, with advice from their graduate mentor, planning and implementing an independent research project. PurposeTo meet global demand for food in the coming decades, new crop varieties adapted to conditions of changing climate, limited land, water and nutrient resources and unyielding disease pressure are needed.  This work requires the collaborative efforts of scientists with knowledge in the areas of genetics, genomics, breeding strategies and experimental design and the application of tools of molecular genetics and computational biology. PBTN-US provides a way for undergraduate students to gain experience and skills in many of these areas, to learn about careers in research, and to prepare for the next step in their own research career.PBTN – US provides:paid research internshipsmentoring by trained graduate studentsinteraction with undergraduate interns at other institutionsinteraction with professional plant breeders in academia and industryfunds for travel to a scientific conference to present research results To learn more about research internships, click below for a description of research projects and contact information.Research Projects http://triticeaecap.org/?q=node/11 Please contact us with any questions you have about plant breeding or internship opportunities. Mary Brakkebrakk001@umn.edu Jamie Sherman jsherman@montana.edu Deana Namuth-Covertdcovert2@unl.edu

413

Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume I, 2001  

SciTech Connect

This is our first volume of the Undergraduate Journal. It is an approbation of the impressive research performed by summer interns under the guidance of their dedicated mentors. The full-length publications were chosen from a pool of submissions that were reviewed by many of the excellent scientists at our National Laboratories. Most of these students will pursue careers in science, engineering and technology and, hopefully, some of this talent will remain with our labs. We have also included about 125 abstracts that survived the review process. These were submitted from all of our participating National Laboratories.

Faletra, P.; Beavis, W.; Franz, K.; Musick, C.; Walbridge, S.E.; Myron, H.

2001-01-01

414

Undergraduate research semester internship fall 1999 abstracts and research papers  

SciTech Connect

The Undergraduate Research Semester (URS) program provides a unique and challenging off-campus research opportunity for upper-division university undergraduate and pre-grad-school students in science, mathematics, and engineering. This internship program is a partnership between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories (New Mexico and California), and Los Alamos National Laboratory, to provide 75+ (annually) science and engineering undergraduates a rich research experience in this collaborative program. The URS project supports the DP mission through ensuring a scientifically and technically literate citizenry, and contributes to the development of a highly skilled, diverse scientific workforce, with experience, exposure and increased awareness and support for the DP science/technology and Science Based Stockpile Stewardship.

Brown, S; Capaldi, L; Garcia, M A; Kahn, S S; Monbleau, D N; Nault, D; Nicks, N; Ho, M; Tran, N L

1999-12-01

415

International Environmental Law and Biochemistry: An Innovative Teaching Opportunity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the ties between international environmental law and biochemistry with respect to genetically modified organisms, biodiversity, marine pollution, cancer biology, and pesticide contamination of food. Contains 30 references. (DDR)

Candlish, John

1998-01-01

416

The Classical Structure of Blood Biochemistry-a Mathematical Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The mathematical simulation of human blood biochemistry includes the results of detailed chemical analysis of human blood under a variety of chemical stresses. Mathematical simulations of increasing degrees of complexity are developed. A rudimentary blood...

E. C. DeLand

1966-01-01

417

Evaluation of a novel method of chemical education: The Undergraduates Teaching Undergraduates program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1995, the University of Pittsburgh was among a number of institutions in the country to join with the City College of the City University of New York in a novel research project, Workshop Chemistry, which fosters cooperative learning by utilizing advanced undergraduates to instruct and mentor other undergraduate students in both recitation and laboratory classes. That year, the Undergraduates Teaching Undergraduates (UTU) program was begun in the chemistry department at the University of Pittsburgh. In the UTU program, undergraduates who have completed an entry-level general chemistry course are trained as peer instructors, called UTUs, for that course. Both first and second term general chemistry classes at the University of Pittsburgh employ UTUs as well as traditional graduate teaching assistants (TAs) for both recitation and laboratory sections. This study investigated the effects of the UTU program in general chemistry laboratory classes by comparing the final exams of students in traditional TA-taught sections with exams of students taught by UTUs. The project was divided into two phases; the preparative measurement development phase in which the coding scheme and rubrics for analyzing the questions were developed and the evaluative learning outcome phase which assessed the students' achievement by examining their responses to three assessment questions. These questions dealt with student awareness of the structure of an experiment in terms of goals, procedures, conclusions and chemical concepts, logical thinking and verbal and written communication skills. The results of the analysis show that students in the UTU sections performed consistently better than students in TA sections, especially in areas that require critical thinking and understanding skills. In no cases examined were the learning outcomes negatively affected by UTU instruction.

McCreary, Christine Louise

418

The clinical biochemistry of obesity-more than skin deep.  

PubMed

While obesity has a high prevalence in developed countries, the routine abnormalities seen from the clinical biochemistry laboratory that may be caused by obesity related pathology do not seem to be as common. Insulin resistance, which is often associated with obesity, is difficult to assess as formal procedures are too complex for clinical practice. Furthermore the interpretation of insulin levels is hampered by their in vivo variability, assay differences and the lack of reference intervals from an unaffected reference population. Interpretation of fasting glucose levels between 5.5 and 6.0mmol/L are also being debated however, it is useful to understand the age related changes in this parameter, which may also be due to increasing obesity in the reference population. The association of obesity and dyslipidaemia in the metabolic syndrome should focus on elevated triglycerides (>1.5mmol/L), which is associated with low HDLC and correlates with atherogenic small dense LDL. High triglycerides are also predictive of fatty liver and the common abnormality of an elevated ALT may not be appreciated if laboratories allow their reference intervals to increase as the population gets more obese with aging. SHBG levels fall with insulin resistance/hyperinsulinaemia and this needs to be taken into account when testosterone is measured. However, low SHBG is showing huge potential as a disease and prognostic marker in obesity. These commonly available tests provide useful insights for the obese patient and their utility may improve with future research into the growing problem of obesity. PMID:17611153

Sikaris, Kenneth Andrew

2007-01-01

419

Recent perspectives into biochemistry of decavanadate  

PubMed Central

The number of papers about decavanadate has doubled in the past decade. In the present review, new insights into decavanadate biochemistry, cell biology, and antidiabetic and antitumor activities are described. Decameric vanadate species (V10) clearly differs from monomeric vanadate (V1), and affects differently calcium pumps, and structure and function of myosin and actin. Only decavanadate inhibits calcium accumulation by calcium pump ATPase, and strongly inhibits actomyosin ATPase activity (IC50 = 1.4 ?mol/L, V10), whereas no such effects are detected with V1 up to 150 ?mol/L; prevents actin polymerization (IC50 of 68 ?mol/L, whereas no effects detected with up to 2 mmol/L V1); and interacts with actin in a way that induces cysteine oxidation and vanadate reduction to vanadyl. Moreover, in vivo decavanadate toxicity studies have revealed that acute exposure to polyoxovanadate induces different changes in antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress parameters, in comparison with vanadate. In vitro studies have clearly demonstrated that mitochondrial oxygen consumption is strongly affected by decavanadate (IC50, 0.1 ?mol/L); perhaps the most relevant biological effect. Finally, decavanadate (100 ?mol/L) increases rat adipocyte glucose accumulation more potently than several vanadium complexes. Preliminary studies suggest that decavanadate does not have similar effects in human adipocytes. Although decavanadate can be a useful biochemical tool, further studies must be carried out before it can be confirmed that decavanadate and its complexes can be used as anticancer or antidiabetic agents.

Aureliano, Manuel; FCT; Algarve, University of; Gambelas; Faro, 8005-139; Portugal

2011-01-01

420

Undergraduate Program: New Orleans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate chemical science students—join us in New Orleans on April 6-7, 2008 for an educational program designed specifically for you. Attend symposia on chemistry in sports and health and learn how it impacts your life everyday; meet with graduate school recruiters. Focus on your professional future in chemistry by learning more about careers in public health and how to communicate and work effectively with cross-functional teams. Hear eminent scientist Richard B. Silverman (John Evans Professor of Chemistry, Northwestern University and author of The Organic Chemistry of Drug Design and Drug Action 2004) speak about "Drug Discovery: Ingenuity or Serendipity?" All events will take place at the Hilton Riverside Hotel in New Orleans, except the Undergraduate Research Poster Sessions and Sci-Mix, both of which will be held in Hall A of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

Betsock, Lori

2008-03-01

421

Undergraduate research in geochemistry at a larger university: developing a community of undergraduate and graduate researchers.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Faculty at state research universities can find the paired requirements of establishing research programs and developing a "pipeline" of graduate students to be the most challenging aspects of their jobs, especially with shrinking pools of graduate applicants. These problems may be more acute for laboratory-based geochemists, as few graduate candidates possess the requisite quantitative and chemical backgrounds. The need to "get my research going" at the University of South Florida led me to work primarily with undergraduates, as a) they were available and interested, b) they required no more laboratory training than M.S. students; and c) small-dollar funds were available to support them, both in-house and via NSF REU Supplements. Some senior colleagues argued that this approach would hinder my developing a graduate program as is necessary for tenure. This contention turned out to be untrue. My success in undergraduate research draws funding (in NSF REU Site and disciplinary research grants), has attracted outside MS and Ph.D. candidates, and has retained quality in-house students seeking MS degrees. Students working with me join a laboratory community in which undergraduate and graduate researchers are on equal footing in terms of access to instrumentation and other facilities. I work with all my students, irrespective of rank, as members of a cooperative research group. I encourage and expect that technical instruction I provide to any individual will be passed on to their colleagues, which helps develop a "lab culture" of best practices, and ingrains new knowledge and skills through the act of teaching them to others. Maintaining this research environment requires active recruitment of capable graduate AND undergraduate students, regular monitoring of laboratory practices, and ready availability for consultation and mentoring. One must be cognizant of the differing time commitment issues of undergraduates and graduates, and set research goals appropriately. Undergraduate research projects in which 3-4 students work together to collect necessary data can get around the class vs. research scheduling issues they face as they can share the laboratory workload through the week. Group projects can thus collect larger bodies of data, allowing students to address more substantive problems.

Ryan, J. G.

2003-12-01

422

Quantitative Application of Sigma Metrics in Medical Biochemistry  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Laboratory errors are result of a poorly designed quality system in the laboratory. Six Sigma is an error reduction methodology that has been successfully applied at Motorola and General Electric. Sigma (?) is the mathematical symbol for standard deviation (SD). Sigma methodology can be applied wherever an outcome of a process has to be measured. A poor outcome is counted as an error or defect. This is quantified as defects per million (DPM). A six sigma process is one in which 99.999666% of the products manufactured are statistically expected to be free of defects. Six sigma concentrates, on regulating a process to 6 SDs, represents 3.4 DPM (defects per million) opportunities. It can be inferred that as sigma increases, the consistency and steadiness of the test improves, thereby reducing the operating costs. We aimed to gauge performance of our laboratory parameters by sigma metrics. Objectives: Evaluation of sigma metrics in interpretation of parameter performance in clinical biochemistry. Material and Methods: The six month internal QC (October 2012 to march 2013) and EQAS (external quality assurance scheme) were extracted for the parameters-Glucose, Urea, Creatinine, Total Bilirubin, Total Protein, Albumin, Uric acid, Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Chloride, SGOT, SGPT and ALP. Coefficient of variance (CV) were calculated from internal QC for these parameters. Percentage bias for these parameters was calculated from the EQAS. Total allowable errors were followed as per Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) guidelines. Sigma metrics were calculated from CV, percentage bias and total allowable error for the above mentioned parameters. Results: For parameters - Total bilirubin, uric acid, SGOT, SGPT and ALP, the sigma values were found to be more than 6. For parameters – glucose, Creatinine, triglycerides, urea, the sigma values were found to be between 3 to 6. For parameters – total protein, albumin, cholesterol and chloride, the sigma values were found to be less than 3. Conclusion: ALP was the best performer when it was gauzed on the sigma scale, with a sigma metrics value of 8.4 and chloride had the least sigma metrics value of 1.4.

Nanda, Sunil Kumar; Ray, Lopamudra

2013-01-01

423

A Safer and Convenient Synthesis of Sulfathiazole for Undergraduate Organic and Medicinal Chemistry Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A safer method for the synthesis of the sulfonamide drug sulfathiazole, for undergraduate classes, is described. This method improves upon procedures currently followed in several undergraduate teaching laboratories for the synthesis of sulfathiazole. Key features of this procedure include the total exclusion of pyridine, which has potential…

Boyle, Jeff; Otty, Sandra; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi

2012-01-01

424

Mentoring Undergraduate Students in Neuroscience Research: A Model System at Baldwin-Wallace College  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource describes opportunities given to undergraduate students to become involved in a sustained, faculty-initiated research program. The system described here provides an encouraging structured community in which undergraduates can develop and mature as they are mentored in the context of a modern neuroscience laboratory.

G. Andrew Mickley, (Baldwin-Wallace College,;); Cynthia Kenmuir (Baldwin-Wallace College;); Dawn Remmers-Roeber (University of Texas;)

2003-05-30

425

Polymer Preparations in the Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes six laboratory procedures for preparing polymers which have been used in a course for undergraduate industrial arts students, who have a concentration in plastics technology but have not taken more than one year of college chemistry. (BT)

Lampman, Gary M.; And Others

1979-01-01

426

NANOLAB at The University of Texas at Austin: A Model for Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Science and Engineering Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of Texas at Austin has developed an upper-division undergraduate laboratory called "NANOLAB" to introduce undergraduate science and engineering students to nanoscale science and engineering (NSE) concepts. The NANOLAB is not a stand-alone course offered by a specific department, but rather a laboratory station--or hub--that…

Heitsch, Andrew T.; Ekerdt, John G.; Korgel, Brian A.

2009-01-01

427

NMR of a Phospholipid: Modules for Advanced Laboratory Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laboratory project is described that builds upon the NMR experience undergraduates receive in organic chemistry with a battery of NMR experiments that investigate egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC). This material, often labeled in health food stores as lecithin, is a major constituent of mammalian cell membranes. The NMR experiments may be used to make resonance assignments, to study molecular organization in model membranes, to test the effects of instrumental parameters, and to investigate the physics of nuclear spin systems. A suite of modular NMR exercises is described, so that the instructor may tailor the laboratory sessions to biochemistry, instrumental analysis, or physical chemistry. The experiments include solution-state one-dimensional (1D) 1H, 13C, and 31P experiments; two-dimensional (2D) TOtal Correlated SpectroscopY (TOCSY); and the spectral editing technique of Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT). To demonstrate the differences between solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and instrumentation, a second set of experiments generates 1H, 13C, and 31P spectra of egg PC dispersed in aqueous solution, under both static and magic-angle spinning conditions.

Gaede, Holly C.; Stark, Ruth E.

2001-09-01

428

Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)  

NSF Publications Database

... for new or renewal NSF grants or cooperative agreements. Undergraduate student participants in ... Award: Standard or Continuing Grant or Cooperative Agreement Estimated Number of Awards: 1700 to ...

429

Undergraduates Leading Undergraduates: Peer Facilitation in a Science Workshop Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the results of a study investigating the experiences of undergraduates acting as peer leaders in an extensive peer-led team learning program in introductory undergraduate sciences and engineering courses. In an effort to understand the facilitator experience in the program better and to report initial findings on the benefits…

Micari, Marina; Streitwieser, Bernhard; Light, Gregory

2005-01-01

430

Food science instruction in undergraduate dietetic education.  

PubMed

To assess the current status of food science instruction in undergraduate dietetic education, a survey was conducted of those persons responsible for teaching this subject in 267 Plan IV and 65 Coordinated Undergraduate Programs. Responses were received from 155 institutions offering a total of 177 programs. Factors examined included the number and academic background of faculty members teaching food science, the structure of the first course in food science, the structure of advanced food science courses required or offered to undergraduate dietetic students, and perceived adequacy of course content. Fifty-eight percent of the respondents had or were candidates for doctoral degrees, and 37% had master's degrees. The results indicated that although all programs offered a beginning course in food science, the required prerequisites and level of difficulty of subject matter varied. Fifty-three percent of the programs required at least one advanced food science course. More than 95% of both beginning and advanced courses are structured to include both lecture and laboratory. Although a majority of respondents indicated satisfaction with the adequacy of course content currently being offered, many made recommendations for improvements. Other concerns included difficulty in locating textbooks and other suitable instructional materials, isolation from others teaching food science, and a lack of standards for content to be included in basic and advanced courses. PMID:2768736

Deskins, B B; Spicher, C B

1989-09-01

431

An undergraduate program for astronomy in México  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy in Mexico has an ancient tradition, reinforced during the XXth century by groups working in theoretical and observational astronomy. During the 90s, the Great Millimeter Telescope (a single 50-m antenna) has been approved, and a 6-m infrared telescope is under study. Graduate and undergraduate programs must be improved to prepare future Mexican and Latin American astronomers to take advantage of these facilities. To meet the challenge, two traditional Mexican programs (Instituto de Astronomia-UNAM and Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica-INAOE) are updating their graduate programs for. Similarly, the Departamento de Astronomia de la Universidad de Guanajuato is joining physicists in the first undergraduate program in Mexico in Physics and Engineering with an option in Astrophysics. This will prepare students so that they can choose between industry, academia or national laboratories, either in Physics or Astronomy. Jobs in academia have been scarce; many students had to give up their goals after one or two postdoctoral positions. Graduate and undergraduate programs must adjust, by broadening the scope of present programs so that students are better prepared for other job opportunities. We present a BSc program designed by astronomers and physicists to try to address some of these concerns and prepare the students for either continuing with graduate studies or finding employment in an ever-changing job market.

Bravo-Alfaro, Hector; Migenes, Victor

432

Teaching Undergraduates to Think Archivally  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study describes efforts in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections to build and teach an undergraduate course to develop archival literacy skills in undergraduate students. The article reviews current models of archival instruction and describes how these were applied in creating the course content. An evaluation of the course's outcomes…

Nimer, Cory L.; Daines, J. Gordon, III

2012-01-01

433

Undergraduate Physics: The National Perspective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Carl Wieman presents his views on how improving undergraduate physics programs is perceived at the national level. He also discusses relevant research on attracting and keeping physics majors and his experience with using science education research to improve undergraduate physics programs.

Wieman, Carl E.

2012-06-14

434

UNDERGRADUATE COMPETENCIES WHICH FACULTY VALUE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concern about the quality of higher education in the United States has led to vigorous debate about desired outcomes and assessment methods. Identifying desired outcomes in behavioural terms is one way to proceed to evaluation.What general competencies should undergraduates attain? The purpose of this research was to identify the commonalities in what faculty value as desired characteristic behaviours for undergraduate

Linnea White

1991-01-01

435

APS undergraduate brainstorming summit report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

IN 2004, the Education Committee was charged with seeking additional strategies to increase the exposure of undergraduate students to physiology studies and careers. Following a reaffirmation of this charge in the 2006 strategic plan, the American Physiological Society (APS) hosted an undergraduate brainstorming summit in late September of 2006.

PhD Robert G. Carroll (East Carolina State University Department of Physiology); PhD Marsha L Matyas (American Physiological Society Education); Van Doze (University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences Pharmacology, Physiology, and Therapeutics); PhD Richard Faircloth (Anne Arundel Community College Dept. of Biology); Patricia Finkenstadt (Phoenix College); PhD Barbara E. Goodman (University of South Dakota School of Medicine Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences)

2007-12-09

436

Increasing undergraduate student retention rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on data from a questionnaire survey of the new undergraduate intake to the University of Birmingham, the factors which influence withdrawal\\/retention rates in the first term were examined. The effectiveness of counselling intervention with first-year undergraduate students at risk of leaving university in their first term is also explored. The implications for universities wishing to increase retention rates and

Barbara Rickinson; Desmond Rutherford

1995-01-01

437

Undergraduate Biology Lab Courses: Comparing the Impact of Traditionally Based "Cookbook" and Authentic Research-Based Courses on Student Lab Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past decade, several reports have recommended a shift in undergraduate biology laboratory courses from traditionally structured, often described as "cookbook," to authentic research-based experiences. This study compares a cookbook-type laboratory course to a research-based undergraduate biology laboratory course at a Research 1…

Brownell, Sara E.; Kloser, Matthew J.; Fukami, Tadishi; Shavelson, Rich

2012-01-01

438

Interlaboratory Collaborations in the Undergraduate Setting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a novel approach for undergraduate laboratory education termed "interlaboratory collaboration" in which students in distinct laboratory courses are responsible for different aspects of a single project that spans these courses. This approach attempts to model the industrial workplace where separate groups are responsible for different aspects of a project. By having students synthesize or study a set of different compounds the students within a class can compare their data and investigate trends in chemical reactivity or physical properties. Students enrolled in both an inorganic synthesis and a physical chemistry laboratory course concurrently are assigned compounds to analyze that they did not synthesize. At the end of this process students share their findings with their peers. The approach has been well received by students and faculty, alike.

Megehee, Elise G.; Hyslop, Alison; Rosso, Richard J.

2005-09-01

439

Introducing the Practical Aspects of Computational Chemistry to Undergraduate Chemistry Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various efforts are being made to introduce the different physical aspects and uses of computational chemistry to the undergraduate chemistry students. A new laboratory approach that demonstrates all such aspects via experiments has been devised for the purpose.

Pearson, Jason K.

2007-01-01

440

Computer Based Data Acquisition in the Undergraduate Lab.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a data acquisition system developed for an undergraduate engineering students' instructional laboratory at Georgia Tech. Special emphasis is placed on the design of an A/D Converter Board used to measure the viscosity and temperature of motor oil. The Simons' BASIC Program Listing for the Commodore 64 microcomputer is appended. (LRW)

Wepfer, William J.; Oehmke, Roger L. T.

1987-01-01

441

A Methods-Based Biotechnology Course for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This new course in biotechnology for upper division undergraduates provides a comprehensive overview of the process of drug discovery that is relevant to biopharmaceutical industry. The laboratory exercises train students in both cell-free and cell-based assays. Oral presentations by the students delve into recent progress in drug discovery.…

Chakrabarti, Debopam

2009-01-01

442

Integrated Undergraduate Research Experience for the Study of Brain Injury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource can be used as a guide for initiating development of an integrated "hands-on" neuroscience exercise for entry-level undergraduates to encourage students to integrate and apply lecture material in a problem-solving "hands-on" laboratory setting.

Clifford L. Barnes (Regis University;); Michelle Sierra (Regis University;); Eugene R. Delay (Regis University;)

2003-05-30

443

NRCL-70, Review of the Activities of the Laboratories 1970.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Included are descriptions of activities of each of the 12 laboratories in the National Research Council of Canada, including background information and a summary of the studies (research) and results. The 12 laboratories in the NRCL are the following: Atlantic Regional Laboratory, Biochemistry Laboratory, Division of Biology, Division of Building…

National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

444

Joseph Provost Ph.D: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Profession Joseph Provost of Minnesota State University Moorhead hosts a volume of helpful material for other educators in biochemistry, biotechnology, or molecular biology. On this site, which is "updated nearly every day," visitors can find links to each of Professor Provost's courses in biochemistry (and two wonderfully applied courses in the Science of Cooking and Chemistry in Everyday Life). Additionally, there are a number of resources to assist with helpful skills including study tips, safety, how to write an abstract, poster presentations, gathering letters of recommendation, as well as information on various careers.

Provost, Joseph

2012-02-09

445

Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.  

PubMed

Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts. PMID:21774056

Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

2011-07-01

446

Undergraduate Course on Global Concerns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GEO 311: Geoscience and Global Concerns is an undergraduate course taught at Stony Brook University during each fall semester. The class meets twice per week, with one session consisting of a lecture and the other, an interactive activity in a computer laboratory that engages the students in exploring real world problems. A specific concern or issue serves as a focus during each session. The students are asked to develop answers to a series of questions that engage them in identifying causes of the problem, connections with the Earth system, relationships to other problems, and possible solutions on both a global and local scale. The questions are designed to facilitate an integrated view of the Earth system. Examples of topics that the students explore during the laboratory sessions are: 1) fossil fuel reserves and consumption rates and the effect of their use on climate, 2) alternative sources of energy and associated technologies, such as solar photovoltaics, nuclear energy, tidal power, geothermal energy, and wind power, 3) effects of tsunamis and earthquakes on human populations and infrastructure, 4) climate change, and 5) hurricanes and storms. The selection and scheduling of topics often takes advantage of the occurrence of media attention or events that can serve as case studies. Tools used during the computer sessions include Google Earth, ArcGIS, spreadsheets, and web sites that offer data and maps. The students use Google Earth or ArcGIS to map events such as earthquakes, storms, tsunamis, and changes in the extent of polar ice. Spreadsheets are employed to discern trends in fossil fuel supply and consumption, and to experiment with models that make predictions for the future. We present examples of several of these activities and discuss how they facilitate an understanding of interrelationships within the Earth system.

Richard, G. A.; Weidner, D. J.

2008-12-01

447

Exploring undergraduate research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this homework assignment, students are required to attend a university-wide poster session, the Symposium for Undergraduate Research and Public Service. I give them a list of students who are presenting research they have done with faculty members in the School of Earth Sciences, and they are required to talk to at least four of those people. They must submit (via email or a course website) a description of their four conversations, along with their personal reflections on the nature of research in the Earth sciences. I've found this to be a particularly effective means of getting students engaged in research because they are talking to their peers rather than to faculty or graduate students. Talking to peers about research lowers the perceived barriers to getting involved, especially for the freshmen and sophomores who think they may not have enough background to get involved.

Egger, Anne

448

Animals and Environments: Resisting Schisms in Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The articles in this volume are a product of the enthusiasm shown by delegates to meet in a remote corner of southern Africa and to discuss comparative physiology and biochemistry in their wider interpretation and future course. This collection reflects a small but long-standing commitment to fostering the engagement of biological research with African issues and col- leagues. Comparative physiology

Steve Morris; André Vosloo

2006-01-01

449

Audio Podcasting in a Tablet PC-Enhanced Biochemistry Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the effects of making audio podcasts of all lectures in a large, basic biochemistry course promptly available to students. The audio podcasts complement a previously described approach in which a tablet PC is used to annotate PowerPoint slides with digital ink to produce electronic notes that can be archived. The fundamentals…

Lyles, Heather; Robertson, Brian; Mangino, Michael; Cox, James R.

2007-01-01

450

A Biochemistry Course for High-Ability Secondary Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a one-semester biochemistry course designed for students who have completed courses in biology, CHEMStudy chemistry, and physical science. Course goals include presenting biochemical concepts (in preparation for college courses), challenging students considering science-related careers, and serving as a springboard for science fairs. (JN)

Sherman, Marie

1984-01-01

451

Uncovering Students' Incorrect Ideas about Foundational Concepts for Biochemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents preliminary data on how an assessment instrument with a unique structure can be used to identify common incorrect ideas from prior coursework at the beginning of a biochemistry course, and to determine whether these ideas have changed by the end of the course. The twenty-one multiple-choice items address seven different…

Villafane, Sachel M.; Loertscher, Jennifer; Minderhout, Vicky; Lewis, Jennifer E.

2011-01-01

452

An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Biochemistry to Biotechnology Specialty Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The faculty of biochemistry established an integrated teaching strategy for biotechnology specialty students, by intermeshing the case-study method, web-assistant teaching, and improved lecture format with a brief content and multimedia courseware. Teaching practice showed that the integrated teaching strategy could retain the best features of…

Ouyang, Liming; Ou, Ling; Zhang, Yuanxing

2007-01-01

453

Inverting Organic and Biochemistry: A Curriculum Tweak that Benefits All  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The approaches of teaching organic (full year) and biochemistry courses in the United States colleges and universities are described. The revised courses are probably more useful and relevant for the students as they maintain and improve the education of chemistry majors.

Reingold, I. David

2004-01-01

454

Teaching of Biochemistry in Integrated Curricula: Experiences in Hungary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an historical perspective on the teaching of biochemistry in Hungary starting during the Austrian-Hungarian Empire. Discusses integration and interdisciplinarity in terms of what should be included in the lecture material and what can be borrowed from other closely related subjects without excessive overlapping. Highlights differences…

Banfalvi, Gaspar

1997-01-01

455

Biochemistry of Nitric Oxide and Its Redox-Activated Forms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nitric oxide (NO^bullet), a potentially toxic molecule, has been implicated in a wide range of biological functions. Details of its biochemistry, however, remain poorly understood. The broader chemistry of nitrogen monoxide (NO) involves a redox array of species with distinctive properties and reactivities: NO^+ (nitrosonium), NO^., and NO^- (nitroxyl anion). The integration of this chemistry with current perspectives of NO

Jonathan S. Stamler; David J. Singel; Joseph Loscalzo

1992-01-01

456

A Problem-Based Learning Design for Teaching Biochemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the design of a biochemistry course that uses problem-based learning. Provides opportunities for students to question, dispute, confirm, and disconfirm their understanding of basic concepts. Emphasizes self-correction through dialogue. Topics covered include amino acids, metabolic pathways and inherited disease, proteins, enzymes and…

Dods, Richard F.

1996-01-01

457

Characterization of the activity and stability of amylase from saliva and detergent: laboratory practicals for studying the activity and stability of amylase from saliva and various commercial detergents.  

PubMed

This article presents two integrated laboratory exercises intended to show students the role of ?-amylases (AAMYs) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative) and the Lugol test (qualitative) under different conditions (e.g. variations in temperature and alkalinity). This work also proposes the study of enzyme stability in the presence of several surfactants and oxidizing agents using the same technical approach. The proposed laboratory exercises promote the understanding of the physiological function of this enzyme and the biotechnological applications of AAMYs in the detergent industry. The exercises also promote the understanding that the enzymatic stability and performance are dependent on the organism of origin, and if necessary, these properties could be modified by genetic engineering. In addition, this article reinforces the development of laboratory skills, problem-solving capabilities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are proposed primarily as an undergraduate project for advanced students in the biochemical and biotechnological sciences. These laboratory practicals are complementary to the previously published BAMBED article (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 280-290, 2011) on detergent proteases. PMID:22807429

Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

2012-07-01

458

Biochemistry Students' Ideas about Shape and Charge in Enzyme-Substrate Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Biochemistry is a visual discipline that requires students to develop an understanding of numerous representations. However, there is very little known about what students actually understand about the representations that are used to communicate ideas in biochemistry. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of multiple…

Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

2014-01-01

459

Teaching Biochemistry to Medical Students in Singapore - From Organic Chemistry to Problem-based Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The medical faculty in the National University of Singapore started in 1905 but the Chair in Biochemistry was only established in 1927. For many years the biochemistry course consisted of the teaching of the organic chemistry of substances of physiological importance, nutrition, metabolism and hormones. In 1961, clinical biochemistry was introduced and in the 1980s, genetics and molecular biology were

Khoo Hoon Eng

460

Learning to Argue and Arguing to Learn: Argument-Driven Inquiry as a Way to Help Undergraduate Chemistry Students Learn How to Construct Arguments and Engage in Argumentation during a Laboratory Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines whether students enrolled in a general chemistry I laboratory course developed the ability to participate in scientific argumentation over the course of a semester. The laboratory activities that the students participated in during the course were designed using the Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) an instructional model. This…

Walker, Joi Phelps; Sampson, Victor

2013-01-01

461

Undergraduate Education in Hydrogeology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a course at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire which improved instruction in physical hydrogeology, chemical hydrogeology, and water resources. Describes 14 laboratory activities including objectives, methods, and a list of equipment needed. (Author/MVL)

Tinker, John Richard, Jr.

1989-01-01

462

Argument-Driven Inquiry as a Way to Help Undergraduate Students Write to Learn by Learning to Write in Chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study examined how undergraduate students’ ability to write in science changed over time as they completed a series of laboratory activities designed using a new instructional model called argument-driven inquiry. The study was conducted in a single section of an undergraduate general chemistry lab course offered at a large two-year community college located in the southeast USA. The

Victor Sampson; Joi Phelps Walker

2012-01-01

463

Argument-Driven Inquiry as a Way to Help Undergraduate Students Write to Learn by Learning to Write in Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study examined how undergraduate students' ability to write in science changed over time as they completed a series of laboratory activities designed using a new instructional model called argument-driven inquiry. The study was conducted in a single section of an undergraduate general chemistry lab course offered at a large…

Sampson, Victor; Walker, Joi Phelps

2012-01-01

464

Strategies for Supporting and Sustaining Undergraduate Research Programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A key challenge in developing a viable undergraduate research program is securing adequate support for the effort, both in terms of reliable financial support, and (perhaps most importantly) in terms of providing adequate student/faculty contact time. Financial support for undergraduate research is available via the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program, which provides funds for student research efforts both on relatively small scales (i.e., 1-2 students/yr via REU Supplement funds) and on much larger scales (REU Site research projects involving 10 or more students/yr). Depending on the NSF program, funds for intermediate scale undergraduate research efforts (i.e., 3-5 students/yr) may be available as Participant Support via the normal proposal submission process. For faculty at predominantly undergraduate institutions, research support obtained via the NSF RUI program and other funding outlets (i.e., ACS-PRF) presumes substantial undergraduate participation in research projects. Securing sufficient faculty contact time for undergraduate researchers is critical to their success and professional development, as well as to the ultimate success of the research. However, the additional time required to train undergraduates in research protocols, along with the challenge of working adequate research time into their generally busier class (and often work) schedules can render such efforts unproductive for research faculty. Strategies I have found helpful in getting the necessary time-on-task and contact time with student researchers include: 1) mentoring 3-4 undergraduates in group research projects, which facilitates technical training and ensures sufficient 'hands' to complete the work; 2) building technical training into traditional courses through open-ended investigative laboratory activities, such that students can begin to develop research skills, as well as the necessary investigative mindset; 3) when possible, providing stipend support for student research efforts, reducing their need for other financial support while in school; 4) committing to a professional outcome and schedule (i.e., presenting results at a specific professional meeting), as a means both to focus student efforts and help them organize their time.

Ryan, J. G.

2004-12-01

465

A Laboratory Safety Trivia Game  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the start of each semester, our department begins our chemistry seminar series with a presentation on laboratory safety. All chemistry faculty, staff, graduate students, undergraduate research students, and student laboratory assistants are required to attend. Many of these individuals have sat through these seminars for several years; they feel the seminars are boring and repetitive. In order to enliven

Kristin I. Gublo

2003-01-01

466

Picosecond excimer laser-plasma x-ray source for microscopy, biochemistry, and lithography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Rutherford Appleton Laboratory we developed a high repetition rate, picosecond, excimer laser system which generates a high temperature and density plasma source emitting approximately 200 mW (78 mW/sr) x ray average power at h(nu) approximately 1.2 KeV or 0.28 KeV < h(nu) < 0.53 KeV (the `water window'). At 3.37 nm wavelength the spectral brightness of the source is approximately 9 X 1011 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1% bandwidth. The x-ray source serves a large user community for applications such as: scanning and holographic microscopy, the study of the biochemistry of DNA damage and repair, microlithography and spectroscopy.

Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Ross, Ian N.; Trenda, P.; Wharton, C. W.; Meldrum, R. A.; Daido, Hiroyuki; Schulz, M. S.; Fluck, P.; Michette, Alan G.; Juna, A. P.; Maldonado, Juan R.; Shields, Harry; Tallents, Gregory J.; Dwivedi, L.; Krishnan, J.; Stevens, D. L.; Jenner, T.; Batani, Dimitri; Goodson, H.

1994-02-01

467

Teaching human genetics in biochemistry by computer literature searching.  

PubMed Central

We describe a new user-intense-learning experience that incorporates the teaching of clinical and research applications of human genetics in biochemistry while training first-year medical students to develop skills in computer access to the literature. Human genetics was incorporated into the biochemistry curriculum by providing each student with experience in on-line literature searching in MEDLINE, using Grateful Med, in order to write an abstract about a specific inherited biochemical disorder. We stressed the need for the students to obtain current information in order to understand and interpret the rapidly changing field of human genetics. We taught the students that the most efficient method of obtaining such information was by searching the medical literature via computer.

Proud, V K; Schmidt, F J; Johnson, E D; Mitchell, J A

1989-01-01

468

CLSI-Derived Hematology and Biochemistry Reference Intervals for Healthy Adults in Eastern and Southern Africa  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical laboratory reference intervals have not been established in many African countries, and non-local intervals are commonly used in clinical trials to screen and monitor adverse events (AEs) among African participants. Using laboratory reference intervals derived from other populations excludes potential trial volunteers in Africa and makes AE assessment challenging. The objective of this study was to establish clinical laboratory reference intervals for 25 hematology, immunology and biochemistry values among healthy African adults typical of those who might join a clinical trial. Methods and Findings Equal proportions of men and women were invited to participate in a cross sectional study at seven clinical centers (Kigali, Rwanda; Masaka and Entebbe, Uganda; two in Nairobi and one in Kilifi, Kenya; and Lusaka, Zambia). All laboratories used hematology, immunology and biochemistry analyzers validated by an independent clinical laboratory. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines were followed to create study consensus intervals. For comparison, AE grading criteria published by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Division of AIDS (DAIDS) and other U.S. reference intervals were used. 2,990 potential volunteers were screened, and 2,105 (1,083 men and 1,022 women) were included in the analysis. While some significant gender and regional differences were observed, creating consensus African study intervals from the complete data was possible for 18 of the 25 analytes. Compared to reference intervals from the U.S., we found lower hematocrit and hemoglobin levels, particularly among women, lower white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and lower amylase. Both genders had elevated eosinophil counts, immunoglobulin G, total and direct bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase, the latter being more pronounced among women. When graded against U.S.-derived DAIDS AE grading criteria, we observed 774 (35.3%) volunteers with grade one or higher results; 314 (14.9%) had elevated total bilirubin, and 201 (9.6%) had low neutrophil counts. These otherwise healthy volunteers would be excluded or would require special exemption to participate in many clinical trials. Conclusions To accelerate clinical trials in Africa, and to improve their scientific validity, locally appropriate reference ranges should be used. This study provides ranges that will inform inclusion criteria and evaluation of adverse events for studies in these regions of Africa.

Karita, Etienne; Ketter, Nzeera; Price, Matt A.; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Nanvubya, Annet; Anzala, Omu; Jaoko, Walter; Mutua, Gaudensia; Ruzagira, Eugene; Mulenga, Joseph; Sanders, Eduard J.; Mwangome, Mary; Allen, Susan; Bwanika, Agnes; Bahemuka, Ubaldo; Awuondo, Ken; Omosa, Gloria; Farah, Bashir; Amornkul, Pauli; Birungi, Josephine; Yates, Sarah; Stoll-Johnson, Lisa; Gilmour, Jill; Stevens, Gwynn; Shutes, Erin; Manigart, Olivier; Hughes, Peter; Dally, Len; Scott, Janet; Stevens, Wendy; Fast, Pat; Kamali, Anatoli

2009-01-01

469

Animals and environments: resisting schisms in comparative physiology and biochemistry.  

PubMed

The articles in this volume are a product of the enthusiasm shown by delegates to meet in a remote corner of southern Africa and to discuss comparative physiology and biochemistry in their wider interpretation and future course. This collection reflects a small but long-standing commitment to fostering the engagement of biological research with African issues and colleagues. Comparative physiology and biochemistry are evolving, but in this we must guard against fractionation of effort and purpose. Increasingly available molecular methods are seductive in encouraging work on model species and in employing these species in place of more appropriate comparative models. Concomitantly, the comparative approach is reaching out beyond the individual organism and organism-organism interactions to establish underlying principles at ecosystem and landscape levels. The integration of molecular methods into comparative studies will require judicious selection and use of such skills if it is to be achieved without abandoning nonmodel species. The physiological and metabolic bases of ecosystem and evolutionary approaches must be underpinned by relevant data, requiring comparative researchers to accommodate colleagues contributing this specialist knowledge. These articles report distinct symposia, prefaced by a plenary paper. While each paper is itself a review of an entire symposium, they all exhibit a common theme, that comparative physiology and biochemistry are about interactions. It is our hope that the Comparative Physiology and Biology in Africa meetings will continue to facilitate special interactions between the people who make this happen. PMID:16555181

Morris, Steve; Vosloo, Andre

2006-01-01

470

Undergraduate Measurements For Fission Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect

Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas (UD) have investigated elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections on structural materials important for criticality considerations in nuclear fission processes. Neutrons scattered off of {sup 23}Na and {sup Nat}Fe were detected using neutron time-of-flight techniques at the University of Kentucky Low-Energy Nuclear Accelerator Facility. These measurements are part of an effort to increase the efficiency of power generation from existing fission reactors in the US and in the design of new fission systems. Students have learned the basics of how to operate the Model CN Van de Graaff generator at the laboratory, setup detectors and electronics, use data acquisition systems, and they are currently analyzing the angular dependence of the scattered neutrons for incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.80 MeV. Most students participating in the project will use the research experience as the material for their undergraduate research thesis required for all Bachelor of Science students at the University of Dallas. The first student projects on this topic were completed during the summer of 2010; an overview of student participation in this investigation and their preliminary results will be presented.

Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. [Department of Physics, University of Dallas, Irving TX 75019 (United States); Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Vanhoy, J. R. [Department of Physics, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis MD 21402 (United States)

2011-06-01

471

Matlab-supported undergraduate image processing instruction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

More and more often, undergraduate students express the desire to take a course on image processing. These students will learn the most if the theory and algorithms covered in class can be not only illustrated through examples shown by the instructor during class but also coded, tested, and evaluated by the class participants. In the past, the major hurdle to developing a hands-on approach to image processing instruction has been the amount of programming required to implement relatively simple applications. Typical undergraduate students lack experience with low level programming languages and time is spent teaching the language itself rather than experimenting with the algorithms. High level and interpreted programming languages such as Matlab permit to address this question. Even with very little practical exposure to the language, students can rapidly develop the level of skills required to implement a range of image processing algorithms. This presentation will go over the material covered in a senior level introductory course in image processing taught at Vanderbilt University. The course itself is taught in a traditional way but it is supported by laboratories during which students are asked to implement algorithms ranging from connected component labeling to image deblurring. The students are also assigned projects that span several weeks. Examples of such assignments and projects are presented.

Dawant, Benoit M.

1998-06-01

472

Undergraduate Measurements For Fission Reactor Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas (UD) have investigated elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections on structural materials important for criticality considerations in nuclear fission processes. Neutrons scattered off of 23Na and NatFe were detected using neutron time-of-flight techniques at the University of Kentucky Low-Energy Nuclear Accelerator Facility. These measurements are part of an effort to increase the efficiency of power generation from existing fission reactors in the US and in the design of new fission systems. Students have learned the basics of how to operate the Model CN Van de Graaff generator at the laboratory, setup detectors and electronics, use data acquisition systems, and they are currently analyzing the angular dependence of the scattered neutrons for incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.80 MeV. Most students participating in the project will use the research experience as the material for their undergraduate research thesis required for all Bachelor of Science students at the University of Dallas. The first student projects on this topic were completed during the summer of 2010; an overview of student participation in this investigation and their preliminary results will be presented.

Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

2011-06-01

473

Teaching Biochemistry at Lisbon University--Facing the Challenge of the Bologna Declaration in the 25th Anniversary of the Biochemistry Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The biochemistry degree has been taught at Lisbon University for 25 years. Since its creation, the curriculum is characterized for being widely eclectic and multidisciplinary. The adoption of the concepts proposed in Europe by the Declaration of Bologna and incorporation of these ideas at Lisbon University is discussed here for the biochemistry

Farinha, Carlos M.; Freire, Ana Ponces

2007-01-01

474

Laboratory Preparation in the Ocular Therapy Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aspects of laboratory preparation necessary for undergraduate or graduate optometric training in the use of therapeutic drugs are discussed, including glaucoma therapy, anterior segment techniques, posterior segment, and systemic procedures. (MSE)

Cummings, Roger W.

1986-01-01

475

Egg Yolk Lecithin: A Biochemical Laboratory Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an undergraduate laboratory project involving lecithin which integrates two general aspects of lipid methodology: chromatographic techniques and use of enzymes specificity to obtain structural information. (Author/SLH)

White, Bernard J.; And Others

1974-01-01

476

Personalizing the Goals of Undergraduate Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Research experiences are becoming increasingly available for undergraduate science students. Although many undergraduate research programs are designed with assessment-friendly outcomes as stated goals, a more personalized approach in goal setting can hel

Stage, Frances K.; Bowman, Martha H.

2001-10-01

477

An Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Collaboration between Undergraduate and Graduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A research experience was made available to an undergraduate Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN) student through collaboration with a Masters-level Nutrition graduate student. Both students were under the supervision of a graduate FSHN faculty member. Positive, self-identified aspects for the students included learning how to work…

Dooley, D. A.; Mahon, R. M.; Oshiro, E. A.

2004-01-01

478

Engineering acoustics: A pioneer undergraduate program at Rio de Janeiro  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acoustics, essentially a multidisciplinary subject, still has in Brazil a small but increasing number of professionals with a solid background to deal with various aspects of this area. Since 1970 the faculty of the Acoustics and Vibration Laboratory, COPPE\\/UFRJ, offers graduate (M.Sc and D.Sc) programs, and some undergraduate courses in acoustics, vibration, and signal processing. In January 2000, this group

Roberto A. Tenenbaum; Moyses Zindeluk

2002-01-01

479

EarthSpace: Resources for Undergraduate Teaching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EarthSpace (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/) is a national clearinghouse for information and resources for undergraduate faculty teaching planetary sciences, Earth sciences, astrophysics, and solar and space physics. Teaching materials include lectures, laboratory exercises, activities, homework assignments, and other resources. All materials are peer-reviewed and authors adhere to the Creative Commons Attribution (NC CC BY 3.0). Materials on the site are searchable by keyword, resource type, teaching topic, and author. Materials are cross-posted to other digital libraries online higher education communities. News and funding opportunities are also emailed monthly in a newsletter via the community mailing list, HENews, and the RSS feed notifies members of new additions to the site. Instructors are invited to visit the site to search contributed materials, news, and opportunities, submit materials, or volunteer to review submitted resources.

Buxner, S.; Dalton, H.; Shipp, S.; Frappier, R.; CoBabe-Ammann, E. A.

2014-07-01

480

The Implementation of a Service-Learning Component in an Organic Chemistry Laboratory Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

avenues for the implementation of service-learning into their curricula. A second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment, in which the undergraduate students make azo dyes, can provide a vehicle for a service-learning module in which university undergraduate

Glover, Sarah R.; Sewry, Joyce D.; Bromley, Candice L.; Davies-Coleman, Michael T.; Hlengwa, Amanda

2013-01-01

481

Quantitative Investigations of Biodiesel Fuel Using Infrared Spectroscopy: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment for Undergraduate Chemistry Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Biodiesel has gained attention in recent years as a renewable fuel source due to its reduced greenhouse gas and particulate emissions, and it can be produced within the United States. A laboratory experiment designed for students in an upper-division undergraduate laboratory is described to study biodiesel production and biodiesel mixing with…

Ault, Andrew P.; Pomeroy, Robert

2012-01-01

482

The LabWrite Project: Experiences reforming lab report writing practice in undergraduate lab courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory reports have always been a part of the modern science and engineering curricula. However, it has also often been the least liked part of a students' (and instructors') laboratory experience. Despite research demonstrating the importance of lab reports to the undergraduate science and engineering lab experience, instructors are likely to minimize their use. Lab reports have been replaced with

Eric N. Wiebe; Catherine E. Brawner; Michael Carter; Miriam G. Ferzli

2005-01-01

483

Macromolecules in Undergraduate Physical Chemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests the topic of macromolecules and synthetic polymers be included in undergraduate courses. Two macromole