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Sample records for unfolded protein response

  1. Unfolded Protein Responses With or Without Unfolded Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Snapp, Erik L.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of secretory protein biogenesis. The ER quality control (QC) machinery, including chaperones, ensures the correct folding of secretory proteins. Mutant proteins and environmental stresses can overwhelm the available QC machinery. To prevent and resolve accumulation of misfolded secretory proteins in the ER, cells have evolved integral membrane sensors that orchestrate the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The sensors, Ire1p in yeast and IRE1, ATF6, and PERK in metazoans, bind the luminal ER chaperone BiP during homeostasis. As unfolded secretory proteins accumulate in the ER lumen, BiP releases, and the sensors activate. The mechanisms of activation and attenuation of the UPR sensors have exhibited unexpected complexity. A growing body of data supports a model in which Ire1p, and potentially IRE1, directly bind unfolded proteins as part of the activation process. However, evidence for an unfolded protein-independent mechanism has recently emerged, suggesting that UPR can be activated by multiple modes. Importantly, dysregulation of the UPR has been linked to human diseases including Type II diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. The existence of alternative regulatory pathways for UPR sensors raises the exciting possibility for the development of new classes of therapeutics for these medically important proteins. PMID:24710536

  2. Unfolding the Unfolded Protein Response: Unique Insights into Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Thomas H.; Gallaway, Molly; Kumar, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is responsible for processing of proteins that are destined to be secreted, enclosed in a vesicle, or incorporated in the plasma membrane. Nascent peptides that enter the ER undergo a series of highly regulated processing steps to reach maturation as they transit the ER. Alterations in the intracellular environment that induce ER stress are thought to interrupt these processing steps, and result in unfolding of proteins in the ER. Accumulation of unfolded proteins concurrently activates three transmembrane stress sensors, IRE1, ATF6 and PERK, and is referred to as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). Our understanding of the mechanisms of UPR induction has been assembled primarily from experiments inducing ER stress with chemical and genetic manipulations. However, physiological stress often induces activation of ER stress sensors in a distinct manner from the canonical UPR. The unique activation profiles in vivo have prompted us to examine the mechanism of UPR activation in neurons following cerebral ischemia. PMID:25830481

  3. The unfolded protein response in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Sarrabeth; Lin, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) occurs in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by the accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER. The UPR is comprised of three signaling pathways that promote cytoprotective functions to correct ER stress; however, if ER stress cannot be resolved the UPR results in apoptosis of affected cells. The UPR is an important feature of various human diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent studies have shown several components of the UPR are upregulated in the multiple cell types in MS lesions, including oligodendrocytes, T cells, microglia/macrophages, and astrocytes. Data from animal model studies, particularly studies of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and the cuprizone model, imply an important role of the UPR activation in oligodendrocytes in the development of MS. In this review we will cover current literature on the UPR and the evidence for its role in the development of MS. PMID:26283904

  4. Signaling the Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Mark W.; Nargund, Amrita M.; Haynes, Cole M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are compartmentalized organelles essential for numerous cellular functions including ATP generation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism as well as apoptosis. To promote biogenesis and proper function, mitochondria have a dedicated repertoire of molecular chaperones to facilitate protein folding and quality control proteases to degrade those proteins that fail to fold correctly. Mitochondrial protein folding is challenged by the complex organelle architecture, the deleterious effects of electron transport chain-generated reactive oxygen species and the mitochondrial genome’s susceptibility to acquiring mutations. In response to the accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins beyond the organelle’s chaperone capacity, cells mount a mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). The UPRmt is a mitochondria-to-nuclear signal transduction pathway resulting in the induction of mitochondrial protective genes including mitochondrial molecular chaperones and proteases to re-establish protein homeostasis within the mitochondrial protein-folding environment. Here, we review the current understanding of UPRmt signal transduction and the impact of the UPRmt on diseased cells. PMID:22445420

  5. Role of unfolded protein response in lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ze; Zhang, Chunbin; Zhang, Kezhong

    2010-01-01

    The signal transduction network in regulating lipid metabolism is a hot topic of biomedical research. Recent research endeavors reveal that intracellular stress signaling from a cellular organelle called endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is critically involved in lipid homeostasis and the development of metabolic disease. The ER is a site where newly-synthesized proteins are folded and assembled into their three-dimensional structures, modified and transported to their precise cellular destinations. A wide range of biochemical, physiological and pathological stimuli can interrupt the protein folding process in the ER and cause accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen, a condition referred to as ER stress. To cope with this stress condition, the ER has evolved highly-specific signaling pathways collectively termed Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) or ER stress response. The UPR regulates transcriptional and translational programs, affecting broad aspects of cellular metabolism and cell fate. Lipogenesis, the metabolic process of de novo lipid biosynthesis, occurs primarily in the liver where metabolic signals regulate expression of key enzymes in glycolytic and lipogenic pathways. Recent studies suggest that the UPR plays crucial roles in modulating lipogenesis under metabolic conditions. Here we address some of recent representative evidence regarding the role of the UPR in lipogenesis. PMID:21160998

  6. Melanoma and the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Erin K; Mactier, Swetlana; Christopherson, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    The UPR (unfolded protein response) has been identified as a key factor in the progression and metastasis of cancers, notably melanoma. Several mediators of the UPR are upregulated in cancers, e.g., high levels of GRP78 (glucose-regulator protein 78 kDa) correlate with progression and poor outcome in melanoma patients. The proliferative burden of cancer induces stress and activates several cellular stress responses. The UPR is a tightly orchestrated stress response that is activated upon the accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER (endoplasmic reticulum). The UPR is designed to mediate two conflicting outcomtes, recovery and apoptosis. As a result, the UPR initiates a widespread signaling cascade to return the cell to homeostasis and failing to achieve cellular recovery, initiates UPR-induced apoptosis. There is evidence that ER stress and subsequently the UPR promote tumourigenesis and metastasis. The complete role of the UPR has yet to be defined. Understanding how the UPR allows for adaption to stress and thereby assists in cancer progression is important in defining an archetype of melanoma pathology. In addition, elucidation of the mechanisms of the UPR may lead to development of effective treatments of metastatic melanoma. PMID:26927180

  7. Druggable Sensors of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Dustin J.; Papa, Feroz R.

    2015-01-01

    The inability of cells to properly fold, modify, and assemble secretory and transmembrane proteins leads to accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Under these conditions of ER stress, cell survival depends on homeostatic benefits from an intracellular signaling pathway called the unfolded protein response (UPR). When activated, the UPR induces transcriptional and translational programs that restore ER homeostasis. However, under high-level/chronic ER stress, these adaptive changes ultimately become overshadowed by alternative Terminal UPR signals that actively commit cells to degeneration, culminating in programmed cell death. Chronic ER stress and maladaptive UPR signaling are implicated in the etiology and pathogenesis of myriad human diseases. Naturally, this has generated widespread interest in targeting key nodal components of the UPR as therapeutic strategies. Here we summarize the state of this field with emphasis placed on two of the master UPR regulators, PERK and IRE1?, which are both capable of being drugged with small molecules. PMID:25325700

  8. The Unfolded Protein Response and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Josh J.; Zhang, Sarah X.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes, is the leading cause of blindness in adults. Diabetes chronically damages retinal blood vessels and neurons likely through multiple pathogenic pathways such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To relieve ER stress, the cell activates an adaptive mechanism known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR coordinates the processes of protein synthesis, protein folding, and degradation to ensure proteostasis, which is vital for cell survival and activity. Emerging evidence suggests that diabetes can activate all three UPR branches in retinal cells, among which the PERK/ATF4 pathway is the most extensively studied in the development of diabetic retinopathy. X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) is a major transcription factor in the core UPR pathway and also regulates a variety of genes involved in cellular metabolism, redox state, autophagy, inflammation, cell survival, and vascular function. The exact function and implication of XBP1 in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy remain elusive. Focusing on this less studied pathway, we summarize recent progress in studies of the UPR pertaining to diabetic changes in retinal vasculature and neurons, highlighting the perspective of XBP1 as a potential therapeutic target in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25530974

  9. The Unfolded Protein Response and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Adolph, Timon Erik; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    As the inner lining of the gastrointestinal tract, the intestinal epithelium serves an essential role in innate immune function at the interface between the host and microbiota. Given the unique environmental challenges and thus physiologic secretory functions of this surface, it is exquisitely sensitive to perturbations that affect its capacity to resolve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Genetic deletion of factors involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR), which functions in the resolution of ER stress that arises from misfolded proteins, result in spontaneous intestinal inflammation closely mimicking human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This is demonstrated by observations wherein deletion of genes such as Xbp1 and Agr2 profoundly affects the intestinal epithelium and results in spontaneous intestinal inflammation. Moreover, both genes, along with others (e.g. ORDML3) represent genetic risk factors for human IBD, both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Here we review the current mechanistic understanding for how unresolved ER stress can lead to intestinal inflammation, and highlight the findings that implicate ER stress as a genetically affected biological pathway in IBD. We further discuss environmental and microbial factors that might impact on the epithelium’s capacity to resolve ER stress, and which may constitute exogenous factors that may precipitate disease in genetically susceptible individuals. PMID:23588234

  10. Endothelin-1, the Unfolded Protein Response, and Persistent Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Belchenko, Dmitry D.; Nguyen, Cecilia M.; Colvin, Kelley L.; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Stenmark, K. R.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelin-1 is a potent vasoactive peptide that occurs in chronically high levels in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in animal models of the disease. Recently, the unfolded protein response was implicated in a variety of diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. In addition, evidence is increasing for pathological, persistent inflammation in the pathobiology of this disease. We investigated whether endothelin-1 might engage the unfolded protein response and thus link inflammation and the production of hyaluronic acid by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Using immunoblot, real-time PCR, immunofluorescence, and luciferase assays, we found that endothelin-1 induces both a transcriptional and posttranslational activation of the three major arms of the unfolded protein response. The pharmacologic blockade of endothelin A receptors, but not endothelin B receptors, attenuated the observed release, as did a pharmacologic blockade of extracellular signalregulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK-1/2) signaling. Using short hairpin RNA and ELISA, we observed that the release by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of inflammatory modulators, including hyaluronic acid, is associated with endothelin-1induced ERK-1/2 phosphorylation and the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, the synthesis of hyaluronic acid induced by endothelin-1 is permissive for persistent THP-1 monocyte binding. These results suggest that endothelin-1, in part because it induces the unfolded protein response in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, triggers proinflammatory processes that likely contribute to vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:21778413

  11. The impact of the unfolded protein response on human disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyu

    2012-01-01

    A central function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to coordinate protein biosynthetic and secretory activities in the cell. Alterations in ER homeostasis cause accumulation of misfolded/unfolded proteins in the ER. To maintain ER homeostasis, eukaryotic cells have evolved the unfolded protein response (UPR), an essential adaptive intracellular signaling pathway that responds to metabolic, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response pathways. The UPR has been implicated in a variety of diseases including metabolic disease, neurodegenerative disease, inflammatory disease, and cancer. Signaling components of the UPR are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of human disease. PMID:22733998

  12. Engineering of chaperone systems and of the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saeed U.

    2008-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells is a successful technology that delivers protein pharmaceuticals for therapies and for diagnosis of human disorders. Cost effective production of protein biopharmaceuticals requires extensive optimization through cell and fermentation process engineering at the upstream and chemical engineering of purification processes at the downstream side of the production process. The majority of protein pharmaceuticals are secreted proteins. Accumulating evidence suggests that the folding and processing of these proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a general rate- and yield limiting step for their production. We will summarize our knowledge of protein folding in the ER and of signal transduction pathways activated by accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER, collectively called the unfolded protein response (UPR). On the basis of this knowledge we will evaluate engineering approaches to increase cell specific productivities through engineering of the ER-resident protein folding machinery and of the UPR. PMID:19003179

  13. Cytomegalovirus Downregulates IRE1 to Repress the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Sebastian; Burkhart, Julia M.; Hinte, Florian; Tirosh, Boaz; Mohr, Hermine; Zahedi, Ren P.; Sickmann, Albert; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Budt, Matthias; Brune, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    During viral infection, a massive demand for viral glycoproteins can overwhelm the capacity of the protein folding and quality control machinery, leading to an accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To restore ER homeostasis, cells initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) by activating three ER-to-nucleus signaling pathways, of which the inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1)-dependent pathway is the most conserved. To reduce ER stress, the UPR decreases protein synthesis, increases degradation of unfolded proteins, and upregulates chaperone expression to enhance protein folding. Cytomegaloviruses, as other viral pathogens, modulate the UPR to their own advantage. However, the molecular mechanisms and the viral proteins responsible for UPR modulation remained to be identified. In this study, we investigated the modulation of IRE1 signaling by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and found that IRE1-mediated mRNA splicing and expression of the X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) is repressed in infected cells. By affinity purification, we identified the viral M50 protein as an IRE1-interacting protein. M50 expression in transfected or MCMV-infected cells induced a substantial downregulation of IRE1 protein levels. The N-terminal conserved region of M50 was found to be required for interaction with and downregulation of IRE1. Moreover, UL50, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) homolog of M50, affected IRE1 in the same way. Thus we concluded that IRE1 downregulation represents a previously undescribed viral strategy to curb the UPR. PMID:23950715

  14. Emerging functions of the unfolded protein response in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Sophie; Pulendran, Bali; Lambrecht, Bart N.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has traditionally been viewed as an adaptive response triggered upon accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aimed at restoring ER function. The UPR can also be an anticipatory response that is activated well before the disruption of protein homeostasis. UPR signaling intersects at many levels with the innate and adaptive immune response. In some immune cell types like dendritic cells and B cells, particular UPR sensors appear constitutively active in the absence of traditional UPR gene program induction, necessary for antigen presentation and immunoglobulin synthesis. The UPR also influences Toll-like receptor signaling and NF-?B activation, and some pathogens subvert the UPR. This review summarizes these emerging non-canonical functions of the UPR in immunity. PMID:25232821

  15. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Toms P; Greene, Catherine M; McElvaney, Noel G

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte. PMID:21266225

  16. Cellular unfolded protein response against viruses used in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dwaipayan; Balakrishnan, Balaji; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are excellent vehicles for gene therapy due to their natural ability to infect and deliver the cargo to specific tissues with high efficiency. Although such vectors are usually "gutted" and are replication defective, they are subjected to clearance by the host cells by immune recognition and destruction. Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a naturally evolved cyto-protective signaling pathway which is triggered due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in its lumen. The UPR signaling consists of three signaling pathways, namely PKR-like ER kinase, activating transcription factor 6, and inositol-requiring protein-1. Once activated, UPR triggers the production of ER molecular chaperones and stress response proteins to help reduce the protein load within the ER. This occurs by degradation of the misfolded proteins and ensues in the arrest of protein translation machinery. If the burden of protein load in ER is beyond its processing capacity, UPR can activate pro-apoptotic pathways or autophagy leading to cell death. Viruses are naturally evolved in hijacking the host cellular translation machinery to generate a large amount of proteins. This phenomenon disrupts ER homeostasis and leads to ER stress. Alternatively, in the case of gutted vectors used in gene therapy, the excess load of recombinant vectors administered and encountered by the cell can trigger UPR. Thus, in the context of gene therapy, UPR becomes a major roadblock that can potentially trigger inflammatory responses against the vectors and reduce the efficiency of gene transfer. PMID:24904562

  17. Cellular unfolded protein response against viruses used in gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Dwaipayan; Balakrishnan, Balaji; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are excellent vehicles for gene therapy due to their natural ability to infect and deliver the cargo to specific tissues with high efficiency. Although such vectors are usually gutted and are replication defective, they are subjected to clearance by the host cells by immune recognition and destruction. Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a naturally evolved cyto-protective signaling pathway which is triggered due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in its lumen. The UPR signaling consists of three signaling pathways, namely PKR-like ER kinase, activating transcription factor 6, and inositol-requiring protein-1. Once activated, UPR triggers the production of ER molecular chaperones and stress response proteins to help reduce the protein load within the ER. This occurs by degradation of the misfolded proteins and ensues in the arrest of protein translation machinery. If the burden of protein load in ER is beyond its processing capacity, UPR can activate pro-apoptotic pathways or autophagy leading to cell death. Viruses are naturally evolved in hijacking the host cellular translation machinery to generate a large amount of proteins. This phenomenon disrupts ER homeostasis and leads to ER stress. Alternatively, in the case of gutted vectors used in gene therapy, the excess load of recombinant vectors administered and encountered by the cell can trigger UPR. Thus, in the context of gene therapy, UPR becomes a major roadblock that can potentially trigger inflammatory responses against the vectors and reduce the efficiency of gene transfer. PMID:24904562

  18. Autophagy Counterbalances Endoplasmic Reticulum Expansion during the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Bernales, Sebastin; McDonald, Kent L; Walter, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is regulated by the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR senses unfolded proteins in the ER lumen and transmits that information to the cell nucleus, where it drives a transcriptional program that is tailored to re-establish homeostasis. Using thin section electron microscopy, we found that yeast cells expand their ER volume at least 5-fold under UPR-inducing conditions. Surprisingly, we discovered that ER proliferation is accompanied by the formation of autophagosome-like structures that are densely and selectively packed with membrane stacks derived from the UPR-expanded ER. In analogy to pexophagy and mitophagy, which are autophagic processes that selectively sequester and degrade peroxisomes and mitochondria, the ER-specific autophagic process described utilizes several autophagy genes: they are induced by the UPR and are essential for the survival of cells subjected to severe ER stress. Intriguingly, cell survival does not require vacuolar proteases, indicating that ER sequestration into autophagosome-like structures, rather than their degradation, is the important step. Selective ER sequestration may help cells to maintain a new steady-state level of ER abundance even in the face of continuously accumulating unfolded proteins. PMID:17132049

  19. Activation of the unfolded protein response by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Pillich, Helena; Loose, Maria; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2012-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) responds to perturbation of homeostasis with stress. To maintain ER function, a signalling-circuitry has evolved which, when engaged, attempts to reduce a surplus of unfolded proteins by triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). Several studies have implicated UPR in viral infections, neurodegenerative disorders and metabolic diseases but UPR has not yet been widely linked to bacterial infections. Here we demonstrate that the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) induces ER expansion and UPR prior to host cell entry. Lm activated protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK) evidenced by the phosphorylation of the α-subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2 (eIF2α), inositol-requiring protein-1 (IRE1) as shown by detection of spliced X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) and activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6) as demonstrated by depletion of its inactive form. A mutant LmΔhly strain that did not produce listeriolysin (LLO) lacked the UPR response. Conversely purified LLO activated UPR. Sustained infection with Lm resulted in apoptosis. Induction of ER stress by thapsigargin or tunicamycin reduced intracellular bacterial number. Our findings suggest that UPR plays an important role in the cell autonomous defence responses to bacterial infection. PMID:22321539

  20. Virus-induced ER stress and the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingrui; Wang, Aiming

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in ER stress that triggers cytoprotective signaling pathways, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR), to restore and maintain homeostasis in the ER or to induce apoptosis if ER stress remains unmitigated. The UPR signaling network encompasses three core elements, i.e., PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), and inositol-requiring protein-1 (IRE1). Activation of these three branch pathways of the UPR leads to the translation arrest and degradation of misfolded proteins, the expression of ER molecular chaperones, and the expansion of the ER membrane to decrease the load of proteins and increase the protein-folding capacity in the ER. Recently, the essential roles of the UPR have been implicated in a number of mammalian diseases, particularly viral diseases. In virus-infected cells, the cellular translation machinery is hijacked by the infecting virus to produce large amounts of viral proteins, which inevitably perturbs ER homeostasis and causes ER stress. This review summarizes current knowledge about the UPR signaling pathways, highlights two identified UPR pathways in plants, and discuss progress in elucidating the UPR in virus-infected cells and its functional roles in viral infection. PMID:23293645

  1. The mitochondrial unfolded protein responsesynchronizing genomes.

    PubMed

    Jovaisaite, Virginija; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-04-01

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial proteome is performed primarily by chaperones, which fold and assemble proteins, and by proteases, which degrade excess damaged proteins. Upon various types of mitochondrial stress, triggered genetically or pharmacologically, dysfunction of the proteome is sensed and communicated to the nucleus, where an extensive transcriptional program, aimed to repair the damage, is activated. This feedback loop, termed the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), synchronizes the activity of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and as such ensures the quality of the mitochondrial proteome. Here we review the recent advances in the UPR(mt) field and discuss its induction, signaling, communication with the other mitochondrial and major cellular regulatory pathways, as well as its potential implications on health and lifespan. PMID:25543897

  2. Unfolded protein response in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shiu-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus of clinical importance. The virus establishes a chronic infection and can progress from chronic hepatitis, steatosis to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mechanisms of viral persistence and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently the unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular homeostatic response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, has emerged to be a major contributing factor in many human diseases. It is also evident that viruses interact with the host UPR in many different ways and the outcome could be pro-viral, anti-viral or pathogenic, depending on the particular type of infection. Here we present evidence for the elicitation of chronic ER stress in HCV infection. We analyze the UPR signaling pathways involved in HCV infection, the various levels of UPR regulation by different viral proteins and finally, we propose several mechanisms by which the virus provokes the UPR. PMID:24904547

  3. Unfolded protein response, treatment and CMT1B.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunhong; Patzko, Agnes; Shy, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    CMT1B is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited neuropathy and is caused by assorted mutations of the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations cause neuropathy gain of function mechanisms that are largely independent MPZs normal role of mediating myelin compaction. Whether there are only a few or multiple pathogenic mechanisms that cause CMT1B is unknown. Arg98Cys and Ser63Del MPZ are two CMT1B causing mutations that have been shown to cause neuropathy in mice at least in part by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR). We have recently treated Arg98Cys mice with derivatives of curcumin that improved the neuropathy and reduced UPR activation.(1) Future studies will address whether manipulating the UPR will be a common or rare strategy for treating CMT1B or other forms of inherited neuropathies. PMID:25002989

  4. Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei?

    PubMed

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Brown, Abigail E N A; Bangs, James D

    2015-11-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress mechanism to cope with misfolded proteins in the early secretory pathway, the hallmark being transcriptional upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones such as BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Despite the lack of transcriptional regulation and the absence of the classical UPR machinery, African trypanosomes apparently respond to persistent ER stress by a UPR-like response, including upregulation of BiP, and a related spliced leader silencing (SLS) response whereby SL RNA transcription is shut down. Initially observed by knockdown of the secretory protein translocation machinery, both responses are also induced by chemical agents known to elicit UPR in mammalian cells (H. Goldshmidt, D. Matas, A. Kabi, A. Carmi, R. Hope, S. Michaeli, PLoS Pathog 6:e1000731, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000731). As these findings were generated primarily in procyclic-stage trypanosomes, we have investigated both responses in pathogenic bloodstream-stage parasites. RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of the core translocon subunit Trypanosoma brucei Sec61? (TbSec61?) failed to induce either response. Interestingly, cell growth halted within 16 h of silencing, but sufficient TbSec61? remained to allow full competence for translocation of nascent secretory proteins for up to 24 h, indicating that replication is finely coupled with the capacity to synthesize and transport secretory cargo. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin at concentrations compatible with short-term (4 h) and long-term (24 h) viability also failed to induce any of the indicators of UPR-like or SLS responses. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was lethal at all concentrations tested. These results indicate that UPR-like and SLS responses to persistent ER stress do not occur in bloodstream-stage trypanosomes. PMID:26318397

  5. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is activated during normal lens development

    PubMed Central

    Firtina, Zeynep; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2010-01-01

    The lens of the eye is a transparent structure responsible for focusing light onto the retina. It is composed of two morphologically different cell types, epithelial cells found on the anterior surface and the fiber cells that are continuously formed by the differentiation of epithelial cells at the lens equator. The differentiation of an epithelial precursor cell into a fiber cell is associated with a dramatic increase in membrane protein synthesis. How the terminally differentiating fiber cells cope with the increased demand on the endoplasmic reticulum for this membrane protein synthesis is not known. In the present study, we have found evidence of Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) activation during normal lens development and differentiation in the mouse. The ER-resident chaperones, immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), were expressed at high levels in the newly forming fiber cells of embryonic lenses. These fiber cells also expressed the UPR-associated molecules; XBP1, ATF6, phospho-PERK and ATF4 during embryogenesis. Moreover, spliced XBP1, cleaved ATF6, and phospho-eIF2 were detected in embryonic mouse lenses suggesting that UPR pathways are active in this tissue. These results propose a role for UPR activation in lens fiber cell differentiation during embryogenesis. PMID:21044701

  6. Oxidative Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Apoptosis in Developmental Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kupsco, Allison; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Physiological development requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of cellular and molecular processes. Disruption of these key events can generate developmental toxicity in the form of teratogenesis or mortality. The mechanism behind many developmental toxicants remains unknown. While recent work has focused on the unfolded protein response (UPR), oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the pathogenesis of disease, few studies have addressed their relationship in developmental toxicity. Redox regulation, UPR, and apoptosis are essential for physiological development and can be disturbed by a variety of endogenous and exogenous toxicants to generate lethality and diverse malformations. This review examines the current knowledge of the role of oxidative stress, UPR, and apoptosis in physiological development as well as in developmental toxicity, focusing on studies and advances in vertebrates model systems. PMID:26008783

  7. The unfolded protein response affects readthrough of premature termination codons

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Yifat S; McClure, Michelle L; Rowe, Steven M; Sorscher, Eric J; Bester, Assaf C; Manor, Miriam; Kerem, Eitan; Rivlin, Joseph; Zahdeh, Fouad; Mann, Matthias; Geiger, Tamar; Kerem, Batsheva

    2014-01-01

    One-third of monogenic inherited diseases result from premature termination codons (PTCs). Readthrough of in-frame PTCs enables synthesis of full-length functional proteins. However, extended variability in the response to readthrough treatment is found among patients, which correlates with the level of nonsense transcripts. Here, we aimed to reveal cellular pathways affecting this inter-patient variability. We show that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) governs the response to readthrough treatment by regulating the levels of transcripts carrying PTCs. Quantitative proteomic analyses showed substantial differences in UPR activation between patients carrying PTCs, correlating with their response. We further found a significant inverse correlation between the UPR and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), suggesting a feedback loop between these homeostatic pathways. We uncovered and characterized the mechanism underlying this NMD-UPR feedback loop, which augments both UPR activation and NMD attenuation. Importantly, this feedback loop enhances the response to readthrough treatment, highlighting its clinical importance. Altogether, our study demonstrates the importance of the UPR and its regulatory network for genetic diseases caused by PTCs and for cell homeostasis under normal conditions. PMID:24705877

  8. The mitochondrial unfolded protein response in mammalian physiology

    PubMed Central

    Mottis, Adrienne; Jovaisaite, Virginija; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the main site of cellular energy harvesting, are derived from proteobacteria that evolved within our cells in endosymbiosis. Mitochondria retained vestiges of their proteobacterial genome, the circular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which encodes 13 subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) multiprotein complexes in the electron transport chain (ETC), while the remaining ~80 ETC components are encoded in the nuclear DNA (nDNA). A further ~1,400 proteins, which are essential for mitochondrial function are also encoded in nDNA. Thus the majority of mitochondrial proteins are translated in the cytoplasm, then imported, processed, and assembled in the mitochondria. An intricate protein quality control (PQC) network, constituted of chaperones and proteases that refold or degrade defective proteins, maintains mitochondrial proteostasis and ensures the cell and organism health. The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) is a relatively recently discovered PQC pathway, which senses the proteostatic disturbances specifically in the mitochondria and resolves the stress by retrograde signaling to the nucleus and consequent transcriptional activation of protective genes. This PQC system does not only transiently resolves the local stress, but can have long lasting effects on whole body metabolism, fitness and longevity. A delicate tuning of its activation levels might constitute a treatment of various diseases, such as metabolic diseases, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24898297

  9. Legionella suppresses the host unfolded protein response via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Treacy-Abarca, Sean; Mukherjee, Shaeri

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, secretes ?300 effector proteins to modulate the host environment. Given the intimate interaction between L. pneumophila and the endoplasmic reticulum, we investigated the role of the host unfolded protein response (UPR) during L. pneumophila infection. Interestingly, we show that the host identifies L. pneumophila infection as a form of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the sensor pATF6 is processed to generate pATF6(N), a transcriptional activator of downstream UPR genes. However, L. pneumophila is able to suppress the UPR and block the translation of prototypical UPR genes, BiP and CHOP. Furthermore, biochemical studies reveal that L. pneumophila uses two effectors (Lgt1 and Lgt2) to inhibit the splicing of XBP1u mRNA to spliced XBP1 (XBP1s), an UPR response regulator. Thus, we demonstrate that L. pneumophila is able to inhibit the UPR by multiple mechanisms including blocking XBP1u splicing and causing translational repression. This observation highlights the utility of L. pneumophila as a powerful tool for studying a critical protein homeostasis regulator. PMID:26219498

  10. Decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Ariyama, Hiroyuki; Kono, Nozomu; Matsuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-16

    Various kinds of fatty acids are distributed in membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells and tissues. The degree of fatty acid unsaturation in membrane phospholipids affects many membrane-associated functions and can be influenced by diet and by altered activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. However, little is known about how mammalian cells respond to changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. In this study we showed that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) knockdown increased the amount of saturated fatty acids and decreased that of monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids without affecting the amount or the composition of free fatty acid and induced unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) mRNAs and splicing of Xbox-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA. SCD1 knockdown-induced UPR was rescued by various unsaturated fatty acids and was enhanced by saturated fatty acid. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3), which incorporates preferentially polyunsaturated fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine, was up-regulated in SCD1 knockdown cells. Knockdown of LPCAT3 synergistically enhanced UPR with SCD1 knockdown. Finally we showed that palmitic acid-induced UPR was significantly enhanced by LPCAT3 knockdown as well as SCD1 knockdown. These results suggest that a decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces UPR. PMID:20489212

  11. Development of Antiproliferative Phenylmaleimides that Activate the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Muus, Ulrike; Hose, Curtis; Yao, Wei; Kosakowska-Cholody, Teresa; Farnsworth, David; Dyba, Marzena; Lountos, George T.; Waugh, David S.; Monks, Anne; Burke, Terrence R.; Michejda, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The current paper presents the synthesis and evaluation of a series of maleimides that were designed to inhibit the Cdc25 phosphatase by alkylation of catalytically essential cysteine residues. Although in HepB3 cell culture assays the analogues did exhibit antiproliferative IC50 values ranging from sub-micromolar to greater than 100 M, inhibition of Cdc25 through cysteine alkylation could not be demonstrated. It was also found that analysis using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) following treatment with the most potent analogue (1t) did not provide data consistent with inhibition at one specific point in the cell cycle, as would be expected if Cdc25A were inhibited. Further studies with a subset of analogues resulted in a correlation of antiproliferative potencies with activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is a regulatory pathway that temporarily suspends protein production when misfolding of proteins occurs within the endoplastic reticulum (ER). In addition, ER chaperones that promote proper refolding become upregulated. If cellular damage cannot be resolved by these mechanisms, then the UPR can initiate apoptosis. The current study indicates that these maleimide analogues lead to UPR activation, which is predictive of the selective antiproliferative activity of the series. PMID:20472436

  12. Drosophila as a model for unfolded protein response research

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Hyung Don

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) is an organelle where most secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized, folded, and undergo further maturation. As numerous conditions can perturb such ER function, eukaryotic cells are equipped with responsive signaling pathways, widely referred to as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). Chronic conditions of ER stress that cannot be fully resolved by UPR, or conditions that impair UPR signaling itself, are associated with many metabolic and degenerative diseases. In recent years, Drosophila has been actively employed to study such connections between UPR and disease. Notably, the UPR pathways are largely conserved between Drosophila and humans, and the mediating genes are essential for development in both organisms, indicating their requirement to resolve inherent stress. By now, many Drosophila mutations are known to impose stress in the ER, and a number of these appear similar to those that underlie human diseases. In addition, studies have employed the strategy of overexpressing human mutations in Drosophila tissues to perform genetic modifier screens. The fact that the basic UPR pathways are conserved, together with the availability of many human disease models in this organism, makes Drosophila a powerful tool for studying human disease mechanisms. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(8): 445-453] PMID:25999177

  13. Insulin demand regulates ? cell number via the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rohit B; O'Donnell, Amy C; Stamateris, Rachel E; Ha, Binh; McCloskey, Karen M; Reynolds, Paul R; Arvan, Peter; Alonso, Laura C

    2015-10-01

    Although stem cell populations mediate regeneration of rapid turnover tissues, such as skin, blood, and gut, a stem cell reservoir has not been identified for some slower turnover tissues, such as the pancreatic islet. Despite lacking identifiable stem cells, murine pancreatic ? cell number expands in response to an increase in insulin demand. Lineage tracing shows that new ? cells are generated from proliferation of mature, differentiated ? cells; however, the mechanism by which these mature cells sense systemic insulin demand and initiate a proliferative response remains unknown. Here, we identified the ? cell unfolded protein response (UPR), which senses insulin production, as a regulator of ? cell proliferation. Using genetic and physiologic models, we determined that among the population of ? cells, those with an active UPR are more likely to proliferate. Moreover, subthreshold endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) drove insulin demand-induced ? cell proliferation, through activation of ATF6. We also confirmed that the UPR regulates proliferation of human ? cells, suggesting that therapeutic UPR modulation has potential to expand ? cell mass in people at risk for diabetes. Together, this work defines a stem cell-independent model of tissue homeostasis, in which differentiated secretory cells use the UPR sensor to adapt organ size to meet demand. PMID:26389675

  14. The unfolded protein response in neurodegenerative diseases: a neuropathological perspective.

    PubMed

    Scheper, Wiep; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M

    2015-09-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to a disturbance in protein folding. The so-called ER stress sensors PERK, IRE1 and ATF6 play a central role in the initiation and regulation of the UPR. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins is a common characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. With the discovery of the basic machinery of the UPR, the idea was born that the UPR or part of its machinery could be involved in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and prion disease. Over the last decade, the UPR has been addressed in an increasing number of studies on neurodegeneration. The involvement of the UPR has been investigated in human neuropathology across different neurological diseases, as well as in cell and mouse models for neurodegeneration. Studies using different disease models display discrepancies on the role and function of the UPR during neurodegeneration, which can often be attributed to differences in methodology. In this review, we will address the importance of investigation of human brain material for the interpretation of the role of the UPR in neurological diseases. We will discuss evidence for UPR activation in neurodegenerative diseases, and the methodology to study UPR activation and its connection to brain pathology will be addressed. More recently, the UPR is recognized as a target for drug therapy for treatment and prevention of neurodegeneration, by inhibiting the function of specific mediators of the UPR. Several preclinical studies have shown a proof-of-concept for this approach targeting the machinery of UPR, in particular the PERK pathway, in different models for neurodegeneration and have yielded paradoxical results. The promises held by these observations will need further support by clarification of the observed differences between disease models, as well as increased insight obtained from human neuropathology. PMID:26210990

  15. Ethanol Cellular Defense Induce Unfolded Protein Response in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although, many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two S. cerevisiae strains, CECT10094, and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico) respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR) and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus, our data suggest that there is a room for ethanol tolerance improvement by enhancing UPR response. PMID:26925053

  16. Ethanol Cellular Defense Induce Unfolded Protein Response in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Tapia, Elisabet; Nana, Rebeca K; Querol, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although, many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two S. cerevisiae strains, CECT10094, and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico) respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR) and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus, our data suggest that there is a room for ethanol tolerance improvement by enhancing UPR response. PMID:26925053

  17. Review: Retinal degeneration: Focus on the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Gorbatyuk, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Recently published literature has provided evidence that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is involved in the development of retinal degeneration. The scope of these studies encompassed diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, glaucoma, retinal detachment, light-induced retinal degeneration, age-related macular degeneration, and inherited retinal degeneration. Subsequent studies investigating the role of individual UPR markers in retinal pathogenesis and examining the therapeutic potential of reprogramming the UPR as a method for modulating the rate of retinal degeneration have been initiated. Manipulation of UPR markers has been made possible by the use of knockout mice, pharmacological agents, and viral vector-mediated augmentation of gene expression. Future research will aim at identifying specific inhibitors and/or inducers of UPR regulatory markers as well as expand the list of UPR-related animal models. Additionally, adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery is a safe and effective method for modulating gene expression, and thus is a useful research tool for manipulating individual UPR markers in affected retinas and a promising delivery vector for gene therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. PMID:24068865

  18. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway in Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Seon Ah; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2014-01-01

    Unique and evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways allow an organism to sense, respond to, and adapt to internal and external environmental cues at its biological niche. In eukaryotic cells, the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway regulates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis upon exposure to environmental changes causing ER stress. The UPR pathway of Cryptococcus neoformans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, which causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals, consists of the evolutionarily conserved Ire1 kinase, a unique bZIP transcription factor, Hxl1, and the ER-resident molecular chaperone Kar2/BiP. Although the Cryptococcus UPR pathway regulates ER stress, antifungal drug resistance, and virulence in an Ire1/Hxl1-dependent manner, Ire1 has Hxl1-independent roles in capsule biosynthesis and thermotolerance. In this review, we highlight the conserved and unique features of the Cryptococcus UPR pathway compared with other fungal UPR systems and its importance in the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis and discuss future challenges in this field. PMID:24504058

  19. Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response by Constitutive G-protein Signaling in Rod Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Chen, Jeannie

    2014-01-01

    Phototransduction is a G-protein signal transduction cascade that converts photon absorption to a change in current at the plasma membrane. Certain genetic mutations affecting the proteins in the phototransduction cascade cause blinding disorders in humans. Some of these mutations serve as a genetic source of equivalent light that activates the cascade, whereas other mutations lead to amplification of the light response. How constitutive phototransduction causes photoreceptor cell death is poorly understood. We showed that persistent G-protein signaling, which occurs in rod arrestin and rhodopsin kinase knock-out mice, caused a rapid and specific induction of the PERK pathway of the unfolded protein response. These changes were not observed in the cGMP-gated channel knock-out rods, an equivalent light condition that mimics light-stimulated channel closure. Thus transducin signaling, but not channel closure, triggers rapid cell death in light damage caused by constitutive phototransduction. Additionally, we show that in the albino light damage model cell death was not associated with increase in global protein ubiquitination or unfolded protein response induction. Taken together, these observations provide novel mechanistic insights into the cell death pathway caused by constitutive phototransduction and identify the unfolded protein response as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25183010

  20. The mitochondrial unfolded protein response, a conserved stress response pathway with implications in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Jovaisaite, Virginija; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to respond to various intracellular and/or extracellular stresses allows the organism to adapt to changing environmental conditions and drives evolution. It is now well accepted that a progressive decline of the efficiency of stress response pathways occurs with aging. In this context, a correct proteostasis is essential for the functionality of the cell, and its dysfunction has been associated with protein aggregation and age-related degenerative diseases. Complex response mechanisms have evolved to deal with unfolded protein stress in different subcellular compartments and their moderate activation translates into positive effects on health. In this review, we focus on the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt), a response to proteotoxic stress specifically in mitochondria, an organelle with a wide array of fundamental functions, most notably the harvesting of energy from food and the control of cell death. We compare UPRmt with the extensively characterized cytosolic heat shock response (HSR) and the unfolded protein response in endoplasmic reticulum (UPRER), and discuss the current knowledge about UPRmt signaling pathways as well as their potential involvement in physiology. PMID:24353213

  1. The effect of the unfolded protein response on the production of recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David Rhys; Walmsley, Amanda Maree

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant proteins are currently produced through a wide variety of host systems, including yeast, E. coli, insect and mammalian cells. One of the most recent systems developed uses plant cells. While considerable advances have been made in the yields and fidelity of plant-made recombinant proteins, many of these gains have arisen from the development of recombinant factors. This includes elements such as highly effective promoters and untranslated regions, deconstructed viral vectors, silencing inhibitors, and improved DNA delivery techniques. However, unlike other host systems, much of the work on recombinant protein production in plants uses wild-type hosts that have not been modified to facilitate recombinant protein expression. As such, there are still endogenous mechanisms functioning to maintain the health of the cell. The result is that these pathways, such as the unfolded protein response, can actively work to reduce recombinant protein production to maintain the integrity of the cell. This review examines how issues arising from the unfolded protein response have been addressed in other systems, and how these methods may be transferable to plant systems. We further identify several areas of host plant biology that present attractive targets for modification to facilitate recombinant protein production. PMID:25187294

  2. Degradation of proteins from the ER of S. cerevisiae requires an intact unfolded protein response pathway.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, R; Stern, P; Diehn, M; Shamu, C; Osario, M; Ziga, M; Brown, P O; Ploegh, H

    2000-04-01

    To dissect the requirements of membrane protein degradation from the ER, we expressed the mouse major histocompatibility complex class I heavy chain H-2K(b) in yeast. Like other proteins degraded from the ER, unassembled H-2K(b) heavy chains are not transported to the Golgi but are degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. The overexpression of H-2K(b) heavy chains induces the unfolded protein response (UPR). In yeast mutants unable to mount the UPR, H-2K(b) heavy chains are greatly stabilized. This defect in degradation is suppressed by the expression of the active form of Hac1p, the transcription factor that upregulates UPR-induced genes. These results indicate that induction of the UPR is required for the degradation of protein substrates from the ER. PMID:10882108

  3. Unfolded protein response to autophagy as a promising druggable target for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hee Seung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong Sang

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is responsible for protein processing. In rapidly proliferating tumor cells, the ER tends to be overloaded with unfolded and misfolded proteins due to high metabolic demand. With the limited protein-folding capacity of the ER, tumor cells often suffer from more ER stress than do normal cells. Thus, cellular stress responses to cope with ER stress, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy, might be more activated in cancer cells than in normal cells. The complex signaling pathways from the UPR to autophagy provide promising druggable targets; a number of UPR/autophagy-targeted anticancer agents are currently in development in preclinical and clinical studies. In this short review we will discuss the potential anticancer efficacy of modulators of cellular stress responses, especially UPR and autophagy, on the basis of their signaling pathways. In addition, the current developmental status of the UPR/autophagy-targeted agents will be discussed. PMID:23050960

  4. The Unfolded Protein Response and the Role of Protein Disulfide Isomerase in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Emma R.; Thomas, Colleen J.; Parakh, Sonam; Spencer, Damian M.; Atkin, Julie D.

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance and regulation of proteostasis is a critical function for post-mitotic neurons and its dysregulation is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite having different clinical manifestations, these disorders share similar pathology; an accumulation of misfolded proteins in neurons and subsequent disruption to cellular proteostasis. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an important component of proteostasis, and when the accumulation of misfolded proteins occurs within the ER, this disturbs ER homeostasis, giving rise to ER stress. This triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR), distinct signaling pathways that whilst initially protective, are pro-apoptotic if ER stress is prolonged. ER stress is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, and emerging evidence highlights the complexity of the UPR in these disorders, with both protective and detrimental components being described. Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI) is an ER chaperone induced during ER stress that is responsible for the formation of disulfide bonds in proteins. Whilst initially considered to be protective, recent studies have revealed unconventional roles for PDI in neurodegenerative diseases, distinct from its normal function in the UPR and the ER, although these mechanisms remain poorly defined. However, specific aspects of PDI function may offer the potential to be exploited therapeutically in the future. This review will focus on the evidence linking ER stress and the UPR to neurodegenerative diseases, with particular emphasis on the emerging functions ascribed to PDI in these conditions. PMID:26779479

  5. The Unfolded Protein Response is activated in Connexin 50 mutant mouse lenses

    PubMed Central

    Alapure, Bhagwat V.; Stull, Jaime K.; Firtina, Zeynep; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2012-01-01

    The unfolded protein response is a set of cell signaling pathways recently recognized to be activated in the lens during both normal development and endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by either unfolded proteins or oxidative damage. While mutations in the gene for connexin 50 are known to cause autosomal dominant cataracts, it has not been previously reported whether mutant connexins can activate the unfolded protein response in the lens. Mice homozygous for the S50P or G22R mutation of connexin 50 have reduced amounts of connexin 50 protein at the cell membrane, with some intracellular staining consistent with retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. Connexin 50 mutants have elevated levels of BiP expression in both lens epithelial and fiber cells from E15.5 with the most robust elevation detected in newborns. While this elevation decreases in magnitude postnatally, BiP expression is still abnormally high in adults, particularly in the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum of cell nuclei that are inappropriately retained in adult homozygous mutant lenses. Xbp1 splicing was elevated in lenses from both connexin mutants studied, while Atf4 and Atf6 levels were not majorly affected. Overall, these data suggest that UPR may be a contributing factor to the phenotype of connexin 50 mutant lenses even though the relatively modest extent of the response suggests that it is unlikely to be a major driver of the pathology. PMID:22713599

  6. Unfolding of Proteins: Thermal and Mechanical Unfolding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hur, Joe S.; Darve, Eric

    2004-01-01

    We have employed a Hamiltonian model based on a self-consistent Gaussian appoximation to examine the unfolding process of proteins in external - both mechanical and thermal - force elds. The motivation was to investigate the unfolding pathways of proteins by including only the essence of the important interactions of the native-state topology. Furthermore, if such a model can indeed correctly predict the physics of protein unfolding, it can complement more computationally expensive simulations and theoretical work. The self-consistent Gaussian approximation by Micheletti et al. has been incorporated in our model to make the model mathematically tractable by signi cantly reducing the computational cost. All thermodynamic properties and pair contact probabilities are calculated by simply evaluating the values of a series of Incomplete Gamma functions in an iterative manner. We have compared our results to previous molecular dynamics simulation and experimental data for the mechanical unfolding of the giant muscle protein Titin (1TIT). Our model, especially in light of its simplicity and excellent agreement with experiment and simulation, demonstrates the basic physical elements necessary to capture the mechanism of protein unfolding in an external force field.

  7. Role of the Unfolded Protein Response in ? Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Nabil; Salas, Elisabet; Froguel, Philippe; Annicotte, Jean-Sbastien

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ? cell failure leads to diabetes development. During disease progression, ? cells adapt their secretory capacity to compensate the elevated glycaemia and the peripheral insulin resistance. This compensatory mechanism involves a fine-tuned regulation to modulate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) capacity and quality control to prevent unfolded proinsulin accumulation, a major protein synthetized within the ? cell. These signalling pathways are collectively termed unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR machinery is required to preserve ER homeostasis and ? cell integrity. Moreover, UPR actors play a key role by regulating ER folding capacity, increasing the degradation of misfolded proteins, and limiting the mRNA translation rate. Recent genetic and biochemical studies on mouse models and human UPR sensor mutations demonstrate a clear requirement of the UPR machinery to prevent ? cell failure and increase ? cell mass and adaptation throughout the progression of diabetes. In this review we will highlight the specific role of UPR actors in ? cell compensation and failure during diabetes. PMID:24812634

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Response in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Christopher L.; Frye, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The underlying causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are unclear, although recent evidence has implicated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in both the development of steatosis and progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Disruption of ER homeostasis, often termed ER stress, has been observed in liver and adipose tissue of humans with NAFLD and/or obesity. Importantly, the signaling pathway activated by disruption of ER homeostasis, the unfolded protein response, has been linked to lipid biosynthesis, insulin action, inflammation, and apoptosis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that disrupt ER homeostasis in NAFLD and the role of ER-mediated signaling have become topics of intense investigation. The present review will examine the ER and the unfolded protein response in the context of NAFLD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 505521. PMID:21128705

  9. Interplay between unfolded protein response and autophagy promotes tumor drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    YAN, MING-MING; NI, JIANG-DONG; SONG, DEYE; DING, MULIANG; HUANG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in the quality control of secreted protein via promoting the correct folding of nascent protein and mediating the degradation of unfolded or misfolded protein, namely ER-associated degradation. When the unfolded or misfolded proteins are abundant, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is elicited, an adaptive signaling cascade from the ER to the nucleus, which restores the homeostatic functions of the ER. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process where cellular long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are engulfed and degraded for recycling to maintain homeostasis. The UPR and autophagy occur simultaneously and are involved in pathological processes, including tumorigenesis, chemoresistance of malignancies and neurodegeneration. Accumulative data has indicated that the UPR may induce autophagy and that autophagy is able to alleviate the UPR. However, the detailed mechanism of interplay between autophagy and UPR remains to be fully understood. The present review aimed to depict the core pathways of the two processes and to elucidate how autophagy and UPR are regulated. Moreover, the review also discusses the molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and autophagy and their roles in malignant survival and drug resistance. PMID:26622781

  10. Zinc homeostasis is involved in unfolded protein response under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miaoying; Xu, Qiangyi; Yuan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded protein or misfolded protein causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Increased salt concentration activates a stress response pathway in the ER in Arabidopsis thaliana to induce the expression of several salt stress response genes, leading to a more optimal protein folding environment in the ER. In addition, some salt stress-regulated proteins require zinc for their activity, including some zinc-dependent DNA binding proteins and zinc-finger proteins. In a recent study, we reported that ZTP29, a putative zinc transporter at the ER membrane, is involved in the response to salt stress through regulation of zinc level in the ER to induce the UPR pathway. In this addendum, we propose a testable hypothesis for the role of ZTP29 in the response to salt stress via the regulation of zinc levels in the ER. PMID:21242724

  11. Bacteria, the endoplasmic reticulum and the unfolded protein response: friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Celli, Jean; Tsolis, Rene M

    2015-02-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cytoprotective response that is aimed at restoring cellular homeostasis following physiological stress exerted on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which also invokes innate immune signalling in response to invading microorganisms. Although it has been known for some time that the UPR is modulated by various viruses, recent evidence indicates that it also has multiple roles during bacterial infections. In this Review, we describe how bacteria interact with the ER, including how bacteria induce the UPR, how subversion of the UPR promotes bacterial proliferation and how the UPR contributes to innate immune responses against invading bacteria. PMID:25534809

  12. Bacteria, the ER and the Unfolded Protein Response: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Celli, Jean; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2015-01-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is a cytoprotective response aimed at restoring cellular homeostasis following physiological stress exerted on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that also invokes innate immune signaling in response to invading microorganisms. While the UPR is modulated by various viruses, recent evidence indicates that it also plays multiple roles during bacterial infections. In this Review, we describe how bacteria adapt to live in the ER and discuss the intricacies of bacterial interactions with the UPR, including how UPR subversion promotes the proliferation of intracellular bacterial pathogens and how the UPR contributes to innate immune responses against invading bacteria. PMID:25534809

  13. Suppression of cytokine responses by indomethacin in podocytes: a mechanism through induction of unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Maro; Takano, Yosuke; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Yao, Jian; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Kitamura, Masanori

    2008-11-01

    We found that, in murine podocytes, expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) in response to TNF-alpha was suppressed by indomethacin but not by ibuprofen. This anti-inflammatory potential was correlated with induction of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a marker of unfolded protein response (UPR). Indomethacin, but not ibuprofen, also triggered expression of CHOP, another endogenous indicator of UPR, as well as repression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive alkaline phosphatase, an exogenous indicator of UPR. Like ibuprofen, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin and sulindac also did not induce UPR, indicating that the induction of UPR by indomethacin was independent of cyclooxygenase inhibition. The induction of UPR by indomethacin was observed similarly in other cells including mesangial cells and tubular epithelial cells. In tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-treated cells, suppression of MCP-1 by indomethacin was inversely correlated with induction of UPR, and other inducers of UPR including tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and A23187 reproduced the suppressive effect. Reporter assays showed that indomethacin as well as thapsigargin attenuated activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha, and it was associated with enhanced degradation of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) and blunted degradation of IkappaBbeta. Subsequent experiments revealed that acute ablation of GRP78 protein by AB5 subtilase cytotoxin caused reinforcement of MCP-1 induction and NF-kappaB activation by TNF-alpha and that transfection with GRP78 significantly suppressed the cytokine-induced activation of NF-kappaB. These results suggested that indomethacin suppressed the response of podocytes to TNF-alpha via UPR and that UPR-triggered induction of GRP78 and degradation of TRAF2 may be responsible, at least in part, for the suppressive effect of indomethacin. PMID:18799549

  14. Making ends meet: a role of RNA ligase RTCB in unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Filipowicz, Witold

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) monitors the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum. One of the UPR branches includes an unusual cytoplasmic splicing reaction leading to removal of an intron from an mRNA encoding a key UPR transcription factor. The cleavage step of the process is well characterized in both yeast and animals, but the animal enzyme responsible for exon ligation has remained a mystery. Recent reports, including a paper in this issue of The EMBO Journal, identify RTCB as the RNA ligase operating during UPR in mammals and C. elegans. PMID:25404664

  15. Spliced X-box Binding Protein 1 Couples the Unfolded Protein Response to Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Deng, Yingfeng; Gao, Ningguo; Pedrozo, Zully; Li, Dan L.; Morales, Cyndi R.; Criollo, Alfredo; Luo, Xiang; Tan, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Lehrman, Mark A.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Lavandero, Sergio; Mammen, Pradeep P.A.; Ferdous, Anwarul; Gillette, Thomas G.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) generates UDP-GlcNAc (uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine) for glycan synthesis and O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) protein modifications. Despite the established role of the HBP in metabolism and multiple diseases, regulation of the HBP remains largely undefined. Here, we show that spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s), the most conserved signal transducer of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is a direct transcriptional activator of the HBP. We demonstrate that the UPR triggers HBP activation via Xbp1s-dependent transcription of genes coding for key, rate-limiting enzymes. We further establish that this previously unrecognized UPR-HBP axis is triggered in a variety of stress conditions. Finally, we demonstrate a physiologic role for the UPR-HBP axis, by showing that acute stimulation of Xbp1s in heart by ischemia/reperfusion confers robust cardioprotection in part through induction of the HBP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Xbp1s couples the UPR to the HBP to protect cells under stress. PMID:24630721

  16. Spliced X-box binding protein 1 couples the unfolded protein response to hexosamine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao V; Deng, Yingfeng; Gao, Ningguo; Pedrozo, Zully; Li, Dan L; Morales, Cyndi R; Criollo, Alfredo; Luo, Xiang; Tan, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Lehrman, Mark A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Lavandero, Sergio; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Ferdous, Anwarul; Gillette, Thomas G; Scherer, Philipp E; Hill, Joseph A

    2014-03-13

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) generates uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) for glycan synthesis and O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) protein modifications. Despite the established role of the HBP in metabolism and multiple diseases, regulation of the HBP remains largely undefined. Here, we show that spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s), the most conserved signal transducer of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is a direct transcriptional activator of the HBP. We demonstrate that the UPR triggers HBP activation via Xbp1s-dependent transcription of genes coding for key, rate-limiting enzymes. We further establish that this previously unrecognized UPR-HBP axis is triggered in a variety of stress conditions. Finally, we demonstrate a physiologic role for the UPR-HBP axis by showing that acute stimulation of Xbp1s in heart by ischemia/reperfusion confers robust cardioprotection in part through induction of the HBP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Xbp1s couples the UPR to the HBP to protect cells under stress. PMID:24630721

  17. Differential requirement of unfolded protein response pathway for calreticulin expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dukgyu; Singaravelu, Gunasekaran; Park, Byung-Jae; Ahnn, Joohong

    2007-09-14

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, which increases the expression of chaperones to maintain the homeostasis. Calreticulin is a calcium-binding chaperone located in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we show that in response to a UPR inducing reagent, tunicamycin, the expression of calreticulin (crt-1) is specifically up-regulated in Caenorhabditis elegans. Tunicamycin (TM) induced expression of the crt-1 requires IRE-1 and XBP-1 but is ATF-6 and PEK-1 independent. Analysis of the crt-1 promoter reveals a putative XBP-1 binding site at the -284 to -278 bp region, which was shown to be necessary for TM-mediated induction. Genetic analysis of crt-1 mutants and mutants of UPR pathway genes show various degrees of developmental arrest upon TM treatment. Our results suggest that the TM-induced UPR pathway culminates in the up-regulation of crt-1, which protects the worm from deleterious accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER. Knockdown of the crt-1, pdi-2, or pdi-3 increased the crt-1 expression, whereas knockdown of the hsp-3 or hsp-4 did not have any effect on crt-1 expression, indicating the existence of complex compensatory networks to cope up with ER stress. PMID:17651753

  18. Advances and New Concepts in Alcohol-Induced Organelle Stress, Unfolded Protein Responses and Organ Damage.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol is a simple and consumable biomolecule yet its excessive consumption disturbs numerous biological pathways damaging nearly all organs of the human body. One of the essential biological processes affected by the harmful effects of alcohol is proteostasis, which regulates the balance between biogenesis and turnover of proteins within and outside the cell. A significant amount of published evidence indicates that alcohol and its metabolites directly or indirectly interfere with protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing an accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) leading to either restoration of homeostasis or cell death, inflammation and other pathologies under severe and chronic alcohol conditions. The UPR senses the abnormal protein accumulation and activates transcription factors that regulate nuclear transcription of genes related to ER function. Similarly, this kind of protein stress response can occur in other cellular organelles, which is an evolving field of interest. Here, I review recent advances in the alcohol-induced ER stress response as well as discuss new concepts on alcohol-induced mitochondrial, Golgi and lysosomal stress responses and injuries. PMID:26047032

  19. Advances and New Concepts in Alcohol-Induced Organelle Stress, Unfolded Protein Responses and Organ Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol is a simple and consumable biomolecule yet its excessive consumption disturbs numerous biological pathways damaging nearly all organs of the human body. One of the essential biological processes affected by the harmful effects of alcohol is proteostasis, which regulates the balance between biogenesis and turnover of proteins within and outside the cell. A significant amount of published evidence indicates that alcohol and its metabolites directly or indirectly interfere with protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing an accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) leading to either restoration of homeostasis or cell death, inflammation and other pathologies under severe and chronic alcohol conditions. The UPR senses the abnormal protein accumulation and activates transcription factors that regulate nuclear transcription of genes related to ER function. Similarly, this kind of protein stress response can occur in other cellular organelles, which is an evolving field of interest. Here, I review recent advances in the alcohol-induced ER stress response as well as discuss new concepts on alcohol-induced mitochondrial, Golgi and lysosomal stress responses and injuries. PMID:26047032

  20. The Unfolded Protein Response: A Pathway That Links Insulin Demand with ?-Cell Failure and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Scheuner, Donalyn; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2008-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the entry site into the secretory pathway for newly synthesized proteins destined for the cell surface or released into the extracellular milieu. The study of protein folding and trafficking within the ER is an extremely active area of research that has provided novel insights into many disease processes. Cells have evolved mechanisms to modulate the capacity and quality of the ER protein-folding machinery to prevent the accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins. These signaling pathways are collectively termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR sensors signal a transcriptional response to expand the ER folding capacity, increase degredation of malfolded proteins, and limit the rate of mRNA translation to reduce the client protein load. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence in both humans and mice supports a requirement for the UPR to preserve ER homeostasis and prevent the ?-cell failure that may be fundamental in the etiology of diabetes. Chronic or overwhelming ER stress stimuli associated with metabolic syndrome can disrupt protein folding in the ER, reduce insulin secretion, invoke oxidative stress, and activate cell death pathways. Therapeutic interventions to prevent polypeptide-misfolding, oxidative damage, and/or UPR-induced cell death have the potential to improve ?-cell function and/or survival in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:18436705

  1. The unfolded protein response is triggered following a single, unaccustomed resistance-exercise bout.

    PubMed

    Ogborn, Daniel I; McKay, Bryon R; Crane, Justin D; Parise, Gianni; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2014-09-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress results from an imbalance between the abundance of synthesized proteins and the folding capacity of the ER. In response, the unfolded protein response (UPR) attempts to restore ER function by attenuating protein synthesis and inducing chaperone expression. Resistance exercise (RE) stimulates protein synthesis; however, a postexercise accumulation of unfolded proteins may activate the UPR. Aging may impair protein folding, and the accumulation of oxidized and misfolded proteins may stimulate the UPR at rest in aged muscle. Eighteen younger (n = 9; 21 3 yr) and older (n = 9; 70 4 yr) untrained men completed a single, unilateral bout of RE using the knee extensors (four sets of 10 repetitions at 75% of one repetition maximum on the leg press and leg extension) to determine whether the UPR is increased in resting, aged muscle and whether RE stimulates the UPR. Muscle biopsies were taken from the nonexercised and exercised vastus lateralis at 3, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Age did not affect any of the proteins and transcripts related to the UPR. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and protein kinase R-like ER protein kinase (PERK) proteins were increased at 48 h postexercise, whereas inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1?) was elevated at 24 h and 48 h. Despite elevated protein, GRP78 and PERK mRNA was unchanged; however, IRE1? mRNA was increased at 24 h postexercise. Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) mRNA increased at 24 h and 48 h, whereas ATF4, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and growth arrest and DNA damage protein 34 mRNA were unchanged. These data suggest that RE activates specific pathways of the UPR (ATF6/IRE1?), whereas PERK/eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha/CHOP does not. In conclusion, acute RE results in UPR activation, irrespective of age. PMID:25009220

  2. Activation of the unfolded protein response in vitiligo: the missing link?

    PubMed

    Passeron, Thierry; Ortonne, Jean-Paul

    2012-11-01

    Vitiligo is characterized by a substantial loss of functional melanocytes in the epidermis and sometimes in hair follicles. Genetic and pathophysiological studies have provided strong evidence that vitiligo is a polygenetic, multifactorial disorder. The key roles of oxidative stress within melanocytes and anti-melanocyte immune responses have been addressed in many studies, but the relationship between these mechanisms remains unclear. In this issue, Toosi et al. report the upregulation of IL-6 and IL-8 after the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) following exposure of melanocytes to phenols. Their results shed light on the missing link between oxidative stress and immune responses in vitiligo. PMID:23069909

  3. The Unfolded Protein Response and Chemical Chaperones Reduce Protein Misfolding and Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    CAO, STEWART SIYAN; ZIMMERMANN, ELLEN M.; CHUANG, BRANDYMENGCHIEH; SONG, BENBO; NWOKOYE, ANOSIKE; WILKINSON, J. ERBY; EATON, KATHRYN A.; KAUFMAN, RANDAL J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been associated with development of inflammatory bowel disease. We examined the effects of ER stressinduced chaperone response and the orally active chemical chaperones tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) and 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), which facilitate protein folding and reduce ER stress, in mice with colitis. METHODS We used dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to induce colitis in mice that do not express the transcription factor ATF6? or the protein chaperone P58IPK. We examined the effects of TUDCA and PBA in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IECs); in wild-type, P58IPK?/?, and Atf6??/? mice with colitis; and in Il10?/? mice. RESULTS P58IPK?/? and Atf6??/? mice developed more severe colitis following administration of DSS than wild-type mice. IECs from P58IPK?/? mice had excessive ER stress, and apoptotic signaling was activated in IECs from Atf6??/? mice. Inflammatory stimuli induced ER stress signals in cultured IECs, which were reduced by incubation with TUDCA or PBA. Oral administration of either PBA or TUDCA reduced features of DSS-induced acute and chronic colitis in wild-type mice, the colitis that develops in Il10?/? mice, and DSS-induced colitis in P58IPK?/? and Atf6??/? mice. Reduced signs of colonic inflammation in these mice were associated with significantly decreased ER stress in colonic epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS The unfolded protein response induces expression of genes that encode chaperones involved in ER protein folding; these factors prevent induction of colitis in mice. Chemical chaperones such as TUDCA and PBA alleviate different forms of colitis in mice and might be developed for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23336977

  4. The Unfolded Protein Response in Retinal Vascular Diseases: Implications and Therapeutic Potential Beyond Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sarah X.; Ma, Jacey H.; Bhatta, Maulasri; Fliesler, Steven J.; Wang, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex, step-wise process of new vessel formation that is involved in both normal embryonic development as well as postnatal pathological processes, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Aberrant blood vessel growth, also known as neovascularization, in the retina and the choroid is a major cause of vision loss in severe eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, and central and branch retinal vein occlusion. Yet, retinal neovascularization is causally and dynamically associated with vasodegeneration, ischemia, and vascular remodeling in retinal tissues. Understanding the mechanisms of retinal neovascularization is an urgent unmet need for developing new treatments for these devastating diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests a vital role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) in regulation of angiogenesis, in part through coordinating the secretion of pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as VEGF, and modulating endothelial cell survival and activity. Herein, we summarize current research in the context of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and UPR signaling in retinal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, highlighting potential implications of targeting these stress response pathways in the prevention and treatment of retinal vascular diseases that result in visual deficits and blindness. PMID:25529848

  5. Discovery of Sulfonamidebenzamides as Selective Apoptotic CHOP Pathway Activators of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cellular proteins that fail to fold properly result in inactive or disfunctional proteins that can have toxic functions. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a two-tiered cellular mechanism initiated by eukaryotic cells that have accumulated misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An adaptive pathway facilitates the clearance of the undesired proteins; however, if overwhelmed, cells trigger apoptosis by upregulating transcription factors such as C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). A high throughput screen was performed directed at identifying compounds that selectively upregulate the apoptotic CHOP pathway while avoiding adaptive signaling cascades, resulting in a sulfonamidebenzamide chemotype that was optimized. These efforts produced a potent and selective CHOP inducer (AC50 = 0.8 ?M; XBP1 > 80 ?M), which was efficacious in both mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and a human oral squamous cell cancer cell line, and demonstrated antiproliferative effects for multiple cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 panel. PMID:25530830

  6. Stress responses in flavivirus-infected cells: activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Blzquez, Ana-Beln; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martn-Acebes, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The Flavivirus is a genus of RNA viruses that includes multiple long known human, animal, and zoonotic pathogens such as Dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, or Japanese encephalitis virus, as well as other less known viruses that represent potential threats for human and animal health such as Usutu or Zika viruses. Flavivirus replication is based on endoplasmic reticulum-derived structures. Membrane remodeling and accumulation of viral factors induce endoplasmic reticulum stress that results in activation of a cellular signaling response termed unfolded protein response (UPR), which can be modulated by the viruses for their own benefit. Concomitant with the activation of the UPR, an upregulation of the autophagic pathway in cells infected with different flaviviruses has also been described. This review addresses the current knowledge of the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum stress, UPR, and autophagy in flavivirus-infected cells and the growing evidences for an involvement of these cellular pathways in the replication and pathogenesis of these viruses. PMID:24917859

  7. Stress responses in flavivirus-infected cells: activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Blzquez, Ana-Beln; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martn-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    The Flavivirus is a genus of RNA viruses that includes multiple long known human, animal, and zoonotic pathogens such as Dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, or Japanese encephalitis virus, as well as other less known viruses that represent potential threats for human and animal health such as Usutu or Zika viruses. Flavivirus replication is based on endoplasmic reticulum-derived structures. Membrane remodeling and accumulation of viral factors induce endoplasmic reticulum stress that results in activation of a cellular signaling response termed unfolded protein response (UPR), which can be modulated by the viruses for their own benefit. Concomitant with the activation of the UPR, an upregulation of the autophagic pathway in cells infected with different flaviviruses has also been described. This review addresses the current knowledge of the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum stress, UPR, and autophagy in flavivirus-infected cells and the growing evidences for an involvement of these cellular pathways in the replication and pathogenesis of these viruses. PMID:24917859

  8. Surveillance-Activated Defenses Block the ROSInduced Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Runkel, Eva D.; Liu, Shu; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance of cellular functions results in the activation of stress-signaling pathways that aim at restoring homeostasis. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify components of the signal transduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) to a nuclear chaperone promoter. We used the ROS generating complex I inhibitor paraquat to induce the UPRmt, and we employed RNAi exposure post-embryonically to allow testing genes whose knockdown results in embryonic lethality. We identified 54 novel regulators of the ROSinduced UPRmt. Activation of the UPRmt, but not of other stress-signaling pathways, failed when homeostasis of basic cellular mechanisms such as translation and protein transport were impaired. These mechanisms are monitored by a recently discovered surveillance system that interprets interruption of these processes as pathogen attack and depends on signaling through the JNK-like MAP-kinase KGB-1. Mutation of kgb-1 abrogated the inhibition of ROSinduced UPRmt, suggesting that surveillance-activated defenses specifically inhibit the UPRmt but do not compromise activation of the heat shock response, the UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum, or the SKN-1/Nrf2 mediated response to cytosolic stress. In addition, we identified PIFK-1, the orthologue of the Drosophila PI 4-kinase four wheel drive (FWD), and found that it is the only known factor so far that is essential for the unfolded protein responses of both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. This suggests that both UPRs may share a common membrane associated mechanism. PMID:23516373

  9. IRE1?/XBP1-mediated branch of the unfolded protein response regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tohmonda, Takahide; Yoda, Masaki; Iwawaki, Takao; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Horiuchi, Keisuke

    2015-08-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular adaptive mechanism that is activated in response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. The inositol-requiring protein-1?/X-box-binding protein-mediated (IRE1?/XBP1-mediated) branch of the UPR is highly conserved and has also been shown to regulate various cell-fate decisions. Herein, we have demonstrated a crucial role for the IRE?/XBP1-mediated arm of the UPR in osteoclast differentiation. Using murine models, we found that the conditional abrogation of IRE1? in bone marrow cells increases bone mass as the result of defective osteoclastic bone resorption. In osteoclast precursors, IRE1? was transiently activated during osteoclastogenesis, and suppression of the IRE1?/XBP1 pathway in these cells substantially inhibited the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts in vitro. We determined that XBP1 directly binds the promoter and induces transcription of the gene encoding the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1). Moreover, activation of IRE1? was partially dependent on Ca2+ oscillation mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors 2 and 3 (ITPR2 and ITPR3) in the endoplasmic reticulum, as pharmacological inhibition or deletion of these receptors markedly decreased Xbp1 mRNA processing. The present study thus reveals an intracellular pathway that integrates the UPR and osteoclast differentiation through activation of the IRE1?/XBP1 pathway. PMID:26193638

  10. IRE1?/XBP1-mediated branch of the unfolded protein response regulates osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tohmonda, Takahide; Yoda, Masaki; Iwawaki, Takao; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Horiuchi, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular adaptive mechanism that is activated in response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. The inositol-requiring protein-1?/X-boxbinding proteinmediated (IRE1?/XBP1-mediated) branch of the UPR is highly conserved and has also been shown to regulate various cell-fate decisions. Herein, we have demonstrated a crucial role for the IRE?/XBP1-mediated arm of the UPR in osteoclast differentiation. Using murine models, we found that the conditional abrogation of IRE1? in bone marrow cells increases bone mass as the result of defective osteoclastic bone resorption. In osteoclast precursors, IRE1? was transiently activated during osteoclastogenesis, and suppression of the IRE1?/XBP1 pathway in these cells substantially inhibited the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts in vitro. We determined that XBP1 directly binds the promoter and induces transcription of the gene encoding the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1). Moreover, activation of IRE1? was partially dependent on Ca2+ oscillation mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors 2 and 3 (ITPR2 and ITPR3) in the endoplasmic reticulum, as pharmacological inhibition or deletion of these receptors markedly decreased Xbp1 mRNA processing. The present study thus reveals an intracellular pathway that integrates the UPR and osteoclast differentiation through activation of the IRE1?/XBP1 pathway. PMID:26193638

  11. Role for the Unfolded Protein Response in Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has been extensively investigated in neurological diseases and diabetes, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. Activated UPR participates in multiple cardiac conditions and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, the UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure by affecting cardiac ion channels expression, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:26729106

  12. Effect of modulation of unfolded protein response pathway on dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Diwaker, Drishya; Mishra, Kamla Prasad; Ganju, Lilly

    2015-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cascade of events that helps restoring cellular homeostasis under stressful conditions. It is activated when there is an imbalance in the protein load and protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a result of an increase in the naïve, unfolded, or misfolded protein content of the cell. Dengue virus (DENV) utilizes the host machinery to synthesize viral proteins and replicates in the cell. During DENV infection, up-regulation of viral proteins increases the protein pool of the cell, resulting in the induction of UPR pathway. In this study, we have tried to understand the consequence of UPR induction during DENV infection in human monocytic cells. To fulfill this objective, we have used VER-155008 (VER), a known inhibitor of the 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), which is the master regulator of the UPR pathway. After VER treatment, cells were infected with DENV, and the induction of the UPR elements and their downstream activation was studied by western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. Interestingly, inhibition of GRP78 via VER treatment led to the decreased expression of DENV envelope protein through the activation of the UPR elements, protein kinase-like ER resident kinase, activating transcription factor 6, and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and then led to the activation of innate immune factors such as double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), interferon regulated factor 3 (IRF3), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β). This strategy may be used to decrease viral infection transiently. Thus UPR elements could be important therapeutic targets for decreasing DENV multiplication. PMID:26515795

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response: targeting the Achilles heel of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Vincenz, Lisa; Jäger, Richard; O'Dwyer, Michael; Samali, Afshin

    2013-06-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by the malignant proliferating antibody-producing plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite recent advances in therapy that improve the survival of patients, multiple myeloma remains incurable and therapy resistance is the major factor causing lethality. Clearly, more effective treatments are necessary. In recent years it has become apparent that, as highly secretory antibody-producing cells, multiple myeloma cells require an increased capacity to cope with unfolded proteins and are particularly sensitive to compounds targeting proteostasis such as proteasome inhibitors, which represent one of the most prominent new therapeutic strategies. Because of the increased requirement for dealing with secretory proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum, multiple myeloma cells are heavily reliant for survival on a set of signaling pathways, known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Thus, directly targeting the UPR emerges as a new promising therapeutic strategy. Here, we provide an overview of the current understanding of the UPR signaling in cancer, and outline its important role in myeloma pathogenesis and treatment. We discuss new therapeutic approaches based on targeting the protein quality control machinery and particularly the IRE1α/XBP1 axis of the UPR. PMID:23729400

  14. Regulation of the unfolded protein response via S-nitrosylation of sensors of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Nakato, Ryosuke; Ohkubo, Yu; Konishi, Akari; Shibata, Mari; Kaneko, Yuki; Iwawaki, Takao; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.; Uehara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-nitrosylation modulates important cellular processes, including neurotransmission, vasodilation, proliferation, and apoptosis in various cell types. We have previously reported that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is S-nitrosylated in brains of patients with sporadic neurodegenerative diseases. This modification inhibits PDI enzymatic activity and consequently leads to the accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen. Here, we describe S-nitrosylation of additional ER pathways that affect the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cell-based models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) can S-nitrosylate the ER stress sensors IRE1α and PERK. While S-nitrosylation of IRE1α inhibited its ribonuclease activity, S-nitrosylation of PERK activated its kinase activity and downstream phosphorylation/inactivation or eIF2α. Site-directed mutagenesis of IRE1α(Cys931) prevented S-nitrosylation and inhibition of its ribonuclease activity, indicating that Cys931 is the predominant site of S-nitrosylation. Importantly, cells overexpressing mutant IRE1α(C931S) were resistant to NO-induced damage. Our findings show that nitrosative stress leads to dysfunctional ER stress signaling, thus contributing to neuronal cell death. PMID:26446798

  15. A new paradigm: innate immune sensing of viruses via the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system depends upon combinations of signals to mount appropriate responses: pathogen specific signals in the context of co-stimulatory danger signals drive immune strength and accuracy. Viral infections trigger anti-viral type I interferon (IFN) responses by stimulating endosomal and cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). However, viruses have also evolved many strategies to counteract IFN responses. Are there intracellular danger signals that enhance immune responses to viruses? During infection, viruses place a heavy demand on the protein folding machinery of the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To survive ER stress, host cells mount an unfolded protein response (UPR) to decrease ER protein load and enhance protein-folding capacity. Viruses also directly elicit the UPR to enhance their replication. Increasing evidence supports an intersection between the host UPR and inflammation, in particular the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and type I IFN. The UPR directly activates pro-inflammatory cytokine transcription factors and dramatically enhances cytokine production in response to viral PRR engagement. Additionally, viral PRR engagement may stimulate specific pathways within the UPR to enhance cytokine production. Through these mechanisms, viral detection via the UPR and inflammatory cytokine production are intertwined. Consequently, the UPR response is perfectly poised to act as an infection-triggered danger signal. The UPR may serve as an internal co-stimulatory signal that (1) provides specificity and (2) critically augments responses to overcome viral subterfuge. Further work is needed to test this hypothesis during viral infections. PMID:24904537

  16. Causal role of oxidative stress in unfolded protein response development in the hyperthyroid state.

    PubMed

    Videla, Luis A; Fernández, Virginia; Cornejo, Pamela; Vargas, Romina; Carrasco, Juan; Fernández, Javier; Varela, Nelson

    2015-12-01

    l-3,3',5-Triiodothyronine (T3)-induced liver oxidative stress underlies significant protein oxidation, which may trigger the unfolded protein response (UPR). Administration of daily doses of 0.1mg T3 for three consecutive days significantly increased the rectal temperature of rats and liver O2 consumption rate, with higher protein carbonyl and 8-isoprostane levels, glutathione depletion, and absence of morphological changes in liver parenchyma. Concomitantly, liver protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase and eukaryotic translation initiator factor 2α were phosphorylated in T3-treated rats compared to controls, with increased protein levels of binding immunoglobulin protein and activating transcription factor 4. In addition, higher mRNA levels of C/EBP homologous protein, growth arrest and DNA damage 34, protein disulfide isomerase, and ER oxidoreductin 1α were observed, changes that were suppressed by N-acetylcysteine (0.5g/kg) given before each dose of T3. In conclusion, T3-induced liver oxidative stress involving higher protein oxidation status has a causal role in UPR development, a response that is aimed to alleviate ER stress and promote cell survival. PMID:26434419

  17. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. PMID:26496881

  18. Sorafenib enhances proteasome inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity via inhibition of unfolded protein response and keratin phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru

    2013-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly resistant to conventional systemic therapies and prognosis for advanced HCC patients remains poor. Recent studies of the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression have identified several potential molecular targets in HCC. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor shown to have survival benefits in advanced HCC. It acts by inhibiting the serine/threonine kinases and the receptor type tyrosine kinases. In preclinical experiments sorafenib had anti-proliferative activity in hepatoma cells and it reduced tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib include its inhibitory effects on protein ubiquitination, unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, we show that combined treatment with sorafenib and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) synergistically induced a marked increase in cell death in hepatoma- and hepatocyte-derived cells. These observations may open the way to potentially interesting treatment combinations that may augment the effect of sorafenib, possibly including drugs that promote ER stress. Because sorafenib blocked the cellular defense mechanisms against hepatotoxic injury not only in hepatoma cells but also in hepatocyte-derived cells, we must be careful to avoid severe liver injury. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib in hepatoma cells. •Sorafenib induces cell death via apoptotic and necrotic fashion. •Sorafenib inhibits protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response. •Autophagy induced by sorafenib may affect its cytotoxicity. •Sorafenib inhibits keratin phosphorylation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation.

  19. Controlling the unfolded protein response-mediated life and death decisions in cancer.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Marion; McGrath, Eoghan P; Mnich, Katarzyna; Healy, Sandra; Chevet, Eric; Samali, Afshin

    2015-08-01

    Cancer cells are exposed to intrinsic (oncogene) or extrinsic (microenvironmental) challenges, leading to activation of stress response pathways. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is the cellular response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and plays a pivotal role in tumor development. Depending on ER stress intensity and duration, the UPR is either pro-survival to preserve ER homeostasis or pro-death if the stress cannot be resolved. On one hand, the adaptive arm of the UPR is essential for cancer cells to survive the harsh conditions they are facing, and on the other hand, cancer cells have evolved mechanisms to bypass ER stress-induced cell death, thereby conferring them with a selective advantage for malignant transformation. Therefore, the mechanisms involved in the balance between survival and death outcomes of the UPR may be exploited as therapeutic tools to treat cancer. PMID:25814342

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum and the Unfolded Protein Response: Dynamics and Metabolic Integration

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Roberto; Parra, Valentina; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Wang, Zhao V.; Zorzano, Antonio; Hill, Joseph A.; Jaimovich, Enrique; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic intracellular organelle with multiple functions essential for cellular homeostasis, development, and stress responsiveness. In response to cellular stress, a well-established signaling cascade, the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated. This intricate mechanism is an important means of reestablishing cellular homeostasis and alleviating the inciting stress. Now, emerging evidence has demonstrated that the UPR influences cellular metabolism through diverse mechanisms, including calcium and lipid transfer, raising the prospect of involvement of these processes in the pathogenesis of disease, including neurodegeneration, cancer, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Here, we review the distinct functions of the ER and UPR from a metabolic point of view, highlighting their association with prevalent pathologies. PMID:23317820

  1. TULP1 Missense Mutations Induces the Endoplasmic Reticulum Unfolded Protein Response Stress Complex (ER-UPR).

    PubMed

    Lobo, Glenn P; Ebke, Lindsey A; Au, Adrian; Hagstrom, Stephanie A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the TULP1 gene are associated with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP); however, the molecular mechanisms related to the deleterious effects of TULP1 mutations remains unknown. Several studies have shown that misfolded proteins secondary to genetic mutations can accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) complex followed by cellular apoptosis. We hypothesize that TULP1 mutations produce misfolded protein products that accumulate in the ER and induce cellular apoptosis via the UPR. To test our hypothesis, we first performed three in-silico analyses of TULP1 missense mutations (I459K, R420P and F491L), which predicted misfolded protein products. Subsequently, the three mutant TULP1-GFP constructs and wild-type (wt) TULP1-GFP were transiently transfected into hTERT-RPE-1 cells. Staining of cells using ER tracker followed by confocal microscopy showed wt-TULP1 localized predominantly to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. In contrast, all three mutant TULP1 proteins revealed cytoplasmic punctate staining which co-localized with the ER. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cells expressing mutant TULP1 proteins revealed induction of downstream targets of the ER-UPR complex, including BiP/GPR-78, phosphorylated-PERK (Thr980) and CHOP. Our in-vitro analyses suggest that mutant TULP1 proteins are misfolded and accumulate within the ER leading to induction of the UPR stress response complex. PMID:26427415

  2. Surveillance-activated defenses block the ROS-induced mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Eva D; Liu, Shu; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance of cellular functions results in the activation of stress-signaling pathways that aim at restoring homeostasis. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify components of the signal transduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) to a nuclear chaperone promoter. We used the ROS generating complex I inhibitor paraquat to induce the UPR(mt), and we employed RNAi exposure post-embryonically to allow testing genes whose knockdown results in embryonic lethality. We identified 54 novel regulators of the ROS-induced UPR(mt). Activation of the UPR(mt), but not of other stress-signaling pathways, failed when homeostasis of basic cellular mechanisms such as translation and protein transport were impaired. These mechanisms are monitored by a recently discovered surveillance system that interprets interruption of these processes as pathogen attack and depends on signaling through the JNK-like MAP-kinase KGB-1. Mutation of kgb-1 abrogated the inhibition of ROS-induced UPR(mt), suggesting that surveillance-activated defenses specifically inhibit the UPR(mt) but do not compromise activation of the heat shock response, the UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum, or the SKN-1/Nrf2 mediated response to cytosolic stress. In addition, we identified PIFK-1, the orthologue of the Drosophila PI 4-kinase four wheel drive (FWD), and found that it is the only known factor so far that is essential for the unfolded protein responses of both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. This suggests that both UPRs may share a common membrane associated mechanism. PMID:23516373

  3. Unfolded protein response in keratinocytes: impact on normal and abnormal keratinization.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Kazumitsu

    2013-03-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a signaling pathway from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the nucleus that protects cells from stress caused by misfolded or unfolded proteins. As such, ER stress is an ongoing challenge for all cells, given the central biologic importance of secretion as part of normal physiologic functions. Mild UPR is activated by mild ER stress, which occurs under normal conditions. Abnormal UPR is activated by severe ER stress, which occurs under pathological conditions. Abnormal UPR activation is associated with a number of diseases, including diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease. Within skin tissues, keratinocytes in the epidermis are especially dependent upon a mild UPR for normal differentiation in the course of their differentiation into secretory cells in the uppermost granular layers. Association between abnormal UPR activation and hereditary keratoses, including Darier's disease, keratosis linearis with ichthyosis congenita and keratoderma syndrome, erythrokeratoderma variabilis, and ichthyosis follicularis with atrichia and photophobia syndrome, have been elucidated recently. This review describes the UPR in normal and abnormal keratinization and discusses the regulation of abnormal UPR activation by chemical chaperones as a potential treatment for one of the hereditary keratoses. PMID:23352280

  4. Unfolded protein response suppresses cisplatin-induced apoptosis via autophagy regulation in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Dai, R Y; Duan, C Y; Liu, Y P; Chen, S K; Yan, D M; Chen, C N; Wei, M; Li, H

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that drug resistance is extremely common in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is one of the major problems in HCC chemotherapy. However, the detailed mechanisms remain largely unknown. We have previously shown that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the tumorigenesis of HCC. Here, we demonstrated that the unfolded protein response (UPR) inhibits cisplatin-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In HCC cells, cisplatin treatment triggers the UPR, which subsequently inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Importantly, mild ER stress precondition suppresses the sensitivity of HCC cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis through autophagy regulation. Furthermore, heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is involved in the cytoprotective role of the UPR in cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We also demonstrated that Hsp27 inhibits cisplatin- induced HCC cell death through autophagy activation. Taken together, our results indicate that the UPR inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells, at least in part, by Hsp27-mediated autophagy activation. PMID:21888831

  5. Role of Oxidative Stress in Modulating Unfolded Protein Response Activity in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Bazi, Ali; Keramati, Mohammad Reza; Gholamin, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, it has been revealed that tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) act through inducing both oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. However, ER stress signaling triggers both apoptotic and survival processes within cells. Nevertheless, mechanisms by which TKIs avoid the pro-survival effects are not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of oxidative stress in activity of unfolded protein response (UPR) survival pathway within K562 cell line. Methods: The expression of UPR survival target genes, Xbp1, and Grp94 (glucose requiring protein 94) was studied in single and combined exposure to oxidative and ER stress in K562 cell line by quantitative and qualitative PCR. Results: The expression of UPR-related survival gene Grp94 was hampered by exposing to oxidative stress in cell induced with ER stress. Conclusion: Interaction of oxidative and ER stress may role as a mediator influencing UPR signaling activity. PMID:26432458

  6. A survival pathway for Caenorhabditis elegans with a blocked unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Fumihiko; Calfon, Marcella; Yoneda, Takunari; Yun, Chi; Kiraly, Moni; Clark, Scott G.; Ron, David

    2002-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) counteracts stress caused by unprocessed ER client proteins. A genome-wide survey showed impaired induction of many UPR target genes in xbp-1 mutant Caenorhabditis elegans that are unable to signal in the highly conserved IRE1-dependent UPR pathway. However a family of genes, abu (activated in blocked UPR), was induced to higher levels in ER-stressed xbp-1 mutant animals than in ER-stressed wild-type animals. RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) inactivation of a representative abu family member, abu-1 (AC3.3), activated the ER stress marker hsp-4::gfp in otherwise normal animals and killed 50% of ER-stressed ire-1 and xbp-1 mutant animals. Abu-1(RNAi) also enhanced the effect of inactivation of sel-1, an ER-associated protein degradation gene. The nine abu genes encode highly related type I transmembrane proteins whose lumenal domains have sequence similarity to a mammalian cell surface scavenger receptor of endothelial cells that binds chemically modified extracellular proteins and directs their lysosomal degradation. Our findings that ABU-1 is an intracellular protein located within the endomembrane system that is induced by ER stress in xbp-1 mutant animals suggest that ABU proteins may interact with abnormal ER client proteins and this function may be particularly important in animals with an impaired UPR. PMID:12186849

  7. Unfolded protein response-induced ERdj3 secretion links ER stress to extracellular proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Genereux, Joseph C; Qu, Song; Zhou, Minghai; Ryno, Lisa M; Wang, Shiyu; Shoulders, Matthew D; Kaufman, Randal J; Lasmzas, Corinne I; Kelly, Jeffery W; Wiseman, R Luke

    2015-01-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) indirectly regulates extracellular proteostasis through transcriptional remodeling of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis pathways. This remodeling attenuates secretion of misfolded, aggregation-prone proteins during ER stress. Through these activities, the UPR has a critical role in preventing the extracellular protein aggregation associated with numerous human diseases. Here, we demonstrate that UPR activation also directly influences extracellular proteostasis through the upregulation and secretion of the ER HSP40 ERdj3/DNAJB11. Secreted ERdj3 binds misfolded proteins in the extracellular space, substoichiometrically inhibits protein aggregation, and attenuates proteotoxicity of disease-associated toxic prion protein. Moreover, ERdj3 can co-secrete with destabilized, aggregation-prone proteins in a stable complex under conditions where ER chaperoning capacity is overwhelmed, preemptively providing extracellular chaperoning of proteotoxic misfolded proteins that evade ER quality control. This regulated co-secretion of ERdj3 with misfolded clients directly links ER and extracellular proteostasis during conditions of ER stress. ERdj3 is, to our knowledge, the first metazoan chaperone whose secretion into the extracellular space is regulated by the UPR, revealing a new mechanism by which UPR activation regulates extracellular proteostasis. PMID:25361606

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Responses in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sarah X.; Sanders, Emily; Fliesler, Steven J.; Wang, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the primary intracellular organelle responsible for protein and lipid biosynthesis, protein folding and trafficking, calcium homeostasis, and several other vital processes in cell physiology. Disturbance in ER function results in ER stress and subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR up-regulates ER chaperones, reduces protein translation, and promotes clearance of cytotoxic misfolded proteins to restore ER homeostasis. If this vital process fails, the cell will be signaled to enter apoptosis, resulting in cell death. Sustained ER stress also can trigger an inflammatory response and exacerbate oxidative stress, both of which contribute synergistically to tissue damage. Studies performed over the past decade have implicated ER stress in a broad range of human diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes, and vascular disorders. Several of these diseases also entail retinal dysfunction and degeneration caused by injury to retinal neurons and/or to the blood vessels that supply retinal cells with nutrients, trophic and homeostatic factors, oxygen, and other essential molecules, as well as serving as a conduit for removal of waste products and potentially toxic substances from the retina. Collectively, such injuries represent the leading cause of blindness world-wide in all age groups. Herein, we summarize recent progress on the study of ER stress and UPR signaling in retinal biology and discuss the molecular mechanisms and the potential clinical applications of targeting ER stress as a new therapeutic approach to prevent and treat neuronal degeneration in the retina. PMID:24792589

  9. Role of the unfolded protein response, GRP78 and GRP94 in organ homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Genyuan; Lee, Amy S

    2015-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular organelle where secretory and membrane proteins, as well as lipids, are synthesized and modified. When cells are subjected to ER stress, an adaptive mechanism referred to as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is triggered to allow the cells to restore homeostasis. Evidence has accumulated that the UPR pathways provide specialized and unique roles in diverse development and metabolic processes. The glucose regulated proteins (GRPs) are traditionally regarded as ER proteins with chaperone and calcium binding properties. The GRPs are constitutively expressed at basal levels in all organs, and as stress-inducible ER chaperones, they are major players in protein folding, assembly and degradation. This conventional concept is augmented by recent discoveries that GRPs can be actively translocated to other cellular locations such as the cell surface, where they assume novel functions that regulate signaling, proliferation, apoptosis and immunity. Recent construction and characterization of mouse models where the gene encoding for the UPR components and the GRPs is genetically altered provide new insights on the physiological contribution of these proteins in vivo. This review highlights recent progress towards the understanding of the role of the UPR and two major GRPs (GRP78 and GRP94) in regulating homeostasis of organs arising from the endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. GRP78 and GRP94 exhibit shared and unique functions, and in specific organs their depletion elicits adaptive responses with physiological consequences. PMID:25546813

  10. Amyloidogenesis of Natively Unfolded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2009-01-01

    Aggregation and subsequent development of protein deposition diseases originate from conformational changes in corresponding amyloidogenic proteins. The accumulated data support the model where protein fibrillogenesis proceeds via the formation of a relatively unfolded amyloidogenic conformation, which shares many structural properties with the pre-molten globule state, a partially folded intermediate first found during the equilibrium and kinetic (un)folding studies of several globular proteins and later described as one of the structural forms of natively unfolded proteins. The flexibility of this structural form is essential for the conformational rearrangements driving the formation of the core cross-beta structure of the amyloid fibril. Obviously, molecular mechanisms describing amyloidogenesis of ordered and natively unfolded proteins are different. For ordered protein to fibrillate, its unique and rigid structure has to be destabilized and partially unfolded. On the other hand, fibrillogenesis of a natively unfolded protein involves the formation of partially folded conformation; i.e., partial folding rather than unfolding. In this review recent findings are surveyed to illustrate some unique features of the natively unfolded proteins amyloidogenesis. PMID:18537543

  11. Unfolded protein response mediated JNK/AP-1 signal transduction, a target for ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gao-Feng; Cai, Zhen; Meng, Xiang-Kai; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Wei; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Dou, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Researches have revealed several stressors, which could activate unfolded protein response (UPR) in cells. However, the survival or death pathway was determined by the duration of UPR exposure. Based on the UPR mediated death pathway, our study was aimed to investigate role of UPR on c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activator protein-1 (Ap-1) signal transduction in diindolylmethane (DIM) treated ovarian cancer cell lines. Activation of UPR proteins, UPR mediated apoptotic signaling proteins and expression level of EpCAM, JNK, Ap-1, Caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were measured. Protein and gene expression, transcription factor activity, and protein phosphorylation were measured using standard molecular biology techniques. Our results demonstrated DIM treatment had significantly increased the expression of Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress regulators such as Bip, IRE1, CHOP and activation of UPR related apoptotic proteins in ovarian cancer cells. Decreased expression of EpCAM and activity of AP-1 transcription factor were observed in DIM treated cells. The pharmacologic inhibitors of the JNK signal transduction pathway, suggest that the impact of EpCAM expression on AP-1 transcription factor activity is mediated through the JNK pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that UPR mediated JNK/Ap-1 signal transduction has a significant role in the regulation of apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cells, and is a potential molecular target to enhance sensitivity of ovarian cancer to chemotherapy. PMID:26261528

  12. Tau accumulation activates the unfolded protein response by impairing endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Abisambra, Jose F; Jinwal, Umesh K; Blair, Laura J; O'Leary, John C; Li, Qingyou; Brady, Sarah; Wang, Li; Guidi, Chantal E; Zhang, Bo; Nordhues, Bryce A; Cockman, Matthew; Suntharalingham, Amirthaa; Li, Pengfei; Jin, Ying; Atkins, Christopher A; Dickey, Chad A

    2013-05-29

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the mechanisms of neuronal loss remain largely unknown. Although tau pathology is closely correlated with neuronal loss, how its accumulation may lead to activation of neurotoxic pathways is unclear. Here we show that tau increased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins in the brain and triggered activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). This suggested that tau interferes with protein quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Consistent with this, ubiquitin was found to associate with the ER in human AD brains and tau transgenic (rTg4510) mouse brains, but this was not always colocalized with tau. The increased levels of ubiquitinated protein were accompanied by increased levels of phosphorylated protein kinase R-like ER kinase (pPERK), a marker that indicates UPR activation. Depleting soluble tau levels in cells and brain could reverse UPR activation. Tau accumulation facilitated its deleterious interaction with ER membrane and associated proteins that are essential for ER-associated degradation (ERAD), including valosin-containing protein (VCP) and Hrd1. Based on this, the effects of tau accumulation on ERAD efficiency were evaluated using the CD3? reporter, an ERAD substrate. Indeed, CD3? accumulated in both in vitro and in vivo models of tau overexpression and AD brains. These data suggest that soluble tau impairs ERAD and the result is activation of the UPR. The reversibility of this process, however, suggests that tau-based therapeutics could significantly delay this type of cell death and therefore disease progression. PMID:23719816

  13. Apoptosis, autophagy and unfolded protein response pathways in Arbovirus replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iranpour, Mahmoud; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Yazdi, Mina; Ande, Sudharsana R; Alizadeh, Javad; Wiechec, Emilia; Lindsay, Robbin; Drebot, Michael; Coombs, Kevin M; Ghavami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses are pathogens that widely affect the health of people in different communities around the world. Recently, a few successful approaches toward production of effective vaccines against some of these pathogens have been developed, but treatment and prevention of the resulting diseases remain a major health and research concern. The arbovirus infection and replication processes are complex, and many factors are involved in their regulation. Apoptosis, autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are three mechanisms that are involved in pathogenesis of many viruses. In this review, we focus on the importance of these pathways in the arbovirus replication and infection processes. We provide a brief introduction on how apoptosis, autophagy and the UPR are initiated and regulated, and then discuss the involvement of these pathways in regulation of arbovirus pathogenesis. PMID:26781343

  14. A Dynamic Unfolded Protein Response Contributes to the Control of Cortical Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Laguesse, Sophie; Creppe, Catherine; Nedialkova, Danny D; Prvot, Pierre-Paul; Borgs, Laurence; Huysseune, Sandra; Franco, Bndicte; Duysens, Gurin; Krusy, Nathalie; Lee, Gabsang; Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc; Close, Pierre; Chariot, Alain; Malgrange, Brigitte; Leidel, Sebastian A; Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    The cerebral cortex contains layers of neurons sequentially generated by distinct lineage-related progenitors. At the onset of corticogenesis, the first-born progenitors are apical progenitors (APs), whose asymmetric division gives birth directly to neurons. Later, they switch to indirect neurogenesis by generating intermediate progenitors (IPs), which give rise to projection neurons of all cortical layers. While a direct lineage relationship between APs and IPs has been established, the molecular mechanism that controls their transition remains elusive. Here we show that interfering with codon translation speed triggers ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR), further impairing the generation of IPs and leading to microcephaly. Moreover, we demonstrate that a progressive downregulation of UPR in cortical progenitors acts as a physiological signal to amplify IPs and promotes indirect neurogenesis. Thus, our findings reveal a contribution of UPR to cell fate acquisition during mammalian brain development. PMID:26651292

  15. The polyamine spermine induces the unfolded protein response via the MAPK cascade in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sagor, G. H. M.; Chawla, Pratima; Kim, Dong W.; Berberich, Thomas; Kojima, Seiji; Niitsu, Masaru; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis three basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor genes, bZIP17, bZIP28, and bZIP60, play crucial roles in the unfolded protein response (UPR). Previously we found that bZIP60 is one of the spermine-induced genes. Consequently we further investigated the response of all the three bZIP genes to spermine. Expression of bZIP17, bZIP28, and bZIP60, and also their target genes was activated by spermine application as well as in plants with elevated endogenous spermine levels. Furthermore, spermine activated the splicing of the bZIP60 transcript mediated by the ribonuclease activity of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 and also recruited bZIP17 and bZIP60 proteins from endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus. We therefore propose that spermine is a novel UPR inducer. Moreover, induction of UPR by spermine required calcium-influx to the cytoplasm and the genes for mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 9 (MKK9), mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3) and MPK6. The result indicates that spermine-induced UPR is mediated by the MKK9-MPK3/MPK6 cascade in Arabidopsis. PMID:26442007

  16. Triptolide activates unfolded protein response leading to chronic ER stress in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mujumdar, Nameeta; Banerjee, Sulagna; Chen, Zhiyu; Sangwan, Veena; Chugh, Rohit; Dudeja, Vikas; Yamamoto, Masato; Vickers, Selwyn M; Saluja, Ashok K

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with a survival rate of <5%. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of prosurvival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression. One of the mechanisms that enables tumor cells to evade cellular stress and promote unhindered proliferation is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Disturbances in the normal functions of the ER lead to an evolutionarily conserved cell stress response, the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR initially compensates for damage, but it eventually triggers cell death if ER dysfunction is severe or prolonged. Triptolide, a diterpene triepoxide, has been shown to be an effective compound against pancreatic cancer. Our results show that triptolide induces the UPR by activating the PKR-like ER kinase-eukaryotic initiation factor 2? axis and the inositol-requiring enzyme 1?-X-box-binding protein 1 axis of the UPR and leads to chronic ER stress in pancreatic cancer. Our results further show that glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), one of the major regulators of ER stress, is downregulated by triptolide, leading to cell death by apoptosis in MIA PaCa-2 cells and autophagy in S2-VP10 cells. PMID:24699326

  17. PERK-dependent compartmentalization of ERAD and unfolded protein response machineries during ER stress.

    PubMed

    Kondratyev, Maria; Avezov, Edward; Shenkman, Marina; Groisman, Bella; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z

    2007-10-01

    Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the ER membrane kinases PERK and IRE1 leading to the unfolded protein response (UPR). We show here that UPR activation triggers PERK and IRE1 segregation from BiP and their sorting with misfolded proteins to the ER-derived quality control compartment (ERQC), a pericentriolar compartment that we had identified previously. PERK phosphorylates translation factor eIF2alpha, which then accumulates on the cytosolic side of the ERQC. Dominant negative PERK or eIF2alpha(S51A) mutants prevent the compartmentalization, whereas eIF2alpha(S51D) mutant, which mimics constitutive phosphorylation, promotes it. This suggests a feedback loop where eIF2alpha phosphorylation causes pericentriolar concentration at the ERQC, which in turn amplifies the UPR. ER-associated degradation (ERAD) is an UPR-dependent process; we also find that ERAD components (Sec61beta, HRD1, p97/VCP, ubiquitin) are recruited to the ERQC, making it a likely site for retrotranslocation. In addition, we show that autophagy, suggested to play a role in elimination of aggregated proteins, is unrelated to protein accumulation in the ERQC. PMID:17707796

  18. Killing Me Softly: Connotations to Unfolded Protein Response and Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Paj?k, Beata; Kania, El?bieta; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the possible causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, underlying molecular mechanisms of this malfunction, possible causes and known consequences of APP, A?, and hyperphosphorylated tau presence in mitochondria, and the contribution of altered lipid metabolism (nonsterol isoprenoids) to pathological processes leading to increased formation and accumulation of the aforementioned hallmarks of AD. Abnormal protein folding and unfolded protein response seem to be the outcomes of impaired glycosylation due to metabolic disturbances in geranylgeraniol intermediary metabolism. The origin and consecutive fate of APP, A?, and tau are emphasized on intracellular trafficking apparently influenced by inaccurate posttranslational modifications. We hypothesize that incorrect intracellular processing of APP determines protein translocation to mitochondria in AD. Similarly, without obvious reasons, the passage of A? and tau to mitochondria is observed. APP targeted to mitochondria blocks the activity of protein translocase complex resulting in poor import of proteins central to oxidative phosphorylation. Besides, APP, A?, and neurofibrillary tangles of tau directly or indirectly impair mitochondrial biochemistry and bioenergetics, with concomitant generation of oxidative/nitrosative stress. Limited protective mechanisms are inadequate to prevent the free radical-mediated lesions. Finally, neuronal loss is observed in AD-affected brains typically by pathologic apoptosis. PMID:26881014

  19. Killing Me Softly: Connotations to Unfolded Protein Response and Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pająk, Beata; Kania, Elżbieta; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the possible causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, underlying molecular mechanisms of this malfunction, possible causes and known consequences of APP, Aβ, and hyperphosphorylated tau presence in mitochondria, and the contribution of altered lipid metabolism (nonsterol isoprenoids) to pathological processes leading to increased formation and accumulation of the aforementioned hallmarks of AD. Abnormal protein folding and unfolded protein response seem to be the outcomes of impaired glycosylation due to metabolic disturbances in geranylgeraniol intermediary metabolism. The origin and consecutive fate of APP, Aβ, and tau are emphasized on intracellular trafficking apparently influenced by inaccurate posttranslational modifications. We hypothesize that incorrect intracellular processing of APP determines protein translocation to mitochondria in AD. Similarly, without obvious reasons, the passage of Aβ and tau to mitochondria is observed. APP targeted to mitochondria blocks the activity of protein translocase complex resulting in poor import of proteins central to oxidative phosphorylation. Besides, APP, Aβ, and neurofibrillary tangles of tau directly or indirectly impair mitochondrial biochemistry and bioenergetics, with concomitant generation of oxidative/nitrosative stress. Limited protective mechanisms are inadequate to prevent the free radical-mediated lesions. Finally, neuronal loss is observed in AD-affected brains typically by pathologic apoptosis. PMID:26881014

  20. Control of dopaminergic neuron survival by the unfolded protein response transcription factor XBP1

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Pamela; Mercado, Gabriela; Vidal, Rene L.; Molina, Claudia; Parsons, Geoffrey; Court, Felipe A.; Martinez, Alexis; Galleguillos, Danny; Armentano, Donna; Schneider, Bernard L.; Hetz, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Although growing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a hallmark of PD, its exact contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Here we report that developmental ablation of X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in the nervous system, a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), protects dopaminergic neurons against a PD-inducing neurotoxin. This survival effect was associated with a preconditioning condition that resulted from induction of an adaptive ER stress response in dopaminergic neurons of the SNpc, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, silencing XBP1 in adult animals triggered chronic ER stress and dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Supporting this finding, gene therapy to deliver an active form of XBP1 provided neuroprotection and reduced striatal denervation in animals injected with 6-hydroxydopamine. Our results reveal a physiological role of the UPR in the maintenance of protein homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons that may help explain the differential neuronal vulnerability observed in PD. PMID:24753614

  1. Tunicamycin-induced Unfolded Protein Response in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal day (PD) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1-CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. PMID:25620058

  2. Unfolded protein response in hypothalamic cultures of wild-type and ATF6?-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenjun; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Tochiya, Masayoshi; Azuma, Yoshinori; Suga, Hidetaka; Goto, Motomitsu; Banno, Ryoichi; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Mori, Kazutoshi; Arima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-26

    Recent studies suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the hypothalamus could affect systemic homeostatic regulation in areas such as energy and water balance. Activating transcription factor 6? (ATF6?) is an ER stress transducer which increases the expression of ER chaperones and ER-associated degradation (ERAD) components under ER stress. In the present study, we examined the regulation of the unfolding protein response (UPR) in mouse hypothalamic cultures of wild-type (WT) and ATF6?(-/-) mice. Thapsigargin (TG), an ER stressor, significantly increased the mRNA expression of immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP), spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and ERAD components, in hypothalamic cultures of WT mice with the same threshold (0.1?M) and similar time courses. On the other hand, TG-induced upregulation of BiP and CHOP as well as most ERAD-related genes, but not spliced XBP1 or ATF4, was attenuated in ATF6?(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Our data suggest that all the UPR arms are activated similarly in the mouse hypothalamus under ER stress conditions, where ATF6? regulates the expression of ER chaperones, CHOP, and ERAD components. PMID:26708632

  3. Recombinant Antibody Production in Arabidopsis Seeds Triggers an Unfolded Protein Response1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    De Wilde, Kirsten; De Buck, Sylvie; Vanneste, Kevin; Depicker, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Among the many plant-based production systems that are being tested for molecular farming, seeds are very attractive, as they provide a stable environment in which the accumulating recombinant proteins can be stored. However, it is not known exactly how high production levels of recombinant antibodies influence the endogenous transcriptome and proteome of the developing seed. To address this question, we studied the transcriptomic status in developing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds 13 d post anthesis of three transgenic lines, producing varying levels of recombinant VHH or single-chain Fv antibody fragments fused to the human immunoglobulin G1-derived Fc fragment under the control of the ?-PHASEOLIN seed-specific promoter. Using genome-wide Tiling arrays, we demonstrated that only a small proportion of the transcriptome was significantly changed in each of the lines compared with the wild type. Strikingly, in all three lines, we found a large overlap of up-regulated genes corresponding to protein folding, glycosylation/modification, translocation, vesicle transport, and protein degradation, suggestive of a state of cellular stress called the unfolded protein response. Moreover, the gene up-regulation amplitude was similar in all three lines. We hypothesize that the production of recombinant antibodies in the endoplasmic reticulum triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress, causing a disturbance of the normal cellular homeostasis. PMID:23188806

  4. The unfolded protein response in the therapeutic effect of hydroxy-DHA against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Manuel; Marcilla-Etxenike, Amaia; Fiol-deRoque, Maria A; Escrib, Pablo V; Busquets, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy are two cellular processes involved in the clearing of intracellular misfolded proteins. Both pathways are targets for molecules that may serve as treatments for several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present work, we show that 2-hydroxy-DHA (HDHA), a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) derivate that restores cognitive function in a transgenic mouse model of AD, modulates UPR and autophagy in differentiated neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Mild therapeutic HDHA exposure induced UPR activation, characterized by the up-regulation of the molecular chaperone Bip as well as PERK-mediated stimulation of eIF2? phosphorylation. Key proteins involved in initiating autophagy, such as beclin-1, and several Atg proteins involved in autophagosome maturation (Atg3, Atg5, Atg12 and Atg7), were also up-regulated on exposure to HDHA. Moreover, when HDHA-mediated autophagy was studied after amyloid-? peptide (A?) stimulation to mimic the neurotoxic environment of AD, it was associated with increased cell survival, suggesting that HDHA driven modulation of this process at least in part mediates the neuroprotective effects of this new anti-neurodegenerative drug. The present results in part explain the pharmacological effects of HDHA inducing full recovery of the cognitive scores in murine models of AD. PMID:25663172

  5. Integration of the Unfolded Protein and Oxidative Stress Responses through SKN-1/Nrf

    PubMed Central

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M.; Lin, Stephanie; Blackwell, T. Keith

    2013-01-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) maintains homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and defends against ER stress, an underlying factor in various human diseases. During the UPR, numerous genes are activated that sustain and protect the ER. These responses are known to involve the canonical UPR transcription factors XBP1, ATF4, and ATF6. Here, we show in C. elegans that the conserved stress defense factor SKN-1/Nrf plays a central and essential role in the transcriptional UPR. While SKN-1/Nrf has a well-established function in protection against oxidative and xenobiotic stress, we find that it also mobilizes an overlapping but distinct response to ER stress. SKN-1/Nrf is regulated by the UPR, directly controls UPR signaling and transcription factor genes, binds to common downstream targets with XBP-1 and ATF-6, and is present at the ER. SKN-1/Nrf is also essential for resistance to ER stress, including reductive stress. Remarkably, SKN-1/Nrf-mediated responses to oxidative stress depend upon signaling from the ER. We conclude that SKN-1/Nrf plays a critical role in the UPR, but orchestrates a distinct oxidative stress response that is licensed by ER signaling. Regulatory integration through SKN-1/Nrf may coordinate ER and cytoplasmic homeostasis. PMID:24068940

  6. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Hempstead, Andrew D.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR. PMID:26598709

  7. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-01

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR. PMID:26598709

  8. The loss of LRPPRC function induces the mitochondrial unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Conradt, Barbara; Rolland, Stéphane Guy

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation of the LRPPRC gene, which has previously been associated with the neurodegenerative French Canadian Leigh Syndrome, results in a decrease in the production of mitochondria-encoded subunits of complex IV, thereby causing a reduction in complex IV activity. Previously we have shown that reducing complex IV activity triggers a compensatory and conserved mitochondrial hyperfusion response. We now demonstrate that LRPPRC knock-down in mammalian cells leads to an imbalance between mitochondria-encoded and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex IV and that this imbalance triggers the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). The inactivation of the LRPPRC-like gene mma-1 in C. elegans also induces UPRmt, which demonstrates that this response is conserved. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mitochondrial hyperfusion and UPRmt are coordinated but mediated by genetically distinct pathways. We propose that in the context of LRPPRC mma-1 knock-down, mitochondrial hyperfusion helps to transiently maintain mitochondrial ATP production while UPRmt participates in the restoration of mitochondrial proteostasis. Mitochondrial proteostasis is not only critical in pathophysiology but also during aging, as proteotoxic stress has been shown to increase with age. Therefore, we speculate that the coordination of these two mitochondrial stress responses plays a more global role in mitochondrial proteostasis. PMID:26412102

  9. Activation of the unfolded protein response enhances motor recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, V; Collyer, E; Armentano, D; Parsons, G B; Court, F A; Hetz, C

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major cause of paralysis, and involves multiple cellular and tissular responses including demyelination, inflammation, cell death and axonal degeneration. Recent evidence suggests that perturbation on the homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is observed in different SCI models; however, the functional contribution of this pathway to this pathology is not known. Here we demonstrate that SCI triggers a fast ER stress reaction (13?h) involving the upregulation of key components of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a process that propagates through the spinal cord. Ablation of X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) or activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression, two major UPR transcription factors, leads to a reduced locomotor recovery after experimental SCI. The effects of UPR inactivation were associated with a significant increase in the number of damaged axons and reduced amount of oligodendrocytes surrounding the injury zone. In addition, altered microglial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression were observed in ATF4 deficient mice after SCI. Local expression of active XBP1 into the spinal cord using adeno-associated viruses enhanced locomotor recovery after SCI, and was associated with an increased number of oligodendrocytes. Altogether, our results demonstrate a functional role of the UPR in SCI, offering novel therapeutic targets to treat this invalidating condition. PMID:22337234

  10. Cantharidins induce ER stress and a terminal unfolded protein response in OSCC.

    PubMed

    Xi, Y; Garshott, D M; Brownell, A L; Yoo, G H; Lin, H-S; Freeburg, T L; Yoo, N G; Kaufman, R J; Callaghan, M U; Fribley, A M

    2015-02-01

    Mortality and morbidity associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unacceptably high with disfiguring treatment options and a death rate of 1 per hour in the United States. The approval of cituximab for advanced OSCC has been the only new treatment for these patients since the 1970s, although it has not significantly increased overall survival. To address the paucity of effective new therapies, we undertook a high-throughput screen to discover small molecules and natural products that could induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and enforce a terminal unfolded protein response (UPR) in OSCC. The terpenoid cantharidin (CNT), previously used to treat various malignancies in culture-specific medical practices for over 2,000 y, emerged as a hit. CNT and its analog, cantharidic acid, potently induced protein and gene expression profiles consistent with the activation of ER stress, the UPR, and apoptosis in OSCC cells. Murine embryonic fibroblasts null for the UPR-associated transcription factors Atf4 or Chop were significantly protected from CNT, implicating a key role for the UPR in the death response. These data validate that our high-throughput screen can identify novel modulators of UPR signaling and that such compounds might provide a new therapeutic approach to treating patients with OSCC. PMID:25425581

  11. Exploring the Conserved Role of MANF in the Unfolded Protein Response in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Riitta; Lindholm, Päivi; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Palgi, Mari; Saarma, Mart; Heino, Tapio I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in the homeostasis of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) referred to as ER stress is involved in a variety of human diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular mechanism the purpose of which is to restore ER homeostasis. Previous studies show that Mesencephalic Astrocyte-derived Neurotrophic Factor (MANF) is an important novel component in the regulation of UPR. In vertebrates, MANF is upregulated by ER stress and protects cells against ER stress-induced cell death. Biochemical studies have revealed an interaction between mammalian MANF and GRP78, the major ER chaperone promoting protein folding. In this study we discovered that the upregulation of MANF expression in response to drug-induced ER stress is conserved between Drosophila and mammals. Additionally, by using a genetic in vivo approach we found genetic interactions between Drosophila Manf and genes encoding for Drosophila homologues of GRP78, PERK and XBP1, the key components of UPR. Our data suggest a role for Manf in the regulation of Drosophila UPR. PMID:26975047

  12. mir-233 Modulates the Unfolded Protein Response in C. elegans during Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), which is activated by perturbations of the endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis, has been shown to play an important role in innate immunity and inflammation. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of the UPR during immune responses. Using small RNA deep sequencing and reverse genetic analysis, we show that the microRNA mir-233 is required for activation of the UPR in Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. P. aeruginosa infection up-regulates the expression of mir-233 in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. Quantitative proteomic analysis identifies SCA-1, a C. elegans homologue of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, as a target of mir-233. During P. aeruginosa PA14 infection, mir-233 represses the protein levels of SCA-1, which in turn leads to activation of the UPR. Whereas mir-233 mutants are more sensitive to P. aeruginosa infection, knockdown of sca-1 leads to enhanced resistance to the killing by P. aeruginosa. Our study indicates that microRNA-dependent pathways may have an impact on innate immunity by activating the UPR. PMID:25569229

  13. Cantharidins Induce ER Stress and a Terminal Unfolded Protein Response in OSCC

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Y.; Garshott, D.M.; Brownell, A.L.; Yoo, G.H.; Lin, H.-S.; Freeburg, T.L.; Yoo, N.G.; Kaufman, R.J.; Callaghan, M.U.

    2015-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unacceptably high with disfiguring treatment options and a death rate of 1 per hour in the United States. The approval of cituximab for advanced OSCC has been the only new treatment for these patients since the 1970s, although it has not significantly increased overall survival. To address the paucity of effective new therapies, we undertook a high-throughput screen to discover small molecules and natural products that could induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and enforce a terminal unfolded protein response (UPR) in OSCC. The terpenoid cantharidin (CNT), previously used to treat various malignancies in culture-specific medical practices for over 2,000 y, emerged as a hit. CNT and its analog, cantharidic acid, potently induced protein and gene expression profiles consistent with the activation of ER stress, the UPR, and apoptosis in OSCC cells. Murine embryonic fibroblasts null for the UPR-associated transcription factors Atf4 or Chop were significantly protected from CNT, implicating a key role for the UPR in the death response. These data validate that our high-throughput screen can identify novel modulators of UPR signaling and that such compounds might provide a new therapeutic approach to treating patients with OSCC. PMID:25425581

  14. Unfolded protein responses in the intestinal epithelium: sensors for the microbial and metabolic environment.

    PubMed

    Rath, Eva; Haller, Dirk

    2012-10-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease, the intestinal microbiota is a key driver of inflammation. Hence, efficient sensing of luminal antigens and subsequent initiation of adequate immune responses is crucial for maintaining homeostasis, particularly in intestinal epithelial cells. Pathways such as Toll-like receptor-mediated signaling and autophagy sense microbial products to activate inflammatory processes and, concomitantly, interact with cellular stress responses such as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Proteostasis is particularly sensitive toward environmental challenges and triggers, such as oxidative stress and metabolic alterations, and impact protein folding in different cellular compartments. In contrast, disturbances in energy supply including impaired mitochondrial function and epithelial ?-oxidation have been suspected to contribute toward intestinal inflammation. Interestingly, the 2 main organelles linking metabolic pathways, inflammatory signaling and pathogen-sensing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria (mt), can trigger distinct UPRs, and both ER UPR and mt UPR have been shown to be disease-relevant in inflammatory bowel disease. The ER is essential for the coordination of metabolic responses through controlling the synthetic and catabolic pathways of various nutrients and furthermore, ER UPR signaling directly intersects with inflammation-associated NF-?B and Toll-like receptor pathways. Consistently, next to their function in cellular energy supply, mitochondria are increasingly recognized as integrators of immune responses. For instance, mitochondria participate in innate immunity to viral infection through the pattern recognition receptor retinoic acid inducible gene-I and are involved in inflammasome activation. Thus, we hypothesize that a concerted UPR activation might represent an innate mechanism to sense potentially threatening changes of the mucosal metabolic environment and impacts host cellular functions and immune responses. PMID:22955354

  15. Chemical Induction of Unfolded Protein Response Enhances Cancer Cell Killing through Lytic Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vibhu; Suomalainen, Maarit; Pennauer, Mirjam; Yakimovich, Artur; Andriasyan, Vardan; Hemmi, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer cells are susceptible to oncolytic viruses, albeit variably. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are widely used oncolytic agents that have been engineered to produce progeny within the tumor and elicit bystander effects. We searched for host factors enhancing bystander effects and conducted a targeted RNA interference screen against guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) of small GTPases. We show that the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is readily inducible in aggressive tumor cells, enhances melanoma or epithelial cancer cell killing upon HAdV infection. UPR was triggered by knockdown of Golgi-specific brefeldin A-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GBF-1) or the GBF-1 inhibitor golgicide A (GCA) and stimulated HAdV infection. GBF-1 is a GEF for ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) regulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi apparatus and intra-Golgi apparatus membrane transport. Cells treated with GCA enhanced HAdV-induced cytopathic effects in epithelial and melanoma cancer cells but not normal cells, if the drug was applied several hours prior to HAdV inoculation. This was shown by real-time label-free impedance measurements using the xCELLigence system. GCA-treated cells contained fewer incoming HAdVs than control cells, but GCA treatment boosted HAdV titers and spreading in cancer cells. GCA enhanced viral gene expression or transgene expression from the cytomegalovirus promoter of B- or C-species HAdVs but did not enhance viral early region 1A (E1A) expression in uninfected cell lines or cells transfected with plasmid reporter DNA. The UPR-enhanced cell killing required the nuclease activity of the UPR sensor inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE-1) and X box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), which alleviate ER stress. The collective results show that chemical UPR induction and viruses boost tumor cell killing by enhancing oncolytic viral efficacy. IMPORTANCE Cancer is difficult to combat. A wide range of oncolytic viruses show promise for killing cancer cells, yet the efficacy of oncolytic killing is low. We searched for host factors enhancing adenovirus cancer cell killing and found that the knockdown of Golgi-specific brefeldin A-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GBF-1) or chemical inhibition of GBF-1 enhanced adenovirus infection by triggering the IRE-1/XBP-1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR). IRE-1/XBP-1 promote cell survival and enhanced the levels of the adenoviral immediate early gene product E1A, virus spreading, and killing of cancer cells. Aggressive tumor cells depend on a readily inducible UPR and, hence, present prime targets for a combined strategy involving adenoviruses and small chemicals inducing UPR. PMID:25187554

  16. Epithelial sodium channel abundance is decreased by an unfolded protein response induced by hyperosmolality

    PubMed Central

    Crambert, Gilles; Ernandez, Thomas; Lamouroux, Christine; Roth, Isabelle; Dizin, Eva; Martin, Pierre?Yves; Fraille, Eric; Hasler, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Large shifts of osmolality occur in the kidney medulla as part of the urine concentrating mechanism. Hyperosmotic stress profoundly challenges cellular homeostasis and induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here, we examined the unfolded protein response (UPR) in hyperosmotically?challenged principal cells of the kidney collecting duct (CD) and show its relevance in controlling epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) abundance, responsible for the final adjustment of Na+ excretion. Dehydration increases medullary but not cortical osmolality. Q?PCR analysis of microdissected CD of water?deprived mice revealed increased aquaporin?2 (AQP2) expression in outer medullary and cortical CD while ENaC abundance decreased in outer medullary but not cortical CD. Immunoblotting, Q?PCR and immunofluorescence revealed that hyperosmolality induced a transient ER stress?like response both ex vivo and in cultured CD principal cells and increased activity of the canonical UPR mediators PERK and ATF6. Both hyperosmolality and chemical induction of ER stress decreased ENaC expression in vitro. ENaC depletion by either stimulus was abolished by transcriptional inhibition and by the chemical chaperone 4?phenylbutyric acid and was partly abrogated by either PERK or ATF6 silencing. Our data suggest that induction of the UPR by hyperosmolality may help preserve body fluid homeostasis under conditions of dehydration by uncoupling AQP2 and ENaC abundance in outer medullary CD. PMID:25413317

  17. Insulin demand regulates β cell number via the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rohit B.; O’Donnell, Amy C.; Stamateris, Rachel E.; Ha, Binh; McCloskey, Karen M.; Reynolds, Paul R.; Arvan, Peter; Alonso, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    Although stem cell populations mediate regeneration of rapid turnover tissues, such as skin, blood, and gut, a stem cell reservoir has not been identified for some slower turnover tissues, such as the pancreatic islet. Despite lacking identifiable stem cells, murine pancreatic β cell number expands in response to an increase in insulin demand. Lineage tracing shows that new β cells are generated from proliferation of mature, differentiated β cells; however, the mechanism by which these mature cells sense systemic insulin demand and initiate a proliferative response remains unknown. Here, we identified the β cell unfolded protein response (UPR), which senses insulin production, as a regulator of β cell proliferation. Using genetic and physiologic models, we determined that among the population of β cells, those with an active UPR are more likely to proliferate. Moreover, subthreshold endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) drove insulin demand–induced β cell proliferation, through activation of ATF6. We also confirmed that the UPR regulates proliferation of human β cells, suggesting that therapeutic UPR modulation has potential to expand β cell mass in people at risk for diabetes. Together, this work defines a stem cell–independent model of tissue homeostasis, in which differentiated secretory cells use the UPR sensor to adapt organ size to meet demand. PMID:26389675

  18. Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response Drives Enhanced Metabolism and Chemoresistance in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Andrea L.; Dechkovskaia, Anjelika M.; Herring, Matthew; Winston, Benjamin A.; Lencioni, Alex M.; Russell, Rae L.; Madsen, Helen; Nega, Meheret; Dusto, Nathaniel L.; White, Jason; Bigner, Darell D.; Nicchitta, Christopher V.; Serkova, Natalie J.; Graner, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-based cytoprotective mechanism acting to prevent pathologies accompanying protein aggregation. It is frequently active in tumors, but relatively unstudied in gliomas. We hypothesized that UPR stress effects on glioma cells might protect tumors from additional exogenous stress (ie, chemotherapeutics), postulating that protection was concurrent with altered tumor cell metabolism. Using human brain tumor cell lines, xenograft tumors, human samples and gene expression databases, we determined molecular features of glioma cell UPR induction/activation, and here report a detailed analysis of UPR transcriptional/translational/metabolic responses. Immunohistochemistry, Western and Northern blots identified elevated levels of UPR transcription factors and downstream ER chaperone targets in gliomas. Microarray profiling revealed distinct regulation of stress responses between xenograft tumors and parent cell lines, with gene ontology and network analyses linking gene expression to cell survival and metabolic processes. Human glioma samples were examined for levels of the ER chaperone GRP94 by immunohistochemistry and for other UPR components by Western blotting. Gene and protein expression data from patient gliomas correlated poor patient prognoses with increased expression of ER chaperones, UPR target genes, and metabolic enzymes (glycolysis and lipogenesis). NMR-based metabolomic studies revealed increased metabolic outputs in glucose uptake with elevated glycolytic activity as well as increased phospholipid turnover. Elevated levels of amino acids, antioxidants, and cholesterol were also evident upon UPR stress; in particular, recurrent tumors had overall higher lipid outputs and elevated specific UPR arms. Clonogenicity studies following temozolomide treatment of stressed or unstressed cells demonstrated UPR-induced chemoresistance. Our data characterize the UPR in glioma cells and human tumors, and link the UPR to chemoresistance possibly via enhanced metabolism. Given the role of the UPR in the balance between cell survival and apoptosis, targeting the UPR and/or controlling metabolic activity may prove beneficial for malignant glioma therapeutics. PMID:24039668

  19. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  20. Activation of the unfolded protein response promotes axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Oñate, Maritza; Catenaccio, Alejandra; Martínez, Gabriela; Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey; Kerr, Bredford; Hetz, Claudio; Court, Felipe A.

    2016-01-01

    Although protein-folding stress at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a driver of neuronal dysfunction in models of spinal cord injury and neurodegeneration, the contribution of this pathway to peripheral nerve damage remains poorly explored. Here we targeted the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive reaction against ER stress, in mouse models of sciatic nerve injury and found that ablation of the transcription factor XBP1, but not ATF4, significantly delay locomotor recovery. XBP1 deficiency led to decreased macrophage recruitment, a reduction in myelin removal and axonal regeneration. Conversely, overexpression of XBP1s in the nervous system in transgenic mice enhanced locomotor recovery after sciatic nerve crush, associated to an improvement in key pro-regenerative events. To assess the therapeutic potential of UPR manipulation to axonal regeneration, we locally delivered XBP1s or an shRNA targeting this transcription factor to sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia using a gene therapy approach and found an enhancement or reduction of axonal regeneration in vivo, respectively. Our results demonstrate a functional role of specific components of the ER proteostasis network in the cellular changes associated to regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26906090

  1. Borrelidin Induces the Unfolded Protein Response in Oral Cancer Cells and Chop-Dependent Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Alpa; Miller, Justin R; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Garshott, Danielle M; Brownell, Amy L; Chiego, Daniel J; Arevang, Carl; Zeng, Qinghua; Jackson, Leah C; Bechler, Shelby A; Callaghan, Michael U; Yoo, George H; Sethi, Seema; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Callaghan, Joseph H; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H; Kaufman, Randal J; Fribley, Andrew M

    2015-11-12

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common cancer affecting the oral cavity, and US clinics will register about 30,000 new patients in 2015. Current treatment modalities include chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy, which often result in astonishing disfigurement. Cancers of the head and neck display enhanced levels of glucose-regulated proteins and translation initiation factors associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Previous work demonstrated that chemically enforced UPR could overwhelm these adaptive features and selectively kill malignant cells. The threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThRS) inhibitor borrelidin and two congeners were discovered in a cell-based chemical genomic screen. Borrelidin increased XBP1 splicing and led to accumulation of phosphorylated eIF2? and UPR-associated genes, prior to death in panel of OSCC cells. Murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) null for GCN2 and PERK were less able to accumulate UPR markers and were resistant to borrelidin. This study demonstrates that UPR induction is a feature of ThRS inhibition and adds to a growing body of literature suggesting ThRS inhibitors might selectively target cancer cells. PMID:26617965

  2. No evidence for activation of the unfolded protein response in neuronopathic models of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Farfel-Becker, Tamar; Vitner, Einat; Dekel, Hani; Leshem, Noa; Enquist, Ida Berglin; Karlsson, Stefan; Futerman, Anthony H

    2009-04-15

    Gaucher disease (GD), the most common lysosomal storage disorder (LSD), is caused by defects in the activity of the lysosomal enzyme, glucocerebrosidase, resulting in intracellular accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer). Neuronopathic forms, which comprise only a small percent of GD patients, are characterized by neurological impairment and neuronal cell death. Little is known about the pathways leading from GlcCer accumulation to neuronal death or dysfunction but defective calcium homeostasis appears to be one of the pathways involved. Recently, endoplasmic reticulum stress together with activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been suggested to play a key role in cell death in neuronopathic forms of GD, and moreover, the UPR was proposed to be a common mediator of apoptosis in LSDs (Wei et al. (2008) Hum. Mol. Genet. 17, 469-477). We now systematically examine whether the UPR is activated in neuronal forms of GD using a selection of neuronal disease models and a combination of western blotting and semi-quantitative and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We do not find any changes in either protein or mRNA levels of a number of typical UPR markers including BiP, CHOP, XBP1, Herp and GRP58, in either cultured Gaucher neurons or astrocytes, or in brain regions from mouse models, even at late symptomatic stages. We conclude that the proposition that the UPR is a common mediator for apoptosis in all neurodegenerative LSDs needs to be re-evaluated. PMID:19193629

  3. Unfolded Protein Response Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways Underlie Pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced Cutaneous Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changzhao; Xu, Jianmin; Li, Fugui; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Weng, Zhiping; Wen, Jianming; Elmets, Craig A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Athar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with an enhanced risk of various cancers including skin cancer. In human skin, arsenic induces precancerous melanosis and keratosis, which may progress to basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. However, the mechanism by which these pathophysiological alterations occur remains elusive. In this study, we showed that sub-chronic arsenic exposure to SKH-1 mice induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulated by proteins, inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1), PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Arsenic activated all three UPR regulatory proteins in the skin. Arsenic induced IRE1 phosphorylation which resulted in augmented splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) leading to its migration to the nucleus, and also enhanced transcriptional activation of downstream target proteins. Hyperphosphorylation of PERK which induces eukaryotic translation initial factor 2 ? (eIF2?) in a phosphorylation-dependent manner enhanced translation of ATF4, in addition to augmenting proteolytic activation of ATF6 in arsenic-treated skin. A similar increase in the expression of CHOP was observed. Enhanced XBP-1s, ATF4 and ATF6 regulated downstream chaperones GRP94 and GRP78. Additionally, arsenic induced inflammation-related p38/MAPKAPK-2 MAPK signaling and alterations in Th-1/Th-2/Th-17 cytokines/chemokines and their receptors. Antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine blocked arsenic-induced reactive oxygen species, with a concomitant attenuation of UPR and MAPK signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine signatures. Our results identify novel pathways involved in the pathogenesis of arsenic-mediated cutaneous inflammation which may also be related to enhanced cancer risk in arsenic exposed cohorts. PMID:21911445

  4. Hepatitis B and C virus-induced hepatitis: Apoptosis, autophagy, and unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Behzad; Rezaei Moghadam, Adel; Alizadeh, Javad; Wiechec, Emilia; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Hashemi, Mohammad; Geramizadeh, Bita; Samali, Afshin; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Post, Martin; Peymani, Payam; Coombs, Kevin M; Ghavami, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the co-incidence of apoptosis, autophagy, and unfolded protein response (UPR) in hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infected hepatocytes. METHODS: We performed immunofluorescence confocal microscopy on 10 liver biopsies from HBV and HCV patients and tissue microarrays of HBV positive liver samples. We used specific antibodies for LC3β, cleaved caspase-3, BIP (GRP78), and XBP1 to detect autophagy, apoptosis and UPR, respectively. Anti-HCV NS3 and anti-HBs antibodies were also used to confirm infection. We performed triple blind counting of events to determine the co-incidence of autophagy (LC3β punctuate), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and unfolded protein response (GRP78) with HBV and HCV infection in hepatocytes. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software for Windows (Version 16 SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, United States). P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Statistical analyses were performed with Mann-Whitney test to compare incidence rates for autophagy, apoptosis, and UPR in HBV- and HCV-infected cells and adjacent non-infected cells. RESULTS: Our results showed that infection of hepatocytes with either HBV and HCV induces significant increase (P < 0.001) in apoptosis (cleavage of caspase-3), autophagy (LC3β punctate), and UPR (increase in GRP78 expression) in the HCV- and HBV-infected cells, as compared to non-infected cells of the same biopsy sections. Our tissue microarray immunohistochemical expression analysis of LC3β in HBVNeg and HBVPos revealed that majority of HBV-infected hepatocytes display strong positive staining for LC3β. Interestingly, although XBP splicing in HBV-infected cells was significantly higher (P < 0.05), our analyses show a slight increase of XBP splicing was in HCV-infected cells (P > 0.05). Furthermore, our evaluation of patients with HBV and HCV infection based on stage and grade of the liver diseases revealed no correlation between these pathological findings and induction of apoptosis, autophagy, and UPR. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that HCV and HBV infection activates apoptosis, autophagy and UPR, but slightly differently by each virus. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the interconnections between these pathways in relation to pathology of HCV and HBV in the liver tissue. PMID:26715805

  5. Disruption of the unfolded protein response (UPR) by lead compound selectively suppresses cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hejing; Liu, Huanan; Liu, Changmei; Fan, Lixia; Zhang, Xinwen; Gao, Anhui; Hu, Xiaobei; Zhang, Kunzhi; Cao, Xianchao; Jiang, Kailong; Zhou, Yubo; Hou, Jian; Nan, Fajun; Li, Jia

    2015-05-01

    Identifying chemotherapy candidates with high selectivity against cancer cells is a major challenge in cancer treatment. Tumor microenvironments cause chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activate the unfolded protein response (UPR) as an adaptive response. Here, one novel small-molecule compound, 17#, was discovered as a potent pan-UPR inhibitor. It exhibited good selection for growth inhibition when cancer cells were cultured in 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), mimicking an in vitro glucose-deprived status. Additionally, 17# alone could mildly suppress the growth of HeLa tumor xenografts, and a synergistic anti-cancer effect was observed when 17# was combined with 2DG. A mechanistic study showed that 17#-induced selective anti-cancer effects were highly dependent on UPR inhibition, and overexpressing GRP78 or XBP1s reversed the 17#-induced growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest, partially by delaying the downregulation of the cell cycle regulator cyclin B1. Furthermore, 17# improved the sensitivity of anti-cancer drugs such as doxorubicin or etoposide. Our study presents evidence that disrupting the UPR has selective therapeutic potential and may enhance drug sensitivity. PMID:25721085

  6. Mutations in the unfolded protein response regulator ATF6 cause the cone dysfunction disorder achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Susanne; Zobor, Ditta; Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Weisschuh, Nicole; Staller, Jennifer; Menendez, Irene Gonzalez; Chang, Stanley; Beck, Susanne C; Garrido, Marina Garcia; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Seeliger, Mathias W; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Inzana, Francesca; Héon, Elise; Vincent, Ajoy; Beis, Jill; Strom, Tim M; Rudolph, Günther; Roosing, Susanne; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Michaelides, Michel; Koenekoop, Robert K; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kaufman, Randal J; Tsang, Stephen H; Wissinger, Bernd; Lin, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by color blindness, photophobia, nystagmus and severely reduced visual acuity. Using homozygosity mapping and whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified ten families carrying six homozygous and two compound-heterozygous mutations in the ATF6 gene (encoding activating transcription factor 6A), a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Patients had evidence of foveal hypoplasia and disruption of the cone photoreceptor layer. The ACHM-associated ATF6 mutations attenuate ATF6 transcriptional activity in response to ER stress. Atf6−/− mice have normal retinal morphology and function at a young age but develop rod and cone dysfunction with increasing age. This new ACHM-related gene suggests a crucial and unexpected role for ATF6A in human foveal development and cone function and adds to the list of genes that, despite ubiquitous expression, when mutated can result in an isolated retinal photoreceptor phenotype. PMID:26029869

  7. Mutations in the unfolded protein response regulator ATF6 cause the cone dysfunction disorder achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Susanne; Zobor, Ditta; Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Weisschuh, Nicole; Staller, Jennifer; Gonzalez Menendez, Irene; Chang, Stanley; Beck, Susanne C; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Seeliger, Mathias W; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Inzana, Francesca; Héon, Elise; Vincent, Ajoy; Beis, Jill; Strom, Tim M; Rudolph, Günther; Roosing, Susanne; Hollander, Anneke I den; Cremers, Frans P M; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Michaelides, Michel; Koenekoop, Robert K; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kaufman, Randal J; Tsang, Stephen H; Wissinger, Bernd; Lin, Jonathan H

    2015-07-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by color blindness, photophobia, nystagmus and severely reduced visual acuity. Using homozygosity mapping and whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified ten families carrying six homozygous and two compound-heterozygous mutations in the ATF6 gene (encoding activating transcription factor 6A), a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Patients had evidence of foveal hypoplasia and disruption of the cone photoreceptor layer. The ACHM-associated ATF6 mutations attenuate ATF6 transcriptional activity in response to ER stress. Atf6(-/-) mice have normal retinal morphology and function at a young age but develop rod and cone dysfunction with increasing age. This new ACHM-related gene suggests a crucial and unexpected role for ATF6A in human foveal development and cone function and adds to the list of genes that, despite ubiquitous expression, when mutated can result in an isolated retinal photoreceptor phenotype. PMID:26029869

  8. Role of Unfolded Protein Response Dysregulation in Oxidative Injury of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Cano, Marisol; Wang, Joshua J.; Li, Jingming; Huang, Chuangxin; Yu, Qiang; Herbert, Terence P.; Handa, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a major cause of legal blindness in the elderly, is associated with genetic and environmental risk factors, such as cigarette smoking. Recent evidence shows that cigarette smoke (CS) that contains high levels of potent oxidants preferably targets retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) leading to oxidative damage and apoptosis; however, the mechanisms are poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in CS-related RPE apoptosis. Results: ER stress and proapoptotic gene C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were induced in the RPE/choroid complex from mice exposed to CS for 2 weeks and in human RPE cells treated with hydroquinone, a potent oxidant found at high concentrations in CS. Suppressing ER stress or inhibiting CHOP activation by pharmacological chaperones or genetic approaches attenuated hydroquinone-induced RPE cell apoptosis. In contrast to enhanced CHOP activation, protein level of active X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), a major regulator of the adaptive UPR, was reduced in hydroquinone-treated cells. Conditional knockout of XBP1 gene in the RPE resulted in caspase-12 activation, increased CHOP expression, and decreased antiapoptotic gene Bcl-2. Furthermore, XBP1-deficient RPE cells are more sensitive to oxidative damage induced by hydroquinone or NaIO3, a CS-unrelated chemical oxidant. Conversely, overexpressing XBP1 protected RPE cells and attenuated oxidative stress-induced RPE apoptosis. Innovation and Conclusion: These findings provide strong evidence suggesting an important role of ER stress and the UPR in CS-related oxidative injury of RPE cells. Thus, the modulation of the UPR signaling may provide a promising target for the treatment of AMD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 20912106. PMID:24053669

  9. Brucella Induces an Unfolded Protein Response via TcpB That Supports Intracellular Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Judith A.; Khan, Mike; Magnani, Diogo D.; Harms, Jerome S.; Durward, Marina; Radhakrishnan, Girish K.; Liu, Yi-Ping; Splitter, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes brucellosis, the most prevalent zoonosis worldwide. The Brucella intracellular replicative niche in macrophages and dendritic cells thwarts immune surveillance and complicates both therapy and vaccine development. Currently, host-pathogen interactions supporting Brucella replication are poorly understood. Brucella fuses with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to replicate, resulting in dramatic restructuring of the ER. This ER disruption raises the possibility that Brucella provokes an ER stress response called the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). In this study, B. melitensis infection up regulated expression of the UPR target genes BiP, CHOP, and ERdj4, and induced XBP1 mRNA splicing in murine macrophages. These data implicate activation of all 3 major signaling pathways of the UPR. Consistent with previous reports, XBP1 mRNA splicing was largely MyD88-dependent. However, up regulation of CHOP, and ERdj4 was completely MyD88 independent. Heat killed Brucella stimulated significantly less BiP, CHOP, and ERdj4 expression, but induced XBP1 splicing. Although a Brucella VirB mutant showed relatively intact UPR induction, a TcpB mutant had significantly compromised BiP, CHOP and ERdj4 expression. Purified TcpB, a protein recently identified to modulate microtubules in a manner similar to paclitaxel, also induced UPR target gene expression and resulted in dramatic restructuring of the ER. In contrast, infection with the TcpB mutant resulted in much less ER structural disruption. Finally, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, a pharmacologic chaperone that ameliorates the UPR, significantly impaired Brucella replication in macrophages. Together, these results suggest Brucella induces a UPR, via TcpB and potentially other factors, that enables its intracellular replication. Thus, the UPR may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of brucellosis. These results also have implications for other intracellular bacteria that rely on host physiologic stress responses for replication. PMID:24339776

  10. ADP ribosylation adapts an ER chaperone response to short-term fluctuations in unfolded protein load

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Kseniya; Tomba, Giulia; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression programs that regulate the abundance of the chaperone BiP adapt the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to unfolded protein load. However, such programs are slow compared with physiological fluctuations in secreted protein synthesis. While searching for mechanisms that fill this temporal gap in coping with ER stress, we found elevated levels of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)ribosylated BiP in the inactive pancreas of fasted mice and a rapid decline in this modification in the active fed state. ADP ribosylation mapped to Arg470 and Arg492 in the substrate-binding domain of hamster BiP. Mutations that mimic the negative charge of ADP-ribose destabilized substrate binding and interfered with interdomain allosteric coupling, marking ADP ribosylation as a rapid posttranslational mechanism for reversible inactivation of BiP. A kinetic model showed that buffering fluctuations in unfolded protein load with a recruitable pool of inactive chaperone is an efficient strategy to minimize both aggregation and costly degradation of unfolded proteins. PMID:22869598

  11. The unfolded protein response in melanocytes: activation in response to chemical stressors of the endoplasmic reticulum and tyrosinase misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Manga, Prashiela; Bis, Sabina; Knoll, Kristen; Perez, Beremis; Orlow, Seth J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR), comprising three signaling pathways initiated by Ire1, Perk and Atf6 respectively. UPR activation was compared in chemically stressed murine wildtype melanocytes and mutant melanocytes that retain tyrosinase in the ER. Thapsigargin, an ER stressor, activated all pathways in wildtype melanocytes, triggering Caspase 12-mediated apoptosis at toxic doses. Albino melanocytes expressing mutant tyrosinase showed evidence of ER stress with increased Ire1 expression; but the downstream effector, Xbp1, was not activated even following thapsigargin treatment. Attenuation of Ire1 signaling was recapitulated in wildtype melanocytes treated with thapsigargin for eight days, with diminished Xbp1 activation observed after four days. Atf6 was also activated in albino melanocytes, with no response to thapsigargin, while the Perk pathway was not activated and thapsigargin treatment elicited robust expression of the downstream effector CHOP. Thus, melanocytes adapt to ER stress by attenuating two UPR pathways. PMID:20444203

  12. Implication of unfolded protein response in resveratrol-induced inhibition of K562 cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Gao, Yan-Yan; Niu, Xiao-Fang; Xie, Ji-Sheng; Meng, Xin; Guan, Yifu; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES), a natural plant polyphenol, is an effective inducer of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of carcinoma cell types. In addition, RES has been reported to inhibit tumorigenesis in several animal models suggesting that it functions as a chemopreventive and anti-tumor agent in vivo. The chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties associated with resveratrol offer promise for the design of new chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms by which RES mediates its effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we showed that RES caused cell cycle arrest and proliferation inhibition via induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) in human leukemia K562 cell line. Treatment of K562 cells with RES induced a number of signature UPR markers, including transcriptional induction of GRP78 and CHOP, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2{alpha} (eIF2{alpha}), ER stress-specific XBP-1 splicing, suggesting the induction of UPR by RES. RES inhibited proliferation of K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that K562 cells were arrested in G1 phase upon RES treatment. Salubrinal, an eIF2{alpha} inhibitor, or overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PERK or eIF2{alpha}, effectively restored RES-induced cell cycle arrest, underscoring the important role of PERK/eIF2{alpha} branch of UPR in RES-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  13. Signal peptide peptidase functions in ERAD to cleave the unfolded protein response regulator XBP1u

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-yi; Malchus, Nicole S; Hehn, Beate; Stelzer, Walter; Avci, Dnem; Langosch, Dieter; Lemberg, Marius K

    2014-01-01

    Signal peptide peptidase (SPP) catalyzes intramembrane proteolysis of signal peptides at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but has also been suggested to play a role in ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we show that SPP forms a complex with the ERAD factor Derlin1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRC8 to cleave the unfolded protein response (UPR) regulator XBP1u. Cleavage occurs within a so far unrecognized type II transmembrane domain, which renders XBP1u as an SPP substrate through specific sequence features. Additionally, Derlin1 acts in the complex as a substrate receptor by recognizing the luminal tail of XBP1u. Remarkably, this interaction of Derlin1 with XBP1u obviates the need for ectodomain shedding prior to SPP cleavage, commonly required for intramembrane cuts. Furthermore, we show that XBP1u inhibits the UPR transcription factor XBP1s by targeting it toward proteasomal degradation. Thus, we identify an ERAD complex that controls the abundance of XBP1u and thereby tunes signaling through the UPR. PMID:25239945

  14. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase promotes hypoxic survival by activating the mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Mao, X R; Kaufman, D M; Crowder, C M

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the mouse nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase type 1 (Nmnat1) produce two remarkable phenotypes: protection against traumatic axonal degeneration and reduced hypoxic brain injury. Despite intensive efforts, the mechanism of Nmnat1 cytoprotection remains elusive. To develop a new model to define this mechanism, we heterologously expressed a mouse Nmnat1 non-nuclear-localized gain-of-function mutant gene (m-nonN-Nmnat1) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and show that it provides protection from both hypoxia-induced animal death and taxol-induced axonal pathology. Additionally, we find that m-nonN-Nmnat1 significantly lengthens C. elegans lifespan. Using the hypoxia-protective phenotype in C. elegans, we performed a candidate screen for genetic suppressors of m-nonN-Nmnat1 cytoprotection. Loss of function in two genes, haf-1 and dve-1, encoding mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mitoUPR) factors were identified as suppressors. M-nonN-Nmnat1 induced a transcriptional reporter of the mitoUPR gene hsp-6 and provided protection from the mitochondrial proteostasis toxin ethidium bromide. M-nonN-Nmnat1 was also protective against axonal degeneration in C. elegans induced by the chemotherapy drug taxol. Taxol markedly reduced basal expression of a mitoUPR reporter; the expression was restored by m-nonN-Nmnat1. Taken together, these data implicate the mitoUPR as a mechanism whereby Nmnat1 protects from hypoxic and axonal injury. PMID:26913604

  15. A Role for the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) in Virulence and Antifungal Susceptibility in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Daryl L.; Hartl, Lukas; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Winters, Michael S.; Fuller, Kevin K.; Miley, Michael D.; White, Stephanie; McCarthy, Jason W.; Latg, Jean-Paul; Feldmesser, Marta; Rhodes, Judith C.; Askew, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Filamentous fungi rely heavily on the secretory pathway, both for the delivery of cell wall components to the hyphal tip and the production and secretion of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes needed to support growth on polymeric substrates. Increased demand on the secretory system exerts stress on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is countered by the activation of a coordinated stress response pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). To determine the contribution of the UPR to the growth and virulence of the filamentous fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we disrupted the hacA gene, encoding the major transcriptional regulator of the UPR. The ?hacA mutant was unable to activate the UPR in response to ER stress and was hypersensitive to agents that disrupt ER homeostasis or the cell wall. Failure to induce the UPR did not affect radial growth on rich medium at 37C, but cell wall integrity was disrupted at 45C, resulting in a dramatic loss in viability. The ?hacA mutant displayed a reduced capacity for protease secretion and was growth-impaired when challenged to assimilate nutrients from complex substrates. In addition, the ?hacA mutant exhibited increased susceptibility to current antifungal agents that disrupt the membrane or cell wall and had attenuated virulence in multiple mouse models of invasive aspergillosis. These results demonstrate the importance of ER homeostasis to the growth and virulence of A. fumigatus and suggest that targeting the UPR, either alone or in combination with other antifungal drugs, would be an effective antifungal strategy. PMID:19132084

  16. Keratin 12 missense mutation induces the unfolded protein response and apoptosis in Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Edwin H.A.; Courtney, David G.; Atkinson, Sarah D.; Moore, Johnny E.; Mairs, Laura; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Schiroli, Davide; Maurizi, Eleonora; Cole, Christian; Hickerson, Robyn P.; James, John; Murgatroyd, Helen; Smith, Frances J.D.; MacEwen, Carrie; Enghild, Jan J.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Leslie Pedrioli, Deena M.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Moore, C.B. Tara

    2016-01-01

    Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by dominant-negative mutations within the KRT3 or KRT12 genes, which encode the cytoskeletal protein keratins K3 and K12, respectively. To investigate the pathomechanism of this disease, we generated and phenotypically characterized a novel knock-in humanized mouse model carrying the severe, MECD-associated, K12-Leu132Pro mutation. Although no overt changes in corneal opacity were detected by slit-lamp examination, the corneas of homozygous mutant mice exhibited histological and ultrastructural epithelial cell fragility phenotypes. An altered keratin expression profile was observed in the cornea of mutant mice, confirmed by western blot, RNA-seq and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mass spectrometry (MS) and immunohistochemistry demonstrated a similarly altered keratin profile in corneal tissue from a K12-Leu132Pro MECD patient. The K12-Leu132Pro mutation results in cytoplasmic keratin aggregates. RNA-seq analysis revealed increased chaperone gene expression, and apoptotic unfolded protein response (UPR) markers, CHOP and Caspase 12, were also increased in the MECD mice. Corneal epithelial cell apoptosis was increased 17-fold in the mutant cornea, compared with the wild-type (P < 0.001). This elevation of UPR marker expression was also observed in the human MECD cornea. This is the first reporting of a mouse model for MECD that recapitulates the human disease and is a valuable resource in understanding the pathomechanism of the disease. Although the most severe phenotype is observed in the homozygous mice, this model will still provide a test-bed for therapies not only for corneal dystrophies but also for other keratinopathies caused by similar mutations. PMID:26758872

  17. Keratin 12 missense mutation induces the unfolded protein response and apoptosis in Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Edwin H A; Courtney, David G; Atkinson, Sarah D; Moore, Johnny E; Mairs, Laura; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Schiroli, Davide; Maurizi, Eleonora; Cole, Christian; Hickerson, Robyn P; James, John; Murgatroyd, Helen; Smith, Frances J D; MacEwen, Carrie; Enghild, Jan J; Nesbit, M Andrew; Leslie Pedrioli, Deena M; McLean, W H Irwin; Moore, C B Tara

    2016-03-15

    Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by dominant-negative mutations within the KRT3 or KRT12 genes, which encode the cytoskeletal protein keratins K3 and K12, respectively. To investigate the pathomechanism of this disease, we generated and phenotypically characterized a novel knock-in humanized mouse model carrying the severe, MECD-associated, K12-Leu132Pro mutation. Although no overt changes in corneal opacity were detected by slit-lamp examination, the corneas of homozygous mutant mice exhibited histological and ultrastructural epithelial cell fragility phenotypes. An altered keratin expression profile was observed in the cornea of mutant mice, confirmed by western blot, RNA-seq and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mass spectrometry (MS) and immunohistochemistry demonstrated a similarly altered keratin profile in corneal tissue from a K12-Leu132Pro MECD patient. The K12-Leu132Pro mutation results in cytoplasmic keratin aggregates. RNA-seq analysis revealed increased chaperone gene expression, and apoptotic unfolded protein response (UPR) markers, CHOP and Caspase 12, were also increased in the MECD mice. Corneal epithelial cell apoptosis was increased 17-fold in the mutant cornea, compared with the wild-type (P < 0.001). This elevation of UPR marker expression was also observed in the human MECD cornea. This is the first reporting of a mouse model for MECD that recapitulates the human disease and is a valuable resource in understanding the pathomechanism of the disease. Although the most severe phenotype is observed in the homozygous mice, this model will still provide a test-bed for therapies not only for corneal dystrophies but also for other keratinopathies caused by similar mutations. PMID:26758872

  18. Maintenance of Pdx1 mRNA Translation in Islet ?-Cells During the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Templin, Andrew T.; Maier, Bernhard; Tersey, Sarah A.; Hatanaka, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes, proinflammatory cytokines secreted by infiltrating immune cells activate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in islet ?-cells, which leads to attenuation of global mRNA translation. Under such conditions, privileged mRNAs required for adaptation to the prevailing stress are maintained in an actively translated state. Pdx1 is a ?-cell transcription factor that is required for the adaptive UPR, but it is not known how translation of its mRNA is maintained under these conditions. To study translation, we established conditions in vitro with MIN6 cells and mouse islets and a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, TNF-?, and IFN-?) that mimicked the UPR conditions seen in type 1 diabetes. Cell extracts were then subjected to polyribosome profiling to monitor changes to mRNA occupancy by ribosomes. Similar to other privileged mRNAs (Atf4 and Chop), Pdx1 mRNA remained partitioned in actively translating polyribosomes under the UPR, whereas the mRNA encoding a proinsulin-processing enzyme (Cpe) and others partitioned into inactively translating monoribosomes. Bicistronic luciferase reporter analyses revealed that the distal portion of the 5?-untranslated region of mouse Pdx1 (between bp ?105 to ?280) contained elements that promoted translation under both normal and UPR conditions, and this region exhibited conserved sequences and secondary structure similar to those of other known internal ribosome entry sites. Our findings suggest that Pdx1 protein levels are maintained in the setting of the UPR, in part, through elements in the 5?-untranslated region that confer privileged mRNA translation in a 5?-7-methylguanylate capindependent manner. PMID:25251389

  19. Mechanistic rationale for targeting the unfolded protein response in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kharabi Masouleh, Behzad; Geng, Huimin; Hurtz, Christian; Chan, Lai N.; Logan, Aaron C.; Chang, Mi Sook; Huang, Chuanxin; Swaminathan, Srividya; Sun, Haibo; Paietta, Elisabeth; Melnick, Ari M.; Koeffler, Phillip; Müschen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, a stress-induced signaling cascade emanating from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), regulates the expression and activity of molecules including BiP (HSPA5), IRE1 (ERN1), Blimp-1 (PRDM1), and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). These molecules are required for terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells and expressed at high levels in plasma cell-derived multiple myeloma. Although these molecules have no known role at early stages of B-cell development, here we show that their expression transiently peaks at the pre–B-cell receptor checkpoint. Inducible, Cre-mediated deletion of Hspa5, Prdm1, and Xbp1 consistently induces cellular stress and cell death in normal pre-B cells and in pre–B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) driven by BCR-ABL1- and NRASG12D oncogenes. Mechanistically, expression and activity of the UPR downstream effector XBP1 is regulated positively by STAT5 and negatively by the B-cell–specific transcriptional repressors BACH2 and BCL6. In two clinical trials for children and adults with ALL, high XBP1 mRNA levels at the time of diagnosis predicted poor outcome. A small molecule inhibitor of ERN1-mediated XBP1 activation induced selective cell death of patient-derived pre-B ALL cells in vitro and significantly prolonged survival of transplant recipient mice in vivo. Collectively, these studies reveal that pre-B ALL cells are uniquely vulnerable to ER stress and identify the UPR pathway and its downstream effector XBP1 as novel therapeutic targets to overcome drug resistance in pre-B ALL. PMID:24821775

  20. Mechanistic rationale for targeting the unfolded protein response in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kharabi Masouleh, Behzad; Geng, Huimin; Hurtz, Christian; Chan, Lai N; Logan, Aaron C; Chang, Mi Sook; Huang, Chuanxin; Swaminathan, Srividya; Sun, Haibo; Paietta, Elisabeth; Melnick, Ari M; Koeffler, Phillip; Mschen, Markus

    2014-05-27

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, a stress-induced signaling cascade emanating from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), regulates the expression and activity of molecules including BiP (HSPA5), IRE1 (ERN1), Blimp-1 (PRDM1), and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). These molecules are required for terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells and expressed at high levels in plasma cell-derived multiple myeloma. Although these molecules have no known role at early stages of B-cell development, here we show that their expression transiently peaks at the pre-B-cell receptor checkpoint. Inducible, Cre-mediated deletion of Hspa5, Prdm1, and Xbp1 consistently induces cellular stress and cell death in normal pre-B cells and in pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) driven by BCR-ABL1- and NRAS(G12D) oncogenes. Mechanistically, expression and activity of the UPR downstream effector XBP1 is regulated positively by STAT5 and negatively by the B-cell-specific transcriptional repressors BACH2 and BCL6. In two clinical trials for children and adults with ALL, high XBP1 mRNA levels at the time of diagnosis predicted poor outcome. A small molecule inhibitor of ERN1-mediated XBP1 activation induced selective cell death of patient-derived pre-B ALL cells in vitro and significantly prolonged survival of transplant recipient mice in vivo. Collectively, these studies reveal that pre-B ALL cells are uniquely vulnerable to ER stress and identify the UPR pathway and its downstream effector XBP1 as novel therapeutic targets to overcome drug resistance in pre-B ALL. PMID:24821775

  1. Molecularly defined unfolded protein response subclasses have distinct correlations with fatty liver disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Vacaru, Ana M; Di Narzo, Antonio Fabio; Howarth, Deanna L; Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya; Imrie, Dru; Cinaroglu, Ayca; Amin, Salma; Hao, Ke; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2014-07-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a complex network of sensors and target genes that ensure efficient folding of secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). UPR activation is mediated by three main sensors, which regulate the expression of hundreds of targets. UPR activation can result in outcomes ranging from enhanced cellular function to cell dysfunction and cell death. How this pathway causes such different outcomes is unknown. Fatty liver disease (steatosis) is associated with markers of UPR activation and robust UPR induction can cause steatosis; however, in other cases, UPR activation can protect against this disease. By assessing the magnitude of activation of UPR sensors and target genes in the liver of zebrafish larvae exposed to three commonly used ER stressors (tunicamycin, thapsigargin and Brefeldin A), we have identified distinct combinations of UPR sensors and targets (i.e. subclasses) activated by each stressor. We found that only the UPR subclass characterized by maximal induction of UPR target genes, which we term a stressed-UPR, induced steatosis. Principal component analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between UPR target gene induction and steatosis. The same principal component analysis showed significant correlation with steatosis in samples from patients with fatty liver disease. We demonstrate that an adaptive UPR induced by a short exposure to thapsigargin prior to challenging with tunicamycin reduced both the induction of a stressed UPR and steatosis incidence. We conclude that a stressed UPR causes steatosis and an adaptive UPR prevents it, demonstrating that this pathway plays dichotomous roles in fatty liver disease. PMID:24973751

  2. Varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein expression differentially induces the unfolded protein response in infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, John E.; Grose, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus that spreads to children as varicella or chicken pox. The virus then establishes latency in the nervous system and re-emerges, typically decades later, as zoster or shingles. We have reported previously that VZV induces autophagy in infected cells as well as exhibiting evidence of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR): XBP1 splicing, a greatly expanded Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and CHOP expression. Herein we report the results of a UPR specific PCR array that measures the levels of mRNA of 84 different components of the UPR in VZV infected cells as compared to tunicamycin treated cells as a positive control and uninfected, untreated cells as a negative control. Tunicamycin is a mixture of chemicals that inhibits N-linked glycosylation in the ER with resultant protein misfolding and the UPR. We found that VZV differentially induces the UPR when compared to tunicamycin treatment. For example, tunicamycin treatment moderately increased (8-fold) roughly half of the array elements while downregulating only three (one ERAD and two FOLD components). VZV infection on the other hand upregulated 33 components including a little described stress sensor CREB-H (64-fold) as well as ER membrane components INSIG and gp78, which modulate cholesterol synthesis while downregulating over 20 components mostly associated with ERAD and FOLD. We hypothesize that this expression pattern is associated with an expanding ER with downregulation of active degradation by ERAD and apoptosis as the cell attempts to handle abundant viral glycoprotein synthesis. PMID:25071735

  3. Dominant negative FADD dissipates the proapoptotic signalosome of the unfolded protein response in diabetic embryopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Weng, Hongbo; Quon, Michael J; Yu, Jingwen; Wang, Jian-Ying; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase 8-dependent apoptosis are two interlinked causal events in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). The inositol-requiring enzyme 1? (IRE1?) signalosome mediates the proapoptotic effect of ER stress. Diabetes increases tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1R-associated death domain (TRADD) expression. Here, we revealed two new unfolded protein response (UPR) regulators, TRADD and Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD). TRADD interacted with both the IRE1?-TRAF2-ASK1 complex and FADD. In vivo overexpression of a FADD dominant negative (FADD-DN) mutant lacking the death effector domain disrupted diabetes-induced IRE1? signalosome and suppressed ER stress and caspase 8-dependent apoptosis, leading to NTD prevention. FADD-DN abrogated ER stress markers and blocked the JNK1/2-ASK1 pathway. Diabetes-induced mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase cleavage were also alleviated by FADD-DN. In vitro TRADD overexpression triggered UPR and ER stress before manifestation of caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage and apoptosis. FADD-DN overexpression repressed high glucose- or TRADD overexpression-induced IRE1? phosphorylation, its downstream proapoptotic kinase activation and endonuclease activities, and apoptosis. FADD-DN also attenuated tunicamycin-induced UPR and ER stress. These findings suggest that TRADD participates in the IRE1? signalosome and induces UPR and ER stress and that the association between TRADD and FADD is essential for diabetes- or high glucose-induced UPR and ER stress. PMID:26419589

  4. Varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein expression differentially induces the unfolded protein response in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, John E; Grose, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus that spreads to children as varicella or chicken pox. The virus then establishes latency in the nervous system and re-emerges, typically decades later, as zoster or shingles. We have reported previously that VZV induces autophagy in infected cells as well as exhibiting evidence of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR): XBP1 splicing, a greatly expanded Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and CHOP expression. Herein we report the results of a UPR specific PCR array that measures the levels of mRNA of 84 different components of the UPR in VZV infected cells as compared to tunicamycin treated cells as a positive control and uninfected, untreated cells as a negative control. Tunicamycin is a mixture of chemicals that inhibits N-linked glycosylation in the ER with resultant protein misfolding and the UPR. We found that VZV differentially induces the UPR when compared to tunicamycin treatment. For example, tunicamycin treatment moderately increased (8-fold) roughly half of the array elements while downregulating only three (one ERAD and two FOLD components). VZV infection on the other hand upregulated 33 components including a little described stress sensor CREB-H (64-fold) as well as ER membrane components INSIG and gp78, which modulate cholesterol synthesis while downregulating over 20 components mostly associated with ERAD and FOLD. We hypothesize that this expression pattern is associated with an expanding ER with downregulation of active degradation by ERAD and apoptosis as the cell attempts to handle abundant viral glycoprotein synthesis. PMID:25071735

  5. Evidence for Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response in Collagen IV Nephropathies

    PubMed Central

    Pieri, Myrtani; Stefanou, Charalambos; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Erguler, Kamil; Stylianou, Kostas; Lapathitis, George; Karaiskos, Christos; Savva, Isavella; Paraskeva, Revekka; Dweep, Harsh; Sticht, Carsten; Anastasiadou, Natassa; Zouvani, Ioanna; Goumenos, Demetris; Felekkis, Kyriakos; Saleem, Moin; Voskarides, Konstantinos; Gretz, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Thin-basement-membrane nephropathy (TBMN) and Alport syndrome (AS) are progressive collagen IV nephropathies caused by mutations in COL4A3/A4/A5 genes. These nephropathies invariably present with microscopic hematuria and frequently progress to proteinuria and CKD or ESRD during long-term follow-up. Nonetheless, the exact molecular mechanisms by which these mutations exert their deleterious effects on the glomerulus remain elusive. We hypothesized that defective trafficking of the COL4A3 chain causes a strong intracellular effect on the cell responsible for COL4A3 expression, the podocyte. To this end, we overexpressed normal and mutant COL4A3 chains (G1334E mutation) in human undifferentiated podocytes and tested their effects in various intracellular pathways using a microarray approach. COL4A3 overexpression in the podocyte caused chain retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that was associated with activation of unfolded protein response (UPR)related markers of ER stress. Notably, the overexpression of normal or mutant COL4A3 chains differentially activated the UPR pathway. Similar results were observed in a novel knockin mouse carrying the Col4a3-G1332E mutation, which produced a phenotype consistent with AS, and in biopsy specimens from patients with TBMN carrying a heterozygous COL4A3-G1334E mutation. These results suggest that ER stress arising from defective localization of collagen IV chains in human podocytes contributes to the pathogenesis of TBMN and AS through activation of the UPR, a finding that may pave the way for novel therapeutic interventions for a variety of collagenopathies. PMID:24262798

  6. Inhibition of protein synthesis leading to unfolded protein response is the major event in abrin-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ritu; Kumar, Meenakshi Sundaram; Karande, Anjali A

    2015-05-01

    Abrin obtained from the plant Abrus precatorius inhibits protein synthesis and also triggers apoptosis in cells. Previous studies from our laboratory suggested a link between these two events. Using an active site mutant of abrin A-chain which exhibits 225-fold lower protein synthesis inhibitory activity than the wild-type abrin A-chain, we demonstrate in this study that inhibition of protein synthesis induced by abrin is the major factor triggering unfolded protein response leading to apoptosis. Since abrin A-chain requires the B-chain for internalization into cells, the wild-type and mutant recombinant abrin A-chains were conjugated to native ricin B-chain to generate hybrid toxins, and the toxic effects of the two conjugates were compared. The rate of inhibition of protein synthesis mediated by the mutant ricin B-rABRA (R167L) conjugate was slower than that of the wild-type ricin B-rABRA conjugate as expected. The mutant conjugate activated p38MAPK and caspase-3 similar to its wild-type counterpart although at later time points. Overall, these results confirm that inhibition of protein synthesis is the major event contributing to abrin-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25753921

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Unfolded Protein Response and Altered T Cell Differentiation in Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peng; Struijs, Marie-Chantal; Mei, Jiaping; Witte-Bouma, Janneke; Korteland-van Male, Anita M.; de Bruijn, Adrianus C. J. M.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Renes, Ingrid B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) play important roles in chronic intestinal inflammation. Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in preterm infants and is characterized by acute intestinal inflammation and necrosis. The objective of the study is to investigate the role of ER stress and the UPR in NEC patients. Methods Ileal tissues from NEC and control patients were obtained during surgical resection and/or at stoma closure. Splicing of XBP1 was detected using PCR, and gene expression was quantified using qPCR and Western blot. Results Splicing of XBP1 was only detected in a subset of acute NEC (A-NEC) patients, and not in NEC patients who had undergone reanastomosis (R-NEC). The other ER stress and the UPR pathways, PERK and ATF6, were not activated in NEC patients. A-NEC patients showing XBP1 splicing (A-NEC-XBP1s) had increased mucosal expression of GRP78, CHOP, IL6 and IL8. Similar results were obtained by inducing ER stress and the UPR in vitro. A-NEC-XBP1s patients showed altered T cell differentiation indicated by decreased mucosal expression of RORC, IL17A and FOXP3. A-NEC-XBP1s patients additionally showed more severe morphological damage and a worse surgical outcome. Compared with A-NEC patients, R-NEC patients showed lower mucosal IL6 and IL8 expression and higher mucosal FOXP3 expression. Conclusions XBP1 splicing, ER stress and the UPR in NEC are associated with increased IL6 and IL8 expression levels, altered T cell differentiation and severe epithelial injury. PMID:24194940

  8. An activated unfolded protein response promotes retinal degeneration and triggers an inflammatory response in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Rana, T; Shinde, V M; Starr, C R; Kruglov, A A; Boitet, E R; Kotla, P; Zolotukhin, S; Gross, A K; Gorbatyuk, M S

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on the endoplasmic reticulum stress have shown that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is involved in the pathogenesis of inherited retinal degeneration caused by mutant rhodopsin. However, the main question of whether UPR activation actually triggers retinal degeneration remains to be addressed. Thus, in this study, we created a mouse model for retinal degeneration caused by a persistently activated UPR to assess the physiological and morphological parameters associated with this disease state and to highlight a potential mechanism by which the UPR can promote retinal degeneration. We performed an intraocular injection in C57BL6 mice with a known unfolded protein response (UPR) inducer, tunicamycin (Tn) and examined animals by electroretinography (ERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and histological analyses. We detected a significant loss of photoreceptor function (over 60%) and retinal structure (35%) 30 days post treatment. Analysis of retinal protein extracts demonstrated a significant upregulation of inflammatory markers including interleukin-1? (IL-1?), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IBA1. Similarly, we detected a strong inflammatory response in mice expressing either Ter349Glu or T17M rhodopsin (RHO). These mutant rhodopsin species induce severe retinal degeneration and T17M rhodopsin elicits UPR activation when expressed in mice. RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant upregulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers such as IL-1?, IL-6, p65 nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and MCP-1, as well as activation of F4/80 and IBA1 microglial markers in both the retinas expressing mutant rhodopsins. We then assessed if the Tn-induced inflammatory marker IL-1? was capable of inducing retinal degeneration by injecting C57BL6 mice with a recombinant IL-1?. We observed ~19% reduction in ERG a-wave amplitudes and a 29% loss of photoreceptor cells compared with control retinas, suggesting a potential link between pro-inflammatory cytokines and retinal pathophysiological effects. Our work demonstrates that in the context of an established animal model for ocular disease, the persistent activation of the UPR could be responsible for promoting retinal degeneration via the UPR-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1?. PMID:25522272

  9. Protein kinase Snf1 is involved in the proper regulation of the unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Dalmau, Jofre; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Marquina, Maribel; Prieto, Jos A; Casamayor, Antonio

    2015-05-15

    Glc7 is the only catalytic subunit of the protein phosphatase type 1 in the yeast S. cerevisiae and, together with its regulatory subunits, is involved in many essential processes. Analysis of the non-essential mutants in the regulatory subunits of Glc7 revealed that the lack of Reg1, and no other subunit, causes hypersensitivity to unfolded protein response (UPR)-inducers, which was concomitant with an augmented UPR element-dependent transcriptional response. The Glc7-Reg1 complex takes part in the regulation of the yeast AMP-activated serine/threonine protein kinase Snf1 in response to glucose. We demonstrate in the present study that the observed phenotypes of reg1 mutant cells are attributable to the inappropriate activation of Snf1. Indeed, growth in the presence of limited concentrations of glucose, where Snf1 is active, or expression of active forms of Snf1 in a wild-type strain increased the sensitivity to the UPR-inducer tunicamycin. Furthermore, reg1 mutant cells showed a sustained HAC1 mRNA splicing and KAR2 mRNA levels during the recovery phase of the UPR, and dysregulation of the Ire1-oligomeric equilibrium. Finally, overexpression of protein phosphatases Ptc2 and Ptc3 alleviated the growth defect of reg1 cells under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress conditions. Altogether, our results reveal that Snf1 plays an important role in the attenuation of the UPR, as well as identifying the protein kinase and its effectors as possible pharmacological targets for human diseases that are associated with insufficient UPR activation. PMID:25730376

  10. The unfolded protein response in fission yeast modulates stability of select mRNAs to maintain protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kimmig, Philipp; Diaz, Marcy; Zheng, Jiashun; Williams, Christopher C; Lang, Alexander; Aragn, Tomas; Li, Hao; Walter, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) monitors the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In all organisms analyzed to date, the UPR drives transcriptional programs that allow cells to cope with ER stress. The non-conventional splicing of Hac1 (yeasts) and XBP1 (metazoans) mRNA, encoding orthologous UPR transcription activators, is conserved and dependent on Ire1, an ER membrane-resident kinase/endoribonuclease. We found that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacks both a Hac1/XBP1 ortholog and a UPR-dependent-transcriptional-program. Instead, Ire1 initiates the selective decay of a subset of ER-localized-mRNAs that is required to survive ER stress. We identified Bip1 mRNA, encoding a major ER-chaperone, as the sole mRNA cleaved upon Ire1 activation that escapes decay. Instead, truncation of its 3? UTR, including loss of its polyA tail, stabilized Bip1 mRNA, resulting in increased Bip1 translation. Thus, S. pombe uses a universally conserved stress-sensing machinery in novel ways to maintain homeostasis in the ER. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00048.001 PMID:23066505

  11. Wolfram Syndrome protein, Miner1, regulates sulphydryl redox status, the unfolded protein response, and Ca2+ homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Sandra E; Andreyev, Alexander Y; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Karisch, Robert; Perkins, Guy; Wall, Estelle A; van der Geer, Peter; Chen, Yi-Fan; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Simon, Melvin I; Neel, Benjamin G; Dixon, Jack E; Murphy, Anne N

    2013-01-01

    Miner1 is a redox-active 2Fe2S cluster protein. Mutations in Miner1 result in Wolfram Syndrome, a metabolic disease associated with diabetes, blindness, deafness, and a shortened lifespan. Embryonic fibroblasts from Miner1−/− mice displayed ER stress and showed hallmarks of the unfolded protein response. In addition, loss of Miner1 caused a depletion of ER Ca2+ stores, a dramatic increase in mitochondrial Ca2+ load, increased reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, an increase in the GSSG/GSH and NAD+/NADH ratios, and an increase in the ADP/ATP ratio consistent with enhanced ATP utilization. Furthermore, mitochondria in fibroblasts lacking Miner1 displayed ultrastructural alterations, such as increased cristae density and punctate morphology, and an increase in O2 consumption. Treatment with the sulphydryl anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine reversed the abnormalities in the Miner1 deficient cells, suggesting that sulphydryl reducing agents should be explored as a treatment for this rare genetic disease. PMID:23703906

  12. Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial Hsp22: a role in resistance to oxidative stress, aging and the mitochondrial unfolding protein response.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Genevive; Le Pcheur, Marie; Tanguay, Robert M

    2016-02-01

    Aging is characterized by the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria. Since these organelles are involved in many important cellular processes, different mechanisms exist to maintain their integrity. Among them is the mitochondrial unfolding protein response, which triggers the expression of a set of proteins aimed at re-establishing mitochondrial homeostasis. The induction of mitochondrial chaperones expression, particularly of Hsp60 and Hsp70, is a hallmark of this pathway. In Drosophila melanogaster, Hsp22 is also up-regulated by mitochondrial stress. This small heat shock protein is one of the members of the family to be localized inside mitochondria. One characteristic of Drosophila Hsp22 is its preferential up-regulation during aging and in oxidative stress conditions. It is a beneficial protein since its over-expression increases lifespan and resistance to stress while its down-regulation is detrimental. This review focuses on Drosophila Hsp22 and its links with the mitochondrial unfolding protein response and the aging process, in addition to highlight the important role of this sHSP in mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:26155908

  13. Enhanced sensitivity to DSS colitis caused by a hypomorphic Mbtps1 mutation disrupting the ATF6-driven unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Katharina; Rutschmann, Sophie; Li, Xiaohong; Du, Xin; Xiao, Nengming; Schnabl, Bernd; Brenner, David A; Beutler, Bruce

    2009-03-01

    Here, we describe an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced missense error in the membrane-bound transcription factor peptidase site 1 (S1P)-encoding gene (Mbtps1) that causes enhanced susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. S1P cleaves and activates cAMP response element binding protein/ATF transcription factors, the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), and other proteins of both endogenous and viral origin. Because S1P has a nonredundant function in the ATF6-dependent unfolded protein response (UPR), woodrat mice show diminished levels of major endoplasmic reticulum chaperones GRP78 (BiP) and GRP94 in the colon upon DSS administration. Experiments with bone marrow chimeric mice reveal a requirement for S1P in nonhematopoietic cells, without which a diminished UPR and colitis develop. PMID:19202076

  14. Enhanced sensitivity to DSS colitis caused by a hypomorphic Mbtps1 mutation disrupting the ATF6-driven unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Katharina; Rutschmann, Sophie; Li, Xiaohong; Du, Xin; Xiao, Nengming; Schnabl, Bernd; Brenner, David A.; Beutler, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced missense error in the membrane-bound transcription factor peptidase site 1 (S1P)-encoding gene (Mbtps1) that causes enhanced susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. S1P cleaves and activates cAMP response element binding protein/ATF transcription factors, the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), and other proteins of both endogenous and viral origin. Because S1P has a nonredundant function in the ATF6-dependent unfolded protein response (UPR), woodrat mice show diminished levels of major endoplasmic reticulum chaperones GRP78 (BiP) and GRP94 in the colon upon DSS administration. Experiments with bone marrow chimeric mice reveal a requirement for S1P in nonhematopoietic cells, without which a diminished UPR and colitis develop. PMID:19202076

  15. MULTIPLE WAYS TO DIE: DELINEATION OF THE UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE AND APOPTOSIS INDUCED BY SURFACTANT PROTEIN C BRICHOS MUTANTS

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Jean Ann; Mulugeta, Surafel; Beers, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial cell dysfunction is now recognized as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung diseases. Surfactant Protein C (SP-C), an alveolar type II cell specific protein, has contributed to this concept with the observation that heterozygous expression of SFTPC gene mutations are associated with chronic interstitial lung disease. We have shown that transient expression of aggregation prone mutant SP-C isoforms (SP-C BRICHOS) destabilizes ER quality control mechanisms resulting in the intracellular accumulation of aggregating propeptide, inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system, and activation of apoptosis. The goal of the present study was to define signaling pathways linking the unfolded protein response (UPR) and subsequent ER stress with intrinsic apoptosis events observed following mutant SP-C expression. In vitro expression of the SP-C BRICHOS mutant, SP-C?exon4, was used as a model system. Here we show stimulation of a broad ER stress response in both transfected A549 and HEK293 cells with activation of all 3 canonical sensing pathways, IRE1/XBP-1, ATF6, and PERK/eIF2?. SP-C?exon4 expression also resulted in activation of caspase 3 but failed to stimulate expression of the apoptosis mediating transcription factors ATF4/CHOP. However, inhibition of either caspase 4 or c-jun kinase (JNK) each blocked caspase 3 mediated cell death. Taken together, these results suggest that expression of SP-C BRICHOS mutants induce apoptosis via activation multiple CHOP independent but specific UPR signaling pathways, and provide new therapeutic targets for the amelioration of ER stress induced cytotoxicity observed in fibrotic lung remodeling. PMID:22016030

  16. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Necessary but Not Sufficient to Compensate for Defects in Disulfide Isomerization*S?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jai-Hyun; Zhao, Yinsuo; Pan, Xuewen; He, Xiangwei; Gilbert, Hiram F.

    2009-01-01

    Pdi1p (protein-disulfide isomerase) is a folding assistant of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that catalyzes disulfide formation and the isomerization of incorrect disulfides. Its disulfide forming activity is its essential function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A truncation mutant (Pdi1a?) that is competent in disulfide formation but deficient in catalyzing isomerization has only a small effect on growth, although the maturation of isomerase-requiring substrates (carboxypeptidase Y) is impaired (Xiao, R., Wilkinson, B., Solovyov, A., Winther, J. R., Holmgren, A., Lundstrom-Ljung, J., and Gilbert, H. F. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 4978049786). We show here that there are multiple ways to compensate for defects in disulfide formation and isomerization in the ER. Genes of the unfolded protein response are induced, and deletions of the nonessential IRE1 or HAC1 genes are synthetically lethal. Diploid synthetic lethality analysis by microarray (dSLAM) using PDIa? and a temperature-sensitive mutant of PDIa? as query mutations reveals a group of 130 synthetically lethal genes. Only 10 of these correspond to genes clearly associated with the unfolded protein response. More than half are involved in vesicle traffic, not only out of and into the ER but anterograde and retrograde traffic from most cellular compartments. This suggests that defects in protein maturation in one intracellular compartment may be compensated for by adjusting vesicular traffic patterns throughout the cell. PMID:19233841

  17. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in plant immunity. PMID:22359644

  18. Activation of unfolded protein response pathway during infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) infection invitro an invivo.

    PubMed

    Kavaliauskis, Arturas; Arnemo, Marianne; Rishovd, Anne-Lise; Gjen, Tor

    2016-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is a salmon pathogen causing serious outbreaks in fish farms world-wide. There is currently no effective commercially available vaccine and there is a need for better understanding of host pathogen interactions with this virus. Various strains can cause both acute and persistent infections and therefore establish a balance with the host immune responses. We have studied host responses to this infection by analyzing the main branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in salmon cells invitro and in tissues from infected fish to gain a better understanding of virus-host interactions. ISAV induce the main symptoms and signaling pathways of UPR (ATF6, PERK and IRE1) without inducing translational attenuation. This may be due to concomitant induction of an important negative feedback loop via the phosphatase regulator GADD34. The host cells can therefore respond with translation of cytokine and antiviral proteins to curb or control infection. PMID:26303456

  19. Sonication-induced unfolding proteins.

    PubMed

    Stepanskiy, Leonard G

    2012-04-01

    The methodology of predicting sonication-induced unfolding proteins (SUP) is presented in this study. The methodology bases on: (a) simulation of SUP by the excessive deviations of protein domains in regime of damped forced vibrations caused by critical level of involved acoustic energy, which is associated with temperature rise and acoustic pressure; (b) simulation of stochasticity of SUP by failures in jobs service in the queueing system with Markovian fluxes. The assessments of probability of SUP accounting the complex of parameters of pulsed ultrasound, biophysical properties of tissue and macromolecular crowding of insonated zone of tissue are considered. PMID:22266660

  20. Myc-Driven Overgrowth Requires Unfolded Protein Response-Mediated Induction of Autophagy and Antioxidant Responses in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Péter; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Hegedűs, Krisztina; Juhász, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal self-degradation and recycling pathway, plays dual roles in tumorigenesis. Autophagy deficiency predisposes to cancer, at least in part, through accumulation of the selective autophagy cargo p62, leading to activation of antioxidant responses and tumor formation. While cell growth and autophagy are inversely regulated in most cells, elevated levels of autophagy are observed in many established tumors, presumably mediating survival of cancer cells. Still, the relationship of autophagy and oncogenic signaling is poorly characterized. Here we show that the evolutionarily conserved transcription factor Myc (dm), a proto-oncogene involved in cell growth and proliferation, is also a physiological regulator of autophagy in Drosophila melanogaster. Loss of Myc activity in null mutants or in somatic clones of cells inhibits autophagy. Forced expression of Myc results in cell-autonomous increases in cell growth, autophagy induction, and p62 (Ref2P)-mediated activation of Nrf2 (cnc), a transcription factor promoting antioxidant responses. Mechanistically, Myc overexpression increases unfolded protein response (UPR), which leads to PERK-dependent autophagy induction and may be responsible for p62 accumulation. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of UPR, autophagy or p62/Nrf2 signaling prevents Myc-induced overgrowth, while these pathways are dispensable for proper growth of control cells. In addition, we show that the autophagy and antioxidant pathways are required in parallel for excess cell growth driven by Myc. Deregulated expression of Myc drives tumor progression in most human cancers, and UPR and autophagy have been implicated in the survival of Myc-dependent cancer cells. Our data obtained in a complete animal show that UPR, autophagy and p62/Nrf2 signaling are required for Myc-dependent cell growth. These novel results give additional support for finding future approaches to specifically inhibit the growth of cancer cells addicted to oncogenic Myc. PMID:23950728

  1. The Unfolded Protein Response Plays a Predominant Homeostatic Role in Response to Mitochondrial Stress in Pancreatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Hsin-Yuan; Waldron, Richard T; Gong, Raymond; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Pandol, Stephen J; Lugea, Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PaSC) are key participants in the stroma of pancreatic cancer, secreting extracellular matrix proteins and inflammatory mediators. Tumors are poorly vascularized, creating metabolic stress conditions in cancer and stromal cells that necessitate adaptive homeostatic cellular programs. Activation of autophagy and the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR) have been described in hepatic stellate cells, but the role of these processes in PaSC responses to metabolic stress is unknown. We reported that the PI3K/mTOR pathway, which AMPK can regulate through multiple inputs, modulates PaSC activation and fibrogenic potential. Here, using primary and immortalized mouse PaSC, we assess the relative contributions of AMPK/mTOR signaling, autophagy and the UPR to cell fate responses during metabolic stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial uncoupler rottlerin at low doses (0.5-2.5 ?M) was added to cells cultured in 10% FBS complete media. Mitochondria rapidly depolarized, followed by altered mitochondrial dynamics and decreased cellular ATP levels. This mitochondrial dysfunction elicited rapid, sustained AMPK activation, mTOR pathway inhibition, and blockade of autophagic flux. Rottlerin treatment also induced rapid, sustained PERK/CHOP UPR signaling. Subsequently, high doses (>5 ?M) induced loss of cell viability and cell death. Interestingly, AMPK knock-down using siRNA did not prevent rottlerin-induced mTOR inhibition, autophagy, or CHOP upregulation, suggesting that AMPK is dispensable for these responses. Moreover, CHOP genetic deletion, but not AMPK knock-down, prevented rottlerin-induced apoptosis and supported cell survival, suggesting that UPR signaling is a major modulator of cell fate in PaSC during metabolic stress. Further, short-term rottlerin treatment reduced both PaSC fibrogenic potential and IL-6 mRNA expression. In contrast, expression levels of the angiogenic factors HGF and VEGF? were unaffected, and the immune modulator IL-4 was markedly upregulated. These data imply that metabolic stress-induced PaSC reprogramming differentially modulates neighboring cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26849807

  2. The Unfolded Protein Response Plays a Predominant Homeostatic Role in Response to Mitochondrial Stress in Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hsin-Yuan; Waldron, Richard T.; Gong, Raymond; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Pandol, Stephen J.; Lugea, Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PaSC) are key participants in the stroma of pancreatic cancer, secreting extracellular matrix proteins and inflammatory mediators. Tumors are poorly vascularized, creating metabolic stress conditions in cancer and stromal cells that necessitate adaptive homeostatic cellular programs. Activation of autophagy and the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR) have been described in hepatic stellate cells, but the role of these processes in PaSC responses to metabolic stress is unknown. We reported that the PI3K/mTOR pathway, which AMPK can regulate through multiple inputs, modulates PaSC activation and fibrogenic potential. Here, using primary and immortalized mouse PaSC, we assess the relative contributions of AMPK/mTOR signaling, autophagy and the UPR to cell fate responses during metabolic stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial uncoupler rottlerin at low doses (0.5–2.5 μM) was added to cells cultured in 10% FBS complete media. Mitochondria rapidly depolarized, followed by altered mitochondrial dynamics and decreased cellular ATP levels. This mitochondrial dysfunction elicited rapid, sustained AMPK activation, mTOR pathway inhibition, and blockade of autophagic flux. Rottlerin treatment also induced rapid, sustained PERK/CHOP UPR signaling. Subsequently, high doses (>5 μM) induced loss of cell viability and cell death. Interestingly, AMPK knock-down using siRNA did not prevent rottlerin-induced mTOR inhibition, autophagy, or CHOP upregulation, suggesting that AMPK is dispensable for these responses. Moreover, CHOP genetic deletion, but not AMPK knock-down, prevented rottlerin-induced apoptosis and supported cell survival, suggesting that UPR signaling is a major modulator of cell fate in PaSC during metabolic stress. Further, short-term rottlerin treatment reduced both PaSC fibrogenic potential and IL-6 mRNA expression. In contrast, expression levels of the angiogenic factors HGF and VEGFα were unaffected, and the immune modulator IL-4 was markedly upregulated. These data imply that metabolic stress-induced PaSC reprogramming differentially modulates neighboring cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26849807

  3. Neurodegeneration and unfolded-protein response in mice expressing a membrane-tethered flexible tail of PrP.

    PubMed

    Dametto, Paolo; Lakkaraju, Asvin K K; Bridel, Claire; Villiger, Lukas; O'Connor, Tracy; Herrmann, Uli S; Pelczar, Pawel; Rlicke, Thomas; McHugh, Donal; Adili, Arlind; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) consists of a flexible N-terminal tail (FT, aa 23-128) hinged to a membrane-anchored globular domain (GD, aa 129-231). Ligation of the GD with antibodies induces rapid neurodegeneration, which is prevented by deletion or functional inactivation of the FT. Therefore, the FT is an allosteric effector of neurotoxicity. To explore its mechanism of action, we generated transgenic mice expressing the FT fused to a GPI anchor, but lacking the GD (PrP?141-225, or "FTgpi"). Here we report that FTgpi mice develop a progressive, inexorably lethal neurodegeneration morphologically and biochemically similar to that triggered by anti-GD antibodies. FTgpi was mostly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it triggered a conspicuous unfolded protein response specifically activating the PERK pathway leading to phosphorylation of eIF2? and upregulation of CHOP ultimately leading to neurodegeration similar to what was observed in prion infection. PMID:25658480

  4. Neurodegeneration and Unfolded-Protein Response in Mice Expressing a Membrane-Tethered Flexible Tail of PrP

    PubMed Central

    Dametto, Paolo; Lakkaraju, Asvin K. K.; Bridel, Claire; Villiger, Lukas; OConnor, Tracy; Herrmann, Uli S.; Pelczar, Pawel; Rlicke, Thomas; McHugh, Donal; Adili, Arlind; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) consists of a flexible N-terminal tail (FT, aa 23128) hinged to a membrane-anchored globular domain (GD, aa 129231). Ligation of the GD with antibodies induces rapid neurodegeneration, which is prevented by deletion or functional inactivation of the FT. Therefore, the FT is an allosteric effector of neurotoxicity. To explore its mechanism of action, we generated transgenic mice expressing the FT fused to a GPI anchor, but lacking the GD (PrP?141225, or FTgpi). Here we report that FTgpi mice develop a progressive, inexorably lethal neurodegeneration morphologically and biochemically similar to that triggered by anti-GD antibodies. FTgpi was mostly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it triggered a conspicuous unfolded protein response specifically activating the PERK pathway leading to phosphorylation of eIF2? and upregulation of CHOP ultimately leading to neurodegeration similar to what was observed in prion infection. PMID:25658480

  5. Induction of the unfolded protein response and cell death pathway in Alzheimer's disease, but not in aged Tg2576 mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hwan; Won, Sun Mi; Suh, Jaehong; Son, Sun Joo; Moon, Gyeong Joon; Park, Ui-Jin

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress results from disrupted protein folding triggered by protein mutation or oxidation, reduced proteasome activity, and altered Ca2+ homeostasis. ER stress is accompanied by activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and cell death pathway. We examined if the UPR and cell death pathway would be activated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). RT-PCR experiments revealed increased splicing of X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1), an UPR transcription factor, in AD compared with age-matched control. Among target genes of XBP-1, expression of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), but not glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), was increased in AD, suggesting disturbed activation of the UPR in AD. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), caspase-3, caspase-4, and caspase-12, downstream mediators of cell death pathway, were activated in AD. Neither the UPR nor cell death pathway was induced in aged Tg2576 mice, a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease that reveals both plaque pathology and some cognitive deficits. The present study suggests that disturbed induction of the UPR and activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins contribute to neuropathological process in AD irrespective of amyloid ? and senile plaque. PMID:20368688

  6. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    van ‘t Wout, Emily F. A.; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E.; Clarke, Hanna J.; Tommassen, Jan; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to “ER stress” and activation of the “unfolded protein response” (UPR). Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR) which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host. PMID:26083346

  7. Blimp-1 controls plasma cell function through the regulation of immunoglobulin secretion and the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Tellier, Julie; Shi, Wei; Minnich, Martina; Liao, Yang; Crawford, Simon; Smyth, Gordon K; Kallies, Axel; Busslinger, Meinrad; Nutt, Stephen L

    2016-03-01

    Plasma cell differentiation requires silencing of B cell transcription, while it establishes antibody-secretory function and long-term survival. The transcription factors Blimp-1 and IRF4 are essential for the generation of plasma cells; however, their function in mature plasma cells has remained elusive. We found that while IRF4 was essential for the survival of plasma cells, Blimp-1 was dispensable for this. Blimp-1-deficient plasma cells retained their transcriptional identity but lost the ability to secrete antibody. Blimp-1 regulated many components of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including XBP-1 and ATF6. The overlap in the functions of Blimp-1 and XBP-1 was restricted to that response, with Blimp-1 uniquely regulating activity of the kinase mTOR and the size of plasma cells. Thus, Blimp-1 was required for the unique physiological ability of plasma cells that enables the secretion of protective antibody. PMID:26779600

  8. Crosstalk between the Unfolded Protein Response and NF-κB-Mediated Inflammation in the Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Gaile L.; Dickhout, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    The chronic inflammatory response is emerging as an important therapeutic target in progressive chronic kidney disease. A key transcription factor in the induction of chronic inflammation is NF-κB. Recent studies have demonstrated that sustained activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) can initiate this NF-κB signaling phenomenon and thereby induce chronic kidney disease progression. A key factor influencing chronic kidney disease progression is proteinuria and this condition has now been demonstrated to induce sustained UPR activation. This review details the crosstalk between the UPR and NF-κB pathways as pertinent to chronic kidney disease. We present potential tools to study this phenomenon as well as potential therapeutics that are emerging to regulate the UPR. These therapeutics may prevent inflammation specifically induced in the kidney due to proteinuria-induced sustained UPR activation. PMID:25977931

  9. Uterine endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response regulation of gestational length is caspase-3 and -7-dependent.

    PubMed

    Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara; Organ, Kenna; Moreci, Rebecca S; Anamthathmakula, Prashanth; Hassan, Sonia S; Caritis, Steve N; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Condon, Jennifer C

    2015-11-10

    We previously identified myometrial caspase-3 (CASP3) as a potential regulator of uterine quiescence. We also determined that during pregnancy, the functional activation of uterine CASP3 is likely governed by an integrated endoplasmic reticulum stress response (ERSR) and is consequently limited by an increased unfolded protein response (UPR). The present study examined the functional relevance of uterine UPR-ERSR in maintaining myometrial quiescence and regulating the timing of parturition. In vitro analysis of the human uterine myocyte hTERT-HM cell line revealed that tunicamycin (TM)-induced ERSR modified uterine myocyte contractile responsiveness. Accordingly, alteration of in vivo uterine UPR-ERSR using a pregnant mouse model significantly modified gestational length. We determined that "normal" gestational activation of the ERSR-induced CASP3 and caspase 7 (CASP7) maintains uterine quiescence through previously unidentified proteolytic targeting of the gap junction protein, alpha 1(GJA1); however, surprisingly, TM-induced uterine ERSR triggered an exaggerated UPR that eliminated uterine CASP3 and 7 tocolytic action precociously. These events allowed for a premature increase in myometrial GJA1 levels, elevated contractile responsiveness, and the onset of preterm labor. Importantly, a successful reversal of the magnified ERSR-induced preterm birth phenotype could be achieved by pretreatment with 4-phenylbutrate, a chaperone protein mimic. PMID:26504199

  10. Mitochondrial Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase Prevents Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response in Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Horsman, Joseph W; Miller, Dana L

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous molecule with important roles in cellular signaling. In mammals, exogenous H2S improves survival of ischemia/reperfusion. We have previously shown that exposure to H2S increases the lifespan and thermotolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans, and improves protein homeostasis in low oxygen. The mitochondrial SQRD-1 (sulfide quinone oxidoreductase) protein is a highly conserved enzyme involved in H2S metabolism. SQRD-1 is generally considered important to detoxify H2S. Here, we show that SQRD-1 is also required to maintain protein translation in H2S. In sqrd-1 mutant animals, exposure to H2S leads to phosphorylation of eIF2? and inhibition of protein synthesis. In contrast, global protein translation is not altered in wild-type animals exposed to lethally high H2S or in hif-1(ia04) mutants that die when exposed to low H2S. We demonstrate that both gcn-2 and pek-1 kinases are involved in the H2S-induced phosphorylation of eIF2?. Both ER and mitochondrial stress responses are activated in sqrd-1 mutant animals exposed to H2S, but not in wild-type animals. We speculate that SQRD-1 activity in H2S may coordinate proteostasis responses in multiple cellular compartments. PMID:26677221

  11. The unfolded protein response and its potential role in Huntington ´s disease elucidated by a systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Kalathur, Ravi Kiran Reddy; Giner-Lamia, Joaquin; Machado, Susana; Ayasolla, Kameshwar R S; Futschik, Matthias E.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington ´s disease (HD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease with a fatal outcome. Although the disease-causing gene (huntingtin) has been known for over 20 years, the exact mechanisms leading to neuronal cell death are still controversial. One potential mechanism contributing to the massive loss of neurons observed in the brain of HD patients could be the unfolded protein response (UPR) activated by accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). As an adaptive response to counter-balance accumulation of un- or misfolded proteins, the UPR upregulates transcription of chaperones, temporarily attenuates new translation, and activates protein degradation via the proteasome. However, persistent ER stress and an activated UPR can also cause apoptotic cell death. Although different studies have indicated a role for the UPR in HD, the evidence remains inconclusive. Here, we present extensive bioinformatic analyses that revealed UPR activation in different experimental HD models based on transcriptomic data. Accordingly, we have identified 58 genes, including RAB5A, HMGB1, CTNNB1, DNM1, TUBB, TSG101, EEF2, DYNC1H1 and SLC12A5 that provide a potential link between UPR and HD. To further elucidate the potential role of UPR as a disease-relevant process, we examined its connection to apoptosis based on molecular interaction data, and identified a set of 40 genes including ADD1, HSP90B1, IKBKB, IKBKG, RPS3A and LMNB1, which seem to be at the crossroads between these two important cellular processes. PMID:26949515

  12. Limitation of individual folding resources in the ER leads to outcomes distinct from the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Eletto, Davide; Maganty, Avinash; Eletto, Daniela; Dersh, Devin; Makarewich, Catherine; Biswas, Chhanda; Paton, James C.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Doroudgar, Shirin; Glembotski, Christopher C.; Argon, Yair

    2012-01-01

    Summary ER stress leads to upregulation of multiple folding and quality control components, known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Glucose Regulated Protein 78 (GRP78) (also known as binding immunoglobulin protein, BiP, and HSPA5) and GRP94 are often upregulated coordinately as part of this homeostatic response. Given that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones have distinct sets of clients, we asked how cells respond to ablation of individual chaperones. The cellular responses to silencing BiP, GRP94, HSP47, PDIA6 and OS-9, were distinct. When BiP was silenced, a widespread UPR was observed, but when GRP94 was either inhibited or depleted by RNA interference (RNAi), the expression of only some genes was induced, notably those encoding BiP and protein disulfide isomerase A6 (PDIA6). Silencing of HSP47 or OS-9 did not lead to any compensatory induction of other genes. The selective response to GRP94 depletion was distinct from a typical ER stress response, both because other UPR target genes were not affected and because the canonical UPR signaling branches were not activated. The response to silencing of GRP94 did not preclude further UPR induction when chemical stress was imposed. Importantly, re-expression of wild-type GRP94 in the silenced cells prevented the upregulation of BiP and PDIA6, whereas re-expression of an ATPase-deficient GRP94 mutant did not, indicating that cells monitor the activity state of GRP94. These findings suggest that cells are able to distinguish among folding resources and generate distinct responses. PMID:22854046

  13. Retention of chimeric Tat2-Gap1 permease in the endoplasmic reticulum induces unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takahiro; Kimata, Yukio; Uemura, Satoshi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, high-affinity tryptophan import is performed by subtle mechanisms involving tryptophan permease Tat2. We have shown that Tat2 requires 15 amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains (TMDs) for its import activity, whereas leucine permease Bap2 requires only seven corresponding residues for its leucine import. For this reason, the structure of Tat2 is elaborately designed to transport the hydrophobic and bulky tryptophan. Newly synthesized cell surface proteins first undergo endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated quality check before entering the secretory pathway. In this study, we used domain replacement with general amino acid permease Gap1 to show that Tat2 chimeric proteins were dysfunctional when TMD10 or TMD11 was replaced. These chimeras formed large 270-800-kDa protein complexes and were stably retained in the ER membrane without efficient degradation. In contrast, Tat2 chimeras of TMD9 or TMD12 retained some of their tryptophan import activity and underwent vacuolar degradation as observed with wild-type Tat2. Thus, ours results suggest that TMD10 and TMD11 are essential for the correct folding of Tat2, probably because of their interdomain interactions. Notably, overexpression of Tat2-Gap1 chimera of TMD10 activated the unfolded protein response (UPR) element-lacZ reporter, suggesting that ER retention of the protein aggregates induces the UPR. PMID:26071436

  14. A mathematical model of the unfolded protein stress response reveals the decision mechanism for recovery, adaptation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a major signalling cascade acting in the quality control of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The cascade is known to play an accessory role in a range of genetic and environmental disorders including neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and kidney diseases. The three major receptors of the ER stress involved with the UPR, i.e. IRE1 α, PERK and ATF6, signal through a complex web of pathways to convey an appropriate response. The emerging behaviour ranges from adaptive to maladaptive depending on the severity of unfolded protein accumulation in the ER; however, the decision mechanism for the switch and its timing have so far been poorly understood. Results Here, we propose a mechanism by which the UPR outcome switches between survival and death. We compose a mathematical model integrating the three signalling branches, and perform a comprehensive bifurcation analysis to investigate possible responses to stimuli. The analysis reveals three distinct states of behaviour, low, high and intermediate activity, associated with stress adaptation, tolerance, and the initiation of apoptosis. The decision to adapt or destruct can, therefore, be understood as a dynamic process where the balance between the stress and the folding capacity of the ER plays a pivotal role in managing the delivery of the most appropriate response. The model demonstrates for the first time that the UPR is capable of generating oscillations in translation attenuation and the apoptotic signals, and this is supplemented with a Bayesian sensitivity analysis identifying a set of parameters controlling this behaviour. Conclusions This work contributes largely to the understanding of one of the most ubiquitous signalling pathways involved in protein folding quality control in the metazoan ER. The insights gained have direct consequences on the management of many UPR-related diseases, revealing, in addition, an extended list of candidate disease modifiers. Demonstration of stress adaptation sheds light to how preconditioning might be beneficial in manifesting the UPR outcome to prevent untimely apoptosis, and paves the way to novel approaches for the treatment of many UPR-related conditions. PMID:23433609

  15. Disease-related amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme trigger the unfolded protein response and disturb eye development in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kumita, Janet R; Helmfors, Linda; Williams, Jocy; Luheshi, Leila M; Menzer, Linda; Dumoulin, Mireille; Lomas, David A; Crowther, Damian C; Dobson, Christopher M; Brorsson, Ann-Christin

    2012-01-01

    We have created a Drosophila model of lysozyme amyloidosis to investigate the in vivo behavior of disease-associated variants. To achieve this objective, wild-type (WT) protein and the amyloidogenic variants F57I and D67H were expressed in Drosophila melanogaster using the UAS-gal4 system and both the ubiquitous and retinal expression drivers Act5C-gal4 and gmr-gal4. The nontransgenic w(1118) Drosophila line was used as a control throughout. We utilized ELISA experiments to probe lysozyme protein levels, scanning electron microscopy for eye phenotype classification, and immunohistochemistry to detect the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation. We observed that expressing the destabilized F57I and D67H lysozymes triggers UPR activation, resulting in degradation of these variants, whereas the WT lysozyme is secreted into the fly hemolymph. Indeed, the level of WT was up to 17 times more abundant than the variant proteins. In addition, the F57I variant gave rise to a significant disruption of the eye development, and this correlated to pronounced UPR activation. These results support the concept that the onset of familial amyloid disease is linked to an inability of the UPR to degrade completely the amyloidogenic lysozymes prior to secretion, resulting in secretion of these destabilized variants, thereby leading to deposition and associated organ damage. PMID:21965601

  16. Crosstalk between the Unfolded Protein Response and Pathways That Regulate Pathogenic Development in Ustilago maydis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Heimel, Kai; Freitag, Johannes; Hampel, Martin; Ast, Julia; Blker, Michael; Kmper, Jrg

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway regulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis during ER stress, which results, for example, from an increased demand for protein secretion. Here, we characterize the homologs of the central UPR regulatory proteins Hac1 (for Homologous to ATF/CREB1) and Inositol Requiring Enzyme1 in the plant pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis and demonstrate that the UPR is tightly interlinked with the b mating-type-dependent signaling pathway that regulates pathogenic development. Exact timing of UPR is required for virulence, since premature activation interferes with the b-dependent switch from budding to filamentous growth. In addition, we found crosstalk between UPR and the b target Clampless1 (Clp1), which is essential for cell cycle release and proliferation in planta. The unusual C-terminal extension of the U. maydis Hac1 homolog, Cib1 (for Clp1 interacting bZIP1), mediates direct interaction with Clp1. The interaction between Clp1 and Cib1 promotes stabilization of Clp1, resulting in enhanced ER stress tolerance that prevents deleterious UPR hyperactivation. Thus, the interaction between Cib1 and Clp1 constitutes a checkpoint to time developmental progression and increased secretion of effector proteins at the onset of biotrophic development. Crosstalk between UPR and the b mating-type regulated developmental program adapts ER homeostasis to the changing demands during biotrophy. PMID:24179126

  17. Machinery of protein folding and unfolding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Beuron, Fabienne; Freemont, Paul S

    2002-04-01

    During the past two years, a large amount of biochemical, biophysical and low- to high-resolution structural data have provided mechanistic insights into the machinery of protein folding and unfolding. It has emerged that dual functionality in terms of folding and unfolding might exist for some systems. The majority of folding/unfolding machines adopt oligomeric ring structures in a cooperative fashion and utilise the conformational changes induced by ATP binding/hydrolysis for their specific functions. PMID:11959502

  18. Activated AMPK boosts the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling axis—A role for the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kristin; Baldinger, Johannes; Mayerhofer, Barbara; Atanasov, Atanas G.; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the emerging interplay between redox and metabolic signaling pathways we investigated the potential cross talk between nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), central regulators of the cellular redox and energy balance, respectively. Making use of xanthohumol (XN) as an activator of both the AMPK and the Nrf2 signaling pathway we show that AMPK exerts a positive influence on Nrf2/heme oxygenase (HO)-1 signaling in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Genetic ablation and pharmacological inhibition of AMPK blunts Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression by XN already at the mRNA level. XN leads to AMPK activation via interference with mitochondrial function and activation of liver kinase B1 as upstream AMPK kinase. The subsequent AMPK-mediated enhancement of the Nrf2/HO-1 response does not depend on inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin, inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, or altered abundance of Nrf2 (total and nuclear). However, reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress was identified and elaborated as a step in the AMPK-augmented Nrf2/HO-1 response. Overall, we shed more light on the hitherto incompletely understood cross talk between the LKB1/AMPK and the Nrf2/HO-1 axis revealing for the first time involvement of the unfolded protein response as an additional player and suggesting tight cooperation between signaling pathways controlling cellular redox, energy, or protein homeostasis. PMID:25843659

  19. Impaired unfolded protein response in the degeneration of cochlea cells in a mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Sun, Yu; Chen, Sen; Zhou, Xingxing; Wu, Xia; Kong, Wen; Kong, Weijia

    2015-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) to prevent the accumulation of proteins in an aberrant conformation. The UPR can restore homeostasis by upregulating ER chaperones, such as glucose-regulated protein 78kD (GRP78), to refold the incorrectly handled protein, and by degrading the misfolded proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome system. ER stress was recently demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases. In this study, we measured the expression levels of GRP78 and ubiquitinated proteins in the cochleae of young C57BL/6 mice and aged mice to assess the capacity of the UPR. The lower expression of GRP78 and the increased number of ubiquitinated proteins observed in the cochleae of aged mice suggested that the capacity of the UPR was impaired and that the cell death pathway was activated. We found a markedly increased expression of the ER-related pro-apoptotic factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in the cochleae of aged mice, whereas the level of cleaved caspase-12 did not differ between the two groups. In addition, the cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 was significantly increased in the aged cochleae, suggesting the activation of apoptosis in the cochleae resulting from the cross-talk between the ER and mitochondria through CHOP. These results indicated that impaired UPR in the cochleae of aged C57BL/6 mice resulting in ER stress may lead to apoptosis that is dependent on the mitochondrial pathway and that ER stress induced apoptosis may not be mediated by caspase-12. PMID:26173054

  20. The critical roles of endoplasmic reticulum chaperones and unfolded protein response in tumorigenesis and anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Biquan; Lee, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer progression is characterized by rapidly proliferating cancer cells that are in need of increased protein synthesis. Therefore, enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activity is required to facilitate the folding, assembly and transportation of membrane and secretory proteins. These functions are carried out by ER chaperones. It is now becoming clear that the ER chaperones have critical functions outside of simply facilitating protein folding. For example, cancer progression requires GRP78 for cancer cell survival and proliferation, as well as angiogenesis in the microenvironment. GRP78 can translocate to the cell surface acting as a receptor regulating oncogenic signaling and cell viability. Calreticulin, another ER chaperone, can translocate to the cell surface of apoptotic cancer cells and induce immunogenic cancer cell death and antitumor responses in vivo. Tumor-secreted GRP94 has been shown to elicit antitumor immune responses when used as antitumor vaccines. Protein disulfide isomerase is another ER chaperone that demonstrates pro-oncogenic and pro-survival functions. Due to intrinsic alterations of cellular metabolism and extrinsic factors in the tumor microenvironment, cancer cells are under ER stress, and they respond to this stress by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR). Depending on the severity and duration of ER stress, the signaling branches of the UPR can activate adaptive and pro-survival signals, or induce apoptotic cell death. The PERK signaling branch of the UPR has a dual role in cancer proliferation and survival, and is also required for ER stress-induced autophagy. The activation of the IRE1? branch promotes tumorigenesis, cancer cell survival, and regulates tumor invasion. In summary, perturbance of ER homeostasis plays critical roles in tumorigenesis, and therapeutic modulation of ER chaperones and/or UPR components presents potential antitumor treatments. PMID:22508478

  1. Targeting the unfolded protein response, XBP1, and the NLRP3 inflammasome in fibrosis and cancer.

    PubMed

    Overley-Adamson, Beth; Artlett, Carol M; Stephens, Connie; Sassi-Gaha, Sihem; Weis, Ransome D; Thacker, James D

    2014-04-01

    Increasing health care costs in the US are due in a large part to the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases in an aging population. Current therapeutic strategies for treating chronic diseases alleviate symptoms allowing patients to live longer with these diseases, but they do little, however, to alter the underlying disease course. Recent advances in molecular biology are revealing new drug targets that may significantly alter the course of these diseases and, as a result, offer economic relief from burgeoning health care costs. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated as an underlying pathology in many chronic diseases, and, therefore, the development of therapies designed to ameliorate ER stress may yield novel, effective treatment strategies. Herein, we report that X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) may be one of the earliest proteins engaged in response to ER stress. We show that a new signaling peptide derived from the ER-embedded transient receptor potential calcium channel protein 1 (TRPC1) engages XBP1 upstream of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated maturation and secretion of IL-1?/IL-18. Moreover, we show that a synthetic homolog of this signaling peptide (Naclynamide) administered intravenously twice weekly over a 4-week treatment course induced suppuration and evoked partial or complete resolution of lesions associated with a fibrotic granuloma, a lymphosarcoma, and a colo-rectal carcinoma in canine patients. The mode of action for Naclynamide as a first-in-class anti-cancer drug candidate is discussed. PMID:24496016

  2. Unfolded Protein Response-regulated Drosophila Fic (dFic) Protein Reversibly AMPylates BiP Chaperone during Endoplasmic Reticulum Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyeilin; Woolery, Andrew R.; Tracy, Charles; Stenesen, Drew; Krämer, Helmut; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Fic (dFic) mediates AMPylation, a covalent attachment of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from ATP to hydroxyl side chains of protein substrates. Here, we identified the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone BiP as a substrate for dFic and mapped the modification site to Thr-366 within the ATPase domain. The level of AMPylated BiP in Drosophila S2 cells is high during homeostasis, whereas the level of AMPylated BiP decreases upon the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER. Both dFic and BiP are transcriptionally activated upon ER stress, supporting the role of dFic in the unfolded protein response pathway. The inactive conformation of BiP is the preferred substrate for dFic, thus endorsing a model whereby AMPylation regulates the function of BiP as a chaperone, allowing acute activation of BiP by deAMPylation during an ER stress response. These findings not only present the first substrate of eukaryotic AMPylator but also provide a target for regulating the unfolded protein response, an emerging avenue for cancer therapy. PMID:25395623

  3. The importance of connections between the cell wall integrity pathway and the unfolded protein response in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Malavazi, Iran; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Brown, Neil Andrew

    2014-11-01

    In the external environment, or within a host organism, filamentous fungi experience sudden changes in nutrient availability, osmolality, pH, temperature and the exposure to toxic compounds. The fungal cell wall represents the first line of defense, while also performing essential roles in morphology, development and virulence. A polarized secretion system is paramount for cell wall biosynthesis, filamentous growth, nutrient acquisition and interactions with the environment. The unique ability of filamentous fungi to secrete has resulted in their industrial adoption as fungal cell factories. Protein maturation and secretion commences in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) maintains ER functionality during exposure to secretion and cell wall stress. UPR, therefore, influences secretion and cell wall homeostasis, which in turn impacts upon numerous fungal traits important to pathogenesis and biotechnology. Subsequently, this review describes the relevance of the cell wall and UPR systems to filamentous fungal pathogens or industrial microbes and then highlights interconnections between the two systems. Ultimately, the possible biotechnological applications of an enhanced understanding of such regulatory systems in combating fungal disease, or the removal of natural bottlenecks in protein secretion in an industrial setting, are discussed. PMID:25060881

  4. Grp78 Heterozygosity Promotes Adaptive Unfolded Protein Response and Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Risheng; Jung, Dae Young; Jun, John Y.; Li, Jianze; Luo, Shengzhan; Ko, Hwi Jin; Kim, Jason K.; Lee, Amy S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78/BiP in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male Grp78+/? mice and their wild-type littermates were subjected to a high-fat diet (HFD) regimen. Pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes was examined by multiple approaches of metabolic phenotyping. Tissue-specific insulin sensitivity was analyzed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Molecular mechanism was explored via immunoblotting and tissue culture manipulation. RESULTS Grp78 heterozygosity increases energy expenditure and attenuates HFD-induced obesity. Grp78+/? mice are resistant to diet-induced hyperinsulinemia, liver steatosis, white adipose tissue (WAT) inflammation, and hyperglycemia. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies revealed that Grp78 heterozygosity improves glucose metabolism independent of adiposity and following an HFD increases insulin sensitivity predominantly in WAT. As mechanistic explanations, Grp78 heterozygosity in WAT under HFD stress promotes adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), attenuates translational block, and upregulates ER degradation-enhancing ?-mannosidaselike protein (EDEM) and ER chaperones, thus improving ER quality control and folding capacity. Further, overexpression of the active form of ATF6 induces protective UPR and improves insulin signaling upon ER stress. CONCLUSIONS HFD-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes are improved in Grp78+/? mice. Adaptive UPR in WAT could contribute to this improvement, linking ER homeostasis to energy balance and glucose metabolism. PMID:19808896

  5. Vitiligo-inducing phenols activate the unfolded protein response in melanocytes resulting in upregulation of IL6 and IL8.

    PubMed

    Toosi, Siavash; Orlow, Seth J; Manga, Prashiela

    2012-11-01

    Vitiligo is characterized by depigmented skin patches caused by loss of epidermal melanocytes. Oxidative stress may have a role in vitiligo onset, while autoimmunity contributes to disease progression. In this study, we sought to identify mechanisms that link disease triggers and spreading of lesions. A hallmark of melanocytes at the periphery of vitiligo lesions is dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We hypothesized that oxidative stress results in redox disruptions that extend to the ER, causing accumulation of misfolded peptides, which activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). We used 4-tertiary butyl phenol and monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone, known triggers of vitiligo. We show that expression of key UPR components, including the transcription factor X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1), is increased following exposure of melanocytes to phenols. XBP1 activation increases production of immune mediators IL6 and IL8. Co-treatment with XBP1 inhibitors reduced IL6 and IL8 production induced by phenols, while overexpression of XBP1 alone increased their expression. Thus, melanocytes themselves produce cytokines associated with activation of an immune response following exposure to chemical triggers of vitiligo. These results expand our understanding of the mechanisms underlying melanocyte loss in vitiligo and pathways linking environmental stressors and autoimmunity. PMID:22696056

  6. Vitiligo-inducing phenols activate the unfolded protein response in melanocytes resulting in upregulation of IL6 and IL8.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Toosi S; Orlow SJ; Manga P

    2012-11-01

    Vitiligo is characterized by depigmented skin patches caused by loss of epidermal melanocytes. Oxidative stress may have a role in vitiligo onset, while autoimmunity contributes to disease progression. In this study, we sought to identify mechanisms that link disease triggers and spreading of lesions. A hallmark of melanocytes at the periphery of vitiligo lesions is dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We hypothesized that oxidative stress results in redox disruptions that extend to the ER, causing accumulation of misfolded peptides, which activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). We used 4-tertiary butyl phenol and monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone, known triggers of vitiligo. We show that expression of key UPR components, including the transcription factor X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1), is increased following exposure of melanocytes to phenols. XBP1 activation increases production of immune mediators IL6 and IL8. Co-treatment with XBP1 inhibitors reduced IL6 and IL8 production induced by phenols, while overexpression of XBP1 alone increased their expression. Thus, melanocytes themselves produce cytokines associated with activation of an immune response following exposure to chemical triggers of vitiligo. These results expand our understanding of the mechanisms underlying melanocyte loss in vitiligo and pathways linking environmental stressors and autoimmunity.

  7. Vitiligo inducing phenols activate the unfolded protein response in melanocytes resulting in upregulation of IL6 and IL8

    PubMed Central

    Toosi, Siavash; Orlow, Seth J.; Manga, Prashiela

    2012-01-01

    Vitiligo is characterized by depigmented skin patches due to loss of epidermal melanocytes. Oxidative stress may play a role in vitiligo onset, while autoimmunity contributes to disease progression. In this study we sought to identify mechanisms that link disease triggers and spreading of lesions. A hallmark of melanocytes at the periphery of vitiligo lesions is dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We hypothesized that oxidative stress results in redox disruptions that extend to the ER, causing accumulation of misfolded peptides, which activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). We used 4-tertiary butyl phenol (4-TBP) and monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone (MBEH), known triggers of vitiligo. We show that expression of key UPR components, including the transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), are increased following exposure of melanocytes to phenols. XBP1 activation increases production of immune mediators interleukin-6 (IL6) and IL8. Co-treatment with XBP1 inhibitors reduced IL6 and IL8 production induced by phenols, while over-expression of XBP1 alone increased their expression. Thus, melanocytes themselves produce cytokines associated with activation of an immune response following exposure to chemical triggers of vitiligo. These results expand our understanding of the mechanisms underlying melanocyte loss in vitiligo and pathways linking environmental stressors and autoimmunity. PMID:22696056

  8. GLP-1 Analogs Reduce Hepatocyte Steatosis and Improve Survival by Enhancing the Unfolded Protein Response and Promoting Macroautophagy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shvetank; Mells, Jamie E.; Fu, Ping P.; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Anania, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a known outcome of hepatosteatosis. Free fatty acids (FFA) induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that may induce apoptosis. Recent data indicate ER stress to be a major player in the progression of fatty liver to more aggressive lesions. Autophagy on the other hand has been demonstrated to be protective against ER stress- induced cell death. We hypothesized that exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog) treatment of fat loaded hepatocytes can reduce steatosis by autophagy which leads to reduced ER stress-related hepatocyte apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary human hepatocytes were loaded with saturated, cis- and trans-unsaturated fatty acids (palmitic, oleic and elaidic acid respectively). Steatosis, induced with all three fatty acids, was significantly resolved after exendin-4 treatment. Exendin-4 sustained levels of GRP78 expression in fat-loaded cells when compared to untreated fat-loaded cells alone. In contrast, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein); the penultimate protein that leads to ER stress-related cell death was significantly decreased by exendin-4 in hepatocytes loaded with fatty acids. Finally, exendin-4 in fat loaded hepatocytes clearly promoted gene products associated with macroautophagy as measured by enhanced production of both Beclin-1 and LC3B-II, markers for autophagy; and visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Similar observations were made in mouse liver lysates after mice were fed with high fat high fructose diet and treated with a long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide. Conclusions/Significance GLP-1 proteins appear to protect hepatocytes from fatty acid-related death by prohibition of a dysfunctional ER stress response; and reduce fatty acid accumulation, by activation of both macro-and chaperone-mediated autophagy. These findings provide a novel role for GLP-1 proteins in halting the progression of more aggressive lesions from underlying steatosis in humans afflicted with NAFLD. PMID:21957486

  9. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is a complex process involving several metabolic and signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated apoptosis can be induced in the pathological conditions of atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the disease progression. Notably, they may play a role in the development of vulnerable plaques that induce thrombosis and are therefore especially dangerous. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response is regulated by several signaling mechanisms that involve protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these molecules can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets to improve treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we will discuss the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in atherosclerosis development in different cell types and summarize the current knowledge on potential therapeutic agents targeting molecules regulating these pathways and their possible use for anti-atherosclerotic therapy. PMID:26840309

  10. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is a complex process involving several metabolic and signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated apoptosis can be induced in the pathological conditions of atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the disease progression. Notably, they may play a role in the development of vulnerable plaques that induce thrombosis and are therefore especially dangerous. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response is regulated by several signaling mechanisms that involve protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these molecules can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets to improve treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we will discuss the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in atherosclerosis development in different cell types and summarize the current knowledge on potential therapeutic agents targeting molecules regulating these pathways and their possible use for anti-atherosclerotic therapy. PMID:26840309

  11. Loss of Oca2 disrupts the unfolded protein response and increases resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsing; Orlow, Seth J; Manga, Prashiela

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) typically induces stress and initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to facilitate recovery. If homeostasis is not restored, apoptosis is induced. However, adaptation to chronic UPR activation can increase resistance to subsequent acute ER stress. We therefore investigated adaptive mechanisms in Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (Oca2)-null melanocytes where UPR signaling is arrested despite continued tyrosinase accumulation leading to resistance to the chemical ER stressor thapsigargin. Although thapsigargin triggers UPR activation, instead of Perk-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α, in Oca2-null melanocytes, eIF2α was rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment. Dephosphorylation was mediated by the Gadd34-PP1α phosphatase complex. Gadd34-complex inhibition blocked eIF2α dephosphorylation and significantly increased Oca2-null melanocyte sensitivity to thapsigargin. Thus, Oca2-null melanocytes adapt to acute ER stress by disruption of pro-apoptotic Perk signaling, which promotes cell survival. This is the first study to demonstrate rapid eIF2α dephosphorylation as an adaptive mechanism to ER stress. PMID:23962237

  12. Alpha-fetoprotein is a biomarker of unfolded protein response and altered proteostasis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells exposed to sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Houessinon, Aline; Gicquel, Albane; Bochereau, Flora; Louandre, Christophe; Nyga, Rmy; Godin, Corinne; Degonville, James; Fournier, Emma; Saidak, Zuzana; Drullion, Claire; Barbare, Jean-Claude; Chauffert, Bruno; Franois, Catherine; Pluquet, Olivier; Galmiche, Antoine

    2016-01-28

    Sorafenib is the treatment of reference for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A decrease in the serum levels of Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is reported to be the biological parameter that is best associated with disease control by sorafenib. In order to provide a biological rationale for the variations of AFP, we analyzed the various steps of AFP production in human HCC cell lines exposed to sorafenib. Sorafenib dramatically reduced the levels of AFP produced by HCC cells independently of its effect on cell viability. The mRNA levels of AFP decreased upon sorafenib treatment, while the AFP protein remained localized in the Golgi apparatus. Sorafenib activated the Regulated Inositol-Requiring Enzyme-1? (IRE-1?) and the PKR-like ER Kinase (PERK)-dependent arms of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The inhibition of IRE-1? partially restored the mRNA levels of AFP upon treatment with sorafenib. The inhibition of both pathways partially prevented the drop in the production of AFP induced by sorafenib. The findings provide new insights on the regulation of AFP, and identify it as a biomarker suitable for the exploration of HCC cell proteostasis in the context of therapeutic targeting. PMID:26546044

  13. Loss of Oca2 disrupts the unfolded protein response and increases resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tsing; Orlow, Seth J.; Manga, Prashiela

    2013-01-01

    Summary Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) typically induces stress and initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to facilitate recovery. If homeostasis is not restored, apoptosis is induced. However, adaptation to chronic UPR activation can increase resistance to subsequent acute ER stress. We therefore investigated adaptive mechanisms in Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (Oca2)-null melanocytes where UPR signaling is arrested despite continued tyrosinase accumulation leading to resistance to the chemical ER stressor thapsigargin. Although thapsigargin triggers UPR activation, instead of Perk-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α, in Oca2-null melanocytes, eIF2α was rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment. Dephosphorylation was mediated by the Gadd34-PP1α phosphatase complex. Gadd34-complex inhibition blocked eIF2α dephosphorylation and significantly increased Oca2-null melanocyte sensitivity to thapsigargin. Thus, Oca2-null melanocytes adapt to acute ER stress by disruption of proapoptotic Perk signaling, which promotes cell survival. This is the first study to demonstrate rapid eIF2α dephosphorylation as an adaptive mechanism to ER stress. PMID:23962237

  14. The ATF6 branch of unfolded protein response and apoptosis are activated to promote African swine fever virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, I; Hernez, B; Muoz-Moreno, R; Cuesta-Geijo, M A; Dalmau-Mena, I; Alonso, C

    2012-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection induces apoptosis in the infected cell; however, the consequences of this activation on virus replication have not been defined. In order to identify the role of apoptosis in ASFV infection, we analyzed caspase induction during the infection and the impact of caspase inhibition on viral production. Caspases 3, 9 and 12 were activated from 16?h post-infection, but not caspase 8. Indeed, caspase 3 activation during the early stages of the infection appeared to be crucial for efficient virus exit. In addition, the inhibition of membrane blebbing reduced the release of virus particles from the cell. ASFV uses the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a site of replication and this process can trigger ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) of the host cell. In addition to caspase 12 activation, indicators of ER stress include the upregulation of the chaperones calnexin and calreticulin upon virus infection. Moreover, ASFV induces transcription factor 6 signaling pathway of the UPR, but not the protein kinase-like ER kinase or the inositol-requiring enzyme 1 pathways. Thus, the capacity of ASFV to regulate the UPR may prevent early apoptosis and ensure viral replication. PMID:22764100

  15. RTCB-1 Mediates Neuroprotection via XBP-1 mRNA Splicing in the Unfolded Protein Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arpita; Zhang, Siyuan; Rentas, Courtney; Caldwell, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons and age-dependent formation of protein inclusions that contain the ?-synuclein (?-syn) protein. RNA interference (RNAi) screening using Caenorhabditis elegans identified RTCB-1, an uncharacterized gene product, as one of several significant modifiers of ?-syn protein misfolding. RTCB-1 is the worm ortholog of the human HSPC117 protein, a component of RNA trafficking granules in mammalian neurons. Here we show that RTCB-1 protects C. elegans DA neurons from age-dependent degeneration induced by human ?-syn. Moreover, neuronal-specific RNAi depletion of rtcb-1 enhanced ?-syn-induced degeneration. Similar results were obtained when worms were exposed to the DA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. HSPC117 has been characterized recently as an essential subunit of the human tRNA splicing ligase complex. tRNA ligases have alternative functions in RNA repair and nonconventional mRNA splicing events. For example, in yeast, unconventional splicing of HAC1, a transcription factor that controls the unfolded protein response (UPR), is mediated by a tRNA ligase. In C. elegans, we demonstrate that RTCB-1 is necessary for xbp-1 (worm homolog of HAC1) mRNA splicing. Moreover, using a RNA ligase-dead mutant, we determine that the ligase activity of worm RTCB-1 is required for its neuroprotective role, which, in turn, is mediated through XBP-1 in the UPR pathway. Collectively, these studies highlight the mechanistic intersection of RNA processing and proteostasis in mediating neuroprotection. PMID:25429148

  16. RTCB-1 mediates neuroprotection via XBP-1 mRNA splicing in the unfolded protein response pathway.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arpita; Zhang, Siyuan; Rentas, Courtney; Caldwell, Kim A; Caldwell, Guy A

    2014-11-26

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons and age-dependent formation of protein inclusions that contain the ?-synuclein (?-syn) protein. RNA interference (RNAi) screening using Caenorhabditis elegans identified RTCB-1, an uncharacterized gene product, as one of several significant modifiers of ?-syn protein misfolding. RTCB-1 is the worm ortholog of the human HSPC117 protein, a component of RNA trafficking granules in mammalian neurons. Here we show that RTCB-1 protects C. elegans DA neurons from age-dependent degeneration induced by human ?-syn. Moreover, neuronal-specific RNAi depletion of rtcb-1 enhanced ?-syn-induced degeneration. Similar results were obtained when worms were exposed to the DA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. HSPC117 has been characterized recently as an essential subunit of the human tRNA splicing ligase complex. tRNA ligases have alternative functions in RNA repair and nonconventional mRNA splicing events. For example, in yeast, unconventional splicing of HAC1, a transcription factor that controls the unfolded protein response (UPR), is mediated by a tRNA ligase. In C. elegans, we demonstrate that RTCB-1 is necessary for xbp-1 (worm homolog of HAC1) mRNA splicing. Moreover, using a RNA ligase-dead mutant, we determine that the ligase activity of worm RTCB-1 is required for its neuroprotective role, which, in turn, is mediated through XBP-1 in the UPR pathway. Collectively, these studies highlight the mechanistic intersection of RNA processing and proteostasis in mediating neuroprotection. PMID:25429148

  17. Exposure to inhaled particulate matter activates early markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and unfolded protein response in rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, R.; Vera-Aguilar, E.; Uribe-Ramirez, M.; Gookin, G.; Camacho, J.; Osornio-Vargas, A.R.; Mugica-Alvarez, V.; Angulo-Olais, R.; Campbell, A.; Froines, J.; Kleinman, T.M.; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A.

    2014-01-01

    To study central nervous system airborne PM related subchronic toxicity, SD male rats were exposed for eight weeks to either coarse (32 g/m3), fine (178 g/m3) or ultrafine (107 g/m3) concentrated PM or filtered air. Different brain regions (olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus), were harvested from the rats following exposure to airborne PM. Subsequently, prooxidant (HO-1 and SOD-2), and inflammatory markers (IL-1? and TNF?), apoptotic (caspase 3), and unfolded protein response (UPR) markers (XBP-1S and BiP), were also measured using real-time PCR. Activation of nuclear transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-?B, associated with antioxidant and inflammation processes, respectively, were also analyzed by GSMA. Ultrafine PM increased HO-1 and SOD-2 mRNA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, in the presence of Nrf-2 activation. Also, ultrafine PM activated NF-?B and increased IL-1? and TNF? in the striatum. Activation of UPR was observed after exposure to coarse PM through the increment of XBP-1S and BiP in the striatum, accompanied by an increase in antioxidant response markers HO-1 and SOD-2. Our results indicate that exposure to different size fractions of PM may induce physiological changes (in a neuroanatomical manner) in the central nervous system (CNS), specifically within the striatum, where inflammation, oxidative stress and UPR signals were effectively activated. PMID:23892126

  18. Carbon ions induce autophagy effectively through stimulating the unfolded protein response and subsequent inhibiting Akt phosphorylation in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaodong; Li, Feifei; Zheng, Xiaogang; Liu, Yan; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Liu, Xiongxiong; Li, Ping; Zhao, Ting; Dai, Zhongying; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Heavy ion beams have advantages over conventional radiation in radiotherapy due to their superb biological effectiveness and dose conformity. However, little information is currently available concerning the cellular and molecular basis for heavy ion radiation-induced autophagy. In this study, human glioblastoma SHG44 and cervical cancer HeLa cells were irradiated with carbon ions of different linear energy transfers (LETs) and X-rays. Our results revealed increased LC3-II and decreased p62 levels in SHG44 and HeLa cells post-irradiation, indicating marked induction of autophagy. The autophagic level of tumor cells after irradiation increased in a LET-dependent manner and was inversely correlated with the sensitivity to radiations of various qualities. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high-LET carbon ions stimulated the unfolded protein response (UPR) and mediated autophagy via the UPR-eIF2?-CHOP-Akt signaling axis. High-LET carbon ions more severely inhibited Akt-mTOR through UPR to effectively induce autophagy. Thus, the present data could serve as an important radiobiological basis to further understand the molecular mechanisms by which high-LET radiation induces cell death. PMID:26338671

  19. Ouabain Targets the Unfolded Protein Response for Selective Killing of HepG2 Cells During Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Tulay; Nar, Rukiye; Kilinc, Veli; Salis, Osman; Duzgun, Aynur; Gulten, Sedat; Bedir, Abdulkerim

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ouabain is a cardiotonic steroid and specific inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase. The relationship between ouabain treatment and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cells is not precisely understood. Therefore, we studied the possible effects of ouabain on proliferation, apoptosis, and the UPR. HepG2 cells were cultured overnight and then treated with various concentrations of ouabain (0.75 to 750 nM) in the absence or presence of 10 mM 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) for 48 hours. We also used real-time polymerase chain reaction to obtain quantitative measurements of expression levels of Grp78, Grp94, CHOP, MTJ-1, HKII, MDR-1, MRP-1, HO-1, and Par-4. Cell number, viability, and proliferation of HepG2 cells were monitored with a real-time cell analyzer system (xCELLigence). We show that ouabain modulates the UPR transcription program and induces cell death in glucose-deprived tumor cells. Ouabain at all concentrations showed no cytotoxicity whereas all concentrations were very effective under 2-DG stress conditions. Our findings show that disruption of the UPR during glucose deprivation could be an attractive approach for selective cancer cell killing and could provide a chemical basis for developing UPR-targeting drugs against solid tumors. Ouabain use as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapy also warrants vigorous investigation. PMID:22757644

  20. Carbon ions induce autophagy effectively through stimulating the unfolded protein response and subsequent inhibiting Akt phosphorylation in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaodong; Li, Feifei; Zheng, Xiaogang; Liu, Yan; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Liu, Xiongxiong; Li, Ping; Zhao, Ting; Dai, Zhongying; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Heavy ion beams have advantages over conventional radiation in radiotherapy due to their superb biological effectiveness and dose conformity. However, little information is currently available concerning the cellular and molecular basis for heavy ion radiation-induced autophagy. In this study, human glioblastoma SHG44 and cervical cancer HeLa cells were irradiated with carbon ions of different linear energy transfers (LETs) and X-rays. Our results revealed increased LC3-II and decreased p62 levels in SHG44 and HeLa cells post-irradiation, indicating marked induction of autophagy. The autophagic level of tumor cells after irradiation increased in a LET-dependent manner and was inversely correlated with the sensitivity to radiations of various qualities. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high-LET carbon ions stimulated the unfolded protein response (UPR) and mediated autophagy via the UPR-eIF2α-CHOP-Akt signaling axis. High-LET carbon ions more severely inhibited Akt-mTOR through UPR to effectively induce autophagy. Thus, the present data could serve as an important radiobiological basis to further understand the molecular mechanisms by which high-LET radiation induces cell death. PMID:26338671

  1. Ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are required for unfolded protein response activation and steatosis in zebrafish with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya; Vacaru, Ana M; Howarth, Deanna L; Yin, Chunyue; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2013-09-01

    Secretory pathway dysfunction and lipid accumulation (steatosis) are the two most common responses of hepatocytes to ethanol exposure and are major factors in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, the mechanisms by which ethanol elicits these cellular responses are not fully understood. Recent data indicates that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to secretory pathway dysfunction can cause steatosis. Here, we examined the relationship between alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, secretory pathway stress and steatosis using zebrafish larvae. We found that ethanol was immediately internalized and metabolized by larvae, such that the internal ethanol concentration in 4-day-old larvae equilibrated to 160 mM after 1 hour of exposure to 350 mM ethanol, with an average ethanol metabolism rate of 56 ?mol/larva/hour over 32 hours. Blocking alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (Cyp2e1), the major enzymes that metabolize ethanol, prevented alcohol-induced steatosis and reduced induction of the UPR in the liver. Thus, we conclude that ethanol metabolism causes ALD in zebrafish. Oxidative stress generated by Cyp2e1-mediated ethanol metabolism is proposed to be a major culprit in ALD pathology. We found that production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in larvae exposed to ethanol, whereas inhibition of the zebrafish CYP2E1 homolog or administration of antioxidants reduced ROS levels. Importantly, these treatments also blocked ethanol-induced steatosis and reduced UPR activation, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) acted as a pro-oxidant that synergized with low doses of ethanol to induce the UPR. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are conserved mechanisms required for the development of steatosis and hepatic dysfunction in ALD, and that these processes contribute to ethanol-induced UPR activation and secretory pathway stress in hepatocytes. PMID:23798569

  2. Disseminated Tumor Cells Persist in the Bone Marrow of Breast Cancer Patients through Sustained Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Kai; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Buck, Friedrich; Gorges, Tobias M; Nilse, Lars; Assmann, Volker; Andreas, Antje; Mller, Volkmar; Wikman, Harriet; Riethdorf, Sabine; Schlter, Hartmut; Pantel, Klaus

    2015-12-15

    Disseminated tumor cells (DTC), which share mesenchymal and epithelial properties, are considered to be metastasis-initiating cells in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms supporting DTC survival are poorly understood. DTC extravasation into the bone marrow may be encouraged by low oxygen concentrations that trigger metabolic and molecular alterations contributing to DTC survival. Here, we investigated how the unfolded protein response (UPR), an important cytoprotective program induced by hypoxia, affects the behavior of stressed cancer cells. DTC cell lines established from the bone marrow of patients with breast cancer (BC-M1), lung cancer, (LC-M1), and prostate cancer (PC-E1) were subjected to hypoxic and hypoglycemic conditions. BC-M1 and LC-M1 exhibiting mesenchymal and epithelial properties adapted readily to hypoxia and glucose starvation. Upregulation of UPR proteins, such as the glucose-regulated protein Grp78, induced the formation of filamentous networks, resulting in proliferative advantages and sustained survival under total glucose deprivation. High Grp78 expression correlated with mesenchymal attributes of breast and lung cancer cells and with poor differentiation in clinical samples of primary breast and lung carcinomas. In DTCs isolated from bone marrow specimens from breast cancer patients, Grp78-positive stress granules were observed, consistent with the likelihood these cells were exposed to acute cell stress. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that the UPR is activated in DTC in the bone marrow from cancer patients, warranting further study of this cell stress pathway as a predictive biomarker for recurrent metastatic disease. Cancer Res; 75(24); 5367-77. 2015 AACR. PMID:26573792

  3. Activation of unfolded protein response protects osteosarcoma cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis through NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mingming; Ni, Jiangdong; Song, Deye; Ding, Muliang; Huang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover that unfolded protein response (UPR) contributed to the development of cisplatin resistance in osteosarcoma. MG-63 cells and SaOS-2 cells were exposed to cisplatin at presence or absence of 4-phenylbutyrayte (4-pba) and then analyzed by MTT assay and flow cytometry to determine the cell survival rates and apoptosis. Levels of glucose regulated protein 78KD (GRP78), C/EBP homologus protein (CHOP), cytoplasmic and nuclear NF-κB were detected by Western blot. Further, MG-63 cells and SaOS-2 cells were subjected to cisplatin with or without Bay 11-7082, a well-known inhibitor of NF-κB. After that, MTT assay and flow cytometry were used to determine the cell survival rates and apoptosis. Cisplatin and 4-PBA co-treatment significantly enhanced the cell apoptosis. Administration of cisplatin substantially increased the levels of GRP78 and CHOP. Moreover, mechanistic investigation uncovered that cisplatin promoted the levels of nuclear NF-κB whereas 4-PBA administration suppressed the cisplatin-induced accumulation of nuclear NF-κB level in osteosarcoma cells. Cisplatin combined with Bay 11-7082 obviously augmented MG-63 cells and SaOS-2 cells apoptosis when compared to that in osteosarcoma cells treated by cisplatin alone. Taken together, our data show that UPR protects osteosarcoma from cisplatin-mediated apoptosis through activation of NF-κB pathway. Therefore, targeting UPR may be a potential strategy to improve the osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:26617729

  4. Trp(250) -hK2 is defective in intracellular trafficking and activates the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Ju; Yoon, Sei Mee; Lee, Suman; Lee, Jinu

    2015-06-01

    hK2, a member of the kallikrein protease family encoded by KLK2, is expressed exclusively in prostate and is a putative adjunct tumor marker for prostate cancer screening. The T allele of rs198977, a single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 5 of KLK2, codes for W-hK2 and is associated with lower serum hK2 levels and higher risk of prostate cancer than the C allele encoding R-hK2. To elucidate the mechanism that underlies this SNP's function, we transfected plasmids expressing R-hK2 or W-hK2 into PC3, HeLa and HEK293A cells and measured the hK2 level in cell lysates and conditioned media. The level of W-hK2 was lower than R-hK2 in conditioned media but was not different from R-hK2 in cell lysates. W-hK2 was hardly colocalized with Golgi-targeted fluorescent protein whereas R-hK2 colocalized. Reporter assays related to the unfolded protein response (UPR) and phospho-eIF2? immunoblot showed that W-hK2 increased UPR activity more than R-hK2. These results indicated that W-hK2 had a defect in cellular trafficking from the ER to the Golgi complex due to its misfolding and that it activated the UPR, suggesting a mechanism to explain the association of the T allele with higher prostate cancer risk. PMID:25847286

  5. The Unfolded Protein Response and Cholesterol Biosynthesis Link Luman/CREB3 to Regenerative Axon Growth in Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhengxin; Zhai, Ruiling; McLean, Nikki A; Johnston, Jayne M; Misra, Vikram; Verge, Valerie M K

    2015-10-28

    We recently revealed that the axon endoplasmic reticulum resident transcription factor Luman/CREB3 (herein called Luman) serves as a unique retrograde injury signal in regulation of the intrinsic elongating form of sensory axon regeneration. Here, evidence supports that Luman contributes to axonal regeneration through regulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and cholesterol biosynthesis in adult rat sensory neurons. One day sciatic nerve crush injury triggered a robust increase in UPR-associated mRNA and protein expression in both neuronal cell bodies and the injured axons. Knockdown of Luman expression in 1 d injury-conditioned neurons by siRNA attenuated axonal outgrowth to 48% of control injured neurons and was concomitant with reduced UPR- and cholesterol biosynthesis-associated gene expression. UPR PCR-array analysis coupled with qRT-PCR identified and confirmed that four transcripts involved in cholesterol regulation were downregulated >2-fold by the Luman siRNA treatment of the injury-conditioned neurons. Further, the Luman siRNA-attenuated outgrowth could be significantly rescued by either cholesterol supplementation or 2 ng/ml of the UPR inducer tunicamycin, an amount determined to elevate the depressed UPR gene expression to a level equivalent of that observed with crush injury. Using these approaches, outgrowth increased significantly to 74% or 69% that of injury-conditioned controls, respectively. The identification of Luman as a regulator of the injury-induced UPR and cholesterol at levels that benefit the intrinsic ability of axotomized adult rat sensory neurons to undergo axonal regeneration reveals new therapeutic targets to bolster nerve repair. PMID:26511246

  6. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26844699

  7. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca(2+) overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca(2+)-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca(2+) in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca(2+) sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca(2+) in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca(2+) is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca(2+)-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca(2+) and calpain-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26844699

  8. HCV induces transforming growth factor β1 through activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Chusri, Pattranuch; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Hong, Jian; Zhu, Chuanlong; Duan, Xiaoqiong; Jilg, Nikolaus; Fusco, Dahlene N.; Brisac, Cynthia; Schaefer, Esperance A.; Cai, Dachuan; Peng, Lee F.; Maneekarn, Niwat; Lin, Wenyu; Chung, Raymond T.

    2016-01-01

    HCV replication disrupts normal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function and activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is directed by three ER transmembrane proteins including ATF6, IRE1, and PERK. HCV increases TGF-β1 and oxidative stress, which play important roles in liver fibrogenesis. HCV has been shown to induce TGF-β1 through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p38 MAPK, JNK, ERK1/2, and NFκB-dependent pathways. However, the relationship between HCV-induced ER stress and UPR activation with TGF-β1 production has not been fully characterized. In this study, we found that ROS and JNK inhibitors block HCV up-regulation of ER stress and UPR activation. ROS, JNK and IRE1 inhibitors blocked HCV-activated NFκB and TGF-β1 expression. ROS, ER stress, NFκB, and TGF-β1 signaling were blocked by JNK specific siRNA. Knockdown IRE1 inhibited JFH1-activated NFκB and TGF-β1 activity. Knockdown of JNK and IRE1 blunted JFH1 HCV up-regulation of NFκB and TGF-β1 activation. We conclude that HCV activates NFκB and TGF-β1 through ROS production and induction of JNK and the IRE1 pathway. HCV infection induces ER stress and the UPR in a JNK-dependent manner. ER stress and UPR activation partially contribute to HCV-induced NF-κB activation and enhancement of TGF-β1. PMID:26927933

  9. Genetic Interactions Due to Constitutive and Inducible Gene Regulation Mediated by the Unfolded Protein Response in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an adaptive signaling pathway utilized to sense and alleviate the stress of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In mammals, the UPR is mediated through three proximal sensors PERK/PEK, IRE1, and ATF6. PERK/PEK is a protein kinase that phosphorylates the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 to inhibit protein synthesis. Activation of IRE1 induces splicing of XBP1 mRNA to produce a potent transcription factor. ATF6 is a transmembrane transcription factor that is activated by cleavage upon ER stress. We show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, deletion of either ire-1 or xbp-1 is synthetically lethal with deletion of either atf-6 or pek-1, both producing a developmental arrest at larval stage 2. Therefore, in C. elegans, atf-6 acts synergistically with pek-1 to complement the developmental requirement for ire-1 and xbp-1. Microarray analysis identified inducible UPR (i-UPR) genes, as well as numerous constitutive UPR (c-UPR) genes that require the ER stress transducers during normal development. Although ire-1 and xbp-1 together regulate transcription of most i-UPR genes, they are each required for expression of nonoverlapping sets of c-UPR genes, suggesting that they have distinct functions. Intriguingly, C. elegans atf-6 regulates few i-UPR genes following ER stress, but is required for the expression of many c-UPR genes, indicating its importance during development and homeostasis. In contrast, pek-1 is required for induction of approximately 23% of i-UPR genes but is dispensable for the c-UPR. As pek-1 and atf-6 mainly act through sets of nonoverlapping targets that are different from ire-1 and xbp-1 targets, at least two coordinated responses are required to alleviate ER stress by distinct mechanisms. Finally, our array study identified the liver-specific transcription factor CREBh as a novel UPR gene conserved during metazoan evolution. PMID:16184190

  10. Bortezomib-induced unfolded protein response increases oncolytic HSV-1 replication resulting in synergistic, anti-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Hurwitz, Brian S; Bolyard, Chelsea; Yu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Jianying; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Rath, Kellie S; He, Shun; Bailey, Zachary; Eaves, David; Cripe, Timothy P; Parris, Deborah S.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Yu, Jianhua; Old, Matthew; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Bortezomib is an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. We tested the impact of combining bortezomib with oHSV for anti-tumor efficacy. Methods The synergistic interaction between oHSV and bortezomib was calculated using Chou-Talalay analysis. Viral replication was evaluated using plaque assay and immune fluorescence. Western-blot assays were used to evaluate induction of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Inhibitors targeting Hsp90 were utilized to investigate the mechanism of cell killing. Anti-tumor efficacy in vivo was evaluated using subcutaneous and intracranial tumor xenografts of glioma and head and neck cancer. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and two-sided log rank test. Results Combination treatment with bortezomib and oHSV, 34.5ENVE, displayed strong synergistic interaction in ovarian cancer, head & neck cancer, glioma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells. Bortezomib treatment induced ER stress, evident by strong induction of Grp78, CHOP, PERK and IRE1? (western blot analysis) and the UPR (induction of hsp40, 70 and 90). Bortezomib treatment of cells at both sublethal and lethal doses increased viral replication (p value <0.001), but inhibition of Hsp90 ablated this response, reducing viral replication and synergistic cell killing. The combination of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE significantly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in multiple different tumor models in vivo. Conclusions The dramatic synergy of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE is mediated by bortezomib- induced UPR and warrants future clinical testing in patients. PMID:24815720

  11. Divergent forms of endoplasmic reticulum stress trigger a robust unfolded protein response in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Brittany A; Hooks, Katarzyna B; McKinstry, Mia; Snow, Jonathan W

    2016-03-01

    Honey bee colonies in the United States have suffered from an increased rate of die-off in recent years, stemming from a complex set of interacting stresses that remain poorly described. While we have some understanding of the physiological stress responses in the honey bee, our molecular understanding of honey bee cellular stress responses is incomplete. Thus, we sought to identify and began functional characterization of the components of the UPR in honey bees. The IRE1-dependent splicing of the mRNA for the transcription factor Xbp1, leading to translation of an isoform with more transactivation potential, represents the most conserved of the UPR pathways. Honey bees and other Apoidea possess unique features in the Xbp1 mRNA splice site, which we reasoned could have functional consequences for the IRE1 pathway. However, we find robust induction of target genes upon UPR stimulation. In addition, the IRE1 pathway activation, as assessed by splicing of Xbp1 mRNA upon UPR, is conserved. By providing foundational knowledge about the UPR in the honey bee and the relative sensitivity of this species to divergent stresses, this work stands to improve our understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings of honey bee health and disease. PMID:26699660

  12. Roles of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response Associated Genes in Seed Stratification and Bud Endodormancy during Chilling Accumulation in Prunus persica

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xi Ling; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Dong Ling; Chen, Min; Tan, Qiu Ping; Li, Ling; De Chen, Xiu; Gao, Dong Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Dormancy mechanisms in seeds and buds arrest growth until environmental conditions are optimal for development. A genotype-specific period of chilling is usually required to release dormancy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. To discover transcriptional pathways associated with dormancy release common to seed stratification and bud endodormancy, we explored the chilling-dependent expression of 11 genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response signal pathways. We propose that endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response impact on seed as well as bud germination and development by chilling-dependent mechanisms. The emerging discovery of similarities between seed stratification and bud endodormancy status indicate that these two processes are probably regulated by common endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response signalling pathways. Clarification of regulatory pathways common to both seed and bud dormancy may enhance understanding of the mechanisms underlying dormancy and breeding programs may benefit from earlier prediction of chilling requirements for uniform blooming of novel genotypes of deciduous fruit tree species. PMID:24999812

  13. Effects of ER stress on unfolded protein responses, cell survival, and viral replication in primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shigemi, Zenpei; Baba, Yusuke; Hara, Naoko; Matsuhiro, Jumpei; Kagawa, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tadashi; Fujimuro, Masahiro

    2016-01-15

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a subtype of non-Hodgkin's B-lymphoma, is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in immunosuppressed patients. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which induces expression of ER chaperones, which in turn decrease ER stress, leading to ER homeostasis. The UPR is necessary for not only ER homeostasis but also persistent infection by, and replication of, many viruses. However, the precise roles and regulation of the UPR in KSHV infection remain poorly understood. Here, we found that IRE1? and PERK were significantly downregulated in PEL cells cultured under normal conditions, compared with KSHV-uninfected B-lymphoma cells. IRE1? and PERK mRNA levels were decreased in PEL cells, and KSHV-encoded LANA and v-cyclin D led to suppressed IRE1? transcription. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress activated the UPR and increased the mRNA levels of UPR-related molecules, including IRE1? and PERK, in PEL cells. However the IRE1? and PERK mRNA levels in PEL cells were lower than those in KSHV-uninfected cells. Furthermore, ER stress induced by brefeldin A and thapsigargin dramatically reduced the viability of PEL cells, compared with KSHV-uninfected cells, and induced apoptosis of PEL cells via the pro-apoptotic UPR through expression of CHOP and activation of caspase-9. In addition to the pro-apoptotic UPR, thapsigargin-induced ER stress enhanced transcription of lytic genes, including RTA, K-bZIP and K8.1, and viral production in PEL cells resulted in induction of the lytic cycle. Thus, we demonstrated downregulation of IRE1? and PERK in PEL cells, transcriptional suppression of IRE1? by LANA and v-cyclin D, apoptosis induction in PEL cells by ER stress, and potentiation of lytic replication by ER stress. PMID:26692493

  14. A novel HAC1-based dual-luciferase reporter vector for detecting endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhijia; Kuang, Xin; Zhang, Youshang; Shi, Ping; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-05-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important cellular phenomenon induced by over-accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen. ER stress and UPR are implicated in human diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. Current methods for measuring ER stress levels and UPR activation usually include cells lysis and other complicated procedures such as reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). These methods typically have low sensitivity and are not suitable for live detection. In this study, we developed a dual-luciferase gene reporter system to monitor UPR activation in live cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by taking advantage of the HAC1 intron and its unconventional splicing-regulation mechanism. We showed that this reporter can be used to monitor UPR in live cells with high sensitivity. PMID:25907266

  15. Approaches to imaging unfolded secretory protein stress in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Patrick; Fazio, Elena N.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the point of entry of proteins into the secretory pathway. Nascent peptides interact with the ER quality control machinery that ensures correct folding of the nascent proteins. Failure to properly fold proteins can lead to loss of protein function and cytotoxic aggregation of misfolded proteins that can lead to cell death. To cope with increases in the ER unfolded secretory protein burden, cells have evolved the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The UPR is the primary signaling pathway that monitors the state of the ER folding environment. When the unfolded protein burden overwhelms the capacity of the ER quality control machinery, a state termed ER stress, sensor proteins detect accumulation of misfolded peptides and trigger the UPR transcriptional response. The UPR, which is conserved from yeast to mammals, consists of an ensemble of complex signaling pathways that aims at adapting the ER to the new misfolded protein load. To determine how different factors impact the ER folding environment, various tools and assays have been developed. In this review, we discuss recent advances in live cell imaging reporters and model systems that enable researchers to monitor changes in the unfolded secretory protein burden and activation of the UPR and its associated signaling pathways. PMID:25419521

  16. Role of the unfolded protein response in regulating the mucin-dependent filamentous-growth mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Hema; Vadaie, Nadia; Chow, Jacky; Caccamise, Lauren M; Chavel, Colin A; Li, Boyang; Bowitch, Alexander; Stefan, Christopher J; Cullen, Paul J

    2015-04-01

    Signaling mucins are evolutionarily conserved regulators of signal transduction pathways. The signaling mucin Msb2p regulates the Cdc42p-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that controls filamentous growth in yeast. The cleavage and release of the glycosylated inhibitory domain of Msb2p is required for MAPK activation. We show here that proteolytic processing of Msb2p was induced by underglycosylation of its extracellular domain. Cleavage of underglycosylated Msb2p required the unfolded protein response (UPR), a quality control (QC) pathway that operates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The UPR regulator Ire1p, which detects misfolded/underglycosylated proteins in the ER, controlled Msb2p cleavage by regulating transcriptional induction of Yps1p, the major protease that processes Msb2p. Accordingly, the UPR was required for differentiation to the filamentous cell type. Cleavage of Msb2p occurred in conditional trafficking mutants that trap secretory cargo in the endomembrane system. Processed Msb2p was delivered to the plasma membrane, and its turnover by the ubiquitin ligase Rsp5p and ESCRT attenuated the filamentous-growth pathway. We speculate that the QC pathways broadly regulate signaling glycoproteins and their cognate pathways by recognizing altered glycosylation patterns that can occur in response to extrinsic cues. PMID:25666509

  17. Nodulin 22, a Novel Small Heat-Shock Protein of the Endoplasmic Reticulum, Is Linked to the Unfolded Protein Response in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Lpez, Jonathan; Martnez-Centeno, Cynthia; Padmanaban, Annamalai; Guilln, Gabriel; Olivares, Juan Elas; Stefano, Giovanni; Lledas, Fernando; Ramos, Fernando; Ghabrial, Said A.; Brandizzi, Federica; Rocha-Sosa, Mario; Daz-Camino, Claudia; Sanchez, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The importance of plant small heat shock proteins (sHsp) in multiple cellular processes has been evidenced by their unusual abundance and diversity; however, little is known about their biological role. Here, we characterized the in vitro chaperone activity and subcellular localization of nodulin 22 of Phaseolus vulgaris (PvNod22; common bean) and explored its cellular function through a virus-induced gene silencingbased reverse genetics approach. We established that PvNod22 facilitated the refolding of a model substrate in vitro, suggesting that it acts as a molecular chaperone in the cell. Through microscopy analyses of PvNod22, we determined its localization in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Furthermore, we found that silencing of PvNod22 resulted in necrotic lesions in the aerial organs of P. vulgaris plants cultivated under optimal conditions and that downregulation of PvNod22 activated the ER-unfolded protein response (UPR) and cell death. We also established that PvNod22 expression in wild-type bean plants was modulated by abiotic stress but not by chemicals that trigger the UPR, indicating PvNod22 is not under UPR control. Our results suggest that the ability of PvNod22 to suppress protein aggregation contributes to the maintenance of ER homeostasis, thus preventing the induction of cell death via UPR in response to oxidative stress during plant-microbe interactions. PMID:24073881

  18. A Novel Interaction Between the Regulatory Subunit of PI 3-Kinase and X-box Binding Protein-1 Modulates the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Winnay, Jonathon N.; Boucher, Jeremie; Mori, Marcelo; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Class Ia phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase, an essential mediator of the metabolic actions of insulin, is composed of a catalytic (p110?) and regulatory (p85?) subunit. Here we demonstrate that p85? interacts with X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1), a transcriptional mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), in an ER stress-dependent manner. Cell lines with knockout or knockdown of p85? exhibit dramatic alterations in the UPR including reduced ER stress-dependent accumulation of nuclear XBP-1, decreased induction of UPR target genes and increased rates of apoptosis. This is associated with a decrease activation of IRE1? and ATF6?. Mice with deletion of p85? in liver (L-Pik3r1?/?) display a similar attenuated UPR following tunicamycin administration leading to an increased inflammatory response. Thus, p85? forms a novel link between the PI 3-kinase pathway, which is central to insulin action, and the regulation of the cellular response to ER stress, which can lead to insulin resistance. PMID:20348923

  19. Methods to study stromal-cell derived factor 2 in the context of ER stress and the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Schott, Andrea; Strahl, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded or unfolded polypeptides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) provokes ER stress and triggers protective signaling pathways termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). Stromal cell-derived factor 2 (SDF2)-type proteins are conserved throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. Upon UPR activation transcription of SDF2-type genes is significantly enhanced in metazoan and plants, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role. However, the precise molecular function of SDF2-type proteins still needs to be established. Most eukaryotes have two SDF2 homologous, whereas the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has a single SDF2, thus representing an ideal model system to study the functional role of SDF2-type proteins. This chapter provides techniques to study SDF2 in the context of ER stress in Arabidopsis. We describe available sdf2 mutants, and methods to evaluate ER stress sensitivity of seedlings. Further, we summarize tools and methods that are helpful to monitor UPR induction in general (e.g., SDF2 promoter-reporter fusion constructs and SDF2-specific antibodies). In Section 6, we provide protocols for the expression and purification of recombinant SDF2 protein that can be used for further biochemical studies. PMID:21266257

  20. Blunted activation of NF-{kappa}B and NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression by geranylgeranylacetone: Involvement of unfolded protein response

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Okamura, Maro; Yao, Jian; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Kitamura, Masanori

    2008-01-04

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an anti-ulcer agent, has anti-inflammatory potential against experimental colitis and ischemia-induced renal inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms involved in its anti-inflammatory effects are largely unknown. We found that, in glomerular mesangial cells, GGA blocked activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B and consequent induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) by inflammatory cytokines. It was inversely correlated with induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) evidenced by expression of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and suppression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive alkaline phosphatase. Various inducers of UPR including tunicamycin, thapsigargin, A23187, 2-deoxyglucose, dithiothreitol, and AB{sub 5} subtilase cytotoxin reproduced the suppressive effects of GGA. Furthermore, attenuation of UPR by stable transfection with GRP78 diminished the anti-inflammatory effects of GGA. These results disclosed a novel, UPR-dependent mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory potential of GGA.

  1. Functional analysis of the impact of ORMDL3 expression on inflammation and activation of the unfolded protein response in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The gene ORMDL3 was shown to be associated with early-onset asthma susceptibility in multiple independent genome-wide and candidate-gene association studies. Asthmatic patients have elevated expression levels of this gene. ORMDL3 encodes a transmembrane protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that may be involved in ER stress and inflammation. It is essential to validate the genetic associations linking ORMDL3 with asthma through functional studies that confirm the biological relevance of this gene in disease. We investigated the effects of manipulating ORMDL3 expression levels in vitro in airway cells on innate immune inflammatory responses, ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Methods ORMDL3 expression levels were manipulated in airway cells using an overexpression plasmid and siRNA technologies. Successful modulation of ORMDL3 was confirmed at both the gene and protein level. The functional impact of modulation of ORMDL3 expression levels on inflammatory responses and activation of the UPR were quantified using complementary cellular and molecular immunology techniques. Results Cells with altered ORMDL3 levels responded equally well to innate immune stimuli and produced similar levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to wild-type cells. Treatment with ER stress inducers, thapsigargin and tunicamycin, resulted in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). However, we observed no difference in UPR activation in cells with ORMDL3 knockdown compared to cells with normal ORMDL3 levels. Conclusions Our results suggest that ORMDL3 variation in the airway epithelium is unlikely to play a significant role in modulating innate immune responses and the UPR in the lung. PMID:23369242

  2. Glucose starvation induces cell death in K-ras-transformed cells by interfering with the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway and activating the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Palorini, R; Cammarata, F; Balestrieri, C; Monestiroli, A; Vasso, M; Gelfi, C; Alberghina, L; Chiaradonna, F

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells, which use more glucose than normal cells and accumulate extracellular lactate even under normoxic conditions (Warburg effect), have been reported to undergo cell death under glucose deprivation, whereas normal cells remain viable. As it may be relevant to exploit the molecular mechanisms underlying this biological response to achieve new cancer therapies, in this paper we sought to identify them by using transcriptome and proteome analysis applied to an established glucose-addicted cellular model of transformation, namely, murine NIH-3T3 fibroblasts harboring an oncogenic K-RAS gene, compared with parental cells. Noteworthy is that the analyses performed in high- and low-glucose cultures indicate that reduction of glucose availability induces, especially in transformed cells, a significant increase in the expression of several unfolded protein response (UPR) hallmark genes. We show that this response is strictly associated with transformed cell death, given that its attenuation, by reducing protein translation or by increasing cell protein folding capacity, preserves the survival of transformed cells. Such an effect is also observed by inhibiting c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, a pro-apoptotic signaling mediator set downstream of UPR. Strikingly, addition of N-acetyl-𝒟-glucosamine, a specific substrate for the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), to glucose-depleted cells completely prevents transformed cell death, stressing the important role of glucose in HBP fuelling to ensure UPR attenuation and increased cell survival. Interestingly, these results have been fully recognized in a human model of breast cancer, MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, we show that glucose deprivation, leading to harmful accumulation of unfolded proteins in consequence of a reduction of protein glycosylation, induces a UPR-dependent cell death mechanism. These findings may open the way for new therapeutic strategies to specifically kill glycolytic cancer cells. PMID:23868065

  3. Knockdown of glucose-regulated protein 78 abrogates chemoresistance of hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells to cisplatin induced by unfolded protein in response to severe hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pi, Lihong; Li, Xiaoming; Song, Qi; Shen, Yupeng; Lu, Xiuying; DI, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Hypoxia renders tumor cells with reduced sensitivity and increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. One of the possible mechanisms underlying this unfavorable status is activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxic conditions, due to the upregulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression. GRP78, an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein and a key regulator of the UPR, has been reported to be overexpressed in various types of cancer. However, the role of GRP78 in regulating the cell growth and apoptosis of hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells, with regard to the severity of hypoxia, remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether, and under what circumstances, GRP78 is associated with hypoxia-induced chemoresistance in hypopharyngeal carcinoma. For this purpose, cells from the FaDu human hypopharyngeal carcinoma cell line were cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions for different time periods. No significant changes in GRP78 and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP) protein expression levels were revealed under moderately hypoxic conditions (oxygen concentration, 1%), but these levels were changed over time under severely hypoxic conditions (oxygen concentration, <0.02%). This indicated that severe hypoxia, rather than moderate hypoxia, leads to UPR activation in hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Knockdown of GRP78 with short hairpin RNA inhibited cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis under severely hypoxic conditions, even with cisplatin treatment, indicating that GRP78 confers FaDu cells resistant to chemotherapy in response to severe hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of GRP78 resulted in a significant increase in CHOP and Bax expression levels and a decrease in Bcl-2 expression levels with simultaneous increase in the levels of apoptosis under severely hypoxic conditions. It was concluded that severe hypoxia leads to UPR activation and elevation of GRP78 expression, promoting cell survival and inducing chemoresistance. Silencing of GRP78 may block the pro-survival arm of UPR, simultaneously promoting proapoptotic signaling through induction of CHOP. Downregulation of GRP78 may be a promising strategy for overcoming the resistance of hypopharyngeal cancer to chemotherapy. PMID:24527073

  4. The unfolded protein response is activated in disease-affected brain regions in progressive supranuclear palsy and Alzheimers disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder pathologically characterized by intracellular tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein distributed throughout the neocortex, basal ganglia, and brainstem. A genome-wide association study identified EIF2AK3 as a risk factor for PSP. EIF2AK3 encodes PERK, part of the endoplasmic reticulums (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR). PERK is an ER membrane protein that senses unfolded protein accumulation within the ER lumen. Recently, several groups noted UPR activation in Alzheimers disease (AD), Parkinsons disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple system atrophy, and in the hippocampus and substantia nigra of PSP subjects. Here, we evaluate UPR PERK activation in the pons, medulla, midbrain, hippocampus, frontal cortex and cerebellum in subjects with PSP, AD, and in normal controls. Results We found UPR activation primarily in disease-affected brain regions in both disorders. In PSP, the UPR was primarily activated in the pons and medulla and to a much lesser extent in the hippocampus. In AD, the UPR was extensively activated in the hippocampus. We also observed UPR activation in the hippocampus of some elderly normal controls, severity of which positively correlated with both age and tau pathology but not with A? plaque burden. Finally, we evaluated EIF2AK3 coding variants that influence PERK activation. We show that a haplotype associated with increased PERK activation is genetically associated with increased PSP risk. Conclusions The UPR is activated in disease affected regions in PSP and the genetic evidence shows that this activation increases risk for PSP and is not a protective response. PMID:24252572

  5. Cross-talk unfolded: MARCKS proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arbuzova, Anna; Schmitz, Arndt A P; Vergres, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The proteins of the MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) family were first identified as prominent substrates of protein kinase C (PKC). Since then, these proteins have been implicated in the regulation of brain development and postnatal survival, cellular migration and adhesion, as well as endo-, exo- and phago-cytosis, and neurosecretion. The effector domain of MARCKS proteins is phosphorylated by PKC, binds to calmodulin and contributes to membrane binding. This multitude of mutually exclusive interactions allows cross-talk between the signal transduction pathways involving PKC and calmodulin. This review focuses on recent, mostly biophysical and biochemical results renewing interest in this protein family. MARCKS membrane binding is now understood at the molecular level. From a structural point of view, there is a consensus emerging that MARCKS proteins are "natively unfolded". Interestingly, domains similar to the effector domain have been discovered in other proteins. Furthermore, since the effector domain enhances the polymerization of actin in vitro, MARCKS proteins have been proposed to mediate regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. However, the recent observations that MARCKS might serve to sequester phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in the plasma membrane of unstimulated cells suggest an alternative model for the control of the actin cytoskeleton. While myristoylation is classically considered to be a co-translational, irreversible event, new reports on MARCKS proteins suggest a more dynamic picture of this protein modification. Finally, studies with mice lacking MARCKS proteins have investigated the functions of these proteins during embryonic development in the intact organism. PMID:11829734

  6. Increase in gene-transcript levels as indicators of up-regulation of the unfolded protein response in spontaneous canine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Kirsten; MacDonald-Dickinson, Valerie; Linn, Kathleen; Simko, Elemir; Misra, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved cellular response to stressors such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, is associated with angiogenesis and metastasis in tumor cells. This article discusses a pilot study conducted to determine whether components of the UPR could be identified in spontaneous canine tumors and whether they were up-regulated within tumor tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue. Tissue samples of various spontaneous canine neoplasms were taken from 13 dogs shortly after surgical excision or euthanasia; control samples were taken from adjacent normal tissue. RNA purification and real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were done to measure the expression of 4 genes associated with the UPR (HERP, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1s). The results indicated that UPR gene expression can be identified in spontaneous canine tumors and that the UPR is up-regulated, as indicated by significantly increased expression of CHOP and GRP78 within the tumor. PMID:24982546

  7. Chronic ethanol exposure increases cytochrome P-450 and decreases activated in blocked unfolded protein response gene family transcripts in caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Juhani; Aarnio, Vuokko; Heikkinen, Liisa; Lakso, Merja; Wong, Garry

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol is a widely consumed and rapidly absorbed toxin. While the physiological effects of ethanol consumption are well known, the underlying biochemical and molecular changes at the gene expression level in whole animals remain obscure. We exposed the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to 0.2 M ethanol from the embryo to L4 larva stage and assayed gene expression changes in whole animals using RNA-Seq and quantitative real-time PCR. We observed gene expression changes in 1122 genes (411 up, 711 down). Cytochrome P-450 (CYP) gene family members (12 of 78) were upregulated, whereas activated in blocked unfolded protein response (ABU) (7 of 15) were downregulated. Other detoxification gene family members were also regulated including four glutathione-S-transferases and three flavin monooxygenases. The results presented show specific gene expression changes following chronic ethanol exposure in C. elegans that indicate both persistent upregulation of detoxification response genes and downregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway genes. PMID:23381935

  8. Unfolded-protein response-associated stabilization of p27(Cdkn1b) interferes with lens fiber cell denucleation, leading to cataract.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Lei; Whitcomb, Elizabeth A; Jiang, Shuhong; Chang, Min-Lee; Gu, Yumei; Duncan, Melinda K; Cvekl, Ales; Wang, Wei-Lin; Limi, Saima; Reneker, Lixing W; Shang, Fu; Du, Linfang; Taylor, Allen

    2016-03-01

    Failure of lens fiber cell denucleation (LFCD) is associated with congenital cataracts, but the pathobiology awaits elucidation. Recent work has suggested that mechanisms that direct the unidirectional process of LFCD are analogous to the cyclic processes associated with mitosis. We found that lens-specific mutations that elicit an unfolded-protein response (UPR) in vivo accumulate p27(Cdkn1b), show cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-1 inhibition, retain their LFC nuclei, and are cataractous. Although a UPR was not detected in lenses expressing K6W-Ub, they also accumulated p27 and showed failed LFCD. Induction of a UPR in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) also induced accumulation of p27 associated with decreased levels of S-phase kinase-associated protein (Skp)-2, a ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis. These cells also showed decreased lamin A/C phosphorylation and metaphase arrest. The suppression of lamin A/C phosphorylation and metaphase transition induced by the UPR was rescued by knockdown of p27. Taken together, these data indicate that accumulation of p27, whether related to the UPR or not, prevents the phosphorylation of lamin A/C and LFCD in maturing LFCs in vivo, as well as in dividing HLECs. The former leads to cataract and the latter to metaphase arrest. These results suggest that accumulation of p27 is a common mechanism underlying retention of LFC nuclei.-Lei, L., Whitcomb, E. A., Jiang, S., Chang, M.-L., Gu, Y., Duncan, M. K., Cvekl, A., Wang, W.-L., Limi, S., Reneker, L. W., Shang, F., Du, L., Taylor, A. Unfolded protein response-associated stabilization of p27(Cdkn1b) interferes with lens fiber cell denucleation, leading to cataract. PMID:26590164

  9. Electrospray Ionization-Induced Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Kitova, Elena N.; Johnson, Margaret A.; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth K. S.; Klassen, John S.

    2012-12-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements were performed under a variety of solution conditions on a highly acidic sub-fragment (B3C) of the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding repeat region of Clostridium difficile toxin B, and two mutants (B4A and B4B) containing fewer acidic residues. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on aqueous ammonium acetate solutions of B3C at low ionic strength ( I < 80 mM) revealed evidence, based on the measured charge state distribution, of protein unfolding. In contrast, no evidence of unfolding was detected from ESI-MS measurements made in positive ion mode at low I or in either mode at higher I. The results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy measurements and gel filtration chromatography performed on solutions of B3C under low and high I conditions suggest that the protein exists predominantly in a folded state in neutral aqueous solutions with I > 10 mM. The results of ESI-MS measurements performed on B3C in a series of solutions with high I at pH 5 to 9 rule out the possibility that the structural changes are related to ESI-induced changes in pH. It is proposed that unfolding of B3C, observed in negative mode for solutions with low I, occurs during the ESI process and arises due to Coulombic repulsion between the negatively charged residues and liquid/droplet surface charge. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on B4A and B4B also reveal a shift to higher charge states at low I but the magnitude of the changes are smaller than observed for B3C.

  10. Electrospray ionization-induced protein unfolding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Kitova, Elena N; Johnson, Margaret A; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth K S; Klassen, John S

    2012-12-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements were performed under a variety of solution conditions on a highly acidic sub-fragment (B3C) of the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding repeat region of Clostridium difficile toxin B, and two mutants (B4A and B4B) containing fewer acidic residues. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on aqueous ammonium acetate solutions of B3C at low ionic strength (I < 80 mM) revealed evidence, based on the measured charge state distribution, of protein unfolding. In contrast, no evidence of unfolding was detected from ESI-MS measurements made in positive ion mode at low I or in either mode at higher I. The results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy measurements and gel filtration chromatography performed on solutions of B3C under low and high I conditions suggest that the protein exists predominantly in a folded state in neutral aqueous solutions with I > 10 mM. The results of ESI-MS measurements performed on B3C in a series of solutions with high I at pH 5 to 9 rule out the possibility that the structural changes are related to ESI-induced changes in pH. It is proposed that unfolding of B3C, observed in negative mode for solutions with low I, occurs during the ESI process and arises due to Coulombic repulsion between the negatively charged residues and liquid/droplet surface charge. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on B4A and B4B also reveal a shift to higher charge states at low I but the magnitude of the changes are smaller than observed for B3C. PMID:22993046

  11. Translational and posttranslational regulation of XIAP by eIF2? and ATF4 promotes ER stressinduced cell death during the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Messah, Carissa; Han, Jaeseok; LaVail, Matthew M.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Lin, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein misfolding activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to help cells cope with ER stress. If ER homeostasis is not restored, UPR promotes cell death. The mechanisms of UPR-mediated cell death are poorly understood. The PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) arm of the UPR is implicated in ER stressinduced cell death, in part through up-regulation of proapoptotic CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Chop?/? cells are partially resistant to ER stressinduced cell death, and CHOP overexpression alone does not induce cell death. These findings suggest that additional mechanisms regulate cell death downstream of PERK. Here we find dramatic suppression of antiapoptosis XIAP proteins in response to chronic ER stress. We find that PERK down-regulates XIAP synthesis through eIF2? and promotes XIAP degradation through ATF4. Of interest, PERK's down-regulation of XIAP occurs independently of CHOP activity. Loss of XIAP leads to increased cell death, whereas XIAP overexpression significantly enhances resistance to ER stressinduced cell death, even in the absence of CHOP. Our findings define a novel signaling circuit between PERK and XIAP that operates in parallel with PERK to CHOP induction to influence cell survival during ER stress. We propose a two-hit model of ER stressinduced cell death involving concomitant CHOP up-regulation and XIAP down-regulation both induced by PERK. PMID:24623724

  12. Treatment with the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir triggers the unfolded protein response and may overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of multiple myeloma in combination with bortezomib: a phase I trial (SAKK 65/08).

    PubMed

    Driessen, Christoph; Kraus, Marianne; Joerger, Markus; Rosing, Hilde; Bader, Jrgen; Hitz, Felicitas; Berset, Catherine; Xyrafas, Alexandros; Hawle, Hanne; Berthod, Gregoire; Overkleeft, Hermann S; Sessa, Christiana; Huitema, Alwin; Pabst, Thomas; von Moos, Roger; Hess, Dagmar; Mey, Ulrich J M

    2016-03-01

    Downregulation of the unfolded protein response mediates proteasome inhibitor resistance in multiple myeloma. The Human Immunodeficieny Virus protease inhibitor nelfinavir activates the unfolded protein response in vitro. We determined dose-limiting toxicity and recommended dose for phase II of nelfinavir in combination with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Twelve patients with advanced hematologic malignancies were treated with nelfinavir (2500-5000 mg/day p.o., days 1-14, 3+3 dose escalation) and bortezomib (1.3 mg/m(2), days 1, 4, 8, 11; 21-day cycles). A run in phase with nelfinavir monotherapy allowed pharmakokinetic/pharmakodynamic assessment of nelfinavir in the presence or absence of concomittant bortezomib. End points included dose-limiting toxicity, activation of the unfolded protein response, proteasome activity, toxicity and response to trial treatment. Nelfinavir 22500 mg was the recommended phase II dose identified. Nelfinavir alone significantly up-regulated expression of proteins related to the unfolded protein response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and inhibited proteasome activity. Of 10 evaluable patients in the dose escalation cohort, 3 achieved a partial response, 4 stable disease for 2 cycles or more, while 3 had progressive disease as best response. In an exploratory extension cohort with 6 relapsed, bortezomib-refractory, lenalidomide-resistant myeloma patients treated at the recommended phase II dose, 3 reached a partial response, 2 a minor response, and one progressive disease. The combination of nelfinavir with bortezomib is safe and shows promising activity in advanced, bortezomib-refractory multiple myeloma. Induction of the unfolded protein response by nelfinavir may overcome the biological features of proteasome inhibitor resistance. PMID:26659919

  13. SCCA1/SerpinB3 promotes oncogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition via the unfolded protein response and IL-6 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Namratha; Catanzaro, Joseph M.; Bott, Alex J.; Sun, Yu; Ullman, Erica; Chen, Emily I.; Pan, Ji-An; Wu, Song; Crawford, Howard C.; Zhang, Jianhua; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The serine/cysteine protease inhibitor SCCA1 (Serpin B3) is upregulated in many advanced cancers with poor prognosis, but there is limited information about whether it makes functional contributions to malignancy. Here we show that SCCA1 expression promoted oncogenic transformation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in mammary epithelial cells, and that SCCA1 silencing in breast cancer cells halted their proliferation. SCCA1 overexpression in neu+ mammary tumors increased the unfolded protein response (UPR), IL-6 expression, and inflammatory phenotypes. Mechanistically, SCCA1 induced a prolonged non-lethal increase in the UPR that was sufficient to activate NF-κB and expression of the pro-tumorigenic cytokine IL-6. Overall, our findings established that SCCA1 contributes to tumorigenesis by promoting EMT and a UPR-dependent induction of NF-κB and IL-6 autocrine signaling that promotes a pro-tumorigenic inflammation. PMID:25213322

  14. Autism-associated R451C mutation in neuroligin3 leads to activation of the unfolded protein response in a PC12 Tet-On inducible system.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Lisa; Favaloro, Flores Lietta; Trobiani, Laura; Marchetti, Valentina; Patel, Vruti; Pascucci, Tiziana; Comoletti, Davide; Marciniak, Stefan J; De Jaco, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Several forms of monogenic heritable autism spectrum disorders are associated with mutations in the neuroligin genes. The autism-linked substitution R451C in neuroligin3 induces local misfolding of its extracellular domain, causing partial retention in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of expressing cells. We have generated a PC12 Tet-On cell model system with inducible expression of wild-type or R451C neuroligin3 to investigate whether there is activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response) as a result of misfolded protein retention. As a positive control for protein misfolding, we also expressed the mutant G221R neuroligin3, which is known to be completely retained within the ER. Our data show that overexpression of either R451C or G221R mutant proteins leads to the activation of all three signalling branches of the UPR downstream of the stress sensors ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6), IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) and PERK [PKR (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase]. Each branch displayed different activation profiles that partially correlated with the degree of misfolding caused by each mutation. We also show that up-regulation of BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) and CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein] was induced by both mutant proteins but not by wild-type neuroligin3, both in proliferative cells and cells differentiated to a neuron-like phenotype. Collectively, our data show that mutant R451C neuroligin3 activates the UPR in a novel cell model system, suggesting that this cellular response may have a role in monogenic forms of autism characterized by misfolding mutations. PMID:26621873

  15. Autism-associated R451C mutation in neuroligin3 leads to activation of the unfolded protein response in a PC12 Tet-On inducible system

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Lisa; Favaloro, Flores Lietta; Trobiani, Laura; Marchetti, Valentina; Patel, Vruti; Pascucci, Tiziana; Comoletti, Davide; Marciniak, Stefan J.; De Jaco, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Several forms of monogenic heritable autism spectrum disorders are associated with mutations in the neuroligin genes. The autism-linked substitution R451C in neuroligin3 induces local misfolding of its extracellular domain, causing partial retention in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of expressing cells. We have generated a PC12 Tet-On cell model system with inducible expression of wild-type or R451C neuroligin3 to investigate whether there is activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response) as a result of misfolded protein retention. As a positive control for protein misfolding, we also expressed the mutant G221R neuroligin3, which is known to be completely retained within the ER. Our data show that overexpression of either R451C or G221R mutant proteins leads to the activation of all three signalling branches of the UPR downstream of the stress sensors ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6), IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) and PERK [PKR (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase]. Each branch displayed different activation profiles that partially correlated with the degree of misfolding caused by each mutation. We also show that up-regulation of BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) and CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein] was induced by both mutant proteins but not by wild-type neuroligin3, both in proliferative cells and cells differentiated to a neuron-like phenotype. Collectively, our data show that mutant R451C neuroligin3 activates the UPR in a novel cell model system, suggesting that this cellular response may have a role in monogenic forms of autism characterized by misfolding mutations. PMID:26621873

  16. Sestrin2 is induced by glucose starvation via the unfolded protein response and protects cells from non-canonical necroptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Ding, Boxiao; Parmigiani, Anita; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Archer, Kellie; Murphy, Anne N; Budanov, Andrei V

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a member of a family of stress responsive proteins, which controls cell viability via antioxidant activity and regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin protein kinase (mTOR). Sestrin2 is induced by different stress insults, which diminish ATP production and induce energetic stress in the cells. Glucose is a critical substrate for ATP production utilized via glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration as well as for glycosylation of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Thus, glucose starvation causes both energy deficiency and activation of ER stress followed by the unfolding protein response (UPR). Here, we show that UPR induces Sestrin2 via ATF4 and NRF2 transcription factors and demonstrate that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death. Sestrin2 inactivation sensitizes cells to necroptotic cell death that is associated with a decline in ATP levels and can be suppressed by Necrostatin 7. We propose that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death via regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:26932729

  17. Sestrin2 is induced by glucose starvation via the unfolded protein response and protects cells from non-canonical necroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Boxiao; Parmigiani, Anita; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Archer, Kellie; Murphy, Anne N.; Budanov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a member of a family of stress responsive proteins, which controls cell viability via antioxidant activity and regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin protein kinase (mTOR). Sestrin2 is induced by different stress insults, which diminish ATP production and induce energetic stress in the cells. Glucose is a critical substrate for ATP production utilized via glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration as well as for glycosylation of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Thus, glucose starvation causes both energy deficiency and activation of ER stress followed by the unfolding protein response (UPR). Here, we show that UPR induces Sestrin2 via ATF4 and NRF2 transcription factors and demonstrate that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death. Sestrin2 inactivation sensitizes cells to necroptotic cell death that is associated with a decline in ATP levels and can be suppressed by Necrostatin 7. We propose that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death via regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:26932729

  18. Ask1 gene deletion blocks maternal diabetes-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in the developing embryo by disrupting the unfolded protein response signalosome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Yanqing; Gu, Hui; Reece, E Albert; Fang, Shengyun; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Aberdeen, Graham; Yang, Peixin

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is activated by various stresses. The link between ASK1 activation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, two causal events in diabetic embryopathy, has not been determined. We sought to investigate whether ASK1 is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) that leads to ER stress. Deleting Ask1 abrogated diabetes-induced UPR by suppressing phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1? (IRE1?), and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) blocked the mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members and ER stress. ASK1 participated in the IRE1? signalosome, and removing ASK1 abrogated the proapoptotic kinase activity of IRE1?. Ask1 deletion suppressed diabetes-induced IRE1? endoriboneclease activities, which led to X-box binding protein 1 mRNA cleavage, an ER stress marker, decreased expression of microRNAs, and increased expression of a miR-17 target, thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), a thioredoxin binding protein, which enhanced ASK1 activation by disrupting the thioredoxin-ASK1 complexes. ASK1 is essential for the assembly and function of the IRE1? signalosome, which forms a positive feedback loop with ASK1 through Txnip. ASK1 knockdown in C17.2 neural stem cells diminished high glucose- or tunicamycin-induced IRE1? activation, which further supports our hypothesis that ASK1 plays a causal role in diabetes-induced ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:25249581

  19. Differential unfolded protein response during Chikungunya and Sindbis virus infection: CHIKV nsP4 suppresses eIF2? phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya (CHIKV) and Sindbis (SINV) are arboviruses belonging to the alphavirus genus within the Togaviridae family. They cause frequent epidemics of febrile illness and long-term arthralgic sequelae that affect millions of people each year. Both viruses replicate prodigiously in infected patients and in vitro in mammalian cells, suggesting some level of control over the host cellular translational machinery that senses and appropriately directs the cells fate through the unfolded protein response (UPR). The mammalian UPR involves BIP (or GRP78), the master sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) together with the three downstream effector branches: inositol-requiring ser/thr protein kinase/endonuclease (IRE-1), PKR-like ER resident kinase (PERK) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF-6). Through careful analysis of CHIKV and SINV infections in cell culture we found that the former selectively activates ATF-6 and IRE-1 branches of UPR and suppresses the PERK pathway. By separately expressing each of the CHIKV proteins as GFP-fusion proteins, we found that non-structural protein 4 (nsP4), which is a RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase, suppresses the serine-51 phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor, alpha subunit (eIF2?), which in turn regulates the PERK pathway. This study provides insight into a mechanism by which CHIKV replication responds to overcome the host UPR machinery. PMID:23356742

  20. The unfolded protein response and cellular senescence. A review in the theme: cellular mechanisms of endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pluquet, Olivier; Pourtier, Albin; Abbadie, Corinne

    2015-03-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle critical for the proper folding and assembly of secreted and transmembrane proteins. Perturbations of ER functions cause ER stress, which activates a coordinated system of transcriptional and translational controls called the unfolded protein response (UPR), to cope with accumulation of misfolded proteins and proteotoxicity. It results in ER homeostasis restoration or in cell death. Senescence is a complex cell phenotype induced by several stresses such as telomere attrition, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and activation of some oncogenes. It is mainly characterized by a cell enlargement, a permanent cell-cycle arrest, and the production of a secretome enriched in proinflammatory cytokines and components of the extracellular matrix. Senescent cells accumulate with age in tissues and are suspected to play a role in age-associated diseases. Since senescence is a stress response, the question arises of whether an ER stress could occur concomitantly with senescence and participate in the onset or maintenance of the senescent features. Here, we described the interconnections between the UPR signaling and the different aspects of the cellular senescence programs and discuss the implication of UPR modulations in this context. PMID:25540175

  1. Puf4 regulates both splicing and decay of HXL1 mRNA encoding the unfolded protein response transcription factor in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Glazier, Virginia E; Kaur, Jan Naseer; Brown, Nancy T; Rivera, Ashley A; Panepinto, John C

    2015-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) responds to errors in protein folding or processing by induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). During conditions of ER stress, unconventional splicing of an mRNA encoding the UPR-responsive transcription factor occurs at the ER surface, resulting in activation of the UPR. UPR activation is necessary for adaptation to ER stress and for the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is an absolute requirement for temperature adaptation and virulence. In this study, we have determined that C. neoformans has co-opted a conserved PUF RNA binding protein to regulate the posttranscriptional processing of the HXL1 mRNA encoding the UPR transcription factor. PUF elements were identified in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the HXL1 transcript, and both elements bound Puf4. Deletion of PUF4 resulted in delayed unconventional splicing of HXL1 mRNA and delayed induction of Hxl1 target genes. In addition, the HXL1 transcript was stabilized in the absence of Puf4. The puf4? mutant exhibited temperature sensitivity but was as virulent as the wild type, despite a reduction in fungal burden in the brains of infected mice. Our results reveal a novel regulatory role in which a PUF protein influences the unconventional splicing of the mRNA encoding the UPR-responsive transcription factor. These data suggest a unique role for a PUF protein in controlling UPR kinetics via the posttranscriptional regulation of the mRNA encoding the UPR transcription factor Hxl1. PMID:25681267

  2. Hypoxic preconditioning and cell death from oxygen/glucose deprivation co-opt a subset of the unfolded protein response in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bickler, P E; Clark, J P; Gabatto, P; Brosnan, H

    2015-12-01

    The state of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), via the unfolded protein response (UPR), regulates a pro- or anti-apoptotic cell fate. Hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) is a potent anti-apoptotic stimulus, wherein ischemic neural injury is averted by a non-damaging exposure to hypoxia. We tested if UPR modulation contributes to the pro-survival/anti-apoptotic phenotype in neurons preconditioned with hypoxia, using organotypic cultures of rat hippocampus as a model system. Pharmacologic induction of the UPR with tunicamycin increased mRNA of 79 of 84 UPR genes and replicated the pro-survival phenotype of HPC, whereas only small numbers of the same mRNAs were upregulated at 0, 6 and 24h after HPC. During the first 24h after HPC, protein signals in all 3 UPR pathways increased at various times: increased ATF4, phosphorylation of eif2? and IRE1, cleavage of xbb1 mRNA and cleavage of ATF6. Pharmacologic inhibition of ATF6 and IRE1 blocked HPC. Ischemia-like conditions (oxygen/glucose deprivation, OGD) caused extensive neuron cell damage and involved some of the same UPR protein signals as HPC. In distinction to HPC and tunicamycin, OGD caused widespread suppression of UPR genes: 55 of 84 UPR gene mRNAs were numerically downregulated. We conclude that although HPC and ischemic cell death in hippocampal neurons involve protein-based signaling in all 3 UPR pathways, these processes co-opt only a subset of the genomic response elicited by agents known to cause protein misfolding, possibly because of persistent transcription/translation arrest induced by hypoxia and especially OGD. PMID:26404874

  3. A mouse model suggests two mechanisms for thyroid alterations in infantile cystinosis: decreased thyroglobulin synthesis due to endoplasmic reticulum stress/unfolded protein response and impaired lysosomal processing.

    PubMed

    Gaide Chevronnay, H P; Janssens, V; Van Der Smissen, P; Liao, X H; Abid, Y; Nevo, N; Antignac, C; Refetoff, S; Cherqui, S; Pierreux, C E; Courtoy, P J

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are released from thyroglobulin (Tg) in lysosomes, which are impaired in infantile/nephropathic cystinosis. Cystinosis is a lysosomal cystine storage disease due to defective cystine exporter, cystinosin. Cystinotic children develop subclinical and then overt hypothyroidism. Why hypothyroidism is the most frequent and earliest endocrine complication of cystinosis is unknown. We here defined early alterations in Ctns(-/-) mice thyroid and identified subcellular and molecular mechanisms. At 9 months, T4 and T3 plasma levels were normal and TSH was moderately increased (∼4-fold). By histology, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of most follicles preceded colloid exhaustion. Increased immunolabeling for thyrocyte proliferation and apoptotic shedding indicated accelerated cell turnover. Electron microscopy revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dilation, apical lamellipodia indicating macropinocytic colloid uptake, and lysosomal cystine crystals. Tg accumulation in dilated ER contrasted with mRNA down-regulation. Increased expression of ER chaperones, glucose-regulated protein of 78 kDa and protein disulfide isomerase, associated with alternative X-box binding protein-1 splicing, revealed unfolded protein response (UPR) activation by ER stress. Decreased Tg mRNA and ER stress suggested reduced Tg synthesis. Coordinated increase of UPR markers, activating transcription factor-4 and C/EBP homologous protein, linked ER stress to apoptosis. Hormonogenic cathepsins were not altered, but lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 immunolabeling disclosed enlarged vesicles containing iodo-Tg and impaired lysosomal fusion. Isopycnic fractionation showed iodo-Tg accumulation in denser lysosomes, suggesting defective lysosomal processing and hormone release. In conclusion, Ctns(-/-) mice showed the following alterations: 1) compensated primary hypothyroidism and accelerated thyrocyte turnover; 2) impaired Tg production linked to ER stress/UPR response; and 3) altered endolysosomal trafficking and iodo-Tg processing. The Ctns(-/-) thyroid is useful to study disease progression and evaluate novel therapies. PMID:25811319

  4. CREB is activated by ER stress and modulates the unfolded protein response by regulating the expression of IRE1? and PERK.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Daisuke; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Nakayama, Koh

    2016-01-01

    Living cells are frequently exposed to various stresses. Hypoxic conditions induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and activate the unfolded protein response (UPR) to maintain homeostasis. We previously reported that CREB has an important role in the proper response to prolonged hypoxia. To further understand the role of CREB in the hypoxic response, CREB stable knock-down (CREB-KD) cells were established from breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells and analyzed. CREB was activated by ER stress, and activation of CREB and the UPR pathway occurred in a coordinated manner in response to different stimuli, including ER stress-inducing chemicals, prolonged hypoxia, and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Depletion of CREB decreased the expression of IRE1? and PERK, two critical UPR signaling molecules. Promoter analysis and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that CREB binds to the promoter region of these genes and regulates their expression. ER stress induced by hypoxia was reduced in CREB-KD cells, leading to reduced tumor metastasis to the lung. Finally, OGD strongly activated the UPR and induced cell death in control cells, whereas the UPR was moderately activated in CREB-KD cells, which were more resistant to cell death. This study demonstrates a new role for CREB as a regulator of ER stress, which is required to properly respond to stressful conditions, such as hypoxia. PMID:26642955

  5. Anticipatory estrogen activation of the unfolded protein response is linked to cell proliferation and poor survival in estrogen receptor α-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Andruska, N; Zheng, X; Yang, X; Helferich, W G; Shapiro, D J

    2015-07-01

    In response to cell stress, cancer cells often activate the endoplasmic reticulum (EnR) stress sensor, the unfolded protein response (UPR). Little was known about the potential role in cancer of a different mode of UPR activation, anticipatory activation of the UPR prior to accumulation of unfolded protein or cell stress. We show that estrogen, acting via estrogen receptor α (ERα), induces rapid anticipatory activation of the UPR, resulting in increased production of the antiapoptotic chaperone BiP/GRP78, preparing cancer cells for the increased protein production required for subsequent estrogen-ERα-induced cell proliferation. In ERα-containing cancer cells, the estrogen, 17β-estradiol (E2) activates the UPR through a phospholipase C γ (PLCγ)-mediated opening of EnR IP3R calcium channels, enabling passage of calcium from the lumen of the EnR into the cytosol. siRNA knockdown of ERα blocked the estrogen-mediated increase in cytosol calcium and UPR activation. Knockdown or inhibition of PLCγ, or of IP3R, strongly inhibited the estrogen-mediated increases in cytosol calcium, UPR activation and cell proliferation. E2-ERα activates all three arms of the UPR in breast and ovarian cancer cells in culture and in a mouse xenograft. Knockdown of ATF6α, which regulates UPR chaperones, blocked estrogen induction of BiP and strongly inhibited E2-ERα-stimulated cell proliferation. Mild and transient UPR activation by estrogen promotes an adaptive UPR response that protects cells against subsequent UPR-mediated apoptosis. Analysis of data from ERα(+) breast cancers demonstrates elevated expression of a UPR gene signature that is a powerful new prognostic marker tightly correlated with subsequent resistance to tamoxifen therapy, reduced time to recurrence and poor survival. Thus, as an early component of the E2-ERα proliferation program, the mitogen estrogen, drives rapid anticipatory activation of the UPR. Anticipatory activation of the UPR is a new role for estrogens in cancer cell proliferation and resistance to therapy. PMID:25263449

  6. TMBIM3/GRINA is a novel unfolded protein response (UPR) target gene that controls apoptosis through the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Rivera, D; Armisn, R; Colombo, A; Martnez, G; Eguiguren, A L; Daz, A; Kiviluoto, S; Rodrguez, D; Patron, M; Rizzuto, R; Bultynck, G; Concha, M L; Sierralta, J; Stutzin, A; Hetz, C

    2012-01-01

    Transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif-containing (TMBIM)-6, also known as BAX-inhibitor 1 (BI-1), is an anti-apoptotic protein that belongs to a putative family of highly conserved and poorly characterized genes. Here we report the function of TMBIM3/GRINA in the control of cell death by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Tmbim3 mRNA levels are strongly upregulated in cellular and animal models of ER stress, controlled by the PERK signaling branch of the unfolded protein response. TMBIM3/GRINA synergies with TMBIM6/BI-1 in the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis and apoptosis, associated with physical interactions with inositol trisphosphate receptors. Loss-of-function studies in D. melanogaster demonstrated that TMBIM3/GRINA and TMBIM6/BI-1 have synergistic activities against ER stress in vivo. Similarly, manipulation of TMBIM3/GRINA levels in zebrafish embryos revealed an essential role in the control of apoptosis during neuronal development and in experimental models of ER stress. These findings suggest the existence of a conserved group of functionally related cell death regulators across species beyond the BCL-2 family of proteins operating at the ER membrane. PMID:22240901

  7. Anticipatory activation of the unfolded protein response by epidermal growth factor is required for immediate early gene expression and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liqun; Andruska, Neal; Zheng, Xiaobin; Shapiro, David J

    2016-02-15

    The onco-protein epidermal growth factor (EGF) initiates a cascade that includes activation of the ERK and AKT signaling pathways and alters gene expression. We describe a new action of EGF-EGF receptor (EGFR), rapid anticipatory activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor, the unfolded protein response (UPR). Within 2min, EGF elicits EGFR dependent activation of phospholipase C ? (PLC?), producing inositol triphosphate (IP3), which binds to IP3 receptor (IP3R), opening the endoplasmic reticulum IP3R Ca(2+) channels, resulting in increased intracellular Ca(2+). This calcium release leads to transient and moderate activation of the IRE1? and ATF6? arms of the UPR, resulting in induction of BiP chaperone. Knockdown or inhibition of EGFR, PLC? or IP3R blocks the increase in intracellular Ca(2+). While blocking the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) by locking the IP3R calcium channel with 2-APB had no effect on EGF activation of the ERK or AKT signaling pathways, it abolished the rapid EGF-mediated induction and repression of gene expression. Knockdown of ATF6? or XBP1, which regulate UPR-induced chaperone production, inhibited EGF stimulated cell proliferation. Supporting biological relevance, increased levels of EGF receptor during tumor progression were correlated with increased expression of the UPR gene signature. Anticipatory activation of the UPR is a new role for EGF. Since UPR activation occurs in <2min, it is an initial cell response when EGF binds EGFR. PMID:26551735

  8. The Graded Unfolding Model: A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Graded Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Laughlin, James E.

    Binary or graded disagree-agree responses to attitude items are often collected for the purpose of attitude measurement. Although such data are sometimes analyzed with cumulative measurement models, recent investigations suggest that unfolding models are more appropriate (J. S. Roberts, 1995; W. H. Van Schuur and H. A. L. Kiers, 1994). Advances in…

  9. Treadmill exercise represses neuronal cell death and inflammation during A?-induced ER stress by regulating unfolded protein response in aged presenilin 2 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun-Bum; Kwon, In-Su; Koo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Eung-Joon; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Jin; Yang, Choon-Ho; Lee, Young-Il; Cho, In-Ho; Cho, Joon-Yong

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of aggregated amyloid-beta (A?), which triggers a cellular stress response called the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR signaling pathway is a cellular defense system for dealing with the accumulation of misfolded proteins but switches to apoptosis when endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is prolonged. ER stress is involved in neurodegenerative diseases including AD, but the molecular mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis and inflammation by A?-induced ER stress to exercise training are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that treadmill exercise (TE) prevented PS2 mutation-induced memory impairment and reduced A?-42 deposition through the inhibition of ?-secretase (BACE-1) and its product, C-99 in cortex and/or hippocampus of aged PS2 mutant mice. We also found that TE down-regulated the expression of GRP78/Bip and PDI proteins and inhibited activation of PERK, eIF2?, ATF6?, sXBP1 and JNK-p38 MAPK as well as activation of CHOP, caspase-12 and caspase-3. Moreover, TE up-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and down-regulated the expressions of Bax in the hippocampus of aged PS2 mutant mice. Finally, the generation of TNF? and IL-1? and the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the hippocampus of aged PS2 mutant mice was also prevented or decreased by TE. These results showed that TE suppressed the activation of UPR signaling pathways as well as inhibited the apoptotic pathways of the UPR and inflammatory response following A?-induced ER stress. Thus, therapeutic strategies that modulate A?-induced ER stress through TE could represent a promising approach for the prevention or treatment of AD. PMID:23907580

  10. Arabidopsis tRNA ligase completes the cytoplasmic splicing of bZIP60 mRNA in the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yukihiro; Iwata, Yuji; Mishiba, Kei-Ichiro; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2016-02-19

    Arabidopsis bZIP60 is a major transcription factor that activates the unfolded protein response and is regulated by cytoplasmic splicing. Two Arabidopsis inositol-requiring 1s (IRE1A and IRE1B) cleave bZIP60 mRNA; however, the ligase that connects the two half-molecules of the split bZIP60 mRNA has not yet been identified. We aimed to determine whether the Arabidopsis tRNA ligase RLG1 catalyzes the ligation of cleaved bZIP60 mRNA. Recombinant IRE1B containing the ribonuclease domain correctly cleaved synthetic RNA covering the cleaved site of bZIP60 invitro. Recombinant RLG1 then ligated the two cleaved fragments. The cytoplasmic form of RLG1 was expressed in a T-DNA insertion mutant whose homozygote exhibited a lethal phenotype and when the transgene was substituted with endogenous RLG1, the plants grew normally. RLG1 proteins derived from transgene were mainly found in the cytoplasm; however, some were in the microsomal fraction, possibly on the ER membrane. This intracellular distribution of RLG1 is discussed. PMID:26820526

  11. Nanomechanics of Protein Unfolding Outside a Generic Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Li, Jingyuan; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-26

    Protein folding and unfolding have been the subject of active research for decades. Most of previous studies in protein unfolding were focused on temperature, chemical, and/or force (such as in atomic force microscopy (AFM)) induced denaturations. Recent studies on the functional roles of proteasomes (such as ClpXP) revealed a different unfolding process in cell, during which a target protein is mechanically unfolded and pulled into a confined, pore-like geometry for degradation. While the proteasome nanomachine has been extensively studied, the mechanism for unfolding proteins with the proteasome pore is still poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanical unfolding process of ubiquitin with (or really outside) a generic nanopore, and compare such process with that in the AFM pulling experiment. Unexpectedly, the required force for protein unfolding through a pore can be much smaller than that by the AFM. Simulation results also unveiled different nanomechanics, tearing fracture vs shearing friction, in these two distinct types of mechanical unfoldings. PMID:26655061

  12. Failure of the Adaptive Unfolded Protein Response in Islets of Obese Mice Is Linked With Abnormalities in β-Cell Gene Expression and Progression to Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jeng Yie; Luzuriaga, Jude; Bensellam, Mohammed; Biden, Trevor J.; Laybutt, D. Ross

    2013-01-01

    The normal β-cell response to obesity-associated insulin resistance is hypersecretion of insulin. Type 2 diabetes develops in subjects with β-cells that are susceptible to failure. Here, we investigated the time-dependent gene expression changes in islets of diabetes-prone db/db and diabetes-resistant ob/ob mice. The expressions of adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) genes were progressively induced in islets of ob/ob mice, whereas they declined in diabetic db/db mice. Genes important for β-cell function and maintenance of the islet phenotype were reduced with time in db/db mice, whereas they were preserved in ob/ob mice. Inflammation and antioxidant genes displayed time-dependent upregulation in db/db islets but were unchanged in ob/ob islets. Treatment of db/db mouse islets with the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid partially restored the changes in several β-cell function genes and transcription factors but did not affect inflammation or antioxidant gene expression. These data suggest that the maintenance (or suppression) of the adaptive UPR is associated with β-cell compensation (or failure) in obese mice. Inflammation, oxidative stress, and a progressive loss of β-cell differentiation accompany diabetes progression. The ability to maintain the adaptive UPR in islets may protect against the gene expression changes that underlie diabetes development in obese mice. PMID:23274897

  13. Monocrotaline pyrrole-induced megalocytosis of lung and breast epithelial cells: Disruption of plasma membrane and Golgi dynamics and an enhanced unfolded protein response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Shah, Mehul; Patel, Kirit; Sehgal, Pravin B. . E-mail: pravin_sehgal@nymc.edu

    2006-03-15

    The pyrrolizidine alkaloid monocrotaline (MCT) initiates pulmonary hypertension by inducing a 'megalocytosis' phenotype in target pulmonary arterial endothelial, smooth muscle and Type II alveolar epithelial cells. In cultured endothelial cells, a single exposure to the pyrrolic derivative of monocrotaline (MCTP) results in large cells with enlarged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi and increased vacuoles. However, these cells fail to enter mitosis. Largely based upon data from endothelial cells, we proposed earlier that a disruption of the trafficking and mitosis-sensor functions of the Golgi (the 'Golgi blockade' hypothesis) may represent the subcellular mechanism leading to MCTP-induced megalocytosis. In the present study, we investigated the applicability of the Golgi blockade hypothesis to epithelial cells. MCTP induced marked megalocytosis in cultures of lung A549 and breast MCF-7 cells. This was associated with a change in the distribution of the cis-Golgi scaffolding protein GM130 from a discrete juxtanuclear localization to a circumnuclear distribution consistent with an anterograde block of GM130 trafficking to/through the Golgi. There was also a loss of plasma membrane caveolin-1 and E-cadherin, cortical actin together with a circumnuclear accumulation of clathrin heavy chain (CHC) and {alpha}-tubulin. Flotation analyses revealed losses/alterations in the association of caveolin-1, E-cadherin and CHC with raft microdomains. Moreover, megalocytosis was accompanied by an enhanced unfolded protein response (UPR) as evidenced by nuclear translocation of Ire1{alpha} and glucose regulated protein 58 (GRP58/ER-60/ERp57) and a circumnuclear accumulation of PERK kinase and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). These data further support the hypothesis that an MCTP-induced Golgi blockade and enhanced UPR may represent the subcellular mechanism leading to enlargement of ER and Golgi and subsequent megalocytosis.

  14. The bZIP Transcription Factor HAC-1 Is Involved in the Unfolded Protein Response and Is Necessary for Growth on Cellulose in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Larrondo, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    High protein secretion capacity in filamentous fungi requires an extremely efficient system for protein synthesis, folding and transport. When the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is exceeded, a pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) is triggered, allowing cells to mitigate and cope with this stress. In yeast, this pathway relies on the transcription factor Hac1, which mediates the up-regulation of several genes required under these stressful conditions. In this work, we identified and characterized the ortholog of the yeast HAC1 gene in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We show that its mRNA undergoes an ER stress-dependent splicing reaction, which in N. crassa removes a 23 nt intron and leads to a change in the open reading frame. By disrupting the N. crassa hac-1 gene, we determined it to be crucial for activating UPR and for proper growth in the presence of ER stress-inducing chemical agents. Neurospora is naturally found growing on dead plant material, composed primarily by lignocellulose, and is a model organism for the study of plant cell wall deconstruction. Notably, we found that growth on cellulose, a substrate that requires secretion of numerous enzymes, imposes major demands on ER function and is dramatically impaired in the absence of hac-1, thus broadening the range of physiological functions of the UPR in filamentous fungi. Growth on hemicellulose however, another carbon source that necessitates the secretion of various enzymes for its deconstruction, is not impaired in the mutant nor is the amount of proteins secreted on this substrate, suggesting that secretion, as a whole, is unaltered in the absence of hac-1. The characterization of this signaling pathway in N. crassa will help in the study of plant cell wall deconstruction by fungi and its manipulation may result in important industrial biotechnological applications. PMID:26132395

  15. Yip1A, a Novel Host Factor for the Activation of the IRE1 Pathway of the Unfolded Protein Response during Brucella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Yuki; Imaoka, Koichi; Kataoka, Michiyo; Uda, Akihiko; Nakatsu, Daiki; Horii-Okazaki, Sakuya; Kunishige, Rina; Kano, Fumi; Murata, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Brucella species replicate within host cells in the form of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vacuoles. The mechanisms by which the bacteria are sequestered into such vacuoles and obtain a continuous membrane supply for their replication remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we provided several lines of evidence that demonstrate the mechanism by which B. abortus acquires the ER-derived membrane. First, during Brucella infection, the IRE1 pathway, but not the PERK and ATF6 pathways, of the unfolded protein response (UPR) was activated in a time-dependent manner, and the COPII vesicle components Sar1, Sec23, and Sec24D were upregulated. Second, a marked accretion of ER-derived vacuoles was observed around replicating bacteria using fluorescent microscopy and electron microscopy. Third, we identified a novel host factor, Yip1A, for the activation of the IRE1 pathway in response to both tunicamycin treatment and infection with B. abortus. We found that Yip1A is responsible for the phosphorylation of IRE1 through high-order assembly of Ire1 molecules at ER exit sites (ERES) under the UPR conditions. In Yip1A-knockdown cells, B. abortus failed to generate the ER-derived vacuoles, and remained in endosomal/lysosomal compartments. These results indicate that the activation of the IRE1 pathway and the subsequent formation of ER-derived vacuoles are critical for B. abortus to establish a safe replication niche, and that Yip1A is indispensable for these processes. Furthermore, we showed that the autophagy-related proteins Atg9 and WIPI1, but not DFCP1, were required for the biogenesis of the ER-derived membrane compartments. ?On the basis of our findings, we propose a model for intracellular Brucella replication that exploits the host UPR and ER-derived vacuole formation machineries, both of which depend on Yip1A-mediated IRE1 activation. PMID:25742138

  16. Unfolded protein response is required for the definitive endodermal specification of mouse embryonic stem cells via Smad2 and ?-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiming; Tsang, Kam Sze; Wang, Yonghui; Chan, Juliana C N; Xu, Gang; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2014-09-19

    Tremendous efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that control the specification of definitive endoderm cell fate in gene knockout mouse models and ES cell (ESC) differentiation models. However, the impact of the unfolded protein response (UPR), because of the stress of the endoplasmic reticulum on endodermal specification, is not well addressed. We employed UPR-inducing agents, thapsigargin and tunicamycin, in vitro to induce endodermal differentiation of mouse ESCs. Apart from the endodermal specification of ESCs, Western blotting demonstrated the enhanced phosphorylation of Smad2 and nuclear translocation of ?-catenin in ESC-derived cells. The inclusion of the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid to the induction cultures prevented the differentiation of ESCs into definitive endodermal cells even when Activin A was supplemented. Also, the addition of the TGF-? inhibitor SB431542 and the Wnt/?-catenin antagonist IWP-2 negated the endodermal differentiation of ESCs mediated by thapsigargin and tunicamycin. These data suggest that the activation of the UPR appears to orchestrate the induction of the definitive endodermal cell fate of ESCs via both the Smad2 and ?-catenin signaling pathways. The prospective regulatory machinery may be helpful for directing ESCs to differentiate into definitive endodermal cells for cellular therapy in the future. PMID:25092289

  17. Unfolded Protein Response Is Required for the Definitive Endodermal Specification of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells via Smad2 and ?-Catenin Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huiming; Tsang, Kam Sze; Wang, Yonghui; Chan, Juliana CN; Xu, Gang; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that control the specification of definitive endoderm cell fate in gene knockout mouse models and ES cell (ESC) differentiation models. However, the impact of the unfolded protein response (UPR), because of the stress of the endoplasmic reticulum on endodermal specification, is not well addressed. We employed UPR-inducing agents, thapsigargin and tunicamycin, in vitro to induce endodermal differentiation of mouse ESCs. Apart from the endodermal specification of ESCs, Western blotting demonstrated the enhanced phosphorylation of Smad2 and nuclear translocation of ?-catenin in ESC-derived cells. The inclusion of the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid to the induction cultures prevented the differentiation of ESCs into definitive endodermal cells even when Activin A was supplemented. Also, the addition of the TGF-? inhibitor SB431542 and the Wnt/?-catenin antagonist IWP-2 negated the endodermal differentiation of ESCs mediated by thapsigargin and tunicamycin. These data suggest that the activation of the UPR appears to orchestrate the induction of the definitive endodermal cell fate of ESCs via both the Smad2 and ?-catenin signaling pathways. The prospective regulatory machinery may be helpful for directing ESCs to differentiate into definitive endodermal cells for cellular therapy in the future. PMID:25092289

  18. The Malat1 long non-coding RNA is upregulated by signalling through the PERK axis of unfolded protein response during flavivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2015-01-01

    Flavivirus infection causes host cell death by initiation of an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is initiated following activation of three ER-membrane resident sensors, PERK, IRE1? and ATF6, which are otherwise kept inactive through association with the ER-chaperone GRP78. Activation precedes cellular and molecular changes that act to restore homeostasis but might eventually initiate apoptosis. These changes involve influencing function of multiple genes by either transcriptional or post-transcriptional or post-translational mechanisms. Transcriptional control includes expression of transcription factor cascades, which influence cognate gene expression. Malat1 is a long non-coding RNA which is over-expressed in many human oncogenic tissues and regulates cell cycle and survival. In this report, for the first time we show activation of Malat1 following infection by two flaviviruses, both of which activate the UPR in host cells. The temporal kinetics of expression was restricted to later time points. Further, Malat1 was also activated by pharmacological inducer of UPR, to a similar degree. Using drugs that specifically inhibit or activate the PERK or IRE1? sensors, we demonstrate that signalling through the PERK axis activates this expression, through a transcriptional mechanism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an UPR pathway regulating the expression of an lncRNA. PMID:26634309

  19. The Malat1 long non-coding RNA is upregulated by signalling through the PERK axis of unfolded protein response during flavivirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2015-01-01

    Flavivirus infection causes host cell death by initiation of an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is initiated following activation of three ER-membrane resident sensors, PERK, IRE1α and ATF6, which are otherwise kept inactive through association with the ER-chaperone GRP78. Activation precedes cellular and molecular changes that act to restore homeostasis but might eventually initiate apoptosis. These changes involve influencing function of multiple genes by either transcriptional or post-transcriptional or post-translational mechanisms. Transcriptional control includes expression of transcription factor cascades, which influence cognate gene expression. Malat1 is a long non-coding RNA which is over-expressed in many human oncogenic tissues and regulates cell cycle and survival. In this report, for the first time we show activation of Malat1 following infection by two flaviviruses, both of which activate the UPR in host cells. The temporal kinetics of expression was restricted to later time points. Further, Malat1 was also activated by pharmacological inducer of UPR, to a similar degree. Using drugs that specifically inhibit or activate the PERK or IRE1α sensors, we demonstrate that signalling through the PERK axis activates this expression, through a transcriptional mechanism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an UPR pathway regulating the expression of an lncRNA. PMID:26634309

  20. A synthetic chalcone, 2'-hydroxy-2,3,5'-trimethoxychalcone triggers unfolded protein response-mediated apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da Hyun; Jung Jung, You; Koh, Dongsoo; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han; Shin, Soon Young

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to find novel chemopreventive agents effective against breast cancer. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress can induce apoptosis through the unfolded protein response (UPR). 2'-Hydroxy-2,3,5'-trimethoxychalcone (DK143) is a synthetic flavonoid derivative. The present study provides evidence supporting the role of the UPR in mediating the apoptotic effect of DK143. Treatment with DK143 triggered apoptosis through the activation of the caspase pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells without affecting viability of MCF10A non-transformed breast epithelial cells. Further analysis revealed that DK143 produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in MCF10A cells, and upregulated the expression of ER stress sensors, including GRP78/BiP, IRE1?, CHOP, and Bim in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, UPR-related transcription factors, XBP-1 and CHOP, were activated by DK143. Moreover, silencing of IRE1? or CHOP by corresponding siRNA molecules attenuated DK143-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, DK143 suppressed mouse tumor growth in vivo. These results demonstrate that promoting ER stress in breast cancer cells via UPR induction might be a promising strategy for developing new chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents for breast cancer. PMID:26742460

  1. Taxol-induced unfolded protein response activation in breast cancer cells exposed to hypoxia: ATF4 activation regulates autophagy and inhibits apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Notte, Annick; Rebucci, Magali; Fransolet, Maude; Roegiers, Edith; Genin, Marie; Tellier, Celine; Watillon, Kassandra; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Arnould, Thierry; Michiels, Carine

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the resistance against chemotherapy-induced cell death is still of great interest since the number of patients with cancer increases and relapse is commonly observed. Indeed, the development of hypoxic regions as well as UPR (unfolded protein response) activation is known to promote cancer cell adaptive responses to the stressful tumor microenvironment and resistance against anticancer therapies. Therefore, the impact of UPR combined to hypoxia on autophagy and apoptosis activation during taxol exposure was investigated in MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells. The results showed that taxol rapidly induced UPR activation and that hypoxia modulated taxol-induced UPR activation differently according to the different UPR pathways (PERK, ATF6, and IRE1?). The putative involvement of these signaling pathways in autophagy or in apoptosis regulation in response to taxol exposure was investigated. However, while no link between the activation of these three ER stress sensors and autophagy or apoptosis regulation could be evidenced, results showed that ATF4 activation, which occurs independently of UPR activation, was involved in taxol-induced autophagy completion. In addition, an ATF4-dependent mechanism leading to cancer cell adaptation and resistance against taxol-induced cell death was evidenced. Finally, our results demonstrate that expression of ATF4, in association with hypoxia-induced genes, can be used as a biomarker of a poor prognosis for human breast cancer patients supporting the conclusion that ATF4 might play an important role in adaptation and resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy in hypoxic tumors. PMID:25724736

  2. Order Statistics Theory of Unfolding of Multimeric Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhmurov, A.; Dima, R.I.; Barsegov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy has become indispensable for the exploration of the mechanical properties of proteins. In force-ramp experiments, performed by utilizing a time-dependent pulling force, the peak forces for unfolding transitions in a multimeric protein (D)N are used to map the free energy landscape for unfolding for a protein domain D. Weshow that theoretical modeling of unfolding transitions based on combining the observed first (f1), second (f2), , Nth (fN) unfolding forces for a protein tandem of fixed length N, and pooling the force data for tandems of different length, n1 < n2 < < N, leads to an inaccurate estimation of the distribution of unfolding forces for the protein D, ?D(f). This problem can be overcome by using Order statistics theory, which, in conjunction with analytically tractable models, can be used to resolve the molecular characteristics that determine the unfolding micromechanics. We present a simple method of estimation of the parent distribution, ?D(f), based on analyzing the force data for a tandem (D)n of arbitrary length n. Order statistics theory is exemplified through a detailed analysis and modeling of the unfolding forces obtained from pulling simulations of the monomer and oligomers of the all-?-sheet WW domain. PMID:20858442

  3. AtBAG7, an Arabidopsis Bcl-2associated athanogene, resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brett; Kabbage, Mehdi; Britt, Robert; Dickman, Martin B.

    2010-01-01

    The Bcl-2associated athanogene (BAG) family is an evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional group of cochaperones that perform diverse cellular functions ranging from proliferation to growth arrest and cell death in yeast, in mammals, and, as recently observed, in plants. The Arabidopsis genome contains seven homologs of the BAG family, including four with domain organization similar to animal BAGs. In the present study we show that an Arabidopsis BAG, AtBAG7, is a uniquely localized endoplasmic reticulum (ER) BAG that is necessary for the proper maintenance of the unfolded protein response (UPR). AtBAG7 was shown to interact directly in vivo with the molecular chaperone, AtBiP2, by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the interaction was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid assay. Treatment with an inducer of UPR, tunicamycin, resulted in accelerated cell death of AtBAG7-null mutants. Furthermore, AtBAG7 knockouts were sensitive to known ER stress stimuli, heat and cold. In these knockouts heat sensitivity was reverted successfully to the wild-type phenotype with the addition of the chemical chaperone, tauroursodexycholic acid (TUDCA). Real-time PCR of ER stress proteins indicated that the expression of the heat-shock protein, AtBiP3, is selectively up-regulated in AtBAG7-null mutants upon heat and cold stress. Our results reveal an unexpected diversity of the plant's BAG gene family and suggest that AtBAG7 is an essential component of the UPR during heat and cold tolerance, thus confirming the cytoprotective role of plant BAGs. PMID:20231441

  4. The aqueous extract of Glycyrrhiza inflata can upregulate unfolded protein response-mediated chaperones to reduce tau misfolding in cell models of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Chen, I-Cheng; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Chen, Hsuan-Chiang; Lin, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Te-Hsien; Weng, Yu-Ting; Chao, Chih-Ying; Wu, Yih-Ru; Lin, Jung-Yaw; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Chen, Chiung-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and several neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies are characterized by misfolding and aggregation of tau protein. Although several studies have suggested the potential of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as treatment for neurodegenerative diseases, the role of TCM in treating AD and tauopathies have not been well explored. Materials and methods Tau protein was coupled to the DsRed fluorophore by fusing a pro-aggregation mutant of repeat domain of tau (ΔK280 tauRD) with DsRed. The ΔK280 tauRD-DsRed fusion gene was then used to generate Tet-On 293 and SH-SY5Y cell clones as platforms to test the efficacy of 39 aqueous extracts of TCM in reducing tau misfolding and in neuroprotection. Results Seven TCM extracts demonstrated a significant reduction in tau misfolding and reactive oxidative species with low cytotoxicity in the ΔK280 tauRD-DsRed 293 cell model. Glycyrrhiza inflata and Panax ginseng also demonstrated the potential to improve neurite outgrowth in the ΔK280 tauRD-DsRed SH-SY5Y neuronal cell model. G. inflata further rescued the upregulation of ERN2 (pro-apoptotic) and downregulation of unfolded-protein-response-mediated chaperones ERP44, DNAJC3, and SERP1 in ΔK280 tauRD-DsRed 293 cells. Conclusion This in vitro study provides evidence that G. inflata may be a novel therapeutic for AD and tauopathies. Future applications of G. inflata on animal models of AD and tauopathies are warranted to corroborate its effect of reducing misfolding and potential disease modification. PMID:27013866

  5. Employing Multiple Spectroscopic Techniques Simultaneously to Observe Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Michael; Kelty, Ben; Link, Justin

    2015-03-01

    A protein's function is directly related to its native, folded structure. In order to study the structure of proteins, the unfolding process may be characterized. In our study, by using the spectroscopic techniques of circular dichroism (CD), absorption, and fluorescence simultaneously, we examined the unfolding of horse heart cytochrome c, a well-studied, model protein by gradually increasing the concentration of the chemical denaturant, guanidine hydrochloride. The signal changes from these modalities over the course of the unfolding reaction provides some of the thermodynamic properties like Gibbs free energy for insight into the stability of the protein. This allows us to compare the three techniques under the exact same conditions. The objective of this session is to present recent work in developing a protocol to observe the unfolding of cytochrome c using fluorescence, absorbance, and CD simultaneously.

  6. Protein Folding and Unfolding Under Force

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Bharat; Marqusee, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The recent revolution in optics and instrumentation has enabled the study of protein folding using extremely low mechanical forces as the denaturant. This exciting development has led to the observation of the protein folding process at single molecule resolution and its response to mechanical force. Here, we describe the principles and experimental details of force spectroscopy on proteins, with a focus on the optical tweezers instrument. Several recent results will be discussed to highlight the importance of this technique in addressing a variety of questions in the protein folding field. PMID:23784721

  7. S(+)-ibuprofen destabilizes MYC/MYCN and AKT, increases p53 expression, and induces unfolded protein response and favorable phenotype in neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, Naohiko; Hicks, Sakeenah L; Regan, Paul L; Jacobs, Joshua; Jumbo, Amina S; Leonhardt, Payton; Rappaport, Eric F; Tang, Xao X

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric solid tumor that exhibits a striking clinical bipolarity: favorable and unfavorable. The survival rate of children with unfavorable neuroblastoma remains low among all childhood cancers. MYCN and MYC play a crucial role in determining the malignancy of unfavorable neuroblastomas, whereas high-level expression of the favorable neuroblastoma genes is associated with a good disease outcome and confers growth suppression of neuroblastoma cells. A small fraction of neuroblastomas harbors TP53 mutations at diagnosis, but a higher proportion of the relapse cases acquire TP53 mutations. In this study, we investigated the effect of S(+)-ibuprofen on neuroblastoma cell lines, focusing on the expression of the MYCN, MYC, AKT, p53 proteins and the favorable neuroblastoma genes in vitro as biomarkers of malignancy. Treatment of neuroblastoma cell lines with S(+)-ibuprofen resulted in a significant growth suppression. This growth effect was accompanied by a marked decrease in the expression of MYC, MYCN, AKT and an increase in p53 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines without TP53 mutation. In addition, S(+)-ibuprofen enhanced the expression of some favorable neuroblastoma genes (EPHB6, CD44) and genes involved in growth suppression and differentiation (EGR1, EPHA2, NRG1 and SEL1L). Gene expression profile and Ingenuity pathway analyses using TP53-mutated SKNAS cells further revealed that S(+)-ibuprofen suppressed molecular pathways associated with cell growth and conversely enhanced those of cell cycle arrest and the unfolded protein response. Collectively, these results suggest that S(+)-ibuprofen or its related compounds may have the potential for therapeutic and/or palliative use for unfavorable neuroblastoma. PMID:24173829

  8. Alzheimer's disease-related peptide PS2V plays ancient, conserved roles in suppression of the unfolded protein response under hypoxia and stimulation of ?-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Moussavi Nik, Seyyed Hani; Newman, Morgan; Wilson, Lachlan; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Wells, Simon; Musgrave, Ian; Verdile, Giuseppe; Martins, Ralph N; Lardelli, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The PRESENILIN1 and PRESENILIN2 genes encode structurally related proteases essential for ?-secretase activity. Of nearly 200 PRESENILIN mutations causing early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) only the K115Efx10 mutation of PSEN2 causes truncation of the open reading frame. If translated, the truncated product would resemble a naturally occurring isoform of PSEN2 named PS2V that is induced by hypoxia and found at elevated levels in late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. The function of PS2V is largely unexplored. We show that zebrafish possess a PS2V-like isoform, PS1IV, produced from the fish's PSEN1 rather than PSEN2 orthologous gene. The molecular mechanism controlling formation of PS2V/PS1IV was probably present in the ancient common ancestor of the PSEN1 and PSEN2 genes. Human PS2V and zebrafish PS1IV have highly divergent structures but conserved abilities to stimulate ?-secretase activity and to suppress the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxia. The putative protein truncation caused by K115Efx10 resembles PS2V in its ability to increase ?-secretase activity and suppress the UPR. This supports increased A? levels as a common link between K115Efx10 early onset AD and sporadic, late onset AD. The ability of mutant variants of PS2V to stimulate ?-secretase activity partially correlates with their ability to suppress the UPR. The cytosolic, transmembrane and luminal domains of PS2V are all critical to its ?-secretase and UPR-suppression activities. Our data support a model in which chronic hypoxia in aged brains promotes excessive Notch signalling and accumulation of A? that contribute to AD pathogenesis. PMID:25814654

  9. Unfolded protein ensembles, folding trajectories, and refolding rate prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A.; Sin, B. K.; Mohazab, A. R.; Plotkin, S. S.

    2013-09-01

    Computer simulations can provide critical information on the unfolded ensemble of proteins under physiological conditions, by explicitly characterizing the geometrical properties of the diverse conformations that are sampled in the unfolded state. A general computational analysis across many proteins has not been implemented however. Here, we develop a method for generating a diverse conformational ensemble, to characterize properties of the unfolded states of intrinsically disordered or intrinsically folded proteins. The method allows unfolded proteins to retain disulfide bonds. We examined physical properties of the unfolded ensembles of several proteins, including chemical shifts, clustering properties, and scaling exponents for the radius of gyration with polymer length. A problem relating simulated and experimental residual dipolar couplings is discussed. We apply our generated ensembles to the problem of folding kinetics, by examining whether the ensembles of some proteins are closer geometrically to their folded structures than others. We find that for a randomly selected dataset of 15 non-homologous 2- and 3-state proteins, quantities such as the average root mean squared deviation between the folded structure and unfolded ensemble correlate with folding rates as strongly as absolute contact order. We introduce a new order parameter that measures the distance travelled per residue, which naturally partitions into a smooth "laminar" and subsequent "turbulent" part of the trajectory. This latter conceptually simple measure with no fitting parameters predicts folding rates in 0 M denaturant with remarkable accuracy (r = -0.95, p = 1 10-7). The high correlation between folding times and sterically modulated, reconfigurational motion supports the rapid collapse of proteins prior to the transition state as a generic feature in the folding of both two-state and multi-state proteins. This method for generating unfolded ensembles provides a powerful approach to address various questions in protein evolution, misfolding and aggregation, transient structures, and molten globule and disordered protein phases.

  10. Rosiglitazone induces the unfolded protein response, but has no significant effect on cell viability, in monocytic and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Caddy, J; Isa, S; Mainwaring, L S; Adam, E; Roberts, A; Lang, D; Morris, R H K; Thomas, A W; Webb, R

    2010-10-01

    Given the safety concerns expressed over negative cardiovascular outcomes resulting from the clinical use of rosiglitazone, and the view that rosiglitazone exerts PPAR?-independent effects alongside its insulin-sensitising PPAR?-dependent effects, we hypothesised that rosiglitazone may trigger Unfolded Protein Responses (UPRs) due to disruptions in [Ca(2+)](i) homeostasis within two cardiovascular cell types: monocytic (MM6) and vascular smooth muscle (A7r5) cells. In microsomal samples derived from both cell types, pre-incubation with rosiglitazone rapidly (30min) brought about concentration-dependent PPAR?-independent inhibition of Ca(2+)ATPase activity (IC(50) ?2?M). Fluo-3 fluorimetric data demonstrated in intact cells that 1h treatment with 1 or 10?M rosiglitazone caused Ca(2+) ions to leak into the cytoplasm. Gene expression analysis showed that within 4h of rosiglitazone exposure, the UPR transcription factor XBP-1 was activated (likely due to corresponding ER Ca(2+) depletion), and the UPR target genes BiP and SERCA2b were subsequently upregulated within 24-72h. After 72h 1 or 10?M rosiglitazone treatment, microsomal Ca(2+)ATPase activity increased to >2-fold of that seen in control microsomes, while [Ca(2+)](i) returned to basal, indicating that UPR-triggered SERCA2b upregulation was responsible for enhanced enzymatic Ca(2+) sequestration within the ER. This appeared to be sufficient to replenish ER Ca(2+) stores and restore normal cell physiology, as cell viability levels were not decreased due to rosiglitazone treatment throughout a 2-week study. Thus, incubation with 1-10?M rosiglitazone triggers the UPR, but does not prove cytotoxic, in cells of the cardiovascular system. This observation provides an important contribution to the current debate over the use of rosiglitazone in the clinical treatment of Type-2 Diabetes. PMID:20816668

  11. Ultrafast hydration dynamics in protein unfolding: Human serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, J. K. Amisha; Zhao, Liang; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2004-01-01

    We report studies of unfolding and ultrafast hydration dynamics of the protein human serum albumin. Unique in this study is our ability to examine different domains of the same protein and the intermediate on the way to the unfolded state. With femtosecond resolution and site-selective labeling, we isolate the dynamics of domains I and II of the native protein, domain I of the intermediate at 2 M guanidine hydrochloride, and the unfolded state at 6 M of the denaturant. For studies of unfolding, we used the fluorophores, acrylodan (covalently bound to Cys-34 in domain I) and the intrinsic tryptophan (domain II), whereas for hydration dynamics, we probed acrylodan and prodan; the latter is bound to domain II. From the time-dependent spectra and the correlation functions, we obtained the time scale of dynamically ordered water: 57 ps for the more stable domain I and 32 ps for the less stable domain II, in contrast to ?0.8 ps for labile, bulk-type water. This trend suggests an increased hydrophilic residueswater interaction of domain I, contrary to some packing models. In the intermediate state, which is characterized by essentially intact domain I and unfolded domain II, the dynamics of ordered water around domain I is nearly the same (61 ps) as that of native state (57 ps), whereas that in the unfolded protein is much shorter (13 ps). We discuss the role of this fluidity in the correlation between stability and function of the protein. PMID:15353599

  12. Urea unfolding of peptide helices as a model for interpreting protein unfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Scholtz, J M; Barrick, D; York, E J; Stewart, J M; Baldwin, R L

    1995-01-01

    To provide a model system for understanding how the unfolding of protein alpha-helices by urea contributes to protein denaturation, urea unfolding was measured for a homologous series of helical peptides with the repeating sequence Ala-Glu-Ala-Ala-Lys-Ala and chain lengths varying from 14 to 50 residues. The dependence of the helix propagation parameter of the Zimm-Bragg model for helix-coil transition theory (s) on urea molarity ([urea]) was determined at 0 degree C with data for the entire set of peptides, and a linear dependence of In s on [urea] was found. The results were fitted by the binding-site model and by the solvent-exchange model for the interaction of urea with the peptides. Each of these thermodynamic models is able to describe the data quite well and we are not able to discern any difference between the ability of each model to fit the data. Thus a linear relation, ln s = ln s0 - (m/RT).[urea], fits the data for alpha-helix unfolding, just as others have found for protein unfolding. When the m value determined here for alpha-helix unfolding is multiplied by the number of helical residues in partly helical protein molecules, the resulting values agree within a factor of 2 with observed m values for these proteins. This result indicates that the interaction between urea and peptide groups accounts for a major part of the denaturing action of urea on proteins, as predicted earlier by some model studies with small molecules. PMID:7816813

  13. Signature of protein unfolding in chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging.

    PubMed

    Goerke, Steffen; Zaiss, Moritz; Kunz, Patrick; Klika, Karel D; Windschuh, Johannes D; Mogk, Axel; Bukau, Bernd; Ladd, Mark E; Bachert, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) allows the detection of metabolites of low concentration in tissue with nearly the sensitivity of MRI with water protons. With this spectroscopic imaging approach, several tissue-specific CEST effects have been observed in vivo. Some of these originate from exchanging sites of proteins, such as backbone amide protons, or from aliphatic protons within the hydrophobic protein core. In this work, we employed CEST experiments to detect global protein unfolding. Spectral evaluation revealed exchange- and NOE-mediated CEST effects that varied in a highly characteristic manner with protein unfolding tracked by fluorescence spectroscopy. We suggest the use of this comprehensive spectral signature for the detection of protein unfolding by CEST, as it relies on several spectral hallmarks. As proof of principle, we demonstrate that the presented signature is readily detectable using a whole-body MR tomograph (B0 ?=?7?T), not only in denatured aqueous protein solutions, but also in heat-shocked yeast cells. A CEST imaging contrast with the potential to detect global protein unfolding would be of particular interest regarding protein unfolding as a marker for stress, ageing, and disease. PMID:26010522

  14. PERK regulated miR-424(322)-503 cluster fine-tunes activation of IRE1 and ATF6 during Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ananya; Hossain, Muhammad Mosaraf; Read, Danielle E.; Hetz, Claudio; Samali, Afshin; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) responds to changes in intracellular homeostasis through activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR can facilitate the restoration of cellular homeostasis, via the concerted activation of three ER stress sensors, namely IRE1, PERK and ATF6. Global approaches in several cellular contexts have revealed that UPR regulates the expression of many miRNAs that play an important role in the regulation of life and death decisions during UPR. Here we show that expression of miR-424(322)-503 cluster is downregulated during UPR. IRE1 inhibitor (4??8C) and deficiency of XBP1 had no effect on downregulation of miR-424(322)-503 during UPR. Treatment of cells with CCT030312, a selective activator of EIF2AK3/PERK signalling, leads to the downregulation of miR-424(322)-503 expression. The repression of miR-424(322)-503 cluster during conditions of ER stress is compromised in PERK-deficient MEFs. miR-424 regulates the expression of ATF6 via a miR-424 binding site in its 3? UTR and attenuates the ATF6 transcriptional activity during UPR. Further miR-424 had no effect on IRE1-XBP1 axis but enhanced the regulated IRE1-dependent decay (RIDD). Our results suggest that miR-424 constitutes an obligatory fine-tuning mechanism where PERK-mediated downregulation of miR-424(322)-503 cluster regulates optimal activation of IRE1 and ATF6 during conditions of ER stress. PMID:26674075

  15. Up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress induced genes of the unfolded protein response in the liver of periparturient dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In dairy cows, the periparturient phase is a stressful period, which is commonly associated with strong metabolic adaptations and the development of pathophysiologic conditions and disorders. Some of the symptoms occurring in the liver, such as the development of fatty liver, are similar to those observed under the condition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Therefore, we hypothesized, that in the liver of dairy cows ER stress is induced during the periparturient phase, which in turn leads to an induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). In order to investigate this hypothesis, we determined relative mRNA concentrations of 14 genes of the ER stress-induced UPR in liver biopsy samples of 13 dairy cows at 3 wk antepartum and 1, 5 and 14 wk postpartum. Results We found, that the mRNA concentrations of 13 out of the 14 genes involved in the UPR in the liver were significantly increased (1.9 to 4.0 fold) at 1 wk postpartum compared to 3 wk antepartum. From 1 wk postpartum to later lactation, mRNA concentrations of all the genes considered were declining. Moreover, at 1 wk postpartum, mRNA concentration of the spliced variant of XBP1 was increased in comparison to 3 wk antepartum, indicating that splicing of XBP1 a hallmark of ER stress - was induced following the onset of lactation. Conclusion The present study reveals, that ER stress might be induced during the periparturient phase in the liver of dairy cows. We assume that the ER stress-induced UPR might contribute to the pathophysiologic conditions commonly observed in the liver of periparturient cows, such as the development of fatty liver, ketosis or inflammation. PMID:24555446

  16. PERK regulated miR-424(322)-503 cluster fine-tunes activation of IRE1 and ATF6 during Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ananya; Hossain, Muhammad Mosaraf; Read, Danielle E; Hetz, Claudio; Samali, Afshin; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) responds to changes in intracellular homeostasis through activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR can facilitate the restoration of cellular homeostasis, via the concerted activation of three ER stress sensors, namely IRE1, PERK and ATF6. Global approaches in several cellular contexts have revealed that UPR regulates the expression of many miRNAs that play an important role in the regulation of life and death decisions during UPR. Here we show that expression of miR-424(322)-503 cluster is downregulated during UPR. IRE1 inhibitor (4??8C) and deficiency of XBP1 had no effect on downregulation of miR-424(322)-503 during UPR. Treatment of cells with CCT030312, a selective activator of EIF2AK3/PERK signalling, leads to the downregulation of miR-424(322)-503 expression. The repression of miR-424(322)-503 cluster during conditions of ER stress is compromised in PERK-deficient MEFs. miR-424 regulates the expression of ATF6 via a miR-424 binding site in its 3' UTR and attenuates the ATF6 transcriptional activity during UPR. Further miR-424 had no effect on IRE1-XBP1 axis but enhanced the regulated IRE1-dependent decay (RIDD). Our results suggest that miR-424 constitutes an obligatory fine-tuning mechanism where PERK-mediated downregulation of miR-424(322)-503 cluster regulates optimal activation of IRE1 and ATF6 during conditions of ER stress. PMID:26674075

  17. N-Octanoyl Dopamine Treatment of Endothelial Cells Induces the Unfolded Protein Response and Results in Hypometabolism and Tolerance to Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Stamellou, Eleni; Fontana, Johann; Wedel, Johannes; Ntasis, Emmanouil; Sticht, Carsten; Becker, Anja; Pallavi, Prama; Wolf, Kerstin; Krmer, Bernhard K.; Hafner, Mathias; van Son, Willem J.; Yard, Benito A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim N-acyl dopamines (NADD) are gaining attention in the field of inflammatory and neurological disorders. Due to their hydrophobicity, NADD may have access to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We therefore investigated if NADD induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) and if this in turn influences cell behaviour. Methods Genome wide gene expression profiling, confirmatory qPCR and reporter assays were employed on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to validate induction of UPR target genes and UPR sensor activation by N-octanoyl dopamine (NOD). Intracellular ATP, apoptosis and induction of thermotolerance were used as functional parameters to assess adaptation of HUVEC. Results NOD, but not dopamine dose dependently induces the UPR. This was also found for other synthetic NADD. Induction of the UPR was dependent on the redox activity of NADD and was not caused by selective activation of a particular UPR sensor. UPR induction did not result in cell apoptosis, yet NOD strongly impaired cell proliferation by attenuation of cells in the S-G2/M phase. Long-term treatment of HUVEC with low NOD concentration showed decreased intracellular ATP concentration paralleled with activation of AMPK. These cells were significantly more resistant to cold inflicted injury. Conclusions We provide for the first time evidence that NADD induce the UPR in vitro. It remains to be assessed if UPR induction is causally associated with hypometabolism and thermotolerance. Further pharmacokinetic studies are warranted to address if the NADD concentrations used in vitro can be obtained in vivo and if this in turn shows therapeutic efficacy. PMID:24926788

  18. D-Penicillamine targets metastatic melanoma cells with induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and Noxa (PMAIP1)-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shuxi; Cabello, Christopher M.; Lamore, Sarah D.; Lesson, Jessica L.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2013-01-01

    D-penicillamine (3,3-Dimethyl-D-cysteine; DP) is an FDA-approved redox-active D-cysteine-derivative with antioxidant, disulfide-reducing, and metal chelating properties used therapeutically for the control of copper-related pathology in Wilsons disease and reductive cystine-solubilization in cystinuria. Based on the established sensitivity of metastatic melanoma cells to pharmacological modulation of cellular oxidative stress, we tested feasibility of using DP for chemotherapeutic intervention targeting human A375 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. DP treatment induced caspase-dependent cell death in cultured human metastatic melanoma cells (A375, G361) without compromising viability of primary epidermal melanocytes, an effect not observed with the thiol-antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and dithiothreitol. Focused gene expression array analysis followed by immunoblot detection revealed that DP rapidly activates the cytotoxic unfolded protein response (UPR; involving phospho-PERK, phospho-eIF2?, Grp78, CHOP, and Hsp70) and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis with p53 upregulation and modulation of Bcl-2 family members (involving Noxa, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2). DP (but not NAC) induced oxidative stress with early impairment of glutathione homeostasis and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. SiRNA-based antagonism of PMAIP1 expression blocked DP-induced upregulation of the proapoptotic BH3-only effector Noxa and prevented downregulation of the Noxa-antagonist Mcl-1, rescuing melanoma cells from DP-induced apoptosis. Intraperitoneal administration of DP displayed significant antimelanoma activity in a murine A375 xenograft model. It remains to be seen if melanoma cell-directed induction of UPR and apoptosis using DP or improved DP-derivatives can be harnessed for future chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:22843330

  19. High Glucose-Repressed CITED2 Expression Through miR-200b Triggers the Unfolded Protein Response and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hui; Yu, Jingwen; Dong, Daoyin; Zhou, Qun; Wang, Jian-Ying; Fang, Shengyun; Yang, Peixin

    2016-01-01

    High glucose in vivo and in vitro induces neural tube defects (NTDs). CITED2 (CBP/p300-interacting transactivator with ED-rich tail 2) is essential for neural tube closure. We explored the regulatory mechanism underlying CITED2 expression and its relationship with miRNA and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. miR-200b levels were increased by maternal diabetes or high glucose in vitro, and this increase was abrogated by transgenic overexpression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) or an SOD1 mimetic. CITED2 was the target of miR-200b and was downregulated by high glucose. Two miR-200b binding sites in the 3'-untranslated region of the CITED2 mRNA were required for inhibiting CITED2 expression. The miR-200b mimic and a CITED2 knockdown mimicked the stimulative effect of high glucose on unfolded protein response (UPR) and ER stress, whereas the miR-200b inhibitor and CITED2 overexpression abolished high glucose-induced UPR signaling, ER stress, and apoptosis. The ER stress inhibitor, 4-phenylbutyrate, blocked CITED2 knockdown-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the miR-200b inhibitor reversed high glucose-induced CITED2 downregulation, ER stress, and NTDs in cultured embryos. Thus, we showed a novel function of miR-200b and CITED2 in high glucose-induced UPR and ER stress, suggesting that miR-200b and CITED2 are critical for ER homeostasis and NTD formation in the developing embryo. PMID:26450995

  20. Expansion and internal friction in unfolded protein chain.

    PubMed

    Yasin, U Mahammad; Sashi, Pulikallu; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2013-10-10

    Similarities in global properties of homopolymers and unfolded proteins provide approaches to mechanistic description of protein folding. Here, hydrodynamic properties and relaxation rates of the unfolded state of carbonmonoxide-liganded cytochrome c (cyt-CO) have been measured using nuclear magnetic resonance and laser photolysis methods. Hydrodynamic radius of the unfolded chain gradually increases as the solvent turns increasingly better, consistent with theory. Curiously, however, the rate of intrachain contact formation also increases with an increasing denaturant concentration, which, by Szabo, Schulten, and Schulten theory for the rate of intramolecular contact formation in a Gaussian polymer, indicates growing intramolecular diffusion. It is argued that diminishing nonbonded atom interactions with increasing denaturant reduces internal friction and, thus, increases the rate of polypeptide relaxation. Qualitative scaling of the extent of unfolding with nonbonded repulsions allows for description of internal friction by a phenomenological model. The degree of nonbonded atom interactions largely determines the extent of internal friction. PMID:24044733

  1. Analysis and Interpretation of Single Molecule Protein Unfolding Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannon, Herbert; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of protein unfolding under a stretching force has been extensively studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) over the past decade [1]. Experimental artifacts at the single molecule level introduce uncertainties in the data analysis that have led to several competing physical models for the unfolding process. For example, the unfolding dynamics of the protein ubiquitin under constant force has been described by probability distributions as diverse as exponential [2,3], a sum of exponentials, log-normal [4], and more recently a function describing static disorder in the Arrhenius model [5]. A new method for data analysis is presented that utilizes maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) combined with other traditional statistical tests to unambiguously rank the consistency of these and other models with the experimental data. These techniques applied to the ubiquitin unfolding data shows that the probability of unfolding is best fit with a stretched exponential distribution, with important implications on the complexity of the mechanism of protein unfolding. [4pt] [1] Carrion-Vazquez, et. al. Springer Series in Biophys. 2006 [0pt] [2] Fernandez et. al. Science 2004 [0pt] [3] Brujic et. al. Nat. Phys 2006 [0pt] [4] Garcia-Manyes et. al. Biophys. J. 2007 [0pt] [5] Kuo et. al. PNAS 2010

  2. First Passage Times, Lifetimes, and Relaxation Times of Unfolded Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Sengupta, Anirvan M.; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of proteins in the unfolded state can be quantified in computer simulations by calculating a spectrum of relaxation times which describes the time scales over which the population fluctuations decay to equilibrium. If the unfolded state space is discretized, we can evaluate the relaxation time of each state. We derive a simple relation that shows the mean first passage time to any state is equal to the relaxation time of that state divided by the equilibrium population. This explains why mean first passage times from state to state within the unfolded ensemble can be very long but the energy landscape can still be smooth (minimally frustrated). In fact, when the folding kinetics is two-state, all of the unfolded state relaxation times within the unfolded free energy basin are faster than the folding time. This result supports the well-established funnel energy landscape picture and resolves an apparent contradiction between this model and the recently proposed kinetic hub model of protein folding. We validate these concepts by analyzing a Markov state model of the kinetics in the unfolded state and folding of the miniprotein NTL9 (where NTL9 is the N -terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9), constructed from a 2.9 ms simulation provided by D. E. Shaw Research.

  3. Forced unfolding of protein domains determines cytoskeletal rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, John

    2005-03-01

    Cells have recently been shown to have a power-law dynamic shear modulus over wide frequency range; the value of the exponent being non-universal, varying from 0.1-0.25 depending on cell type. This observation has been interpreted as evidence for the Soft Glassy Rheology (SGR) model, a trap-type glass model with an effective granular temperature. We propose a simple, alternative model of cytoskeletal mechanics based on the thermally activated, forced unfolding of domains in proteins cross-linking a stressed semi-flexible polymer gel. It directly relates a cells mechanical response to biophysical parameters of the cytoskeletons molecular constituents. Simulations indicate that unfolding events in a random network display a collective self-organization, giving rise to an exponential distribution of crosslink stress that can reproduce cell viscoelasticity. The model suggests natural explanations for the observed correlation between cell rheology and intracellular static stress, including those previously explained using the tensegrity concept. Moreover, our model provides insight into potential mechanisms of mechanotransduction as well as cell shape sensing and maintenance.

  4. Developing a Novel, Interdisciplinary Approach to Study Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Ian; Link, Justin

    2013-03-01

    The ability of a protein to function is a direct result of its ability to properly obtain its native, folded structure. In order to determine the structural stability of proteins and to gain knowledge of their folding mechanism, we must develop protocols that allow us to monitor the controlled unfolding of proteins. Here, we investigate the stability of cytochrome c, a well-studied, model protein, under denaturing conditions using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence. Using either a chemical denaturant (Guanidine HCl) or heat, we can cause a protein to gradually unfold. The changes in the fluorescence and CD spectra can provide insight into the stability of proteins by providing us with thermodynamic parameters such as the Gibbs free energy, melting temperature and enthalpy. Research in this lab has been explored with mutant proteins and change in CD signal, however further work must still be done to observe their unfolding monitored by fluorescence. This technique will allow us to determine which regions of native cytochrome c have the greatest impact on the protein folding process. The objective of this session is to present recent work in developing a protocol to observe the unfolding of wild type and mutant proteins with fluorescence. The Borcer Fund, The John A. Hauck Foundation, and Xavier University

  5. Rosiglitazone induces the unfolded protein response, but has no significant effect on cell viability, in monocytic and vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Caddy, J.; Isa, S.; Mainwaring, L.S.; Adam, E.; Roberts, A.; Lang, D.; Morris, R.H.K.; Thomas, A.W.; Webb, R.

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Rosiglitazone rapidly (30 min) inhibited microsomal Ca{sup 2+}ATPase activity (IC{sub 50} {approx}2 {mu}M). {yields} After 4 h rosiglitazone exposure, the UPR transcription factor XBP-1 was activated. {yields} Within 24-72 h, UPR target genes were upregulated, enhancing ER Ca{sup 2+} sequestration. {yields} Replenishment of ER Ca{sup 2+} stores appeared to restore normal cell physiology. {yields} Monocyte/VSMC viability was not decreased during 2 weeks' rosiglitazone treatment. -- Abstract: Given the safety concerns expressed over negative cardiovascular outcomes resulting from the clinical use of rosiglitazone, and the view that rosiglitazone exerts PPAR{gamma}-independent effects alongside its insulin-sensitising PPAR{gamma}-dependent effects, we hypothesised that rosiglitazone may trigger Unfolded Protein Responses (UPRs) due to disruptions in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} homeostasis within two cardiovascular cell types: monocytic (MM6) and vascular smooth muscle (A7r5) cells. In microsomal samples derived from both cell types, pre-incubation with rosiglitazone rapidly (30 min) brought about concentration-dependent PPAR{gamma}-independent inhibition of Ca{sup 2+}ATPase activity (IC{sub 50} {approx}2 {mu}M). Fluo-3 fluorimetric data demonstrated in intact cells that 1 h treatment with 1 or 10 {mu}M rosiglitazone caused Ca{sup 2+} ions to leak into the cytoplasm. Gene expression analysis showed that within 4 h of rosiglitazone exposure, the UPR transcription factor XBP-1 was activated (likely due to corresponding ER Ca{sup 2+} depletion), and the UPR target genes BiP and SERCA2b were subsequently upregulated within 24-72 h. After 72 h 1 or 10 {mu}M rosiglitazone treatment, microsomal Ca{sup 2+}ATPase activity increased to >2-fold of that seen in control microsomes, while [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} returned to basal, indicating that UPR-triggered SERCA2b upregulation was responsible for enhanced enzymatic Ca{sup 2+} sequestration within the ER. This appeared to be sufficient to replenish ER Ca{sup 2+} stores and restore normal cell physiology, as cell viability levels were not decreased due to rosiglitazone treatment throughout a 2-week study. Thus, incubation with 1-10 {mu}M rosiglitazone triggers the UPR, but does not prove cytotoxic, in cells of the cardiovascular system. This observation provides an important contribution to the current debate over the use of rosiglitazone in the clinical treatment of Type-2 Diabetes.

  6. Connecting Thermal and Mechanical Protein (Un)folding Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Noel, JeffreyK.; Sulkowska, JoannaI.; Levine, Herbert; Onuchic, JosN.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations supplement single-molecule pulling experiments by providing the possibility of examining the full free energy landscape using many coordinates. Here, we use an all-atom structure-based model to study the force and temperature dependence of the unfolding of the protein filamin by applying force at both termini. The unfolding time-force relation ?(F) indicates that the force-induced unfolding behavior of filamin can be characterized into three regimes: barrier-limited low- and intermediate-force regimes, and a barrierless high-force regime. Slope changes of ?(F) separate the three regimes. We show that the behavior of ?(F) can be understood from a two-dimensional free energy landscape projected onto the extension X and the fraction of native contacts Q. In the low-force regime, the unfolding rate is roughly force-independent due to the small (even negative) separation in X between the native ensemble and transition state ensemble (TSE). In the intermediate-force regime, force sufficiently separates the TSE from the native ensemble such that ?(F) roughly follows an exponential relation. This regime is typically explored by pulling experiments. While X may fail to resolve the TSE due to overlap with the unfolded ensemble just below the folding temperature, the overlap is minimal at lower temperatures where experiments are likely to be conducted. The TSE becomes increasingly structured with force, whereas the average order of structural events during unfolding remains roughly unchanged. The high-force regime is characterized by barrierless unfolding, and the unfolding time approaches a limit of ?10 ?s for the highest forces we studied. Finally, a combination of X and Q is shown to be a good reaction coordinate for almost the entire force range. PMID:25517160

  7. Protein Unfolding by Biological Unfoldases: Insights from Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Micha?; Szymczak, Piotr; Carrin-Vzquez, Mariano; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants of the high efficiency of biological machines like unfoldases (e.g., the proteasome) are not well understood. We propose a model to study protein translocation into the chamber of biological unfoldases represented as a funnel. It is argued that translocation is a much faster way of unfolding a protein than end-to-end stretching, especially in a low-force regime, because it allows for a conformational freedom while concentrating local tension on consecutive regions of a protein chain and preventing refolding. This results in a serial unfolding of the protein structures dominated by unzipping. Thus, pulling against the unfoldase pore is an efficient catalyst of the unfolding reaction. We also show that the presence of the funnel makes the tension along the backbone of the substrate protein nonuniform even when the protein gets unfolded. Hence, the stalling force measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques may be smaller than the traction force of the unfoldase motor. PMID:25296319

  8. Protein unfolding by biological unfoldases: insights from modeling.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Micha?; Szymczak, Piotr; Carrin-Vzquez, Mariano; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-10-01

    The molecular determinants of the high efficiency of biological machines like unfoldases (e.g., the proteasome) are not well understood. We propose a model to study protein translocation into the chamber of biological unfoldases represented as a funnel. It is argued that translocation is a much faster way of unfolding a protein than end-to-end stretching, especially in a low-force regime, because it allows for a conformational freedom while concentrating local tension on consecutive regions of a protein chain and preventing refolding. This results in a serial unfolding of the protein structures dominated by unzipping. Thus, pulling against the unfoldase pore is an efficient catalyst of the unfolding reaction. We also show that the presence of the funnel makes the tension along the backbone of the substrate protein nonuniform even when the protein gets unfolded. Hence, the stalling force measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques may be smaller than the traction force of the unfoldase motor. PMID:25296319

  9. Sequential Unfolding of Beta Helical Protein by Single-Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jamin, Marc; Jacob-Dubuisson, Franoise

    2013-01-01

    The parallel ?helix is a common fold among extracellular proteins, however its mechanical properties remain unexplored. In Gram-negative bacteria, extracellular proteins of diverse functions of the large TpsA family all fold into long ?helices. Here, single-molecule atomic force microscopy and steered molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the mechanical properties of a prototypic TpsA protein, FHA, the major adhesin of Bordetella pertussis. Strong extension forces were required to fully unfold this highly repetitive protein, and unfolding occurred along a stepwise, hierarchical process. Our analyses showed that the extremities of the ?helix unfold early, while central regions of the helix are more resistant to mechanical unfolding. In particular, a mechanically resistant subdomain conserved among TpsA proteins and critical for secretion was identified. This nucleus harbors structural elements packed against the ?helix that might contribute to stabilizing the N-terminal region of FHA. Hierarchical unfolding of the ?helix in response to a mechanical stress may maintain ?-helical portions that can serve as templates for regaining the native structure after stress. The mechanical properties uncovered here might apply to many proteins with ?-helical or related folds, both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes, and play key roles in their structural integrity and functions. PMID:24009757

  10. Regulated increase in folding capacity prevents unfolded protein stress in the ER

    PubMed Central

    Christis, Chantal; Fullaondo, Asier; Schildknegt, Danny; Mkrtchian, Souren; Heck, Albert J. R.; Braakman, Ineke

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of thyrocytes with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) leads to a morphological change and a massive increase in thyroglobulin (Tg) production. Although Tg is a demanding client of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), its increase did not result in significant accumulation of unfolded protein in the ER. Instead, ER chaperones and folding enzymes reached maximum synthesis rates immediately after TSH stimulation, before significant upregulation of Tg synthesis. The resulting increase in folding capacity before client protein production prevented cellular unfolded-protein stress, confirmed by the silence of the most conserved branch of the unfolded protein response. Thyrocytes set an example of physiological adaptation of cells to a future potentially stress-causing situation, which suggests a general strategy for both non-secretory and specialized secretory cells. PMID:20144991

  11. A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Responses from a Graded Disagree-Agree Response Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Laughlin, James E.

    1996-01-01

    A parametric item response theory model for unfolding binary or graded responses is developed. The graded unfolding model (GUM) is a generalization of the hyperbolic cosine model for binary data of D. Andrich and G. Luo (1993). Applicability of the GUM to attitude testing is illustrated with real data. (SLD)

  12. Down-modulation of SEL1L, an unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation protein, sensitizes glioma stem cells to the cytotoxic effect of valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Monica; Baronchelli, Simona; Schiffer, Davide; Mellai, Marta; Caldera, Valentina; Saccani, Gloria Jotti; Dalpra, Leda; Daga, Antonio; Orlandi, Rosaria; DeBlasio, Pasquale; Biunno, Ida

    2014-01-31

    Valproic acid (VPA), an histone deacetylase inhibitor, is emerging as a promising therapeutic agent for the treatments of gliomas by virtue of its ability to reactivate the expression of epigenetically silenced genes. VPA induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive pathway displaying a dichotomic yin yang characteristic; it initially contributes in safeguarding the malignant cell survival, whereas long-lasting activation favors a proapoptotic response. By triggering UPR, VPA might tip the balance between cellular adaptation and programmed cell death via the deregulation of protein homeostasis and induction of proteotoxicity. Here we aimed to investigate the impact of proteostasis on glioma stem cells (GSC) using VPA treatment combined with subversion of SEL1L, a crucial protein involved in homeostatic pathways, cancer aggressiveness, and stem cell state maintenance. We investigated the global expression of GSC lines untreated and treated with VPA, SEL1L interference, and GSC line response to VPA treatment by analyzing cell viability via MTT assay, neurosphere formation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress/UPR-responsive proteins. Moreover, SEL1L immunohistochemistry was performed on primary glial tumors. The results show that (i) VPA affects GSC lines viability and anchorage-dependent growth by inducing differentiative programs and cell cycle progression, (ii) SEL1L down-modulation synergy enhances VPA cytotoxic effects by influencing GSCs proliferation and self-renewal properties, and (iii) SEL1L expression is indicative of glioma proliferation rate, malignancy, and endoplasmic reticulum stress statuses. Targeting the proteostasis network in association to VPA treatment may provide an alternative approach to deplete GSC and improve glioma treatments. PMID:24311781

  13. Down-modulation of SEL1L, an Unfolded Protein Response and Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation Protein, Sensitizes Glioma Stem Cells to the Cytotoxic Effect of Valproic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Monica; Baronchelli, Simona; Schiffer, Davide; Mellai, Marta; Caldera, Valentina; Saccani, Gloria Jotti; Dalpra, Leda; Daga, Antonio; Orlandi, Rosaria; DeBlasio, Pasquale; Biunno, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), an histone deacetylase inhibitor, is emerging as a promising therapeutic agent for the treatments of gliomas by virtue of its ability to reactivate the expression of epigenetically silenced genes. VPA induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive pathway displaying a dichotomic yin yang characteristic; it initially contributes in safeguarding the malignant cell survival, whereas long-lasting activation favors a proapoptotic response. By triggering UPR, VPA might tip the balance between cellular adaptation and programmed cell death via the deregulation of protein homeostasis and induction of proteotoxicity. Here we aimed to investigate the impact of proteostasis on glioma stem cells (GSC) using VPA treatment combined with subversion of SEL1L, a crucial protein involved in homeostatic pathways, cancer aggressiveness, and stem cell state maintenance. We investigated the global expression of GSC lines untreated and treated with VPA, SEL1L interference, and GSC line response to VPA treatment by analyzing cell viability via MTT assay, neurosphere formation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress/UPR-responsive proteins. Moreover, SEL1L immunohistochemistry was performed on primary glial tumors. The results show that (i) VPA affects GSC lines viability and anchorage-dependent growth by inducing differentiative programs and cell cycle progression, (ii) SEL1L down-modulation synergy enhances VPA cytotoxic effects by influencing GSCs proliferation and self-renewal properties, and (iii) SEL1L expression is indicative of glioma proliferation rate, malignancy, and endoplasmic reticulum stress statuses. Targeting the proteostasis network in association to VPA treatment may provide an alternative approach to deplete GSC and improve glioma treatments. PMID:24311781

  14. Connecting thermal and mechanical protein (un)folding landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Noel, Jeffrey; Sulkowska, Joanna; Levine, Herbert; Onuchic, Jos

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations supplement single-molecule pulling experiments by providing the possibility of examining the full free energy landscape using many coordinates. Here, we use an all-atom structure-based model to study the force and temperature dependence of the unfolding of the protein filamin by applying force at both termini. The unfolding time-force relation ?(F) indicates that the unfolding behavior can be characterized into three regimes: barrier-limited low- and intermediate-force regimes, and a barrierless high-force regime. Slope changes of ?(F) separate the three regimes. We show that the behavior of ?(F) can be understood from a two-dimensional free energy landscape projected onto the extension X and the fraction of native contacts Q. In the low-force regime, the unfolding rate is roughly force-independent due to the small (even negative) separation in X between the native ensemble and transition state ensemble (TSE). In the intermediate-force regime, force sufficiently separates the TSE from the native ensemble such that ?(F) roughly follows an exponential relation. The TSE becomes increasingly structured with force. The high-force regime is characterized by barrierless unfolding, approaching a time limit of around 10 ?s.

  15. [Unfolding chaperone as a prion protein relating molecule].

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Naomi S; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi

    2003-11-01

    Prion protein exists in two different isoforms, a normal cellular isoform (PrPc) and an abnormal infectious isoform (PrPSc), the latter is a causative agent of prion disease such as mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Amino acid sequences of PrPc and PrPSc are identical, but their conformations are rather different; PrPc rich in non beta-sheet vs. PrPSc rich in beta-sheet isoform. Since the two isoforms have quite different conformation, this host factor might be a molecular chaperone, which enables to override an energy barrier between PrPc and PrPSc. To examine the protein unfolding activities against collectively folded structure exist or not, we constructed an assay system and purified a novel molecular chaperone. Unfolding, from S. cerevisiae. Unfolding consists of oligomeric ring-like structure with the central cavity and has an ATP-dependent protein Unfoldingg activity with broad specificity in vitro, of which targets included PrP in beta-sheet form, alpha-synuclein, and A beta protein. We have also found that mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells contained the activity. Treatment of this factor with an ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme, apyrase, caused the decrease in its protein Unfoldingg activity. It was suggested that the purified protein probably formed homo-oligomer consisting of 4-5 subunits and its activity was ATP-dependent. PMID:15152473

  16. Quality control for unfolded proteins at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Apaja, Pirjo M.; Xu, Haijin

    2010-01-01

    Cellular protein homeostasis profoundly depends on the disposal of terminally damaged polypeptides. To demonstrate the operation and elucidate the molecular basis of quality control of conformationally impaired plasma membrane (PM) proteins, we constructed CD4 chimeras containing the wild type or a temperature-sensitive bacteriophage ? domain in their cytoplasmic region. Using proteomic, biochemical, and genetic approaches, we showed that thermal unfolding of the ? domain at the PM provoked the recruitment of Hsp40/Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperones and the E2E3 complex. Mixed-chain polyubiquitination, monitored by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and immunoblotting, is responsible for the nonnative chimeraaccelerated internalization, impaired recycling, and endosomal sorting complex required for transportdependent lysosomal degradation. A similar paradigm prevails for mutant dopamine D4.4 and vasopressin V2 receptor removal from the PM. These results outline a peripheral proteostatic mechanism in higher eukaryotes and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of a subset of conformational diseases. PMID:20974815

  17. An Item Response Unfolding Model for Graphic Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    The graphic rating scale, a measurement tool used in many areas of psychology, usually takes a form of a fixed-length line segment, with both ends bounded and labeled as extreme responses. The raters mark somewhere on the line, and the length of the line segment from one endpoint to the mark is taken as the measure. An item response unfolding

  18. Energetically significant networks of coupled interactions within an unfolded protein.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Hyun; Meng, Wenli; Sato, Satoshi; Kim, Eun Young; Schindelin, Hermann; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2014-08-19

    Unfolded and partially unfolded proteins participate in a wide range of biological processes from pathological aggregation to the regulation of normal cellular activity. Unfolded states can be populated under strongly denaturing conditions, but the ensemble which is relevant for folding, stability, and aggregation is that populated under physiological conditions. Characterization of nonnative states is critical for the understanding of these processes, yet comparatively little is known about their energetics and their structural propensities under native conditions. The standard view is that energetically significant coupled interactions involving multiple residues are generally not present in the denatured state ensemble (DSE) or in intrinsically disordered proteins. Using the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9, a small ?-? protein, as an experimental model system, we demonstrate that networks of energetically significant, coupled interactions can form in the DSE of globular proteins, and can involve residues that are distant in sequence and spatially well separated in the native structure. X-ray crystallography, NMR, dynamics studies, native state pKa measurements, and thermodynamic analysis of more than 25 mutants demonstrate that residues are energetically coupled in the DSE. Altering these interactions by mutation affects the stability of the domain. Mutations that alter the energetics of the DSE can impact the analysis of cooperativity and folding, and may play a role in determining the propensity to aggregate. PMID:25099351

  19. Amino acid substitutions in the non-structural proteins 4A or 4B modulate the induction of autophagy in West Nile virus infected cells independently of the activation of the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Blzquez, Ana-Beln; Martn-Acebes, Miguel A.; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for outbreaks of meningitis and encephalitis. Whereas the activation of autophagy in cells infected with other flaviviruses is well known, the interaction of WNV with the autophagic pathway still remains unclear and there are reports describing opposite findings obtained even analyzing the same viral strain. To clarify this controversy, we first analyzed the induction of autophagic features in cells infected with a panel of WNV strains. WNV was determined to induce autophagy in a strain dependent manner. We observed that all WNV strains or isolates analyzed, except for the WNV NY99 used, upregulated the autophagic pathway in infected cells. Interestingly, a variant derived from this WNV NY99 isolated from a persistently infected mouse increased LC3 modification and aggregation. Genome sequencing of this variant revealed only two non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions when compared to parental NY99 strain. These nucleotide substitutions introduced one amino acid replacement in NS4A and other in NS4B. Using genetically engineered viruses we showed that introduction of only one of these replacements was sufficient to upregulate the autophagic pathway. Thus, in this work we have shown that naturally occurring point mutations in the viral non-structural proteins NS4A and NS4B confer WNV with the ability to induce the hallmarks of autophagy such as LC3 modification and aggregation. Even more, the differences on the induction of an autophagic response observed among WNV variants in infected cells did not correlate with alterations on the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), suggesting an uncoupling of UPR and autophagy during flavivirus infection. The findings here reported could help to improve the knowledge of the cellular processes involved on flavivirushost cell interactions and contribute to the design of effective strategies to combat these pathogens. PMID:25642225

  20. Backbone-driven collapse in unfolded protein chains.

    PubMed

    Teufel, Daniel P; Johnson, Christopher M; Lum, Jenifer K; Neuweiler, Hannes

    2011-06-01

    Collapse of unfolded protein chains is an early event in folding. It affects structural properties of intrinsically disordered proteins, which take a considerable fraction of the human proteome. Collapse is generally believed to be driven by hydrophobic forces imposed by the presence of nonpolar amino acid side chains. Contributions from backbone hydrogen bonds to protein folding and stability, however, are controversial. To date, the experimental dissection of side-chain and backbone contributions has not yet been achieved because both types of interactions are integral parts of protein structure. Here, we realized this goal by applying mutagenesis and chemical modification on a set of disordered peptides and proteins. We measured the protein dimensions and kinetics of intra-chain diffusion of modified polypeptides at the level of individual molecules using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, thereby avoiding artifacts commonly caused by aggregation of unfolded protein material in bulk. We found no contributions from side chains to collapse but, instead, identified backbone interactions as a source sufficient to form globules of native-like dimensions. The presence of backbone hydrogen bonds decreased polypeptide water solubility dramatically and accelerated the nanosecond kinetics of loop closure, in agreement with recent predictions from computer simulation. The presence of side chains, instead, slowed loop closure and modulated the dimensions of intrinsically disordered domains. It appeared that the transient formation of backbone interactions facilitates the diffusive search for productive conformations at the early stage of folding and within intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:21497607

  1. Protein Unfolding Coupled to Ligand Binding: Differential Scanning Calorimetry Simulation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celej, Maria Soledad; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel; Dassie, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical description of thermal protein unfolding coupled to ligand binding is presented. The thermodynamic concepts are independent of the method used to monitor protein unfolding but a differential scanning calorimetry is being used as a tool for examining the unfolding process.

  2. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidaseY (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26616142

  3. A General Item Response Theory Model for Unfolding Unidimensional Polytomous Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Donoghue, John R.; Laughlin, James E.

    2000-01-01

    Develops a generalized graded unfolding model that allows for either binary or graded responses and generalizes previous item response models for unfolding in two useful ways. It implements a discrimination parameter that varies across items and permits response category threshold parameters to vary across items. (Author/SLD)

  4. Exploring Early Stages of the Chemical Unfolding of Proteins at the Proteome Scale

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Michela; Prez, Alberto; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Rueda, Manuel; Meyer, Tim; Gelp, Josep Llus; Orozco, Modesto

    2013-01-01

    After decades of using urea as denaturant, the kinetic role of this molecule in the unfolding process is still undefined: does urea actively induce protein unfolding or passively stabilize the unfolded state? By analyzing a set of 30 proteins (representative of all native folds) through extensive molecular dynamics simulations in denaturant (using a range of force-fields), we derived robust rules for urea unfolding that are valid at the proteome level. Irrespective of the protein fold, presence or absence of disulphide bridges, and secondary structure composition, urea concentrates in the first solvation shell of quasi-native proteins, but with a density lower than that of the fully unfolded state. The presence of urea does not alter the spontaneous vibration pattern of proteins. In fact, it reduces the magnitude of such vibrations, leading to a counterintuitive slow down of the atomic-motions that opposes unfolding. Urea stickiness and slow diffusion is, however, crucial for unfolding. Long residence urea molecules placed around the hydrophobic core are crucial to stabilize partially open structures generated by thermal fluctuations. Our simulations indicate that although urea does not favor the formation of partially open microstates, it is not a mere spectator of unfolding that simply displaces to the right of the folded??unfolded equilibrium. On the contrary, urea actively favors unfolding: it selects and stabilizes partially unfolded microstates, slowly driving the protein conformational ensemble far from the native one and also from the conformations sampled during thermal unfolding. PMID:24348236

  5. Tannin-assisted aggregation of natively unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, D.; Narayanan, T.; Hagenmuller, D.; Baron, A.; Guyot, S.; Cabane, B.; Bouhallab, S.

    2008-06-01

    Tannin-protein interactions are essentially physical: hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond-mediated. We explored the tannin-assisted protein aggregation on the case of ?-casein, which is a natively unfolded protein known for its ability to form micellar aggregates. We used several tannins with specified length. Our SAXS results show that small tannins increase the number of proteins per micelle, but keeping their size constant. It leads to a tannin-assisted compactization of micelles. Larger tannins, with linear dimensions greater than the crown width of micelles, lead to the aggregation of micelles by a bridging effect. Experimental results can be understood within a model where tannins are treated as effective enhancers of hydrophobic attraction between specific sites in proteins.

  6. Protein co-translocational unfolding depends on the direction of pulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Bayley, Hagan

    2014-09-01

    Protein unfolding and translocation through pores occurs during trafficking between organelles, protein degradation and bacterial toxin delivery. In vivo, co-translocational unfolding can be affected by the end of the polypeptide that is threaded into the pore first. Recently, we have shown that co-translocational unfolding can be followed in a model system at the single-molecule level, thereby unravelling molecular steps and their kinetics. Here, we show that the unfolding kinetics of the model substrate thioredoxin, when pulled through an α-haemolysin pore, differ markedly depending on whether the process is initiated from the C terminus or the N terminus. Further, when thioredoxin is pulled from the N terminus, the unfolding pathway bifurcates: some molecules finish unfolding quickly, while others finish ~100 times slower. Our findings have important implications for the understanding of biological unfolding mechanisms and in the application of nanopore technology for the detection of proteins and their modifications.

  7. Protein co-translocational unfolding depends on the direction of pulling

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Bayley, Hagan

    2014-01-01

    Protein unfolding and translocation through pores occurs during trafficking between organelles, protein degradation and bacterial toxin delivery. In vivo, co-translocational unfolding can be affected by the end of the polypeptide that is threaded into the pore first. Recently, we have shown that co-translocational unfolding can be followed in a model system at the single-molecule level, thereby unravelling molecular steps and their kinetics. Here, we show that the unfolding kinetics of the model substrate thioredoxin, when pulled through an ?-haemolysin pore, differ markedly depending on whether the process is initiated from the C terminus or the N terminus. Further, when thioredoxin is pulled from the N terminus, the unfolding pathway bifurcates: some molecules finish unfolding quickly, while others finish ~100 times slower. Our findings have important implications for the understanding of biological unfolding mechanisms and in the application of nanopore technology for the detection of proteins and their modifications. PMID:25197784

  8. The mechanochemistry of copper reports on the directionality of unfolding in model cupredoxin proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beedle, Amy E. M.; Lezamiz, Ainhoa; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the directionality and sequence of protein unfolding is crucial to elucidate the underlying folding free energy landscape. An extra layer of complexity is added in metalloproteins, where a metal cofactor participates in the correct, functional fold of the protein. However, the precise mechanisms by which organometallic interactions are dynamically broken and reformed on (un)folding are largely unknown. Here we use single molecule force spectroscopy AFM combined with protein engineering and MD simulations to study the individual unfolding pathways of the blue-copper proteins azurin and plastocyanin. Using the nanomechanical properties of the native copper centre as a structurally embedded molecular reporter, we demonstrate that both proteins unfold via two independent, competing pathways. Our results provide experimental evidence of a novel kinetic partitioning scenario whereby the protein can stochastically unfold through two distinct main transition states placed at the N and C termini that dictate the direction in which unfolding occurs.

  9. The mechanochemistry of copper reports on the directionality of unfolding in model cupredoxin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beedle, Amy E. M.; Lezamiz, Ainhoa; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the directionality and sequence of protein unfolding is crucial to elucidate the underlying folding free energy landscape. An extra layer of complexity is added in metalloproteins, where a metal cofactor participates in the correct, functional fold of the protein. However, the precise mechanisms by which organometallic interactions are dynamically broken and reformed on (un)folding are largely unknown. Here we use single molecule force spectroscopy AFM combined with protein engineering and MD simulations to study the individual unfolding pathways of the blue-copper proteins azurin and plastocyanin. Using the nanomechanical properties of the native copper centre as a structurally embedded molecular reporter, we demonstrate that both proteins unfold via two independent, competing pathways. Our results provide experimental evidence of a novel kinetic partitioning scenario whereby the protein can stochastically unfold through two distinct main transition states placed at the N and C termini that dictate the direction in which unfolding occurs. PMID:26235284

  10. The unfolded protein response in a dolichyl phosphate mannose-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell line points out the key role of a demannosylation step in the quality-control mechanism of N-glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Foulquier, Franois; Harduin-Lepers, Anne; Duvet, Sandrine; Marchal, Ingrid; Mir, Anne Marie; Delannoy, Philippe; Chirat, Frdric; Cacan, Ren

    2002-01-01

    The CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) glycosylation mutant cell line, B3F7, transfers the truncated glycan Glc(3)Man(5)GlcNAc(2) on to nascent proteins. After deglucosylation, the resulting Man(5)GlcNAc(2) glycan is subjected to two reciprocal enzymic processes: the action of an endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) kifunensine-sensitive alpha1,2-mannosidase activity to yield a Man(4)GlcNAc(2) glycan, and the reglucosylation involved in the quality-control system which ensures that only correctly folded glycoproteins leave the ER. We show that the recombinant secreted alkaline phosphatase (SeAP) produced in stably transfected B3F7 cells, is co-immunoprecipitated with the GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein 78), a protein marker of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The level of GRP78 transcription has been evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and we demonstrate that B3F7 cells present a constitutively higher level of UPR in the absence of inductors, compared with Pro(-5) cells. Interestingly, a decrease was observed in the UPR and an increase in SeAP secretion in the kifunensine-treated B3F7 cells. Altogether, these data highlight the relationships between the glycan structure, the quality control system and the UPR. Moreover, they support the idea that a specific demannosylation step is a key event of the glycoprotein quality control in B3F7 cells. PMID:11853559

  11. The Unfolded Protein Response and the Phosphorylations of Activating Transcription Factor 2 in the trans-Activation of il23a Promoter Produced by ?-Glucans*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrguez, Mario; Domingo, Esther; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier Garca; Eiros, Jos; Crespo, Mariano Snchez; Fernndez, Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Current views on the control of IL-23 production focus on the regulation of il23a, the gene encoding IL-23 p19, by NF-?B in combination with other transcription factors. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), X2-Box-binding protein 1 (XBP1), activator protein 1 (AP1), SMAD, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP?), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) have been involved in response to LPS, but no data are available regarding the mechanism triggered by the fungal mimic and ?-glucan-containing stimulus zymosan, which produces IL-23 and to a low extent the related cytokine IL-12 p70. Zymosan induced the mobilization of CHOP from the nuclear fractions to phagocytic vesicles. Hypha-forming Candida also induced the nuclear disappearance of CHOP. Assay of transcription factor binding to the il23a promoter showed an increase of Thr(P)-71Thr(P)-69-activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) binding in response to zymosan. PKC and PKA/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase inhibitors down-regulated Thr(P)-71ATF2 binding to the il23a promoter and il23a mRNA expression. Consistent with the current concept of complementary phosphorylations on N-terminal Thr-71 and Thr-69 of ATF2 by ERK and p38 MAPK, MEK, and p38 MAPK inhibitors blunted Thr(P)-69ATF2 binding. Knockdown of atf2 mRNA with siRNA correlated with inhibition of il23a mRNA, but it did not affect the expression of il12/23b and il10 mRNA. These data indicate the following: (i) zymosan decreases nuclear proapoptotic CHOP, most likely by promoting its accumulation in phagocytic vesicles; (ii) zymosan-induced il23a mRNA expression is best explained through coordinated ?B- and ATF2-dependent transcription; and (iii) il23a expression relies on complementary phosphorylation of ATF2 on Thr-69 and Thr-71 dependent on PKC and MAPK activities. PMID:24982422

  12. Preferential binding of an unfolded protein to DsbA.

    PubMed Central

    Frech, C; Wunderlich, M; Glockshuber, R; Schmid, F X

    1996-01-01

    The oxidoreductase DsbA from the periplasm of escherichia coli introduces disulfide bonds into proteins at an extremely high rate. During oxidation, a mixed disulfide is formed between DsbA and the folding protein chain, and this covalent intermediate reacts very rapidly either to form the oxidized protein or to revert back to oxidized DsbA. To investigate its properties, a stable form of the intermediate was produced by reacting the C33A variant of DsbA with a variant of RNase T1. We find that in this stable mixed disulfide the conformational stability of the substrate protein is decreased by 5 kJ/mol, whereas the conformational stability of DsbA is increased by 5 kJ/mol. This reciprocal effect suggests strongly that DsbA interacts with the unfolded substrate protein not only by the covalent disulfide bond, but also by preferential non-covalent interactions. The existence of a polypeptide binding site explains why DsbA oxidizes protein substrates much more rapidly than small thiol compounds. Such a very fast reaction is probably important for protein folding in the periplasm, because the accessibility of the thiol groups for DsbA can decrease rapidly when newly exported polypeptide chains begin to fold. PMID:8617214

  13. SANS and DLS Studies of Protein Unfolding in Presence of Urea and Surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Aswal, V. K.; Chodankar, S. N.; Wagh, A. G.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Vavrin, R.

    2008-03-17

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been used to study conformational changes in protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) during its unfolding in presence of protein denaturating agents urea and surfactant. On addition of urea, the BSA protein unfolds for urea concentrations greater than 4 M and acquires a random coil configuration with its radius of gyration increasing with urea concentration. The addition of surfactant unfolds the protein by the formation of micelle-like aggregates of surfactants along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The fractal dimension of such a protein-surfactant complex decreases and the overall size of the complex increases on increasing the surfactant concentration. The conformation of the unfolded protein in the complex has been determined directly using contrast variation SANS measurements by contrast matching the surfactant to the medium. Results of DLS measurements are found to be in good agreement with those obtained using SANS.

  14. Protein unfolding in detergents: effect of micelle structure, ionic strength, pH, and temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Otzen, Daniel E

    2002-01-01

    The 101-residue monomeric protein S6 unfolds in the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) above the critical micelle concentration, with unfolding rates varying according to two different modes. Our group has proposed that spherical micelles lead to saturation kinetics in unfolding (mode 1), while cylindrical micelles prevalent at higher SDS concentrations induce a power-law dependent increase in the unfolding rate (mode 2). Here I investigate in more detail how micellar properties affect protein unfolding. High NaCl concentrations, which induce cylindrical micelles, favor mode 2. This is consistent with our model, though other effects such as electrostatic screening cannot be discounted. Furthermore, unfolding does not occur in mode 2 in the cationic detergent LTAB, which is unable to form cylindrical micelles. A strong retardation of unfolding occurs at higher LTAB concentrations, possibly due to the formation of dead-end protein-detergent complexes. A similar, albeit much weaker, effect is seen in SDS in the absence of salt. Chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 exhibits the same modes of unfolding in SDS as S6, indicating that this type of protein unfolding is not specific for S6. The unfolding process in mode 1 has an activation barrier similar in magnitude to that in water, while the activation barrier in mode 2 is strongly concentration-dependent. The strong pH-dependence of unfolding in SDS and LTAB suggests that the rate of unfolding in anionic detergent is modulated by repulsion between detergent headgroups and anionic side chains, while cationic side chains modulate unfolding rates in cationic detergents. PMID:12324439

  15. Unfolding the Role of Stress Response Signaling in Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Robert; Cook, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an ancient stress response that enables a cell to manage the energetic stress that accompanies protein folding. There has been a significant recent increase in our understanding of the UPR, how it integrates physiological processes within cells, and how this integration can affect cancer cells and cell fate decisions. Recent publications have highlighted the role of UPR signaling components on mediating various cell survival pathways, cellular metabolism and bioenergenics, and autophagy. We address the role of UPR on mediating endocrine therapy resistance and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell survival. PMID:26157705

  16. A human coronavirus OC43 variant harboring persistence-associated mutations in the S glycoprotein differentially induces the unfolded protein response in human neurons as compared to wild-type virus

    SciTech Connect

    Favreau, Dominique J.; Desforges, Marc; St-Jean, Julien R.; Talbot, Pierre J.

    2009-12-20

    We have reported that human respiratory coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is neurotropic and neuroinvasive in humans and mice, and that neurons are the primary target of infection in mice, leading to neurodegenerative disabilities. We now report that an HCoV-OC43 mutant harboring two persistence-associated S glycoprotein point mutations (H183R and Y241H), induced a stronger unfolded protein response (UPR) and translation attenuation in infected human neurons. There was a major contribution of the IRE1/XBP1 pathway, followed by caspase-3 activation and nuclear fragmentation, with no significant role of the ATF6 and eIF2-alpha/ATF4 pathways. Our results show the importance of discrete molecular viral S determinants in virus-neuronal cell interactions that lead to increased production of viral proteins and infectious particles, enhanced UPR activation, and increased cytotoxicity and cell death. As this mutant virus is more neurovirulent in mice, our results also suggest that two mutations in the S glycoprotein could eventually modulate viral neuropathogenesis.

  17. Hsp70 chaperones accelerate protein translocation and the unfolding of stable protein aggregates by entropic pulling.

    PubMed

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Ben-Zvi, Anat; Slutsky, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2006-04-18

    Hsp70s are highly conserved ATPase molecular chaperones mediating the correct folding of de novo synthesized proteins, the translocation of proteins across membranes, the disassembly of some native protein oligomers, and the active unfolding and disassembly of stress-induced protein aggregates. Here, we bring thermodynamic arguments and biochemical evidences for a unifying mechanism named entropic pulling, based on entropy loss due to excluded-volume effects, by which Hsp70 molecules can convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into a force capable of accelerating the local unfolding of various protein substrates and, thus, perform disparate cellular functions. By means of entropic pulling, individual Hsp70 molecules can accelerate unfolding and pulling of translocating polypeptides into mitochondria in the absence of a molecular fulcrum, thus settling former contradictions between the power-stroke and the Brownian ratchet models for Hsp70-mediated protein translocation across membranes. Moreover, in a very different context devoid of membrane and components of the import pore, the same physical principles apply to the forceful unfolding, solubilization, and assisted native refolding of stable protein aggregates by individual Hsp70 molecules, thus providing a mechanism for Hsp70-mediated protein disaggregation. PMID:16606842

  18. Using Data Augmentation and Markov Chain Monte Carlo for the Estimation of Unfolding Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Junker, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Unfolding response models, a class of item response theory (IRT) models that assume a unimodal item response function (IRF), are often used for the measurement of attitudes. Verhelst and Verstralen (1993)and Andrich and Luo (1993) independently developed unfolding response models by relating the observed responses to a more common monotone IRT

  19. Glucose starvation and hypoxia, but not the saturated fatty acid palmitic acid or cholesterol, activate the unfolded protein response in 3T3-F442A and 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Adina D; Schröder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in adipose tissue. In this study we identify physiological triggers of ER stress and of the UPR in adipocytes in vitro. We show that two markers of adipose tissue remodelling in obesity, glucose starvation and hypoxia, cause ER stress in 3T3-F442A and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Both conditions induced molecular markers of the IRE1α and PERK branches of the UPR, such as splicing of XBP1 mRNA and CHOP, as well as transcription of the ER stress responsive gene BiP. Hypoxia also induced an increase in phosphorylation of the PERK substrate eIF2α. By contrast, physiological triggers of ER stress in many other cell types, such as the saturated fatty acid palmitic acid, cholesterol, or several inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, do not cause ER stress in 3T3-F442A and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our data suggest that physiological changes associated with remodelling of adipose tissue in obesity, such as hypoxia and glucose starvation, are more likely physiological ER stressors of adipocytes than the lipid overload or hyperinsulinemia associated with obesity. PMID:26257992

  20. Protein unfolding versus ?-sheet separation in spider silk nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez

    2014-03-01

    In this communication a mechanism for spider silk strain hardening is proposed. Shear failure of ?-sheet nanocrystals is the first failure mode that gives rise to the creation of smaller nanocrystals, which are of higher strength and stiffness. ?-sheet unfolding requires more energy than nanocrystal separation in a shear mode of failure. As a result, unfolding occurs after the nanocrystals separate in shear. ?-sheet unfolding yields a secondary strain hardening effect once the ?-sheet conformation is geometrically stable and acts like a unidirectional fibre in a fibre reinforced composite. The mechanism suggested herein is based on molecular dynamics calculations of residual inter-?-sheet separation strengths against residual intra-?-sheet unfolding strengths.

  1. Elucidation of GB1 Protein Unfolding Mechanism via a Long-timescale Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumaryada, T.; Hati, J.; Wahyudi, S. T.; Malau, N. D.; Sawitri, K. N.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the unfolding mechanism of 1GB1 protein at various simulation temperatures using a long-timescale molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of structural parameters of molecular dynamics simulation have indicated that the unfolding process of GB1 protein has started at 95 ns for 475 K simulation, and at 745 ps for 500 K simulation. The unfolding process in this simulation exhibit the feature of hydrophobic core collapse model, in which the beta-hairpin destruction precedes the a-helix to coil transition. The unfolding was started with the increasing flexibility of the beta-sheets and hydrophobic core region, continued with beta-hairpins destruction, and ended with a-helix to coil and turn transition. The final structures of GB1 protein after unfolding, suggest an unfinished denaturation of protein as seen from the small remains of α-helix structure.

  2. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  3. Shifting transition states in the unfolding of a large ankyrin repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Rowling, Pamela J. E.; Chellamuthu, Vasuki R.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2008-01-01

    The 33-amino-acid ankyrin motif comprises a ?-turn followed by two anti-parallel ?-helices and a loop and tandem arrays of the motif pack in a linear fashion to produce elongated structures characterized by short-range interactions. In this article we use site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the kinetic unfolding mechanism of D34, a 426-residue, 12-ankyrin repeat fragment of the protein ankyrinR. The data are consistent with a model in which the N-terminal half of the protein unfolds first by unraveling progressively from the start of the polypeptide chain to form an intermediate; in the next step, the C-terminal half of the protein unfolds via two pathways whose transition states have either the early or the late C-terminal ankyrin repeats folded. We conclude that the two halves of the protein unfold by different mechanisms because the N-terminal moiety folds and unfolds in the context of a folded C-terminal moiety, which therefore acts as a seed and confers a unique directionality on the process, whereas the C-terminal moiety folds and unfolds in the context of an unfolded N-terminal moiety and therefore behaves like a single-domain ankyrin repeat protein, having a high degree of symmetry and consequently more than one unfolding pathway accessible to it. PMID:18632570

  4. Optimizing the calculation of energy landscape parameters from single-molecule protein unfolding experiments.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Hughes, Megan L; Bourke, James; Taniguchi, Yukinori; Kawakami, Masaru; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy using an atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to measure the average unfolding force of proteins in a constant velocity experiment. In combination with Monte Carlo simulations and through the application of the Zhurkov-Bell model, information about the parameters describing the underlying unfolding energy landscape of the protein can be obtained. Using this approach, we have completed protein unfolding experiments on the polyprotein (I27)(5) over a range of pulling velocities. In agreement with previous work, we find that the observed number of protein unfolding events observed in each approach-retract cycle varies between one and five, due to the nature of the interactions between the polyprotein, the AFM tip, and the substrate, and there is an unequal unfolding probability distribution. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation that incorporates the impact of this unequal unfolding probability distribution on the median unfolding force and the calculation of the protein unfolding energy landscape parameters. These results show that while there is a significant, unequal unfolding probability distribution, the unfolding energy landscape parameters obtained from use of the Zhurkov-Bell model are not greatly affected. This result is important because it demonstrates that the minimum acceptance criteria typically used in force extension experiments are justified and do not skew the calculation of the unfolding energy landscape parameters. We further validate this approach by determining the error in the energy landscape parameters for two extreme cases, and we provide suggestions for methods that can be employed to increase the level of accuracy in single-molecule experiments using polyproteins. PMID:25679645

  5. Theoretical models for electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and local ?-potential of unfolded proteins in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitarelli, Michael J.; Talaga, David S.

    2013-09-01

    Single solid-state nanopores find increasing use for electrical detection and/or manipulation of macromolecules. These applications exploit the changes in signals due to the geometry and electrical properties of the molecular species found within the nanopore. The sensitivity and resolution of such measurements are also influenced by the geometric and electrical properties of the nanopore. This paper continues the development of an analytical theory to predict the electrochemical impedance spectra of nanopores by including the influence of the presence of an unfolded protein using the variable topology finite Warburg impedance model previously published by the authors. The local excluded volume of, and charges present on, the segment of protein sampled by the nanopore are shown to influence the shape and peak frequency of the electrochemical impedance spectrum. An analytical theory is used to relate the capacitive response of the electrical double layer at the surface of the protein to both the charge density at the protein surface and the more commonly measured zeta potential. Illustrative examples show how the theory predicts that the varying sequential regions of surface charge density and excluded volume dictated by the protein primary structure may allow for an impedance-based approach to identifying unfolded proteins.

  6. Mimicking Ribosomal Unfolding of RNA Pseudoknot in a Protein Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Xu, Xiaojun; Yang, Zhiyu; Burcke, Andrew J; Gates, Kent S; Chen, Shi-Jie; Gu, Li-Qun

    2015-12-23

    Pseudoknots are a fundamental RNA tertiary structure with important roles in regulation of mRNA translation. Molecular force spectroscopic approaches such as optical tweezers can track the pseudoknot's unfolding intermediate states by pulling the RNA chain from both ends, but the kinetic unfolding pathway induced by this method may be different from that in vivo, which occurs during translation and proceeds from the 5' to 3' end. Here we developed a ribosome-mimicking, nanopore pulling assay for dissecting the vectorial unfolding mechanism of pseudoknots. The pseudoknot unfolding pathway in the nanopore, either from the 5' to 3' end or in the reverse direction, can be controlled by a DNA leader that is attached to the pseudoknot at the 5' or 3' ends. The different nanopore conductance between DNA and RNA translocation serves as a marker for the position and structure of the unfolding RNA in the pore. With this design, we provided evidence that the pseudoknot unfolding is a two-step, multistate, metal ion-regulated process depending on the pulling direction. Most notably, unfolding in both directions is rate-limited by the unzipping of the first helix domain (first step), which is Helix-1 in the 5' ? 3' direction and Helix-2 in the 3' ? 5' direction, suggesting that the initial unfolding step in either pulling direction needs to overcome an energy barrier contributed by the noncanonical triplex base-pairs and coaxial stacking interactions for the tertiary structure stabilization. These findings provide new insights into RNA vectorial unfolding mechanisms, which play an important role in biological functions including frameshifting. PMID:26595106

  7. Intrinsic coordination for revealing local structural changes in protein folding-unfolding.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Ying-Jen; Hayashi, Michitoshi; Shih, Orion; Su, Charlene; Tsai, Min-Yeh; Yeh, Yi-Qi; Su, Chun-Jen; Huang, Yu-Shan; Lin, Sheng-Hsien; Jeng, U-Ser

    2016-01-20

    With a deformed object of a rigid rod inside, the local dislocations may be tracked relatively easily with respect to the internal rigid rod. We apply this concept on protein folding-unfolding to track the internal structural changes of an unfolded protein in solution. Proposed here is a protein internal coordination based on the major axis X of an ellipsoidal protein and the stable intrinsic transition dipole moment ? of the protein during unfolding. In this methodology, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to provide the protein global morphologies in the native and unfolded states. Furthermore, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) provides the relative orientation between X and ? of Trp59 of the model protein cytochrome c. Hence observed in the protein unfolding with denaturants, acid, urea, or GuHCl, is the elongation of the native protein conformation along a reoriented protein major axis; accompanied are the different extents of relocations of the terminal ? helices and loop structures of the protein in the corresponding unfolding. PMID:26743265

  8. Worm-Like Ising Model for Protein Mechanical Unfolding under the Effect of Osmolytes

    PubMed Central

    Aioanei, Daniel; Brucale, Marco; Tessari, Isabella; Bubacco, Luigi; Samor, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    We show via single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments that the osmolyte glycerol stabilizes the native state of the human cardiac I27 titin module against unfolding without shifting its unfolding transition state on the mechanical reaction coordinate. Taken together with similar findings on the immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1), these experimental results suggest that osmolytes act on proteins through a common mechanism that does not entail a shift of their unfolding transition state. We investigate the above common mechanism via an Ising-like model for protein mechanical unfolding that adds worm-like-chain behavior to a recent generalization of the Wako-Sait-Muoz-Eaton model with support for group-transfer free energies. The thermodynamics of the model are exactly solvable, while protein kinetics under mechanical tension can be simulated via Monte Carlo algorithms. Notably, our force-clamp and velocity-clamp simulations exhibit no shift in the position of the unfolding transition state of GB1 and I27 under the effect of various osmolytes. The excellent agreement between experiment and simulation strongly suggests that osmolytes do not assume a structural role at the mechanical unfolding transition state of proteins, acting instead by adjusting the solvent quality for the protein chain analyte. PMID:22339871

  9. Development and Application of a High Throughput Protein Unfolding Kinetic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Waterhouse, Nicklas; Feyijinmi, Olusegun; Dominguez, Matthew J.; Martinez, Lisa M.; Sharp, Zoey; Service, Rachel; Bothe, Jameson R.; Stollar, Elliott J.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of folding and unfolding underlie protein stability and quantification of these rates provides important insights into the folding process. Here, we present a simple high throughput protein unfolding kinetic assay using a plate reader that is applicable to the studies of the majority of 2-state folding proteins. We validate the assay by measuring kinetic unfolding data for the SH3 (Src Homology 3) domain from Actin Binding Protein 1 (AbpSH3) and its stabilized mutants. The results of our approach are in excellent agreement with published values. We further combine our kinetic assay with a plate reader equilibrium assay, to obtain indirect estimates of folding rates and use these approaches to characterize an AbpSH3-peptide hybrid. Our high throughput protein unfolding kinetic assays allow accurate screening of libraries of mutants by providing both kinetic and equilibrium measurements and provide a means for in-depth ϕ-value analyses. PMID:26745729

  10. Truncated HSPB1 causes axonal neuropathy and impairs tolerance to unfolded protein stress

    PubMed Central

    Ylikallio, Emil; Konovalova, Svetlana; Dhungana, Yogesh; Hilander, Taru; Junna, Nella; Partanen, Juhani V.; Toppila, Jussi P.; Auranen, Mari; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2015-01-01

    Background HSPB1 belongs to the family of small heat shock proteins (sHSP) that have importance in protection against unfolded protein stress, in cancer cells for escaping drug toxicity stress and in neurons for suppression of protein aggregates. sHSPs have a conserved ?-crystalline domain (ACD), flanked by variable N- and C-termini, whose functions are not fully understood. Dominant missense variants in HSPB1, locating mostly to the ACD, have been linked to inherited neuropathy. Methods Patients underwent detailed clinical and neurophysiologic characterization. Disease causing variants were identified by exome or gene panel sequencing. Primary patient fibroblasts were used to investigate the effects of the dominant defective HSPB1 proteins. Results Frameshift variant predicting ablation of the entire C-terminus p.(Met169Cfs2*) of HSPB1 and a missense variant p.(Arg127Leu) were identified in patients with dominantly inherited motor-predominant axonal CharcotMarieTooth neuropathy. We show that the truncated protein is stable and binds wild type HSPB1. Both mutations impaired the heat stress tolerance of the fibroblasts. This effect was particularly pronounced for the cells with the truncating variant, independent of heat-induced nuclear translocation and induction of global transcriptional heat response. Furthermore, the truncated HSPB1 increased cellular sensitivity to protein misfolding. Conclusion Our results suggest that truncation of the non-conserved C-terminus impairs the function of HSPB1 in cellular stress response. General significance sHSPs have important roles in prevention of protein aggregates that induce toxicity. We showed that C-terminal part of HSPB1 is critical for tolerance of unfolded protein stress, and when lacking causes axonal neuropathy in patients. PMID:26675522

  11. Fully Atomistic Simulations of Protein Unfolding in Low Speed Atomic Force Microscope and Force Clamp Experiments with the Help of Boxed Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Booth, Jonathan J; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2016-02-01

    The results of boxed dynamics (BXD) fully atomistic simulations of protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both force clamp (FC) and velocity clamp (VC) modes are reported. In AFM experiments the unfolding occurs on a time scale which is too long for standard atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are usually performed with the addition of forces which exceed those of experiment by many orders of magnitude. BXD can reach the time scale of slow unfolding and sample the very high free energy unfolding pathway, reproducing the experimental dependence of pulling force against extension and extension against time. Calculations show the presence of the pulling force "humps" previously observed in the VC AFM experiments and allow the identification of intermediate protein conformations responsible for them. Fully atomistic BXD simulations can estimate the rate of unfolding in the FC experiments up to the time scale of seconds. PMID:26760898

  12. The Paracrine Effect of Skeletal Myoblasts Is Cardioprotective Against Oxidative Stress and Involves EGFR-ErbB4 Signaling, Cystathionase, and the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Antti; Nuutila, Kristo; Imanishi, Yukiko; Uenaka, Hisazumi; Mkel, Johanna; Ptil, Tommi; Vento, Antti; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Harjula, Ari; Kankuri, Esko

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of skeletal myoblast transplantation into the myocardium are mediated via paracrine factors. We investigated the ability of myoblast-derived soluble mediators to protect cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress. Fetal rat cardiac cells were treated with conditioned medium from cultures of myoblasts or cardiac fibroblasts, and oxidative stress was induced with H2O2. Myoblast-derived factors effectively prevented oxidative stress-induced cardiac cell death and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. This protective effect was mediated via epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and c-Met signaling, and mimicked by neuregulin 1 but not EGF. Microarray analysis of cardiac cells treated with myoblast versus cardiac fibroblast-derived mediators revealed differential regulation of genes associated with antioxidative effects: cystathionine-?-lyase (cst), xanthine oxidase, and thioredoxin-interacting protein as well as tribbles homolog 3 (trib3). Cardiac cell pretreatment with tunicamycin, an inducer of trib3, also protected them against H2O2-induced cell death. Epicardial transplantation of myoblast sheets in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction was used to evaluate the expression of CST and trib3 as markers of myoblasts' paracrine effect in vivo. Myoblast sheets induced expression of the CST as well as trib3 in infarcted myocardium. CST localized around blood vessels, suggesting smooth muscle cell localization. Our results provide a deeper molecular insight into the therapeutic mechanisms of myoblast-derived paracrine signaling in cardiac cells and suggest that myoblast transplantation therapy may prevent oxidative stress-induced cardiac deterioration and progression of heart failure. PMID:26021843

  13. Assaying the kinetics of protein denaturation catalyzed by AAA+ unfolding machines and proteases

    PubMed Central

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent molecular machines of the AAA+ superfamily unfold or remodel proteins in all cells. For example, AAA+ ClpX and ClpA hexamers collaborate with the self-compartmentalized ClpP peptidase to unfold and degrade specific proteins in bacteria and some eukaryotic organelles. Although degradation assays are straightforward, robust methods to assay the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed protein unfolding in the absence of proteolysis have been lacking. Here, we describe a FRET-based assay in which enzymatic unfolding converts a mixture of donor-labeled and acceptor-labeled homodimers into heterodimers. In this assay, ClpX is a more efficient protein-unfolding machine than ClpA both kinetically and in terms of ATP consumed. However, ClpP enhances the mechanical activities of ClpA substantially, and ClpAP degrades the dimeric substrate faster than ClpXP. When ClpXP or ClpAP engage the dimeric subunit, one subunit is actively unfolded and degraded, whereas the other subunit is passively unfolded by loss of its partner and released. This assay should be broadly applicable for studying the mechanisms of AAA+ proteases and remodeling chaperones. PMID:25870262

  14. Oxidative stress-dependent activation of the eIF2?ATF4 unfolded protein response branch by skin sensitizer 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene modulates dendritic-like cell maturation and inflammatory status in a biphasic manner [corrected].

    PubMed

    Lus, Andreia; Martins, Joo Demtrio; Silva, Ana; Ferreira, Isabel; Cruz, Maria Teresa; Neves, Bruno Miguel

    2014-12-01

    The pathogenesis of allergic contact dermatitis, the most common manifestation of immunotoxicity in humans, is intimately connected to hapten-induced maturation of dendritic cells (DC). The molecular mechanisms driving this maturational program are not completely known; however, initial danger signals such as the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were shown to play a critical role. Recent evidence linking ROS production, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases led us to analyze, in the present work, the ability of the skin sensitizer 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) to evoke ER stress in DC-like THP-1 cells and the concomitant consequences to their immunobiology. We found that DNFB triggers a ROS-dependent activation of the PERK-eIF?-ATF4 unfolded protein response (UPR) branch conferring cytoprotection and modulating the maturation/proinflammatory cell status in a biphasic manner. Early DNFB induction of ATF4 positively modulates autophagy-related genes MAP1LC3B and ATG3 and stabilizes the transcription factor Nrf2, causing a strong induction of the HMOX1-detoxifying gene. Moreover, we observed that in a first phase, DNFB-induced ATF4 upregulates IL8 mRNA levels while blocking CD86, IL1B, IL12B, and CXL10 transcription. Later, following ATF4 decay, HMOX1 and IL8 transcription drastically decrease and CD86, IL1B, and Il12B are upregulated. Overall, our results evidence a connection between sensitizer-induced redox imbalance and the establishment of ER stress in DC-like cells and provide new insights into the role of UPR effectors such as ATF4 to the complex DC maturational program. PMID:25236743

  15. Adsorption and Unfolding of a Single Protein Triggers Nanoparticle Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kisley, Lydia; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Hoggard, Anneli; Shuang, Bo; D S Indrasekara, A Swarnapali; Chen, Sishan; Wang, Lin-Yung; Derry, Paul J; Liopo, Anton; Zubarev, Eugene R; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2016-02-23

    The response of living systems to nanoparticles is thought to depend on the protein corona, which forms shortly after exposure to physiological fluids and which is linked to a wide array of pathophysiologies. A mechanistic understanding of the dynamic interaction between proteins and nanoparticles and thus the biological fate of nanoparticles and associated proteins is, however, often missing mainly due to the inadequacies in current ensemble experimental approaches. Through the application of a variety of single molecule and single particle spectroscopic techniques in combination with ensemble level characterization tools, we identified different interaction pathways between gold nanorods and bovine serum albumin depending on the protein concentration. Overall, we found that local changes in protein concentration influence everything from cancer cell uptake to nanoparticle stability and even protein secondary structure. We envision that our findings and methods will lead to strategies to control the associated pathophysiology of nanoparticle exposure in vivo. PMID:26751094

  16. Adsorption and Unfolding of a Single Protein Triggers Nanoparticle Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The response of living systems to nanoparticles is thought to depend on the protein corona, which forms shortly after exposure to physiological fluids and which is linked to a wide array of pathophysiologies. A mechanistic understanding of the dynamic interaction between proteins and nanoparticles and thus the biological fate of nanoparticles and associated proteins is, however, often missing mainly due to the inadequacies in current ensemble experimental approaches. Through the application of a variety of single molecule and single particle spectroscopic techniques in combination with ensemble level characterization tools, we identified different interaction pathways between gold nanorods and bovine serum albumin depending on the protein concentration. Overall, we found that local changes in protein concentration influence everything from cancer cell uptake to nanoparticle stability and even protein secondary structure. We envision that our findings and methods will lead to strategies to control the associated pathophysiology of nanoparticle exposure in vivo. PMID:26751094

  17. Unfolded state dynamics and structure of protein L characterized by simulation and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Voelz, Vincent A.; Singh, Vijay R.; Wedemeyer, William J.; Lapidus, Lisa J.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2010-01-01

    While several experimental techniques now exist for characterizing protein unfolded states, all-atom simulation of unfolded states has been challenging due to the long time scales and conformational sampling required. We address this problem by using a combination of accelerated calculations on graphics processor units and distributed computing to simulate tens of thousands of molecular dynamics trajectories each up to ~10 ?s (for a total aggregate simulation time of 127 milliseconds). We used this approach in conjunction with Trp-Cys contact quenching experiments to characterize the unfolded structure and dynamics of protein L. We employed a polymer theory method to make quantitative comparisons between high temperature simulated and chemically denatured experimental ensembles, and find that reaction-limited quenching rates calculated from simulation agree remarkably well with experiment. In both experiment and simulation, we find that unfolded state intramolecular diffusion rates are very slow compared to highly denatured chains, and that a single-residue mutation can significantly alter unfolded state dynamics and structure. This work suggests a view of the unfolded state in which surprisingly low diffusion rates could limit folding, and opens the door for all-atom molecular simulation to be a useful predictive tool for characterizing protein unfolded states along with experiments that directly measure intramolecular diffusion. PMID:20218718

  18. An Application of Unfolding and Cumulative Item Response Theory Models for Noncognitive Scaling: Examining the Assumptions and Applicability of the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sgammato, Adrienne N.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the applicability of a relatively new unidimensional, unfolding item response theory (IRT) model called the generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM; Roberts, Donoghue, & Laughlin, 2000). A total of four scaling methods were applied. Two commonly used cumulative IRT models for polytomous data, the Partial Credit Model and the

  19. Computational approaches to study protein unfolding: hen egg white lysozyme as a case study.

    PubMed

    Hnenberger, P H; Mark, A E; van Gunsteren, W F

    1995-03-01

    Four methods are compared to drive the unfolding of a protein: (1) high temperature (T-run), (2) high pressure (P-run), (3) by imposing a gradual increase in the mean radius of the protein using a penalty function added to the physical interaction function (F-run, radial force driven unfolding), and (4) by weak coupling of the difference between the temperature of the radially outward moving atoms and the radially inward moving atoms to an external temperature bath (K-run, kinetic energy driven unfolding). The characteristic features of the four unfolding pathways are analyzed in order to detect distortions due to the size or the type of the applied perturbation, as well as the features that are common to all of them. Hen egg white lysozyme is used as a test system. The simulations are analyzed and compared to experimental data like 1H-NMR amide proton exchange-folding competition, heat capacity, and compressibility measurements. PMID:7784424

  20. Toward a Taxonomy of the Denatured State: Small Angle Scattering Studies of Unfolded Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, I.S.; Doniach, S.; Plaxco, K.W.

    2005-02-15

    Despite the critical role the unfolded state plays in defining protein folding kinetics and thermodynamics (Berg et al., 2002; Dunker, 2002; Shortle, 2002; Wright and Dyson, 2002), our understanding of its detailed structure remains rather rudimentary; the heterogeneity of the unfolded ensemble renders difficult or impossible its study by traditional, atomic-level structural methods. Consequently, recent years have seen a significant expansion of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS, respectively) techniques that provide direct, albeit rotationally and time-averaged, measures of the geometric properties of the unfolded ensemble. These studies have reached a critical mass, allowing us for the first time to define general observations regarding the nature of the geometry - and possibly the chemistry and physics - of unfolded proteins.

  1. Conformational dynamics of a protein in the folded and the unfolded state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitter, Jörg

    2003-08-01

    In a quasielastic neutron scattering experiment, the picosecond dynamics of α-amylase was investigated for the folded and the unfolded state of the protein. In order to ensure a reasonable interpretation of the internal protein dynamics, the protein was measured in D 2O-buffer solution. The much higher structural flexibility of the pH induced unfolded state as compared to the native folded state was quantified using a simple analytical model, describing a local diffusion inside a sphere. In terms of this model the conformational volume, which is explored mainly by confined protein side-chain movements, is parameterized by the radius of a sphere (folded state, r=1.2 Å; unfolded state, 1.8 Å). Differences in conformational dynamics between the folded and the unfolded state of a protein are of fundamental interest in the field of protein science, because they are assumed to play an important role for the thermodynamics of folding/unfolding transition and for protein stability.

  2. Solvation in protein (un)folding of melittin tetramermonomer transition

    PubMed Central

    Othon, Christina M.; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Lin, Milo M.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2009-01-01

    Protein structural integrity and flexibility are intimately tied to solvation. Here, we examine the effect that changes in bulk and local solvent properties have on protein structure and stability. We observe the change in solvation of an unfolding of the protein model, melittin, in the presence of a denaturant, trifluoroethanol. The peptide system displays a well defined transition in that the tetramer unfolds without disrupting the secondary or tertiary structure. In the absence of local structural perturbation, we are able to reveal exclusively the role of solvation dynamics in protein structure stabilization and the (un)folding pathway. A sudden retardation in solvent dynamics, which is coupled to the change in protein structure, is observed at a critical trifluoroethanol concentration. The large amplitude conformational changes are regulated by the local solvent hydrophobicity and bulk solvent viscosity. PMID:19622745

  3. Unfolding and Refolding Study of a Large Dimeric Protein ?-Glucosidase from Almond Monitored by Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kanti K; Paul, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    In our present investigation, the unfolding and refolding of ?-glucosidase (BGL-Al) from sweet almond was investigated using tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence spectroscopy. When the unfolding of BGL-Al was induced by guanidium chloride (GdnHCl) and monitored using biological activity as well as Trp fluorescence spectroscopic measurement, we observed that the denaturation of BGL-Al could be easily induced by low concentration of GdnHCl and the enzyme was completely inactivated at 1.0 M GdnHCl. Higher unfolding in the presence of reducing agent revealed that the protein perhaps containing multiple di-sulfide bonds indicating a reason of high stability against unfolding by GdnHCl. Refolding results suggested that the protein refolded with high yield from 1 M GdnHCl denatured state, however, refolded with negligible yield from completely unfolded state. The kinetic studies of BGL-Al refolding unravel a two phase refolding process with calculated t1/2 (refolding half time) of 1.8 and 33 min, respectively. When 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) was used as extrinsic fluorophore, we found that the surface hydrophobicity of BGL-Al was continuously decreased during GdnHCl-mediated unfolding. The surface hydrophobicity of the protein was calculated to be as high as 128.32. Acrylamide quenching study demonstrated that Trp residues of BGL-Al are mostly and hence they must be located either on the surface or in the crevices accessible by quenchers. PMID:26100686

  4. Nucleic acid induced unfolding of recombinant prion protein globular fragment is pH dependent.

    PubMed

    Bera, Alakesh; Nandi, Pradip K

    2014-12-01

    Nucleic acid can catalyze the conversion of ?-helical cellular prion protein to ?-sheet rich Proteinase K resistant prion protein oligomers and amyloid polymers in vitro and in solution. Because unfolding of a protein molecule from its ordered ?-helical structure is considered to be a necessary step for the structural conversion to its ?-sheet rich isoform, we have studied the unfolding of the ?-helical globular 121-231 fragment of mouse recombinant prion protein in the presence of different nucleic acids at neutral and acid pH. Nucleic acids, either single or double stranded, do not have any significant effect on the secondary structure of the protein fragment at neutral pH; however the protein secondary structure is modified by the nucleic acids at pH 5. Nucleic acids do not show any significant effect on the temperature induced unfolding of the globular prion protein domain at neutral pH which, however, undergoes a gross conformational change at pH 5 as evidenced from the lowering of the midpoint of thermal denaturation temperatures, Tm, of the protein. The extent of Tm decrease shows a dependence on the nature of nucleic acid. The interaction of nucleic acid with the nonpolar groups exposed from the protein interior at pH 5 probably contributes substantially to the unfolding process of the protein. PMID:25271002

  5. Mechanical Folding and Unfolding of Protein Barnase at the Single-Molecule Level.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Anna; Rey-Serra, Blanca; Frutos, Silvia; Cecconi, Ciro; Ritort, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The unfolding and folding of protein barnase has been extensively investigated in bulk conditions under the effect of denaturant and temperature. These experiments provided information about structural and kinetic features of both the native and the unfolded states of the protein, and debates about the possible existence of an intermediate state in the folding pathway have arisen. Here, we investigate the folding/unfolding reaction of protein barnase under the action of mechanical force at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers. We measure unfolding and folding force-dependent kinetic rates from pulling and passive experiments, respectively, and using Kramers-based theories (e.g., Bell-Evans and Dudko-Hummer-Szabo models), we extract the position of the transition state and the height of the kinetic barrier mediating unfolding and folding transitions, finding good agreement with previous bulk measurements. Measurements of the force-dependent kinetic barrier using the continuous effective barrier analysis show that protein barnase verifies the Leffler-Hammond postulate under applied force and allow us to extract its free energy of folding, ?G0. The estimated value of ?G0 is in agreement with our predictions obtained using fluctuation relations and previous bulk studies. To address the possible existence of an intermediate state on the folding pathway, we measure the power spectrum of force fluctuations at high temporal resolution (50 kHz) when the protein is either folded or unfolded and, additionally, we study the folding transition-path time at different forces. The finite bandwidth of our experimental setup sets the lifetime of potential intermediate states upon barnase folding/unfolding in the submillisecond timescale. PMID:26745410

  6. Physical modeling of the conformation of the unfolded proteins of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilman, Anton; Opferman, Michael; Coalson, Rob; Jasnow, David

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) is a biological ``nano-machine'' that controls the macromolecular transport between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm. NPC functions without direct input of metabolic energy and without transitions of the gate from a ``closed'' to an ``open'' state during transport. The key and unique aspect of transport is the interaction of the transported molecules with the unfolded, natively unstructured proteins that cover the lumen of the NPC. Recently, the NPC inspired creation of artificial bio-mimetic for nano-technology applications. Although several models have been proposed, it is still not clear how the passage of the transport factors is coupled to the conformational dynamics of the unfolded proteins within the NPC. Morphology changes in assemblies of the unfolded proteins induced by the transport factors have been investigated experimentally in vitro. I will present a coarse-grained theoretical and simulation framework that mimics the interactions of unfolded proteins with nano-sized transport factors. The simple physical model predicts morphology changes that explain the recent puzzling experimental results and suggests possible new modes of transport through the NPC. It also provides insights into the physics of the behavior of unfolded proteins.

  7. Reversible unfolding of ribosomal protein E-L30: an NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    van de Ven, F.J.M.; Hilbers, C.W.

    1987-08-25

    Ribosomal protein E-L30 unfolds reversibly at pH values between 7.0 and 4.5. Unfolding of the protein involves a fast and a slow equilibrium, which depend on the degree of protonation of His/sub 19/ and His/sub 33/. Both the fast equilibrium between protonated and deprotonated histidines and the slow equilibrium between folded and unfolded protein could be monitored by means of 500-MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. The degree of protonation of His/sub 19/ and His/sub 33/ appears to be determinant in the unfolding process of the protein. It is shown however that even when the histidines are uncharged, the protein has only limited stability, probably as a result of the presence of all four Glu's of E-L30 in its triple-stranded ..beta..-sheet. At equimolar concentrations of the folded and unfolded form, the rate constant characterizing the transition between these forms is approximately 0.14 s/sup -1/. Making use of sequential resonance assignments of the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum the fast equilibrium could be interpreted in terms of alterations in the spatial structure of E-L30 in a specific domain of the molecule. This domain is also affected by temperature although not in exactly the same manner as by pH.

  8. A Theoretical Search for Folding/Unfolding Nuclei in Three-Dimensional Protein Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galzitskaya, Oxana V.; Finkelstein, Alexei V.

    1999-09-01

    When a protein folds or unfolds, it has to pass through many half-folded microstates. Only a few of them can be seen experimentally. In a two-state transition proceeding with no accumulation of metastable intermediates [Fersht, A. R. (1995) Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 5, 79-84], only the semifolded microstates corresponding to the transition state can be outlined; they influence the folding/unfolding kinetics. Our aim is to calculate them, provided the three-dimensional protein structure is given. The presented approach follows from the capillarity theory of protein folding and unfolding [Wolynes, P. G. (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 6170-6175]. The approach is based on a search for free-energy saddle point(s) on a network of protein unfolding pathways. Under some approximations, this search is rapidly performed by dynamic programming and, despite its relative simplicity, gives a good correlation with experiment. The computed folding nuclei look like ensembles of those compact and closely packed parts of the three-dimensional native folds that contain a small number of disordered protruding loops. Their estimated free energy is consistent with the rapid (within seconds) folding and unfolding of small proteins at the point of thermodynamic equilibrium between the native fold and the coil.

  9. Model for Stretching and Unfolding the Giant Multidomain Muscle Protein Using Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staple, Douglas B.; Payne, Stephen H.; Reddin, Andrew L. C.; Kreuzer, Hans Jrgen

    2008-12-01

    Single-molecule manipulation has allowed the forced unfolding of multidomain proteins. Here we outline a theory that not only explains these experiments but also points out a number of difficulties in their interpretation and makes suggestions for further experiments. For titin we reproduce force-extension curves, the dependence of break force on pulling speed, and break-force distributions and also validate two common experimental views: Unfolding titin Ig domains can be explained as stepwise increases in contour length, and increasing force peaks in native Ig sequences represent a hierarchy of bond strengths. Our theory is valid for essentially any molecule that can be unfolded in atomic force microscopy; as a further example, we present force-extension curves for the unfolding of RNA hairpins.

  10. Computational modeling of acrylodan-labeled cAMP dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit unfolding.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Aleksei; Kivi, Rait; Järv, Jaak

    2016-04-01

    Structure of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, where the asparagine residue 326 was replaced with acrylodan-cystein conjugate to implement this fluorescence reporter group into the enzyme, was modeled by molecular dynamics (MD) method and the positioning of the dye molecule in protein structure was characterized at temperatures 300K, 500K and 700K. It was found that the acrylodan moiety, which fluorescence is very sensitive to solvating properties of its microenvironment, was located on the surface of the native protein at 300K that enabled its partial solvation with water. At high temperatures the protein structure significantly changed, as the secondary and tertiary structure elements were unfolded and these changes were sensitively reflected in positioning of the dye molecule. At 700K complete unfolding of the protein occurred and the reporter group was entirely expelled into water. However, at 500K an intermediate of the protein unfolding process was formed, where the fluorescence reporter group was directed towards the protein interior and buried in the core of the formed molten globule state. This different positioning of the reporter group was in agreement with the two different shifts of emission spectrum of the covalently bound acrylodan, observed in the unfolding process of the protein. PMID:26896699

  11. The Surface-Mediated Unfolding Kinetics of Globular Proteins is Dependent on Molecular Weight and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Patananan, Alexander; Goheen, Steven C

    2008-12-01

    The adsorption and unfolding of proteins on rigid surfaces is characterized by numerous chemical and physical interactions such as hydrogen bonds, disulfide bridges, hydrophobic effects, and London forces. The kinetics of unfolding is dependent on pH, temperature, surface chemistry, as well as protein deformability and structure. In practical applications, this fundamental process has broad implications in biomedical engineering (i.e. artificial implants, drug delivery, and surgical equipment), nanotechnology, maritime construction, and chromatography. However, little is known about the mechanisms behind unfolding because of the atomic lengths and rapid time scales associated with the surface-mediated pathway. Therefore, the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin were investigated by adsorbing the proteins to non-porous cationic polymer beads. The protein fractions were adsorbed at different residence times (0, 9, 10, 20, and 30 min) at near-physiological conditions using a gradient elution system similar to that in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The elution profiles and retention times were obtained by UV/Vis spectrophotometry. A decrease in recovery was observed with time for almost all proteins and was attributed to protein unfolding on the non-porous surfaces. This data, and those of previous studies, fit a linear trend between percent unfolding after a fixed (9 min) residence time (71.8%, 31.1%, and 32.1% of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin, respectively) and molecular weight. Of all the proteins examined so far, only myoglobin deviated from this trend. Myoglobin also exhibited an increase in retention time over a wide temperature range (0°C and 55°C, 4.39 min and 5.74 min, respectively) whereas ovalbumin and β-glucosidase did not. Further studies using a larger set of proteins are required to better understand the physiological and physiochemical implications of protein unfolding kinetics. This study confirms that unfolding can be described by experimental techniques, thereby allowing for the better elucidation of the relationships between the structure and function of soluble proteins as well as other macromolecules.

  12. THE SURFACE-MEDIATED UNFOLDING KINETICS OF GLOBULAR PROTEINS IS DEPENDENT ON MOLECULAR WEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Patananan, A.N.; Goheen, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and unfolding pathways of proteins on rigid surfaces are essential in numerous complex processes associated with biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, and chromatography. It is now well accepted that the kinetics of unfolding are characterized by chemical and physical interactions dependent on protein deformability and structure, as well as environmental pH, temperature, and surface chemistry. Although this fundamental process has broad implications in medicine and industry, little is known about the mechanism because of the atomic lengths and rapid time scales involved. Therefore, the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin were investigated by adsorbing the globular proteins to non-porous cationic polymer beads. The protein fractions were adsorbed at different residence times (0, 9, 10, 20, and 30 min) at near-physiological conditions using a gradient elution system similar to that in high-performance liquid chromatography. The elution profi les and retention times were obtained by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. A decrease in recovery was observed with time for almost all proteins and was attributed to irreversible protein unfolding on the non-porous surfaces. These data, and those of previous studies, fi t a positively increasing linear trend between percent unfolding after a fi xed (9 min) residence time (71.8%, 31.1%, and 32.1% of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin, respectively) and molecular weight. Of all the proteins examined so far, only myoglobin deviated from this trend with higher than predicted unfolding rates. Myoglobin also exhibited an increase in retention time over a wide temperature range (0°C and 55°C, 4.39 min and 5.74 min, respectively) whereas ovalbumin and β-glucosidase did not. Further studies using a larger set of proteins are required to better understand the physiological and physiochemical implications of protein unfolding kinetics. This study confi rms that surface-mediated unfolding can be described by experimental techniques, thereby allowing for the better elucidation of the relationships between the structure and function of soluble proteins as well as other macromolecules.

  13. A hypothesis to reconcile the physical and chemical unfolding of proteins.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Silva, Jerson L

    2015-05-26

    High pressure (HP) or urea is commonly used to disturb folding species. Pressure favors the reversible unfolding of proteins by causing changes in the volumetric properties of the protein-solvent system. However, no mechanistic model has fully elucidated the effects of urea on structure unfolding, even though protein-urea interactions are considered to be crucial. Here, we provide NMR spectroscopy and 3D reconstructions from X-ray scattering to develop the "push-and-pull" hypothesis, which helps to explain the initial mechanism of chemical unfolding in light of the physical events triggered by HP. In studying MpNep2 from Moniliophthora perniciosa, we tracked two cooperative units using HP-NMR as MpNep2 moved uphill in the energy landscape; this process contrasts with the overall structural unfolding that occurs upon reaching a threshold concentration of urea. At subdenaturing concentrations of urea, we were able to trap a state in which urea is preferentially bound to the protein (as determined by NMR intensities and chemical shifts); this state is still folded and not additionally exposed to solvent [fluorescence and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)]. This state has a higher susceptibility to pressure denaturation (lower p1/2 and larger ΔVu); thus, urea and HP share concomitant effects of urea binding and pulling and water-inducing pushing, respectively. These observations explain the differences between the molecular mechanisms that control the physical and chemical unfolding of proteins, thus opening up new possibilities for the study of protein folding and providing an interpretation of the nature of cooperativity in the folding and unfolding processes. PMID:25964355

  14. Forced protein unfolding leads to highly elastic and tough protein hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jie; Mehlich, Alexander; Koga, Nobuyasu; Huang, Jiqing; Koga, Rie; Gao, Xiaoye; Hu, Chunguang; Jin, Chi; Rief, Matthias; Kast, Juergen; Baker, David; Li, Hongbin

    2013-12-01

    Protein-based hydrogels usually do not exhibit high stretchability or toughness, significantly limiting the scope of their potential biomedical applications. Here we report the engineering of a chemically cross-linked, highly elastic and tough protein hydrogel using a mechanically extremely labile, de novo-designed protein that assumes the classical ferredoxin-like fold structure. Due to the low mechanical stability of the ferredoxin-like fold structure, swelling of hydrogels causes a significant fraction of the folded domains to unfold. Subsequent collapse and aggregation of unfolded ferredoxin-like domains leads to intertwining of physically and chemically cross-linked networks, entailing hydrogels with unusual physical and mechanical properties: a negative swelling ratio, high stretchability and toughness. These hydrogels can withstand an average strain of 450% before breaking and show massive energy dissipation. Upon relaxation, refolding of the ferredoxin-like domains enables the hydrogel to recover its massive hysteresis. This novel biomaterial may expand the scope of hydrogel applications in tissue engineering.

  15. ClpXP, an ATP-powered unfolding and protein-degradation machine

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    ClpXP is a AAA+ protease that uses the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform mechanical work during targeted protein degradation within cells. ClpXP consists of hexamers of a AAA+ ATPase (ClpX) and a tetradecameric peptidase (ClpP). Asymmetric ClpX hexamers bind unstructured peptide tags in protein substrates, unfold stable tertiary structure in the substrate, and then translocate the unfolded polypeptide chain into an internal proteolytic compartment in ClpP. Here, we review our present understanding of ClpXP structure and function, as revealed by two decades of biochemical and biophysical studies. PMID:21736903

  16. Reversibility and two state behaviour in the thermal unfolding of oligomeric TIM barrel proteins.

    PubMed

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Costas, Miguel; Rodrguez-Romero, Adela; Alejandro Fernndez-Velasco, D

    2015-08-28

    Temperature is one of the main variables that modulate protein function and stability. Thermodynamic studies of oligomeric proteins, the dominant protein natural form, have been often hampered because irreversible aggregation and/or slow reactions are common. There are no reports on the reversible equilibrium thermal unfolding of proteins composed of (?/?)8 barrel subunits, albeit this "TIM barrel" topology is one of the most abundant and versatile in nature. We studied the eponymous TIM barrel, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), belonging to five species of different bacterial taxa. All of them were found to be catalytically efficient dimers. The three-dimensional structure of four enzymes was solved at high/medium resolution. Irreversibility and kinetic control were observed in the thermal unfolding of two TIMs, while for the other three the thermal unfolding was found to follow a two-state equilibrium reversible process. Shifts in the global stability curves of these three proteins are related to the organismal temperature range of optimal growth and modulated by variations in maximum stability temperature and in the enthalpy change at that temperature. Reversibility appears to correlate with the low isoelectric point, the absence of a residual structure in the unfolded state, small cavity volume in the native state, low conformational stability and a low melting temperature. Furthermore, the strong coupling between dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding may reduce aggregation and favour reversibility. It is therefore very thought-provoking to find that a common topological ensemble, such as the TIM barrel, can unfold/refold in the Anfinsen way, i.e. without the help of the cellular machinery. PMID:26206330

  17. Characterizing the unfolded states of proteins using single-molecule FRET spectroscopy and molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Kusai A; Best, Robert B; Louis, John M; Gopich, Irina V; Eaton, William A

    2007-01-30

    To obtain quantitative information on the size and dynamics of unfolded proteins we combined single-molecule lifetime and intensity FRET measurements with molecular simulations. We compared the unfolded states of the 64-residue, alpha/beta protein L and the 66-residue, all-beta cold-shock protein CspTm. The average radius of gyration (Rg) calculated from FRET data on freely diffusing molecules was identical for the two unfolded proteins at guanidinium chloride concentrations >3 M, and the FRET-derived Rg of protein L agreed well with the Rg previously measured by equilibrium small-angle x-ray scattering. As the denaturant concentration was lowered, the mean FRET efficiency of the unfolded subpopulation increased, signaling collapse of the polypeptide chain, with protein L being slightly more compact than CspTm. A decrease in Rg with decreasing denaturant was also observed in all-atom molecular dynamics calculations in explicit water/urea solvent, and Langevin simulations of a simplified representation of the polypeptide suggest that collapse can result from either increased interresidue attraction or decreased excluded volume. In contrast to both the FRET and simulation results, previous time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering experiments showed no collapse for protein L. Analysis of the donor fluorescence decay of the unfolded subpopulation of both proteins gives information about the end-to-end chain distribution and suggests that chain dynamics is slow compared with the donor life-time of approximately 2 ns, whereas the bin-size independence of the small excess width above the shot noise for the FRET efficiency distributions may result from incomplete conformational averaging on even the 1-ms time scale. PMID:17251351

  18. Macromolecular crowding remodels the energy landscape of a protein by favoring a more compact unfolded state

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jiang; Gierasch, Lila M.

    2010-01-01

    The interior of cells is highly crowded with macromolecules, which impacts all physiological processes. To explore how macromolecular crowding may influence cellular protein folding, we interrogated the folding landscape of a model ?-rich protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (CRABP I), in the presence of an inert crowding agent (Ficoll 70). Urea titrations revealed a crowding-induced change in the water-accessible polar amide surface of its denatured state, based on an observed ca. 15% decrease in the m-value (the change in unfolding free energy with respect to urea concentration), and the effect of crowding on the equilibrium stability of CRABP I was less than our experimental error (i.e., ?1.2 kcal/mol). Consequently, we directly probed the effect of crowding on the denatured state of CRABP I by measuring side chain accessibility using iodide quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and chemical modification of cysteines. We observed that the urea-denatured state is more compact under crowded conditions, and the observed extent of reduction of the m value by crowding agent is fully consistent with the extent of reduction of the accessibility of the Trp and Cys probes, suggesting a random and nonspecific compaction of the unfolded state. The thermodynamic consequences of crowding-induced compaction are discussed. In addition, over a wide range of Ficoll concentration, crowding significantly retarded the unfolding kinetics of CRABP I without influencing the urea dependence of the unfolding rate, arguing for no appreciable change in the nature of the transition state. Our results demonstrate how macromolecular crowding may influence protein folding by effects both on the unfolded state ensemble and on unfolding kinetics. (end of abstract) PMID:20662522

  19. A hypothesis to reconcile the physical and chemical unfolding of proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2015-01-01

    High pressure (HP) or urea is commonly used to disturb folding species. Pressure favors the reversible unfolding of proteins by causing changes in the volumetric properties of the protein–solvent system. However, no mechanistic model has fully elucidated the effects of urea on structure unfolding, even though protein–urea interactions are considered to be crucial. Here, we provide NMR spectroscopy and 3D reconstructions from X-ray scattering to develop the “push-and-pull” hypothesis, which helps to explain the initial mechanism of chemical unfolding in light of the physical events triggered by HP. In studying MpNep2 from Moniliophthora perniciosa, we tracked two cooperative units using HP-NMR as MpNep2 moved uphill in the energy landscape; this process contrasts with the overall structural unfolding that occurs upon reaching a threshold concentration of urea. At subdenaturing concentrations of urea, we were able to trap a state in which urea is preferentially bound to the protein (as determined by NMR intensities and chemical shifts); this state is still folded and not additionally exposed to solvent [fluorescence and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)]. This state has a higher susceptibility to pressure denaturation (lower p1/2 and larger ΔVu); thus, urea and HP share concomitant effects of urea binding and pulling and water-inducing pushing, respectively. These observations explain the differences between the molecular mechanisms that control the physical and chemical unfolding of proteins, thus opening up new possibilities for the study of protein folding and providing an interpretation of the nature of cooperativity in the folding and unfolding processes. PMID:25964355

  20. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K.; Cheong, S. A.

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with ? helix and ? hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein folding dynamics.

  1. Dynameomics: A Consensus View of the Protein Unfolding/Folding Transition State Ensemble across a Diverse Set of Protein Folds

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Amanda L.; Scott, Kathryn A.; Daggett, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The Dynameomics project aims to simulate a representative sample of all globular protein metafolds under both native and unfolding conditions. We have identified protein unfolding transition state (TS) ensembles from multiple molecular dynamics simulations of high-temperature unfolding in 183 structurally distinct proteins. These data can be used to study individual proteins and individual protein metafolds and to mine for TS structural features common across all proteins. Separating the TS structures into four different fold classes (all proteins, all-?, all-?, and mixed ?/? and ? + ?) resulted in no significant difference in the overall protein properties. The residues with the most contacts in the native state lost the most contacts in the TS ensemble. On average, residues beginning in an ?-helix maintained more structure in the TS ensemble than did residues starting in ?-strands or any other conformation. The metafolds studied here represent 67% of all known protein structures, and this is, to our knowledge, the largest, most comprehensive study of the protein folding/unfolding TS ensemble to date. One might have expected broad distributions in the average global properties of the TS relative to the native state, indicating variability in the amount of structure present in the TS. Instead, the average global properties converged with low standard deviations across metafolds, suggesting that there are general rules governing the structure and properties of the TS. PMID:19948125

  2. Diffuse transition state structure for the unfolding of a leucine-rich repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sadie E.; Meisl, Georg; Rowling, Pamela J. E.; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Knowles, Tuomas; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Tandem-repeat proteins, such as leucine-rich repeats, comprise arrays of small structural motifs that pack in a linear fashion to produce elongated architectures. They lack contacts between residues that are distant in primary sequence, a feature that distinguishes them from the complex topologies of globular proteins. Here we have investigated the unfolding pathway of the leucine-rich repeat domain of the mRNA export protein TAP (TAPLRR) using ?-value analysis. Whereas most of the tandem-repeat proteins studied to date have been found to unfold via a polarised mechanism in which only a small, localised number of repeats are structured in the transition state, the unfolding mechanism of TAPLRR is more diffuse in nature. In the transition state for unfolding of TAPLRR, three of the four LRRs are highly structured and non-native interactions are formed within the N-terminal ?-helical cap and the first LRR. Thus, the ?-helical cap plays an important role in which non-native interactions are required to provide a scaffold for the LRRs to pack against in the folding reaction. PMID:24535093

  3. Surface-Mediated Protein Unfolding as a Search Process for Denaturing Sites.

    PubMed

    Weltz, James S; Schwartz, Daniel K; Kaar, Joel L

    2016-01-26

    Surface-induced protein denaturation has important implications for the development of materials that are resistant and/or innocuous to biomolecules. Here, we studied the mechanism of lysozyme (T4L) unfolding on fused silica (FS) using single-molecule methods that provided direct insight into the cause of denaturation. Unfolding of T4L was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer while simultaneously tracking the adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual molecules at the solid-solution interface. Results of high-throughput single-molecule analysis suggested that the unfolding of T4L on FS was mediated by surface diffusion and occurred on isolated nanoscale sites, which were relatively rare and distinct from the majority of the surface. These observations suggest that surface-mediated protein unfolding is a search process that is based on the exploration for denaturing sites by the protein. Ultimately, these findings have important implications for the design of protein-compatible surfaces. PMID:26580418

  4. Ligand-induced changes of the apparent transition-state position in mechanical protein unfolding.

    PubMed

    Stigler, Johannes; Rief, Matthias

    2015-07-21

    Force-spectroscopic measurements of ligand-receptor systems and the unfolding/folding of nucleic acids or proteins reveal information on the underlying energy landscape along the pulling coordinate. The slope ?x() of the force-dependent unfolding/unbinding rates is interpreted as the distance from the folded/bound state to the transition state for unfolding/unbinding and, hence, often related to the mechanical compliance of the sample molecule. Here we show that in ligand-binding proteins, the experimentally inferred ?x() can depend on the ligand concentration, unrelated to changes in mechanical compliance. We describe the effect in single-molecule, force-spectroscopy experiments of the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and explain it in a simple model where mechanical unfolding and ligand binding occur on orthogonal reaction coordinates. This model predicts changes in the experimentally inferred ?x(), depending on ligand concentration and the associated shift of the dominant barrier between the two reaction coordinates. We demonstrate quantitative agreement between experiments and simulations using a realistic six-state kinetic scheme using literature values for calcium-binding kinetics and affinities. Our results have important consequences for the interpretation of force-spectroscopic data of ligand-binding proteins. PMID:26200872

  5. Force-dependent switch in protein unfolding pathways and transition-state movements.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Pavel I; Hinczewski, Michael; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Marqusee, Susan; Thirumalai, D

    2016-02-01

    Although it is known that single-domain proteins fold and unfold by parallel pathways, demonstration of this expectation has been difficult to establish in experiments. Unfolding rate, [Formula: see text], as a function of force f, obtained in single-molecule pulling experiments on src SH3 domain, exhibits upward curvature on a [Formula: see text] plot. Similar observations were reported for other proteins for the unfolding rate [Formula: see text]. These findings imply unfolding in these single-domain proteins involves a switch in the pathway as f or [Formula: see text] is increased from a low to a high value. We provide a unified theory demonstrating that if [Formula: see text] as a function of a perturbation (f or [Formula: see text]) exhibits upward curvature then the underlying energy landscape must be strongly multidimensional. Using molecular simulations we provide a structural basis for the switch in the pathways and dramatic shifts in the transition-state ensemble (TSE) in src SH3 domain as f is increased. We show that a single-point mutation shifts the upward curvature in [Formula: see text] to a lower force, thus establishing the malleability of the underlying folding landscape. Our theory, applicable to any perturbation that affects the free energy of the protein linearly, readily explains movement in the TSE in a ?-sandwich (I27) protein and single-chain monellin as the denaturant concentration is varied. We predict that in the force range accessible in laser optical tweezer experiments there should be a switch in the unfolding pathways in I27 or its mutants. PMID:26818842

  6. Single-molecule protein unfolding and translocation by an ATP-fueled proteolytic machine

    PubMed Central

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Olivares, Adrian O.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    All cells employ ATP-powered proteases for protein-quality control and regulation. In the ClpXP protease, ClpX is a AAA+ machine that recognizes specific protein substrates, unfolds these molecules, and then translocates the denatured polypeptide through a central pore and into ClpP for degradation. Here, we use optical-trapping nanometry to probe the mechanics of enzymatic unfolding and translocation of single molecules of a multidomain substrate. Our experiments demonstrate the capacity of ClpXP and ClpX to perform mechanical work under load, reveal very fast and highly cooperative unfolding of individual substrate domains, suggest a translocation step size of 58 amino acids, and support a power-stroke model of denaturation in which successful enzyme-mediated unfolding of stable domains requires coincidence between mechanical pulling by the enzyme and a transient stochastic reduction in protein stability. We anticipate that single-molecule studies of the mechanical properties of other AAA+ proteolytic machines will reveal many shared features with ClpXP. PMID:21496645

  7. Mechanical Unfolding of Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Karsai, rpd; Kellermayer, MiklsS.Z.; Harris, SamanthaP.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is a thick-filament-associated protein that performs regulatory and structural roles within cardiac sarcomeres. It is a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of proteins consisting of eight Ig- and three fibronectin (FNIII)-like domains, along with a unique regulatory sequence referred to as the M-domain, whose structure is unknown. Domains near the C-terminus of cMyBP-C bind tightly to myosin and mediate the association of cMyBP-C with thick (myosin-containing) filaments, whereas N-terminal domains, including the regulatory M-domain, bind reversibly to myosin S2 and/or actin. The ability of MyBP-C to bind to both myosin and actin raises the possibility that cMyBP-C cross-links myosin molecules within the thick filament and/or cross-links myosin and thin (actin-containing) filaments together. In either scenario, cMyBP-C could be under mechanical strain. However, the physical properties of cMyBP-C and its behavior under load are completely unknown. Here, we investigated the mechanical properties of recombinant baculovirus-expressed cMyBP-C using atomic force microscopy to assess the stability of individual cMyBP-C molecules in response to stretch. Force-extension curves showed the presence of long extensible segment(s) that became stretched before the unfolding of individual Ig and FNIII domains, which were evident as sawtooth peaks in force spectra. The forces required to unfold the Ig/FNIII domains at a stretch rate of 500nm/s increased monotonically from ?30 to ?150 pN, suggesting a mechanical hierarchy among the different Ig/FNIII domains. Additional experiments using smaller recombinant proteins showed that the regulatory M-domain lacks significant secondary or tertiary structure and is likely an intrinsically disordered region of cMyBP-C. Together, these data indicate that cMyBP-C exhibits complex mechanical behavior under load and contains multiple domains with distinct mechanical properties. PMID:22004751

  8. A Hyperbolic Cosine Latent Trait Model for Unfolding Dichotomous Single-Stimulus Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Luo, Guanzhong

    1993-01-01

    A unidimensional model for responses to statements that have an unfolding structure was constructed from the cumulative Rasch model for ordered response categories. A joint maximum likelihood estimation procedure was investigated. Analyses of data from a small simulation and a real data set show that the model is readily applicable. (SLD)

  9. Insight into Early-Stage Unfolding of GPI-Anchored Human Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Emilia L; Qi, Yifei; Park, Soohyung; Mallajosyula, Sairam S; MacKerell, Alexander D; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-17

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) converted from a normal host cellular prion protein (PrPC). Experimental studies suggest that PrPC is enriched with ?-helical structure, whereas PrPSc contains a high proportion of ?-sheet. In this study, we report the impact of N-glycosylation and the membrane on the secondary structure stability utilizing extensive microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that the HB (residues 173 to 194) C-terminal fragment undergoes conformational changes and helix unfolding in the absence of membrane environments because of the competition between protein backbone intramolecular and protein-water intermolecular hydrogen bonds as well as its intrinsic instability originated from the amino acid sequence. This initiation of the unfolding process of PrPC leads to a subsequent increase in the length of the HB-HC loop (residues 195 to 199) that may trigger larger rigid body motions or further unfolding around this region. Continuous interactions between prion protein and the membrane not only constrain the protein conformation but also decrease the solvent accessibility of the backbone atoms, thereby stabilizing the secondary structure, which is enhanced by N-glycosylation via additional interactions between the N-glycans and the membrane surface. PMID:26588568

  10. New bonner sphere response matrix, ARK1, for neutron spectral unfolding

    SciTech Connect

    Lemley, E.C.; West. L.

    1996-12-31

    Although the energy spectra of neutron radiation cannot be measured directly, knowledge of the neutron spectrum in the workplace is necessary for predictions of personnel radiation doses and shielding design. Bonner spheres consist of a central detector over which polyethylene moderating spheres are placed, permitting measurement of the counting rate for various combinations of the central detector and several moderators. The process of approximating neutron spectra from Bonner sphere count-rate data is known as spectral unfolding and requires knowledge of the energy response of each detector-moderator combination (i.e., a response function). The unfolding process may be sensitive to small changes because the response functions are usually ill conditioned making an accurate set of response functions vital to the unfolding process. Previous response function calculations have been limited to a one-dimensional model of the detector-moderator combination and to binned cross-section sets, already averaged over some representative energy spectrum. Of these available response matrices, UTA4 and SAN4 perform the best in unfolding tests. This paper focuses on the relative performance differences between previously published response functions and those we have calculated by modeling Bonner spheres in three dimensions with the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A.

  11. Conformational equilibration time of unfolded protein chains and the folding speed limit

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Christina J.; Goldbeck, Robert A.; Latypov, Ramil F.; Roder, Heinrich; Kliger, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The speed with which the conformers of unfolded protein chains interconvert is a fundamental question in the study of protein folding. Kinetic evidence is presented here for the time constant for interconversion of disparate unfolded chain conformations of a small globular protein, cytochrome c, in the presence of guanidine HCl denaturant. The axial binding reactions of histidine and methionine residues with the Fe(II) heme cofactor were monitored with time-resolved magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy after photodissociation of the CO complexes of unfolded protein obtained from horse and tuna, and from several histidine mutants of the horse protein. A kinetic model fitting both the reaction rate constants and spectra of the intermediates was used to obtain a quantitative estimate of the conformational diffusion time. The latter parameter was approximated as a first-order time constant for exchange between conformational subensembles presenting either a methionine or a histidine residue to the heme iron for facile binding. The mean diffusional time constant of the wild type and variants was 3 2 ?s, close to the folding "speed limit". The implications of the relatively rapid conformational equilibration time observed are discussed in terms of the energy landscape and classical pathway time regimes of folding, for which the conformational diffusion time can be considered a pivot point. PMID:17352458

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between two protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Thomas A; Loh, Stewart N

    2007-08-10

    A simple model is formulated for analyzing the coupled folding-unfolding equilibrium present in a unique class of molecular switch proteins. We previously fused two single-domain proteins, barnase and ubiquitin, such that the free energy stored in the folded structure of one subunit is used to drive unfolding of the other. Here, we present a thermodynamic test of that mechanism. The antagonistic interaction is represented by a coupling free energy term DeltaGX. DeltaGX is the penalty imposed on folding of one domain by the native structure of the other. If DeltaGX=0, then neither domain senses the other and they fold and unfold independently. If DeltaGX>0, then destabilizing one domain will stabilize the other, and vice versa. In the limit where DeltaGX is greater than the intrinsic stability of either protein, then only one domain can be folded at any given time. We estimate DeltaGX by measuring stability parameters for a series of mutants that destabilize either the barnase or ubiquitin domains. Fitting the data to the model leads to a DeltaGX value of approximately 4 kcal mol(-1). DeltaGX is proposed to depend on both the length of the linker peptides used to join the two proteins, and on the inherent structural plasticity of each domain. We predict that shortening the linkers from their current lengths of two and three amino acid residues will increase structural and thermodynamic coupling. PMID:17572441

  13. Investigating Protein Folding and Unfolding in Electrospray Nanodrops Upon Rapid Mixing Using Theta-Glass Emitters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Theta-glass emitters are used to rapidly mix two solutions to induce either protein folding or unfolding during nanoelectrospray (nanoESI). Mixing acid-denatured myoglobin with an aqueous ammonium acetate solution to increase solution pH results in protein folding during nanoESI. A reaction time and upper limit to the droplet lifetime of 9 ± 2 μs is obtained from the relative abundance of the folded conformer in these rapid mixing experiments compared to that obtained from solutions at equilibrium and a folding time constant of 7 μs. Heme reincorporation does not occur, consistent with the short droplet lifetime and the much longer time constant for this process. Similar mixing experiments with acid-denatured cytochrome c and the resulting folding during nanoESI indicate a reaction time of between 7 and 25 μs depending on the solution composition. The extent of unfolding of holo-myoglobin upon rapid mixing with theta-glass emitters is less than that reported previously (Fisher et al. Anal. Chem.2014, 86, 4581−458824702054), a result that is attributed to the much smaller, ∼1.5 μm, average o.d. tips used here. These results indicate that the time frame during which protein folding or unfolding can occur during nanoESI depends both on the initial droplet size, which can be varied by changing the emitter tip diameter, and on the solution composition. This study demonstrates that protein folding or unfolding processes that occur on the ∼10 μs time scale can be readily investigated using rapid mixing with theta-glass emitters combined with mass spectrometry. PMID:25525976

  14. Deconvoluting Protein (Un)folding Structural Ensembles Using X-Ray Scattering, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Nasedkin, Alexandr; Marcellini, Moreno; Religa, Tomasz L.; Freund, Stefan M.; Menzel, Andreas; Fersht, Alan R.; Jemth, Per; van der Spoel, David; Davidsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The folding and unfolding of protein domains is an apparently cooperative process, but transient intermediates have been detected in some cases. Such (un)folding intermediates are challenging to investigate structurally as they are typically not long-lived and their role in the (un)folding reaction has often been questioned. One of the most well studied (un)folding pathways is that of Drosophila melanogaster Engrailed homeodomain (EnHD): this 61-residue protein forms a three helix bundle in the native state and folds via a helical intermediate. Here we used molecular dynamics simulations to derive sample conformations of EnHD in the native, intermediate, and unfolded states and selected the relevant structural clusters by comparing to small/wide angle X-ray scattering data at four different temperatures. The results are corroborated using residual dipolar couplings determined by NMR spectroscopy. Our results agree well with the previously proposed (un)folding pathway. However, they also suggest that the fully unfolded state is present at a low fraction throughout the investigated temperature interval, and that the (un)folding intermediate is highly populated at the thermal midpoint in line with the view that this intermediate can be regarded to be the denatured state under physiological conditions. Further, the combination of ensemble structural techniques with MD allows for determination of structures and populations of multiple interconverting structures in solution. PMID:25946337

  15. Protein unfolding accounts for the unusual mechanical behavior of fibrin networks

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Prashant K.; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Brown, Andre E. X.; Discher, Dennis E.; Weisel, John W.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the mechanical behavior of isotropic fibrin networks at the macroscopic scale in terms of the nanoscale force response of fibrin molecules that are its basic building blocks. We show that the remarkable extensibility and compressibility of fibrin networks have their origins in the unfolding of fibrin molecules. The force-stretch behavior of a single fibrin fiber is described using a two-state model in which the fiber has a linear force-stretch relation in the folded phase and behaves like a worm-like-chain in the unfolded phase. The nanoscale force-stretch response is connected to the macro-scale stress-stretch response by means of the eight-chain model. This model is able to capture the macroscopic response of a fibrin network in uniaxial tension and appears remarkably simple given the molecular complexity. We use the eight-chain model to explain why fibrin networks have negative compressibility and Poissons ratio greater than one due to unfolding of fibrin molecules. PMID:21342665

  16. An Item Response Unfolding Model for Graphic Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    The graphic rating scale, a measurement tool used in many areas of psychology, usually takes a form of a fixed-length line segment, with both ends bounded and labeled as extreme responses. The raters mark somewhere on the line, and the length of the line segment from one endpoint to the mark is taken as the measure. An item response unfolding…

  17. Performance comparison of bonner sphere response matrices by unfolding UARK SRCC neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Lemley, E.C.; West, L.

    1994-12-31

    Determining the energy-dependent dose equivalent for neutrons is a difficult problem. The slowing-down process that neutrons undergo in moderating detectors destroys their incident energy information, causing the detector response to be a complicated function of energy. The improvement of neutron dosimetry requires experimental determination of neutron energy spectra in irradiation environments. Bonner spheres, which consist of a thermal-neutron scintillator and several polyethylene moderating spheres, are commonly used as a field neutron Spectrometer. A computer code must be used in tandem with the Bonner spheres to produce some approximate neutron spectrum from the sphere data by a technique known as spectral unfolding. The unfolding technique requires at least one of several available Bonner sphere response matrices. The choice of response matrix may strongly affect the end-product spectrum. This paper describes the comparison of the several response matrices currently available.

  18. ?-sheet-like formation during the mechanical unfolding of prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Weiwei; Yoon, Gwonchan; Cao, Penghui; Eom, Kilho; Park, Harold S.

    2015-09-01

    Single molecule experiments and simulations have been widely used to characterize the unfolding and folding pathways of different proteins. However, with few exceptions, these tools have not been applied to study prion protein, PrPC, whose misfolded form PrPSc can induce a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we apply novel atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to study the constant force unfolding of human PrP at time scales inaccessible with standard molecular dynamics. We demonstrate for forces around 100 pN, prion forms a stable, three-stranded ?-sheet-like intermediate configuration containing residues 155-214 with a lifetime exceeding hundreds of nanoseconds. A mutant without the disulfide bridge shows lower stability during the unfolding process but still forms the three-stranded structure. The simulations thus not only show the atomistic details of the mechanically induced structural conversion from the native ?-helical structure to the ?-rich-like form but also lend support to the structural theory that there is a core of the recombinant PrP amyloid, a misfolded form reported to induce transmissible disease, mapping to C-terminal residues ?160-220.

  19. Human defensins facilitate local unfolding of thermodynamically unstable regions of bacterial protein toxins

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Elena; Quintyn, Royston; Seveau, Stephanie; Lu, Wuyuan; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Defensins are short cationic, amphiphilic, cysteine-rich peptides that constitute the front line immune defense against various pathogens. In addition to exerting direct antibacterial activities, defensins inactivate several classes of unrelated bacterial exotoxins. To date, no coherent mechanism has been proposed that would explain defensins’ enigmatic efficiency towards various toxins. We showed that binding of neutrophil α-defensin HNP1 to affected bacterial toxins caused their local unfolding, potentiated their thermal melting and precipitation, exposed new regions for proteolysis, and increased susceptibility to collisional quenchers, without causing similar affects on tested mammalian structural and enzymatic proteins. Enteric α-defensin HD5 and β-defensin hBD2 shared similar toxin-unfolding effects with HNP1, albeit to different degrees. We propose that protein susceptibility to inactivation by defensins is contingent to their thermolability and conformational plasticity and that the defensin-induced unfolding is a key element in the general mechanism of toxin inactivation by human defensins. PMID:25517613

  20. Mechanisms of triggering H1 helix in prion proteins unfolding revealed by molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Lee, H. C.

    2006-03-01

    In template-assistance model, normal Prion protein (PrP^C), the pathogen to cause several prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) in human, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in cow, and scrapie in sheep, converts to infectious prion (PrP^Sc) through a transient interaction with PrP^Sc. Furthermore, conventional studies showed S1-H1-S2 region in PrP^C to be the template of S1-S2 β-sheet in PrP^Sc, and Prion protein's conformational conversion may involve an unfolding of H1 and refolding into β-sheet. Here we prepare several mouse prion peptides that contain S1-H1-S2 region with specific different structures, which are corresponding to specific interactions, to investigate possible mechanisms to trigger H1 α-helix unfolding process via molecular dynamic simulation. Three properties, conformational transition, salt-bridge in H1, and hydrophobic solvent accessible surface (SAS) are analyzed. From these studies, we found the interaction that triggers H1 unfolding to be the one that causes dihedral angle at residue Asn^143 changes. Whereas interactions that cause S1 segment's conformational changes play a minor in this process. These studies offers an additional evidence for template-assistance model.

  1. Dynamical properties of α-amylase in the folded and unfolded state: the role of thermal equilibrium fluctuations for conformational entropy and protein stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitter, J.; Herrmann, R.; Hauß, T.; Lechner, R. E.; Dencher, N. A.

    2001-07-01

    A comparative analysis of thermal equilibrium fluctuations occurring in a mesophilic and in a thermophilic α-amylase was performed to study the effect of structural fluctuations on thermostability. The thermal fluctuations determining the conformational entropy of both enzymes have been characterised for the folded (at 30°C and 60°C) and for the unfolded state by applying neutron spectroscopy (at 30°C). The folded state shows a higher structural flexibility for the thermophilic protein as compared to the mesophilic homologue. In contrast, the unfolded state of both enzymes is rather similar with respect to the structural fluctuations. On the basis of this result, a mechanism characterised by entropic stabilisation (i.e., smaller Δ S for the unfolding transition of thermophilic α-amylase) can be assumed to be responsible for the higher thermostability of the thermophilic enzyme.

  2. Concerted dihedral rotations give rise to internal friction in unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Ignacia; Makarov, Dmitrii E; Papoian, Garegin A

    2014-06-18

    Protein chains undergo conformational diffusion during folding and dynamics, experiencing both thermal kicks and viscous drag. Recent experiments have shown that the corresponding friction can be separated into wet friction, which is determined by the solvent viscosity, and dry friction, where frictional effects arise due to the interactions within the protein chain. Despite important advances, the molecular origins underlying dry friction in proteins have remained unclear. To address this problem, we studied the dynamics of the unfolded cold-shock protein at different solvent viscosities and denaturant concentrations. Using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations we estimated the internal friction time scales and found them to agree well with the corresponding experimental measurements (Soranno et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2012, 109, 17800-17806). Analysis of the reconfiguration dynamics of the unfolded chain further revealed that hops in the dihedral space provide the dominant mechanism of internal friction. Furthermore, the increased number of concerted dihedral moves at physiological conditions suggest that, in such conditions, the concerted motions result in higher frictional forces. These findings have important implications for understanding the folding kinetics of proteins as well as the dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:24844314

  3. Water-protein interaction in native and partially unfolded equine cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banci, Lucia

    1998-12-01

    The problem of the interaction of water solvent with proteins has been addressed by investigating the water 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of cytochrome c solutions. It is shown that the 1H NMRD profiles are accounted for by 1, a sizeable contribution from exchangeable protein protons (mostly from lysine side chains) and 2, a modest contribution from long-lived water. It is also shown that the number of exchangeable protons is sizeably increased in the oxidized but not in the reduced protein in the presence of the unfolding agent guanidinium chloride at a 3M concentration. This additional contribution arises mostly from backbone protons, as evidenced by high resolution NMR data which provide significant and independent data on the structure and the dynamic behaviour of the partly unfolded oxidized protein. Higher accessibility to short lived water molecules is proposed also. For the analysis of the 1H NMRD data a complete relaxation matrix approach is presented that is analogous, but not identical, to one recently described. This approach permits the simultaneous incorporation of exchangeable protein protons and an unlimited number of water molecules in pre-defined protein binding sites.

  4. Characterization of membrane protein non-native states. 2. The SDS-unfolded states of rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arpana; Kim, Tai-Yang; Moeller, Martina; Wu, Jenny; Alexiev, Ulrike; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular nature of residual structure in unfolded states of membrane proteins. A screen of chemical denaturants to maximally unfold the mammalian membrane protein and prototypic G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin, without interference from aggregation described in an accompanying paper (Dutta et al., 2010 ibid.) identified sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), alone or in combination with other chemicals, as the most suitable denaturant. Here, we initiate the biophysical characterization of SDS-denatured states of rhodopsin. Using absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and cysteine accessibility studies, tertiary structure of denatured states was characterized. In agreement with the pattern of secondary structure changes detected by circular dichroism described in the accompanying paper, tertiary structure changes are distinct over four SDS concentration ranges based on the expected predominant micellar structures. Dodecyl maltoside (DM)/SDS mixed micelle spheres (0.05-0.3% SDS) turn into SDS spheres (0.3-3% SDS) that gradually (3-15% SDS) become cylindrical (above 15% SDS). Denatured states in SDS spheres and cylinders show a relatively greater burial of cysteine and tryptophan residues and are more compact as compared to the states observed in mixed micellar structures. Protein structural changes at the membrane/water interface region are most prominent at very low SDS concentrations but reach transient stability in the compact conformations in SDS spheres. This is the first experimental evidence for the formation of a compact unfolding intermediate state with flexible surface elements in a membrane protein. PMID:20575562

  5. Inhibition of Unfolding and Aggregation of Lens Protein Human Gamma D Crystallin by Sodium Citrate

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Daniel R.; Knee, Kelly M.; King, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Cataract affects 1 in 6 Americans over the age of 40, and is considered a global health problem. Cataract is caused by the aggregation of unfolded or damaged proteins in the lens, which accumulate as an individual ages. Currently, surgery is the only available treatment for cataract, however, small molecules have been suggested as potential preventative therapies. In this work, we study the effect of sodium citrate on the stability of Human ?D Crystallin (H?D-Crys), a structural protein of the eye lens, and two cataract-related mutants, L5S H?D-Crys and I90F H?D-Crys. In equilibrium unfolding-refolding studies, the presence of 250 mM sodium citrate increased the transition midpoint of the N-td of WT H?D-Crys and L5S H?D-Crys by 0.3 M GuHCl, the C-td by 0.6M GuHCl, and the single transition of I90F H?D-Crys by 0.4M GuHCl. In kinetic unfolding reactions, sodium citrate demonstrates a measurable stabilization effect only for the mutant I90F H?D-Crys. In the presence of citrate, a kinetic unfolding intermediate of I90F H?D-Crys can be observed, which was not observed in the absence of citrate. Rate of aggregation was measured using solution turbidity, and sodium citrate demonstrates negligible effect on rate of aggregation of WT H?D-Crys, but considerably slows the rate of aggregation of both L5S H?D-Crys and I90F H?D-Crys. The presence of sodium citrate dramatically slows refolding of WT H?D-Crys and I90F H?D-Crys, but has a significantly smaller effect on the refolding of L5S H?D-Crys. The differential stabilizing effect of sodium citrate suggests that the ion is binding to a partially unfolded conformation of the C-td, but a solution-based Hofmeister effect cannot be eliminated as a possible explanation for the effects observed. These results suggest that sodium citrate may be a potential preventative agent for cataract. PMID:21600897

  6. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central “hubs”. Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  7. Sulfatide-Hsp70 interaction promotes Hsp70 clustering and stabilizes binding to unfolded protein.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yoichiro; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70), one of the major stress-inducible molecular chaperones, is localized not only in the cytosol, but also in extracellular milieu in mammals. Hsp70 interacts with various cell surface glycolipids including sulfatide (3'-sulfogalactosphingolipid). However, the molecular mechanism, as well as the biological relevance, underlying the glycolipid-Hsp70 interaction is unknown. Here we report that sulfatide promotes Hsp70 oligomerization through the N-terminal ATPase domain, which stabilizes the binding of Hsp70 to unfolded protein in vitro. We find that the Hsp70 oligomer has apparent molecular masses ranging from 440 kDa to greater than 669 kDa. The C-terminal peptide-binding domain is dispensable for the sulfatide-induced oligomer formation. The oligomer formation is impaired in the presence of ATP, while the Hsp70 oligomer, once formed, is unable to bind to ATP. These results suggest that sulfatide locks Hsp70 in a high-affinity state to unfolded proteins by clustering the peptide-binding domain and blocking the binding to ATP that induces the dissociation of Hsp70 from protein substrates. PMID:25989600

  8. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-09-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native ?-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  9. Insights into Unfolded Proteins from the Intrinsic ?/? Propensities of the AAXAA Host-Guest Series.

    PubMed

    Towse, Clare-Louise; Vymetal, Jiri; Vondrasek, Jiri; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-01-19

    Various host-guest peptide series are used by experimentalists as reference conformational states. One such use is as a baseline for random-coil NMR chemical shifts. Comparison to this random-coil baseline, through secondary chemical shifts, is used to infer protein secondary structure. The use of these random-coil data sets rests on the perception that the reference chemical shifts arise from states where there is little or no conformational bias. However, there is growing evidence that the conformational composition of natively and nonnatively unfolded proteins fail to approach anything that can be construed as random coil. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations of an alanine-based host-guest peptide series (AAXAA) as a model of unfolded and denatured states to examine the intrinsic propensities of the amino acids. We produced ensembles that are in good agreement with the experimental NMR chemical shifts and confirm that the sampling of the 20 natural amino acids in this peptide series is be far from random. Preferences toward certain regions of conformational space were both present and dependent upon the environment when compared under conditions typically used to denature proteins, i.e., thermal and chemical denaturation. Moreover, the simulations allowed us to examine the conformational makeup of the underlying ensembles giving rise to the ensemble-averaged chemical shifts. We present these data as an intrinsic backbone propensity library that forms part of our Structural Library of Intrinsic Residue Propensities to inform model building, to aid in interpretation of experiment, and for structure prediction of natively and nonnatively unfolded states. PMID:26789758

  10. Genetic regulation of spy gene expression in Escherichia coli in the presence of protein unfolding agent ethanol.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Ghosh, Tamoghna; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2014-09-10

    In a living cell, folding of proteins is assisted by molecular chaperones and other folding helpers. In Escherichia coli (E. coli), recently an ATP independent chaperon 'Spy' was discovered which is highly up-regulated in the presence of protein unfolding agents like ethanol, butanol and tannic acid. Two response regulators; BaeR and CpxR have been recognized as transcriptional regulators of spy gene. However, the mechanism of genetic regulation of spy under protein denaturants like ethanol has not been studied in detail so far. Based on a combination of genetic, molecular biology and biochemical experimental data, we propose that BaeR protein is the primary regulator of spy gene in response to ethanol stress in E. coli. In addition, we expanded the experimental spectrum and validated that regulation of spy gene in the presence of zinc and copper metal stress is primarily via BaeR and CpxR regulators respectively. We also performed in-silico analysis to identify the homologs of Spy protein and their cognate regulatory elements in bacterial species belonging to enterobacteriaceae family. Based on the unique ATP-independent chaperone nature and genetic regulation of spy we also propose its importance in biosensor development and facilitated production of properly folded recombinant proteins. PMID:24999585

  11. NMR unfolding studies on a liver bile acid binding protein reveal a global two-state unfolding and localized singular behaviors.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ragona, Laura; Fessas, Dimitrios; Signorelli, Marco; Ugolini, Raffaella; Pedò, Massimo; Assfalg, Michael; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-01-01

    The folding properties of a bile acid binding protein, belonging to a subfamily of the fatty acid binding proteins, have been here investigated both by hydrogen exchange measurements, using the SOFAST NMR approach, and urea denaturation experiments. The urea unfolding profiles of individual residues, acting as single probes, were simultaneously analyzed through a global fit, according to a two-state unfolding model. The resulting conformational stability DeltaG(U)(H(2)O)=7.2+/-0.25kcal mol(-1) is in good agreement with hydrogen exchange stability DeltaG(op). While the majority of protein residues satisfy this model, few amino-acids display a singular behavior, not directly amenable to the presence of a folding intermediate, as reported for other fatty acid binding proteins. These residues are part of a protein patch characterized by enhanced plasticity. To explain this singular behavior a tentative model has been proposed which takes into account the interplay between the dynamic features and the formation of transient aggregates. A functional role for this plasticity, related to translocation across the nuclear membrane, is discussed. PMID:18977333

  12. Mechanism of Protein Denaturation: Partial Unfolding of the P22 Coat Protein I-Domain by Urea Binding.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Rebecca L; Fraser, LaTasha C R; Teschke, Carolyn M; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2015-12-15

    The I-domain is an insertion domain of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein that drives rapid folding and accounts for over half of the stability of the full-length protein. We sought to determine the role of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the unfolding of the I-domain by examining (3)JNC' couplings transmitted through H-bonds, the temperature and urea-concentration dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts, and native-state hydrogen exchange at urea concentrations where the domain is predominantly folded. The native-state hydrogen-exchange data suggest that the six-stranded ?-barrel core of the I-domain is more stable against unfolding than a smaller subdomain comprised of a short ?-helix and three-stranded ?-sheet. H-bonds, separately determined from solvent protection and (3)JNC' H-bond couplings, are identified with an accuracy of 90% by (1)HN temperature coefficients. The accuracy is improved to 95% when (15)N temperature coefficients are also included. In contrast, the urea dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts is unrelated to H-bonding. The protein segments with the largest chemical-shift changes in the presence of urea show curved or sigmoidal titration curves suggestive of direct urea binding. Nuclear Overhauser effects to urea for these segments are also consistent with specific urea-binding sites in the I-domain. Taken together, the results support a mechanism of urea unfolding in which denaturant binds to distinct sites in the I-domain. Disordered segments bind urea more readily than regions in stable secondary structure. The locations of the putative urea-binding sites correlate with the lower stability of the structure against solvent exchange, suggesting that partial unfolding of the structure is related to urea accessibility. PMID:26682823

  13. Susceptibility of Nrf2-null mice to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis upon consumption of a high-fat diet is associated with oxidative stress, perturbation of the unfolded protein response, and disturbance in the expression of metabolic enzymes but not with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Meakin, Paul J; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Sharma, Ritu S; Ashford, Fiona B; Walsh, Shaun V; McCrimmon, Rory J; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Dillon, John F; Hayes, John D; Ashford, Michael L J

    2014-09-01

    Mice lacking the transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) develop more severe nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), with cirrhosis, than wild-type (Nrf2(+/+)) mice when fed a high-fat (HF) diet for 24 weeks. Although NASH is usually associated with insulin resistance, HF-fed Nrf2(-/-) mice exhibited better insulin sensitivity than HF-fed Nrf2(+/+) mice. In livers of HF-fed mice, loss of Nrf2 resulted in greater induction of lipogenic genes, lower expression of ?-oxidation genes, greater reduction in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) levels, and diminished acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase phosphorylation than in the wild-type livers, which is consistent with greater fatty acid (FA) synthesis in Nrf2(-/-) livers. Moreover, primary Nrf2(-/-) hepatocytes displayed lower glucose and FA oxidation than Nrf2(+/+) hepatocytes, with FA oxidation partially rescued by treatment with AMPK activators. The unfolded protein response (UPR) was perturbed in control regular-chow (RC)-fed Nrf2(-/-) mouse livers, and this was associated with constitutive activation of NF-?B and JNK, along with upregulation of inflammatory genes. The HF diet elicited an antioxidant response in Nrf2(+/+) livers, and as this was compromised in Nrf2(-/-) livers, they suffered oxidative stress. Therefore, Nrf2 protects against NASH by suppressing lipogenesis, supporting mitochondrial function, increasing the threshold for the UPR and inflammation, and enabling adaptation to HF-diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24958099

  14. Tracking Unfolding and Refolding Reactions of Single Proteins using Atomic Force Microscopy Methods

    PubMed Central

    Bujalowski, Paul J.; Oberhauser, Andres F.

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades single-molecule manipulation techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) has risen to prominence through their unique capacity to provide fundamental information on the structure and function of biomolecules. Here we describe the use of single-molecule AFM to track protein unfolding and refolding pathways, enzymatic catalysis and the effects of osmolytes and chaperones on protein stability and folding. We will outline the principles of operation for two different AFM pulling techniques: length clamp and force-clamp discuss prominent applications. We provide protocols for the construction of polyproteins which are amenable for AFM experiments, the preparation of different coverslips, choice and calibration of AFM cantilevers. We also discuss the selection criteria for AFM recordings, the calibration of AFM cantilevers, protein sample preparations and analysis of the obtained data. PMID:23523554

  15. Telomerase recruitment by the telomere end binding protein-beta facilitates G-quadruplex DNA unfolding in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Paeschke, Katrin; Juranek, Stefan; Simonsson, Tomas; Hempel, Anne; Rhodes, Daniela; Lipps, Hans Joachim

    2008-06-01

    The telomeric G-overhangs of the ciliate Stylonychia lemnae fold into a G-quadruplex DNA structure in vivo. Telomeric G-quadruplex formation requires the presence of two telomere end binding proteins, TEBPalpha and TEBPbeta, and is regulated in a cell-cycle dependent manner. Unfolding of this structure in S phase is dependent on the phosphorylation of TEBPbeta. Here we show that TEBPbeta phosphorylation is necessary but not sufficient for a G-quadruplex unfolding rate compatible with telomere synthesis. The telomerase seems to be actively involved in telomeric G-quadruplex DNA structure unfolding in vivo. Significantly, the telomerase is recruited to telomeres by phosphorylated TEBPbeta, and hence telomerase recruitment is cell-cycle regulated through phosphorylation. These observations allow us to propose a model for the regulation of G-quadruplex unfolding and telomere synthesis during the cell cycle. PMID:18488043

  16. Substrate-Induced Unfolding of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Displaces the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit from Its Holotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael; Burress, Helen; Banerjee, Tuhina; Ray, Supriyo; Curtis, David; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2014-01-01

    To generate a cytopathic effect, the catalytic A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CT) must be separated from the rest of the toxin. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is thought to mediate CT disassembly by acting as a redox-driven chaperone that actively unfolds the CTA1 subunit. Here, we show that PDI itself unfolds upon contact with CTA1. The substrate-induced unfolding of PDI provides a novel molecular mechanism for holotoxin disassembly: we postulate the expanded hydrodynamic radius of unfolded PDI acts as a wedge to dislodge reduced CTA1 from its holotoxin. The oxidoreductase activity of PDI was not required for CT disassembly, but CTA1 displacement did not occur when PDI was locked in a folded conformation or when its substrate-induced unfolding was blocked due to the loss of chaperone function. Two other oxidoreductases (ERp57 and ERp72) did not unfold in the presence of CTA1 and did not displace reduced CTA1 from its holotoxin. Our data establish a new functional property of PDI that may be linked to its role as a chaperone that prevents protein aggregation. PMID:24516389

  17. Escherichia coli Ribosomal Protein S1 Unfolds Structured mRNAs Onto the Ribosome for Active Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Mlodie; Korepanov, Alexey; Fuchsbauer, Olivier; Fechter, Pierre; Haller, Andrea; Fabbretti, Attilio; Choulier, Laurence; Micura, Ronald; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Romby, Pascale; Springer, Mathias; Marzi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of translation initiation is well appropriate to adapt cell growth in response to stress and environmental changes. Many bacterial mRNAs adopt structures in their 5? untranslated regions that modulate the accessibility of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Structured mRNAs interact with the 30S in a two-step process where the docking of a folded mRNA precedes an accommodation step. Here, we used a combination of experimental approaches in vitro (kinetic of mRNA unfolding and binding experiments to analyze mRNAprotein or mRNAribosome complexes, toeprinting assays to follow the formation of ribosomal initiation complexes) and in vivo (genetic) to monitor the action of ribosomal protein S1 on the initiation of structured and regulated mRNAs. We demonstrate that r-protein S1 endows the 30S with an RNA chaperone activity that is essential for the docking and the unfolding of structured mRNAs, and for the correct positioning of the initiation codon inside the decoding channel. The first three OB-fold domains of S1 retain all its activities (mRNA and 30S binding, RNA melting activity) on the 30S subunit. S1 is not required for all mRNAs and acts differently on mRNAs according to the signals present at their 5? ends. This work shows that S1 confers to the ribosome dynamic properties to initiate translation of a large set of mRNAs with diverse structural features. PMID:24339747

  18. Study of thermally and chemically unfolded conformations of a small ?-protein by means of small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, D.; Durand, D.; Desmadril, M.; Calmettes, P.

    2000-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments shows that the unfolded conformation of neocarzinostatin heated at 78C is different from that obtained with 5 M guanidinium chloride at 12C. The values of the second virial coefficient of the protein solutions indicates that the interactions between the polypeptide chain and the solvent are different for the thermally and the chemically unfolded states. In the first case the protein conformation is like that of an ideal chain whereas it is similar to an excluded volume chain in the second one. The corresponding values of the contour length, the statistical length, and the apparent radius of the chain cross-section are given.

  19. Probing the Folding-Unfolding Transition of a Thermophilic Protein, MTH1880

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youngjin; Han, Jeongmin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae

    2016-01-01

    The folding mechanism of typical proteins has been studied widely, while our understanding of the origin of the high stability of thermophilic proteins is still elusive. Of particular interest is how an atypical thermophilic protein with a novel fold maintains its structure and stability under extreme conditions. Folding-unfolding transitions of MTH1880, a thermophilic protein from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, induced by heat, urea, and GdnHCl, were investigated using spectroscopic techniques including circular dichorism, fluorescence, NMR combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results suggest that MTH1880 undergoes a two-state N to D transition and it is extremely stable against temperature and denaturants. The reversibility of refolding was confirmed by spectroscopic methods and size exclusion chromatography. We found that the hyper-stability of the thermophilic MTH1880 protein originates from an extensive network of both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions coordinated by the central β-sheet. Spectroscopic measurements, in combination with computational simulations, have helped to clarify the thermodynamic and structural basis for hyper-stability of the novel thermophilic protein MTH1880. PMID:26766214

  20. Protein unfolding is essential for cleavage within the ?-helix of a model protein substrate by the serine protease, thrombin.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Amy L; Headey, Stephen J; Ng, Natasha M; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Scanlon, Martin J; Pike, Robert N; Bottomley, Stephen P

    2016-03-01

    Proteolysis has a critical role in transmitting information within a biological system and therefore an important element of biology is to determine the subset of proteins amenable to proteolysis. Until recently, it has been thought that proteases cleave native protein substrates only within solvent exposed loops, but recent evidence indicates that cleavage sites located within ?-helices can also be cleaved by proteases, despite the conformation of this secondary structure being generally incompatible with binding into an active site of a protease. In this study, we address the mechanism by which a serine endopeptidase, thrombin, recognizes and cleaves a target sequence located within an ?-helix. Thrombin was able to cleave a model substrate, protein G, within its ?-helix when a suitable cleavage sequence for the enzyme was introduced into this region. However, structural data for the complex revealed that thrombin was not perturbing the structure of the ?-helix, thus it was not destabilizing the helix in order to allow it to fit within its active site. This indicated that thrombin was only cleaving within the ?-helix when it was in an unfolded state. In support of this, the introduction of destabilizing mutations within the protein increased the efficiency of cleavage by the enzyme. Our data suggest that a folded ?-helix cannot be proteolytically cleaved by thrombin, but the species targeted are the unfolded conformations of the native state ensemble. PMID:26403495

  1. Engineered oligomerization state of OmpF protein through computational design decouples oligomer dissociation from unfolding.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Hammad; Jimenez-Morales, David; Tian, Jun; Pasupuleti, Volga; Kenney, Linda J; Liang, Jie

    2012-05-25

    Biogenesis of ?-barrel membrane proteins is a complex, multistep, and as yet incompletely characterized process. The bacterial porin family is perhaps the best-studied protein family among ?-barrel membrane proteins that allows diffusion of small solutes across the bacterial outer membrane. In this study, we have identified residues that contribute significantly to the protein-protein interaction (PPI) interface between the chains of outer membrane protein F (OmpF), a trimeric porin, using an empirical energy function in conjunction with an evolutionary analysis. By replacing these residues through site-directed mutagenesis either with energetically favorable residues or substitutions that do not occur in natural bacterial outer membrane proteins, we succeeded in engineering OmpF mutants with dimeric and monomeric oligomerization states instead of a trimeric oligomerization state. Moreover, our results suggest that the oligomerization of OmpF proceeds through a series of interactions involving two distinct regions of the extensive PPI interface: two monomers interact to form a dimer through the PPI interface near G19. This dimer then interacts with another monomer through the PPI interface near G135 to form a trimer. We have found that perturbing the PPI interface near G19 results in the formation of the monomeric OmpF only. Thermal denaturation of the designed dimeric OmpF mutant suggests that oligomer dissociation can be separated from the process of protein unfolding. Furthermore, the conserved site near G57 and G59 is important for the PPI interface and might provide the essential scaffold for PPIs. PMID:22391420

  2. On the Mechanism of Protein Unfolding by Pressure A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigera, J. Raul; McCarthy, Andres; Ferrara, Carlos

    2007-03-01

    Proteins are denaturized at high pressure and the mechanism of such a denaturation is still on debate. We have studied lyzozyme and apomyoglobin, under pressure up to 0.3GPa using molecular dynamics simulation. Lysozyme shows more stability, although it cannot retain the native structure. On the other hand apomyoglobin shows a continuing unfolding process during the 180 ns simulation time. The analysis of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteins Solvent Accessed Surface clearly shows the increment of the hydrophobic exposed area in the formation of crevices and in the appearing of hydrophobic `spikes' around the overall surface. The observation of the final state, within the simulation time, shows a clear effect on the conformational state of the proteins. Comparing the behavior of the proteins with de aggregation state of simple non-polar solutes at different pressures we have been able to conclude that the driving force of the denaturation is the change in the hydrophobic contribution to the native folding due to the changes of water structure under pressure, which have been shown both experimental and by computer simulation.

  3. Lipid insertion domain unfolding regulates protein orientational transition behavior in a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kwan Hon; Qiu, Liming; Cheng, Sara Y; Vaughn, Mark W

    2015-11-01

    We have used coarse-grained (CG) and united atom (UA) molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanisms of protein orientational transition of a model peptide (Aβ42) in a phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (PC/CHO) lipid bilayer. We started with an inserted state of Aβ42 containing a folded (I) or unfolded (II) K28-A42 lipid insertion domain (LID), which was stabilized by the K28-snorkeling and A42-anchoring to the PC polar groups in the lipid bilayer. After a UA-to-CG transformation and a 1000ns-CG simulation for enhancing the sampling of protein orientations, we discovered two transitions: I-to-"deep inserted" state with disrupted K28-snorkeling and II-to-"deep surface" state with disrupted A42-anchoring. The new states remained stable after a CG-to-UA transformation and a 200ns-UA simulation relaxation. Significant changes in the cholesterol-binding domain of Aβ42 and protein-induced membrane disruptions were evident after the transitions. We propose that the conformation of the LID regulates protein orientational transitions in the lipid membrane. PMID:26164502

  4. Hydration-responsive folding and unfolding in graphene oxide liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Kim, Franklin; Han, Tae Hee; Shenoy, Vivek B; Huang, Jiaxing; Hurt, Robert H

    2011-10-25

    Graphene oxide is promising as a plate-like giant molecular building block for the assembly of new carbon materials. Its water dispersibility, liquid crystallinity, and ease of reduction offer advantages over other carbon precursors if its fundamental assembly rules can be identified. This article shows that graphene oxide sheets of known lateral dimension form nematic liquid crystal phases with transition points in agreement with the Onsager hard-plate theory. The liquid crystal phases can be systematically ordered into defined supramolecular patterns using surface anchoring, complex fluid flow, and microconfinement. Graphene oxide is seen to exhibit homeotropic surface anchoring at interfaces driven by excluded volume entropy and by adsorption enthalpy associated with its partially hydrophobic basal planes. Surprisingly, some of the surface-ordered graphene oxide phases dry into graphene oxide solids that undergo a dramatic anisotropic swelling upon rehydration to recover their initial size and shape. This behavior is shown to be a unique hydration-responsive folding and unfolding transition. During drying, surface tension forces acting parallel to the layer planes cause a buckling instability that stores elastic energy in accordion-folded structures in the dry solid. Subsequent water infiltration reduces interlayer frictional forces and triggers release of the stored elastic energy in the form of dramatic unidirectional expansion. We explain the folding/unfolding phenomena by quantitative nanomechanics and introduce the potential of liquid crystal-derived graphene oxide phases as new stimuli-response materials. PMID:21877716

  5. Hydration-Responsive Folding and Unfolding in Graphene Oxide Liquid Crystal Phases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Kim, Franklin; Han, Tae Hee; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Huang, Jiaxing; Hurt, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene oxide is promising as a plate-like giant molecular building block for the assembly of new carbon materials. Its water dispersibility, liquid crystallinity, and ease of reduction offer advantages over other carbon precursors if its fundamental assembly rules can be identified. This article shows that graphene oxide sheets of known lateral dimension form nematic liquid crystal phases with transition points in agreement with the Onsager hard-plate theory. The liquid crystal phases can be systematic ordered into defined supramolecular patterns using surface anchoring, complex fluid flow, and micro-confinement. Graphene oxide is seen to exhibit homeotropic surface anchoring at interfaces driven by excluded volume entropy and by adsorption enthalpy associated with its partially hydrophobic basal planes. Surprisingly, some of the surface-ordered graphene oxide phases dry into graphene oxide solids that undergo a dramatic anisotropic swelling upon rehydration to recover their initial size and shape. This behavior is shown to be a unique hydration-responsive folding and unfolding transition. During drying, surface tension forces acting parallel to the layer planes cause a buckling instability that stores elastic energy in accordion-folded structures in the dry solid. Subsequent water infiltration reduces interlayer frictional forces and triggers release of the stored elastic energy in the form of dramatic unidirectional expansion. We explain the folding/unfolding phenomena by quantitative nanomechanics, and introduce the potential of liquid crystal-derived graphene oxide phases as new stimuli-response materials. PMID:21877716

  6. The Large Hsp70 Grp170 Binds to Unfolded Protein Substrates in Vivo with a Regulation Distinct from Conventional Hsp70s*

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Julia; Hendershot, Linda M.

    2014-01-01

    The Hsp70 superfamily is a ubiquitous chaperone class that includes conventional and large Hsp70s. BiP is the only conventional Hsp70 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) whose functions include: assisting protein folding, targeting misfolded proteins for degradation, and regulating the transducers of the unfolded protein response. The ER also possesses a single large Hsp70, the glucose-regulated protein of 170 kDa (Grp170). Like BiP it is an essential protein, but its cellular functions are not well understood. Here we show that Grp170 can bind directly to a variety of incompletely folded protein substrates in the ER, and as expected for a bona fide chaperone, it does not interact with folded secretory proteins. Our data demonstrate that Grp170 and BiP associate with similar molecular forms of two substrate proteins, but while BiP is released from unfolded substrates in the presence of ATP, Grp170 remains bound. In comparison to conventional Hsp70s, the large Hsp70s possess two unique structural features: an extended C-terminal ?-helical domain and an unstructured loop in the putative substrate binding domain with an unknown function. We find that in the absence of the ?-helical domain the interaction of Grp170 with substrates is reduced. In striking contrast, deletion of the unstructured loop results in increased binding to substrates, suggesting the presence of unique intramolecular mechanisms of control for the chaperone functions of large Hsp70s. PMID:24327659

  7. Susceptibility of Nrf2-Null Mice to Steatohepatitis and Cirrhosis upon Consumption of a High-Fat Diet Is Associated with Oxidative Stress, Perturbation of the Unfolded Protein Response, and Disturbance in the Expression of Metabolic Enzymes but Not with Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Paul J.; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Sharma, Ritu S.; Ashford, Fiona B.; Walsh, Shaun V.; McCrimmon, Rory J.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Dillon, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Mice lacking the transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) develop more severe nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), with cirrhosis, than wild-type (Nrf2+/+) mice when fed a high-fat (HF) diet for 24 weeks. Although NASH is usually associated with insulin resistance, HF-fed Nrf2−/− mice exhibited better insulin sensitivity than HF-fed Nrf2+/+ mice. In livers of HF-fed mice, loss of Nrf2 resulted in greater induction of lipogenic genes, lower expression of β-oxidation genes, greater reduction in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) levels, and diminished acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase phosphorylation than in the wild-type livers, which is consistent with greater fatty acid (FA) synthesis in Nrf2−/− livers. Moreover, primary Nrf2−/− hepatocytes displayed lower glucose and FA oxidation than Nrf2+/+ hepatocytes, with FA oxidation partially rescued by treatment with AMPK activators. The unfolded protein response (UPR) was perturbed in control regular-chow (RC)-fed Nrf2−/− mouse livers, and this was associated with constitutive activation of NF-κB and JNK, along with upregulation of inflammatory genes. The HF diet elicited an antioxidant response in Nrf2+/+ livers, and as this was compromised in Nrf2−/− livers, they suffered oxidative stress. Therefore, Nrf2 protects against NASH by suppressing lipogenesis, supporting mitochondrial function, increasing the threshold for the UPR and inflammation, and enabling adaptation to HF-diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24958099

  8. An approach to unfold the response of a multi-element system using an artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, E.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Schuetz, R.; Sprunck, M.; Hahn, K.; Hofmann, R.; Wahl, W.; Biersack, J.P.

    1998-06-01

    An unfolding procedure is proposed which aims at obtaining spectral information of a neutron radiation field by the analysis of the response of a multi-element system consisting of converter type semiconductors. For the unfolding procedure an artificial neural network (feed forward network), trained by the back-propagation method, was used. The response functions of the single elements to neutron radiation were calculated by application of a computational model for an energy range from 10{sup {minus}2} eV to 10 MeV. The training of the artificial neural network was based on the computation of responses of a six-element system for a set of 300 neutron spectra and the application of the back-propagation method. The validation was performed by the unfolding of 100 computed responses. Two unfolding examples were pointed out for the determination of the neutron spectra. The spectra resulting from the unfolding procedure agree well with the original spectra used for the response computation.

  9. Protein denaturation at a single-molecule level: the effect of nonpolar environments and its implications on the unfolding mechanism by proteases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bo; Wu, Shaogui; Liu, Shixin; Rodriguez-Aliaga, Piere; Yu, Jin; Cui, Shuxun

    2015-02-01

    Most proteins are typically folded into predetermined three-dimensional structures in the aqueous cellular environment. However, proteins can be exposed to a nonpolar environment under certain conditions, such as inside the central cavity of chaperones and unfoldases during protein degradation. It remains unclear how folded proteins behave when moved from an aqueous solvent to a nonpolar one. Here, we employed single-molecule atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and mechanical variations of a polyprotein, I278, during the change from a polar to a nonpolar environment. We found that the polyprotein was unfolded into an unstructured polypeptide spontaneously when pulled into nonpolar solvents. This finding was corroborated by MD simulations where I27 was dragged from water into a nonpolar solvent, revealing details of the unfolding process at the water/nonpolar solvent interface. These results highlight the importance of water in maintaining folding stability, and provide insights into the response of folded proteins to local hydrophobic environments.Most proteins are typically folded into predetermined three-dimensional structures in the aqueous cellular environment. However, proteins can be exposed to a nonpolar environment under certain conditions, such as inside the central cavity of chaperones and unfoldases during protein degradation. It remains unclear how folded proteins behave when moved from an aqueous solvent to a nonpolar one. Here, we employed single-molecule atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and mechanical variations of a polyprotein, I278, during the change from a polar to a nonpolar environment. We found that the polyprotein was unfolded into an unstructured polypeptide spontaneously when pulled into nonpolar solvents. This finding was corroborated by MD simulations where I27 was dragged from water into a nonpolar solvent, revealing details of the unfolding process at the water/nonpolar solvent interface. These results highlight the importance of water in maintaining folding stability, and provide insights into the response of folded proteins to local hydrophobic environments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The schematic diagram of environment change, the comparison of F-E curves obtained at various stretching velocities, the details of the QM-WLC model and the process of generation of fitting curves, the comparison of F-E curves of polylysine obtained in PBS and I278 obtained in 6 M GdnHCl, the normalized F-E curves of polylysine obtained in a PBS solution, MD simulation movies, the hydrophobicity change of PAN/20S and HsIU. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07140a

  10. The unfolded state of the murine prion protein and properties of single-point mutants related to human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Gerum, Christian; Schlepckow, Kai; Schwalbe, Harald

    2010-08-01

    The prion protein can exist both in a normal cellular isoform and in a pathogenic conformational isoform. The latter is responsible for the development of different neurodegenerative diseases, for example Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or fatal familial insomnia. To convert the native benign state of the protein into a highly ordered fibrillar aggregate, large-scale rearrangements of the tertiary structure are necessary during the conversion process and intermediates that are at least partially unfolded are present during fibril formation. In addition to the sporadic conversion into the pathogenic isoform, more than 20 familial diseases are known that are caused by single point mutations increasing the probability of aggregation and neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that the chemically denatured states of the mouse and human prion proteins have very similar structural and dynamic characteristics. Initial studies on the single point mutants E196K, F198S, V203I and R208H of the oxidized mouse construct, which are related to human prion diseases, reveal significant differences in the rate of aggregation. Aggregation for mutants V203I and R208H is slower than it is for the wild type, and the constructs E196K and F198S show accelerated aggregation. These differences in aggregation behaviour are not correlated with the thermal stability of the mutants, indicating different mechanisms promoting the conformational conversion process. PMID:20541558

  11. Protein-disulfide Isomerase Displaces the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit from the Holotoxin without Unfolding the A1 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael; Banerjee, Tuhina; Ray, Supriyo; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been proposed to exhibit an unfoldase activity against the catalytic A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CT). Unfolding of the CTA1 subunit is thought to displace it from the CT holotoxin and to prepare it for translocation to the cytosol. To date, the unfoldase activity of PDI has not been demonstrated for any substrate other than CTA1. An alternative explanation for the putative unfoldase activity of PDI has been suggested by recent structural studies demonstrating that CTA1 will unfold spontaneously upon its separation from the holotoxin at physiological temperature. Thus, PDI may simply dislodge CTA1 from the CT holotoxin without unfolding the CTA1 subunit. To evaluate the role of PDI in CT disassembly and CTA1 unfolding, we utilized a real-time assay to monitor the PDI-mediated separation of CTA1 from the CT holotoxin and directly examined the impact of PDI binding on CTA1 structure by isotope-edited Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Our collective data demonstrate that PDI is required for disassembly of the CT holotoxin but does not unfold the CTA1 subunit, thus uncovering a new mechanism for CTA1 dissociation from its holotoxin. PMID:21543321

  12. Simulating protein unfolding under pressure with a coarse-grained model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perezzan, Ramiro; Rey, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    We describe and test a coarse-grained molecular model for the simulation of the effects of pressure on the folding/unfolding transition of proteins. The model is a structure-based one, which takes into account the desolvation barrier for the formation of the native contacts. The pressure is taken into account in a qualitative, mean field approach, acting on the parameters describing the native stabilizing interactions. The model has been tested by simulating the thermodynamic and structural behavior of protein GB1 with a parallel tempering Monte Carlo algorithm. At low effective pressures, the model reproduces the standard two-state thermal transition between the native and denatured states. However, at large pressures a new state appears. Its structural characteristics have been analyzed, showing that it corresponds to a swollen version of the native structure. This swollen state is at equilibrium with the native state at low temperatures, but gradually transforms into the thermally denatured state as temperature is increased. Therefore, our model predicts a downhill transition between the swollen and the denatured states. The analysis of the model permits us to obtain a phase diagram for the pressure-temperature behavior of the simulated system, which is compatible with the known elliptical shape of this diagram for real proteins.

  13. Simulating protein unfolding under pressure with a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Perezzan, Ramiro; Rey, Antonio

    2012-11-14

    We describe and test a coarse-grained molecular model for the simulation of the effects of pressure on the folding/unfolding transition of proteins. The model is a structure-based one, which takes into account the desolvation barrier for the formation of the native contacts. The pressure is taken into account in a qualitative, mean field approach, acting on the parameters describing the native stabilizing interactions. The model has been tested by simulating the thermodynamic and structural behavior of protein GB1 with a parallel tempering Monte Carlo algorithm. At low effective pressures, the model reproduces the standard two-state thermal transition between the native and denatured states. However, at large pressures a new state appears. Its structural characteristics have been analyzed, showing that it corresponds to a swollen version of the native structure. This swollen state is at equilibrium with the native state at low temperatures, but gradually transforms into the thermally denatured state as temperature is increased. Therefore, our model predicts a downhill transition between the swollen and the denatured states. The analysis of the model permits us to obtain a phase diagram for the pressure-temperature behavior of the simulated system, which is compatible with the known elliptical shape of this diagram for real proteins. PMID:23163394

  14. Inactivation and Unfolding of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 during Urea and Guanidine Hydrochloride Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lina; Gao, Chunyan; Xu, Shui; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    The effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) on the activity, conformation and unfolding process of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), a thermostable low molecular weight protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27, have been studied. Enzymatic activity assays showed both urea and GdnHCl resulted in the inactivation of PTPase in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Inactivation kinetics analysis suggested that the inactivation of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl were both monophasic and reversible processes, and the effects of urea and GdnHCl on PTPase were similar to that of mixed-type reversible inhibitors. Far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD), Tryptophan and 1-anilinonaphthalene -8-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence spectral analyses indicated the existence of a partially active and an inactive molten globule-like intermediate during the unfolding processes induced by urea and GdnHCl, respectively. Based on the sequence alignment and the homolog Tt1001 protein structure, we discussed the possible conformational transitions of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl and compared the conformations of these unfolding intermediates with the transient states in bovine PTPase and its complex structures in detail. Our results may be able to provide some valuable clues to reveal the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity, and the unfolding pathway and mechanism of PTPase. PMID:25255086

  15. Interactions of main chain in folding and self assembly of unfolded protein structure: Enquiries with a serine solubilized nonapeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Kinshuk Raj; Durani, Susheel

    2014-06-01

    Interactions of the protein main chain are probed for their role in folding and self-assembly. The interactions are assessed with serine nonapeptide Ac-(Ser-Ala)4-Ser-NH2 in poly-L and alternating-L,D structure variations. Being a neutral molecule, Serine nonapeptide has been found to display not only folding-unfolding equilibrium, but also association-dissociation equilibrium as a function of solvent and concentration. Thus scrutiny of intra- and inter-molecular interactions have been undertaken in water, methanol, and DMSO solvents. In water, poly-L peptide displays a PPII-helix conformation which unfolds to extended ?-conformation with increase of temperature, apparently in a two-state equilibrium. Poly-L peptide at high concentration and on transfer to the low polarity solvent, methanol, displays ordering as a ?-hairpin. This implies folding of the peptide by self assembly. Self assembly and ordering possibly as double-stranded ?-helix is also evidence for alternating-L,D peptide. Both isomers were observed to be unfolded in high polarity solvent DMSO. Dynamic light scattering suggests that assembly in both isomers may involve large size aggregates. The results have established that folding and self-assembly can be coupled equilibria dependent upon solute structure, concentration, and solvent. The interactions of the protein main chain involved in folding and self assembly of unfolded structure are illuminated and have been discussed.

  16. The thermal unfolding of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin-S6 characterized by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Marina; Scirè, Andrea; Tanfani, Fabio; Ausili, Alessio

    2015-10-01

    Saporin-S6 is a plant toxin belonging to the type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) family. Since it was extracted and isolated from Saponaria officinalis for the first time almost thirty years ago, the protein has been widely studied mainly for its potential applications in anti-tumour and anti-viral infection therapy. Like other RIPs, saporin-S6 is particularly effective in the form of immunotoxin conjugated with monoclonal antibodies and its chemico-physical characteristics made the protein a perfect candidate for the synthesis, development and use of saporin-S6-based chimeric toxins. The high stability of the protein against different denaturing agents has been broadly demonstrated, however, its complete thermal unfolding characterization has not already been performed. In this work we analyse in detail structure, thermostability and unfolding features by means of infrared spectroscopy coupled with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy. Our data showed that saporin-S6 in solution at neutral pH exhibits a secondary structure analogue to that of the crystal and confirmed its good stability at moderately high temperatures, with a temperature of melting of 58°C. Our results also demonstrated that the thermal unfolding process is non-cooperative and occurs in two steps, and revealed the sequence of the events that take place during the denaturation, showing a higher stability of the N-terminal domain of the protein. PMID:26096917

  17. Impacts of the charged residues mutation S48E/N62H on the thermostability and unfolding behavior of cold shock protein: insights from molecular dynamics simulation with Gō model.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Guo; Han, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Hou, Yan-Xue; Li, Xing-Yuan; Qi, Li-Sheng; Wang, Ji-Hua

    2016-04-01

    The cold shock protein from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima (Tm-Csp) exhibits significantly higher thermostability than its homologue from the thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus (Bc-Csp). Experimental studies have shown that the electrostatic interactions unique to Tm-Csp are responsible for improving its thermostability. In the present work, the favorable charged residues in Tm-Csp were grafted into Bc-Csp by a double point mutation of S48E/N62H, and the impacts of the mutation on the thermostability and unfolding/folding behavior of Bc-Csp were then investigated by using a modified Gō model, in which the electrostatic interactions between charged residues were considered in the model. Our simulation results show that this Tm-Csp-like charged residue mutation can effectively improve the thermostability of Bc-Csp without changing its two-state folding mechanism. Besides that, we also studied the unfolding kinetics and unfolding/folding pathway of the wild-type Bc-Csp and its mutant. It is found that this charged residue mutation obviously enhanced the stability of the C-terminal region of Bc-Csp, which decreases the unfolding rate and changes the unfolding/folding pathway of the protein. Our studies indicate that the thermostability, unfolding kinetics and unfolding/folding pathway of Bc-Csp can be artificially changed by introducing Tm-Csp-like favorable electrostatic interactions into Bc-Csp. Graphical abstract Tertiary structure of wild-type cold shock protein from the thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus. PMID:27021210

  18. Effects of ammonium bicarbonate on the electrospray mass spectra of proteins: evidence for bubble-induced unfolding.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Jason B; Vahidi, Siavash; Yue, Xuanfeng; Konermann, Lars

    2013-07-01

    Many protein investigations by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) strive to ensure a "native" solvent environment, i.e., nondenaturing conditions up to the point of gas-phase ion formation. Ideally, these studies would employ a volatile pH buffer to mitigate changes in H(+) concentration that can occur during ESI. Ammonium acetate is a commonly used additive, despite its low buffering capacity at pH 7. Ammonium bicarbonate provides greatly improved pH stabilization, thus offering an interesting alternative. Surprisingly, protein analyses in bicarbonate at pH 7 tend to result in the formation of very high charge states, similar to those obtained when electrospraying unfolded proteins in a denaturing solvent. This effect has been reported previously (Sterling, H. J.; Cassou, C. A.; Susa, A. C.; Williams, E. R. Anal. Chem. 2012, 84, 3795), but its exact mechanistic origin remains unclear. ESI-mediated unfolding does not take place in acetate under otherwise identical conditions. We demonstrate that heating of protein-containing bicarbonate solutions results in extensive foaming, caused by CO2 outgassing. In contrast, acetate solutions do not generate foam. Protein denaturation caused by gas bubbles is a well-known phenomenon. Adsorption to the gas/liquid interface is accompanied by major conformational changes that allow the protein to act as a surfactant. The foaming of beer is a manifestation of this effect. Bubble formation in bicarbonate during ESI is facilitated by collisional and blackbody droplet heating. Our data imply that heat and bubbles act synergistically to cause unfolding during the electrospray process, while proteins reside in ESI droplets. Because of this effect we advise against the use of ammonium bicarbonate for native ESI-MS. Ammonium acetate represents a gentler droplet environment, despite its low buffering capacity. PMID:23724896

  19. Protein unfolding from free-energy calculations: Integration of the Gaussian network model with bond binding energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Amit; Granek, Rony

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by single molecule experiments, we study thermal unfolding pathways of four proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor, barnase, ubiquitin, and adenylate kinase, using bond network models that combine bond energies and elasticity. The protein elasticity is described by the Gaussian network model (GNM), to which we add prescribed bond binding energies that are assigned to all (nonbackbone) connecting bonds in the GNM of native state and assumed identical for simplicity. Using exact calculation of the Helmholtz free energy for this model, we consider bond rupture single events. The bond designated for rupture is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all (nonbackbone) bonds in the network. Plotting the free-energy profile along this pathway at different temperatures, we observe a few major partial unfolding, metastable or stable, states, that are separated by free-energy barriers and change role as the temperature is raised. In particular, for adenylate kinase we find three major partial unfolding states, which is consistent with single molecule FRET experiments [Pirchi et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 493 (2011), 10.1038/ncomms1504] for which hidden Markov analysis reveals between three and five such states. Such states can play a major role in enzymatic activity.

  20. Protein unfolding from free-energy calculations: integration of the Gaussian network model with bond binding energies.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amit; Granek, Rony

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by single molecule experiments, we study thermal unfolding pathways of four proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor, barnase, ubiquitin, and adenylate kinase, using bond network models that combine bond energies and elasticity. The protein elasticity is described by the Gaussian network model (GNM), to which we add prescribed bond binding energies that are assigned to all (nonbackbone) connecting bonds in the GNM of native state and assumed identical for simplicity. Using exact calculation of the Helmholtz free energy for this model, we consider bond rupture single events. The bond designated for rupture is chosen by minimizing the free-energy difference for the process, over all (nonbackbone) bonds in the network. Plotting the free-energy profile along this pathway at different temperatures, we observe a few major partial unfolding, metastable or stable, states, that are separated by free-energy barriers and change role as the temperature is raised. In particular, for adenylate kinase we find three major partial unfolding states, which is consistent with single molecule FRET experiments [Pirchi et al., Nat. Commun. 2, 493 (2011)] for which hidden Markov analysis reveals between three and five such states. Such states can play a major role in enzymatic activity. PMID:25768532

  1. Unfolding and Folding of the Three-Helix Bundle Protein KIX in the Absence of Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schennach, Moritz; Schneeberger, Eva-Maria; Breuker, Kathrin

    2016-03-01

    Electron capture dissociation was used to probe the structure, unfolding, and folding of KIX ions in the gas phase. At energies for vibrational activation that were sufficiently high to cause loss of small molecules such as NH3 and H2O by breaking of covalent bonds in about 5% of the KIX (M + nH)n+ ions with n = 7-9, only partial unfolding was observed, consistent with our previous hypothesis that salt bridges play an important role in stabilizing the native solution fold after transfer into the gas phase. Folding of the partially unfolded ions on a timescale of up to 10 s was observed only for (M + nH)n+ ions with n = 9, but not n = 7 and n = 8, which we attribute to differences in the distribution of charges within the (M + nH)n+ ions.

  2. Energy functions for protein design: adjustment with protein-protein complex affinities, models for the unfolded state, and negative design of solubility and specificity.

    PubMed

    Pokala, Navin; Handel, Tracy M

    2005-03-18

    The development of the EGAD program and energy function for protein design is described. In contrast to most protein design methods, which require several empirical parameters or heuristics such as patterning of residues or rotamers, EGAD has a minimalist philosophy; it uses very few empirical factors to account for inaccuracies resulting from the use of fixed backbones and discrete rotamers in protein design calculations, and describes the unfolded state, aggregates, and alternative conformers explicitly with physical models instead of fitted parameters. This approach unveils important issues in protein design that are often camouflaged by heuristic-emphasizing methods. Inter-atom energies are modeled with the OPLS-AA all-atom forcefield, electrostatics with the generalized Born continuum model, and the hydrophobic effect with a solvent-accessible surface area-dependent term. Experimental characterization of proteins designed with an unmodified version of the energy function revealed problems with under-packing, stability, aggregation, and structural specificity. Under-packing was addressed by modifying the van der Waals function. By optimizing only three parameters, the effects of >400 mutations on protein-protein complex formation were predicted to within 1.0 kcal mol(-1). As an independent test, this modified energy function was used to predict the stabilities of >1500 mutants to within 1.0 kcal mol(-1); this required a physical model of the unfolded state that includes more interactions than traditional tripeptide-based models. Solubility and structural specificity were addressed with simple physical approximations of aggregation and conformational equilibria. The complete energy function can design protein sequences that have high levels of identity with their natural counterparts, and have predicted structural properties more consistent with soluble and uniquely folded proteins than the initial designs. PMID:15733929

  3. Repetitive protein unfolding by the trans ring of the GroEL-GroES chaperonin complex stimulates folding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zong; Puchalla, Jason; Shoup, Daniel; Rye, Hays S

    2013-10-25

    A key constraint on the growth of most organisms is the slow and inefficient folding of many essential proteins. To deal with this problem, several diverse families of protein folding machines, known collectively as molecular chaperones, developed early in evolutionary history. The functional role and operational steps of these remarkably complex nanomachines remain subjects of active debate. Here we present evidence that, for the GroEL-GroES chaperonin system, the non-native substrate protein enters the folding cycle on the trans ring of the double-ring GroEL-ATP-GroES complex rather than the ADP-bound complex. The properties of this ATP complex are designed to ensure that non-native substrate protein binds first, followed by ATP and finally GroES. This binding order ensures efficient occupancy of the open GroEL ring and allows for disruption of misfolded structures through two phases of multiaxis unfolding. In this model, repeated cycles of partial unfolding, followed by confinement within the GroEL-GroES chamber, provide the most effective overall mechanism for facilitating the folding of the most stringently dependent GroEL substrate proteins. PMID:24022487

  4. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Kravats, Andrea N.; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation. PMID:26734937

  5. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides. PMID:26821345

  6. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Larowe, D. E.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive chemical potential constraints on the interactions of microbes with their environment.

  7. Unfolding the Role of Large Heat Shock Proteins: New Insights and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Daming; Subjeck, John; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) of eukaryotes are evolutionarily conserved molecules present in all the major intracellular organelles. They mainly function as molecular chaperones and participate in maintenance of protein homeostasis in physiological state and under stressful conditions. Despite their relative abundance, the large HSPs, i.e., Hsp110 and glucose-regulated protein 170 (Grp170), have received less attention compared to other conventional HSPs. These proteins are distantly related to the Hsp70 and belong to Hsp70 superfamily. Increased sizes of Hsp110 and Grp170, due to the presence of a loop structure, result in their exceptional capability in binding to polypeptide substrates or non-protein ligands, such as pathogen-associated molecules. These interactions that occur in the extracellular environment during tissue injury or microbial infection may lead to amplification of an immune response engaging both innate and adaptive immune components. Here, we review the current advances in understanding these large HSPs as molecular chaperones in proteostasis control and immune modulation as well as their therapeutic implications in treatment of cancer and neurodegeneration. Given their unique immunoregulatory activities, we also discuss the emerging evidence of their potential involvement in inflammatory and immune-related diseases. PMID:26973652

  8. Insight into the Unfolding Properties of Chd64, a Small, Single Domain Protein with a Globular Core and Disordered Tails

    PubMed Central

    Dobryszycki, Piotr; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michał; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Two major lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH), govern insect development and growth. While the mode of action of 20E is well understood, some understanding of JH-dependent signalling has been attained only in the past few years, and the crosstalk of the two hormonal pathways remains unknown. Two proteins, the calponin-like Chd64 and immunophilin FKBP39 proteins, have recently been found to play pivotal roles in the formation of dynamic, multiprotein complex that cross-links these two signalling pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction remains unexplored. The aim of this work was to determine structural elements of Chd64 to provide an understanding of molecular basis of multiple interactions. We analysed Chd64 in two unrelated insect species, Drosophila melanogaster (DmChd64) and Tribolium castaneum (TcChd64). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), we showed that both Chd64 proteins have disordered tails that outflank the globular core. The folds of the globular cores of both Chd64 resemble the calponin homology (CH) domain previously resolved by crystallography. Monitoring the unfolding of DmChd64 and TcChd64 by far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) revealed a highly complex process. Chd64 unfolds and forms of a molten globule (MG)—like intermediate state. Furthermore, our data indicate that in some conditions, Chd64 may exists in discrete structural forms, indicating that the protein is pliable and capable of easily acquiring different conformations. The plasticity of Chd64 and the existence of terminal intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) may be crucial for multiple interactions with many partners. PMID:26325194

  9. Programs in C for parameterizing measured 5? 5? NaI gamma response functions and unfolding of continuous gamma spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. V.; Campbell, J. M.; Couchell, G. P.; Li, S.; Pullen, D. J.; Schier, W. A.; Seabury, E. H.; Tipnis, S. V.

    1996-02-01

    A 5? 5? NaI(Tl) detector has been used to measure gamma-ray spectra resulting from the decay of aggregate fission products. In order to extract the true gamma-ray energy distribution from the measured spectra, the detector response functions for monoenergetic gamma rays spanning the energy range of the measurements must be determined. At present we have measured 13 such response functions in the energy range 0.081-6.13 MeV. NGRC is a program in C written to implement an interpolation scheme for estimating the response function at any other intermediate energy. This program takes a library of response function tails and constructs a response function matrix which is used as input to a second program CRSUP written for obtaining gamma-ray energy distributions. It assumes the measured spectrum consists of a superposition of a specified number of response functions placed at energies determined by the program according to the detector resolution and spectrum end point energy. The program then computes the distribution of the strength of the response functions in a least-squares fashion. This program is designed to maximize the number of response functions that can be used in modeling the measured spectrum without reducing the number of bins used in each response function. The response functions constructed by the interpolation procedure have been used in the program SPEC-FIT to fit in a least-squares fashion the gamma-ray spectrum of 152Eu. The fit is an excellent reproduction of both the photopeak and continuous regions of the entire measured spectrum. Finally the validity of the least-square method implemented by CRSUP has also been tested by using this program to unfold an analytically constructed continuous spectrum. The results obtained were in excellent agreement with the assumed distribution function, illustrating the applicability of CRSUP for unfolding other types of continuous spectra as encountered in beta, neutron-time-of-flight and Rutherford-backscattering spectroscopy.

  10. Experiments and simulations show how long-range contacts can form in expanded unfolded proteins with negligible secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wenli; Lyle, Nicholas; Luan, Bowu; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2013-01-01

    The sizes of unfolded proteins under highly denaturing conditions scale as N0.59 with chain length. This suggests that denaturing conditions mimic good solvents, whereby the preference for favorable chain–solvent interactions causes intrachain interactions to be repulsive, on average. Beyond this generic inference, the broader implications of N0.59 scaling for quantitative descriptions of denatured state ensembles (DSEs) remain unresolved. Of particular interest is the degree to which N0.59 scaling can simultaneously accommodate intrachain attractions and detectable long-range contacts. Here we present data showing that the DSE of the N-terminal domain of the L9 (NTL9) ribosomal protein in 8.3 M urea lacks detectable secondary structure and forms expanded conformations in accord with the expected N0.59 scaling behavior. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements, however, indicate the presence of detectable long-range contacts in the denatured-state ensemble of NTL9. To explain these observations we used atomistic thermal unfolding simulations to identify ensembles whose properties are consistent with all of the experimental observations, thus serving as useful proxies for the DSE of NTL9 in 8.3 M urea. Analysis of these ensembles shows that residual attractions are present under mimics of good solvent conditions, and for NTL9 they result from low-likelihood, medium/long-range contacts between hydrophobic residues. Our analysis provides a quantitative framework for the simultaneous observation of N0.59 scaling and low-likelihood long-range contacts for the DSE of NTL9. We propose that such low-likelihood intramolecular hydrophobic clusters might be a generic feature of DSEs that play a gatekeeping role to protect against aggregation during protein folding. PMID:23341588

  11. Association Properties and Unfolding of a βγ-Crystallin Domain of a Vibrio-Specific Protein

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Shashi Kumar; Ravindra, Daddali; Sharma, Yogendra; Mishra, Amita

    2013-01-01

    The βγ-crystallin superfamily possesses a large number of versatile members, of which only a few members other than lens βγ-crystallins have been studied. Understanding the non-crystallin functions as well as origin of crystallin-like properties of such proteins is possible by exploring novel members from diverse sources. We describe a novel βγ-crystallin domain with S-type (Spherulin 3a type) Greek key motifs in protein vibrillin from a pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. This domain is a part of a large Vibrio-specific protein prevalent in Vibrio species (found in at least fourteen different strains sequenced so far). The domain contains two canonical N/D-N/D-X-X-S/T-S Ca2+-binding motifs, and bind Ca2+. Unlike spherulin 3a and other microbial homologues studied so far, βγ-crystallin domain of vibrillin self-associates forming oligomers of various sizes including dimers. The fractionated dimers readily form octamers in concentration-dependent manner, suggesting an association between these two major forms. The domain associates/dissociates forming dimers at the cost of monomeric populations in the presence of Ca2+. No such effect of Ca2+ has been observed in oligomeric species. The equilibrium unfolding of both forms follows a similar pattern, with the formation of an unfolding intermediate at sub-molar concentrations of denaturant. These properties exhibited by this βγ-crystallin domain are not shown by any other domain studied so far, demonstrating the diversity in domain properties. PMID:23349723

  12. Resolution of the unfolded state.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Gregory

    2008-03-01

    The unfolded states in proteins and nucleic acids remain weakly understood despite their importance to protein folding; misfolding diseases (Parkinson's & Alzheimer's); natively unfolded proteins (˜ 30% of eukaryotic proteins); and to understanding ribozymes. Research has been hindered by the inability to quantify the residual (native) structure present in an unfolded protein or nucleic acid. Here, a scaling model is proposed to quantify the degree of folding and the unfolded state (Beaucage, 2004, 2007). The model takes a global view of protein structure and can be applied to a number of analytic methods and to simulations. Three examples are given of application to small-angle scattering from pressure induced unfolding of SNase (Panick, 1998), from acid unfolded Cyt c (Kataoka, 1993) and from folding of Azoarcus ribozyme (Perez-Salas, 2004). These examples quantitatively show 3 characteristic unfolded states for proteins, the statistical nature of a folding pathway and the relationship between extent of folding and chain size during folding for charge driven folding in RNA. Beaucage, G., Biophys. J., in press (2007). Beaucage, G., Phys. Rev. E. 70, 031401 (2004). Kataoka, M., Y. Hagihara, K. Mihara, Y. Goto J. Mol. Biol. 229, 591 (1993). Panick, G., R. Malessa, R. Winter, G. Rapp, K. J. Frye, C. A. Royer J. Mol. Biol. 275, 389 (1998). Perez-Salas U. A., P. Rangan, S. Krueger, R. M. Briber, D. Thirumalai, S. A. Woodson, Biochemistry 43 1746 (2004).

  13. “Invisible” Conformers of an Antifungal Disulfide Protein Revealed by Constrained Cold and Heat Unfolding, CEST-NMR Experiments, and Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Fizil, Ádám; Gáspári, Zoltán; Barna, Terézia; Marx, Florentine; Batta, Gyula

    2015-01-01

    Transition between conformational states in proteins is being recognized as a possible key factor of function. In support of this, hidden dynamic NMR structures were detected in several cases up to populations of a few percent. Here, we show by two- and three-state analysis of thermal unfolding, that the population of hidden states may weight 20–40 % at 298 K in a disulfide-rich protein. In addition, sensitive 15N-CEST NMR experiments identified a low populated (0.15 %) state that was in slow exchange with the folded PAF protein. Remarkably, other techniques failed to identify the rest of the NMR “dark matter”. Comparison of the temperature dependence of chemical shifts from experiments and molecular dynamics calculations suggests that hidden conformers of PAF differ in the loop and terminal regions and are most similar in the evolutionary conserved core. Our observations point to the existence of a complex conformational landscape with multiple conformational states in dynamic equilibrium, with diverse exchange rates presumably responsible for the completely hidden nature of a considerable fraction. PMID:25676351

  14. "Invisible" conformers of an antifungal disulfide protein revealed by constrained cold and heat unfolding, CEST-NMR experiments, and molecular dynamics calculations.

    PubMed

    Fizil, dm; Gspri, Zoltn; Barna, Terzia; Marx, Florentine; Batta, Gyula

    2015-03-23

    Transition between conformational states in proteins is being recognized as a possible key factor of function. In support of this, hidden dynamic NMR structures were detected in several cases up to populations of a few percent. Here, we show by two- and three-state analysis of thermal unfolding, that the population of hidden states may weight 20-40?% at 298?K in a disulfide-rich protein. In addition, sensitive (15) N-CEST NMR experiments identified a low populated (0.15?%) state that was in slow exchange with the folded PAF protein. Remarkably, other techniques failed to identify the rest of the NMR "dark matter". Comparison of the temperature dependence of chemical shifts from experiments and molecular dynamics calculations suggests that hidden conformers of PAF differ in the loop and terminal regions and are most similar in the evolutionary conserved core. Our observations point to the existence of a complex conformational landscape with multiple conformational states in dynamic equilibrium, with diverse exchange rates presumably responsible for the completely hidden nature of a considerable fraction. PMID:25676351

  15. Characterizing the Structures and Folding of Free Proteins Using 2-D Gas-Phase Separations: Observation of Multiple Unfolded Conformers

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Li, Fumin; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-05-15

    Understanding the 3-D structure and dynamics of proteins and other biological macromolecules in various environments is among the central challenges of chemistry. Electrospray ionization (ESI) can transfer ions from solution to gas phase with only limited structural distortion, allowing their profiling using mass spectrometry and other gas phase approaches. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) can be used to separate and characterize macroion conformations with high sensitivity and speed. However, IMS separation power has proven insufficient for full resolution of major structural variants of protein ions and elucidation of their interconversion dynamics. Here we report characterization of macromolecular conformations using field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) coupled to conventional IMS in conjunction with mass spectrometry. The controlled activation of ions in the electrodynamic funnel trap between FAIMS and IMS stages enables investigating the structural evolution of particular isomeric precursors as a function of the extent and duration of activation that can be varied over a large range. These new capabilities are demonstrated for bovine ubiquitin, a common model for study of structure and folding of gas-phase proteins. For nearly all charge states, two-dimensional FAIMS/IMS separations distinguish many more conformations than either FAIMS or IMS alone, including some species with very low abundance. The unfolding of specific ubiquitin conformers has been studied employing ion heating in the FAIMS/IMS interface.

  16. Slow Proton Transfer Coupled to Unfolding Explains the Puzzling Results of Single-Molecule Experiments on BBL, a Paradigmatic Downhill Folding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cerminara, Michele; Campos, Luis A.; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A battery of thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural approaches has indicated that the small α-helical protein BBL folds-unfolds via the one-state downhill scenario. Yet, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers a more conflicting view. Single-molecule experiments at pH 6 show a unique half-unfolded conformational ensemble at mid denaturation, whereas other experiments performed at higher pH show a bimodal distribution, as expected for two-state folding. Here we use thermodynamic and laser T-jump kinetic experiments combined with theoretical modeling to investigate the pH dependence of BBL stability, folding kinetics and mechanism within the pH 6–11 range. We find that BBL unfolding is tightly coupled to the protonation of one of its residues with an apparent pKa of ∼7. Therefore, in chemical denaturation experiments around neutral pH BBL unfolds gradually, and also converts in binary fashion to the protonated species. Moreover, under the single-molecule experimental conditions (denaturant midpoint and 279 K), we observe that proton transfer is much slower than the ∼15 microseconds folding-unfolding kinetics of BBL. The relaxation kinetics is distinctly biphasic, and the overall relaxation time (i.e. 0.2–0.5 ms) becomes controlled by the proton transfer step. We then show that a simple theoretical model of protein folding coupled to proton transfer explains quantitatively all these results as well as the two sets of single-molecule experiments, including their more puzzling features. Interestingly, this analysis suggests that BBL unfolds following a one-state downhill folding mechanism at all conditions. Accordingly, the source of the bimodal distributions observed during denaturation at pH 7–8 is the splitting of the unique conformational ensemble of BBL onto two slowly inter-converting protonation species. Both, the unprotonated and protonated species unfold gradually (one-state downhill), but they exhibit different degree of unfolding at any given condition because the native structure is less stable for the protonated form. PMID:24205082

  17. Molten-globule and other conformational forms of zinc cytochrome C. Effect of partial and complete unfolding of the protein on its electron-transfer reactivity.

    PubMed

    Tremain, Scott M; Kostić, Nenad M

    2002-06-17

    To test the effect of protein conformation on reactivity, we use laser flash photolysis to compare the electron-transfer properties of the triplet state of zinc-substituted cytochrome c, designated (3)Zncyt, in the folded forms at low (F(low)) and high (F(high)) ionic strength, molten-globule (MG) form, and the forms unfolded by acid (U(acid)) and urea (U(urea)) toward the following four oxidative quenchers: Fe(CN)(6)(3-), Co(acac)(3), Co(phen)(3)(3+), and iron(III) cytochrome c. We characterize the conformational forms of Zncyt on the basis of the far-UV circular dichroism, Soret absorption, and rate constant for natural decay of the triplet state. This rate constant in the absence of quencher increases in the order F(high) < F(low) < MG < U(acid) < U(urea) because the exposure of porphyrin to solvent increases as Zncyt unfolds. Bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of (3)Zncyt with the four quenchers show significant effects on reactivity of electrostatic interactions and porphyrin exposure to solvent. This rate constant at the ionic strength of 20 mM increases upon unfolding by urea and acid, respectively, as follows: 1340-fold and 466-fold when the quencher is Co(phen)(3)(3+) and 168-fold and 36-fold when the quencher is cyt(III). To compare reactivity of (3)Zncyt in the F(low), F(high), MG, U(acid), and U(urea) forms without complicating effects of electrostatic interactions, we used the electroneutral quencher Co(acac)(3). Indeed, reactivity of folded (3)Zncyt with Co(acac)(3) was independent of ionic strength. Reactivity of (3)Zncyt with Co(acac)(3) upon partial and complete unfolding increases 10-fold, 54-fold, and 64-fold in the molten-globule, urea-unfolded, and acid-unfolded forms. PMID:12055008

  18. Missense Mutation Lys18Asn in Dystrophin that Triggers X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy Decreases Protein Stability, Increases Protein Unfolding, and Perturbs Protein Structure, but Does Not Affect Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surinder M.; Bandi, Swati; Shah, Dinen D.; Armstrong, Geoffrey; Mallela, Krishna M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in a vital muscle protein dystrophin trigger X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM). However, disease mechanisms at the fundamental protein level are not understood. Such molecular knowledge is essential for developing therapies for XLDCM. Our main objective is to understand the effect of disease-causing mutations on the structure and function of dystrophin. This study is on a missense mutation K18N. The K18N mutation occurs in the N-terminal actin binding domain (N-ABD). We created and expressed the wild-type (WT) N-ABD and its K18N mutant, and purified to homogeneity. Reversible folding experiments demonstrated that both mutant and WT did not aggregate upon refolding. Mutation did not affect the protein's overall secondary structure, as indicated by no changes in circular dichroism of the protein. However, the mutant is thermodynamically less stable than the WT (denaturant melts), and unfolds faster than the WT (stopped-flow kinetics). Despite having global secondary structure similar to that of the WT, mutant showed significant local structural changes at many amino acids when compared with the WT (heteronuclear NMR experiments). These structural changes indicate that the effect of mutation is propagated over long distances in the protein structure. Contrary to these structural and stability changes, the mutant had no significant effect on the actin-binding function as evident from co-sedimentation and depolymerization assays. These results summarize that the K18N mutation decreases thermodynamic stability, accelerates unfolding, perturbs protein structure, but does not affect the function. Therefore, K18N is a stability defect rather than a functional defect. Decrease in stability and increase in unfolding decrease the net population of dystrophin molecules available for function, which might trigger XLDCM. Consistently, XLDCM patients have decreased levels of dystrophin in cardiac muscle. PMID:25340340

  19. Structural characterization of the intrinsically unfolded protein beta-synuclein, a natural negative regulator of alpha-synuclein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Bertoncini, Carlos W; Rasia, Rodolfo M; Lamberto, Gonzalo R; Binolfi, Andres; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Fernandez, Claudio O

    2007-09-21

    The synuclein family of intrinsically unfolded proteins is composed of three highly homologous members, alpha-synuclein (alphaS), beta-synuclein (betaS) and gamma-synuclein (gammaS), which are linked to neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. alphaS has been studied intensively after its identification as the major protein component of amyloid-like deposits in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. betaS, on the other hand, was found to act as a potent inhibitor of alphaS amyloid formation, and it is proposed as a natural regulator of its neurotoxicity. It is then of particular interest to elucidate the structural and dynamic features of the soluble state of betaS as a first step to understand the molecular basis of its anti-amyloidogenic effect on alphaS. We present here the characterization of natively unstructured betaS by high resolution heteronuclear NMR techniques. A combination of pulse-field gradient, three-dimensional heteronuclear correlation, residual dipolar couplings, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and backbone relaxation experiments were employed to characterize the ensemble of conformations populated by the protein. The results indicate that betaS adopts extended conformations in its native state, characterized by the lack of the long-range contacts as previously reported for alphaS. Despite the lack of defined secondary structure, we found evidence for transient polyproline II conformations clustered at the C-terminal region. The structuring of the backbone at the C terminus is locally encoded, stabilized by the presence of eight proline residues embedded in a polypeptide stretch rich in hydrophilic and negatively charged amino acids. The structural and functional implications of these findings are analyzed via a thorough comparison with its neurotoxic homolog alphaS. PMID:17681539

  20. Trapping, unfolding, identifying, and binding single proteins using the double-nanohole optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Skyler; Kotnala, Abhay; Al Balushi, Ahmed; Gefald, Ryan M.; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Rajashekara, Yashaswini; Gordon, Reuven

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we describe the double nanohole laser tweezer system used to trap single nanoparticles. We cover the basic theory behind the DNH and what makes it more powerful than traditional laser tweezers commonly used for larger particles. We outline the basic setup u