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Sample records for unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

  1. Microchondrules in three unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigolski, John N.; Weisberg, Michael K.; Connolly, Harold C.; Ebel, Denton S.

    2016-02-01

    We report on a suite of microchondrules from three unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs). Microchondrules, a subset of chondrules that are ubiquitous components of UOCs, commonly occur in fine-grained chondrule rims, although may also occur within matrix. Microchondrules have a variety of textures: cryptocrystalline, microporphyritic, radial, glassy. In some cases, their textures, and in many cases, their compositions, are similar to their larger host chondrules. Bulk compositions for both chondrule populations frequently overlap. The primary material that composes many of the microchondrules has compositions that are pyroxene-normative and is similar to low-Ca-pyroxene phenocrysts from host chondrules; primary material rarely resembles olivine or plagioclase. Some microchondrules are composed of FeO-rich material that has compositions similar to the bulk submicron fine-grained rim material. These microchondrules, however, are not a common compositional type and probably represent secondary FeO-enrichment. Microchondrules may also be porous, suggestive of degasing to form vesicles. Our work shows that the occurrence of microchondrules in chondrule rims is an important constraint that needs to be considered when evaluating chondrule-forming mechanisms. We propose that microchondrules represent melted portions of the chondrule surfaces and/or the melt products of coagulated dust in the immediate vicinity of the larger chondrules. We suggest that, through recycling events, the outer surfaces of chondrules were heated enough to allow microchondrules to bud off as protuberances and become entrained in the surrounding dusty environment as chondrules were accreting fine-grained rims. Microchondrules are thus byproducts of cyclic processing of chondrules in localized environments. Their occurrence in fine-grained rims represents a snapshot of the chondrule-forming environment. We evaluate mechanisms for microchondrule formation and hypothesize a potential link between

  2. Isotopically Anomalous Nitrogen in Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyota, K.; Sugiura, N.; Hashizume, K.

    1993-07-01

    Introduction: Presolar grains such as diamond, SiC, and graphite have been reported to have isotopically anomalous nitrogen [1-3]. Because of their stability to chemical treatment, they are relatively easily concentrated in laboratories. There are probably other, less-durable presolar materials in primitive meteorites. We have therefore been searching for such presolar grains in UOCs, using the nitrogen isotope ratio as an indicator. In fact, isotopically heavy nitrogen in Yamato 74191 (LL3.7) and light nitrogen in ALHA 77214 (L3.4), which are not those of diamond, SiC, or graphite, have been reported [4]. Here, we report some other nitrogen isotope anomalies, especially light nitrogen found in many UOCs. Results and Discussion: Nitrogen and argon extracted by the stepped combustion method from 200 degrees C to 1200 degrees C every 100 degrees C are measured with a static QMS. ALHA 77278 (LL3.7), LEW 86018 (L3.1), and ALHA 77216 (H3.7/3.9) have isotopically heavy nitrogen. There is a possibility that these chondrites have solar nitrogen, because ALHA 77216 has a large amount of solar neon and ALHA 77278 has a small amount of solar neon. ALHA 78119 (L3.5) shows a similar degassing profile to ALHA 77214 [4]. Therefore, it may have the same carriers of anomalous nitrogen as ALHA 77214. Since Chainpur also has a similar degassing profile to ALHA 77214, although its light nitrogen abundance is smaller, it has probably the same nitrogen carrier. ALHA 78084 (H4), Grady (H3.7), and Yamato 74024 (L3.8) have very small amounts of nitrogen, probably because of metamorphic loss, and their delta ^15N values are nearly 0 per mil. ALHA 81251 (H3.2/3.4) degasses isotopically light nitrogen and primordial ^36Ar around 1100 degrees C (see Fig. 1), and delta ^15N goes down to -60 per mil at this temperature. Nearly the same degassing profiles have been found in ALH 83007 (L3.2/3.5), ALH 83010 (L3.3), EET 83399 (L3.3), LEW 86022 (L3.2), Yamato 791500, Yamato 82038, and Mezo Madaras

  3. Thermoluminescence Sensitivity and Thermal History of Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites: Review and Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Ninagawa, K.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the induced thermoluminescence (TL) data for 102 unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. We discuss these data in terms of pairing, weathering, and parent body thermal history. We identify ten possible meteorites of petrologic types 3.0-3.1.

  4. Metamorphic grade of organic matter in six unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirico, E.; Raynal, P. I.; Bourot-Denise, M.

    2003-05-01

    The thermal metamorphism grade of organic matter (OM) trapped in 6 unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) (Semarkona [LL 3.0], Bishunpur [L/LL 3.1], Krymka [LL 3.1], Chainpur [LL 3.4], Inman [L/LL 3.4], and Tieschitz [H/L 3.6]) has been investigated with Raman spectroscopy in the region of the first-order carbon bands. The carbonaceous chondrite Renazzo (CR2) was also investigated and used as a reference object for comparison, owing to the fact that previous studies pointed to the OM in this meteorite as being the most pristine among all chondrites. The results show that the OM thermal metamorphic grade: 1) follows the hierarchy Renazzo << Semarkona << other UOCs; 2) is well correlated to the petrographic type of the studied objects; and 3) is also well correlated with the isotopic enrichment 15N. These results are strikingly consistent with earlier cosmochemical studies, in particular, the scenario proposed by Alexander et al. (1998). Thermal metamorphism in the parent body appears as the main evolution process of OM in UOCs, demonstrating that nebular heating was extremely weak and that OM burial results in the destabilization of an initial isotopic composition with high D and 15N. Furthermore, the clear discrimination between Renazzo, Semarkona, and other UOCs shows: 1) Semarkona is a very peculiar UOC--by far the most pristine; and 2) Raman spectroscopy is a valid and valuable tool for deriving petrographic sub-types (especially the low ones) that should be used in the future to complement current techniques. We compare our results with other current techniques, namely, induced thermo-luminescence and opaques petrography. Other results have been obtained. First, humic coals are not strictly valid standard materials for meteoritic OM but are helpful in the study of evolutionary trends due to thermal metamorphism. Second, terrestrial weathering has a huge effect on OM structure, particularly in Inman, which is a find. Finally, the earlier statement that fine

  5. Identification of solar nebula condensates in interplanetary dust particles and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloeck, W.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    Orthopyroxene and olivine grains, low in FeO, but containing MnO contents up to 5 wt percent were found in interplanetary dust particles (IDP) collected in the stratosphere. The majority of olivines and pyroxenes in meteorites contain less than 0.5 wt percent MnO. Orthopyroxenes and olivines high in Mn and low in FeO have only been reported from a single coarse grained chondrule rim in the Allende meteorite and from a Tieschitz matrix augite grain. The bulk MnO contents of the extraterrestrial dust particles with high MnO olivines and pyroxenes are close to CI chondrite abundances. High MnO, low FeO olivines and orthopyroxenes were also found in the matrix of Semarkona, an unequilibrated ordinary chondrite. This may indicate a related origin for minerals in extraterrestrial dust particles and in the matrix of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  6. The matrices of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites - Implications for the origin and history of chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.; Keil, K.; Taylor, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    The matrices of 16 unequilibrated chondrites were examined by optical microscopy, an electron microprobe, and a scanning electron microscope. The fine-grained, opaque, silicate matrix of type 3 unequilibrated chondrites was compositionally, mineralogically, and texturally different from the chondrules and their fragments; it may be the low temperature condensate proposed by Larimer and Anders (1967, 1970). Each meteorite has been metamorphosed by a combination of processes including thermal metamorphism and the passage of shock waves; the appearance of each chondrite results from the temperature and pressure conditions which formed it, and subsequent metamorphic alterations.

  7. Metal and associated phases in Bishunpur, a highly unequilibrated ordinary chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaldi, E. R.; Wasson, J. T.

    1981-07-01

    Bishunpur is one of the most unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, and preserves a relatively unaltered record of solar nebular processes. A survey of three polished thin sections of Bishunpur revealed that metal occurs in three textural domains: (1) in the matrix, (2) within chondrules and (3) in coatings on chondrules. A table provides a textural classification of the various metal types found in Bishunpur and their composition. Electron-microprobe analyses are discussed, and similarities between Bishunpur metal and opaques and those in carbonaceous chondrites are considered. Attention is given to low-Ni kamacite grains in chondrule olivine, Si-bearing chondrule metal, spheroidal metal in chondrules, metal and sulfide-bearing rims, coarse matrix metal, and fine matrix metal formation.

  8. Widespread hydrothermal alteration minerals in the fine-grained matrices of the Tieschitz unequilibrated ordinary chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobricǎ, E.; Brearley, A. J.

    2014-08-01

    Mineralogic, textural, and compositional studies of black and white matrices in the unequilibrated ordinary chondrite Tieschitz (H/L, 3.6) show, for the first time in an ordinary chondrite, the presence of widespread, randomly distributed geode-like voids and veins. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies show that these voids and veins are partially or completely filled by sodic-calcic amphiboles (winchite and barroisite). The occurrence of amphiboles provides unequivocal evidence of the involvement of fluids in the metamorphic evolution of the parent body of Tieschitz. The presence of amphiboles as the main hydrous phases, rather than phyllosilicates, indicates that aqueous fluids were present at or close to the peak of thermal metamorphism, rather than during the waning stages of the cooling history of the parent body. In addition, ferrous olivine crystals, in association with the amphibole, also establish an important link between thermal metamorphism and hydrous phases formed at high temperatures. Mineralogic and textural evidence suggests that the white matrix and amphibole formed contemporaneously from the same hydrous fluid, prior to the formation of ferrous olivine crystals. Additionally, a dark inclusion identified in the host chondrite has mineralogic, petrologic, and bulk chemical characteristics that are similar to the black matrix of host Tieschitz, suggesting that this dark inclusion was emplaced before or during parent body metamorphism.

  9. Fine, nickel-poor Fe-Ni grains in the olivine of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaldi, E. R.; Wasson, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    Nickel-poor Fe-Ni grains smaller than 2.0 microns are common inclusions in ordinary, unequilibrated chondrites' porphyritic chondrule olivine, where the olivine grains seem to be relicts that survived chondrule formation without melting. This 'dusty' metal, whose most common occurrence is in the core of olivine grains having clear, Fe-poor rims, appears to be the product of the in situ reduction of FeO from the host olivine, with H2 or carbonaceous matter being the most likely reductants. H2 may have been implanted by solar wind or solar flare irradiation, but this requires the dissipation of nebular gas before the end of the chondrule formation process. Carbonaceous matter may have been implanted by shock. The large relict olivine grains may be nebular condensates or fragments broken from earlier chondrule generations.

  10. Na, K-Rich Rim Around a Chondrule in Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrite Lew 86018 (L3.1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Simon, J. I.; Ross, D. K.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Han, J.; Marhas, K. K.

    2015-01-01

    Ordinary chondrites represent the most abundant early Solar system extra-terrestrial (approximately 85% abundance) material available for laboratory studies and expectedly record the most extensive range of alterations effects from unmetamorphosed chondritic material to the highest temperatures of thermal metamorphism. The least metamorphosed chondrites belonging to petrologic type 3, the so called unequili-brated ordinary chondrites (UOCs), provide insights into alteration that happened during the primeval, ear-liest stage of Solar system formation. The higher grade petrologic types 4-6 ordinary chondrites on the other hand document up to near textural equilibrium (in type 6) extensive thermal metamorphism consisting of minerals and phases providing evidence of equilibration of heterogeneous mineral composition, solid-state recrystallization. Despite being the most abundant, the effect of alteration is less explicitly understood in ordinary chondrites (even less in UOCs) compared to other groups (e.g. CV, CO, CR). Additionally, the relationship between metasomatism (also referred as aqueous alteration or fluid-assisted metamorphism) and metamorphism (primarily thermal driven) has not been studied and alterations in the ordinary chondrites have been considered to have occurred in absence of fluids in general. Despite this conventional view, UOCs of lowest grades (3.0-3.2) show some evidence of low temperature (approximately 200 C), fluid assisted metamorphism in the form of the presence of phyllosilicates, ferroan olivine, and magnetites in their matrices and occasionally in chondrules. Here, we present petrographic and mineralogical studies of UOC, Lewis Hills (LEW) 86018 to further our understanding of the extent and relative importance of metasomatism and/or metamorphism in UOCs.

  11. Aqueous Alteration and Hydrogen Generation on Parent Bodies of Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites: Thermodynamic Modeling for the Semarkona Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Mironenko, M. V.; Shock, E. L.

    2005-01-01

    Ordinary chondrites are the most abundant class of meteorites that could represent rocky parts of solar system bodies. However, even the most primitive unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOC) reveal signs of mild alteration that affected the matrix and peripheral zones of chondrules. Major chemical changes include oxidation of kamacite, alteration of glass, removal of alkalis, Al, and Si from chondrules, and formation of phases enriched in halogens, alkalis, and hydrogen. Secondary mineralogical changes include formation of magnetite, ferrous olivine, fayalite, pentlandite, awaruite, smectites, phosphates, carbonates, and carbides. Aqueous alteration is consistent with the oxygen isotope data for magnetite. The presence of secondary magnetite, Ni-rich metal alloys, and ferrous silicates in UOC implies that H2O was the oxidizing agent. However, oxidation by H2O means that H2 is produced in each oxidative pathway. In turn, production of H2, and its redistribution and possible escape should have affected total pressure, as well as the oxidation state of gas, aqueous and mineral phases in the parent body. Here we use equilibrium thermodynamic modeling to explore water-rock reactions in UOC. The chemical composition of gas, aqueous, and mineral phases is considered.

  12. Fayalite-silica association in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites: Evidence for aqueous alteration on a parent body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, John T.; Krot, Alexander N

    1994-01-01

    We report ten occurrences of high-fayalite (Fa56-99 mol%; four with Fa greater than 82 mol%) olivine in association with silica in type-3 ordinary chondrites. Pyroxene with high Fs contents is much less common; Fs contents do not exceed 66 mol%, and most maxima are less than 50 mol%. In those cases where the amount of fayalite is minor relative to that of silica, the fayalite forms a layer on the silica, and shows textural evidence of formation by reaction of silica with oxidized Fe; the latter seems to have resulted from reaction of metallic Fe-Ni with an oxidant, most likely H2O vapor. The fayalite is generally in contact with pyroxene (and, in one case, olivine) having a much lower Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios, indicating that lattice diffusion has been minimal. Formation of fayalite from SiO2 explains the low Mg content of this olivine; the Mg was sequestered inside the lattices of mafic minerals and was thus inaccessible. In contrast, the moderately high Mn contents of the fayalite indicate that an appreciable fraction of the Mn in the precursor assemblage was accessible; it was probably sited in the matrix in the form of tiny, poorly crystallized oxide grains produced by nebular condensation at temperatures too low to permit diffusion into forsterite or enstatite. The reaction of SiO2 with FeO produced by oxidation (during metamorphism) of Fe-Ni can also account for fayalitic olivine associated with SiO2 microspherules in the fine-grained matrices of type-3 ordinary chondrites and, because matrix is SiO2 normative, for other occurrences of fayalite in matrix. The presence of Mn in the fayalitic rims on the olivine of carbonaceous chondrites does not require a nebular sign.

  13. Survey of chondrule average properties in H-, L-, and LL-group chondrites - Are chondrules the same in all unequilibrated ordinary chondrites?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The petrogenetic properties of chondrules in different unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) are compared to averaged chondrule-suite values obtained from recent analyses of several H-group, L-group, and LL-group chondrites. The purpose of the study was to develop a data base for future statistical analyses of chondrite characteristics. Mean end-member compositions of olivine (mol percent Fa) and pyroxene (mol percent Fs) were used as indices of the relative degree of 'equilibration' of each chondrule suite. It is found that the bulk chondrule geometric-mean abundances of Na, Mg, and Ni are the same from one UOC to another, and show no major systematic trends related to the H-group, L-group, of LL-group parentage of the host chondrites. The patterns of rare-earth element abundances in the chondrules are also examined, and the results are compared with statistical analyses. It is concluded that multivariate statistical analysis of pooled UOC chondrule data is justified for chondrule bulk compositions, as long as the statistical results are not misinterpreted as the primary petrogenetic features of chondrules.

  14. Microchondrules in two unequilibrated ordinary chondrites: Evidence for formation by splattering from chondrules during stochastic collisions in the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobricǎ, E.; Brearley, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    The diversity of silicate, glassy spherules analogous to chondrules, called microchondrules, and the implications for their presence in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) were investigated using different electron microscope techniques. Our observations show that the abundance of microchondrules in UOCs is much larger than the values proposed by previous studies. We identified two different types of microchondrules, porous and nonporous, embedded within fine-grained matrices and type I chondrule rims. The porous microchondrules are characterized by distinctive textures and chemical compositions that have not been recognized previously. Additionally, we show detailed textures and chemical compositions of protuberances of silicate materials, connected to the chondrules and ending with microchondrules. We suggest that microchondrules and protuberances formed from materials splattered from the chondrules during stochastic collisions when they were still either completely or partially molten. The occurrence and distinct morphologies of microchondrules and protuberances suggest that rather than just a passive flash melting of chondrules, an additional event perturbed the molten chondrules before they underwent cooling. The bulk chemical compositions suggest that (1) nonporous microchondrules and protuberances were formed by splattering of materials that are compositionally similar to the bulk silicate composition of type I chondrules, and (2) the porous microchondrules could represent the splattered melt products of a less evolved, fine-grained dust composition. The preservation of protuberances and microchondrules in the rims suggests that the cooling and accretion rates were exceptionally fast and that they represent the last objects that were formed before the accretion of the parent bodies of OCs.

  15. A Petrologic and bulk Chemical Characterization of the Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrite Northwest Africa 5717

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigolski, J. N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Weisberg, M. K.; O'Keefe, M.-C.

    2014-09-01

    We examine the chemical group affinities of Northwest Africa 5717 (Type 3.05) in terms of its petrologic and bulk chemical characteristics and test its apparent dual lithology. Preliminary data suggest it to be related to L- and LL-chondrites.

  16. Anomalous REE patterns in unequilibrated enstatite chondrites: Evidence and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozaz, Ghislaine; Hsu, Weibiao

    1993-01-01

    We present here a study of Rare Earth Element (REE) microdistributions in unequilibrated enstatite chondrites (EOC's). Although the whole rock REE contents are similar in both unequilibrated and equilibrated chondrites, the host minerals of these refractory elements are different. In the least equilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOC's), the REE reside mainly in glass whereas, in their more equilibrated counterparts, the bulk of the REE is in calcium phosphate, a metamorphic mineral that formed by oxidation of phosphorous originally contained in metal. In the smaller group of enstatite (E) chondrites, calcium phosphate is absent and the phase that contains the highest REE concentrations is a minor mineral, CaS (oldhamite), which contains approximately 50 percent of the total Ca present. In E chondrites, elements typically considered to be lithophiles (such as Ca and Mn) occur in sulfides rather than silicates. This indicates formation under extremely reducing conditions, thus in a region of the solar nebula distinct from those that supplied the more abundant ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites. Previously, we observed a variety of REE patterns in the oldhamite of UEC's; they range from almost flat to some with pronounced positive Eu and Yb anomalies. Here, we searched for complementary REE patterns in other minerals from E chondrites and found them in the major mineral, enstatite. Whenever Eu and Yb anomalies are present in this mineral, they are always negative.

  17. Mobility of iron and nickel at low temperatures: Implications for 60Fe-60Ni systematics of chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telus, Myriam; Huss, Gary R.; Ogliore, Ryan C.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Howard, Daryl L.; Newville, Matthew G.; Tomkins, Andrew G.

    2016-04-01

    The Fe and Ni isotopic composition of ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) have been used to estimate the initial abundance of the short-lived radionuclide, 60Fe, in the early Solar System. However, these estimates vary widely, and there are systematic discrepancies in initial 60Fe/56Fe ratios inferred from in situ and bulk analyses of chondrules. A possible explanation is that the Fe-Ni isotope system in UOC chondrules has not remained closed (a necessary condition for isotopic dating), and Fe and Ni have been redistributed since the chondrules formed. In order to evaluate this, we collected high-spatial-resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps of UOC chondrules to better understand the distribution and mobility of Fe and Ni at the low metamorphic temperatures of these chondrites. We used synchrotron X-ray-fluorescence microscopy to map the distribution of Fe, Ni and other elements in portions of 71 chondrules from 8 UOCs (types 3.00-3.2). The synchrotron XRF maps show clear enrichment of Fe and/or Ni in fractures ranging down to micrometer scale in chondrules from all UOCs analyzed for this study regardless of petrologic type and regardless of whether fall or find, indicating that there was significant exchange of Fe and Ni between chondrules and matrix and that the Fe-Ni system was not closed. Sixty percent of chondrules in Semarkona (LL3.00) have Fe and Ni enrichment along fractures, while 80-100% of chondrules analyzed from the other UOCs show these enrichments. Mobilization was likely a result of fluid transport of Fe and Ni during aqueous alteration on the parent body and/or during terrestrial weathering. In situ and bulk Fe-Ni analyses that incorporate extraneous Fe and Ni from chondrule fractures will result in lowering the inferred initial 60Fe/56Fe ratios.

  18. Rock magnetic properties of dusty olivine: a potential carrier of pre-accretionary remanence in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappe, S. C. L. L.; Harrison, R. J.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of chondrule formation is an important outstanding question in cosmochemistry. Magnetic signals recorded by Fe-Ni nanoparticles in chondrules could carry clues to their origin. Recently, research in this area has focused on 'dusty olivine' grains within ordinary chondrites as potential carriers of pre-accretionary remanence. Dusty olivine is characterised by the presence of sub-micron Fe-Ni inclusions within the olivine host. These metal particles form via subsolidus reduction of the olivine during chondrule formation and are thought to be protected from subsequent chemical and thermal alteration by the host olivine. Three sets of synthetic dusty olivines have been produced, using natural olivine (average Ni-content of 0.3 wt%), synthetic Ni-containing olivine (0.1wt% Ni) and synthetic Ni-free olivine as starting materials. The starting materials were ground to powders, packed into a 2-3 mm3 graphite crucible, heated up to 1350 °C under a pure CO gas flow and kept at this temperature for 10 minutes. After this the samples were held in a fixed orientation and quenched into water in a range of known magnetic fields, ranging from 0.2 mT to 1.5 mT. We present here for the first time an analysis of a new FORC-based method of paleointensity determination applied to metallic Fe-bearing samples [1, 2]. The method uses a first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagram to generate a Preisach distribution of coercivities and interaction fields within the sample and then physically models the acquisition of TRM as a function of magnetic field, temperature and time using thermal relaxation theory. The comparison of observed and calculated NRM demagnetisation spectra is adversely effected by a large population of particles in the single-vortex state. Comparison of observed and calculated REM' curves, however, yields much closer agreement in the high-coercivity SD-dominated range. Calculated values of the average REM' ratio show excellent agreement with the experimental

  19. Chondrules and Opaque Phases in Unequilibrated R Chondrites: A Comprehensive Assessment of Their Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. E.; Lauretta, D. S.; Connolly, H. C., Jr.; Berger, E. L.; Domanik, K.

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrated Rumuruti (R) chondrites record an oxygen fugacity between 0 and 3.5 log units below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer, and a sulfur fugacity (fS2) 2 log units above the iron-troilite buffer. They are more than an order of magnitude more oxidized than the ordinary chondrites [1], and orders of magnitude more sulfidized than solar values. Although the R chondrites have the highest (delta)O-17 value of any meteorites, analyses of unequilibrated R chondrites indicate chondrule formation in an oxygen isotope reservoir similar to that of the ordinary chondrite chondrules. We present the relationship of the R chondrite parent body to pre-accretionary volatiles O and S based on our analyses of unequilibrated R chondrite material in two thin sections from the meteorite Mount Prestrud (PRE) 95404.

  20. Graphite-magnetite aggregates in ordinary chondritic meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Rubin, A. E.; Okada, A.; Keil, K.

    1981-06-01

    The graphite-magnetite component has been found (1) as abundant isolated inclusions in eight ordinary-chondritic, regolith breccias; (2) as the sole matrix in a new kind of unequilibrated chondrite that forms clasts in these regolith breccias; and (3) together with a Huss matrix in six unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the component was formed by low-temperature, gas-solid reactions before the accretion of the meteorite, and that the isolated inclusions of graphite-magnetite in regolith breccias were derived from bodies composed of the new kind of chondrite that has graphite-magnetite as its sole matrix.

  1. Graphite-magnetite aggregates in ordinary chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Rubin, A. E.; Keil, K.; Okada, A.

    1981-01-01

    The graphite-magnetite component has been found (1) as abundant isolated inclusions in eight ordinary-chondritic, regolith breccias; (2) as the sole matrix in a new kind of unequilibrated chondrite that forms clasts in these regolith breccias; and (3) together with a Huss matrix in six unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the component was formed by low-temperature, gas-solid reactions before the accretion of the meteorite, and that the isolated inclusions of graphite-magnetite in regolith breccias were derived from bodies composed of the new kind of chondrite that has graphite-magnetite as its sole matrix.

  2. Accretionary dark rims in unequilibrated chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. V. V.; King, E. A.

    1981-12-01

    Textural and qualitative EDX investigations of dark-rimmed particles in six low petrologic type chondrites indicate that the rims accreted on host particles over a wide range of temperatures prior to initial accumulation and lithification of the meteorites in which the rimmed particles are now contained. Many dark rims are enriched in moderately volatile trace elements such as Na, Cl, P, and K, relative to the host particles and matrix. The range of physical/chemical environments associated with hypervelocity impacts may have offered the setting for the formation of dark-rimmed particles early in solar system history.

  3. Composition of the metal phases in ordinary chondrites - Implications regarding classification and metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afiattalab, F.; Wasson, J. T.

    1980-03-01

    The paper examines the composition of metal phases and metamorphism in ordinary chondrites. It is shown that below 550 C increasing Co decreases the equilibrium kamacite Ni concentration of an alpha to gamma system, and that the equilibrated L chondrites have kamacite and taenite Co concentrations in the L-group range. Metal-phase studies of petrologic type-3 ordinary chondrites with highly unequilibrated silicates showed a wide range in the degree of matrix kamacite equilibration; in the three most unequilibrated chondrites most taenite is clear, and the high Ni content shows that metamorphic temperatures were lower than 400 C in these meteorites.

  4. Composition of the metal phases in ordinary chondrites - Implications regarding classification and metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afiattalab, F.; Wasson, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the composition of metal phases and metamorphism in ordinary chondrites. It is shown that below 550 C increasing Co decreases the equilibrium kamacite Ni concentration of an alpha to gamma system, and that the equilibrated L chondrites have kamacite and taenite Co concentrations in the L-group range. Metal-phase studies of petrologic type-3 ordinary chondrites with highly unequilibrated silicates showed a wide range in the degree of matrix kamacite equilibration; in the three most unequilibrated chondrites most taenite is clear, and the high Ni content shows that metamorphic temperatures were lower than 400 C in these meteorites.

  5. Roosevelt County 075: A petrologic chemical and isotopic study of the most unequilibrated known H chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, T. J.; Keil, K.; Ash, R. D.; Morse, A. D.; Pillinger, C. T.; Wieler, R.; Mayeda, T. K.; Clayton, R. N.; Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Roosevelt County (RC) 075 was recovered in 1990 as a single 258-gram stone. Classification of this meteorite is complicated by its highly unequilibrated nature and its severe terrestrial weathering, but we favor H classification. This is supported by O isotopes and estimates of the original Fe, Ni metal content. The O isotopic composition is similar to that of a number of reduced ordinary chondrites (e.g., Cerro los Calvos, Willaroy), although RC 075 exhibits no evidence of reduced mineral compositions. Chondrule diameters are consistent with classification as an L chondrite, but large uncertainties in chondrule diameters of RC 075 and poorly constrained means of H, L and LL chondrites prevent use of this parameter for reliable classification. Other parameters are compromised by severe weathering (e.g., siderophile element abundances) or unsuitable for discrimination between unequilibrated H, L and LL chondrites (e.g., Co in kamacite delta C-13). Petrologic subtype 3.2 +/- 0.1 is suggested by the degree of olivine heterogeneity, the compositions of chondrule olivines, the thermoluminescence sensitivity, the abundances and types of chondrules mapped on cathodoluminescence mosaics, and the amount of presolar SiC. The meteorite is very weakly shocked (S2), with some chondrules essentially unshocked and, thus, is classified as an H3.2(S2) chondrite. Weathering is evident by a LREE enrichment due to clay contamination, reduced levels of many siderophile elements, the almost total loss of Fe, Ni metal and troilite, and the reduced concentrations of noble gases. Some components of the meteorite (e.g., type IA chondrules, SiC) appear to preserve their nebular states, with little modification from thermal metamorphism. We conclude that RC 075 is the most equilibrated H chondrite yet recovered and may provide additional insights into the origin of primitive materials in the solar nebula.

  6. Major element chemical compositions of chondrules in unequilibrated chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical compositions (except for metals and sulfides in chondrules) of more than 500 chondrules from unequilibrated E, H, L, LL, and C chondrites were measured using a broad beam of an electron-probe microanalyzer. The compositions of chondrules can be represented by various mixtures of normative compositions of olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, plagioclase, and high-Ca pyroxene with minor amounts of spinel, feldspathoid, SiO2-minerals, etc., indicating that the chondrule precursor materials consisted of aggregates of these minerals. The Al, Na, and K contents of most chondrules reflect the compositions of the ternary feldspar (An-Ab-Kf) of the chondrule precursor materials, and chemical types of chondrules (KF, SP, IP, and CP) are defined on the basis of the atomic proportion of Al, Na, and K.

  7. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  8. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  9. Porphyritic Olivine-Pyroxene Clast in Kaidun: First Discovery of an Ordinary Chondrite Clast?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Makishima, J.; Koizumi, E.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Kaidun is an enigmatic meteorite showing a micro-brecciated texture composed of variable kinds of lithic clasts and mineral fragments. The constituent components range from primitive chondritic materials to differentiated achondritic materials, and thus believed to have originated from a large parent body accumulating materials from many different bodies in the asteroid belt. One of the interesting observations is that no ordinary chondrite component has been found yet, although C and E chondrites components are abundant. In this abstract, we report mineralogy of the clast (Kaidun #15415- 01.3.13a) showing a porphyritic olivine-pyroxene chondrule-like texture similar to those found in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  10. Incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Boesenberg, J.S.; Britt, D.T.; Rovers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2010-01-22

    We document the size distributions and locations of voids present within five highly porous equilibrated ordinary chondrites using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) and helium pycnometry. We found total porosities ranging from {approx}10 to 20% within these chondrites, and with {mu}CT we show that up to 64% of the void space is located within intergranular voids within the rock. Given the low (S1-S2) shock stages of the samples and the large voids between mineral grains, we conclude that these samples experienced unusually low amounts of compaction and shock loading throughout their entire post accretionary history. With Fe metal and FeS metal abundances and grain size distributions, we show that these chondrites formed naturally with greater than average porosities prior to parent body metamorphism. These materials were not 'fluffed' on their parent body by impact-related regolith gardening or events caused by seismic vibrations. Samples of all three chemical types of ordinary chondrites (LL, L, H) are represented in this study and we conclude that incomplete compaction is common within the asteroid belt.

  11. Si-rich Fe-Ni grains in highly unequilibrated chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambaldi, E. R.; Sears, D. W.; Wasson, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration is given to the Si contents of Fe-Ni grains in highly unequilibrated chondrites, which have undergone little metamorphosis and thus best preserve the record of processes in the solar nebula. Electron microprobe determinations of silicon content in grains of the Bishunpur chondrite are presented for the six Si-bearing Fe-Ni grains for which data could be obtained, five of which were found to be embedded in olivine chondrules. In addition, all grains are found to be Cr-rich, with Cr increased in concentration towards the grain edge, and to be encased in FeS shells which evidently preserved the Si that entered the FeNi at higher temperatures. A mechanism for the production of Si-bearing metal during the condensation of the cooling solar nebula is proposed which considers the metal to have condensed heterogeneously while the mafic silicates condensed homogeneously with amounts of required undercooling in the low-pressure regions where ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites formed, resulting in Si mole fractions of 0.003 at nebular pressures less than 0.000001 atm.

  12. Si-rich Fe-Ni grains in highly unequilibrated chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaldi, E. R.; Sears, D. W.; Wasson, J. T.

    1980-10-01

    Consideration is given to the Si contents of Fe-Ni grains in highly unequilibrated chondrites, which have undergone little metamorphosis and thus best preserve the record of processes in the solar nebula. Electron microprobe determinations of silicon content in grains of the Bishunpur chondrite are presented for the six Si-bearing Fe-Ni grains for which data could be obtained, five of which were found to be embedded in olivine chondrules. In addition, all grains are found to be Cr-rich, with Cr increased in concentration towards the grain edge, and to be encased in FeS shells which evidently preserved the Si that entered the FeNi at higher temperatures. A mechanism for the production of Si-bearing metal during the condensation of the cooling solar nebula is proposed which considers the metal to have condensed heterogeneously while the mafic silicates condensed homogeneously with amounts of required undercooling in the low-pressure regions where ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites formed, resulting in Si mole fractions of 0.003 at nebular pressures less than 0.000001 atm.

  13. Shock metamorphism of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, Dieter; Keil, Klaus; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1991-01-01

    This study proposes a revised petrographic classification of progressive stages of shock metamorphism of 26 ordinary chondrites. Six stages of shock (S1 to S6) are defined on the basis of shock effects in olivine and plagioclase as recognized by thin section microscopy, and the characteristic shock effects of each shock stage are described. It is concluded that shock effects and the sequence of progressively increasing degrees of shock metamorphosis are very similar in H, L, and LL groups. Differences in the frequency distribution of shock stages are relatively minor. It is suggested that the collisional histories of the H, L, and LL parent bodies were similar. Petrologic type-3 chondrites are deficient in stages S4 and S6 and, with increasing petrologic type, the frequency of stages S4 to S6 increases. It is suggested that the more porous and volatile-rich Type-3 chondrites are subject to melting at a lower shock pressure than the nonporous chondrites of higher petrologic type. Stage S3 is the most abundant in nearly all petrologic types.

  14. Metallic Fractions of Ordinary Chondrites: Implications to the Structure of Chondritic Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, M.; Kong, P.

    1995-09-01

    Bulk metal and taenite fractions separated by a chemical method [1] from 23 ordinary chondrites were studied by INAA and Mossbauer spectroscopy. The elemental distributions demonstrate that siderophile elements, except Co and possibly As and Mo, are more enriched in taenite than kamacite but with different abundance ratios between them. Apparently, kamacite and taenite are not produced by redox reactions, condensation fractionation and melt-solid fractionation. Instead, kamacite and taenite can only be the equilibrated products by low temperature diffusion following the Fe-Ni phase diagram. Positive correlation of Co and Ni in carbonaceous chondritic metals and the existence of a high Co and low Ni metal phase in some LL chondrites suggest that chondritic kamacite and taenite can not be developed in the nebula. Rather, kamacite and taenite are produced through solid diffusion in the chondritic parent bodies. There is a large difference in the development of kamacite and taenite between the equilibrated and the unequilibrated L chondrites: the taenite phase of the unequilibrated L chondrites is mostly or totally developed into tetrataenite while low-Ni paramagnetic taenite is still present abundantly in the equilibrated L chondrites. The low-Ni paramagnetic taenite is believed to be an unequilibrated phase of either an incompletely transformed phase during fast cooling [2] or a metastable taenite located out of the miscibility gap on the Fe-Ni phase diagram [3]. In either case, the arrangement of the EOCs and the UOCs in the parent body was the same; the EOCs located near the surface of the parent body, with the UOCs being near the center, if they derived from the common parent body. An intrinsic thermal activity in the parent body would produce a temperature gradient decreasing from the center to the surface, whereas an external heating would exhibit the inverse trend. If a "reverse" onion shell structure is invoked, the generally accepted metamorphic temperatures

  15. Oxidation during metamorphism of the ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Labotka, Theodore C.

    1993-01-01

    It is suggested that some current concepts about the conditions of metamorphism in ordinary chondrites may be flawed. These meteorites display small systematic variations in the oxidation state of Fe. Evidence is presented that oxidation of Fe is linked to metamorphic grade in types 4-6 ordinary chondrites. This conclusion is at variance with a commonly accepted model for chondrite metamorphism that assumes Fe reduction by graphite.

  16. Multiple and fast: The accretion of ordinary chondrite parent bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Vernazza, P.; Barge, P.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R.; Binzel, R. P.; DeMeo, F. E.; Lockhart, M.; Hiroi, T.; Birlan, M.; Ricci, L.

    2014-08-20

    Although petrologic, chemical, and isotopic studies of ordinary chondrites and meteorites in general have largely helped establish a chronology of the earliest events of planetesimal formation and their evolution, there are several questions that cannot be resolved via laboratory measurements and/or experiments alone. Here, we propose the rationale for several new constraints on the formation and evolution of ordinary chondrite parent bodies (and, by extension, most planetesimals) from newly available spectral measurements and mineralogical analysis of main-belt S-type asteroids (83 objects) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites (53 samples). Based on the latter, we suggest that spectral data may be used to distinguish whether an ordinary chondrite was formed near the surface or in the interior of its parent body. If these constraints are correct, the suggested implications include that: (1) large groups of compositionally similar asteroids are a natural outcome of planetesimal formation and, consequently, meteorites within a given class can originate from multiple parent bodies; (2) the surfaces of large (up to ∼200 km) S-type main-belt asteroids mostly expose the interiors of the primordial bodies, a likely consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system; (3) the duration of accretion of the H chondrite parent bodies was likely short (instantaneous or in less than ∼10{sup 5} yr, but certainly not as long as 1 Myr); (4) LL-like bodies formed closer to the Sun than H-like bodies, a possible consequence of the radial mixing and size sorting of chondrules in the protoplanetary disk prior to accretion.

  17. Multiple and Fast: The Accretion of Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernazza, P.; Zanda, B.; Binzel, R. P.; Hiroi, T.; DeMeo, F. E.; Birlan, M.; Hewins, R.; Ricci, L.; Barge, P.; Lockhart, M.

    2014-08-01

    Although petrologic, chemical, and isotopic studies of ordinary chondrites and meteorites in general have largely helped establish a chronology of the earliest events of planetesimal formation and their evolution, there are several questions that cannot be resolved via laboratory measurements and/or experiments alone. Here, we propose the rationale for several new constraints on the formation and evolution of ordinary chondrite parent bodies (and, by extension, most planetesimals) from newly available spectral measurements and mineralogical analysis of main-belt S-type asteroids (83 objects) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites (53 samples). Based on the latter, we suggest that spectral data may be used to distinguish whether an ordinary chondrite was formed near the surface or in the interior of its parent body. If these constraints are correct, the suggested implications include that: (1) large groups of compositionally similar asteroids are a natural outcome of planetesimal formation and, consequently, meteorites within a given class can originate from multiple parent bodies; (2) the surfaces of large (up to ~200 km) S-type main-belt asteroids mostly expose the interiors of the primordial bodies, a likely consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system; (3) the duration of accretion of the H chondrite parent bodies was likely short (instantaneous or in less than ~105 yr, but certainly not as long as 1 Myr); (4) LL-like bodies formed closer to the Sun than H-like bodies, a possible consequence of the radial mixing and size sorting of chondrules in the protoplanetary disk prior to accretion.

  18. The Lu-Hf isotopic composition of CHUR and BSE: Tighter constraints from unequilibrated chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Vervoort, J. D.; Patchett, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Lu-Hf isotopic system has been used increasingly in geochemistry as a chronometer and tracer of mantle and crust processes since the development of MC-ICPMS techniques [1]. Although a consensus has emerged on the value of the 176Lu decay constant, in contrast, the Lu and Hf isotopic compositions of the Chondrite Uniform Reservoir (CHUR) and Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) have not been as well constrained. Lu-Hf isotopic compositions vary dramatically between the chondrite classes and petrologic types of the specimens that have been analyzed [1-3], which hampers a choice of Lu-Hf CHUR parameters. Chondrites are classified in three main petrologic groups: carbonaceous (CC), ordinary (OC) and enstatite chondrites (EC). They represent distinct chemical and isotopic compositions, which can be associated with reservoirs in the protoplanetary disk where the respective parent bodies have formed. They also have been subjected to various degrees of aqueous alteration (types 1 and 2) or thermal metamorphism (types 3-6) that has potentially affected their initial chemical and mineralogical characteristics. Despite the fact that numerous OCs (~50) have been analyzed for their Lu-Hf isotopic composition, nearly all of these have been equilibrated types 4-6; only 5 finds of types 3.6-3.8 unequilibrated OC have been analyzed. We have analyzed 20 new chondrites for Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotope systematics including (i) 13 H, L, and LL OC of types 3.0- 3.8, where their low degree of metamorphism limits the growth of phosphate (main carrier of REE) compared to the equilibrated OC; and (ii) 7 CC of types 1-3 (CI, CV, CO and CK groups). We obtained mean values (2σSE) of 176Lu/177Hf = 0.0337 ± 3, 176Hf/177Hf = 0.282802 ± 23, 147Sm/144Nd = 0.1961 ± 6, and 143Nd/144Nd = 0.512629 ± 16 from the types 1-3 OC and CC from this study and [2]. Our Lu-Hf values are higher than the previous estimates of [3] and are our best estimates for CHUR. The CC alone give higher mean values of 176Lu/177Hf

  19. Partial Melting of Ordinary Chondrite Under Reducing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Rushmer, T.; Benedix, G.; McCoy, T.

    2004-12-01

    A critical parameter in determining the nature and processes of differentiation of planetary materials in the early solar system is oxygen fugacity. Chondrites record a range of oxygen fugacities from approximately 5 log units below the iron-wustite (Fe-FeO) buffer (enstatite chondrites) to close to QFM (some carbonaceous chondrites). Among the equilibrated chondrites, an "oxidation gap" appears to exist between ordinary chondrites and enstatite chondrites, although several groups of unequilibrated carbonaceous chondrites appear to occupy this "gap". Some primitive achondrites fill this gap (e.g. pallasites, acapulcoites, lodranites, winonaites, and silicate-bearing IAB and IIE irons), although the precursors to these groups are poorly known. In this experimental study, we have determined the modification in mineral compositions during partial melting under reducing conditions and explore the idea that the primitive achondrites may be formed through differentiation under reducing conditions of a more oxidized precursor. Partial melting experiments were conducted on an H6 chondrite (Kernouve) under reducing conditions at 1 atm and at 1.3 GPa pressure in a solid media deformation apparatus. In the 1 atm experiments, fO2 was buffered by gas mixing and sealed silica tube techniques to values determined from thermodynamic calculations of primitive achondrites; in the deformation experiments, aluminum jackets were used. The experiments suggest that partial melting of an oxidized precursor under reducing conditions can produce some of the reduced features observed in primitive achondrites such as magnesian olivine, pyroxene and chromite compositions typical of primitive achondrites at temperatures of 1200-1300 ° C, as well as chalcophilic behavior of previously lithophillic ions (e.g., Cr in sulfide) at temperatures at 1000° C. Some features of primitive achondrites (e.g. oxygen isotopic compositions and Cr/(Cr+Al) ratios of chromites) appear to be intrinsic to the

  20. Classification of four ordinary chondrites from Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, T. J.; Keil, Klaus; Casanova, I.; Wieler, R.

    1990-01-01

    Based on optical microsocpy and electron microprobe analysis of mafic minerals, four previously poorly described ordinary chondrites from Spain are classified. The classifications of Guarena (H6), Olmedilla de Alarcon (H5) and Reliegos (L5) are confirmed. Molina is reclassified as H5, based on new data.

  1. Oxygen isotope studies of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Olsen, Edward J.; Goswami, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    Several stages in the evolution of ordinary chondritic meteorites are recorded in the oxygen isotopic composition of the meteorites and their separable components (chondrules, fragments, clasts, and matrix). The whole-rock isotopic compositions reflect the iron-group of the meteorite (H, L, or LL). Isotopic uniformity of H3 to H6 and L3 to L6 are consistent with closed-system metamorphism within each parent body. LL3 chondrites differ slightly from LL4 to LL6, implying a small degree of open-system aqueous alteration and carbon reduction. On the scale of individual chondrules, the meteorites are isotopically heterogeneous, allowing recognition of the solar-nebular processes of chondrule formation. Chondrules for all classes of ordinary chondrites are derived from a common population, which was separate from the population of chondrules in carbonaceous or enstatite chondrites. Chondrules define an isotopic mixing line dominated by exchange between (O - 16)-rich and (O - 16)-poor reservoirs. The oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites serve as 'fingerprints' for identification of genetic association with other meteorite types (achondrites and iron) and for recognition of source materials in meteoritic breccias.

  2. Fossil records of high level of 60Fe in chondrules from unequilibrated chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ritesh Kumar; Chaussidon, Marc

    2014-07-01

    The short-lived now-extinct nuclide (SLN) 60Fe, which decays to 60Ni with a half-life of 2.62 Ma, is uniquely of stellar origin. Hence, its Solar System initial abundance yields information about the source of SLNs and the astrophysical environment in which the Solar System was born. Only a few chondrules (∼19) from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites have reported resolved 60Ni excesses using in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry implying Fe60/Fe56>∼0.6×10-7 in the early Solar System, and among these very few (3) have higher excesses implying Fe60/Fe56∼7×10-7 (Mishra et al., 2010; Mishra and Goswami, 2014; Telus et al., 2012). At variance, multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer studies of bulk samples and mineral separates from differentiated meteorites, angrites, achondrites, and chondrules suggest a low abundance of 60Fe/56Fe of ∼1.4×10-8 which would rule out the need for an external seeding of the early Solar with stellar 60Fe (Quitté et al., 2011; Tang and Dauphas, 2012). Two Semarkona chondrules and one Efremovka chondrule analyzed in the present study have mass fractionation corrected excess of up to ∼75 permil (‰) and give 60Fe isochrons with initial 60Fe/56Fe ratios of (7.8±3.7)×10-7, (3.8±1.6)×10-7, and (2.2±1.1)×10-7 (2σ), for Efremovka Ch 1, Semarkona Ch 12, and Semarkona Ch J5 respectively. The higher values of 60Fe/56Fe ratios seen in the chondrules of these least altered meteorites samples concur with and lend greater credence to the suggestion of a massive star as the source of 60Fe, and possibly of other short-lived nuclides, to the early Solar System. However, no definitive explanation (e.g. sample bias, effects of metamorphism, 60Fe heterogeneity) to the apparent disagreement with studies of bulk chondrules and chondrule fragments has been found.

  3. The asteroidal source region of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The final, Earth-impacting orbits of ordinary chondritic meteorites have a very special distribution. By use of visual radiant and time of fall data, as well as photographic fireball orbits (1) it is inferred that chondrite perihelia are concentrated near 1 A.U., eccentricities are usually rather high (approximately 0.5), and inclinations are low (approximately 10 deg). Velocity selection resulting from atmospheric ablation plays a significant role in determining this orbital distribution, but by no means suffices to explain it. The observed distribution is a fragile one, and can easily be destroyed by Earth and Venus perturbations. This places severe constraints on the location of the original source bodies, of which these meteorites are fragments. New calculations were made of the expected distribution of final orbits from a range of initial sources, taking into consideration close encounter planetary perturbations, secular resonance, destruction by collision in space, and atmospheric ablation.

  4. {sup 60}Fe AND {sup 26}Al IN CHONDRULES FROM UNEQUILIBRATED CHONDRITES: IMPLICATIONS FOR EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, R. K.; Goswami, J. N.; Rudraswami, N. G.; Tachibana, S.; Huss, G. R.

    2010-05-10

    The presence of about a dozen short-lived nuclides in the early solar system, including {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al, has been established from isotopic studies of meteorite samples. An accurate estimation of solar system initial abundance of {sup 60}Fe, a distinct product of stellar nucleosynthesis, is important to infer the stellar source of this nuclide. Previous studies in this regard suffered from the lack of exact knowledge of the time of formation of the analyzed meteorite samples. We present here results obtained from the first combined study of {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al records in early solar system objects to remove this ambiguity. Chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites belonging to low petrologic grades were analyzed for their Fe-Ni and Al-Mg isotope systematics. The Al-Mg isotope data provide the time of formation of the analyzed chondrules relative to the first solar system solids, the Ca-Al-rich inclusions. The inferred initial {sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe values of four chondrules, combined with their time of formation based on Al-Mg isotope data, yielded a weighted mean value of (6.3 {+-} 2) x 10{sup -7} for solar system initial {sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe. This argues for a high-mass supernova as the source of {sup 60}Fe along with {sup 26}Al and several other short-lived nuclides present in the early solar system.

  5. Ubiquitous brecciation after metamorphism in equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Lusby, D.; Keil, K.

    1985-01-01

    Ten objects with aberrant Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios have been found in apparently unbrecciated types 4-6 H and L chondrites. Since the Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios of these objects are incompatible with the metamorphic history of the host chondrites, it is concluded that a high proportion of ordinary chondrites are breccias that were lithified after peak metamorphism. This is consistent with the results of Scott (1984), who concluded that most type three ordinary chondrites are breccias of materials with diverse thermal histories, even though they do not show prominent brecciation. It is found that the classification scheme of Van Schmus and Wood (1967) does not identify chondrites with similar thermal histories; the petrologic type of a chondrite is only a measure of the average thermal history of its ingredients. Chondrite and achondrite breccias are also compared in order to understand how brecciation of chondrites after metamorphism is so well camouflaged.

  6. Penecontemporaneous metamorphism, fragmentation, and reassembly of ordinary chondrite parent bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal histories of ordinary chondrites and the canonical internal heating or onion shell models, which predict an inverse relation between the petrologic type of chondrites and the metallographic cooling rate, are reviewed. The thermal and accretional requirements of the 'metamorphosed planetesimal' model proposed by Scott and Rajan (1981) are analyzed, and an alternative model consistent with the metallographic cooling rate constraints is suggested in which ordinary chondrite parent bodies are collisionally fragmented and then rapidly reassembled before metamorphic heat has been dissipated.

  7. Chromium on Eros: Further Evidence of Ordinary Chondrite Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, C. N.; Nittler, L. R.; Brown, M. R. M.; McCoy, T. J.; Lim, L. F.

    2005-01-01

    The surface major element composition of the near-earth asteroid 433-Eros has been determined by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRS) on the NEAR-Shoemaker spacecraft [1]. The abundances of Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe match those of ordinary chondrites [1]. However, the observation that Eros appears to have a sulfur abundance at least a factor of two lower than ordinary chondrites, suggests either sulfur loss from the surface of Eros by impact and/or radiation processes (space weathering) or that its surface is comprised of a somewhat more differentiated type of material than an ordinary chondrite [1]. A definitive match for an ordinary chondrite parent body has very rarely been made, despite the conundrum that ordinary chondrites are the most prevalent type of meteorite found on Earth. Furthermore, Eros is classified as an S(IV) type asteroid [2] and being an S, it is the second most prevalent type of asteroid in the asteroid belt [3].

  8. The evolution of enstatite and chondrules in unequilibrated enstatite chondrites: Evidence from iron-rich pyroxene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisberg, Michael K.; Prinz, Martin; Fogel, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    FeO-rich (Fs(sub 6)-34) pyroxene lacking cathodoluminescence (CL), hereafter black pyroxene, is a major constituent of some of the chondrules and fragments in unequilibrated (type 3) enstatite chondrites (UECs). It contains structurally oriented zones of Cr-, Mn-, V-rich, FeO-poor enstatite with red CL, associated with mm-sized blebs of low-Ni, Fe-metal and, in some cases, silica. These occurrences represent clear evidence of pyroxene reduction. The black pyroxene is nearly always rimmed by minor element (Cr, Mn, V)-poor enstatite having a blue CL. More commonly, red and blue enstatites, unassociated with black pyroxene, occur as larger grains in chondrules and fragments, and these constitute the major silicate phases in UECs. The rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns of the black pyroxene are LREE-depleted. The blue enstatite rims, however, have a near-flat to LREE-enriched pattern, approx. 0.5-4x chondritic. The petrologic and trace element data indicate that the black pyroxene is from an earlier generation of chondrules that formed in a nebular region that was more oxidizing than that of the enstatite chondrites. Following solidification, these chondrules experienced a more reducing nebular environment and underwent reduction. Some, perhaps most, of the red enstatite that is common throughout the UECs may be the product of solid-state reduction of black pyroxene. The blue enstatite rims grew onto the surfaces of the black pyroxene and red enstatite as a result of condensation from a nebular gas. The evolutionary history of some of the enstatite and chondrules in enstatite chondrites can be expressed in a four-stage model that includes: Stage 1. Formation of chondrules in an oxidizing nebular environment. Stage 2. Solid-state reduction of the more oxidized chondrules and fragments to red enstatite in a more reducing nebular environment. Stage 3. Formation of blue enstatite rims on the black pyroxene as well as on the red enstatite. Stage 4. Reprocessing, by

  9. Classification of eight ordinary chondrites from Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, A. J.; Keil, K.

    1985-06-01

    Based on optical microscopy and electron microprobe analyses, eight previously undescribed or poorly known chondrites were classified into compositional groups, petrologic types, and degree of shock alteration. These chondrites are: Leander, L4b; Nazareth(a), L6d; La Villa, H4b; Mereta, H4c; Gail, H4d; Shafter Lake, H5a; Uvalde, H5d; and Howe, H5d.

  10. Multiple parent bodies of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yomogida, K.; Matsui, T.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal histories of chondrite parent bodies are calculated from an initial state with material in a powder-like form, taking into account the effect of consolidation state on thermal conductivity. The very low thermal conductivity of the starting materials makes it possible for a small body with a radius of less than 100 km to be heated by several hundred degrees even if long-lived radioactive elements in chondritic abundances are the only source of heat. The maximum temperature is determined primarily by the temperature at which sintering of the constituent materials occurs. The thermal state of the interior of a chondrite parent body after sintering has begun is nearly isothermal. Near the surface, however, where the material is unconsolidated and the thermal conductivity is much lower, the thermal gradient is quite large. This result contradicts the conventional 'onion-shell' model of chondrite parent bodies. But because the internal temperature is almost constant through the whole body, it supports a 'multiple-parent bodies' model, according to which each petrologic type of chondrite comes from a different parent body.

  11. 187Re-187Os systematics, highly siderophile element, S-Se-Te abundances in the components of unequilibrated L chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlag, Yogita; Becker, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The 187Re-187Os systematics, abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE: Re, platinum group elements and Au), Te, Se and S as well as major and minor elements were determined in separated components of two unequilibrated L chondrites QUE 97008 (L3.05) and Ceniceros (L3.7). The 187Re-187Os systematics are disturbed in the components of both meteorites, most likely due to open system behavior of Re during terrestrial weathering of QUE 97008 and alteration on the L chondrite parent body as indicated by an internal errorchron generated for components of Ceniceros. The HSE abundance patterns suggest that the bulk rock abundances were mainly controlled by two different end members. Non-magnetic fractions display lower Re/Os and HSE/Ir than CI chondrites. Chondrules, metal-troilite spherules and fine magnetic fractions, are depleted in refractory HSE and show higher Rh/Ir, Pd/Ir and Au/Ir than in CI chondrites. The different HSE compositions indicate the presence of unequilibrated alloys and loss of refractory HSE-rich carrier phases from the precursors of some L chondrite components. Gold is decoupled from other HSE in magnetic fractions and shows chalcophile affinities with a grain size dependent variation similar to S and Se, presumably inherited from preaccretionary processes. Tellurium is depleted in all components compared to other analysed siderophile elements, and its abundance was most likely controlled by fractional condensation and different geochemical affinities. The volatility dependent depletion of Te requires different physical and chemical conditions than typical for the canonical condensation sequence as represented by carbonaceous chondrites. Tellurium also shows variable geochemical behavior, siderophile in Ceniceros, predominantly chalcophile in QUE 97008. These differences may have been inherited from element partitioning during chondrule formation. Selenium and S on the other hand are almost unfractionated from each other and only show

  12. A hydrogen isotope study of CO3 type carbonaceous chondrites; comparison with type 3 ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, A. D.; Newton, J.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Meteorites of the Ornans type 3 carbonaceous chondrites exhibit a range in degree of equilibration, attributed to differing amounts of thermal metamorphism. These differences have been used to split the CO3 chondrites into petrologic sub-types from 3.0, least equilibrated, to 3.7, being most equilibrated. This is similar to the system of assigning the type 3 ordinary chondrites into petrologic sub-types 3.0 to 3.9 based upon thermoluminescence (TL) and other properties; however, the actual range of thermal metamorphism experienced by CO3 chondrites is much less than that of the type 3 ordinary chondrites. The least equilibrated ordinary chondrites show evidence of aqueous alteration and have high D/H ratios possibly due to a deuterium-rich organic carrier. The aim of this study was to determine whether the CO3 chondrites, which have experienced similar secondary conditions to the type 3 ordinary chondrites, also contain a similar deuterium-rich carrier. To date a total of 5 CO3 meteorites, out of a set of 11 for which carbon and nitrogen isotopic data are available, have been analyzed. Ornans has not been analyzed yet, because it does not appear to fit in with the metamorphic sequence exhibited by the other CO3 chondrites; it also has an extremely high delta-D value of +2150 percent, unusual for such a comparatively equilibrated meteorite (type 3.4). Initial results indicate that the more equilibrated CO3's tend to have lower delta-D values, analogous to the higher petrologic type ordinary chondrites. However this is complicated by the effects of terrestrial weathering and the small data-set.

  13. Screening and classification of ordinary chondrites by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittarello, Lidia; Baert, Kitty; Debaille, Vinciane; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Classification of ordinary chondrite meteorites generally implies (1) determining the chemical group by the composition in endmembers of olivine and pyroxene, and (2) identifying the petrologic group by microstructural features. The composition of olivine and pyroxene is commonly obtained by microprobe analyses or oil immersion of mineral separates. We propose Raman spectroscopy as an alternative technique to determine the endmember content of olivine and pyroxene in ordinary chondrites, by using the link between the wavelength shift of selected characteristic peaks in the spectra of olivine and pyroxene and the Mg/Fe ratio in these phases. The existing correlation curve has been recalculated from the Raman spectrum of reference minerals of known composition and further refined for the range of chondritic compositions. Although the technique is not as accurate as the microprobe for determining the composition of olivine and pyroxene, for most of the samples the chemical group can be easily determined by Raman spectroscopy. Blind tests with ordinary chondrites of different provenance, weathering, and shock stages have confirmed the potential of the method. Therefore, we suggest that a preliminary screening and the classification of most of the equilibrated ordinary chondrites can be carried out using an optical microscope equipped with a Raman spectrometer.

  14. Magnetite in the unequilibrated CK chondrites: Implications for metamorphism and new insights into the relationship between the CV and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Tasha L.; Gross, Juliane; Ivanova, Marina A.; Runyon, Simone E.; Bruck, Andrea M.

    2016-09-01

    Bulk isotopic and elemental compositions of CV and CK chondrites have led to the suggestion that both originate from the same asteroid. It has been argued that magnetite compositions also support this model; however, magnetite has been studied almost exclusively in the equilibrated (type 4-6) CKs. Magnetite in seven unequilibrated CKs analyzed here is enriched in MgO, TiO2, and Al2O3 relative to the equilibrated CKs, suggesting that magnetite compositions are affected by metamorphism. Magnetite in CKs is compositionally distinct from CVs, particularly in abundances of Cr2O3, NiO, and TiO2. Although there are minor similarities between CV and equilibrated CK chondrite magnetite, this is contrary to what we would expect if the CVs and CKs represent a single metamorphic sequence. CV magnetite should resemble CK3 magnetite, as both were metamorphosed to type 3 conditions. Oxygen fugacities and temperatures of CVox and CK chondrites are also difficult to reconcile using existing CV-CK parent body models. Mineral chemistries, which eliminate issues of bulk sample heterogeneity, provide a reliable alternative to techniques that involve a small amount of sample material. CV and CK chondrite magnetite has distinct compositional differences that cannot be explained by metamorphism.

  15. Magnetite in the unequilibrated CK chondrites: Implications for metamorphism and new insights into the relationship between the CV and CK chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Tasha L.; Gross, Juliane; Ivanova, Marina A.; Runyon, Simone E.; Bruck, Andrea M.

    2016-07-01

    Bulk isotopic and elemental compositions of CV and CK chondrites have led to the suggestion that both originate from the same asteroid. It has been argued that magnetite compositions also support this model; however, magnetite has been studied almost exclusively in the equilibrated (type 4-6) CKs. Magnetite in seven unequilibrated CKs analyzed here is enriched in MgO, TiO2, and Al2O3 relative to the equilibrated CKs, suggesting that magnetite compositions are affected by metamorphism. Magnetite in CKs is compositionally distinct from CVs, particularly in abundances of Cr2O3, NiO, and TiO2. Although there are minor similarities between CV and equilibrated CK chondrite magnetite, this is contrary to what we would expect if the CVs and CKs represent a single metamorphic sequence. CV magnetite should resemble CK3 magnetite, as both were metamorphosed to type 3 conditions. Oxygen fugacities and temperatures of CVox and CK chondrites are also difficult to reconcile using existing CV-CK parent body models. Mineral chemistries, which eliminate issues of bulk sample heterogeneity, provide a reliable alternative to techniques that involve a small amount of sample material. CV and CK chondrite magnetite has distinct compositional differences that cannot be explained by metamorphism.

  16. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  17. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  18. Can the ordinary chondrites have condensed from a gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, J. M.; Suess, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The conditions under which ordinary chondrites containing iron in three different chemical states can form in thermodynamic equilibrium with a gas phase are calculated. Hydrogen depletion factors of 100-1000 are obtained and the formation of liquid condensates from residual gases occurs at pressures (prior to hydrogen depletion) of roughly equal to or greater than 1 atm.

  19. Relative abundances of chondrule primary textural types in ordinary chondrites and their bearing on conditions of chondrule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Keil, K.

    1981-03-01

    A petrographic survey of > 1600 chondrules in thin-sections of 12 different mildly to highly unequilibrated H-, L-, and Li-chondrites, as well as morphological and textural study of 141 whole chondrules separated from 11 of the same chondrites, was used to determine the relative abundances of definable chondrule primary textural types. Percentage abundances of various chondrule types are remarkably similar in all chondrites studied and are ˜47-52 porphyritic olivine-pyroxene (POP), 15-27 porphyritic olivine (P 0), 9-11 porphyritic pyroxene (PP), 34 barred olivine (BO), 7-9 radial pyroxene (RP), 2-5 granular olivine-pyroxene (GOP), 3-5 cryptocrystalline (C), and ≥ 1 metallic (M). Neither chondrule size nor shape is strongly correlated with textural type. Compound and cratered chondrules, which are interpreted as products of collisions between plastic chondrules, comprise ˜2-28% of non-porphyritic (RP, GOP, C) but only ˜2-9% of porphyritic (POP, PO, PP, BO) chondrules, leading to a model-dependent implication that non-porphyritic chondrules evolved at number densities (chondrules per unit volume of space) which were 102 to 104 times greater than those which prevailed during porphyritic chondrule formation (total range of ˜1 to ˜106 m-3. Distinctive "rims" of fine-grained sulfides and/or silicates occur on both porphyritic and non-porphyritic types and appear to post-date chondrule formation. Apparently, either the same process(es) contributed chondrules to all unequilibrated ordinary chondrites or, if genetically different, the various chondrule types were well mixed before incorporation into chondrites. Melting of pre-existing materials is the mechanism favored for chondrule formation.

  20. Ca-Al-rich chondrules and inclusions in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischoff, A.; Keil, K.

    1983-01-01

    Ca-Al-rich objects, hitherto mostly found in carbonaceous chondrites, are shown to be widespread, albeit rare, constituents of type 3 ordinary chondrites. Widespread occurrence and textural similarities of Ca-Al-rich chondrules to common, Mg-Fe-rich chondrules suggest that they formed by related processes. It is suggested in this article that Ca-Al-rich chondrules were formed by total melting and crystallization of heterogeneous, submillimeter- to submillimeter-sized dustballs made up of mixtures of high-temperature, Ca-Al-rich and lower-temperature, Na-K-rich components.

  1. Rapid Classification of Ordinary Chondrites Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, M.; Welzenbach, L.

    2014-01-01

    Classification of ordinary chondrites is typically done through measurements of the composition of olivine and pyroxenes. Historically, this measurement has usually been performed via electron microprobe, oil immersion or other methods which can be costly through lost sample material during thin section preparation. Raman microscopy can perform the same measurements but considerably faster and with much less sample preparation allowing for faster classification. Raman spectroscopy can facilitate more rapid classification of large amounts of chondrites such as those retrieved from North Africa and potentially Antarctica, are present in large collections, or are submitted to a curation facility by the public. With development, this approach may provide a completely automated classification method of all chondrite types.

  2. Post-metamorphic brecciation in type 3 ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; McCoy, T. J.; Keil, K.

    1993-03-01

    Type 3.1-3.9 ordinary chondrites can be divided into two kinds: those in which the compositions of chondrule silicates are entirely consistent with metamorphism of type 3.0 material, and those in which the computational heterogeneity appears to be too extreme for in situ metamorphism. We present petrologic data for three LL3 chondrites of the second kind--Ngawi, ALH A77278 (both type 3.6), and Hamlet (type 3.9)--and compare these data with results for the first kind of LL3-4 chondrites. Given that chondrules form in the nebula and that metamorphic equilibration occurs in asteroids, our new data imply that Ngawi, A77278, Hamlet, and many other type 3 ordinary chondrites are post-metamorphic breccias containing materials with diverse metamorphic histories; they are not metamorphic rocks or special kinds of 'primitive breccias.' We infer also that metamorphism to type 3.1-3.9 levels produces very friable material that is easily remixed into breccias and lithified by mild shock. Thus, petrologic types and subtypes of chondrites indicate the mean metamorphic history of the ingredients, not the thermal history of the rock. The metamorphic history of individual type 1 or 2 porphyritic chondrules in type 3 breccias is best derived from olivine and pyroxene analyses and the data of McCoy et al. for unbrecciated chondrites. The new chondrule classification schemes of Sears, DeHart et al., appears to provide less information about the original state and metamorphic history of individual porphyritic chondrules and should not replace existing classification schemes.

  3. Post-metamorphic brecciation in type 3 ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Mccoy, T. J.; Keil, K.

    1993-01-01

    Type 3.1-3.9 ordinary chondrites can be divided into two kinds: those in which the compositions of chondrule silicates are entirely consistent with metamorphism of type 3.0 material, and those in which the computational heterogeneity appears to be too extreme for in situ metamorphism. We present petrologic data for three LL3 chondrites of the second kind--Ngawi, ALH A77278 (both type 3.6), and Hamlet (type 3.9)--and compare these data with results for the first kind of LL3-4 chondrites. Given that chondrules form in the nebula and that metamorphic equilibration occurs in asteroids, our new data imply that Ngawi, A77278, Hamlet, and many other type 3 ordinary chondrites are post-metamorphic breccias containing materials with diverse metamorphic histories; they are not metamorphic rocks or special kinds of 'primitive breccias.' We infer also that metamorphism to type 3.1-3.9 levels produces very friable material that is easily remixed into breccias and lithified by mild shock. Thus, petrologic types and subtypes of chondrites indicate the mean metamorphic history of the ingredients, not the thermal history of the rock. The metamorphic history of individual type 1 or 2 porphyritic chondrules in type 3 breccias is best derived from olivine and pyroxene analyses and the data of McCoy et al. for unbrecciated chondrites. The new chondrule classification schemes of Sears, DeHart et al., appears to provide less information about the original state and metamorphic history of individual porphyritic chondrules and should not replace existing classification schemes.

  4. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. XI - Metamorphism, pairing, and brecciation of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Hasan, F. A.; Batchelor, J. D.; Lu, J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study reports recent measurements of the induced thermoluminescence (TL) properties of 69 type-3 ordinary chondrites, bringing to 125 the number of type-3 ordinary chondrites for which TL data are available. The samples include several of the particularly low petrographic type and many breccias, some of them gas-rich. The significance of the data with respect to the physical conditions affecting metamorphism is discussed. The TL data, olivine heterogeneity, carbon content, and inert-gas content were used to assign the samples to petrologic types. Twelve meteorites were identified as being type 3.0-3.2, and 10 of the breccias were found to contain material that may also be of this type. The temperature and width of the induced TL peak are also related to thermal history, with type 3.2-3.4 chondrites tending to have narrower peaks at lower glow curve temperatures than the type 3.6-3.9 chondrites. Type 3 H chondrites were found to be a higher petrographic type than the type 3 L and LL chondrites.

  5. Carbon in weathered ordinary chondrites from Roosevelt County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. D.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    A suite of Roosevelt County ordinary chondrites of known terrestrial age have been analyzed for carbon content and isotopic composition. Initial results indicate that significant carbon contamination is evident only in samples with a terrestrial age greater than 40 ka. These samples are of weathering grade D and E and contain three times more carbon than the less weathered samples. The soil in which they were preserved has a carbon content of ca. 1.5 percent. Over 200 meteorites have been recovered from a series of soil depleted areas of New Mexico and West Texas. Most have been recovered from blowouts near Clovis in Roosevelt County (RC) on the high plains of New Mexico. The mineralogical and petrologic Al effects of weathering upon these samples have been studied previously and show that the degree of weathering is largely depend ant upon the terrestrial residence time. The study was undertaken to determine the effects of prolonged exposure to the soil and climate of Roosevelt County upon ordinary chondrites in the hope that this will enable a better understanding of the problems associated with the collection of meteoritic falls. A suite of ten grade 4 to 6 H, L, and LL ordinary chondrites were analyzed for carbon content and isotopic composition.

  6. Nature and origin of C-rich ordinary chondrites and chondritic clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Brearley, A. J.; Keil, K.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    The abundance and the isotopic compositions of C, O, and noble gases were investigated together with the petrologic characteristics of four carbon-rich ordinary chondrites (Sharps and Allan Hills A77011, A78119, and A81024) and three C-rich chondritic clasts. The results of the analyses suggest that all of the chondrites and clasts analyzed belong to petrologic type 3 and contain abundant carbon-rich aggregates, which, in at least two of these samples, consist of poorly graphitized carbon commonly associated with metallic Fe,Ni. The data also suggest that the four C-rich chondrites originated on the H, L, and LL parental bodies, but that clasts in Dimmitt and Plainview and other regolith breccias may come from different bodies. The results obtained are consistent with the view that graphite is not a common nebular phase.

  7. An ordinary chondrite impactor for the Popigai crater, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagle, Roald; Claeys, Philippe

    2005-06-01

    With a diameter of ˜100 km, Popigai in Northern Siberia is the largest crater known in the Cenozoic. The concentrations in platinum group elements (PGE) were analyzed in twenty samples of homogeneous impact melt collected in the northwestern flank of the crater to identify the composition of the projectile. The method selected was preconcentration by NiS fire assay followed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This technique measures all the PGE (except Os) and by using aliquots >10g, the results are highly reproducible. The major and trace element composition of the impact melt resembles that of gneissic lithologies of the Anabar shield, which are representative of the target rock. The PGE are enriched in the melt by factors of 3 to 14 compared to the main target lithology, but the meteoritic contamination is only around 0.2 wt.%. Using plots of elemental ratios such as Ru/Rh vs. Pt/Pd or Ru/Rh vs. Pd/Ir, the Popigai impactor is clearly identified as an ordinary chondrite and most likely L-chondrite. This study indicates that PGE elemental ratios allow discrimination of the type of impactor, even in the case of low meteoritic contamination. This study confirms that a significant fraction of the crater-forming projectiles presently documented could have an ordinary chondrite composition. Their probable source, the S-type asteroids, appears to form the majority of the bodies in the main asteroid belt and among Near Earth Objects (NEOs). The ordinary chondrite origin of the Popigai projectile supports an asteroidal origin for the late Eocene impacts as a plausible alternative to the comet shower scenario proposed by Farley et al. (1998).

  8. Shock Classication of Ordinary Chondrites: New Data and Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffler, D.; Keil, K.; Scott, E. R. D.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction. The recently proposed classification system for shocked chondrites (1) is based on a microscopic survey of 76 non-Antarctic H, L, and LL chondrites. Obviously, a larger database is highly desirable in order to confirm earlier conclusions and to allow for a statistically relevant interpretation of the data. Here, we report the shock classification of an additional 54 ordinary chondrites and summarize implications based on a total of 130 samples. New observations on shock effects. Continued studies of those shock effects in olivine and plagioclase that are indicative of the shock stages S1 - S6 as defined in (1) revealed the following: Planar deformation features in olivine, considered typical of stage S5, occur occasionally in stage S3 and are common in stage S4. In some S4 chondrites plagioclase is not partially isotropic but still birefringent coexisting with a small fraction of S3 olivines. Opaque shock veins occur not only in shock stage S3 and above (1) but have now been found in a few chondrites of shock stage S2. Thermal annealing of shock effects. Planar fractures and planar deformation features in olivine persist up to the temperatures required for recrystallization of olivine (> ca. 900 degrees C). Shock history of breccias. In a number of petrologic types 3 and 4 chondrites without recognizable (polymict) breccia texture, we found chondrules and olivine fragments with different shock histories ranging from S1 to S3. Regolith and fragmental breccias are polymict with regard to lithology and shock. The intensity of the latest shock typically varies from S1 to S4 in the breccias studied so far. Frequency distribution of shock stages. A significant difference between H and L chondrites is emerging in contrast to our previous statistics (1), whereas the conspicuous lack of shock stages S5 and S6 in type 3 and 4 chondrites is clearly confirmed (Fig. 1). Correlation between shock and noble gas content. The concentration of radiogenic argon and of

  9. U-Pb systematics of phosphates from equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopel, C.; Manhes, G.; Allegre, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    U-Pb systematics were determined from fifteen phosphate separates from equilibrated ordinary chondrites and from small bulk fragments of the same meteorites. The high U-238/Pb-204 ratios of thirteen of these phosphate separates lead to extremely radiogenic Pb whose Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios range from 250 up to 3500. The Pb/Pb model ages for these phosphates range from 4.563 to 4.502 Ga, with an analytical precision of 106y and the U-Pb system is apparently concordant. The time interval observed 60 x 106y, reflects the thermal processing of the equilibrated chondrites and is consistent with that previously derived from the Rb/Sr, K/Ar and Pu chronologies. The Pb/Pb ages of the phosphates from the seven H chondrites show a negative correlation versus their metamorphic grade. This is the first clear relationship ever observed between a long-lived chronometer and the intensity of metamorphism as reflected by metamorphic grade. Assuming that the Pb/Pb age indicates the accurate U-Pb closure time in phosphates, the Pb/Pb chronology is compatible with the model of a layered H chondrite parent body. However, this interpretation of the U/Pb systematics is not unique; it postulates a slow cooling of the equilibrated materials at high temperature, in apparent conflict with petrological observations. Except for the H chondrites, which agree rather well with Pu systematics, comparison of the Pb/Pb chronology with published radiochronometric data does not reveal simple correlations. In the present debate concerning the thermal history of chondrites, the chronometric information derived from each isotope system is interpreted as the time of its thermal closure. However, this basic assumption may not be correct for all the radio-chronologies and must be evaluated before the radiochronometric data can be applied as compelling time constraints for the period of 4.56 - 4.4 Ga of proto-planetary history.

  10. Magnetic classification of stony meteorites: 2. Non-ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, JéRôMe; Bonal, Lydie; Bourot-Denise, MichèLe; Chevrier, Vincent; Clerc, Jean-Pierre; Consolmagno, Guy; Folco, Luigi; Gounelle, Matthieu; Kohout, Tomas; Pesonen, Lauri; Quirico, Eric; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Skripnik, Anna

    2008-05-01

    A database of magnetic susceptibility (χ) measurements on different non-ordinary chondrites (C, E, R, and ungrouped) populations is presented and compared to our previous similar work on ordinary chondrites. It provides an exhaustive study of the amount of iron-nickel magnetic phases (essentially metal and magnetite) in these meteorites. In contrast with all the other classes, CM and CV show a wide range of magnetic mineral content, with a two orders of magnitude variation of χ. Whether this is due to primary parent body differences, metamorphism or alteration, remains unclear. C3-4 and C2 yield similar χ values to the ones shown by CK and CM, respectively. By order of increasing χ, the classes with well-grouped χ are: R << CO < CK ≈ CI < Kak < CR < E ≈ CH < CB. Based on magnetism, EH and EL classes have indistinguishable metal content. Outliers that we suggest may need to have their classifications reconsidered are Acfer 202 (CO), Elephant Moraine (EET) 96026 (C4-5), Meteorite Hills (MET) 01149, and Northwest Africa (NWA) 521 (CK), Asuka (A)-88198, LaPaz Icefield (LAP) 031156, and Sahara 98248 (R). χ values can also be used to define affinities of ungrouped chondrites, and propose pairing, particularly in the case of CM and CV meteorites.

  11. Cosmic-ray exposure history of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Graf, T.

    1992-01-01

    The exposure age histograms for H-, L-, and LL-chondrites are discussed. None of these histograms is consistent with a continuous delivery of asteroidal material to the earth, as the observed T(e) histograms clearly disagree with expected exponential distributions for a variety of orbital lifetimes. It is concluded that T(e) histograms are dominated by stochastic events and that the continuous supply of asteroidal material can account only for a minor background of the T(e) histograms. An attempt is made to identify major collisional levels among the major classes of ordinary chondrites in order to estimate the frequency of stochastic events. Orbital maturity in the inner solar system is documented by the p.m./total fall ratio among observed meteorite falls. All chondrite classes exhibit a uniform ratio of 2/3 except type H5 chondrites, which reveal a 0.5 or lower p.m./total fall ratio. This shift in the time of fall statistics suggests a strongly evolved orbit for the H5 parent at the time of collision about 7 Ma ago.

  12. Invited review: Evidence for the insignificance of ordinary chondritic material in the asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Anders; Clark, Beth E.

    1999-01-01

    We review the meteoritical and astronomical literature to answer the question: What is the evidence for the importance of ordinary chondritic material to the composition of the asteroid belt? From the meteoritical literature we find that currently: 1) our meteorite collections sample at least 135 different asteroids; 2) out of 25+ chondritic meteorite parent bodies, 3 are (by definition) ordinary chondritic; 3) out of 14 chondritic grouplets and unique chondrites, 11 are affiliated with a carbonaceous group/clan of chondrites; 4) out of 24 differentiated groups of meteorites, only the IIE iron meteorites clearly formed from ordinary chondritic precursor material; 5) out of 12 differentiated grouplets and unique differentiated meteorites, 8 seem to have had carbonaceous chondritic precursors; 6) a high frequency of carbonaceous clasts in ordinary chondritic breccias suggests that ordinary chondrites have been embedded in a swarm of carbonaceous material. The rare occurrence (only one example) of ordinary chondritic clasts in carbonaceous chondritic breccias indicates that ordinary chondritic material has not been widespread in the asteroid belt; 7) cosmic spherules, micrometeorites, and stratospheric interplanetary dust particles, believed to represent a less biased sampling of asteroidal material, show that only a very small fraction (< ?1%) of asteroidal dust has an ordinary chondritic composition. From the astronomical literature we find that currently: 8) spectroscopic surveys of the main asteroid belt are finding more and more non-ordinary chondritic primitive material in the inner main belt; 9) the increase in spectroscopic data has increased the inferred mineralogical diversity of main belt asteroids; 10) no ordinary chondritic asteroids have been directly observed in the main belt. These lines of evidence strongly suggest a scenario in which ordinary chondritic asteroids were never abundant in the main belt. The S-type asteroids may currently be primarily

  13. Kamacite and olivine in ordinary chondrites - Intergroup and intragroup relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. E.

    1990-05-01

    Results are presented from high-precision electron microprobe analyses of olivine and kamacite in a suite of 134 ordinary chondrites (OCs). The compositional ranges of these phases are defined for each OC group (high total Fe, low total Fe, and low total Fe/low metallic Fe). Anomalous OCs that have olivine and/or kamacite compositions that lie outside the established ranges are identified. The phases in the chondritic clasts of the Netschaevo iron meteorite are characterized to determine the relationship between Netschaevo and OCs. Intragroup variations of olivine and kamacite compositions with petrologic type are examined and OCs that contain olivine and/or kamacite grains with aberrant compositions are identified as fragmental breccias. Also, a search for new metallic Fe-Ni phases with extreme compositions is conducted. As a result of these analyses, several meteorites are reclassified.

  14. The onset of metamorphism in ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, J.N.; Brearley, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites of the lowest petrologic types were surveyed by X-ray mapping techniques. A variety of metamorphic effects were noted and subjected to detailed analysis using electron microprobe, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and cathodoluminescence (CL) methods. The distribution of Cr in FeO-rich olivine systematically changes as metamorphism increases between type 3.0 and type 3.2. Igneous zoning patterns are replaced by complex ones and Cr-rich coatings develop on all grains. Cr distributions in olivine are controlled by the exsolution of a Cr-rich phase, probably chromite. Cr in olivine may have been partly present as tetrahedrally coordinated Cr3+. Separation of chromite is nearly complete by petrologic type 3.2. The abundance of chondrules showing an inhomogeneous distribution of alkalis in mesostasis also increases with petrologic type. TEM shows this to be the result of crystallization of albite. Residual glass compositions systematically change during metamorphism, becoming increasingly rich in K. Glass in type I chondrules also gains alkalis during metamorphism. Both types of chondrules were open to an exchange of alkalis with opaque matrix and other chondrules. The matrix in the least metamorphosed chondrites is rich in S and Na. The S is lost from the matrix at the earliest stages of metamorphism due to coalescence of minute grains. Progressive heating also results in the loss of sulfides from chondrule rims and increases sulfide abundances in coarse matrix assemblages as well as inside chondrules. Alkalis initially leave the matrix and enter chondrules during early metamorphism. Feldspar subsequently nucleates in the matrix and Na re-enters from chondrules. These metamorphic trends can be used to refine classification schemes for chondrites. Cr distributions in olivine are a highly effective tool for assigning petrologic types to the most primitive meteorites and can be used to

  15. Asteroidal source of ordinary chondrites (Meteoritical Society Presidential Address 1984)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    The orbital evolution of asteroidal fragments injected into the 3-1 Kirkwood gap resonance at 2.5 AU is investigated on the basis of a Monte Carlo simulation. The diameters of the fragments in the simulation were between 10 cm and 20 km, and it was assumed that the fragments cross the orbital path of the earth every one million years. The effects of close encounter planetary perturbations, the nu dot 6 secular resonance, and the ablative effects of the earth atmosphere were also taken into account. It is found that: (1) the predicted meteorite orbits closely matched the known orbits of ordinary chondrites; and (2) the total flux was in approximate agreement with the observed fall rate of ordinary chondrites. About 90 percent of the predicted impacting bodies were created by fragmentation of larger earth crossing asteroidal fragments, the largest of which were observed in the vicinity of the Apollo-Amor objects. The numerical results are presented in a series of graphs.

  16. Metallographic cooling rates of L-group ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Marvin E.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1993-03-01

    Shock metamorphism appears to be a ubiquitous feature in L-group ordinary chondrites. Brecciation and heterogeneous melting obscure much of the early history of this meteorite group and have caused confusion as to whether L chondrites have undergone thermal metamorphism within onion-shell or rubble-pile parent bodies. Employing the most recent shock criteria, we have examined 55 Antarctic and 24 non-Antarctic L chondrites in order to identify those which have been least affected by post-accretional shock. Six low-shock samples (those with shock grade less than S4) of petrographic types L3-L5 were selected from both populations and metallographic cooling rates were obtained following the technique of Willis and Goldstein. All non-Antarctic L6 chondrites inspected were too heavily shocked to be included in this group. However, 4 shocked L6 chondrites were analyzed in order to determine what effects shock may impose on metallographic cooling rates. Metallographic cooling rates were derived by analyzing the cores of taenite grains and then measuring the distance to the nearest grain edge. Taenites were identified using backscatter imaging on a Cameca SX-50 electron microprobe. Using backscatter we were able to locate homogeneous, rust-free, nearly spherical grains. M-shaped profiles taken from grain traverses were also used to help locate the central portions of selected grains. All points which contained phosphorus above detection limits were discarded. Plots of cooling-rate data are summarized and data from the high-shock samples are presented. The lack of coherency of cooling rates for individual samples is indicative of heterogeneous cooling following shock. The data confirms the statement expressed by numerous workers that extreme care must be taken when selecting samples of L chondrites for cooling-rate studies. Data for the 6 non-Antarctic low-shock samples are also presented. The samples display a general trend in cooling rates. The lowest metamorphic grade

  17. Metallographic cooling rates of L-group ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Marvin E.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Shock metamorphism appears to be a ubiquitous feature in L-group ordinary chondrites. Brecciation and heterogeneous melting obscure much of the early history of this meteorite group and have caused confusion as to whether L chondrites have undergone thermal metamorphism within onion-shell or rubble-pile parent bodies. Employing the most recent shock criteria, we have examined 55 Antarctic and 24 non-Antarctic L chondrites in order to identify those which have been least affected by post-accretional shock. Six low-shock samples (those with shock grade less than S4) of petrographic types L3-L5 were selected from both populations and metallographic cooling rates were obtained following the technique of Willis and Goldstein. All non-Antarctic L6 chondrites inspected were too heavily shocked to be included in this group. However, 4 shocked L6 chondrites were analyzed in order to determine what effects shock may impose on metallographic cooling rates. Metallographic cooling rates were derived by analyzing the cores of taenite grains and then measuring the distance to the nearest grain edge. Taenites were identified using backscatter imaging on a Cameca SX-50 electron microprobe. Using backscatter we were able to locate homogeneous, rust-free, nearly spherical grains. M-shaped profiles taken from grain traverses were also used to help locate the central portions of selected grains. All points which contained phosphorus above detection limits were discarded. Plots of cooling-rate data are summarized and data from the high-shock samples are presented. The lack of coherency of cooling rates for individual samples is indicative of heterogeneous cooling following shock. The data confirms the statement expressed by numerous workers that extreme care must be taken when selecting samples of L chondrites for cooling-rate studies. Data for the 6 non-Antarctic low-shock samples are also presented. The samples display a general trend in cooling rates. The lowest metamorphic grade

  18. The implications of the magnetism of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morden, Simon James

    Eleven ordinary chondrites (including ALHA77278 (LL3), ALH84086 (LL3), Appley Bridge (LL6), Crumlin (L5), Dalgety Downs (L4), Khanpur (LL5), Oberline (LL5), and Parnallee (LL3)) were studied in order to determine (1) the magnetic mineralogy, (2) the shape of the metal grains, and (3) the nature of the Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM). Response to alternating field demagnetization, high-field isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), magnetic hysteresis, and thermal demagnetization were all measured. It was found that the magnetic mineralogy of the chondrites was dominated by the FeNi alloy system. Alpha-kamacite, gamma-taenite, and gamma"-tetrataenite were all found in varying quantities. It was shown that tetrataenite was the dominant magnetic carrier, possessing a high coercivity (greater than 500 mT) and high remanence. On heating, tetrataenite became magnetically soft taenite. Since tetrataenite can only form as the result of very slow cooling, the transition was irreversible. No tetrataenite was found in the type 3 chondrites studied. The orientation of the stable NRM in the samples was shown to be random. The stable remanence was held by tetrataenite, where present. A magnetic fabric was found in all the samples. In all but two, the fabric was a distinct foliation; Tuxtuac and Wold Cottage showed lineations. It was concluded that the magnetic carriers were magnetized before emplacement in the rock, and that the rock was not a fine-scale breccia. Planetary magnetic fields were discounted as the source of the magnetizing field. Thermal demagnetizations of NRM showed a definite trend towards higher blocking temperatures for type 6 chondrites over types 3-5, and a tentative trend for lower blocking temperatures of type 3 against 4-5. Hot accretion of chondrites was favored and it is possible that this accretion occurred after a catastrophic impact between two large bodies. The plasma cloud thus formed might enhance any magnetic field present, and may have been

  19. Fe-Ni metal in primitive chondrites: Indicators of classification and metamorphic conditions for ordinary and CO chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimura, M.; Grossman, J.N.; Weisberg, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of our petrological and mineralogical study of Fe-Ni metal in type 3 ordinary and CO chondrites, and the ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Fe-Ni metal in ordinary and CO chondrites occurs in chondrule interiors, on chondrule surfaces, and as isolated grains in the matrix. Isolated Ni-rich metal in chondrites of petrologic type lower than type 3.10 is enriched in Co relative to the kamacite in chondrules. However, Ni-rich metal in type 3.15-3.9 chondrites always contains less Co than does kamacite. Fe-Ni metal grains in chondrules in Semarkona typically show plessitic intergrowths consisting of submicrometer kamacite and Ni-rich regions. Metal in other type 3 chondrites is composed of fine- to coarse-grained aggregates of kamacite and Ni-rich metal, resulting from metamorphism in the parent body. We found that the number density of Ni-rich grains in metal (number of Ni-rich grains per unit area of metal) in chondrules systematically decreases with increasing petrologic type. Thus, Fe-Ni metal is a highly sensitive recorder of metamorphism in ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites, and can be used to distinguish petrologic type and identify the least thermally metamorphosed chondrites. Among the known ordinary and CO chondrites, Semarkona is the most primitive. The range of metamorphic temperatures were similar for type 3 ordinary and CO chondrites, despite them having different parent bodies. Most Fe-Ni metal in Acfer 094 is martensite, and it preserves primary features. The degree of metamorphism is lower in Acfer 094, a true type 3.00 chondrite, than in Semarkona, which should be reclassified as type 3.01. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2008.

  20. Unusual olivine and pyroxene composition in interplanetary dust and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klock, W.; Mckay, D. S.; Thomas, K. L.; Palme, H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence, in both a number of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and in meteorite matrices, of olivine and orthopyroxene grains, low in FeO but containing up to 5 wt pct MnO, is reported. The majority of olivines and pyroxenes in meteorites contain less than 0.5 wt pct MnO. The presence of these low-iron, manganese-enriched (LIME) olivines and pyroxenes in IDPs and meteorites may indicate a link between the origin and history of IDPs and the matrix material of primitive meteorites. The origin of the LIME silicates could be explained by condensation from a gas of solar composition. Forsterite is the first major silicate phase to condense from a solar nebula gas, and Mn, which is not stable as a metal under solar nebula conditions, would condense at about 1100 K as Mn2SiO4 in solid solution with forsterite.

  1. Unusual olivine and pyroxene composition in interplanetary dust and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klock, W.; Thomas, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Palme, H.

    1989-05-01

    The presence, in both a number of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and in meteorite matrices, of olivine and orthopyroxene grains, low in FeO but containing up to 5 wt pct MnO, is reported. The majority of olivines and pyroxenes in meteorites contain less than 0.5 wt pct MnO. The presence of these low-iron, manganese-enriched (LIME) olivines and pyroxenes in IDPs and meteorites may indicate a link between the origin and history of IDPs and the matrix material of primitive meteorites. The origin of the LIME silicates could be explained by condensation from a gas of solar composition. Forsterite is the first major silicate phase to condense from a solar nebula gas, and Mn, which is not stable as a metal under solar nebula conditions, would condense at about 1100 K as Mn2SiO4 in solid solution with forsterite.

  2. Compositions of three low-FeO ordinary chondrites: Indications of a common origin with the H chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Troiano, Julianne; Rumble III, Douglas; Rivers, Mark L.; Friedrich, Jon M.

    2011-11-17

    Burnwell, EET 96031, and LAP 04575 are ordinary chondrites (OC) that possess lower than typical olivine Fa content than has been established for the H chondrites (< 17 mol%). Mean low-Ca pyroxene Fs contents are typically lower than mean Fa content, with generally 16 mol% Fs. We have investigated these three low-FeO chondrites by measuring their trace element abundances, oxygen isotopic compositions, and examining their three-dimensional (3D) petrography with synchrotron X-ray microtomography. We compare our results with those established for more common OC. The low FeO chondrites studied here have bulk trace element abundances that are identical to the H chondrites. From bulk oxygen isotopic analysis, we show that Burnwell, EET 96010, and LAP 04757 sampled oxygen reservoirs identical to the H chondrites. Burnwell, EET 96031, and LAP 04575 possess common 3D opaque mineral structures that could be distinct from the H chondrites, as evidenced by X-ray microtomographic analysis, but our comparison suite of H chondrites is small and unrepresentative. Overall, our data suggest a common origin for the low-FeO chondrites Burnwell, EET 96010, and LAP 04757 and the H chondrites. These three samples are simply extreme members of a redox process where a limiting nebular oxidizing agent, probably ice, reacted with material containing slightly higher amounts of metal than typically seen in the H chondrites.

  3. A Survey of Large Silicate Objects in Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, R.; Bridges, J. C.

    1995-09-01

    We present the results of a survey of large silicate objects in ordinary chondrites (OCs) from the collection of the Natural History Museum, London; 390 H-group, 386 L-group and 57 LL-group meteorites were examined. A total of 61 objects were identified (Table 1). Meteorites with light and dark, brecciated fabrics were excluded from our survey. Following Weisberg et al. [1], large silicate objects are taken to be >= 5mm in size. Macrochondrules have rounded outlines and textures - porphyritic, barred olivine, radiating pyroxene - that are indistinguishable from normal chondrules in OCs [1]. In addition, we also recognise igneous clasts and chondritic clasts. The largest macrochondrule in the collection is 4cm diameter, with a microporphyritic texture [2]. Igneous clasts are those objects whose properties indicate that they originated through melting and differentiation on a planetary body. Examples include a 2cm diameter clast, in Ness County (L6), which contains large (2mm) olivine and enstatite grains set in a plagioclase + olivine groundmass, cristobalite- and tridymite-rich clasts [3] and the FELINE feldspar-nepheline clast [4]. Chondritic clasts comprise a diverse group including a 1cm clast from Barwell (L6) which contains apparently remelted chondrules, microporphyritic clasts with K-rich mesostasis e.g. in Quenggouk (H4) and a 1cm single olivine grain with minor inclusions of anorthite and enstatite, in Julesburg (L3). The K-rich objects are similar to others described from a survey of LL-chondrites and may have an impact origin or have undergone exchange with a K-rich vapor [5]. Abundances of the three types of large silicate objects (Table 1) reflect the relative numbers of H, L and LL meteorite samples in the collection, although LL-group hosted clasts are over-represented as our work concentrated on sections of LL-chondrites. In total, 46% of the objects are macrochondrules, 18% are igneous clasts and 36% are in the indeterminate chondritic clast group

  4. A unique type 3 ordinary chondrite containing graphite-magnetite aggregates - Allan Hills A77011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinley, S. G.; Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.

    1982-01-01

    ALHA 77011, which is the object of study in the present investigation, is a chondrite of the 1977 meteorite collection from Allan Hills, Antarctica. It contains an opaque and recrystallized silicate matrix (Huss matrix) and numerous aggregates consisting of micron- and submicron-sized graphite and magnetite. It is pointed out that no abundant graphite-magnetite aggregates could be observed in other type 3 ordinary chondrites, except for Sharps. Attention is given to the results of a modal analysis, relations between ALHA 77011 and other type 3 ordinary chondrites, and the association of graphite-magnetite and metallic Fe, Ni. The discovery of graphite-magnetite aggregates in type 3 ordinary chondrites is found to suggest that this material may have been an important component in the formation of ordinary chondrites.

  5. Aqueous Alteration on Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies- The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Water.O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L.; Franchi, I. A.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    2003-04-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that aqueous alteration has been a major process on meteorite parent bodies. Understanding the details of such processes can be greatly improved by a knowledge of the isotopic composition of water taking part in aqueous alteration. Studies of the unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (1, 2) have identified the presence of phyllosilicates which necessarily require reaction with water in some form. Using the technique of (3) we have measured the oxygen isotopic composition of water extracted from Semarkona and Bishunpur from room temp to 900^oC. Water release profiles generally define large low temperature peaks that tail off to about 800^oC, with smaller releases superimposed. This is consistent with the main hydrated mineral present being a smectite but with contributions from other hydrated phases. Isotopic compositions at different temperatures allow identification of water originating from distinct reservoirs within the samples, including both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. That at low temperatures is dominated by terrestrial water while that released at high temperatures contains a large proportion indigenous to the meteorite. In Semarkona the highest temperature releases originating from O-H structural groups within hydrated minerals possesses a positive Δ17O of ˜+2.4 ppm, in excess of twice that measured in the silicate phases of these meteorites and greater than that measured in any carbonaceous chondrites. These results suggest that during reaction with solid phases water, originally with a Δ17O value equal to or in excess that measured in magnetites ˜+6 ppm (4), must have evolved to lower values after magnetite formation. However, the final water composition, represented by the structural O-H groups, did not achieve isotopic equilibrium with the surrounding phases. Refs: [1] Hutchison R. et al. (1987) GCA 51, 1875-1882. [2] Alexander C. M. O'D. et al. (1989) EPSL 95, 187-207. [3] Baker L. et al. (2002) Anal

  6. Metamorphism and partial melting of ordinary chondrites: Calculated phase equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. E.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the metamorphic pressures (P) and temperatures (T) recorded by meteorites is key to understanding the size and thermal history of their asteroid parent bodies. New thermodynamic models calibrated to very low P for minerals and melt in terrestrial mantle peridotite permit quantitative investigation of high-T metamorphism in ordinary chondrites using phase equilibria modelling. Isochemical P-T phase diagrams based on the average composition of H, L and LL chondrite falls and contoured for the composition and abundance of olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and chromite provide a good match with values measured in so-called equilibrated (petrologic type 4-6) samples. Some compositional variables, in particular Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, exhibit a strong pressure dependence when considered over a range of several kilobars, providing a means of recognising meteorites derived from the cores of asteroids with radii of several hundred kilometres, if such bodies existed at that time. At the low pressures (<1 kbar) that typify thermal metamorphism, several compositional variables are good thermometers. Although those based on Fe-Mg exchange are likely to have been reset during slow cooling, those based on coupled substitution, in particular Ca and Al in orthopyroxene and Na in clinopyroxene, are less susceptible to retrograde diffusion and are potentially more faithful recorders of peak conditions. The intersection of isopleths of these variables may allow pressures to be quantified, even at low P, permitting constraints on the minimum size of parent asteroid bodies. The phase diagrams predict the onset of partial melting at 1050-1100 °C by incongruent reactions consuming plagioclase, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene, whose compositions change abruptly as melting proceeds. These predictions match natural observations well and support the view that type 7 chondrites represent a suprasolidus continuation of the established petrologic

  7. (7) Iris: a possible source of ordinary chondrites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorini, F.; Manara, A.; Cellino, A.; di Martino, M.; Zappala, V.

    1997-05-01

    Rotationally resolved visible spectroscopy (6000~9500Å) of (7) Iris is presented. Within a few percents, no variation in Iris' visible spectrum over a rotational period has been found. These data suggest that the mineralogic properties of Iris' surface are globally homogeneous, although we cannot exclude the presence of some texture and/or albedo variegation as suggested by previous photometric and polarimetric studies available in the literature. From a dynamical point of view, we estimate the ejection velocity required for collisional fragments from this asteroid to be injected into the surrounding chaotic regions. The resulting velocity values are fairly high, but not incompatible with the values suggested by the present knowledge of catastrophic break-up phenomena and by the observational constraints put by asteroid families. Taking into account the close similarity between Iris' spectrum and that of (6) Hebe, a typical S(IV)-type object according with the most modern spectral classifications, we believe that (7) Iris may be a not negligible source of ordinary chondrite meteorites.

  8. The formation of FeO-rich pyroxene and enstatite in unequilibrated enstatite chondrites: A petrologic-trace element (SIMS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisberg, M. K.; Prinz, M.; Fogel, R. A.; Shimizu, N.

    1993-01-01

    Enstatite (En) chondrites record the most reducing conditions known in the early solar system. Their oxidation state may be the result of condensation in a nebular region having an enhanced C/O ratio, reduction of more oxidized materials in a reducing nebula, reduction during metamorphic reheating in a parent body, or a combination of these events. The presence of more oxidized Fe-rich silicates, two types of En (distinguished by red and blue CL), and the juxtaposition of FeO-rich pyroxenes (Fe-pyx) surrounded by blue En (enstatite) in the UEC's (unequilibrated enstatite chondrites) is intriguing and led to the examination of the question of enstatite chondrite formation. Previously, data was presented on the petrologic-geochemical characteristics of the Fe-pyx and coexisting red and blue En. Here minor and trace element abundances (determined by ion probe-SIMS) on these three types of pyroxenes are reported on in the following meteorites: Kota Kota and LEW87223 (EH3), MAC88136 (EL3), St. Marks (EH4), and Hvittis (EL6). More data are currently being collected.

  9. Silica-Fayalite-bearing Chondrules in Ordinary Chondrites: Evidence of Oxidation in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, A. N.; Wasson, J. T.

    1993-07-01

    Most ordinary chondrite (OC) chondrules have compositions similar to those of bulk OC in terms of lithophile-element abundances. There are only a few rare chondrule classes that deviate significantly from OC-like compositions; these include Al-rich chondrules, chromitic and chromite-bearing silicate chondrules, and silica-rich chondrules. We studied 41 thin sections of unequilibrated OC and found 82 silica-bearing chondrules that can be divided into two major categories: silica-pyroxene chondrules and silica-fayalite- pyroxene chondrules. These chondrules are more common in H (>3/cm^2) than in L and LL chondrites (<1/cm^2). Silica-pyroxene chondrules consist mainly of low-Ca pyroxene and silica and have radial and porphyritic textures. Silica-bearing radial pyroxene (RP) chondrules contain 5-10 vol% silica grains; the low-Ca pyroxene is uniform in individual chondrules but varies from one chondrule to another (Fs(sub)10.2- Fs(sub)31.5). Silica-bearing porphyritic pyroxene (PP) chondrules contain 15- 40 vol% silica; the low-Ca pyroxene varies in composition within individual PP chondrules and tends to be more magnesian than in the silica-bearing RP chondrules (Fs(sub)5.0-Fs(sub)21.1). Petrographic observations suggest that some PP chondrules were not completely molten; they appear to have cooled more slowly than the silica-bearing RP chondrules. Silica-fayalite-pyroxene chondrules consist of silica, fayalite, and low-Ca pyroxene; accessory high-Ca pyroxene, plagioclase mesostasis, troilite, and metallic Fe-Ni are also present. Based on texture and the modal abundances of pyroxene and silica these chondrules can be divided into two types: (1) radial or porphyritic silica-fayalite-pyroxene chondrules containing 5-40 vol% silica and (2) granular silica-fayalite-pyroxene chondrules consisting almost entirely (90-95 vol%) of silica. Silica-fayalite-bearing pyroxene chondrules are texturally and compositionally similar to the silica-bearing pyroxene chondrules described

  10. Metamorphism and aqueous alteration in low petrographic type ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, T.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Sears, D. W. G.; Guimon, R. K.; Jie, Lu; Benoit, P. H.; O'D. Alexander, C. M.; Wright, Ian; Pillinger, C.; Morse, A. D.; Hutchison, Robert

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the relative importance of dry metamorphism and aqueous alteration in the history of chondruies, chondruies were hand-picked from the Semarkona (petrographic type 3.0), Bishunpur (3. 1), Chainpur (3.4), Dhajala (3.8) and Allegan (5) chondrites, and matrix samples were extracted from the first three ordinary chondrites. The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of all the samples were measured, and appropriate subsets of the samples were analyzed by electron-microprobe and radiochemical neutron activation and the water and H-isotopic composition determined. The TL data for chondrules from Semarkona and Bishunpur scatter widely showing no unambiguous trends, although group B1 chondrules tend to have lower sensitivities and lower peak temperatures compared with group A5 chondrules. It is argued that these data reflect the variety of processes accompanying chondrule formation. The chondrules show remarkably uniform contents of the highly labile elements, indicating mineralogical control on abundance and volatile loss from silicates and loss and recondensation of mobile chalcophiles and siderophiles in some cases. Very high D/H values (up to approx. 8000% SMOW) are observed in certain Semarkona chondrules, a confirmation of earlier work. With increasing petrographic type, mean TL sensitivities of the chondrules increase, the spread of values within an individual meteorite decreases, and peak temperatures and peak widths show trends indicating that the TL is mainly produced by feldspar and that dry, thermal metamorphism is the dominant secondary process experienced by the chondrules. The TL sensitivities of matrix samples also increase with petrographic type. Chainpur matrix samples show the same spread of peak temperatures and peak widths as Chainpur chondruies, indicating metamorphism-related changes in the feldspar are responsible for the TL of the matrix. The TL data for the Semarkona and Bishunpur matrix samples provide, at best, only weak

  11. Group IIE Iron Meteorites; Metal Composition, Formation, Relationship to Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, J. T.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2011-03-01

    INAA data for metal in 8 new and 12 known IIE irons show they crystallized from various silicate-rich Fe-Ni melts with diverse S contents after impacts melted an ordinary chondrite asteroid that was probably more reduced than H chondrites.

  12. Rhenium-osmium isotope systematics of ordinary chondrites and iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Morgan, J. W.; Horan, M. F.; Grossman, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    Using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry, Re and Os abundances were determined by isotope dilution and Os-187/Os-186 measured in 11 ordinary chondrites, and also in 1 IIB and 3 IIIB irons. In addition, Os-186/Os-188 and Os-189/Os-188 ratios were precisely determined for 3 unspiked ordinary chondrites as a means of constraining the intensity of any neutron irradiation these meteorites may have experienced.

  13. Metal phases in ordinary chondrites: Magnetic hysteresis properties and implications for thermal history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattacceca, J.; Suavet, C.; Rochette, P.; Weiss, B. P.; Winklhofer, M.; Uehara, M.; Friedrich, Jon M.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic properties are sensitive proxies to characterize FeNi metal phases in meteorites. We present a data set of magnetic hysteresis properties of 91 ordinary chondrite falls. We show that hysteresis properties are distinctive of individual meteorites while homogeneous among meteorite subsamples. Except for the most primitive chondrites, these properties can be explained by a mixture of multidomain kamacite that dominates the induced magnetism and tetrataenite (both in the cloudy zone as single-domain grains, and as larger multidomain grains in plessite and in the rim of zoned taenite) dominates the remanent magnetism, in agreement with previous microscopic magnetic observations. The bulk metal contents derived from magnetic measurements are in agreement with those estimated previously from chemical analyses. We evidence a decreasing metal content with increasing petrologic type in ordinary chondrites, compatible with oxidation of metal during thermal metamorphism. Types 5 and 6 ordinary chondrites have higher tetrataenite content than type 4 chondrites. This is compatible with lower cooling rates in the 650-450 °C interval for higher petrographic types (consistent with an onion-shell model), but is more likely the result of the oxidation of ordinary chondrites with increasing metamorphism. In equilibrated chondrites, shock-related transient heating events above approximately 500 °C result in the disordering of tetrataenite and associated drastic change in magnetic properties. As a good indicator of the amount of tetrataenite, hysteresis properties are a very sensitive proxy of the thermal history of ordinary chondrites, revealing low cooling rates during thermal metamorphism and high cooling rates (e.g., following shock reheating or excavation after thermal metamorphism). Our data strengthen the view that the poor magnetic recording properties of multidomain kamacite and the secondary origin of tetrataenite make equilibrated ordinary chondrites challenging

  14. Plutonium, uranium and rare earths in the phosphates of ordinary chondrites - The quest for a chronometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crozaz, G.; Pellas, P.; Bourot-Denise, M.; de Chazal, S. M.; Fieni, C.; Lundberg, L. L.; Zinner, E.

    1989-06-01

    The distributions of Pu, U, and the REEs in single crystals of the calcium phosphates, merrillite, and apatite of ordinary chondrites were investigated, inferring limites on Pu concentrations from fossil track measurements. The study takes spallation-induced tracks into account. Despite the higher affinity of both Pu and the REEs for merrilite than apatite, no quantitative correlation is found between the abundances of these elements in merrillite grains from a given ordinary chondrite, indicating that Pu-244 cannot be used to determine the relative formation times of chondrites.

  15. Ion microprobe magnesium isotope analysis of plagioclase and hibonite from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, R. W.; Bischoff, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ion and electron microprobes were used to examine Mg-26 excesses from Al-26 decay in four Al-rich objects from the type 3 ordinary hibonite clast in the Dhajala chondrite. The initial Al-26/Al-27 ratio was actually significantly lower than Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites. Also, no Mg-26 excesses were found in three plagioclase-bearing chondrules that were also examined. The Mg-26 excesses in the hibonite chondrites indicated a common origin for chondrites with the excesses. The implied Al-26 content in a proposed parent body could not, however, be confirmed as a widespread heat source in the early solar system.

  16. Igneous rock from Severnyi Kolchim (H3) chondrite: Nebular origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarov, M. A.; Brandstaetter, F.; Kurat, G.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of lithic fragments with compositions and textures similar to igneous differentiates in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOC's) and carbonaceous chondrites (CC's) has been interpreted as to suggest that planetary bodies existed before chondrites were formed. As a consequence, chondrites (except, perhaps CI chondrites) cannot be considered primitive assemblages of unprocessed nebular matter. We report about our study of an igneous clast from the Severnyi Kolchim (H3) chondrite. The results of the study are incompatible with an igneous origin of the clast but are in favor of a nebular origin similar to that of chondrules.

  17. Physical propoerties of incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites: Implications for asteroidal structure and impact processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Britt, D.T.; Rivers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2009-03-19

    Aside from robotic exploration, meteorites are our primary source of information about the asteroids that they sample. Although there are some discrepancies, there are dynamical, spectral, and compositional evidence for an S-type asteroid connection to the ordinary chondrite meteorites. Reconciling the measured bulk density of chondrites with that of asteroids can yield important inferences about the internal structure of asteroids. For example, the bulk density of S-type asteroids is typically much less than the bulk density of chondrites, leading to the inference that asteroids contain a significant quantity of macroporosity. We have identified several unusual ordinary chondrites that have been incompletely compacted relative to petrologically similar but much less porous chondrites. Although these are equilibrated chondrites, they have extreme amounts of pore spaces between mineral grains. Here, we detail our efforts quantifying the nature of the pore spaces in these chondrites and we examine the implications for the structure and mechanical processing of the asteroids from which these chondrites originate. Our pore size distribution data may also provide constraints for the modeling of heat flow and shock waves within primordial chondritic parent bodies.

  18. The valence and coordination of titanium in ordinary and enstatite chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Steven B.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Grossman, Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    One way to better understand processes related to chondrite metamorphism is to evaluate changes in chondrite features as a function of petrologic type. Toward this end the valence and coordination of Ti in olivine and pyroxene in suites of ordinary (H, L, and LL) and enstatite (EH and EL) chondrites of types 3 through 6 have been determined with XANES spectroscopy. Trivalent Ti, typically 10-40% of the Ti in the analytical volumes, was found in ordinary chondrites of all types, despite the stability of oxidized iron in the samples. Average valences and the proportions of Ti that are in tetrahedral coordination generally decrease with increasing grade between types 3.0 and 3.5, increase from 3.5 to 4, and then level off. These trends are consistent with previous studies of chondrite oxidation states using other methods, except here the onset of oxidation is observed at a lower type, ∼3.5, than previously indicated (4). These results are also consistent with previous suggestions that oxidation of higher-grade ordinary chondrite samples involved exposure to aqueous fluids from melting of accreted ice. In the enstatite chondrites, typically 20-90% of the Ti is trivalent Ti, so it is reduced compared to Ti in the ordinary chondrites. Valence decreases slightly from petrologic type 3 to 4 and increases from 4 to 6, but no increases in tetrahedral coordination with petrologic type are observed, indicating a redox environment or process distinct from that of ordinary chondrite metamorphism. The presence of Ti4+ in the E chondrites supports previous suggestions that they formed from oxidized precursors that underwent reduction. Unlike ordinary chondrites, enstatite chondrites are thought to have been derived from a body or bodies that did not accrete ice, which could account for their different valence-coordination-petrologic type relationships. The hypothesis, based on observations of unmetamorphosed chondrules and supported by laboratory experiments, that equilibration

  19. Ordinary chondrites - Multivariate statistical analysis of trace element contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipschutz, Michael E.; Samuels, Stephen M.

    1991-01-01

    The contents of mobile trace elements (Co, Au, Sb, Ga, Se, Rb, Cs, Te, Bi, Ag, In, Tl, Zn, and Cd) in Antarctic and non-Antarctic populations of H4-6 and L4-6 chondrites, were compared using standard multivariate discriminant functions borrowed from linear discriminant analysis and logistic regression. A nonstandard randomization-simulation method was developed, making it possible to carry out probability assignments on a distribution-free basis. Compositional differences were found both between the Antarctic and non-Antarctic H4-6 chondrite populations and between two L4-6 chondrite populations. It is shown that, for various types of meteorites (in particular, for the H4-6 chondrites), the Antarctic/non-Antarctic compositional difference is due to preterrestrial differences in the genesis of their parent materials.

  20. Non-Destructive Classification Approaches for Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Harrington, R.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R. V.

    2013-09-01

    In order to compare a few non-destructive classification techniques with the standard approaches, we have characterized a group of chondrites from the Larkman Nunatak region using magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  1. Exposure Histories of Seven Ordinary Chondrites with Helium-3 Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, P.; Herzog, G. F.; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Rugel, G.; Wallner, A.; Schultz, L.; Johnson, J.; Jull, A. J. T.; Fink, D.

    2003-03-01

    Among 7 chondrites with He losses and 21Ne<1E-8 cm3 STP/g, simple cosmic-ray exposure histories are likely for 3 (Daraj 115, Staelldalen, and Ybbsitz) but ambiguous for 4 (ALH 88004, Indio Rico, Markovka, and HaH 002). Daraj 115 may show SCR effects.

  2. Chromite and olivine in type II chondrules in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites - Implications for thermal histories and group differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Craig A.; Prinz, Martin

    1991-01-01

    Unequilibrated chromite and olivine margin compositions in type II chondrules are noted to differ systematically among three of the chondrite groups, suggesting that type II liquids differed in composition among the groups. These differences may be interpreted as indicators of different chemical compositions of the precursor solids which underwent melting, or, perhaps, as differences in the extent to which immiscible metal sulfide droplets were lost during chondrule formation. Because zinc is detectable only in type II chromites which have undergone reequilibration, the high zinc contents reported for chondritic chromites in other studies probably reflect redistribution during thermal metamorphism.

  3. Bleached chondrules: Evidence for widespread aqueous processes on the parent asteroids of ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, J.N.; Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Wang, Jingyuan; Brearley, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first detailed study of a population of texturally distinct chondrules previously described by Kurat (1969), Christophe Michel-Levy (1976), and Skinner et al. (1989) that are sharply depleted in alkalis and Al in their outer portions. These 'bleached' chondrules, which are exclusively radial pyroxene and cryptocrystalline in texture, have porous outer zones where mesostasis has been lost. Bleached chondrules are present in all type 3 ordinary chondrites and are present in lower abundances in types 4-6. They are most abundant in the L and LL groups, apparently less common in H chondrites, and absent in enstatite chondrites. We used x-ray mapping and traditional electron microprobe techniques to characterize bleached chondrules in a cross section of ordinary chondrites. We studied bleached chondrules from Semarkona by ion microprobe for trace elements and H isotopes, and by transmission electron microscopy. Chondrule bleaching was the result of low-temperature alteration by aqueous fluids flowing through fine-grained chondrite matrix prior to thermal metamorphism. During aqueous alteration, interstitial glass dissolved and was partially replaced by phyllosilicates, troilite was altered to pentlandite, but pyroxene was completely unaffected. Calcium-rich zones formed at the inner margins of the bleached zones, either as the result of the early stages of metamorphism or because of fluid-chondrule reaction. The mineralogy of bleached chondrules is extremely sensitive to thermal metamorphism in type 3 ordinary chondrites, and bleached zones provide a favorable location for the growth of metamorphic minerals in higher petrologic types. The ubiquitous presence of bleached chondrules in ordinary chondrites implies that they all experienced aqueous alteration early in their asteroidal histories, but there is no relationship between the degree of alteration and metamorphic grade. A correlation between the oxidation state of chondrite groups and their degree of

  4. Multiple impact events recorded in the NWA 7298 H chondrite breccia and the dynamical evolution of an ordinary chondrite asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jon M.; Weisberg, Michael K.; Rivers, Mark L.

    2014-05-01

    The major geologic process that has shaped the asteroids and led to development of their regoliths is impact. Petrofabrics in ordinary chondrites are undoubtedly the result of impact events on their asteroidal parent bodies and the foliation present in a chondrite serves as an enduring record of the magnitude of the most intense compacting event experienced by the material. An overwhelming majority of chondrites have an internally consistent petrofabric contained within the spatial dimensions of the entire rock, including across clasts or different petrographic domains. This indicates that the magnitude of the most recent impact to have affected the assembled chondrite was significant enough to impart a foliation across all lithologies. Information of any previous impacts is largely lost because of the consistent, realigned foliations. We present X-ray microtomography derived 3D petrofabric intensity and orientation data for three lithologies in the NWA 7298 breccia. The internally inconsistent petrofabrics among differing lithologies indicate that the magnitude of the final impact event was smaller than previous ones. This latter case preserves fabric information recorded during previous impacts and allows a more complete interpretation of the impact history of a local region of the asteroidal parent. We used our data to infer the sequence and intensity of distinct impact events affecting the NWA 7298 parent asteroid. We suggest a near-surface impact debris zone on the H chondrite parent asteroid as an origin for NWA 7298. These observations yield new opportunities for investigating and interpreting the dynamic collisional evolution of asteroids.

  5. The Cooling History and Structure of the Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1996-01-01

    Most major meteorite classes exhibit significant ranges of metamorphism. The effects of metamorphism have been extensively characterized, but the heat source(s) and the metamorphic environment are unknown. Proposed beat sources include Al-26, Fe-60, electromagnetic induction, and impact. It is typically assumed that metamorphism occurred in parent bodies of some sort, but it uncertain whether these bodies were highly structured ("onion skins") or were chaotic mixes of material ("rubble piles"). The lack of simple trends of metallographic cooling rates with petrologic type has been considered supportive of both concepts. In this study, we use induced thermoluminescence (TL) as an indicator of thermal history. The TL of ordinary chondrites is produced by sodic feldspar, and the induced TL peak temperature is related to its crystallographic order/disorder. Ordered feldspar has TL peak temperatures of approx. 120 C, and disordered feldspar has TL peak temperatures of approx. 220 C. While ordered feldspar can be easily disordered in the laboratory by heating above 650 C and is easily quenched in the disordered form, producing ordered feldspar requires cooling at geologic cooling rates. We have measured the induced TL properties of 101 equilibrated ordinary chondrites, including 49 H, 29 L, and 23 LL chondrites. For the H chondrites there is an apparent trend of decreasing induced TL peak temperature with increasing petrologic type. H4 chondrites exhibit a tight range of TL peak temperatures, 190 C - 200 C, while H6 chondrites exhibit TL peak temperatures between 180 C and 190 C. H5 chondrites cover the range between H4 and H6, and also extend up to 210 C. Similar results are obtained for LL chondfiles and most L6 chondrites have lower induced TL peak temperatures than L5 chondrites.

  6. Hysteresis properties of ordinary chondrites and implications for their thermal history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattacceca, J.; Suavet, C. R.; Rochette, P.; Weiss, B. P.; Winklhofer, M.; Uehara, M.; Friedrich, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a large dataset of magnetic hysteresis properties of ordinary chondrite falls. We show that hysteresis properties are distinctive of individual meteorites while homogeneous among meteorite subsamples. Except for the most primitive chondrites, these properties can be explained by a mixture of multidomain kamacite and tetrataenite (both in the cloudy zone and as larger grains in plessite and in the rim of zoned taenite). Kamacite dominates the induced magnetism whereas tetrataenite dominates the remanent magnetism, in agreement with previous microscopic magnetic observations. Type 5 and 6 chondrites have higher tetrataenite content than type 4 chondrites, suggesting they have lower cooling rates at least in the 650-450 °C interval, consistent with an onion-shell model. In equilibrated chondrites, shock-related transient heating events above ~500 °C result in the disordering of tetrataenite and associated drastic change in magnetic properties. As a good indicator of the amount of tetrataenite, hysteresis properties are a very sensitive proxy of the thermal history of ordinary chondrites, revealing low cooling rates during thermal metamorphism, and high cooling rates following shock reheating or excavation after thermal metamorphism.

  7. Partial melting of ordinary chondrites: Lost City (H) and St. Severin (LL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, Amy J. G.; Jones, John H.; Weber, Egon T.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Eucrites and diogenites are examples of asteroidal basalts and orthopyroxenites, respectively. As they are found intermingled in howardites, which are inferred to be regolith breccias, eucrites and diogenites are thought to be genetically related. But the details of this relationship and of their individual origins remain controversial. Work by Jurewicz et al. showed that 1170-1180 C partial melts of the (anhydrous) Murchison (CM) chondrite have major element compositions extremely similar to primitive eucrites, such as Sioux County. However, the MnO contents of these melts were about half that of Sioux County, a problem for the simple partial melting model. In addition, partial melting of Murchison could not produce diogenites, because residual pyroxenes in the Murchison experiments were too Fe- and Ca-rich and were minor phases at all but the lowest temperatures. A parent magma for diogenites needs an expanded low-calcium pyroxene field. In their partial melting study of an L6 chondrite, Kushiro and Mysen found that ordinary chondrites did have an expanded low-Ca pyroxene field over that of CV chondrites (i.e., Allende), probably because ordinary chondrites have lower Mg/Si ratios. This study expands that of both Kushiro and Mysen and Jurewicz et al. to the Lost City (H) and St. Severin (LL) chondrites at temperatures ranging from 1170 to 1325 C, at an fO2 of one log unit below the iron-wuestite buffer (IW-1).

  8. SXRF determination of trace elements in chondrule rims in the unequilibrated CO3 chondrite, ALH A77307

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Bajt, Sasa; Sutton, Steve R.; Papike, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The concentrations of Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, and Se in five chondrule rims in the CO3 chondrite ALH A77307 (3.0) using the synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe at Brookhaven National Laboratory were determined. The data show that the trace element chemistry of rims on different chondrules is remarkably similar, consistent with data obtained for the major elements by electron microprobe. These results support the idea that rims are not genetically related to individual chondrules, but all sampled the same reservoir of homogeneously mixed dust. Of the trace elements analyzed Zn and Ga show depletions relative to CI chondrite values, but in comparison with bulk CO chondrites all the elements are enriched by approximately 1.5 to 3.5 x CO. The high concentrations of the highly volatile elements Se and Ga and moderately volatile Zn (1.5 to 2 x CO) in rims show that matrix is the major reservoir of volatile elements in ALH A77307.

  9. Non-Destructive Classification Approaches for Equilbrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Harrington, R.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R. V.

    2013-01-01

    Classification of meteorites is most effectively carried out by petrographic and mineralogic studies of thin sections, but a rapid and accurate classification technique for the many samples collected in dense collection areas (hot and cold deserts) is of great interest. Oil immersion techniques have been used to classify a large proportion of the US Antarctic meteorite collections since the mid-1980s [1]. This approach has allowed rapid characterization of thousands of samples over time, but nonetheless utilizes a piece of the sample that has been ground to grains or a powder. In order to compare a few non-destructive techniques with the standard approaches, we have characterized a group of chondrites from the Larkman Nunatak region using magnetic susceptibility and Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  10. Effects of Metamorphism on the Valence and Coordination of Titanium in Ordinary Chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, S.B.; Sutton, S.R.; Grossman, L.

    2012-04-02

    Despite years of study, the conditions under which ordinary chondrites were metamorphosed from grade 3 to grade 6 are not well defined. Wide ranges of peak temperature are inferred for each grade. The long-popular 'onion shell' model, in which higher metamorphic grade is attributed to greater depths of origin, implies a corresponding decrease in cooling rate with increasing grade, and there is disagreement as to whether or not this is observed. Redox conditions during chondrite metamorphism are also not well understood. Some workers have reported evidence for reduction, presumably by carbon, with increase in grade from 3-4, followed by oxidation during metamorphism to higher grades, but other work indicates little variation in fO{sub 2} as a function of metamorphic grade. During our investigation of the valence of Ti in planetary materials, we found high proportions of Ti{sup 3+} in olivine and pyroxene in chondrules in Semarkona (LL3.0) and low proportions in New Concord (L6) olivine, suggesting that Ti was oxidized during ordinary chondrite metamorphism. We have undertaken a study of L and LL chondrites of grades 3-6 to see how Ti valence and coordination vary with grade and to see if the variations can be used to constrain conditions of chondrite metamorphism.

  11. Carbon-rich aggregates in type 3 ordinary chondrites - Characterization, origins, and thermal history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, Adrian J.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon-rich aggregates from three type 3.4-3.6 ordinary chondrites and two chondritic clasts have been characterized in detail, using TEM techniques. The aggregates in all the meteorites studied range in size from 5-1000 microns and consist of a fine scale intergrowth of poorly graphitized carbon, amorphous carbon, Fe,Ni metal, and minor chromite. Contrary to previous reports, well-crystallized graphite and magnetite are absent. The association of Fe,Ni metal and carbonaceous material suggests that the original carbonaceous material may have formed by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) type reactions at low temperatures (less than 400 K), possibly in the solar nebula. This carbonaceous material probably consisted of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons, kerogen-like material, and other complex organic molecules. The aggregates were subsequently accreted onto the ordinary chondrite parent bodies and underwent planetary thermal processing which resulted in the catalytic graphitization of hydrocarbons, in the presence of Fe,Ni metal, to produce poorly graphitized carbon. None of the meteorites studied experienced temperatures sufficiently high to produce crystalline, ordered graphite. Using the empirical geothermometer of Rietmeijer and Mackinnon (1985), the measured d(002) spacings of poorly graphitized carbon show that graphitization occurred at temperatures between 300 and 450 C. This range of temperatures is significantly lower than the generally quoted metamorphic temperatures for type 3.4-3.6 ordinary chondrites (about 450-500 C).

  12. The Oxygen Isotope Composition of Dark Inclusions in HEDs, Ordinary and Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, R. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Buchanan, P. C.; Franchi, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    Dark inclusions (DIs) are lithic fragments that form a volumetrically small, but important, component in carbonaceous chondrites. Carbonaceous clasts similar to DIs are also found in some ordinary chondrites and HEDs. DIs are of particular interest because they provide a record of nebular and planetary processes distinct from that of their host meteorite. DIs may be representative of the material that delivered water and other volatiles to early Earth as a late veneer. Here we focus on the oxygen isotopic composition of DIs in a variety of settings with the aim of understanding their formational history and relationship to the enclosing host meteorite.

  13. Evidence from the Semarkona ordinary chondrite for Al-26 heating of small planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheon, I. D.; Hutchison, R.

    1989-01-01

    The first observation of radiogenic Mg-26 in nonrefractory meteoritic material, a plagioclase-bearing, olivine-pyroxene clast chondrule in the Semarkona ordinary chondrite, is reported. The inferred initial abundance of Al-26 is sufficient to produce incipient melting in well-insulated bodies of chondritic composition. It is concluded that planetary accretion and diffentiation must have begun on a timescale comparable to the half-life of Al-26 and that, even if widespread melting did not occur, Al-26 heating played a significant role in thermal metamorphism on small planets.

  14. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn-53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn-53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  15. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition,more » measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.« less

  16. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  17. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Patricia M; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J; Hutcheon, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric (53)Mn-(53)Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ∼1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs. PMID:26100451

  18. Chemical zoning and homogenization of olivines in ordinary chondrites and implications for thermal histories of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, Masamichi; Mckay, David S.; Mckay, Gordon A.; Duke, Michael B.

    1986-01-01

    The extent and degree of homogenization of chemical zoning of olivines in type 3 ordinary chondrites is studied in order to obtain some constraints on cooling histories of chondrites. Based on Mg-Fe and CaO zoning, olivines in type 3 chondrites are classified into four types. A single chondrule usually contains olivines with the same type of zoning. Microporphyritic olivines show all four zoning types. Barred olivines usually show almost homogenized chemical zoning. The cooling rates or burial depths needed to homogenize the chemical zoning are calculated by solving the diffusion equation, using the zoning profiles as an initial condition. Mg-Fe zoning of olivine may be altered during initial cooling, whereas CaO zoning is hardly changed. Barred olivines may be homogenized during initial cooling because their size is relatively small. To simulated microporphyritic olivine chondrules, cooling from just below the liquidus at moderately high rates is preferable to cooling from above the liquidus at low rates. For postaccumulation metamorphism of type 3 chondrites to keep Mg-Fe zoning unaltered, the maximum metamorphic temperature must be less than about 400 C if cooling rates based on Fe-Ni data are assumed. Calculated cooling rates for both Fa and CaO homogenization are consistent with those by Fe-Ni data for type 4 chondrites. A hot ejecta blanket several tens of meters thick on the surface of a parent body is sufficient to homogenize Mg-Fe zoning if the temperature of the blanket is 600-700 C. Burial depths for petrologic types of ordinary chondrites in a parent body heated by Al-26 are broadly consistent with those previously proposed.

  19. Experimental Space Weathering of Ordinary Chondrites by Nanopulse Laser: TEM Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Hiroi, T.; Keller, L. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    A set of ordinary chondrite meteorites has been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser to simulate the effects of micrometeorite bombardment. Three meteorites, an H (Ehole), L (Chateau Renard - CR), and LL (Appley Bridge - AB) were lasered following the method of Sasaki et al [1]. Near IR spectra were taken before and after exposure to examine the optical changes induced and the samples were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) to understand the physical changes.

  20. Mineralogy and petrology of two ordinary chondrites and their correlation with other meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Krzysztof; Pilski, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Two ordinary chondrites are compared and classified using transmitted and reflected light microscopy and electron microprobe analyses. Both meteorites were confiscated by the Polish Customs Service at the border with Belarus. The first meteorite (called in this paper Terespol-1) is a L/LL6 chondrite, its classification being supported by the equilibrated compositions of olivine and orthopyroxene and the presence of large recrystallized feldspars (< 150 μm). The specimen examined experienced weak shock metamorphism (S3) and moderate weathering (although metal in the inner part of the meteorite seems to be unaffected by oxidization). The other meteorite (called in this paper Terespol-2) is a LL6 chondrite which experienced weak shock metamorphism (S3) and is unaffected by weathering. The Terespol-2 meteorite shares its classification with the Dhofar 1401 chondrite but the lack of data prevents further correlation. Both meteorites have been correlated with known findings from the Meteoritical Bulletin database and an attempt is made to identify their place of origin (fall event). Results indicate that Terespol-1 is most closely related to the Dhofar 1316 chondrite and we suggest that both meteorites at least came from the same parent body.

  1. Phosphate control on the Th/U variations in ordinary chondrites: Improving solar system abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreva, J. S.; Burnett, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    Isotope dilution thorium and uranium analyses by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry of 12 samples of Harleton (L6) show a much larger scatter than was previously observed in equilibrated ordinary chondrites. Th/U linearly correlates with 1/U in Harleton and in the total equilibrated ordinary chondrite data set as well. Such a correlation suggests a two component mixture and this trend can be quantitatively modeled as reflecting variations in the mixing ratio between two phosphate phases: chlorapatite and merrillite. The major effect is due to apatite variations, which strongly control the whole rock U concentrations. Phosphorous variations will tend to destroy the Th/U vs. 1/U correlation, and measured P concentrations on exactly the same samples as U and Th show a factor of 3 range. It appears that the P variations are compensated by inverse variations in U (a dilution effect) to preserve the Th/U vs. 1/U correlation. Because variations in whole rock Th/U are consequences of phosphate sampling, a weighted average of high accuracy Th/U measurements in equilibrated ordinary chondrites should converge to a significantly improved average solar system Th/U. Our best estimate of this ratio is 3.53 with ?mean = 0.10.

  2. Postshock Annealing and Postannealing Shock in Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites: Implications for the Thermal and Shock Histories of Chondritic Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    In addition to shock effects in olivine, plagioclase, orthopyroxene and Ca-pyroxene, petrographic shock indicators in equilibrated ordinary chondrites (OC) include chromite veinlets, chromite-plagioclase assemblages, polycrystalline troilite, metallic Cu, irregularly shaped troilite grains within metallic Fe-Ni, rapidly solidified metal-sulfide intergrowths, martensite and various types of plessite, metal-sulfide veins, large metal and/or sulfide nodules, silicate melt veins, silicate darkening, low-Ca clinopyroxene, silicate melt pockets, and large regions of silicate melt. The presence of some of these indicators in every petrologic type-4 to -6 ordinary chondrite (OC) demonstrates that collisional events caused all equilibrated OC to reach shock stages S3-S6. Those type-4 to -6 OC that are classified as shock-stage S1 (on the basis of sharp optical extinction in olivine) underwent postshock annealing due to burial beneath materials heated by the impact event. Those type-4 to -6 OC that are classified S2 (on the basis of undulose extinction and lack of planar fractures in olivine) were shocked to stage S3-S6, annealed to stage S1 and then shocked again to stage S2. Some OC were probably shocked to stage 253 after annealing. It seems likely that many OC experienced multiple episodes of shock and annealing. Because 40Ar-39Ar chronological data indicate that MIL 99301 (LL6, Sl) was annealed approximately 4.26 Ga ago, presumably as a consequence of a major impact, it seems reasonable to suggest that other equilibrated S1 and S2 OC (which contain relict shock features) were also annealed by impacts. Because some type-6 S1 OC (e.g., Guarena, Kernouve, Portales Valley, all of which contain relict shock features) were annealed 4.44-4.45 Ga ago (during a period when impacts were prevalent and most OC were thermally metamorphosed), it follows that impact-induced annealing could have contributed significantly to OC thermal metamorphism.

  3. Distribution of rare earth elements and uranium in various components of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, M.; Honda, M.

    1984-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) and uranium were studied for their distributions in various component phases of four ordinary chondrites. Kesen (H4), Richardton (H5), Bruderheim (L6), and Saint Severin (LL6). A selective dissolution method was applied for the phase fractionation. The REE were analysed by neutron activation analysis, and U was determined by neutron-induced fission tracks. The present study revealed that both REE and U are highly enriched in the Ca-phosphate minerals with different enrichment factors, implying chemical fractionation between them. The phosphates seem to be responsible for more than 80 percent of the light REE in all chondrites. On the other hand, only 20-40 percent of the total U resides in the Ca-phosphates. This difference in enrichments might have been caused through the levels of metamorphic activity on the meteoritic parent bodies.

  4. The Ardón L6 ordinary chondrite: A long-hidden Spanish meteorite fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-RodríGuez, Josep M.; Llorca, Jordi; Weyrauch, Mona; Bischoff, Addi; Moyano-Cambero, Carles E.; Keil, Klaus; Laubenstein, Matthias; Pack, Andreas; Madiedo, José MaríA.; Alonso-AzcáRate, Jacinto; Riebe, My; Wieler, Rainer; Ott, Uli; Tapia, Mar; Mestres, NarcíS.

    2014-08-01

    We report and describe an L6 ordinary chondrite fall that occurred in Ardón, León province, Spain (longitude 5.5605°W, latitude 42.4364°N) on July 9th, 1931. The 5.5 g single stone was kept hidden for 83 yr by Rosa González Pérez, at the time an 11 yr old who had observed the fall and had recovered the meteorite. According to various newspaper reports, the event was widely observed in Northern Spain. Ardón is a very well-preserved, fresh, strongly metamorphosed (petrologic type 6), and weakly shocked (S3) ordinary chondrite with well-equilibrated and recrystallized minerals. The mineral compositions (olivine Fa23.7±0.3, low-Ca pyroxene Fs20.4±0.2Wo1.5±0.2, plagioclase An10.3±0.5Ab84.3±1.2), magnetic susceptibility (log χ = 4.95 ± 0.05 × 10-9 m3 kg-1), bulk density (3.49 ± 0.05 g cm-3), grain density (3.58 ± 0.05 g cm-3), and porosity (2.5 vol%) are typical for L6 chondrites. Short-lived radionuclides confirm that the meteorite constitutes a recent fall. The 21Ne and 38Ar cosmic ray exposure ages are both about 20-30 Ma, similar to values for many other L chondrites. The cosmogenic 22Ne/21Ne ratio indicates that preatmospheric Ardón was a relatively large body. The fact that the meteorite was hidden in private hands for 83 yr makes one wonder if other meteorite falls may have experienced the same fate, thus possibly explaining the anomalously low number of falls reported in continental Spain in the 20th century.

  5. The Cali Meteorite: Luminescence of a recently fallen H/L ordinary chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Llorca, J.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2009-08-17

    The Cali meteorite fall occurred on 6 July 2007 at 21h33m+-1m UTC. Some specimens were recovered just after their fall so they are extremely fresh materials. Mineral analysis and bulk chemistry revealed that the measured abundances for most elements closely match the values recorded for other ordinary chondrites classified as H/L. We present here thermoluminescence studies of this recently fallen meteorite in order to get additional information on the radiation environment, and the thermal history of this meteorite. Such information is revealed to be complementary with the range of orbital elements deduced from eyewitness reports of the fireball.

  6. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. V - Ordinary chondrites at the Allan Hills ice fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data have been obtained for 167 ordinary chondrites from the ice fields in the vicinity of the Allan Hills in Victoria Land, Antarctica, in order to investigate their thermal and radiation history, pairing, terrestrial age, and concentration mechanisms. Natural TL values for meteorites from the Main ice field are fairly low, while the Farwestern field shows a spread with many values 30-80 krad, suggestive of less than 150-ka terrestrial ages. There appear to be trends in TL levels within individual ice fields which are suggestive of directions of ice movement at these sites during the period of meteorite concentration. These directions seem to be confirmed by the orientations of elongation preserved in meteorite pairing groups. The proportion of meteorites with very low natural TL levels at each field is comparable to that observed at the Lewis Cliff site and for modern non-Antarctic falls and is also similar to the fraction of small perihelia orbits calculated from fireball and fall observations. Induced TL data for meteorites from the Allan Hills confirm trends which show that a select group of H chondrites from the Antarctic experienced a different extraterrestrial thermal history to that of non-Antarctic H chondrites.

  7. Origin of SiO 2-rich components in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezel, Dominik C.; Palme, Herbert; Nasdala, Lutz; Brenker, Frank E.

    2006-03-01

    Silica-rich objects are common minor components in ordinary chondrites (OC), occurring as fragments and as chondrules. Their typical paragenesis is orthopyroxene + SiO 2 (with bulk SiO 2 >65 wt%) and occasionally with additional olivine and/or spinel. Individual silica-rich components (SRC) have previously been studied in various types of OCs, although there is only one comprehensive study of these objects by Brigham et al. [Brigham, C.A., Murrell, M.T., Yabuki, H., Ouyang, Z., El Goresy, A., 1986. Silica-bearing chondrules and clasts in ordinary chondrites. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 50, 1655-1666]. Several different explanations of how SRCs formed have been published. The main question is how silica-enrichment was achieved, because CI-chondritic atomic Mg/Si-ratio is 1.07 and as a consequence only olivine and pyroxene, but no free silica should be stable. There are two basic possibilities for the SiO 2-enrichment: (1) a RedOx-mechanism or magmatic fractionation on the parent body and (2) fractional condensation or recycling of chondrule mesostasis in the solar nebula. To better constrain the origin of these objects, we measured major and rare earth elements in SRCs of various types of ordinary chondrites, and in addition, we studied silica polymorphism in these objects using an in situ micro-Raman technique. Bulk chondrule compositions define mixing lines between the compositions of olivine and pyroxene. The SRCs extend these lines to an SiO 2 end member. In contrast, magmatic trends grossly deviate from these mixing lines. Concentrations of CaO, Al 2O 3, and REE in the pyroxenes of the SRCs are low (0.01 to 1× CI) and the CI-normalized REE-patterns are virtually flat, typical of bulk chondrules, but untypical of magmatic trends. We therefore conclude that SiO 2-rich objects are not of magmatic origin. They are the result of fractional condensation in the solar nebula. The silica in SRCs occurs mainly as tridymite and sometimes as cristobalite or—in very rare

  8. Three-dimensional imaging of ordinary chondrite microporosity at 2.6 μm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jon M.; Rivers, Mark L.

    2013-09-01

    We show that high resolution (2.6 μm/voxel) synchrotron X-ray microtomography (μCT) scans are able to observe the majority of microporosity in ordinary chondrites. This porosity is present in the form of microcracks and voids among and between mineral grains. We examined, in total, seven small (6-12 mm3) chips of the ordinary chondrites Baszkówka (L5, S1), ALH A77258 (H5, S2), Moorleah (L6, S3), and Kyushu (L6, S5). These four samples were chosen because of their variable impact histories. Using μCT and various digital isolation and visualization techniques, we found that the structure of microporosity varies with the degree of compaction and shock loading experienced by the materials. The microporosity in the compacted and more strongly shock samples Moorleah and Kyushu is visible as sheet-like fractures within brittle silicates as well as in discontinuous, distributed voids sometimes associated with chondrule rims and grain boundaries. In samples that have experienced less shock and only mild compaction, we found few, if any, microcracks in the silicate grains of the materials. Microporosity in the Baszkówka and ALH A77258 samples is largely represented by intergranular voids, with occasional intragranular voids being present. Regardless of degree of shock loading, ductile Fe-Ni or FeS grains give no evidence of shock-related internal fractures contributing to porosity.

  9. Chondrules in the Qingzhen type-3 enstatite chondrite Possible precursor components and comparison to ordinary chondrite chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, J. N.; Rubin, A. E.; Rambaldi, E. R.; Rajan, R. S.; Wasson, J. T.

    1985-08-01

    The mineral composition of chondrules from a fragment of Qingzhen (EH3) fall was analyzed by neutron activation method. Unlike the ordinary chondrite (OC) chondrules (Gooding and Keil, 1981), the Qingzhen radial pyroxene (RP) and porphyritic pyroxene (PP) chondrules have similar bulk compositions. Porphyritic olivine-pyroxene (POP) chondrules are richer than PP and RP chondrules in refractory lithophiles and siderophiles. Elements in each of the following sets intercorrelate significantly: (1) Fe-Co-Ni-Ir-Au, probably derived from a metal component; (2) Ca-Eu-Se, which suggests an oldhamite-rich precursor; (3) Al-Sc-Hf, occurring in high concentrations in POP chondrules, this set suggesting the existence of a refractory lithophile-rich and olivine-rich component; (4) Na REE; and (5) Cl-Br. Sets (2) and (4) were not precursors of OC. The interelement ratios of refractory lithophiles such as Ca, Al, Ti, Sc, and REE are similar to CI ratios, suggesting that they originated in the earliest phases as silicates, which were sulfurized before chondrule formation.

  10. Striking Graphite Bearing Clasts Found in Two Ordinary Chondrite Samples; NWA6169 and NWA8330

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jessica M.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Chan, Queenie; Kring, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Meteorites play an integral role in understanding the history of the solar system. Not only can they contain some of the oldest material found in the solar system they also can contain material that is unique. Many lithologies are only found as foreign clasts within distinctly different host meteorites. In this investigation two foreign clasts within the meteorites, NWA6169 and NWA8330 were studied. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the mineralogy and petrography of the clasts within the samples. From there an identification and possible origin were to be inferred. NWA6169 is an unclassified ordinary chondrite that has a presumed petrologic type of L3. NWA8330 is a classified ordinary chondrite that has a petrologic type of LL3. Both meteorites were found to contain clasts that were similar; both modally were comprised of about 5% acicular graphite. Through SEM and Raman Spectroscopy it was found that they contained olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, Fe-Ni sulfides, graphite, and metals. They were found to portray an igneous texture with relationships that suggest concurrent growth. Analytical microprobe results for NWA6169 revealed mineral compositions of Fa31-34, Fs23-83, and Ab7-85. For NWA8330 these were Fa28-32, Fs10-24, and Ab4-83. Only one similar material has been reported, in the L3 chondrite Krymka (Semenenko & Girich, 1995). The clast they described exhibited similar mineralogies including the unusual graphite. Krymka data displayed compositional values of Fa28.5-35.0 and Fs9-25.9. These ranges are fairly similar to that of NWA6169 and NWA8330. These samples may all be melt clasts, probably of impact origin. Two possibilities are (1) impact of a C-type asteroid onto the L chondrite parent asteroid, and (2) a piece of proto-earth ejected from the moon-forming collision event. These possibilities present abundant questions, and can be tested. The measurement of oxygen isotope compositions from the clasts should reveal the original source of the

  11. The Iodine-Xenon System in Outer and Inner Portions of Chondrules from the Unnamed Antarctic LL3 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshik, A. P.; Pravdivtseva, O. V.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Amelin, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Alteration processes may affect I-Xe system in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. It was shown that at the edges, where a contribution is made by matrix material around the rim, *Xe-129/Xe-128 values are generally lower (later apparent ages) than in the main chondrule mass. In this work we attempted to investigate whether thermal metamorphism can affect the I-Xe system in LL3 chondrites which did not experienced aqueous alteration.

  12. The Natural Thermoluminescence of Meteorites. Part 5; Ordinary Chondrites at the Allan Hills Ice Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data have been obtained for 167 ordinary chondrites from the ice fields in the vicinity of the Allan Hills in Victoria Land, Antarctica, in order to investigate their thermal and radiation history, pairing, terrestrial age, and concentration mechanisms. Using fairly conservative criteria (including natural and induced TL, find location, and petrographic data), the 167 meteorite fragments are thought to represent a maximum of 129 separate meteorites. Natural TL values for meteorites from the Main ice field are fairly low (typically 5-30 krad, indicative of terrestrial ages of approx. 400 ka), while the Far western field shows a spread with many values 30-80 krad, suggestive of less then 150-ka terrestrial ages. There appear to be trends in TL levels within individual ice fields which are suggestive of directions of ice movement at these sites during the period of meteorite concentration. These directions seem to be confirmed by the orientations of elongation preserved in meteorite pairing groups. The proportion of meteorites with very low natural TL levels (less then 5 krad) at each field is comparable to that observed at the Lewis Cliff site and for modern non-Antarctic falls and is also similar to the fraction of small perihelia (less then 0.85 AU) orbits calculated from fireball and fall observations. Induced TL data for meteorites from the Allan Hills confirm trends observed for meteorites collected during the 1977/1978 and 1978/1979 field seasons which show that a select group of H chondrites from the Antarctic experienced a different extraterrestrial thermal history to that of non-Antarctic H chondrites.

  13. The cali meteorite fell: A new H/L ordinary chondrite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, J.M.T.; Llorca, J.; Rubin, A.E.; Grossman, J.N.; Sears, D.W.G.; Naranjo, M.; Bretzius, S.; Tapia, M.; Sepulveda, M.H.G.

    2009-01-01

    The fall of the Cali meteorite took place on 6 July 2007 at 16 h 32 ?? 1 min local time (21 h 32 ?? 1 min UTC). A daylight fireball was witnessed by hundreds of people in the Cauca Valley in Colombia from which 10 meteorite samples with a total mass of 478 g were recovered near 3??24.3'N, 76??30.6'W. The fireball trajectory and radiant have been reconstructed with moderate accuracy. From the computed radiant and from considering various plausible velocities, we obtained a range of orbital solutions that suggest that the Cali progenitor meteoroid probably originated in the main asteroid belt. Based on petrography, mineral chemistry, magnetic susceptibility, fhermoluminescence, and bulk chemistry, the Cali meteorite is classified as an H/L4 ordinary chondrite breccia.

  14. The Danebury Iron Age meteorite—An H5 ordinary chondrite "find" from Hampshire, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillinger, C. T.; Pillinger, J. M.; Johnson, D.; Greenwood, R. C.; Tindle, A. G.; Jull, A. J. T.; Allen, D. H.; Cunliffe, B.

    2014-06-01

    What remains of a 30 g sample, first recognized as a meteorite in 1989 during characterization of metalworking debris from Danebury, an Iron Age hillfort, in Hampshire, England, has been classified as an H5 ordinary chondrite. Its arrival on Earth has been dated as 2350 ± 120 yr BP, making it contemporary with the period of maximum human activity at the recovery site. Despite its considerable terrestrial residence age, the interior of the specimen is remarkably fresh with a weathering index of W1/2. There is, however, no evidence of human intervention in its preservation. Its near-pristine state is explained in terms of its serendipitous burial during the back-fill of a pit dug into chalk by prehistoric people for the storage of grain. This chance discovery has interesting ramifications for the survival of meteorites in areas having a high pH because of a natural lime content arising as a result of the local geology.

  15. The structure and composition of metal particles in two type 6 ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland-Duffield, C. E.; Williams, D. B.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1991-01-01

    The microstructure and composition of taenite particles were examined in two type-6 ordinary chondrites, Kernouve (H6) and Saint Severin (LL6), using reflected light microscopy and a combination of electron optical instruments. It was found that, in both meteorites, the taenite particles consisted of a narrow rim of high-Ni taenite and a central region of cloudy zone similar to those present in iron meteorites. The microstructure of the cloudy zone in Saint Severin was coarser than that in Kernouve , due to the higher Ni content and slower cooling rate of the former. Three microstructural zones were observed in the outer taenite rim of both meteorites, the origin of which is considered likely to be due to the presence of ordered domain boundaries or to the presence of two phases FeNi and FeNi3 in the high-Ni region of the outer taenite rim.

  16. Cosmogenic Records in 18 Ordinary Chondrites from the Dar Al Gani Region, Libya. 2; Radionclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Finkel, R. C.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Jull, A. J. T.; Schultz, L.

    2003-01-01

    In the past decade more than 1000 meteorites have been recovered from the Dar al Gani (DaG) plateau in the Libyan part of the Sahara. The geological setting, meteorite pairings and density are described. So far, only a few terrestrial ages are known for DaG meteorites, e.g. 60+/- 20 kyr for the DaG 476 shergottite shower and 80+/- 20 kyr for the lunar meteorite DaG 262. However, from other desert areas, such as Oman, it is known that achondrites may survive much longer than chondritic meteorites, so the ages of these two achondrites may not be representative of the majority of the DaG meteorite collection, of which more than 90% are ordinary chondrites. In this work we report concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides, 14C (half-life = 5,730 yr), 41Ca (1.04x10 superscript 5 yr), Cl-36 (3.01x10 superscript 5 yr), Al-26 (7.05x10 superscript 5 yr) and 10Be (1.5x10 superscript 6 yr) to determine the terrestrial ages of DaG meteorites and constrain their pre-atmospheric size and exposure history.

  17. Ancient porosity preserved in ordinary chondrites: Examining shock and compaction on young asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Jon M.; Rubin, Alan E.; Beard, Sky P.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Isachsen, Clark E.; Rivers, Mark L.; Macke, Robert J.

    2014-07-01

    We use a combination of 2D and 3D petrographic examination and 40Ar-39Ar analyses to examine the impact histories of a suite of seven ordinary chondrites (Baszkówka, Miller, NWA 2380, Mount Tazerzait, Sahara 98034, Tjerebon, and MIL 99301) that partially preserve their ancient, but postaccretionary, porosity ranging from 10 to 20%. We examine whether materials that seem to be only mildly processed (as their large intergranular pore spaces suggest) may have more complex shock histories. The ages determined for most of the seven OCs studied here indicate closure of the 40Ar-39Ar system after primary accretion, but during (Baszkówka) or shortly after (others) thermal metamorphism, with little subsequent heating. Exceptions include Sahara 98034 and MIL 99301, which were heated to some degree at later stages, but retain some evidence for the timing of thermal metamorphism in the 40Ar-39Ar system. Although each of these chondrites has olivine grains with sharp optical extinction (signaling an apparent shock stage of S1), normally indicative of an extremely mild impact history, all of the samples contain relict shock indicators. Given the high porosity and relatively low degree of compaction coupled with signs of shock and thermal annealing, it seems plausible that impacts into materials that were already hot may have produced the relict shock indicators. Initial heating could have resulted from prior collisions, the decay of 26Al, or both processes.

  18. Dynamic behavior of an ordinary chondrite: The effects of microstructure on strength, failure and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, James David; Kimberley, Jamie; Hazeli, Kavan; Plescia, Jeffrey; Ramesh, K. T.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the relationships between microstructure, stress-state and failure mechanisms is important in the development and validation of numerical models simulating large-scale impact events. In this study, we investigate the effects of microstructural constituent phases and defects on the compressive and tensile strength, failure, and fragmentation of a stony meteorite (GRO 85209). In the first part of the paper we consider the effect of defects on the strength and failure. Strengths are measured and linked with detailed quantification of the important defects in this material. We use the defect statistic measurements in conjunction with our current understanding of rate-dependent strengths to discuss the uniaxial compressive strength measurements of this ordinary chondrite with those of another ordinary chondrite, with a different defect population. In the second part of the paper, we consider the effects of the microstructure and defects on the fragmentation of GRO 85209. Fragment size distributions are measured using image processing techniques and fragments were found to result from two distinct fragmentation mechanisms. The first is a mechanism that is associated with relatively smaller fragments arising from individual defect grains and the coalescence of fractures initiating from microstructure defects. This mechanism becomes more dominant as the strain-rate is increased. The second mechanism is associated with larger fragments that are polyphase and polygrain in character and is dependent on the structural failure mechanisms that are activated during load. In turn, these are dependent on (for example) the strain-rate, stress state, and specimen geometry. The implications of these results are briefly discussed in terms of regolith generation and catastrophic disruption.

  19. Outgassing of ordinary chondritic material and some of its implications for the chemistry of asteroids, planets, and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce

    2007-02-01

    We used chemical equilibrium calculations to model thermal outgassing of ordinary chondritic material as a function of temperature, pressure, and bulk composition and use our results to discuss outgassing on asteroids and the early Earth. The calculations include ∼1000 solids and gases of the elements Al, C, Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, F, Fe, H, K, Mg, Mn, N, Na, Ni, O, P, S, Si, and Ti. The major outgassed volatiles from ordinary chondritic material are CH4, H2, H2O, N2, and NH3 (the latter at conditions where hydrous minerals form). Contrary to widely held assumptions, CO is never the major C-bearing gas during ordinary chondrite metamorphism. The calculated oxygen fugacity (partial pressure) of ordinary chondritic material is close to that of the quartz-fayalite-iron (QFI) buffer. Our results are insensitive to variable total pressure, variable volatile element abundances, and kinetic inhibition of C and N dissolution in Fe metal. Our results predict that Earth's early atmosphere contained CH4, H2, H2O, N2, and NH3; similar to that used in Miller-Urey synthesis of organic compounds.

  20. Chemical and physical studies of chondrites. X - Cathodoluminescence and phase composition studies of metamorphism and nebular processes in chondrules of type 3 ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehart, John M.; Lofgren, Gary E.; Jie, LU; Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1992-01-01

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics of eight type-3 ordinary chondrites and one L5 chondrite were investigated with particular emphasis on detailed compositions of the relevant phases in four of these chondrites: Semarkona (type-3.0); Krymka (3.1); Allan Hills A77214 (3.5); and Dhajala (3.8). By sorting the chondrules into eight groups according to the CL of mesostasis and to certain compositional criteria and by determining the number of chondrules in these groups as a function of petrological type, it was possible to deduce genetic/evolutionary sequences of the chondrules. It is shown that there are major compositional differences in chondrules, which account for their CL properties and the chondrule groups.

  1. Chemical and physical studies of chondrites: 10. Cathodoluminescence and phase composition studies of metamorphism and nebular processes in chondrules of type 3 ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, J.M.; Lu Jie; Benoit, P.H.; Sears, D.W.G. ); Lofgren, G.E. )

    1992-10-01

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) properties of eight type 3 ordinary chondrites and one L5 chondrite have been determined, and phenocryst and mesostasis compositions have been analyzed in the chondrules of four of them (Semarkona, type 3.0; Krymka, 3.1; Allan Hills A77214, 3.5; and Dhajala, 3.8) in order to investigate their origins and metamorphic history. In the present study, the authors discuss the CL properties of nine ordinary chondrites of a variety of petrologic types with particular emphasis on detailed studies of the compositions of the relevant phases in four of these: Semarkona (3.0), Krymka (3.1), Allan Hills A77214 (3.5), and Dhajala (3.8). They describe a means of classifying chondrules that is based on the composition of their two major components, the mesostasis and phenocrysts. The system is applicable to > 90-95% off the chondrules in a given meteorite and it describes the range of material produced by nebular material and of the effect of metamorphism on the chondrules. They also discuss the relevance of the results for the origin of the nine chondrite classes.

  2. Chromite-rich mafic silicate chondrules in ordinary chondrites: Formation by impact melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Rubin, Alan E.

    1993-01-01

    Chromium-rich chondrules constitute less than 0.1 percent of all ordinary chondrite (OC) chondrules and comprise three groups: chromian-spinel chondrules, chromian-spinel inclusions, and chromite-rich mafic silicate (CRMS) chondrules. Chromian-spinel chondrules (typically 100-300 microns in apparent diameter) exhibit granular, porphyritic and unusual textures and occur mainly in H chondrites. Their morphologies are distinct from the irregularly shaped chromian-spinel inclusions of similar mineralogy. Chromian-spinel chondrules and inclusions consist of grains of chromian-spinel embedded in plagioclase (Pl) or mesostasis of Pl composition. Many also contain accessory ilmenite (Ilm), high-Ca pyroxene (Px), merrillite (Mer), and rare olivine (Ol); some exhibit concentric mineral and chemical zoning. CRMS chondrules (300-1100 microns in apparent diameter) are generally larger than chromian-spinel chondrules and occur in all metamorphosed OC groups. Most CRMS chondrules are nearly spherical although a few are ellipsoidal with a/b aspect ratios ranging up to 1.7. Textures include cryptocrystalline, granular, radial, barred, and porphyritic varieties; some contain apparently relict grains. The chondrules consist of chromite (Chr), Ol and Pl, along with accessory Mer, troilite (Tr), metallic Fe-Ni (Met), Px and Ilm. The mesostasis in CRMS chondrules is nearly opaque in transmitted light; thus, they can be easily recognized in the optical microscope. Based on the similarity of mineralogy and chemistry between CRMS chondrules of different textures (opaque chromite-rich mesostasis, skeletal morphology of Ol grains, similar bulk compositions) we suggest that these chondrules form a genetically related population.

  3. Thermal recalcitrance of the organic D-rich component of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remusat, L.; Piani, L.; Bernard, S.

    2016-02-01

    Carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites (CCs and OCs) contain insoluble organic matter (IOM) with large D-excess compared to other objects in the solar system. The higher the temperature experienced by CCs, the lower the D/H ratio of their IOM. It seems to be the opposite for OCs. Here, we report NanoSIMS H- (and N-) isotopic imaging of IOM of three OCs that experienced thermal metamorphism in the sequence Semarkona, Bishunpur and GRO 95502. In addition, we performed flash heating experiments on the IOM of GRO 95502 at 600 °C and characterized the residues using NanoSIMS, Raman and XANES spectroscopy. The present study shows that, in contrast to IOM of CI, CM and CR, IOM of OCs exhibits very few D-rich (or 15N-rich) hotspots. Furthermore, although the evolution of the molecular structure of OC and CC IOM is similar upon heating, their D/H ratios do not follow the same trend: the D/H of OC IOM drastically increases while the D/H of CC IOM decreases. In contrast to CC IOM, the D-rich component of which does not survive at high temperatures, the present results highlight the thermal recalcitrance of the D-rich component of OC IOM. This suggests that CCs and OCs did not accrete the same organic material, thereby challenging the hypothesis of a common precursor on chondritic parent bodies. The present results support the hypothesis that OC IOM contains an organic component that could originate from the interstellar medium.

  4. The Origin of Silica-Rich Chondrules and Clasts in Ordinary and Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, A.; Boynton, W. V.

    1992-07-01

    Chondrules and clasts containing a silica mineral or a silica glass are a minor but important constituent in many ordinary (Planner, 1983; Brigham et al., 1986) and some carbonaceous (Olsen, 1983) chondrites, and have been considered somewhat enigmatic. The recent discovery of a large, silica-rich igneous clast in the Bovedy (L3) chondrite (Ruzicka and Boynton, 1992) sheds light on the possible origin of other silica-rich objects. As discussed in Ruzicka and Boynton (1992), the Bovedy clast probably crystallized from an Lchondrite silicate magma in a relatively large magma body that had previously undergone olivine fractionation. The existence of similar fractionating magmas can also account for the origin of other silica-rich objects, as shown below. Pyroxene-silica objects. Chondrules (drop-formed objects) and clasts (irregularly shaped objects) consisting essentially of a mixture of orthopyroxene (opx) and a silica mineral (SiO2) have been found in various ordinary chondrites (Brigham et al., 1986). Brigham and coworkers (1986) proposed that these objects could be condensates. However, fractional crystallization of a liquid similar in composition to the Bovedy clast (Ruzicka and Boynton, 1992) will produce (Morse, 1980) the following solids: (a) orthopyroxenite, (b) an opx + SiO2 rock, and (c) a feldspar, SiO2 and pyroxene rock. Brecciation or remelting of rock (b), which lies on the opx-SiO2 join in the cristobalite primary crystallization field, could have produced the pyroxene-silica objects of Brigham et al. (1986) and Planner (1983). Fayalite-silica clasts. These clasts consist of SiO2, olivine (ol, Fa(sub)63-96), and highly variable amounts of opx and clinopyroxene (Brigham et al., 1986). Brigham et al. (1986) discussed various origins for these objects and concluded that none were entirely satisfactory, but that an accidental mixture of the various phases in them was probably the best hypothesis. However, a rock mainly containing SiO2 and fayalitic ol (Fa

  5. Partial Melting of Ordinary Chondrite: Implications for Siderophile Behavior During Early Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushmer, T.

    2002-12-01

    Core formation scenarios in growing planetesimals include a variety of possible physical mechanisms such as segregation in a solid or partially molten silicate body or whether or not the body was actively deforming. The resulting geochemical composition of the metal and silicate phases will also be a function of bulk composition, percent of metal melted and oxygen fugacity. To explore the relationship between physical core formation scenarios and geochemistry, deformation experiments have been conducted on a H6 ordinary chondrite at different stages of melting. Deformation experiments provide a dynamic component that allows liquid metal to segregate from solid silicate, or from matrices containing various amounts of silicate melt. Geochemical analyses of metal quench in several experimental charges and on metal grains in the Kernouve H6 starting material have been performed by LA-ICP-MS (Hummayun &\\ Campbell, EPSL, 2002; Rushmer et.al., Geochem. Cosmochem. Acta, Goldschmidt Conf. Abs,, 2002). Below the silicate solidus (KM-10, 1.0 GPa, 925°C, 1x10-5 s-1), analyses of compatible (Re, Os) and incompatible (Pd, Au) siderophiles in residual, strained Fe-Ni metal and unmodified metal show little variation. These data suggest even though metamorphosed, siderophile abundances are not strongly modified by shearing. At higher temperatures, (KM-17, 1.2 GPa, 940°C, 10-6 s-1) data from metal quench representing early formed liquid (S-rich and possibly O-rich) and of residual Fe-Ni metal have been plotted on a Fe, H-chondrite normalized plot with starting Kernouve metal and bulk H4-6 metal compositions. The quench metal resembles liquid, being depleted in compatible siderophiles, e.g., Re, Os, Ir, and enriched in Ni, Pd. Residual metal mirrors the quench metal and is enriched in compatible elements and depleted in the incompatibles when compared with bulk H metal. Ga and Ge show slight fractionation. Ga, Ge, Co and Ir vs. Ni plots show quench metal compositions are similar

  6. Evidence for a late thermal event of unequilibrated enstatite chondrites: a Rb-Sr study of Qingzhen and Yamato 6901 (EH3) and Khairpur (EL6)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torigoye, N.; Shima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The Rb-Sr whole rock and internal systematics of two EH3 chondrites, Qingzhen and Yamato 6901, and of one EL6 chondrite, Khairpur, were determined. The internal Rb-Sr systematics of the EH3 chondrites are highly disturbed. Fractions corresponding to sulfide phases show excess 87Sr, while other fractions corresponding to silicate phases produce a linear trend on a Rb-Sr evolution diagram. If these linear relations are interpreted as isochrons, the ages of the silicate phases are 2.12?? 0.23 Ga and 2.05 ??0.33 Ga with the initial Sr isotopic ratios of 0.7112 ?? 0.0018 and 0.7089 ?? 0.0032, for Qingzhen and Yamato 6901, respectively. The Rb-Sr results are interpeted as indicative of a late thermal event about 2Ga ago on the parent bodies of these EH3 chondrites. These ages agree well with previously published K-Ar ages. An older isochron age of 4.481 ?? 0.036 Ga with a low initial Sr isotopic ratio of 0.69866 ?? 0.00038 was obtained for the data from silicate fractions of Khairpur, indicating early petrological equilibrium on the parent body of EL6 chondrites. -from Authors

  7. Thermoluminescence and the shock and reheating history of meteorites. IV - The induced TL properties of type 4-6 ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haq, Munir; Hasan, Fouad A.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1988-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties were measured in 121 equilibrated H and L ordinary chondrites of which 33 H and 32 L were from Antarctica. It was found that the distribution of TL sensitivities for non-Antarctic L chondrites differs from that of non-Antarctic H chondrites, reflecting the well-known differences in shock history between L and H classes, the greater proportion of the former having suffered postmetamorphic shock. The data also show differences in TL sensitivity between Antarctic and non-Antarctic H chondrites, suggesting nontrivial differences in thermal history of these chondrites.

  8. Accretion, metamorphism, and brecciation of ordinary chondrites - Evidence from petrologic studies of meteorites from Roosevelt County, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Edward R. D.; Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Keil, Klaus

    1986-01-01

    The olivines and pyroxenes from twenty-nine ordinary chondrites from Roosevelt County, New Mexico are examined. The mineralogical properties of the chondrites studied are described. Correlations between mineral compositions and petrologic type and between petrologic type and bulk chemistry are analyzed. It is observed that mean CaO concentrations in olivine show significant variations among equilibrated chondrites, but these are not correlated with petrologic type; the degree of heterogeneity of FeO concentrations in olivines of types 4-6 is not correlated with the degree of metamorphism; and mean FeO concentrations of silicates show average increases of 3-5 percent from type 4 to type 6 in each group.

  9. Space Weathering of Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies, Its Impact on the Method of Distinguishing H, L, and LL Types and Implications for Itokawa Samples Returned by the Hayabusa Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Sasaki, S.; Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    As the most abundance meteorites in our collections, ordinary chondrites potentially have very important implications on the origin and formation of our Solar System. In order to map the distribution of ordinary chondrite-like asteroids through remote sensing, the space weathering effects of ordinary chondrite parent bodies must be addressed through experiments and modeling. Of particular importance is the impact on distinguishing different types (H/L/LL) of ordinary chondrites. In addition, samples of asteroid Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft may re veal the mechanism of space weathering on an LLchondrite parent body. Results of space weathering simulations on ordinary chondrites and implications for Itokawa samples are presented here.

  10. Weathering of Ordinary Chondrites from Algeria and Australia as a Climatic Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, P. A.; Berry, F. J.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-09-01

    Introduction: Recently it has been recognized that ordinary chondrite meteorites resident in desert regions may preserve information about the climate at the time of their arrival on Earth in the degree to which they are weathered [1], providing that a stable surface has existed at the accumulation site. We present here a comparison of ^57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy data for additional meteorites for which terrestrial ages exist, recovered from Reg el Acfer, Algeria and the Nullarbor Region, Australia. Results and Discussion: The data presented in Fig. 1 compare abundance of ferric iron oxide/oxyhydroxide species against terrestrial age [2, 3] for ordinary chondrites from Australia (a) and Algeria (b). Even with an increased dataset for Australian meteorites (compared to that already presented [1]) the initial hypothesis remains intact i.e. meteorite weathering over time is sensitive to changes in climate. Peaks in oxidation at around 2,000, 7,000 and 23,000 years correspond to periods of speleothem formation [4] and high lake level status [5]. Similarly, a period of low oxidation between 12,000-20,000 years is mirrored in low lake level status [5] and aridity in the Nullarbor [6]. The mechanism by which meteorites may record palaeoclimatic information is given in [1]. A correlation that strengthens our case is that where data from both H and L(LL) chondrites are available (i.e. around 7,000-8,000 years) the two plots are similar, indicating a broadscale environmental effect. In contrast, the distribution for meteorites from the Acfer region appears to be more random, with no correlation between H and L(LL) data. The difference may be related to the stability of the respective accumulation surfaces. The surface of the Nullarbor appears to have been stable over the last 30,000 years [7]. The Algerian and Libyan Sahara, however, has experienced several episodes of active fluvial processes over the last 10,000 years [8] which may have profoundly effected the meteorites

  11. Surface Properties of (6) Hebe: A Possible Parent Body of Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorini, F.; Manara, A.; Scaltriti, F.; Farinella, P.; Cellino, A.; Di Martino, M.

    1997-07-01

    We report for the first time rotationally resolved spectroscopic observations, as well as new photometric and polarimetric measurements, of the large S-type asteroid (6) Hebe, always at near-equatorial aspects. We have found evidence for only minor variations in Hebe's visible reflectance spectrum over a rotational cycle, comparable to our measurement accuracy (a few percent) and consistent with an undifferentiated silicate assemblage on the surface. We have also confirmed previous results of the existence of small polarization changes, but they are not correlated with the (complex and asymmetric) photometric lightcurve of the asteroid. A plausible interpretation of these data is that Hebe's surface is composed of undifferentiated materials, but presents texture, albedo, and spectral changes possibly related to the occurrence of energetic cratering events. Given the comparatively large size of Hebe, its proximity to resonance-related chaotic zones of the orbital element space (Farinellaet al. 1993,Celest. Mech.56,287-305, andIcarus101,174-187), and its assignment by Gaffeyet al. (1993,Icarus106,573-602) to the S(IV) taxonomic subclass, our results support the idea that this asteroid may be the source of a significant fraction of the ordinary chondrite meteorites.

  12. Partial melting of the St. Severin (LL) and Lost City (H) ordinary chondrites: One step backwards and two steps forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Jones, J. H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    This study looks at partial melting in H and LL chondrites at nearly one atmosphere of total pressure as part of a continuing study of the origins of basaltic achondrites. Previously, melting experiments on anhydrous CM and CV chondrites showed that, near its solidus, the CM chondrite produced melts having major element chemistries similar to the Sioux County eucrite; but, the pyroxenes in the residuum were too iron-rich to form diogenites. Our preliminary results from melting experiments on ordinary (H, LL) chondrites suggested that, although the melts did not look like any known eucrites, pyroxenes from these charges bracketed the compositional range of pyroxenes found in diogenites. We had used the Fe/Mg exchange coefficients calculated for olivine, pyroxene, and melt in these charges to evaluate the approach to equilibrium, which appeared to be excellent. Unfortunately, mass balance calculations later indicated to us that, unlike our CM and CV charges, the LL and H experimental charges had lost significant amounts of iron to their (Pt or PtRh) supports. Apparently, pyroxene stability in chondritic systems is quite sensitive to the amount of FeO, and it was this unrecognized change in the bulk iron content which had stabilized the high temperature, highly magnesian pyroxenes. Accordingly, this work reinvestigates the phase equilibria of ordinary chondrites, eliminating iron and nickel loss, and reports significant differences. It also looks closely at how the iron and sodium in the bulk charge affect the stability of pyroxene, and it comments on how these new results apply to the problems of diogenite and eucrite petrogenesis.

  13. Asteroid 6 Hebe: The probable parent body of the H-Type ordinary chondrites and the IIE iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.; Gilbert, Sarah L.

    1998-11-01

    The S(IV)-type asteroid 6 Hebe is identified as the probable parent body of the H-type ordinary chondrites and of the IIE iron meteorites. The ordinary chondrites are the most common type of meteorites falling to Earth, but prior to the present study no large mainbelt source bodies have been confirmed. Hebe is located adjacent to both the (6 and 3:1 resonances, and has been previously suggested as a major potential source of the terrestrial meteorite flux. Hebe exhibits subtle rotational spectral variations indicating the presence of some compositional variations across its surface. The silicate portion of the surface assemblage of Hebe is consistent, both in overall average and in its range of variation, with the silicate components in the suite of H-type chondrites. The high albedo of Hebe rules out a lunar-style space weathering process to produce the weakened absorption features and reddish spectral slope in the S-type spectrum of Hebe. Linear unmixing models show that a typical nickel-iron metal spectrum is consistent with the component which modifies an H-chondrite spectrum to produce the S-type spectrum of Hebe. Based on the association between the H chondrites and the IIE iron meteorites, our model suggests that large impacts onto the relatively metal-rich H chondrite target produced melt bodies (sheets or pods) which differentiated to form thin, laterally extensive near-surface layers of NiFe metal. Fragments of the upper silicate portions of these melt bodies are apparently represented by some of the igneous inclusions in H-chondrite breccias. Alternately, masses of metal could have been deposited on the surface of Hebe by the impact of a core or core fragment from a differentiated parent body of H chondrite composition. Subsequent impacts preferentially eroded and depleted the overlying silicate and regolith components exposing and maintaining large masses of metal at the optical surface of Hebe. In this interpretation, the nonmagmatic IIE iron

  14. A shock-metamorphic model for silicate darkening and compositionally variable plagioclase in CK and ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.E. )

    1992-04-01

    Silicate darkening in ordinary chondrites (OC) is caused by tiny grains of metallic Fe-Ni and troilite occurring mainly within curvilinear trails that traverse silicate interiors and decorate or, in some cases, cut across silicate grain boundaries. Highly shocked OC tend to have greater degrees of silicate darkening than lightly shocked OC; this indicates that silicate darkening is probably a result of shock metamorphism. The low Fe-FeS eutectic temperature (988C) renders metal and troilite susceptible to melting and mobilization during shock heating. Unshocked OC tend to have plagioclase with uniform compositions; shocked OC tend to have plagioclase with more variable (albeit still stoichiometric) compositions. The low impedance of plagioclase to shock compression makes it particularly susceptible to melting and mobilization; this is consistent with the molten appearance of plagioclase in highly shocked OC (e.g., Rose City and Paragould). CK chondrites also have compositionally variable plagioclase. The common association of silicate darkening with compositionally variable plagioclase is consistent with the hypothesis that both are products of shock metamorphism. Some CK and OC chondrites exhibit light shock effects in olivine that are consistent with equilibrium peak shock pressures that are too low to account for the silicate darkening or opaque shock veins in these meteorites. Therefore, the olivine in these chondrites may have been annealed after intense shock produced these effects. A few CK chondrites that contain olivine with undulose or mosaic extinction (e.g., LEW87009 and EET83311) may have been shocked again, after annealing.

  15. A search for subkilometer-sized ordinary chondrite like asteroids in the main-belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. W.; Yoshida, Fumi; Chen, Y. T.; Ip, W. H.; Chang, C. K.

    2015-07-01

    The size-dependent effects of asteroids on surface regolith and collisional lifetimes suggest that small asteroids are younger than large asteroids. In this study, we performed multicolor main-belt asteroid (MBA) survey by Subaru telescope/Suprime-Cam to search for subkilometer-sized ordinary chondrite (Q-type) like MBAs. The total survey area was 1.5 deg2 near ecliptic plane and close to the opposition. We detected 150 MBAs with 4 bands (B, V, R, I) in this survey. The range of absolute magnitude of detected asteroids was between 13 and 22 magnitude, which is equivalent to the size range of kilometer to sub-kilometer diameter in MBAs. From this observation, 75 of 150 MBAs with color uncertainty less than 0.1 were used in the spectral type analysis, and two possible Q-type asteroids were detected. This mean that the Q-type to S-type ratio in MBAs is <0.05. Meanwhile, the Q/S ratio in near Earth asteroids (NEAs) has been estimated to be 0.5-2 (Binzel, R.P. et al. [2004]. Icarus 107, 259-224; Dandy, C.L., Fitzsimmins, A., Collander-Brown, S.J. [2003]. Icarus 163, 363-373). Therefore, Q-type NEAs might be delivered from the main belt region with weathered, S-type surface into near Earth region and then obtain their Q-type, non-weathered surface after undergoing re-surfacing process there. The resurfacing mechanisms could be: 1. dispersal of surface material by tidal effect during planetary encounters (Binzel, R.P. et al. [2010]. Nature 463, 331-334; Nesvorný, D. et al. [2010]. Icarus 209, 510-519), 2. the YORP spin-up induced rotational-fission (Polishook, D. et al. [2014]. Icarus 233, 9-26) or surface re-arrangement, or 3. thermal degradation (Delbo, M. et al. [2014]. Nature 508, 233-236).

  16. Lithium isotopes as an indicator of primary and secondary processes in unequilibrated meteorites: Chondrule cooling and aqueous alteration in CO chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharrock, J. L.; Harvey, J.; Fehr, M.; James, R. H.; Parkinson, I. J.

    2010-12-01

    Chondrites have escaped planetary scale differentiation and thus represent some of the best examples of early solar system material. However, even the most pristine chondrites have experienced some degree of aqueous alteration and/or metamorphism. Where and when these processes occurred, their nature, duration and extent remains poorly understood (e.g.[1]). During the crystallisation of chondrule phenocrysts, compositional gradients drive the more rapid diffusion of 6Li compared to 7Li, creating distinctive 7Li/6Li profiles [2,3]. This potentially makes Li isotopes a useful tool for the calculation of chondrule cooling rates. Lithium is also highly mobile during the aqueous weathering of silicate material with 7Li preferentially entering the solution, thus fractionating the two isotopes (e.g. [4]); a process already identified in the aqueous alteration of chondritic materials [5]. Lithium isotopes may therefore provide the means to quantify the effects of both primary and secondary processes in chondritic material. We will present new data for intra- and inter-chondrule δ7Li variation, determined by ion microprobe and MC ICP MS, as well as bulk data for Ornans (CO3.3) and Lancé (CO3.4) with the aim to (i) assess the preservation of primary Li isotope diffusion profiles in chondrule phenocrysts (ii) examine the extent and effects of aqueous alteration using the Li isotope systematics of bulk-rock and chondrules, in addition to intra-chondrule δ7Li variations. High Mg# (>0.99) in chondrule cores suggests that primitive geochemical compositions may have been retained. In contrast, lower rim Mg# (≤0.80) suggests diffusive exchange with matrix during cooling or subsequent secondary alteration. As variability in Mg# is also observed close to fractures in the interior of chondrule phenocrysts these variations are unlikely to be primary, suggesting that Li isotope fractionation during chondrule cooling may have been overprinted. Bulk-rock δ7Li values for Ornans (4

  17. Deformation and thermal histories of ordinary chondrites: Evidence for post-deformation annealing and syn-metamorphic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, Alex; Hugo, Richard; Hutson, Melinda

    2015-08-01

    We show that olivine microstructures in seven metamorphosed ordinary chondrites of different groups studied with optical and transmission electron microscopy can be used to evaluate the post-deformation cooling setting of the meteorites, and to discriminate between collisions affecting cold and warm parent bodies. The L6 chondrites Park (shock stage S1), Bruderheim (S4), Leedey (S4), and Morrow County (S5) were affected by variable shock deformation followed by relatively rapid cooling, and probably cooled as fragments liberated by impact in near-surface settings. In contrast, Kernouvé (H6 S1), Portales Valley (H6/7 S1), and MIL 99301 (LL6 S1) appear to have cooled slowly after shock, probably by deep burial in warm materials. In these chondrites, post-deformation annealing lowered apparent optical strain levels in olivine. Additionally, Kernouvé, Morrow County, Park, MIL 99301, and possibly Portales Valley, show evidence for having been deformed at an elevated temperature (⩾800-1000 °C). The high temperatures for Morrow County can be explained by dynamic heating during intense shock, but Kernouvé, Park, and MIL 99301 were probably shocked while the H, L and LL parent bodies were warm, during early, endogenically-driven thermal metamorphism. Thus, whereas the S4 and S5 chondrites experienced purely shock-induced heating and cooling, all the S1 chondrites examined show evidence for static heating consistent with either syn-metamorphic shock (Kernouvé, MIL 99301, Park), post-deformation burial in warm materials (Kernouvé, MIL 99301, Portales Valley), or both. The results show the pitfalls in relying on optical shock classification alone to infer an absence of shock and to construct cooling stratigraphy models for parent bodies. Moreover, they provide support for the idea that "secondary" metamorphic and "tertiary" shock processes overlapped in time shortly after the accretion of chondritic planetesimals, and that impacts into warm asteroidal bodies were

  18. Silica-bearing objects in the Dengli H3.8 and Gorlovka H3-4 chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Kononkova, N. N.; Petaev, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    Silica-bearing objects are enigmatic components of the olivine-normative ordinary chondrites. Several papers have been devoted to the study of these objects in various chondrite types. While a relatively large body of information has been collected, the origin of these objects is still controversial. Here we report new data on silica-bearing objects in the unequilibrated H-chondrites Dengli and Gorlovka. The crystallization history of these objects could be explained on the basis of the phase diagram of the Q-Ol-Pl (Al2O3) system, but the origin of the silica-rich liquids remains unclear.

  19. Chondrules in the Murray CM2 meteorite and compositional differences between CM-CO and ordinary chondrite chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. E.; Wasson, J. T.

    1986-02-01

    Thirteen of the least aqueously altered chondrules in Murray (CM2) were analyzed for bulk compositions, by means of a broad beam electron microprobe, to explore the compositional differences between the CM-CO, and the ordinary chondrite OC chondrules. The CO chondrules are richer in refractory lithophiles and poorer in Cr, Mn, and volatile lithophiles than the OC chondrules; much lower refractory lithophile abundances in CM chondrules resulted from aqueous alteration. Evidence is found for two important lithophile precursor components of CM-CO chondrite chondrules: (1) pyroxene- and refractory-rich, FeO-poor, and (2) olivine-rich, refractoryand FeO-poor. It is suggested that the pyroxene- and refractory-rich, FeO-poor lithophile precursor component has formed by an incomplete evaporation of presolar silicates that brought these materials into the enstatite stability field.

  20. Northwest Africa 8709: A Rare but Revealing Type 3 Ordinary Chondrite Melt Breccia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, A. M.; Hutson, M.; Friedrich, J. M.; Bland, P. A.; Pugh, R.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the discovery of a rare L3 melt breccia, which has implications for compaction processes that must have contributed to the lithification of what are expected to have been initially porous primordial chondritic agglomerates.

  1. Crystallization trends of precursor pyroxene in ordinary chondrites: Implications for igneous origin of precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T.; Kitamura, M.

    1994-01-01

    Various observations suggest that the precursor of the fine fragments and the relict pyroxene was formed by an igneous process in a grandparent body of the chondrite. Furthermore, the fact that the precursors appear as fragments in the matrix as well as relicts in the chondrule suggests a shock origin for the chondrite by collision of two or more bodies, which had already to some extent undergone igneous differentiation.

  2. Cosmic-ray exposure ages of the ordinary chondrites and their significance for parent body stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabb, J.; Schultz, L.

    1981-01-01

    Improved exposure ages are derived for 201 H, 203 L, and 38 LL chondrites in an effort to understand the characteristics of the chondrite parent body. The Ne-21 exposure ages were calculated from literature values taking into account shielding differences, a trapped component and radiogenic He. The exposure age distributions show clear peaks at 4.5 and 20 million years for the H chondrites, while the Ls and LLs appear more as a continuous series of intermediate peaks which may be modeled by at least six peaks between 1 and 35 million years in the case of L chondrites. The observations that every petrological type occurs in each large peak and contain solar wind gases suggest that the parent bodies have been fragmented and reassembled into a megabreccia. The H meteorites are proposed to represent the surface layer of a body with a substantial, active regolith as indicated by the relatively high abundances of solar gases. The L chondrites, on the other hand, are attributed to a parent body that was fragmented by collision about 500 million years ago.

  3. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. II Thermoluminescence of sixteen type 3 ordinary chondrites and relationships with oxygen isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Weeks, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity values for sixteen type 3 ordinary chondrites, fourteen of them from Antarctica, have been measured. The values obtained (normalized to the TL sensitivity of the Dhajala meteorite) range from 1.6 (Allan Hills A77216) to 0.010 (Allan Hills A77176), and include two (Reckling Peak A80207 and Allan Hills A77176) that are particularly low. They fill a hiatus in the TL distribution that previously existed between St. Mary's County and Bishunpur, the latter being a meteorite with one of the lowest TL sensitivities known. The histogram of TL sensitivity values now shows a single distribution with higher values preferred; it resembles the histogram for L chondrites occupying the petrologic types 3, 4, 5, and 6. There is a tendency for the TL sensitivity of meteorites to decrease as delta O-18 increases. Theoretically, it is possible that the range of delta O-18 values observed may reflect progressive loss of O in the form of CO at very low temperatures, but very restrictive physical conditions and a complex history seem to be required.

  4. Extraterrestrial chromite in latest Maastrichtian and Paleocene pelagic limestone at Gubbio, Italy: The flux of unmelted ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronholm, Anders; Schmitz, Birger

    The distribution of sediment-dispersed extraterrestrial (ordinary chondritic) chromite (EC) grains (>63 μm) has been studied across the latest Maastrichtian and Paleocene in the Bottaccione Gorge section at Gubbio, Italy. This section is ideal for determining the accumulation rate of EC because of its condensed nature and well-constrained sedimentation rates. In a total of 210 kg of limestone representing eight samples of 14-28 kg distributed across 24 m of the Bottaccione section, only 6 EC grains were found (an average of 0.03 EC grains kg-1). In addition, one probable pallasitic chromite grain was found. No EC grains could be found in two samples at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary, which is consistent with the K-T boundary impactor being a carbonaceous chondrite or comet low in chromite. The average influx of EC to Earth is calculated to ˜0.26 grain m-2 kyr-1. This corresponds to a total flux of ˜200 tons of extraterrestrial matter per year, compared to ˜30,000 tons per year, as estimated from Os isotopes in deep-sea sediments. The difference is explained by the EC grains representing only unmelted ordinary chondritic matter, predominantly in the size range from ˜0.1 mm to a few centimeters in diameter. Sedimentary EC grains can thus give important information on the extent to which micrometeorites and small meteorites survive the passage through the atmosphere. The average of 0.03 EC grain kg-1 in the Gubbio limestone contrasts with the up to ˜3 EC grains kg-1 in mid-Ordovician limestone that formed after the disruption of the L chondrite parent body in the asteroid belt at ˜470 Ma. The two types of limestone were deposited at about the same rate, and the difference in EC abundance gives support for an increase by two orders of magnitude in the flux of chondritic matter directly after the asteroid breakup.

  5. The thermoluminescence sensitivity-metamorphism relationship in ordinary chondrites - Experimental data on the mechanism and implications for terrestrial systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimon, R. K.; Sears, D. W. G.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrothermal annealing experiments have been performed on samples of the Sharps meteorite in order to investigate the mechanism responsible for the metamorphism-related, 10-to-the-5th-fold range in the thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity in ordinary chondrites. Duplicate 50 mg samples of meteorite were annealed under the following conditions: (1) 168 h at 785 C and 1 kbar; (2) the same time, temperature and pressure, but with 2 wt pct water; (3) 174 h at 855 C and 0.77 kbar with 2 wt pct water and 2 molal sodium disilicate (NadiSi); (4) the same time, temperature and pressure as the preceding samples, but with 10 wt pct H2O and 2 molal NadiSi. Samples annealed under the first three sets of conditions showed little or no change in their TL sensitivities, however the samples annealed with 10 wt pct water and 2 molal NadiSi showed a three-fold to 10-fold increase in TL sensitivity, and the temperature of the TL peak was suggestive of feldspar in the high-temperature form. It is suggested that these data are consistent with the TL sensitivity-metamorphism relationship in ordinary chondrites being due to the formation of the TL phosphor, feldspar, by the crystallization of chondrule glass.

  6. Troilite in the Chondrules of Type-3 Ordinary Chondrites: Implications for Chondrule Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Sailer, Alan L.; Wasson, John T.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of primary troilite in chondrules requires that nebular temperatures were <650 K (the 50% condensation temperature of S) at the time of chondrule formation and that chondrules were molten for periods short enough (less than or equal to 10 s) to avoid significant volatilization of S. We examined 226 intact chondrules of all textural types from eight unshocked to weakly shocked ordinary chondrite falls of low petrologic type to determine the origin of troilite in chondrules; 68 chondrules are from LL3.0 Semarkona. There is a high probability that troilite is primary (i.e , was present among the chondrule precursors) if it is completely embedded in a mafic silicate phenocryst, located within one-half radius of the apparent chondrule center and is part of an opaque assemblage with an igneous texture Based on these criteria, 13% of the chondrules in Semarkona and in the set as a whole contain primary troilite. Most of the remaining chondrules contain troilite that is probably primary, but does not meet all three criteria. Troilite occurs next to tetratacnite in some opaque spherules within low-FeO chondrules in Semarkona, implying that the Ni required to form the tetrataenite came from the troilite Troilite can accommodate 5 mg/g Ni at high temperatures (> 1170 K) but much less Ni at lower temperatures; because this is far higher than the metamorphic temperature inferred for Semarkona (approx. 670 K), the troilite must be primary Primary troilite fitting the three criteria occurs in a smaller fraction of low-FeO [FeO/(FeO + MgO) in olivine and/or low-Ca pyroxene not greater than 0.0751 than high-FeO porphyritic chondrules in Semarkona (9% vs 33%) Coarse-grained low-FeO porphyritic chondrules appear to contain somewhat more troilite on average than those of medium grain size We found a few troilite-free, metallic-Fe-Ni-bearing, low-FeO chondrules that contain Na2O-bearing augite and Na2O- and K2O-rich mesostasis; these chondrules were probably formed after

  7. Relationships Among Intrinsic Properties of Ordinary Chondrites: Oxidation State, Bulk Chemistry, Oxygen-isotopic Composition, Petrologic Type, and Chondrule Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    The properties of ordinary chondrites (OC) reflect both nebular and asteroidal processes. OC are modeled here as having acquired nebular water, probably contained within phyllosilicates, during agglomeration. This component had high Ai70 and acted like an oxidizing agent during thermal metamorphism. The nebular origin of this component is consistent with negative correlations in H, L, and LL chondrites between oxidation state (represented by olivine Fa) and bulk concentration ratios of elements involved in the metal-silicate fractionation (e.g., NdSi, Ir/Si, Ir/Mn, Ir/Cr, Ir/Mg, Ni/Mg, As/Mg, Ga/Mg). LL chondrites acquired the greatest abundance of phyllosilicates with high (delta)O-17 among OC (and thus became the most oxidized group and the one with the heaviest O isotopes); H chondrites acquired the lowest abundance, becoming the most reduced OC group with the lightest O isotopes. Chondrule precursors may have grown larger and more ferroan with time in each OC agglomeration zone. Nebular turbulence may have controlled the sizes of chondrule precursors. H-chondrite chondrules (which are the smallest among OC) formed from the smallest precursors. In each OC region, low-FeO chondrules formed before high-FeO chondrules during repeated episodes of chondrule formation. During thermal metamorphism, phyllosilicates were dehydrated; the liberated water oxidized metallic Fe-Ni. This caused correlated changes with petrologic type including decreases in the modal abundance of metal, increases in olivine Fa and low-Ca pyroxene Fs, increases in the olivine/pyroxene ratio, and increases in the kamacite Co and Ni contents. As water (with its heavy 0 isotopes) was lost during metamorphism, inverse correlations between bulk (delta)O-18 and bulk (delta)O-17 with petrologic type were produced. The H5 chondrites that were ejected from their parent body approx.7.5 Ma ago during a major impact event probably had been within a few kilometers of each other since they accreted approx.4

  8. Presolar SiC in chondrites - How variable and how many sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'd.

    1993-06-01

    The carbon and silicon isotropic compositions of 246 isotopically anomalous SiC grains measured in low concentration residues are reported. The residues were prepared from nine chondrites, namely, 6 unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs), Qingzhen (EH3), Leoville (CV3), and Murchison (CM2). Murchison is used as a standard to which all the other meteorites studied are compared. The range of isotopic compositions exhibited by UOC SiC is found to be similar to Murchison, except in Inman. Inman SiC has a distinctly different distribution of its silicon isotopic composition compared to the other meteorites. Residues from Qingzhen and Leoville produce only one anomalous SiC grain each.

  9. Asteroid 6 Hebe: Spectral Evaluation of the Prime Large Mainbelt Ordinary Chondrite Parent Body Candidate with Implications from Space Weathering of Gaspra and the Ida-Dactyl System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffey, M. J.

    1996-03-01

    No large mainbelt asteroid has yet been confirmed as an ordinary chondrite parent body. A number of plausible candidates have been identified based on dynamical considerations and/or spectral evidence. The fifth largest S-asteroid, 6 Hebe, is the best current candidate for one of the long sought large mainbelt ordinary chondrite parent bodies. Its proximity to the chaotic zones associated with both the 3:1 proper motion and the nu(sub)6 (or g=g(sub)6) secular resonance "escape hatches" should make Hebe a major mainbelt contributor to the terrestrial meteorite flux. Hebe also exhibits a surface assemblage (subtype S(IV), the only subgroup among the S-asteroids that might include ordinary chondrite parent bodies) which allows (or more precisely, does not exclude) an ordinary chondrite affinity. An analysis of the rotational variations of spectra obtained in June 1979 and February 1989 provide a sophisticated test of whether or not Hebe is a viable ordinary chondrite parent body. If the rotational spectral variations of Hebe are consistent with an undifferentiated silicate assemblage, there still remains the mismatch in the overall spectral slope and band intensities. It has been suggested that the Gaspra and Ida-Dactyl encounters establish that space weathering causes this discrepancy. However, there are several inconsistencies in this simple picture which suggest that while the presence of a space weathering process on Ida and Gaspra appears well established, there still remains considerable uncertainty concerning its nature and ability to spectrally modify ordinary chondrites to match the slope and band depths of S-asteroids.

  10. Differences of Terrestrial Alteration Effects in Ordinary Chondrites from Hot and Cold Deserts: Petrography and Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, P.; Loeken, T.; Schultz, L.

    1992-07-01

    Several differences between Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorite populations have been recognized that are attributed to two main causes, namely a general difference in their parent meteoroid populations and/or secondary effects like weathering or pairing (see e.g.[1]). In the last few years several hundred new meteorites have become available from hot desert areas (Nullabor Plain, Roosevelt County, Sahara Desert). Compared to Antarctic meteorites these stones are stored on Earth in very different climatic environments. Thus, both groups should show different patterns of weathering. In this paper we report petrographic observations and noble gas measurements concerning terrestrial alterations of a suite of ordinary chondrites from the Sahara desert and Antarctica. Forty thin sections of desert meteorites (Acfer, El Djouf, Illafegh, Daraj, and Roosevelt County) and 60 thin sections of Antarctic ordinary chondrites (Allan Hills and Frontier Mountain) were investigated microscopically. In addition, in some of these meteorites the concentration and isotopic composition of all noble gases were determined. In this report we will discuss the trapped Kr and Xe only. As already noted by Jull et al. [2] many desert meteorites are heavily weathered. Compared to Antarctic meteorites their proportion of metal and troilite is smaller, while iron oxides and iron hydroxides are more abundant. In Antarctic meteorites most silicates are not severely altered. H- and L-group chondri- tes from the Acfer region and Roosevelt County, however, show a remarkable weathering feature of some silicates: In many of these samples nest-like structures are found that consist of silicate fragments embedded in iron oxide or hydroxide. Different stages of their development can be observed. It starts with the filling by these iron compounds of fine cracks of the original grains. With the process of weathering proceeding these cracks grow and finally destroy larger crystals completely to smaller

  11. Partitioning of Nd, Tb, Lu, and Hf Between Garnet and Ordinary Chondrite Melt at 5 to 9 GPa: Applications to Martian Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, D. S.; Chabot, N. L.; Xirouchakis, D.; Wasserman, A. A.; Agee, C. B.

    2001-01-01

    One explanation for Al and REE depletions in SNC meteorites is early majorite fractionation in a deep martian magma ocean. We report initial results from an experimental investigation of partitioning between majoritic garnet and ordinary chondrite liquid. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Silica-merrihueite/roedderite-bearing chondrules and clasts in ordinary chondrites: New occurrences and possible origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Wasson, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Merrihueite (K,Na)2(Fe,Mg)5Si12O30 (na less than 0.5, fe greater than 0.5, where na = Na/(Na + K), fe = Fe/(Fe + Mg) in atomic ratio) is a rare mineral described only in several chondrules and irregularly-shaped fragments in the Mezo-Madaras L3 chondrite (Dodd et al., 1965; Wood and Holmberg, 1994). Roedderite (Na,K)2(Mg,Fe)5Si12O30 (na greater than 0.5, fe less than 0.5) has been found only in enstatite chondrites and in the reduced, subchondritic silicate inclusions in IAB irons (Fuchs, 1966; Rambaldi et al., 1984; Olsen, 1967). We described silica-roedderite-bearing clasts in L/LL3.5 ALHA77011 and LL3.7 ALHA77278, a silica-roedderite-bearing chondrule in L3 Mezo-Madaras, and a silica-merrihueite-bearing chondrule in L/LL3.5 ALHA77115. The findings of merrihueite and roedderite in ALHA77011, ALHA77115, ALHA77278 and Mezo-Madaras fill the compositional gap betweeen previously described roedderite in enstatite chondrites and silicate inclusions in IAB irons and merrihueite in Mezo-Madaras, suggesting that there is a complete solid solution of roedderite and merrihueite in meteorites. We infer that the silica- and merrihueite/roedderite-bearing chondrules and clasts experienced a complex formational history including: (a) fractional condensation in the solar nebular that produced Si-rich and Al-poor precursors, (b) melting of fractionated nebular solids resulting in the formation of silica-pyroxene chondrules, (c) in some cases, fragmentation in the nebula or on a parent body, (d) reaction of silica with alkali-rich gas that formed merrihueite/roedderite on a parent body, (e) formation of fayalitic olivine and feerosilite-rich pyroxene due to reaction of silica with oxidized Fe on a parent body, and (f) minor thermal metamorphism, possibly generated by impacts.

  13. Trace-Element Constraints on Origin of SiO2-bearing Clasts in Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, K.; Kanazawa, M.; Bridges, J. C.; Nakamura, N.; Hutchison, R.

    1995-09-01

    Silica-rich igneous-textured clasts are found in OC [1-6]. The SiO2-bearing clasts found in the Parnallee (LL3.6) and Farmington (L5) chondrites are isotopically unique [4-6]. They plot on a mixing line defined between UOC chondrules and an 16(sub)O-depleted end member in the oxygen three isotope diagram. We analyzed trace elements including REE by MSID technique for SiO2-bearing clasts (CB1, CB4, CB7, and CB8) from Parnallee. Some major and minor elements of CB8 were determined by AA or ICP-AES. The CI-chondrite normalized REE patterns of the clasts are shown in Fig. 1. CB8 has a high Si/Mg ratio (2.5), although its bulk Mg/(Mg + Fe) and Fe/Mn ratios (0.79 and 51, respectively) are within the range of chondritic values. Refractory elements Ca and Al are highly fractionated in CB8; the clast is enriched in Ca (3 x CI) but depleted in Al (0.7 x CI). CB1, CB4, and CB7 also show Ca enrichment (3-7 x CI). CB8 is depleted in moderately volatile lithophiles Mn, Na, K, and Rb (0.18-0.71 x CI), siderophile elements Fe, Co, and Ni (0.0041-0.39 x CI), and chalcophile element Zn (0.076 x CI). The SiO2-bearing clasts analyzed exhibit a gradual depletion from LREE to HREE (CI-normalized La/Lu ratios vary from 1.6 to 18) and a large positive Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu*=2.4-14) along with a depletion of La. This LREE/HREE fractionation is inversely correlated with SiO2 contents of the clasts. Abundance of Sr is parallel to that of Eu in CB8. However, Sr is depleted compared with Eu in the other clasts. These abundance patterns are quite different from those of typical ferromagnesian chondrules in UOCs, SiO2-bearing pyroxene-rich clast in Hedjaz (L3.7) [3], and silica-rich orthopyroxenite Bo-1 in Bovedy (L3) [7]. Absence of metal and sulfide, low abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the clasts imply that metal and sulfide were removed from precursor material before or during clast formation. General REE patterns of SiO2-bearing clasts from Parnallee suggest that they were

  14. Terrestrial weathering of Antarctic stone meteorites - Formation of Mg-carbonates on ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velbel, M. A.; Long, D. T.; Gooding, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on the mineralogy, chemistry, and origin of white efflorescences on the surface of Lewis Cliff (Antarctica) 85320 (H5) chondrite (LEW 85320). Particular attention is given to determining the sources of the cations and anions of the evaporite, in order to establish the relative importance of the meteoritic element distribution and terrestrial contamination in the evaporite formation during the weathering process. The data on Na, K, Ca, and Rb abundances in efflorescence from LEW 85320 suggest that cations in evaporite minerals on Antarctic meteorites are not the products of contamination by terrestrial (marine) salts. It is suggested that the Mg in efflorescence on LEW 85320 originated from weathering of meteoritic olivine.

  15. Mossbauer Spectra of Weathered H5 Ordinary Chondrites from Reg EL Acfer, Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, F.; Oates, G.; Bland, P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-07-01

    Approximately 380 meteorite specimens have been retrieved from the Acfer region of the Sahara desert, Algeria. To date, 26 of these have been classified H5 (Bischoff et al., 1990, 1991, 1992). Being the most common meteorite type and having a tightly constrained mineralogy (Mason, 1965), H5 chondrites are ideal candidates for investigating terrestrial weathering products in meteorites. Arid climate, uniform topography, and lack of a concentration/movement mechanism makes it likely that meteorites throughout Reg el Acfer were weathered by a common mechanism. Jull et al. (1991) showed a correlation in meteorites from Roosevelt County between terrestrial ^14C ages and a qualitative weathering scale. An aim of the present study is to provide a quantitative measure of weathering for the Acfer region that might allow an estimate of terrestrial age, as well as information on pairing. Meteorite Specimens: Approximately 1 g of sample was used, prepared by grinding under acetone to prevent oxidation during crushing, until a homogenized powder was produced. Mossbauer spectra were recorded at 298 degrees K with a microprocessor controlled Mossbauer spectrometer using a ^57Co/Rh source. Drive velocity was calibrated with the same source and a metallic iron foil. Results: The H5 chondrite Acfer 146 (Bischoff, forthcoming Meteoritical Bulletin) was found on 19/11/90 at coordinates 27 degrees 38'N, 4 degrees 05'E. This meteorite gave a spectrum dominated by quadrupole split absorption characteristics of Fe^2+ in a forsteritic olivine structure. A sample of the outer crust showed the additional presence of Fe^3+. XRD was insensitive to the unequivocal identification of the phases present in the two samples and given that the Mossbauer parameters of the hydrolyzed Fe^3+ species and ferric oxyhydroxides are very similar it is not possible at this stage to identify the oxidized phase. Clearly, however, the results demonstrate the sensitivity of Mossbauer spectroscopy to the products

  16. Minor and trace element concentrations in adjacent kamacite and taenite in the Krymka chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, N.; Mostefaoui, S.; Jambon, A.; Guedda, E. H.; Pont, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report in situ NanoSIMS siderophile minor and trace element abundances in individual Fe-Ni metal grains in the unequilibrated chondrite Krymka (LL3.2). Associated kamacite and taenite of 10 metal grains in four chondrules and one matrix metal were analyzed for elemental concentrations of Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Rh, Ir, and Pt. The results show large elemental variations among the metal grains. However, complementary and correlative variations exist between adjacent kamacite-taenite. This is consistent with the unequilibrated character of the chondrite and corroborates an attainment of chemical equilibrium between the metal phases. The calculated equilibrium temperature is 446 ± 9 °C. This is concordant with the range given by Kimura et al. (2008) for the Krymka postaccretion thermal metamorphism. Based on Ni diffusivity in taenite, a slow cooling rate is estimated of the Krymka parent body that does not exceed ~1K Myr-1, which is consistent with cooling rates inferred by other workers for unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. Elemental ionic radii might have played a role in controlling elemental partitioning between kamacite and taenite. The bulk compositions of the Krymka metal grains have nonsolar (mostly subsolar) element/Ni ratios suggesting the Fe-Ni grains could have formed from distinct precursors of nonsolar compositions or had their compositions modified subsequent to chondrule formation events.

  17. An Ordinary Chondrite Impactor Composition for the Bosumtwi Impact Structure, Ghana, West Africa: Discussion of Siderophile Element Contents and Os and Cr Isotope Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Shukolyukov, Alex; Lugmair, Guenter

    2004-01-01

    Osmium isotope data had shown that Ivory Coast tektites contain an extraterrestrial component, but do not allow distinction between chondritic and iron meteorite contamination. PGE abundances of Ivory Coast tektites and impactites and target rocks from the Bosumtwi crater, the source crater of the Ivory Coast tektites, were all relatively high and did not allow to resolve the presence, or identify the nature, of the meteoritic component. However, Cr isotope analyses of an Ivory Coast tektite yielded a distinct 53Cr excess of 0.30+/-0.06, which indicates that the Bosumtwi impactor was an ordinary chondrite.

  18. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. 7: Ordinary chondrites from the Elephant Moraine region, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Roth, J.; Sears, H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1994-01-01

    We report natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) measurements for meteorites from the Elephant Moraine region (76 deg 17 min S, 157 deg 20 min E) of Antarctica. We use our data to identify fragmented meteorites (i.e., 'pairings'); our dataset of 107 samples represents at most 73 separate meteorite falls. Pairing groups are generally confined to single icefields, or to adjacent icefields, but a small proportion cross widely separated icefields in the region, suggesting that the fields can be considered as a single unit. Meteorites from this region have high natural TL levels, which indicates that they have small terrestrial surface exposure ages (less than 12,500 years). There do not appear to be significant differences in natural TL levels (and hence surface exposure ages) between individual blue icefields in the region. The proportion of reheated meteorites from the Elephant Moraine region is similar to that of other Antarctic sites and modern falls, consistent with the uniformity of the meteoritic flux in this regard. An unusual subset of H-chondrites, with high induced TL peak temperatures, is absent among the data for meteorites collected in the Elephant Moraine region, which stresses their similarity to modern falls. We suggest that the Elephant Moraine region, which stresses their similarity to modern falls. We suggest that the Elephant Moraine icefields formed through shallow ablation of the ice. Unlike the Allan Hills sites to the south, lateral transport is probably less important relative to the infall of meteorites in concentrating meteorites on these icefields.

  19. Impact Melting of Ordinary Chondrite Regoliths and the Production of Fine-grained Fe(sup 0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; See, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The detailed study of individual lunar soil grains provides evidence that the major optical properties of the lunar surface are primarily related to the production of fine-grained (< 20 nm, super-paramagnetic) Fe-particles in agglutinitic impact melts and to iron-rich vapor deposits on the surfaces of individual grains. These Fe-rich materials are derived from oxidized species due to high post-shock temperatures in the presence of solar-wind derived H2; part of the Fe-rich grain surfaces may also be due to sputtering processes. Identical processes were recently suggested for the optical maturation of S-type asteroid surfaces, the parent objects of ordinary chondrites (OCs). OCs, however, do not contain impact-produced soil melts, and should thus also be devoid of impact-triggered vapor condensates. The seeming disparity can only be understood if all OCs resemble relatively immature impact debris, akin to numerous lunar highland breccias. It is possible to assess this scenario by evaluating experimentally whether impact velocities of 5- 6 km/s, typical for the present day asteroid belt, suffice to produce both impact melts and fine-grained metallic iron. We used 125-250 m powders of the L6 chondrite ALH85017. These powders were aliquots from fines that were produced by collisionally disrupting a single, large (461g) chunk of this meteorite during nine impacts and by subjecting the resulting rubble to an additional 50 impacts. As a consequence, the present shock-recovery experiments employ target materials of exceptional fidelity (i.e., a real chondrite that was impact pulverized). The target powders were packed into tungsten-alloy containers to allow for the potential investigation of freshly produced, fine-grained iron and impacted by stainless-steel and tungsten flyer plates; the packing density varied between 38 and 45% porosity. Peak pressures ranged from 14.5 to 67 GPa and were attained after multiple reverberations of the shock wave at the interface of the

  20. A Quantitative NMR Analysis of Phosphorus in Carbonaceous and Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasek, M. A.; Smith, V. D.; Lauretta, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus is important in a number of biochemical molecules, from DNA to ATP. Early life may have depended on meteorites as a primary source of phosphorus as simple dissolution of crustal apatite may not produce the necessary concentration of phosphate. Phosphorus is found in several mineral phases in meteorites. Apatite and other Ca- and Mg phosphate minerals tend to be the dominant phosphorus reservoir in stony meteorites, whereas in more iron-rich or reduced meteorites, the phosphide minerals schreibersite, (Fe, Ni)3P, and perryite, (Ni, Fe)5(Si, P)2 are dominant. However, in CM chondrites that have experienced significant aqueous alteration, phosphorus has been detected in more exotic molecules. A series of phosphonic acids including methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butyl- phosphonic acids were observed by GC-MS in Murchison. Phosphorian sulfides are in Murchison and Murray. NMR spectrometry is capable of detecting multiple substances with one experiment, is non-destructive, and potentially quantitative, as discussed below. Despite these advantages, NMR spectrometry is infrequently applied to meteoritic studies due in large part to a lack of applicability to many compounds and the relatively high limit of detection requirements. Carbon-13 solid-state NMR has been applied to macromolecular carbon in Murchison. P-31 NMR has many advantages over aqueous carbon-13 NMR spectrometry. P-31 is the only isotope of phosphorus, and P-31 gives a signal approximately twice as strong as C-13. These two factors together with the relative abundances of carbon and phosphorus imply that phosphorus should give a signal approximately 20 as strong as carbon in a given sample. A discussion on the preparation of the quantitative standard and NMR studies are presented

  1. Weathering of ordinary chondrites from Oman: Correlation of weathering parameters with 14C terrestrial ages and a refined weathering scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurfluh, Florian J.; Hofmann, Beda A.; Gnos, Edwin; Eggenberger, Urs; Jull, A. J. Timothy

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated 128 14C-dated ordinary chondrites from Oman for macroscopically visible weathering parameters, for thin section-based weathering degrees, and for chemical weathering parameters as analyzed with handheld X-ray fluorescence. These 128 14C-dated meteorites show an abundance maximum of terrestrial age at 19.9 ka, with a mean of 21.0 ka and a pronounced lack of samples between 0 and 10 ka. The weathering degree is evaluated in thin section using a refined weathering scale based on the current W0 to W6 classification of Wlotzka (1993), with five newly included intermediate steps resulting in a total of nine (formerly six) steps. We find significant correlations between terrestrial ages and several macroscopic weathering parameters. The correlation of various chemical parameters including Sr and Ba with terrestrial age is not very pronounced. The microscopic weathering degree of metal and sulfides with newly added intermediate steps shows the best correlation with 14C terrestrial ages, demonstrating the significance of the newly defined weathering steps. We demonstrate that the observed 14C terrestrial age distribution can be modeled from the abundance of meteorites with different weathering degrees, allowing the evaluation of an age-frequency distribution for the whole meteorite population.

  2. Weathering of ordinary chondrites from Oman: Correlation of weathering parameters with 14C terrestrial ages and a refined weathering scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurfluh, Florian J.; Hofmann, Beda A.; Gnos, Edwin; Eggenberger, Urs; Jull, A. J. Timothy

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated 128 14C-dated ordinary chondrites from Oman for macroscopically visible weathering parameters, for thin section-based weathering degrees, and for chemical weathering parameters as analyzed with handheld X-ray fluorescence. These 128 14C-dated meteorites show an abundance maximum of terrestrial age at 19.9 ka, with a mean of 21.0 ka and a pronounced lack of samples between 0 and 10 ka. The weathering degree is evaluated in thin section using a refined weathering scale based on the current W0 to W6 classification of Wlotzka (1993), with five newly included intermediate steps resulting in a total of nine (formerly six) steps. We find significant correlations between terrestrial ages and several macroscopic weathering parameters. The correlation of various chemical parameters including Sr and Ba with terrestrial age is not very pronounced. The microscopic weathering degree of metal and sulfides with newly added intermediate steps shows the best correlation with 14C terrestrial ages, demonstrating the significance of the newly defined weathering steps. We demonstrate that the observed 14C terrestrial age distribution can be modeled from the abundance of meteorites with different weathering degrees, allowing the evaluation of an age-frequency distribution for the whole meteorite population.

  3. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. IV Annealing studies of a type 3.4 ordinary chondrite and the metamorphic history of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimon, R. K.; Keck, B. D.; Weeks, K. S.; Dehart, J.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1985-07-01

    Samples of a type 3.4 chondrite have been annealed at 400 - 1000°C for 1 - 200 hours, their thermoluminescence properties determined and analyzed for K, Na, Mn, Sc and Ca by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  4. Correlation between relative ages inferred from 26Al and bulk compositions of ferromagnesian chondrules in least equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, S.; Nagahara, H.; Mostefaoui, S.; Kita, N. T.

    2003-06-01

    We have studied the relationship between bulk chemical compositions and relative formation ages inferred from the initial 26Al/27Al ratios for sixteen ferromagnesian chondrules in least equilibrated ordinary chondrites, Semarkona (LL3.0) and Bishunpur (LL3.1). The initial 26Al/27Al ratios of these chondrules were obtained by Kita et al. (2000) and Mostefaoui et al. (2002), corresponding to relative ages from 0.7 ± 0.2 to 2.4 -0.4/+0.7 Myr after calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), by assuming a homogeneous distribution of 26Al in the early solar system. The measured bulk compositions of the chondrules cover the compositional range of ferromagnesian chondrules reported in the literature and, thus, the chondrules in this study are regarded as representatives of ferromagnesian chondrules. The relative ages of the chondrules appear to correlate with bulk abundances of Si and the volatile elements (Na, K, Mn, and Cr), but there seems to exist no correlation of relative ages neither with Fe nor with refractory elements. Younger chondrules tend to be richer in Si and volatile elements. Our result supports the result of Mostefaoui et al. (2002) who suggested that pyroxene-rich chondrules are younger than olivine-rich ones. The correlation provides an important constraint on chondrule formation in the early solar system. It is explained by chondrule formation in an open system, where silicon and volatile elements evaporated from chondrule melts during chondrule formation and recondensed as chondrule precursors of the next generation.

  5. The thermoluminescence carrier in the Dhajala chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, M. H.; Mckimmey, P. M.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the type 3 (unequilibrated) ordinary chondrites provide a major source of information on the early solar system. However, the interpretation of the data is difficult because all but a few display signs of metamorphic alteration. The present investigation is concerned with the thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity measurements on 58 chondrules separated from the Dhajala meteorites. The data were discussed briefly by Sparks and Sears (1982). In the current investigation particular attention is given to the constraints placed by these data on the mechanism by which metamorphism is related to TL sensitivity. Dhajala-normalized TL sensitivity of the separated chondrules is plotted against chondrule mass, and a histogram of the CaO contents of 15 chondrules is presented. Histograms showing the TL sensitivity of chondrules separated from the Dhajala meteorite are also provided.

  6. An Experimental Study of Partially Molten Ordinary Chondrite Under Dynamic Conditions: Siderophile Abundances in Quench Fe-S-Ni Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushmer, T.; Humayun, M.; Campbell, A. J.

    2004-05-01

    Early differentiation in planetesimals involved a variety of different physical mechanisms. Fe-rich metallic liquid segregation can occur in a solid, partially molten or purely molten silicate body, with or without the presence of deformation. Deformation may assist the segregation of low degree metallic melts. Segregation of Fe-S-Ni liquids formed by variable degrees of partial melting of chondrites also imparts distinct geochemical signatures on the composition of the resulting metal. These chemical signatures vary according to initial parent body composition, segregation mechanisms and the degree to which early S-rich, and possibly O-bearing, core-forming liquids were extracted. In addition, the presence of deformation may both enhance kinetics and efficiency of the physical segregation process. To explore the relationship between core formation scenarios and geochemistry, deformation experiments on the Kernouve H6 ordinary chondrite were performed under partially molten conditions. The siderophile element compositions of quench Fe-S-Ni liquids dynamically segregated at different degrees of partial melting and associated Fe-Ni metal were then determined by laser ablation ICP-MS. Partition coefficients have been calculated for residual metal and the associated quench composition in the different experiments; KM-12 (P=1.2 GPa, T=900oC, strain rate= 10-6/s, no silicate melt present,10% strain) which contains the highest sulfur quench compositions and represents the lowest degree Fe-S-Ni partial melt, KM-10 (P=1.0 GPa, T=925oC, strain rate=10-5/s, 40%\\ strain), KM-17 (P=1.2 GPa, T=940oC, strain rate = 10-6/s, 12% silicate melt present, 10% strain) and KM-11 (P=1.0 GPa, T=990oC, strain rate=10-5/s, 15-18% silicate melt present, 15% strain) which shows the lowest sulfur quench composition of the highest degree Fe-S-Ni partial melt. Clear trends exist in the data from high to low wt% S content. Cu partitions into the S-bearing liquid under all conditions and Ds range

  7. Chromite-Plagioclase Assemblages as a New Shock Indicator; Implications for the Shock and Thermal Histories of Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Chromite in ordinary chondrites (OC) can be used as a shock indicator. A survey of 76 equilibrated H, L and LL chondrites shows that unshocked chromite grains occur in equant, subhedral and rounded morphologies surrounded by silicate or intergrown with metallic Fe-Ni and/or troilite. Some unmelted chromite grains are fractured or crushed during whole-rock brecciation. Others are transected by opaque veins; the veins form when impacts cause localized heating of metal-troilite intergrowths above the Fe-FeS eutectic (988 C), mobilization of metal-troilite melts, and penetration of the melt into fractures in chromite grains. Chromite-plagioclase assemblages occur in nearly every shock-stage S3-S6 OC; the assemblages range in size from 20-300 microns and consist of 0.2-20-micron-size euhedral, subhedral, anhedral and rounded chromite grains surrounded by plagioclase or glass of plagioclase composition. Plagioclase has a low impedance to shock compression. Heat from shock-melted plagioclase caused adjacent chromite grains to melt; chromite grains crystallized from this melt. Those chromite grains in the assemblages that are completely surrounded by plagioclase are generally richer in Al2O3, than unmelted, matrix chromite grains in the same meteorite. Chromite veinlets (typically 0.5-2 microns thick and 10-300 microns long) occur typically in the vicinity of chromite-plagioclase assemblages. The veinlets formed from chromite-plagioclase melts that were injected into fractures in neighboring silicate grains; chromite crystallized in the fractures and the residual plagioclase-rich melt continued to flow, eventually pooling to form plagioclase-rich melt pockets. Chromite-rich chondrules (consisting mainly of olivine, plagioclase-normative mesostasis, and 5-15 vol.% chromite) occur in many shocked OC and OC regolith breccias but they are absent from primitive type-3 OC. They may have formed by impact melting chromite, plagioclase and adjacent mafic silicates during higher

  8. Raman spectroscopic study of four Spanish shocked ordinary chondrites: Cañellas, Olmedilla de Alarcón, Reliegos and Olivenza.

    PubMed

    Rull, F; Muñoz-Espadas, M J; Lunar, R; Martínez-Frías, J

    2010-07-13

    Shock metamorphism in chondritic parent bodies produces typical textures, visible under the microscope, which are a consequence of structural deformation of the crystals. Such deformations can be studied with Raman spectroscopy. The vibrational characteristics of olivines and pyroxenes, structurally deformed by weak-to-moderate shock metamorphism, have been determined on four Spanish ordinary chondrites (Cañellas, Olmedilla de Alarcón, Reliegos and Olivenza). Such deformations would affect, in principle, the band positions and widths of the Raman spectra peaks. The measured band positions and relative intensities are consistent with chemical composition for olivines and pyroxenes, but show little influence on the degree of shock. However, the full spectral band width of the silicate internal modes shows some dependence on the impact grade, which could be attributed to inhomogeneous effects produced by the impacts. PMID:20529952

  9. A 3D nanoscale approach to nebular paleomagnetism in the Semarkona LL3.0 ordinary chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsle, J. F.; Fu, R. R.; Weiss, B. P.; Kasama, T.; Midgley, P. A.; Harrison, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Solar nebular models suggest that magnetic fields are central to the redistribution of mass and angular momentum in the protoplanetary disk. Using individual chondrules with patches of dusty olivine the strength of these magnetic fields can be measured due to presence of nanoscale Fe inclusions. Since chondrules formed by rapid heating and cooling in the early solar nebula, individual chondrules have the potential to record the magnetic field that was present during their formation, and retain this signal for several billion years. Recently the first robust paleointensity measurement of nebular fields was compleated by measureing dusty olivine grains from the Semarkona LL3.0 ordinary chondrite meteorite in a SQUID microscope. (Fu et al. this meeting) Extracting quantitative information from the paleomagnetic meaurements requires a full understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms producing the measured magnetic signal. Here we characterise the magnetic behaviour of the same dusty olivine chondrules, using a variety of electron microscopy techniques. Electron holography and Lorentz imaging confirm the dominance of single vortex (SV) states in the majority of the remanence carriers. In-field measurements demonstrate the high stability of this SV state, making them suitable carriers of paleomagnetic information. We present a 3D volume reconstruction of the dusty olivine using Focussed-Ion-Beam (FIB) slice-and-view tomography. Combining the selective milling properties of FIB with the high spatial resolution of the Scanning Electron Microscope we are able to capture images as we make successive slices through a selected region of the sample. For this initial study we present a collection of 400 images taken every 10 nm as we slice through an 10 μm x 10 μm x 4 μm volume of the dusty olivine patch within a single chondrule. Each image possesses resolution around 10 nm allowing us to resolve particles in both the single domain and single vortex size ranges. Once

  10. Fe-Ni metal and sulfide minerals in CM chondrites: An indicator for thermal history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimura, M.; Grossman, J.N.; Weisberg, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    CM chondrites were subjected to aqueous alteration and, in some cases, to secondary metamorphic heating. The effects of these processes vary widely, and have mainly been documented in silicate phases. Herein, we report the characteristic features of Fe-Ni metal and sulfide phases in 13 CM and 2 CM-related chondrites to explore the thermal history of these chondrites. The texture and compositional distribution of the metal in CM are different from those in unequilibrated ordinary and CO chondrites, but most have similarities to those in highly primitive chondrites, such as CH, CR, and Acfer 094. We classified the CM samples into three categories based on metal composition and sulfide texture. Fe-Ni metal in category A is kamacite to martensite. Category B is characterized by pyrrhotite grains always containing blebs or lamellae of pentlandite. Opaque mineral assemblages of category C are typically kamacite, Ni-Co-rich metal, and pyrrhotite. These categories are closely related to the degree of secondary heating and are not related to degree of the aqueous alteration. The characteristic features of the opaque minerals can be explained by secondary heating processes after aqueous alteration. Category A CM chondrites are unheated, whereas those in category B experienced small degrees of secondary heating. CMs in category C were subjected to the most severe secondary heating process. Thus, opaque minerals can provide constraints on the thermal history for CM chondrites. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2011.

  11. The Portales Valley meteorite breccia: evidence for impact-induced melting and metamorphism of an ordinary chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Ulff-Møller, Finn; Wasson, John T.; Carlson, William D.

    2001-01-01

    The Portales Valley H-chondrite fall is an annealed impact-melt breccia with coarse metal interstitial to angular and subrounded silicate clasts. The large metal-rich regions exhibit a Widmanstätten structure and contain very little troilite. We were able to examine a 16.5 kg metal-rich specimen of Portales Valley. Silicates contain numerous flecks of metallic Cu and curvilinear trails of tiny metallic Fe-Ni blebs, characteristic of shocked and annealed chondrites. One silicate clast appears to have experienced little (<10%) or no melting; it is essentially identical to normal H6 chondrites. Other clasts are finer grained and have a low abundance of recognizable relict chondrules; they are significantly enriched in troilite and depleted in metallic Fe-Ni relative to typical H chondrites. Their low metal abundance indicates that they are not simply ultra-recrystallized H6 chondrites. If the silicates in these clasts started off as normal H-chondrite material and were recrystallized to the same extent as the progenitor of the H6-like clast, then their low modal abundance of chondrules indicates that they experienced significant crushing and/or impact melting. We infer that most of the metal and troilite was lost from these silicate clasts during impact melting; it appears that troilite was reintroduced into the silicates, perhaps by an S 2-rich vapor (that formed FeS by reacting with Fe vapor or residual metal). Portales Valley probably formed on a low-density, porous H-chondrite asteroid by a high-energy impact event that caused crushing and melting; the target material was buried deeply enough to undergo slow cooling. Meteorites that appear to have formed, at least in part, by analogous processes include IIE-an Netschaëvo and EL6 Blithfield.

  12. Comparison of Nickel XANES Spectra and Elemental Maps from a Ureilite, a LL3.8 Ordinary Chondrite, Two Carbonaceous Chondrites and Two Large Cluster IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel in the extraterrestrial world is commonly found in both Fe-Ni sulfide and Fe-Ni met-al forms [1] and in the pure metal state in the interior of iron meteorites where it is not easily oxidized. Ni is also found in olivine, pyroxene and glasses and in some melts the partitioning of Ni between the olivines and glass is controlled by the amount of S in the melt [2]. Its most common valence state is Ni(2+) but Ni also occurs as Ni(0), Ni(+), and Ni(3+) and rarely as Ni(2-), Ni(1-) and Ni(4+) [3]. It's valence state in olivines is Ni(2+) in octa-hedral coordination on the M1 site and rarely on the M2 site.[4]. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray absorp-tion near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy is well established and can be used to determine not only va-lence states but also coordination sites [5]. We report here Ni XANES spectroscopy and elemental maps collected from 2 carbonaceous chondrites, 2 large clus-ter IDPs, 1 ureilite and 1 LL3 orginary chondrite.Using XANES it may be possible to find a common trait in the large cluster IDPs that will also be found in mete-orite samples.

  13. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. IX. Thermoluminescence and hydrothermal annealing experiments and their relationship to metamorphism and aqueous alteration in type < 3. 3 ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Guimon, R.K.; Lofgren, G.E.; Sears, D.W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of four type 3 chondrites have been annealed at 400-850/sup 0/C and 0.77-1 kbar for 10-500 h in the presence of various amounts of water (0-10 wt.%) and sodium disilicate (0-2 molal) and their thermoluminescence properties measured. After annealing for > 20 h at temperatures > 600/sup 0/C, the TL sensitivity of the samples increased by factors of up to 40. After annealing at < 600/sup 0/C for 10-500 h, or relatively short periods at high temperatures (e.g., less than or equal to 20 h at 850/sup 0/C), the TL sensitivity of the samples decreased by up to 2 orders of magnitude (depending on the original value). The TL peak temperatures observed in the present experiments are consistent with a low form of feldspar (the TL phosphor) being produced at < 800/sup 0/C and a high form being produced at > 800/sup 0/C. When both high and low forms were present originally, the low-form was destroyed preferentially. The authors suggest that these data are consistent with the TL-metamorphism trends observed in type > 3.2 chondrites, being due to the formation of feldspar by the devitrification of chondrule glass during metamorphism. For types < 3.2, the TL data are equally consistent with these types experiencing lower levels of metamorphism than the higher types, or with type 3.0 being produced from higher types by aqueous alteration. The presence of water with non-terrestrial D/H ratios, and petrographic evidence for aqueous alteration in Semarkona, lead to favoring the aqueous alteration hypothesis.

  14. Alkali-granitoids as fragments within the ordinary chondrite Adzhi-Bogdo: Evidence for highly fractionated, alkali-granitic liquids on asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischoff, A.

    1993-01-01

    Adzhi-Bogdo is an ordinary chondrite regolith breccia (LL3-6) that fell October 30, 1949 in Gobi Altay, Mongolia. The rock consists of submm- to cm-sized fragments embedded in a fine-grained elastic matrix. The breccia contains various types of clasts, some of which must be of foreign heritage. Based on chemical compositions of olivine some components have to be classified as L-type. Components of the breccia include chondrules, impact melts (some are K-rich, similar to those found in other LL-chondrites, highly recrystalized rock fragments ('granulites'), pyroxene-rich fragments with achondritic textures, and alkali-granitoidal fragments that mainly consist of K-feldspar and quartz or tridymite. Probably, this is the first report on granitoids from asteroids. It can be ruled out that these fragments represent huge rock assemblages of the parent body like granites do on Earth. Therefore, to avoid misunderstandings, these rocks will be designated as granitoids. In one thin section four granitoids were observed. The main phases within these clasts are K-feldspar and SiO2-phases. Minor phases include albite, Cl-apatite, whitlockite, ilmenite, zircon, Ca-poor pyroxene, and an unidentified Na,Ti-bearing silicate. Based on chemical composition and on optical properties quartz appears to be the SiO2-phase in two fragments, whereas tridymite seems to occur in the other two. The calculated formula of the unknown Na,Ti-rich silicate is very close to (Na,Ca)2.7(Fe,Mg)6(Ti)1.3(Si)7(O)24. Quartz and K-feldspar can reach sizes of up to 700 microns. Thus, the fragments can be described as coarse-grained (by chondritic standards). This is especially the case considering that quartz and K-feldspar are very rare minerals in ordinary chondrites. Representative analyses of minerals from some granitoidal clasts are given. Based on the mineral compositions and the modal abundances the bulk compositions were calculated. Besides these granitoidal rocks, pyroxene-rich fragments occur that

  15. The formation of weathering products on the LEW 85320 ordinary chondrite - Evidence from carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions and implications for carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1989-03-01

    Isotopic analysis of nesquehonite recovered from the surface of the LEW 85320 H5 ordinary chondrite shows that the delta C-13 and delta O-18 values of the two generations of bicarbonate (Antarctic and Texas) are different: delta C-13 = + 7.9 per mil and + 4.2 per mil; delta O-18 = + 17.9 per mil and + 12.1 per mil, respectively. Carbon isotopic compositions are consistent with equilibrium formation from atmospheric carbon dioxide at - 2 + or - 4 C (Antarctic) and + 16 + or - 4 C (Texas). Oxygen isotopic data imply that the water required for nesquehonite precipitation was derived from atmospheric water vapor or glacial meltwater which had locally exchanged with silicates, either in the meteorite or in underlying bedrock. Although carbonates with similar delta C-13 values have been identified in the SNC meteorites EETA 79001 and Nakhla, petrographic and temperature constraints argue against their simply being terrestrial weathering products.

  16. The formation of weathering products on the LEW 85320 ordinary chondrite - Evidence from carbon and oxygen stable isotope compositions and implications for carbonates in SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Monica M.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of nesquehonite recovered from the surface of the LEW 85320 H5 ordinary chondrite shows that the delta C-13 and delta O-18 values of the two generations of bicarbonate (Antarctic and Texas) are different: delta C-13 = + 7.9 per mil and + 4.2 per mil; delta O-18 = + 17.9 per mil and + 12.1 per mil, respectively. Carbon isotopic compositions are consistent with equilibrium formation from atmospheric carbon dioxide at - 2 + or - 4 C (Antarctic) and + 16 + or - 4 C (Texas). Oxygen isotopic data imply that the water required for nesquehonite precipitation was derived from atmospheric water vapor or glacial meltwater which had locally exchanged with silicates, either in the meteorite or in underlying bedrock. Although carbonates with similar delta C-13 values have been identified in the SNC meteorites EETA 79001 and Nakhla, petrographic and temperature constraints argue against their simply being terrestrial weathering products.

  17. Using the Fe/Mn Ratio of FeO-Rich Olivine In WILD 2, Chondrite Matrix, and Type IIA Chondrules to Disentangle Their Histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David R.; Le, L.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The Stardust Mission returned a large abundance of impactors from Comet 81P/Wild2 in the 5-30 m range. The preliminary examination of just a limited number of these particles showed that the collection captured abundant crystalline grains with a diverse mineralogy [1,2]. Many of these grains resemble those found in chondrite matrix and even contain fragments of chondrules and CAIs [1-3]. In particular, the olivine found in Wild 2 exhibits a wide compositional range (Fa0-97) with minor element abundances similar to the matrix olivine found in many carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs). Despite the wide distribution of Fa content, the olivine found in the matrices of CCs, UOCs, and Wild 2 can be roughly lumped into two types based solely on fayalite content. In fact, in some cases, a distinct bi-modal distribution is observed.

  18. The Effects of Shock Metamorphism on Metal Textures and Metallographic Cooling Rates in L-Group Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M. E.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.

    1993-07-01

    Postshock reheating and rapid cooling have severely disturbed geothermometers and coolingrate indicators in L chondrites. This has generated an ongoing debate on the interpretation of the early thermal history of an 'onion-shell' [1] or a 'rubble-pile' [2] L-chondrite parent body. In order to access the degree that reheating has perturbed metallographic cooling rates (disrupting this early thermal history), we have undertaken a study of textures derived from shock metamorphism and subsequent fast cooling of sulfides and Fe-Ni metals. Classification of shock stage by petrographic analysis [3] was performed on 70 L- chondrite thin sections, 55 Antarctic and 15 non-Antarctic, in order to place each into their appropriate shock stage. Fe-Ni metals from representative samples of each shock stage were studied optically and analyzed chemically with a Cameca SX-50 electron microprobe to obtain textural and chemical data. Meteorites of shock stage S3. Meteorites of S4 shock stage contain features similar to lower-shocked S3s, except that they exhibit more abundant melt pockets with melt droplets larger by an order of magnitude (~10 micrometers in diameter). Samples of shock grade S5 have numerous melt

  19. Textural properties of iron-rich phases in H ordinary chondrites and quantitative links to the degree of thermal metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignard, J.; Toplis, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    The textural characteristics of opaque iron-rich phases (kamacite-taenite and troilite) have been quantified in the eight H-chondrites (two H4, three H5 and three H6) that have been the subject of previous thermo-chronological studies. These samples are of interest as they have temperature-time paths during cooling that have been shown to be consistent with radiogenic heating by 26Al on a single parent-body, thus offering the possibility to quantitatively link textural characteristics to thermal history. In addition to these eight samples, two other H5 samples (Forest City & Misshof) and two primitive achondrites (Acapulco & Lodran) were studied for comparison. The textural characteristics measured include: (i) phase proportions, (ii) the length of metal-sulphide contacts, (iii) dihedral angle at contacts with silicate grains, (iv) grain shape and circularity, (v) grain size and size distributions. The absolute and relative proportions of metals and sulphides are found to be approximately constant in all studied H chondrites, consistent with evolution in a chemically closed system. With increasing degree of thermal metamorphism, H-chondrites are found to show evidence for separation of metal and sulphide phases, increasing grain circularity, increasing grain size, and modification of size distributions characterized by the elimination of small grains. Variations of these parameters are found to be almost identical for sulphides and metals suggesting similar growth mechanisms for these two phases. Furthermore, trends between samples place them consistently in the same order: Sainte Marguerite (H4), Forest Vale (H4), Nadiabondi (H5), Richardton (H5), Forest City (H5), Misshof (H5), Allegan (H5), Kernouvé (H6), Guareña (H6) and Estacado (H6). In all cases Acapulco and Lodran extend the trends observed among the H-chondrites. In general, it is found that characteristics requiring material transport over shorter length scales (i.e. within grains) show greater

  20. The S(IV)-type Asteroids as Ordinary Chondrite Parent Body Candidates: Implications for the Completeness of the Meteorite Sample of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffey, M. J.

    1995-09-01

    The discrepancy between the abundance of ordinary chondrites (OCs) among the meteorites and the rarity of unambiguously similar assemblages in the asteroid belt has been a major point of discussion within and between the asteroid and meteorite communities. Various resolutions to this apparent paradox have been proposed [e.g., 1-5], including: 1) interpretations of S-type asteroid spectra are incorrect due to space weathering effects; 2) ordinary chondrites derive from a few rare but favorably situated parent bodies; 3) OCs come from a residual population of small unheated mainbelt asteroids; 4) shock effects darken OC parent body surfaces disguising them as C-type asteroids, and 5) OCs come from inner solar system planetesimals ejected to the Oort cloud which have been recently perturbed into Earth-crossing orbits. Although none of these possibilities has yet been rigorously excluded, recent investigations suggest that the resolution of the apparent paradox lies in some combination of the first three options. For option 3, the discovery of a small mainbelt asteroid with an OC-like spectrum indicates OC-assemblages among the smaller mainbelt asteroids [6], although their abundance is still low in the current sample [7]. For option 2, the mineralogical survey indicated that while most S-asteroids could be rigorously excluded on mineralogical criteria, the S(IV) subtype of this class has silicate compositions within the OC range [8]. The S(IV)-objects are concentrated near the 3:1 secular resonance at 2.5 AU providing an efficient escape into Earth-crossing orbits. Unfortunately for a simple resolution of the OC parent body question, S(IV) spectra still exhibit weaker silicate features and redder spectral slopes than OC assemblages. Although significant uncertainties remain, optical alteration of asteroid surfaces interpreted from the Galileo images of Ida and Gaspra may reconcile the mismatch between OC and S(IV) spectra [option 1]. Although only a subset of the S

  1. Organic Analysis of Catalytic Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Products and Ordinary Chondrite Meteorites by Stepwise Pyrolysis-GCMS: Organics in the Early Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, Darren R.; Yazzie, Cyriah A.; Burton, Aaron S.; Niles, Paul B.; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic generation of complex organic compounds, in the early solar nebula that formed our solar system, is hypothesized by some to occur via Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. In its simplest form, FT synthesis involves the low temperature (<300degC) catalytic reaction of hydrogen and carbon monoxide gases to form more complex hydrocarbon compounds, primarily n-alkanes, via reactive nano-particulate iron, nickel, or cobalt, for example. Industrially, this type of synthesis has been utilized in the gas-to-liquid process to convert syngas, produced from coal, natural gas, or biomass, into paraffin waxes that can be cracked to produce liquid diesel fuels. In general, the effect of increasing reaction temperature (>300degC) produces FT products that include lesser amounts of n-alkanes and greater alkene, alcohol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. We have begun to experimentally investigate FT synthesis in the context of abiotic generation of organic compounds in the early solar nebula. It is generally thought that the early solar nebula included abundant hydrogen and carbon monoxide gases and nano-particulate matter such as iron and metal silicates that could have catalyzed the FT reaction. The effect of FT reaction temperature, catalyst type, and experiment duration on the resulting products is being investigated. These solid organic products are analyzed by thermal-stepwise pyrolysis-GCMS and yield the types and distribution of hydrocarbon compounds released as a function of temperature. We show how the FT products vary by reaction temperature, catalyst type, and experimental duration and compare these products to organic compounds found to be indigenous to ordinary chondrite meteorites. We hypothesize that the origin of organics in some chondritic meteorites, that represent an aggregation of materials from the early solar system, may at least in part be from FT synthesis that occurred in the early solar nebula.

  2. Calibration of cosmogenic noble gas production in ordinary chondrites based on 36Cl-36Ar ages. Part 1: Refined produced rates for cosmogenic 21Ne and 38Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcher, N.; Caffee, M. W.; Nishiizumi, K.; Welten, K. C.; Vogel, N.; Wieler, R.; Leya, I.

    2013-10-01

    We measured the concentrations and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar in bulk samples and metal separates of 14 ordinary chondrite falls with long exposure ages and high metamorphic grades. In addition, we measured concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl in metal separates and in the nonmagnetic fractions of the selected meteorites. Using cosmogenic 36Cl and 36Ar measured in the metal separates, we determined 36Cl-36Ar cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, which are shielding-independent and therefore particularly reliable. Using the cosmogenic noble gases and radionuclides, we are able to decipher the CRE history for the studied objects. Based on the correlation 3He/21Ne versus 22Ne/21Ne, we demonstrate that, among the meteorites studied, only one suffered significant diffusive losses (about 35%). The data confirm that the linear correlation 3He/21Ne versus 22Ne/21Ne breaks down at high shielding. Using 36Cl-36Ar exposure ages and measured noble gas concentrations, we determine 21Ne and 38Ar production rates as a function of 22Ne/21Ne. The new data agree with recent model calculations for the relationship between 21Ne and 38Ar production rates and the 22Ne/21Ne ratio, which does not always provide unique shielding information. Based on the model calculations, we determine a new correlation line for 21Ne and 38Ar production rates as a function of the shielding indicator 22Ne/21Ne for H, L, and LL chondrites with preatmospheric radii less than about 65 cm. We also calculated the 10Be/21Ne and 26Al/21Ne production rate ratios for the investigated samples, which show good agreement with recent model calculations.

  3. Thermal history of type-3 chondrites in the NASA antarctic collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, L.; Quirico, E.; Montagnac, G.

    2014-07-01

    to evaluate the metamorphic grade of the objects and to assign a petrologic type along a unique petrologic scale [1-4]. This technique has been successfully applied to type 3 Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites [1], carbonaceous CV chondrites [2], and CO chondrites [3]. The interpretation of the structural order of the polyaromatic carbonaceous matter in terms of thermal history is thus reliable. Raman spectroscopy enables the determination of the degree of structural order of the polyaromatic organic matter present in the matrix of chondrites. Both falls and finds, from Antarctica [4] and elsewhere, have been analyzed. It does not require a large amount of samples and is relatively easy to implement. Raman spectroscopy is particularly sensitive to the lowest petrologic types (3.0-3.2). The present NASA collection of Antarctic meteorites represents an incredible source of precious samples for our community. The present work finely characterizes the thermal history of most of the type 3 chondrites (UOCs, CVs, and COs) from that collection. At the present time, the objectives are threefold: (i) determination of reliable petrologic types indispensable for our community; (ii) identification of the most primitive type 3 chondrites (petrologic type ≤ 3.1); and (iii) identification of potential ''anomalous'' samples having experienced a slightly different thermal history. The JSC Meteorite Working Group generously allocated us with more than 150 chondrites (UOCs, CVs, and COs). The following points summarize the main results. (i) At the present time, the thermal histories of more than 100 samples have been characterized. (ii) The terrestrial weathering experienced by several chondrites (˜25 chondrites) has been too pervasive for the method to be applied. For these meteorites, as signatures of oxide minerals dominate Raman spectra of the matrix, the organic matter might have been significantly altered through oxidation. (iii) Real discrepancies with the preliminary JSC

  4. Nonporphyritic chondrules and chondrule fragments in enstatite chondrites: Insights into their origin and secondary processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, M. E.; Sylvester, P.; BrandstäTter, F.; Engler, A.

    2015-08-01

    Sixteen nonporphyritic chondrules and chondrule fragments were studied in polished thin and thick sections in two enstatite chondrites (ECs): twelve objects from unequilibrated EH3 Sahara 97158 and four objects from equilibrated EH4 Indarch. Bulk major element analyses, obtained with electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and analytical scanning electron microscopy (ASEM), as well as bulk lithophile trace element analyses, determined by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), show that volatile components (K2O + Na2O versus Al2O3) scatter roughly around the CI line, indicating equilibration with the chondritic reservoir. All lithophile trace element abundances in the chondrules from Sahara 97158 and Indarch are within the range of previous analyses of nonporphyritic chondrules in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs). The unfractionated (solar-like) Yb/Ce ratio of the studied objects and the mostly unfractionated refractory lithophile trace element (RLTE) abundance patterns indicate an origin by direct condensation. However, the objects possess subchondritic CaO/Al2O3 ratios; superchondritic (Sahara 97158) and subchondritic (Indarch) Yb/Sc ratios; and chondritic-normalized deficits in Nb, Ti, V, and Mn relative to RLTEs. This suggests a unique nebular process for the origin of these ECs, involving elemental fractionation of the solar gas by the removal of oldhamite, niningerite, and/or another phase prior to chondrule condensation. A layered chondrule in Sahara 97158 is strongly depleted in Nb in the core compared to the rim, suggesting that the solar gas was heterogeneous on the time scales of chondrule formation. Late stage metasomatic events produced the compositional diversity of the studied objects by addition of moderately volatile and volatile elements. In the equilibrated Indarch chondrules, this late process has been further disturbed, possibly by a postaccretional process (diffusion?) that preferentially mobilized Rb with

  5. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Ordinary Chondrite (OC) Meteorites from Antarctica Indicate Distinct Carbonate Species Using a Stepped Acid Extraction Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from five Ordinary Chondrite (OC) meteorites collected in Antarctica. These samples were identified and requested from NASA based upon their size, alteration history, and collection proximity to known Martian meteorites. They are also assumed to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth. This research addresses two questions involving Mars carbonates: 1) characterize terrestrial, secondary carbonate isotope values to apply to Martian meteorites for isolating in-situ carbonates, and 2) increase understanding of carbonates formed in cold and arid environments with Antarctica as an analog for Mars. Two samples from each meteorite, each approximately 0.5 grams, were crushed and dissolved in pure phosphoric acid for 3 sequential reactions: a) R times 0 for 1 hour at 30 degrees Centigrade (fine calcite extraction), b) R times 1 for 18 hours at 30 degrees Centigrade (course calcite extraction), and c) R times 2 for 3 hours at 150 degrees Centigrade (siderite and/or magnesite extraction). CO (sub 2) was distilled by freezing with liquid nitrogen from each sample tube, then separated from organics and sulfides with a TRACE GC using a Restek HayeSep Q 80/100 6 foot 2 millimeter stainless column, and then analyzed on a Thermo MAT 253 Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) in Dual Inlet mode. This system was built at NASA/JSC over the past 3 years and proof-tested with known carbonate standards to develop procedures, assess yield, and quantify expected error bands. Two distinct species of carbonates are found: 1) calcite, and 2) non-calcite carbonate (future testing will attempt to differentiate siderite from magnesite). Preliminary results indicate the terrestrial carbonates are formed at approximately sigma (sup 13) C equal to plus 5 per mille, which is consistent with atmospheric CO (sub 2) sigma (sup 13) C equal to minus 7 per mille and fractionation of plus

  6. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Ordinary Chondrite (OC) Meteorites from Antarctica Indicate Distinct Terrestrial Carbonate Species using a Stepped Acid Extraction Procedure Impacting Mars Carbonate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. E.; Niles, P. B.; Locke, D.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from five OC meteorites collected in Antarctica. These samples were selected for analysis based upon their size and collection proximity to known Martian meteorites. They were also selected based on petrologic type (3+) such that they were likely to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth. This study has two main tasks: 1) characterize the isotopic composition of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals formed on meteorites in Antarctica, and 2) study the mechanisms of carbonate formation in cold and arid environments with Antarctica as an analog for Mars. Two samples from each meteorite, each ~0.5g, was crushed and dissolved in pure phosphoric acid for 3 sequential reactions: a) Rx0 for 1 hour at 30°C, b) Rx1 for 18 hours at 30°C, and c) Rx2 for 3 hours at 150°C. CO2 was distilled by freezing with liquid nitrogen from each sample tube, then separated from organics and sulfides with a TRACE GC using a Restek HayeSep Q 80/100 6' 2mm stainless column, and then analyzed on a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS in Dual Inlet mode. This system was built at NASA/JSC over the past 3 years and proof tested with known carbonate standards to develop procedures, assess yield, and quantify expected uncertainties. Two distinct species of carbonates are found based on the stepped extraction technique: 1) Ca-rich carbonate released at low temperatures, and 2) Mg, or Fe-rich carbonate released at high temperatures. Preliminary results indicate that most of the carbonates present in the ordinary chondrites analyzed have δ13C=+5‰, which is consistent with formation from atmospheric CO2 δ13C=-7‰ at -20°C. The oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates vary between +4‰ and +34‰ with the Mg-rich and/or Fe-rich carbonates possessing the lowest δ18O values. This suggests that the carbonates formed under a wide range of temperatures. However, the carbonate oxygen

  7. "Sweating meteorites"—Water-soluble salts and temperature variation in ordinary chondrites and soil from the hot desert of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurfluh, Florian J.; Hofmann, Beda A.; Gnos, Edwin; Eggenberger, Urs

    2013-10-01

    The common appearance of hygroscopic brine ("sweating") on ordinary chondrites (OCs) from Oman during storage under room conditions initiated a study on the role of water-soluble salts on the weathering of OCs. Analyses of leachates from OCs and soils, combined with petrography of alteration features and a 11-month record of in situ meteorite and soil temperatures, are used to evaluate the role of salts in OC weathering. Main soluble ions in soils are Ca2+, SO42-, HCO3-, Na+, and Cl-, while OC leachates are dominated by Mg2+ (from meteoritic olivine), Ca2+ (from soil), Cl- (from soil), SO42- (from meteoritic troilite and soil), and iron (meteoritic). "Sweating meteorites" mainly contain Mg2+ and Cl-. The median Na/Cl mass ratio of leachates changes from 0.65 in soils to 0.07 in meteorites, indicating the precipitation of a Na-rich phase or loss of an efflorescent Na-salt. The total concentrations of water-soluble ions in bulk OCs ranges from 600 to 9000 μg g-1 (median 2500 μg g-1) as compared to 187-14140 μg g-1 in soils (median 1148 μg g-1). Soil salts dissolved by rain water are soaked up by meteorites by capillary forces. Daily heating (up to 66.3 °C) and cooling of the meteorites cause a pumping effect, resulting in a strong concentration of soluble ions in meteorites over time. The concentrations of water-soluble ions in meteorites, which are complex mixtures of ions from the soil and from oxidation and hydrolysis of meteoritic material, depend on the degree of weathering and are highest at W3. Input of soil contaminants generally dominates over the ions mobilized from meteorites. Silicate hydrolysis preferentially affects olivine and is enhanced by sulfide oxidation, producing local acidic conditions as evidenced by jarosite. Plagioclase weathering is negligible. After completion of troilite oxidation, the rate of chemical weathering slows down with continuing Ca-sulfate contamination.

  8. Intrinsic oxygen fugacity measurements on seven chondrites, a pallasite, and a tektite and the redox state of meteorite parent bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.; Sato, M.

    1984-01-01

    Intrinsic oxygen-fugacity (fO2) measurements were made on five ordinary chondrites, a carbonaceous chondrite, an enstatite chondrite, a pallasite, and a tektite. Results are of the form of linear log fO2 - 1 T plots. Except for the enstatite chondrite, measured results agree well with calculated estimates by others. The tektite produced fO2 values well below the range measured for terrestrial and lunar rocks. The lowpressure atmospheric regime that is reported to follow large terrestrial explosions, coupled with a very high temperature, could produce glass with fO2 in the range measured. The meteorite Salta (pallasite) has low fO2 and lies close to Hvittis (E6). Unlike the other samples, results for Salta do not parallel the iron-wu??stite buffer, but are close to the fayalite-quartz-iron buffer in slope. Minor reduction by graphite appears to have taken place during metamorphism of ordinary chondrites. fO2 values of unequilibrated chondrites show large scatter during early heating suggesting that the constituent phases were exposed to a range of fO2 conditions. The samples equilibrated with respect to fO2 in relatively short time on heating. Equilibration with respect to fO2 in ordinary chondrites takes place between grades 3 and 4 of metamorphism. Application of P - T - fO2 relations in the system C-CO-CO2 indicates that the ordinary chondrites were metamorphosed at pressures of 3-20 bars, as it appears that they lay on the graphite surface. A steep positive thermal gradient in a meteorite parent body lying at the graphite surface will produce thin reduced exterior, an oxidized near-surface layer, and an interior that is increasingly reduced with depth; a shallow thermal gradient will produce the reverse. A body heated by accretion on the outside will have a reduced exterior and oxidized interior. Meteorites from the same parent body clearly are not required to have similar redox states. ?? 1984.

  9. The Natural Thermoluminescence Survey of Antarctic Meteorites: Ordinary Chondrites at the Grosvenor Mountains, MacAlpine Hills, Pecora Escarpment and Queen Alexandra Range, and New Data New Data for the Elephant Moraine, Ice Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    2000-01-01

    The natural TL survey of Antarctic meteorites was started in 1987 at the request of the Antarctic Meteorite Working Group in order to provide an initial description of radiation and thermal histories. It was intended to be a complement to the mineralogical and petrographic surveys performed at the Johnson Space Center and the Smithsonian Institution. All ANSMET samples recovered since then, besides those that were heated throughout by atmospheric passage, have been measured. To date this amounts to about 1200 samples. As the data for each ice field reaches a significant level, we have been conducting a thorough examination of the data for that field with a view to (1) identifying pairing, (2) providing an estimate of terrestrial age and residence time on the ice surface, (3) looking for differences in natural TL between ice fields, (4) looking for variations in natural TL level with location on the ice, (5) looking for meteorites with natural TL levels outside the normal range. Pairing is a necessary first step in ensuring the @ost productive use of the collection, while geographical variations could perhaps provide clues to concentration mechanisms. Samples with natural TL values outside the normal range are usually inferred to have had either small perihelia or recent changes in orbital elements. In addition, induced TL data have enabled us to (5) look for evidence for secular variation in the nature of the flux of meteorites to Earth, and (6) look for petrologically unusual meteorites, such as particularly primitive ordinary chondrites, heavily shocked meteorites, or otherwise anomalous meteorites. To date we have published studies of the TL properties of 167 ordinary chondrites from Allan Hills, 107 from Elephant Moraine and 302 from Lewis Cliff and we have discussed the TL properties of fifteen H chondrites collected at the Allan Hills by Euromet after a storm during the 1988 season. We now have additional databases for a reasonable number of ordinary

  10. The Natural Thermoluminescence Survey of Antarctic Meteorites: Ordinary Chondrites at the Grosvenor Mountains, Macalpine Hills, Pecora Escarpment and Queen Alexandra Range, and New Data for the Elephant Moraine, Ice Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1999-01-01

    The natural TL (Thermoluminescence) survey of Antarctic meteorites was started in 1987 at the request of the Antarctic Meteorite Working Group in order to provide an initial description of radiation and thermal histories. It was intended to be a complement to the mineralogical and petrographic surveys performed at the Johnson Space Center and the Smithsonian Institution. All ANSMET (Antarctic Search for Meteorites) samples recovered since then, besides those that were heated throughout by atmospheric passage, have been measured. To date this amounts to about 1200 samples. As the data for each ice field reaches a significant level, we have been conducting a thorough examination of the data for that field with a view to identifying pairing, providing an estimate of terrestrial age and residence time on the ice surface, looking for differences in natural TL between ice fields, looking for variations in natural TL level with location on the ice, looking for meteorites with natural TL levels outside the normal range. Pairing is a necessary first step in ensuring the most productive use of the collection, while geographical variations could perhaps provide clues to concentration mechanisms. Samples with natural TL values outside the normal range are usually inferred to have had either small perihelia or recent changes in orbital elements. In addition, induced TL data have enabled us to look for evidence for secular variation in the nature of the flux of meteorites to Earth, and look for petrologically unusual meteorites, such as particularly primitive ordinary chondrites, heavily shocked meteorites, or otherwise anomalous meteorites. To date we have published studies of the TL properties of 167 ordinary chondrites from Allan Hills, 107 from Elephant Moraine and 302 from Lewis Cliff and we have discussed the TL properties of fifteen H chondrites collected at the Allan Hills by Euromet after a storm during the 1988 season. We now have additional databases for a reasonable

  11. Micron-scale D/H heterogeneity in chondrite matrices: A signature of the pristine solar system water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piani, Laurette; Robert, François; Remusat, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Organic matter and hydrous silicates are intimately mixed in the matrix of chondrites and in-situ determination of their individual D/H ratios is therefore challenging. Nevertheless, the D/H ratio of each pure component in this mixture should yield a comprehensible signature of the origin and evolution of water and organic matter in our solar system. We measured hydrogen isotope ratios of organic and hydrous silicates in the matrices of two carbonaceous chondrites (Orgueil CI1 and Renazzo CR2) and one unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (Semarkona, LL3.0). A novel protocol was adopted, involving NanoSIMS imaging of H isotopes of monoatomatic (H-) and molecular (OH-) secondary ions collected at the same location. This allowed the most enriched component with respect to D to be identified in the mixture. Using this protocol, we found that in carbonaceous chondrites the isotopically homogeneous hydrous silicates are mixed with D-rich organic matter. The opposite was observed in Semarkona. Hydrous silicates in Semarkona display highly heterogeneous D/H ratios, ranging from 150 to 1800 ×10-6 (δDSMOW = - 40 to 10 600‰). Organic matter in Semarkona does not show such large isotopic variations. This suggests limited isotopic exchange between the two phases during aqueous alteration. Our study greatly expands the range of water isotopic values measured so far in solar system objects. This D-rich water reservoir was sampled by the LL ordinary chondrite parent body and an estimate (≤9%) of its relative contribution to the D/H ratio of water in Oort cloud family comets is proposed.

  12. Mineralogy of Carbonaceous Chondrites and ACFER 217 from the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, T.; Bischoff, A.

    1992-07-01

    are quite homogeneous in composition; their average compositions in Acfer 202 and 243 are Fa 45 and Fa 38, respectively. Acfer 094: This chondrite has trace element characteristics of CM-chondrites, but cannot be a CM-chondrite based on the oxygen isotopic composition (Bischoff et al., 1991), which is more closely related to CO-chondrites. The sample consists of abundant chondrules, olivine aggregates, CAIs and fragments embedded in an extremely fine-grained, sulfide-rich groundmass. Based on microprobe analyses of the bulk matrix we rule out significant proportions of phyllosilicates (high totals). The abundance of nonporphyritic chondrules (~8%) is higher than in most CO-chondrites, similar to that of CM-chondrites. Acfer 217: This meteorite is a new interesting chondritic breccia. At the moment it cannot be assigned either to the ordinary or carbonaceous chondrites. Acfer 217 consists of a low percentage of chondrules and larger fragments embedded in a well-compacted olivine-rich matrix. The overwhelming majority of olivines are Fe-rich (Fa ~39); however, Mg-rich olivines of Fa 3-20 are present as well. Ca-rich pyroxenes are more abundant than Ca-poor pyroxenes. The latter are unequilibrated in composition (Fs 3-32; mean: 25.0 +- 10.9). The sample is extremely depleted in Ni; no Fe,Ni-metals were observed. Other constituents include abundant plagioclase with variable composition, large Cr-spinels and clusters that appear to consist of phyllosilicates. We rule out that Acfer 217 is related to CK chondrites because the latter have lower mean Fa-values (Fa 30-33), significant amounts of NiO in olivine, and have equilibrated olivines and pyroxenes. References: Bischoff A., Palme H., Clayton R.N., Mayeda T.K., Grund T., Spettel B., Geiger T., Endress M., Beckerling W., and Metzler K. (1991) Meteoritics (abstract) 26, 318. Bischoff A., Palme H., Ash R.D., Clayton R.N., Schultz L., Herpers U., Stoffler D., Grady M.M., Pillinger C.T., Spettel B., Weber H., Grund T

  13. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. IX - Thermoluminescence and hydrothermal annealing experiments and their relationship to metamorphism and aqueous alteration in type below 3.3 ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimon, R. Kyle; Sears, Derek W. G.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1988-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties were measured in samples of four type-3.0 chondrites annealed at 400-850 C and 0.77-1 kbar in the presence of various amounts of water and sodium disilicate. Several changes recorded in TL characteristics, such as the lowering of TL sensitivity in certain samples, its increase in other samples, and changes in the peak position and peak width of TL suggested the occurrence of metamorphic processes in these samples. It is suggested that, for the chondrite types above 3.2, the observed changes in TL are consistent with the TL-metamorphism trends, being due to the formation of feldspar by the devitrification of chondrule glass during metamorphism. For types below 3.2, the TL data are consistent with the hypothesis that these chondrules experienced lower levels of metamorphism than the higher types or, alternatively, with the hypothesis that the type 3.0 chondrules are being produced from higher types by aqueous alteration.

  14. A partial melting study of an ordinary (H) chondrite composition with application to the unique achondrite Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Jones, John H.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2015-04-01

    Melting experiments of a synthesized, alkali-bearing, H-chondrite composition were conducted at ambient pressure with three distinct oxygen fugacity conditions (IW-1, IW, and IW+2). Oxygen fugacity conditions significantly influence the compositions of partial melts. Partial melts at IW-1 are distinctly enriched in SiO2 relative to those of IW and IW+2 melts. The silica-enriched, reduced (IW-1) melts are characterized by high alkali contents and have silica-oversaturated compositions. In contrast, the silica-depleted, oxidized (≥IW) melts, which are also enriched in alkali contents, have distinctly silica-undersaturated compositions. These experimental results suggest that alkali-rich, felsic, asteroidal crusts as represented by paired achondrites Graves Nunataks 06128 and 06129 should originate from a low-degree, relatively reduced partial melt from a parent body having near-chondritic compositions. Based on recent chronological constraints and numerical considerations as well as our experimental results, we propose that such felsic magmatism should have occurred in a parent body that is smaller in size and commenced accreting later than those highly differentiated asteroids having basaltic crusts and metallic cores.

  15. Mean Atomic Weight of Chelyabinsk and Olivenza LL5 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szurgot, M.

    2015-07-01

    Mean atomic weights (Amean) of Chelyabinsk and Olivenza LL5 chondrites have been determined and analysed. Relationship between Fe/Si atomic ratio and mean atomic weight of ordinary chondrites has been established which enables one to predict Amean values.

  16. Shock metamorphism of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Edward R. D.; Keil, Klaus; Stoeffler, Dieter

    1992-01-01

    Shock effects were studied in 69 carbonaceous chondrites, including CM2, CO3, CV3, ungrouped C2-C4, and CK4-6 chondrites, using optical microscopy of thin sections. It is shown that the classification scheme of Stoeffler et al. (1991) for the progressive stages of shock metamorphism in ordinary chondrites is also applicable to carbonaceous chondrites. On the basis of shock effects in olivine, the 69 carbonaceous chondrites could be assigned to four shock stage, S1 to S4. The CM2 and CO3 groups were found to be the least shocked chondrite groups, whereas the CK4-6 and CV3 were the most strongly shocked groups.

  17. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Concerning Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV session entitled "Concerning Chondrites" includes the following topics: 1) Petrology and Raman Spectroscopy of Shocked Phases in the Gujba CB Chondrite and the Shock History of the CB Parent Body; 2) The Relationship Between CK and CV Chondrites: A Single Parent Body Source? 3) Samples of Asteroid Surface Ponded Deposits in Chondritic Meteorites; 4) Composition and Origin of SiO2-rich Objects in Carbonaceous and Ordinary Chondrites; 5) Re-Os Systematics and HSE distribution in Tieschitz (H3.6); Two Isochrons for One Meteorite; 6) Loss of Chromium from Olivine During the Metamorphism of Chondrites; 7) Very Short Delivery Times of Meteorites After the L-Chondrite Parent Body Break-Up 480 Myr Ago; and 8) The Complex Exposure History of a Very Large L/LL5 Chondrite Shower: Queen Alexandra Range 90201.

  18. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) A Quantitative NMR Analysis of Phosphorus in Carbonaceous and Ordinary Chondrites; 2) An Infrared Study of the Matrices of CI1 and CM2 Chondrites; 3) A Study of the Morphology, Composition and Mineral Associations of Fe-Ni Sulphides in CM Carbonaceous Chondrites; 4) Aqueous Alteration Mineralogy in CM Carbonaceous Chondrites; 5) In Situ Location and Characterization of Carbon-bearing Phases in Carbonaceous; 6) Chondrites: Insights from Yamato 791198, a Weakly-altered CM2 Chondrite; 7) Unique Texture in EET 83389: Clues to Formation of Fine Grained Rims in CM Chondrites; 8) Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates in the NWA 760 CV3 Chondrite; 9) Petrologic Type of CV3 Chondrites as Revealed by Raman Spectroscopy of Organic Matter; 10) A First Look at Acfer 324: Evidence for Another CR 3 Chondrite? 11) Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of the Bencubbin Meteorite; 12) The Fountain Hills Meteorite: A New CBa Chondrite from Arizona; 13) Shock Effects in the Metal-rich Chondrites QUE 94411, Hammadah al Hamra 237 and Bencubbin; 14) Mineralogy and Petrology of Al-rich Objects in the CH Carbonaceous Chondrite North West Africa 739.

  19. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. V - The enstatite chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, K. S.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1985-07-01

    The results of instrumental neutron activation analysis of 19 major, minor, and trace elements in three unequilibrated, or type 3, enstatite chondrites (ECs) are reported. Based on these and the literature data, the relationship between the type 3 ECs and the other ECs is discussed. The abundance of siderophile elements in type 3 ECs places them with the EH, rather than EL chondrites. The chalcophile elements are at the low end of EH range. Cr is intermediate between EH and EL. It is suggested that the type 3 ECs are EH chondrites which have suffered small depletions of certain chalcophile elements through the loss of shock-produced removal of these chalcophiles by the formation of sulfurous veins, and not by weathering. The processes responsible for formation of these and other types of ECs are discussed.

  20. Chondrites and Their Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Krot, A. N.

    Chondrites are extraordinary mixtures of materials with diverse origins that formed around other stars, in the solar nebula, and in their parent asteroids. Most chondrites were so severely altered by aqueous fluids, thermal metamorphism, and impacts that the original characteristics of their components have been largely erased. But a few pristine chondrites have preserved an exquisite mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, and chronological record of the first few million years of solar system history. The properties of diverse types of carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites focusing on the most pristine samples are reviewed to establish the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical properties and origins of their components and to elucidate the asteroidal processes that modified them. Refractory inclusions - amoeboid olivine aggregates and Ca-Al-rich inclusions - were the first solids to form in the solar nebula near to the protosun. Chondrules and associated metallic Fe-Ni grains were still forming several million years later when the earliest planetesimals, which melted due to heat from 26Al decay, were colliding. In the least-altered chondrites, matrix material, which coats chondrules and other components, is largely composed of micrometer-sized silicates and amorphous materials, which formed at high temperatures, plus small amounts (up to 200 ppm) of presolar oxides and silicates.

  1. Thermal history of type 3 chondrites from the Antarctic meteorite collection determined by Raman spectroscopy of their polyaromatic carbonaceous matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, Lydie; Quirico, Eric; Flandinet, Laurène; Montagnac, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    This paper is focused on the characterization of the thermal history of 151 CV, CO and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) from the NASA Antarctic meteorite collection, using an approach based on the structure of the included polyaromatic carbonaceous matter determined by Raman spectroscopy. 114 out of these 151 chondrites provided Raman spectra of carbonaceous matter and allowing to assign a petrologic type, which mostly reflects the peak temperature experienced by the rock on the parent body. A thorough review of literature shows however that it is not possible to deduce a peak temperature because accurate calibration is not available. Twenty-three new weakly metamorphosed chondrites have been identified: MIL 07671 (CV3.1); DOM 08006 (CO3.0); DOM 03238, MIL 05024, MIL 05104, MIL 07193 (CO3.1); TIL 82408, LAR 06279 (LL3.05-3.1); EET 90628 (L3.0); GRO 06054, QUE 97008 (L3.05), ALHA 77176, EET 90066, LAR 04380, MET 96515, MIL 05050 (L3.1); ALHA 78133, EET 87735, EET 90909, LEW 87208, PRE 95401 (L3.05-3.1); MCY 05218 (H3.05-3.1) and MET 00506 (H3.1). This study confirms that the width of the D band (FWHMD) and the ratio of the peak intensity of the D and G bands (ID/IG) are the most adapted tracers of the extent of thermal metamorphism in type 3 chondrites. It also unambiguously shows, thanks to the large number of samples, that the width of the G band (FWHMG) does not correlate with the maturity of polyaromatic carbonaceous matter. This parameter is nevertheless very valuable because it shows that Raman spectra of CV chondrites preserve memory of either the metamorphic conditions (possibly oxidation controlled by aqueous alteration) or the nature of the organic precursor. Oxidation memory is our preferred interpretation, however an extensive petrologic characterization of this CV series is required to get firm conclusions. Pre-graphitic carbonaceous matter is reported in seven chondrites and is even the only carbonaceous material detected in the chondrites

  2. Solar gases in meteorites - The origin of chondrites and C1 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence suggesting that chondritic meteorites broke off from parent bodies in earth-crossing orbits is considered. It is suggested that ordinary chondrites have an asteroidal origin, and the possibility that C1 chondrites have a cometary origin is examined. Indications of heavy shock and reheating among L and H chondrites provides support for an asteroidal origin, while the Apollo and Amor objects are too small to be unfragmented asteroids, as proposed in the Anders theory of the origin of gas-rich meteorites. Events associated with the megaregolith are discussed in the framework of the proposed cometary origin of C1 chondrites.

  3. Osmium Isotopic Compositions of Chondrites and Earth's Primitive Upper Mantle: Constraints on the Late Veneer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Horan, M. F.; Morgan, J. W.; Meisel, T.

    2001-01-01

    The 187 Os/188 Os of carbonaceous chondrites averages approximately 2% lower than for enstatite and ordinary chondrites. The primitive upper mantle ratio for the Earth best matches that of ordinary and enstatite chondrites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Gallium and germanium in the metal and silicates of L- and LL-chondrites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, C.-L.; Cohen, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Concentrations of Ga and Ge in the metal of 31 L-, 8 LL- and 2 H-chondrites, and in the silicates of 12 L- and LL-chondrites have been determined by spectrophotometric methods. The ranges of Ga contents in the metal of L- and LL-chondrites are 1.1 to 36.9 ppm and 1.0 to 34.1 ppm, respectively. The Ge content in the metal is positively correlated with Ga and ranges from 89.1 to 160 ppm and from 126 to 308 ppm for L- and LL-chondrites, respectively. The Ga content in the silicates of L-chondrites varies from 4.0 to 8.9 ppm. The Ga and Ge contents in the metal are clearly lower in unequilibrated than in equilibrated L- and LL-group chondrites. Unequilibrated and equilibrated chondrites are well separated in the plots of Ga vs Ge in the metal, and the L- and LL-groups are also well resolved. The Ga and Ge in the metal are well correlated with petrologic grade. This suggests that Ga and Ge variations in the metal are related to thermal metamorphism. There is evidence of an enrichment of Ga in the metal due to shock reheating.

  5. Chondrites and the Protoplanetary Disk, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    the Ungrouped Carbonaceous Chondrites Acfer 094 and Adelaide. Oxygen Isotopes of Aluminum-rich Chondrules from Unequilibrated Enstatite Chondrites.

  6. Lea County 001, an H5 chondrite, and Lea County 002, an ungrouped type 3 chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Zolensky, M.E.; Score, R.; Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K.; Schutt, J.W. Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Co., Houston, TX Chicago Univ., IL )

    1989-12-01

    A search of active deflation basins near Jal, Lea County, New Mexico resulted in the discovery of two meteorites, Lea County 001 and 002. Lea County 001 has mean olivine and low-Ca pyroxene compositions of Fa(19) and Fs(17), respectively. These and all other mineralogical and petrological data collected indicate a classification of H5 for this stone. Lea County 002 has mean olivine and low-Ca pyroxene compositions of Fa(2) and Fs(4), and is unequilibrated. Although it is mineralogically most similar to Kakangari and chondritic clasts within Cumberland Falls, the high modal amount of forsterite makes Lea County a unique type 3 chondrite. Oxygen isotope data for Lea County 002 fall on an 0-16-mixing line through those of the enstatite meteorites and IAB irons, a feature shared by Kakangari. 28 refs.

  7. Opaque Assemblages in CK and CV Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, K. E.; Righter, K.

    2006-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites are the only group of carbonaceous chondrites that exhibit thermal metamorphism. As a result, CKs display features of metamorphism such as silicate darkening, recrystallization and shock veins. Calcium Aluminum Inclusions and Fe-Ni metal are rare. CV carbonaceous chondrites are unequilibrated and have two subgroups; oxidized and reduced. The CV and CK carbonaceous chondrite groups have been compared to each other often because of petrographic similarities, such as overlapping oxygen isotopic ratios. Scientists have suggested the two groups of carbonaceous chondrites formed from the same parent body and CKs are equilibrated CV chondrites [1, 2]. The oxidized CV group has been most closely related to CKs. This study examines the petrology and mineralogy of CKs and CVs focusing on opaque minerals found in the meteorites. Using the oxide, metal and sulfide assemblages, constraints can be placed on the temperature and oxygen fugacity at which the meteorites equilibrated. The temperature and oxygen fugacity of the CK and CV chondrites can be compared in order to help define their formation history.

  8. The Vicência meteorite fall: A new unshocked (S1) weakly metamorphosed (3.2) LL chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Klaus; Zucolotto, Maria E.; Krot, Alexander N.; Doyle, Patricia M.; Telus, Myriam; Krot, Tatiana V.; Greenwood, Richard C.; Franchi, Ian A.; Wasson, John T.; Welten, Kees C.; Caffee, Marc W.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Riebe, My; Wieler, Rainer; Santos, Edivaldo; Scorzelli, Rosa B.; Gattacceca, Jerome; Lagroix, France; Laubenstein, Matthias; Mendes, Julio C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Harir, Mourad; Moutinho, Andre L. R.

    2015-06-01

    The Vicência meteorite, a stone of 1.547 kg, fell on September 21, 2013, at the village Borracha, near the city of Vicência, Pernambuco, Brazil. It was recovered immediately after the fall, and our consortium study showed it to be an unshocked (S1) LL3.2 ordinary chondrite. The LL group classification is based on the bulk density (3.13 g cm-3); the chondrule mean apparent diameter (0.9 mm); the bulk oxygen isotopic composition (δ17O = 3.768 ± 0.042‰, δ18O = 5.359 ± 0.042‰, Δ17O = 0.981 ± 0.020‰); the content of metallic Fe,Ni (1.8 vol%); the Co content of kamacite (1.73 wt%); the bulk contents of the siderophile elements Ir and Co versus Au; and the ratios of metallic Fe0/total iron (0.105) versus total Fe/Mg (1.164), and of Ni/Mg (0.057) versus total Fe/Mg. The petrologic type 3.2 classification is indicated by the beautifully developed chondritic texture, the standard deviation (~0.09) versus mean Cr2O3 content (~0.14 wt%) of ferroan olivine, the TL sensitivity and the peak temperature and peak width at half maximum, the cathodoluminescence properties of chondrules, the content of trapped 132Xetr (0.317 × 10-8cm3STP g-1), and the Raman spectra for organic material in the matrix. The cosmic ray exposure age is ~72 Ma, which is at the upper end of the age distribution of LL group chondrites. The meteorite is unusual in that it contains relatively large, up to nearly 100 μm in size, secondary fayalite grains, defined as olivine with Fa>75, large enough to allow in situ measurement of oxygen and Mn-Cr isotope systematics with SIMS. Its oxygen isotopes plot along a mass-dependent fractionation line with a slope of ~0.5 and Δ17O of 4.0 ± 0.3‰, and are similar to those of secondary fayalite and magnetite in the unequilibrated chondrites EET 90161, MET 96503, and Ngawi. These data suggest that secondary fayalite in Vicência was in equilibrium with a fluid with a Δ17O of ~4‰, consistent with the composition of the fluid in equilibrium with

  9. The record of cosmogenic, radiogenic, fissiogenic, and trapped noble gases in recently recovered Chinese and other chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, O.; Michel, Th.; Niedermann, S.; Wang, D.; Yi, W.

    1993-03-01

    Noble-gas isotopic abundances were determined in 36 recently recovered chondrites including 27 chondrites recovered in China. The comparison of the release patterns of trapped noble gases from ordinary and from carbonaceous chondrites showed that the planetary trapped noble gases in ordinary chondrites were released mainly above 1200 C, whereas more than 85 percent of noble gases trapped in carbonaceous chondrites were released at or below 1200 C, indicating that the carrier phases of the trapped noble gases in ordinary and in carbonaceous chondrites may not be the same. It is suggested that the ordinary chondrites started to retain fission Xe about 48 +/- 30 Ma earlier than Angra dos Reis. No systematic differences were observed between H, L, and LL or type 5 and 6 chondrites with respect to the time of fission Xe retention. Eight chondrites displayed neutron capture effects due to secondary cosmic-ray-produced neutrons.

  10. Establishment of redox conditions during planetary collisions as an origin of chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Kitamura, M.

    1994-01-01

    Collisions between a 'cometlike' body (mixtures of chondritic materials and ice) and a slightly differentiated body were proposed for shock origin of ordinary chondrites. In this model, chondrules were formed with shock melting, and matrices were formed both by fracturing of materials and by recondensation of evaporated materials. This model can explain different redox conditions of chondrite formations by ice evaporation. Although this model was originally proposed for ordinary chondrites, we assume here that the model can be extended to chondrite formation in general. In this paper, redox conditions during chondrite formation by collisions will be discussed in the light of phase diagrams for solid-vapor equilibria.

  11. The classification and complex thermal history of the enstatite chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yanhong; Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have carried out instrumental neutron activation analysis of 11 enstatite chondrites and electron microprobe analyses of 17 enstatite chondrites, most of which were previously little described. We report here the third known EH5 chondrite (LEW 88180) and an unusual EL6 chondrite (LEW 87119), new data on four EL3 chondrites (ALH 85119, EET 90299, PCA 91020, and MAC 88136, which is paired with MAC 88180 and MAC 88184), the second EL5 chondrite (TIL 91714), and an unusual metal-rich and sulfide-poor EL3 chondrite (LEW 87223). The often discussed differences in mineral composition displayed by the EH and EL chondrites are not as marked after the inclusion of the new samples in the database, and the two classes apparently experienced a similar range of equilibrium temperatures. However, texturally the EL chondrites appear to have experienced much higher levels of metamorphic alteration than EH chondrites of similar equilibration temperatures. Most of the petrologic type criteria are not applicable to enstatite chondrites and, unlike the ordinary chondrites, texture and mineralogy reflect different aspects of the meteorite history. We therefore propose that the existing petrologic type scheme not be used for enstatite chondrites. We suggest that while 'textural type' reflects peak metamorphic temperatures, the 'mineralogical type' reflects equilibration during postmetamorphic (probably regolith) processes. Unlike the ordinary chondrites and EH chondrites, EL chondrites experienced an extensive low-temperature metamorphic episode. There are now a large number of enstatite meteorite breccias and impact melts, and apparently surface processes were important in determining the present nature of the enstatite chondrites.

  12. Petrology of types 4-6 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Taylor, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A comparative mineralogic study has been made of Coolidge, Karoonda, and new C4 chondrites in order to clarify the origin of C4-6 chondrites. It is shown that the properties of all C4-6 chondrites are consistent with an origin by metamorphism of C3-like precursors by processes analogous to those operating in ordinary chondrite parent bodies or planetesimals. However, type 4-6 material was not well mixed with type 3 material in the CV3 parent body. It is concluded that C4-6 chondrites may come from one or more separate parent bodies.

  13. I-Xe systematics in LL chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Swindle, T. D.; Honda, M.

    1988-01-01

    A stepwise heating analysis of Ar and Xe data from five neutron-irradiated whole rock LL chondrites (Soko Banja, Alta Ameen, Tuxtuac, Guidder, and Olivenza) is presented, emphasizing the complicated thermal history of ordinary chondrites. None of the present meteorites show a well-defined (Ar-40)-(Ar-39) apparent age plateau comprised of more than two release fractions. Most of the samples are found to yield well-defined high-temperature correlations between Xe-129/Xe-130 and Xe-128/Xe-130, and thus determinations of I-129/I-127 and Xe-129/Xe-130 at the time of isotopic closure for Xe. As in the case of other ordinary chondrites, the I-Xe systematics for LL chondrites correlate neither with a metamorphic grade nor with chronologies based opon other methods.

  14. Discovery of Hg-Cu-bearing metal-sulfide assemblages in a primitive H-3 chondrite: Towards a new insight in early solar system processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillet Komorowski, Catherine; El Goresy, Ahmed; Miyahara, Masaaki; Boudouma, Omar; Ma, Chi

    2012-10-01

    We report here the discovery of a novel meteoritic paragenesis consisting of sub-micrometric HgS, Cu sulfides, and Hg metal, associated with polycrystalline fine-grained native Cu in opaque mineral aggregates heterogeneously distributed in the matrix of the H-3 Tieschitz unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (UOC). The systematic association of Hg with Cu in Tieschitz chondrite provides a unique opportunity to place robust constraints on the origin of these assemblages either by condensation and sulfidation in a local nebular reservoir of non-solar composition, followed by gentle and fast accretion, or by sublimation of Hg from the hot interior of the asteroid and recondensation in its cold outer regions. The sulfide phase relations support low temperature conditions (<300 °C), implying that subsequent to accretion indigenous hydrothermal processing, oxidation/sulfidation, transportation, or shock-induced thermal processing of the assemblage on the parent body earlier proposed are very unlikely and unrealistic. Origin of HgS by sublimation of Hg from the hotter asteroid interior and precipitation as cinnabar in the colder surface regions is discrepant with our findings and can be ruled out because cinnabar occurs only in Tieschitz matrix in alternating rhythmic intergrowth with Cu-sulfide. The sublimation scenario calls for co-evaporation of both the highly volatile Hg as HgS and Hg metal and the moderately volatile Cu both as Cu metal, or their sulfides and deposition as sulfides in alternating episodes. Our findings provide further ample evidence refuting the repeated claim of formation of native copper in chondritic metal by shock-induced impact melting. Cold accretion is the only reasonable possibility to preserve the delicate accretionary intergrowth textures, the polycrystallinity of FeNi-metal, native Cu, Hg-Cu-sulfides and native Hg globules and the high Hg concentration retained in this meteorite. Our findings strongly suggest that Tieschitz resided near the

  15. The Bencubbin chondrite breccia and its relationship to CR chondrites and the ALH85085 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, Michael K.; Nehru, Cherukupalli E.; Prinz, Martin

    1990-12-01

    Bencubbin is an unclassified meteorite breccia which consists mainly of host silicate (˜40 vol.%) and host metal (˜60%) components. Rare (<1%) ordinary chondrite clasts and a dark xenolith (formerly called a carbonaceous chondrite clast) are also found. A petrologic study of the host silicates shows that they have textures, modes, mineralogy and bulk compositions that are essentially the same as that of barred olivine (BO) chondrules, and they are considered to be BO chondritic material. Bulk compositions of individual host silicate clasts are identical and differ only in their textures which are a continuum from coarsely barred, to finely barred, to feathery microcrystalline; these result from differing cooling rates. The host silicates differ from average BO chondrules only in being angular clasts rather than fluid droplet-shaped objects, and in being larger in size (up to 1 cm) than most chondrules; but large angular to droplet-shaped chondrules occur in many chondrites. Bencubbin host metallic FeNi clasts have a positive Ni-Co trend, which coincides with that of a calculated equilibrium nebular condensation path. This appears to indicate a chondritic, rather than impact, origin for this component as well. The rare ordinary chondrite clast and dark xenolith also contain FeNi metal with compositions similar to that of the host metal. Two scenarios are offered for the origin of the Bencubbin breccia. One is that the Bencubbin components are chondritic and were produced in the solar nebula. Later brecciation, reaggregation and minor melting of the chondritic material resulted in it becoming a monomict chondritic breccia. The alternative scenario is that the Bencubbin components formed as a result of major impact melting on a chondritic parent body; the silicate fragments were formed from an impact-induced lava flow and are analogous to the spinifex-textured rocks characteristic of terrestrial . Both scenarios have difficulties, but the petrologic, chemical and

  16. Metasomatic Processes in the Early Solar System: The Record from Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brearley, A. J.; Krot, A.

    2012-12-01

    Chondritic meteorites are among the oldest solar system materials available for study in the laboratory. These unique samples contain a complex record of processes that occurred during the earliest stages of solar system evolution, including evidence of metasomatism. The effects of metasomatism are variably among the different chondrite groups, being most well developed in the CV group, with more limited effects in the CO3 and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite groups. Unlike most metasomatized terrestrial rocks, the chondrite metasomatism has not caused detectable changes in the bulk chondrite composition. Instead, it occurs at a highly localized scale and has involved elemental exchange between the different chondrite components - chondrules, matrix and Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) with vastly differing mineralogies. These components respond in different ways to metasomatism and the resultant alteration assemblages are largely dependent on the local bulk composition/mineralogy of the objects that are being metasomatized. As a consequence, there is remarkable diversity in the alteration mineralogy on the scale of 10-100μm. In CV chondrites, the secondary alteration is characterized by the introduction of alkalis, Cl and Fe into metasomatized chondrules and CAIs and the loss of Ca from these objects into the matrix. Chondrule glass has been replaced by nepheline, sodalite and other minor phases, forsteritic olivine phenocrysts have developed overgrowths of ferroan olivine, clinoenstatite is replaced by ferroan olivine and metal/sulfide nodules have been replaced by magnetite, Ni-rich metal and Fe,Ni-carbides. In CAIs, the main refractory phases, melilite, Al-Ti-rich pyroxene, anorthite, spinel and perovskite show variable degrees of alteration with the formation of a large number of secondary phases including grossular, andradite, nepheline, sodalite, wadalite Di-Hd pyroxenes, kushiroite, wollastonite, monticellite, ilmenite and, in some cases, minor amounts of

  17. Paired Renazzo-type (CR) carbonaceous chondrites from the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, A.; Palme, H.; Ash, R. D.; Clayton, R. N.; Schultz, L.; Herpers, U.; Stoffler, D.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.; Spettel, B.; Weber, H.; Grund, T.; Endress, M.; Weber, D.

    1993-04-01

    Data on the chemical composition, mineralogy, abundance, and isotopic composition of recently found Sahara meteorites are presented. The nine Acfer samples and the El Djouf 001 meteorite are considered to belong to the same parent meteoroid and are classified as a CR chondrite. The Acfer-El Djouf meteorite has a CI-chondritic composition of nonvolatile elements, in particular CI ratios of refractory elements to Mg. The presence of metal with chondritic Fe/Ni ratios, olivine with relatively low FeO contents and with high Cr is attributed to the primitive, unequilibrated nature of Acfer-El Djouf and other CR chondrites. The carbon and nitrogen stable isotropic composition of the Acfer-El Djouf chondrite lies within the range of other members of the CR group. Rare gases of the Acfer-El Djouf meteorite contain a comparatively large solar wind component, in excess of that in Renazzo. The cosmic-ray exposure age of the Acfer-El Djouf meteorite is about 6 million years.

  18. Correlations and zoning patterns of phosphorus and chromium in olivine from H chondrites and the LL chondrite Semarkona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanta, M. C.; Beckett, J. R.; Stolper, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Phosphorus zoning is observed in olivines in high-FeO (type IIA) chondrules in H chondrites over the entire range of petrologic grades: H3.1-H6. Features in P concentrations such as oscillatory and sector zoning, and high P cores are present in olivines that are otherwise unzoned in the divalent cations. Aluminum concentrations are low and not significantly associated with P zoning in chondrule olivines. In highly unequilibrated H chondrites, phosphorus zoning is generally positively correlated with Cr. Atomic Cr:P in olivine is roughly 1:1 (3:1 for one zone in one olivine in RC 075), consistent with Cr3+ charge-balancing P5+ substituting for Si4+. Normal igneous zonation involving the dominant chrome species Cr2+ was observed only in the LL3.0 chondrite Semarkona. In more equilibrated chondrites (H3.5-H3.8), Cr spatially correlated with P is occasionally observed but it is diffuse relative to the P zones. In H4-H6 chondrites, P-correlated Cr is absent. One signature of higher metamorphic grades (≥H3.8) is the presence of near matrix olivines that are devoid of P oscillatory zoning. The restriction to relatively high metamorphic grade and to grains near the chondrule-matrix interface suggests that this is a response to metasomatic processes. We also observed P-enriched halos near the chondrule-matrix interface in H3.3-H3.8 chondrites, likely reflecting the loss of P and Ca from mesostasis and precipitation of Ca phosphate near the chondrule surface. These halos are absent in equilibrated chondrites due to coarsening of the phosphate and in unequilibrated chondrites due to low degrees of metasomatism. Olivines in type IA chondrules show none of the P-zoning ubiquitous in type IIA chondrules or terrestrial igneous olivines, likely reflecting sequestration of P in reduced form within metallic alloys and sulfides during melting of type IA chondrules.

  19. Aqueous Alteration of Enstatite Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Ziegler, K.; Weisberg, M. K.; Gounelle, M.; Berger, E. L.; Le, L.; Ivanov, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Kaidun meteorite is different from all other meteorites [1], consisting largely of a mixture of “incompatible” types of meteoritic material – carbonaceous and enstatite chondrites, i.e. corre-sponding to the most oxidized and the most reduced samples of meteorite materials, including CI1, CM1-2, CV3, EH3-5, and EL3. In addition to these, minor amounts of ordinary and R chondrites are present. In addition, approximately half of the Kaidun lithologies are new materials not known as separate meteorites. Among these are aqueously altered enstatite chondrites [1], which are of considerable interest because they testify that not all reduced asteroids escaped late-stage oxidation, and hydrolysis, and also because hydrated poorly crystalline Si-Fe phase, which in turn is re-placed by serpentine (Figs 3-5). In the end the only indication of the original presence of metal is the re-sidual carbides. In other enstatite chondrite lithogies (of uncertain type) original silicates and metal have been thoroughly replaced by an assemblage of authi-genic plagioclase laths, calcite boxwork, and occasion-al residual grains of silica, Cr-rich troilite, ilmenite, and rare sulfides including heideite (Fig. 6). Fe and S have been largely leached from the rock (Fig. 4). Again the accessory phases are the first clue to the original character of the rock, which can be verified by O isotopes. It is fortunate that Kaidun displays every step of the alteration process.

  20. New kind of type 3 chondrite with a graphite-magnetite matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Rubin, A. E.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.

    1981-01-01

    Four clasts in three ordinary-chondrite regolith breccias are discovered which are a new kind of type 3 chondrite. As with ordinary and carbonaceous type 3 chondrites, they have distinct chondrules, some of which contain glass, highly heterogeneous olivines and pyroxenes, and predominantly monoclinic low-Ca pyroxenes. Instead of the usual, fine-grained, Fe-rich silicate matrix, however, the clasts have a matrix composed largely of aggregates of micron- and submicron-sized graphite and magnetite. The bulk compositions of the clasts, as well as the types of chondrules (largely porphyritic), are characteristic of type 3 ordinary chondrites, although chondrules in the clasts are somewhat smaller (0.1-0.5 mm). A close relationship with ordinary chondrites is also suggested by the presence of similar graphite-magnetite aggregates in seven type 3 ordinary chondrites. It is thought that this new kind of chondrite is probably the source of the abundant graphite-magnetite inclusions in ordinary-chondrite regolith breccias and that it may be more common than indicated by the absence of whole meteorites made of chondrules and graphite-magnetite.

  1. Thermal histories of CO3 chondrites - Application of olivine diffusion modelling to parent body metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Rhian H.; Rubie, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The petrologic sequence observed in the CO3 chondrite group has been suggested to be the result of thermal metamorphism on a parent body. A model developed to examine the possibility that chondrule and matrix olivines equilibrated in situ, during parent body metamorphism is presented. The model considers Fe-Mg interdiffusion between chondrule and matrix olivines. Zoning profiles comparable to those observed in chondrule olivines from partially equilibrated members of the series are reproduced successfully. Metamorphism of CO3 chondrites on a parent body is therefore a viable model for the observed equilibration. Results indicate that peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the CO3 chondrites were around 500 C, and that the range of peak temperatures between unequilibrated and equilibrated subtypes was relatively narrow, around 100 C.

  2. Petrology and Cosmochemistry of a Suite of R Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrano, Z. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites are among the most primitive surviving materials from the early solar system. They are divided into groups based on chemical types defined by mineralogy, bulk composition, and oxygen isotope compositions. Chondrites range in petrographic grade from type 1 to type 7. Type 3 chondrites are the most primitive and are little changed from the nebular solids accreted to form asteroids. They are composed of chondrules, fine-grained matrix, metal and sulfide, plus or minus Ca-Al-rich inclusions. With increasing aqueous alteration at low temperatures, members of some chondrite classes transformed from type 3 towards type 1. With increasing thermal metamorphism and low fluid content, members of other classes changed from type 3 towards type 7. Rumuruti (R) chondrites are a rare group (0.1% of falls) similar to ordinary chondrites in some properties but different in others. They are characterized by low chondrule/matrix modal abundance ratios, high oxidation state, small mean chondrule size, abundant sulfides and low metal contents. R chondrites vary in petrologic type from 3 to 6. They are important objects to study because some of them have undergone metamorphism at high temperatures in the presence of aqueous fluids. In contrast, CM and CI chondrites were heated to low temperatures in the presence of aqueous fluids leading to alteration; they contain low-T hydrous phases (phyllosilicates) and little or no remaining metal. Ordinary chondrites were heated to high temperatures in a low-fluid environment resulting in anhydrous metamorphic rocks. R6 chondrites are highly metamorphosed and some contain the high-T hydrous phases mica and amphibole. R chondrites are thus unique and give us an opportunity to examine whether there are compositional effects caused by high-T, highfluid metamorphism of nebular materials.

  3. Primitive material surviving in chondrites - Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Barber, D. J.; Alexander, C. M.; Hutchinson, R.; Peck, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A logical place to search for surviving pristine nebular material is in the fine-grained matrices of ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites of petrographic type 3. Unfortunately, many of these chondrites have experienced brecciation, thermal metamorphism, and aqueous alteration, so that interpreting individual features in terms of specific nebular conditions and/or processes is difficult. It follows that the origin and evolutionary history of such matrix phases are controversial, and a consensus is difficult to define. In this chapter, therefore, after summarizing the salient mineralogical, petrographic, chemical, and isotopic features of matrix in apparently primitive chondrites, an attempt is made to provide an overview both of areas of agreement and of topics that are currently in dispute.

  4. A simple chondritic model of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanloup, C.; Jambon, A.; Gillet, P.

    1999-03-01

    SNC meteorites (Shergottites, Nakhlites and Chassigny) define a fractionation line in a δ 17O/δ 18O diagram as expected for rocks differentiated from a formerly homogenized parent body, which is intermediate between H ordinary chondrites and EH enstatite chondrites. The planet Mars is located between the Earth and the asteroid belts, the potential source of ordinary chondrites. Since oxygen is a major component of the terrestrial planets, our model assumes that Mars composition is a mixture of two chondritic sources whose proportions are calculated by mass balance based on oxygen isotopes only. Two possible model compositions can be derived: if the average isotopic composition of SNC is relaxed along its fractionation line (Model 1) and if the end members are average H and EH chondrites, one obtains a 30:70 H:EH mixture. If the average isotopic composition of SNC is a robust feature, then an extreme composition of H chondrites must be selected which yields the proportion, 55:45 for the H:EH components. This composition carries the same oxygen isotopic composition as the iron inclusions in the IIE of the conjectured end member of the ordinary chondrite group. The proportions obtained this way enable to calculate two model compositions for all the refractory elements and oxygen. Model 1 can be discarded as it does not permit to fit reasonably the physical properties of the planet. Mass and composition of the core (Model 2) is easily derived (23% of Mars mass, containing 16% S); the remainder forming the bulk mantle composition. Comparison with recent estimates based on the composition of SNC meteorites reveals only minor differences, essentially for Si, Mg and Fe; this is because of our choice of non-CI chondritic composition, unlike previous models. Discussion of the assumptions made in previous models confirms that the new composition is in agreement with the SNC compositions. The model also permits to calculate adequate physical properties of the planet like its

  5. The compositions of incipient shock melts in L6 chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, R. T.; Jarosewich, E.

    1982-07-01

    Microprobe analyses of 33 melt pocket glasses in five L6d and L6e chondrites show them to be chemically varied but typically enriched in the constituents of plagioclase relative to the host meteorites. This enrichment appears to increase with the degree of melting, but other chemical variations among the glasses appear to be unrelated to shock intensity and melt abundance. Chemical trends for melt pocket glasses differ sharply from those reported for chondrules in ordinary chondrites. Thus partial shock melting of chondritic material is an inadequate explanation for the chemical properties of chondrules.

  6. Chondrites and the Protoplanetary Disk, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: On the Dynamical Evolution of a Nebula and Its Effect on Dust Coagulation and the Formation of Centimeter-sized Particles. The Mineralogy and Grain Properties of the Disk Surfaces in Three Herbig Ae/Be Stars. Astrophysical Observations of Disk Evolution Around Solar Mass Stars. The Systematic Petrology of Chondrites: A Consistent Approach to Assist Classification and Interpretation. Understanding Our Origins: Formation of Sun-like Stars in H II Region Environments. Chondrule Crystallization Experiments. Formation of SiO2-rich Chondrules by Fractional Condensation. Refractory Forsterites from Murchison (CM2) and Yamato 81020 (CO3.0) Chondrites: Cathodoluminescence, Chemical Compositions and Oxygen Isotopes. Apparent I-Xe Cooling Rates of Chondrules Compared with Silicates from the Colomera Iron Meteorite. Chondrule Formation in Planetesimal Bow Shocks: Physical Processes in the Near Vicinity of the Planetesimal. Genetic Relationships Between Chondrules, Rims and Matrix. Chondrite Fractionation was Cosmochemical; Chondrule Fractionation was Geochemical. Chondrule Formation and Accretion of Chondrite Parent Bodies: Environmental Constraints. Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates from the Semarkona LL3.0 Chondrite. The Evolution of Solids in Proto-Planetary Disks. New Nickel Vapor Pressure Measurements: Possible Implications for Nebular Condensates. Chemical, Mineralogical and Isotopic Properties of Chondrules: Clues to Their Origin. Maximal Size of Chondrules in Shock-Wave Heating Model: Stripping of Liquid Surface in Hypersonic Rarefied Gas Flow. The Nature and Origin of Interplanetary Dust: High Temperature Components. Refractory Relic Components in Chondrules from Ordinary Chondrites. Constraints on the Origin of Chondrules and CAIs from Short-lived and Long-lived Radionuclides. The Genetic Relationship Between Refractory Inclusions and Chondrules. Contemporaneous Chondrule Formation Between Ordinary and Carbonaceous Chondrites. Chondrules and

  7. 26Al in plagioclase-rich chondrules in carbonaceous chondrites: Evidence for an extended duration of chondrule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheon, I. D.; Marhas, K. K.; Krot, A. N.; Goswami, J. N.; Jones, R. H.

    2009-09-01

    The 26Al- 26Mg isotope systematics in 33 petrographically and mineralogically characterized plagioclase-rich chondrules (PRCs) from 13 carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) - one ungrouped (Acfer 094), six CR, five CV, and one CO - reveal large variations in the initial 26Al/ 27Al ratio, ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0. Well-resolved 26Mg excesses (δ 26Mg) from the in situ decay of the short-lived nuclide 26Al ( t1/2 ˜ 0.72 Ma) were found in nine chondrules, two from Acfer 094, five from the CV chondrites, Allende and Efremovka, and one each from the paired CR chondrites, EET 92147 and EET 92042, with ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values ranging from ˜3 × 10 -6 to ˜1.5 × 10 -5. Data for seven additional chondrules from three CV and two CR chondrites show evidence suggestive of the presence of 26Al but do not yield well defined values for ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0, while the remaining chondrules do not contain excess radiogenic 26Mg and yield corresponding upper limits of (11-2) × 10 -6 for ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0. The observed range of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 in PRCs from CCs is similar to the range seen in chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) of low metamorphic grade (3.0-3.4). However, unlike the UOC chondrules, there is no clear trend between the ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs and the degree of thermal metamorphism experienced by the host meteorites. High and low values of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 are found equally in PRCs from both CCs lacking evidence for thermal metamorphism (e.g., CRs) and CCs where such evidence is abundant (e.g., CVs). The lower ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs, relative to most CAIs, are consistent with a model in which 26Al was distributed uniformly in the nebula when chondrule formation began, approximately a million years after the formation of the majority of CAIs. The observed range of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs is most plausibly explained in terms of an extended duration of ˜2-3 Ma for the formation of CC chondrules. This interval is in sharp

  8. The Pasamonte unequilibrated eucrite: Pyroxene REE systematic and major-, minor-, and trace-element zoning. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pun, A.; Papike, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    We are evaluating the trace-element concentrations in the pyroxenes of Pasamonte. Pasamonte is a characteristic member of the main group eucrites, and has recently been redescribed as a polymict eucrite. Our Pasamonte sample contained eucritic clasts with textures ranging from subophitic to moderately coarse-grained. This study concentrates on pyroxenes from an unequilibrated, coarse-grained eucrite clast. Major-, minor-, and trace-element analyses were measured for zoned pyroxenes in the eucritic clast of Pasamonte. The major- and minor-element zoning traverses were measured using the JEOL 733 electron probe with an Oxford-Link imaging/analysis system. Complemenatry trace elements were then measured for the core and rim of each of the grains by SIMS. The trace elements analyzed consisted of eight REE, Sr, Y, and Zr. These analyses were performed on a Cameca 4f ion probe. The results of the CI chondrite normalized (average CI trace-element analyses for several grains and the major- and minor-element zoning patterns from a single pyroxene grain are given. The Eu abundance in the cores of the pyroxenes represents the detection limit and therefore the (-Eu) anomaly is a minimum. Major- and minor-element patterns are typical for igneous zoning. Pyroxene cores are Mg enriched, whereas the rims are enriched in Fe and Ca. Also, Ti and Mn are found to increase, while Cr and Al generally decrease in core-to-rim traverses. The cores of the pyroxenes are more depleted in the Rare Earth Elements (REE) than the rims. Using the minor- and trace-element concentrations of bulk Pasamonte and the minor- and trace-element concentrations from the cores of the pyroxenes in Pasamonte measured in this study, we calculated partition coefficients between pyroxene and melt. This calculation assumes that bulk Pasamonte is representative of a melt composition.

  9. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites - VIII: Thermoluminescence and metamorphism in the CO chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, B.D.; Sears, D.W.G. )

    1987-11-01

    The thermoluminescence properties of nine CO chondrites have been measured. With the exception of Colony and Allan Hills A77307 (ALHA 77307), whose maximum induced TL emission is at approximately 350{degree}C, CO chondrites exhibit two TL peaks, one at 124 {plus minus} 7{degree}C (130{degree}C peak) and one at 252 {plus minus} 7{degree}C (250{degree}C peak). The 130{degree}C peak shows a 100-fold range in TL sensitivity and correlates with various metamorphism-related phenomena, such as silicate heterogeneity, metal composition and McSween's metamorphic subtypes. The peak at 250{degree}C does not show these correlations and, Colony excepted, varies little throughout the class. Mineral separation experiments, and a series of annealing experiments on Isna, suggest that the TL properties for CO chondrites reflect the presence of feldspar in two forms, (1) a form produced during metamorphism, and analogous to the dominant form of feldspar in type 3 ordinary chondrites, and (2) a primary, metamorphism-independent form, perhaps associated with the amoeboid inclusions. If this interpretation is correct, then the CO chondrites have not experienced temperatures above the order/disorder temperature for feldspar (500-600{degree}C) and they cooled more slowly than comparable type 3 ordinary chondrites. Colony and ALHA 77307 have atypical TL properties, including very low TL sensitivity, suggesting that phosphors other than feldspar are important. They have apparently experienced less metamorphism than the others, and may have also been aqueously altered.

  10. The primitive matrix components of the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094: a TEM study.

    PubMed

    Greshake, A

    1997-01-01

    The mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the fine-grained matrix (< or = 3 micrometers) of the unique primitive carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 have been investigated in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). Generally, the fine-grained matrix represents a highly unequilibrated assemblage of an amorphous material, small forsteritic olivines (200-300 nm), low Ca-pyroxenes (300-400 nm), and Fe,Ni-sulfides (100-300 nm). The matrix is basically unaffected by secondary processes. Only minor amounts of serpentine and ferrihydrite, as products of hydrous alteration, are present. Texturally, the amorphous material acts as a groundmass to olivines, pyroxenes, and sulfides, mostly exhibiting rounded or elongated morphologies. Only very few clastic mineral grains have been found. The texture and chemical composition of the amorphous material are consistent with an origin by disequilibrium condensation in either the cooling solar nebula or a circumstellar environment. As such, the amorphous material may be considered as a possible precursor of matrix materials in other types of chondrites. The non-clastic matrix olivines (Fo98-99) and pyroxenes (En97-100) are suggested to have formed either by condensation in the solar nebula under highly oxidizing conditions or by recrystallization from the amorphous material. The formation of these grains by fragmentation of chondrule components is unlikely due to chemical and microstructural reasons. Rapid cooling caused the observed intergrowths of clino/orthoenstatite in the Mg-rich matrix pyroxenes. Although some similarities exist comparing the fine-grained matrix of Acfer 094 with the matrices of the unequilibrated CO3 chondrite ALHA77307 and the unique type 3 chondrite Kakangari, Acfer 094 remains unique. Since it contains the highest measured concentrations of circumstellar SiC and the second highest of diamond (highest is Orgueil), it seems reasonable to