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Sample records for unipedal stance time

  1. The influence of initial bipedal stance width on the clinical measurement of unipedal balance time

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, James K.; Tang, Chi; Nwagwu, Chijioke; Nnodim, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of varying initial bipedal stance width (ISW) on the clinical measurement of unipedal balance time (UBT). Design Observational, cross sectional study. Setting Academic physiatric outpatient facility. Subjects Thirty-one clinic subjects with neuromuscular and/or musculoskeletal conditions known to influence mobility, and 30 similarly-aged healthy subjects. Methods Demographic and clinical information were recorded. UBT was determined under three distinct conditions by varying bipedal inter-malleolar distance: 1) ISW of 0.3 body height; 2) ISW of 0.05 body height; and 3) ISW of 0 body height. The last was accomplished by subjects assuming unipedal balance while using the hands on a horizontal surface for stabilization. Subjects lifted the contralateral foot (or hands in the case of 0 body height condition) in response to a cadenced command to minimize variation in rate of weight transfer Main Outcome Measurements UBT under each of the three ISW conditions. Results Mean UBT increased with decreasing ISW, and the differences were significant when comparing each ISW with the next smaller. Healthy subjects demonstrated greater UBT than clinic subjects at each ISW, but the magnitude of these group differences were similar across ISW condition. A UBT > 10 seconds in the 0.3 body height ISW was the best discriminator between clinic and healthy subjects. Conclusions Because UBT varies with ISW, standardization of ISW is necessary for accurate within subject, and between subject, comparisons in UBT. Healthy subjects were best differentiated from clinic subjects by UBT > 10 sec in the 0.3 body height ISW condition. PMID:20430326

  2. Frontal plane hip and ankle sensorimotor function, not age, predicts unipedal stance time

    PubMed Central

    Allet, Lara; Kim, Hogene; Ashton-Miller, James; De Mott, Trina; Richardson, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Changes occur in muscles and nerves with aging. This study aimed to explore the relationship between unipedal stance time (UST) and frontal plane hip and ankle sensorimotor function in subjects with diabetic neuropathy. Methods UST, quantitative measures of frontal plane ankle proprioceptive thresholds, and ankle and hip motor function were tested in forty-one persons with a spectrum of lower limb sensorimotor function, ranging from healthy to moderately severe diabetic neuropathy. Results Frontal plane hip and ankle sensorimotor function demonstrated significant relationships with UST. Multivariate analysis identified only composite hip strength, composite ankle proprioceptive threshold, and age to be significant predictors of UST (R2=0.73); they explained 46%, 24% and 3% of the variance, respectively. Discussion/Conclusions Frontal plane hip strength was the single best predictor of UST and appeared to compensate for less precise ankle proprioceptive thresholds. This finding is clinically relevant given the possibility of strengthening the hip, even in patients with significant PN. . PMID:22431092

  3. Effects of focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static balance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Application of cryotherapy over an injured joint has been shown to improve muscle function, yet it is unknown how ankle cryotherapy affects postural control. Our purpose was to determine the effects of a 20-min focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static stance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen young subjects with CAI (9 males, 6 females) and 15 healthy gender-matched controls participated. All subjects underwent two intervention sessions on different days in which they had a 1.5L plastic bag filled with either crushed ice (active treatment) or candy corn (sham) applied to the ankle. Unipedal stance with eyes closed for 10s were assessed with a forceplate before and after each intervention. Center of pressure (COP) data were used to compute 10 specific dependent measures including velocity, area, standard deviation (SD), and percent range of COP excursions, and mean and SD of time-to-boundary (TTB) minima in the anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral directions. For each measure a three-way (Group-Intervention-Time) repeated ANOVAs found no significant interactions and main effects involving intervention (all Ps > 0.05). There were group main effects found for mean velocity (F(1,28) = 6.46, P = .017), area (F(1,28) = 12.83, P = .001), and mean of TTB minima in the AP direction (F(1,28) = 5.19, P = .031) indicating that the CAI group demonstrated greater postural instability compared to the healthy group. Postural control of unipedal stance was not significantly altered following focal ankle joint cooling in groups both with and without CAI. Ankle joint cryotherapy was neither beneficial nor harmful to single leg balance. PMID:25468685

  4. Unipedal Postural Balance and Countermovement Jumps After a Warm-up and Plyometric Training Session: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    Romero-Franco, N and Jiménez-Reyes, P. Unipedal postural balance and countermovement jumps after a warm-up and plyometric training session: A randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 29(11): 3216-3222, 2015-The purpose of this study was to analyze the immediate effects of a plyometric training protocol on unipedal postural balance and countermovement jumps. In addition, we analyzed the effects of a warm-up on these parameters. Thirty-two amateur male sprinters (24.9 ± 4.1 years; 72.3 ± 10.7 kg; 1.78 ± 0.05 m; 22.6 ± 3.3 kg·m) were randomly sorted into a control group (n = 16) (they did not perform any physical activity) and a plyometric training group (n = 16) (they performed a 15-minute warm-up and a high-intensity plyometric protocol consisting of 10 sets of 15 vertical jumps). Before and after the warm-up, and immediately after and 5 minutes after the plyometric protocol, all athletes indicated the perceived exertion on calf and quad regions on a scale from 0 (no exertion) to 10 (maximum exertion). They also carried out a maximum countermovement jump and a unipedal postural balance test (athletes would remain as still as possible for 15 seconds in a left leg and right leg support stance). Results showed that, in the plyometric group, length and velocity of center-of-pressure movement in right leg support stance increased compared with baseline (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively) and to the control group (p = 0.035 and p = 0.029, respectively) immediately after the plyometric protocol. In addition, the countermovement jump height decreased right after the plyometric protocol (p < 0.001). The perceived exertion on calf and quad regions increased after the plyometry (p < 0.001). Five minutes later, these parameters remained deteriorated despite a slight recovery (length: p = 0.044; velocity: p = 0.05; countermovement jump height: p < 0.001; local exertion: p < 0.001). Data also showed that countermovement jump height improved after the warm-up (p = 0.021), but unipedal postural balance remained unaltered. As a conclusion, high-intensity plyometric exercises blunt unipedal postural balance and countermovement jump performance. The deterioration lasts at least 5 minutes, which may influence future exercises in the training session. Coaches should plan the training routine according to the immediate effects of plyometry on postural balance and vertical jumps, which play a role in injury prevention and sports performance. PMID:26506062

  5. Lower extremity muscle activation onset times during the transition from double-leg stance to single-leg stance in anterior cruciate ligament injured subjects.

    PubMed

    Dingenen, Bart; Janssens, Luc; Luyckx, Thomas; Claes, Steven; Bellemans, Johan; Staes, Filip F

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate muscle activation onset times (MAOT) of both legs during a transition task from double-leg stance (DLS) to single-leg stance (SLS) in anterior cruciate ligament injured (ACLI) (n=15) and non-injured control subjects (n=15) with eyes open and eyes closed. Significantly delayed MAOT were found in the ACLI group compared to the control group for vastus lateralis, vastus medialis obliquus, hamstrings medial, hamstrings lateral, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus and gastrocnemius in both vision conditions, for gluteus maximus and gluteus medius with eyes open and for tensor fascia latae with eyes closed. Within the ACLI group, delayed MAOT of tibialis anterior with eyes open and gastrocnemius with eyes closed were found in the injured leg compared to the non-injured leg. All other muscles were not significantly different between legs. In conclusion, the ACLI group showed delayed MAOT not only around the knee, but also at the hip and ankle muscles compared to the non-injured control group. No differences between both legs of the ACLI group were found, except for tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius. These findings indirectly support including central nervous system re-education training to target the underlying mechanisms of these altered MAOT after ACL injury. PMID:26409102

  6. Stance time variability during stair stepping before and after total knee arthroplasty: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica W; Marcus, Robin L; Tracy, Brian L; Foreman, K Bo; Christensen, Jesse C; LaStayo, Paul C

    2016-02-01

    The main objectives of this pilot study were to: (1) investigate stance time variability (STV) during stair stepping in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and compare to an age- and sex-matched group of healthy controls with native knees and (2) evaluate the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair stepping before and after TKA. A prospective, observational, pilot study was carried out on 13 individuals (15% male, mean age 62.71±6.84years) before and after TKA using an instrumented stairway, patient-reported outcomes, timed stair stepping test, and quadriceps strength measures. At 6-months post-operatively, STV during stair descent was significantly greater in the TKA-GROUP compared to the CONTROL-GROUP, but was not significantly different at 12-months compared to controls. There were no significant differences in STV for stair ascent between the pre- and post-operative visits, or compared to controls. There was a trend toward significance for the relationship between quadriceps strength and STV during stair ascent (P=0.059) and descent (P=0.073). Variability during stair stepping may provide an important, short-term rehabilitation target for individuals following TKA and may represent another parameter to predict declines in functional mobility. PMID:26590484

  7. "The Road to Freedom": How One Salvadoran Youth Takes an Agentive Stance to Narrate the Self across Time and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Theresa Ann; Garcia, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we use narrative theory to analyze and discuss how one Salvadoran youth, Thomas, constructed three different yet overlapping narratives, including a digital story, on his family's movement across borders. We describe how each telling of his narratives is situated in time and space, where Thomas reveals his understandings of…

  8. The Moral Stance of the Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Edwin

    1982-01-01

    Defines a moral stance and considers whether teachers should adopt a publicly approved moral stance or allow their teaching to be guided by their personal ethical opinions. Modern educational theories imply that teachers should not try to transmit a moral stance, but lead pupils to a search for personal autonomy. (RM)

  9. Stance width influences frontal plane balance responses to centripetal accelerations.

    PubMed

    Goodworth, Adam; Chandan, Aditi; Chase, Hannah; Foster, Elizabeth; Francoeur, Heather; Michaud, Jenna; Terry, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Whenever the body is moving in a curvilinear path, inertial torques resulting from centripetal accelerations act on the body and must be counteracted to maintain stability. We tested the hypothesis that healthy subjects orient their center of mass in the position where gravitational torques offset the inertial torques due to centripetal accelerations. Ten healthy subjects stood on a platform that rotated in a circle at either a slow or fast speed, eyes open or closed, and in narrow or wide stance. Upper body, lower body, and center of mass (CoM) tilt with respect to vertical were measured and averaged across a 40 second time period of constant velocity. Body tilt was compared to the gravito-inertial acceleration (GIA) angle with respect to vertical. In all moving conditions, the upper body, lower body, and CoM tilted inward. However, this inward tilt did not reach the predicted GIA angle (CoM tilt was ~78% and 39% toward the predicted GIA angle in narrow and wide stance, respectively). Ratios of body tilt to GIA angle were minimally influenced by visual availability and magnitude of centripetal acceleration; but were largely influenced by stance width whereby narrow stance inward tilt was greater than wide stance. These results further highlight the important influence of the base of support on balance control strategies and enhance our understanding of how the balance control system compensates for inertial torques generated from centripetal accelerations. PMID:22819010

  10. Statistical analysis of quiet stance sway in 2-D

    PubMed Central

    DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Subjects exposed to a rotating environment that perturbs their postural sway show adaptive changes in their voluntary spatially directed postural motion to restore accurate movement paths but do not exhibit any obvious learning during passive stance. We have found, however, that a variable known to characterize the degree of stochasticity in quiet stance can also reveal subtle learning phenomena in passive stance. We extended Chow and Collins (Phys Rev E 52(1):909–912, 1995) one-dimensional pinned-polymer model (PPM) to two dimensions (2-D) and then evaluated the model’s ability to make analytical predictions for 2-D quiet stance. To test the model, we tracked center of mass and centers of foot pressures, and compared and contrasted stance sway for the anterior–posterior versus medio-lateral directions before, during, and after exposure to rotation at 10 rpm. Sway of the body during rotation generated Coriolis forces that acted perpendicular to the direction of sway. We found significant adaptive changes for three characteristic features of the mean square displacement (MSD) function: the exponent of the power law defined at short time scales, the proportionality constant of the power law, and the saturation plateau value defined at longer time scales. The exponent of the power law of MSD at a short time scale lies within the bounds predicted by the 2-D PPM. The change in MSD during exposure to rotation also had a power-law exponent in the range predicted by the theoretical model. We discuss the Coriolis force paradigm for studying postural and movement control and the applicability of the PPM model in 2-D for studying postural adaptation. PMID:24477760

  11. The duration of the stance phase of the stride (time of contact, tc) explains most of the speed-related and size-related

    E-print Network

    Hoyt, Donald F.

    and experimental protocol Five Arabian horses (three mares and two geldings) with a 221The Journal of Experimental for trotting horses. In the present study, we attempt to develop a better understanding of time of contact, we study the effects of load-carrying and trotting up an incline in horses to determine whether time

  12. Interpersonal Stance in Conflict Conversation: Police Interviews

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    predicts the dynamics between the stances of interactants which he calls "interpersonal reflexes". Acts of strategies and tactics that policemen apply and explicit models of the relevant internal psycho

  13. Good Posture: a Stance for Better Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 154845.html Good Posture: A Stance for Better Health Straighten up with these expert tips To use ... and Physical Fitness Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Back Pain Exercise and Physical Fitness About ...

  14. Five Stances That Have Got to Go

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Earle F.

    1973-01-01

    The five stances in physical education that have to go are as follows: a) the shotgun approach'' to professional preparation; b) the athletics uber alles approach''; c) the women are all right in their place approach''; d) the body of knowledge approach'' and the password is treadmill' approach.''

  15. Ratite Footprints and the Stance and Gait

    E-print Network

    Olsen, Paul E.

    footprints of the Mesozoic Era attributed to theropod dinosaurs. Of par- ticular interest,'(i) the rheaRatite Footprints and the Stance and Gait of Mesozoic Theropods KEVIN PADIAN AND PAUL E. OLSEN, and the toes and claws leave no drag marks. These are all characteristic of Mesozoic theropod (and ornithopod

  16. Narrative Stance in the Douglass Autobiographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Phebe

    To consider Frederick Douglass as an autobiographer, it is useful to examine each of his three autobiographical texts with a view to drawing some conclusion about their relation to one another, and about the relation of the author to each one. It seems likely that the shifting of Douglass' narrative stance is an index of his intellectual…

  17. [Recognition of walking stance phase and swing phase based on moving window].

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaobo; Yang, Peng; Wang, Xinran; Geng, Yanli; Han, Yu

    2014-04-01

    Wearing transfemoral prosthesis is the only way to complete daily physical activity for amputees. Motion pattern recognition is important for the control of prosthesis, especially in the recognizing swing phase and stance phase. In this paper, it is reported that surface electromyography (sEMG) signal is used in swing and stance phase recognition. sEMG signal of related muscles was sampled by Infiniti of a Canadian company. The sEMG signal was then filtered by weighted filtering window and analyzed by height permitted window. The starting time of stance phase and swing phase is determined through analyzing special muscles. The sEMG signal of rectus femoris was used in stance phase recognition and sEMG signal of tibialis anterior is used in swing phase recognition. In a certain tolerating range, the double windows theory, including weighted filtering window and height permitted window, can reach a high accuracy rate. Through experiments, the real walking consciousness of the people was reflected by sEMG signal of related muscles. Using related muscles to recognize swing and stance phase is reachable. The theory used in this paper is useful for analyzing sEMG signal and actual prosthesis control. PMID:25039126

  18. Step initiation in Parkinson's disease: influence of initial stance conditions.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Laura; Chiari, Lorenzo; Mancini, Martina; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Gross, Anne; Horak, Fay B

    2006-10-01

    In this study, we investigated how the size of preparatory postural adjustments prior to step initiation, and step length and velocity depend on initial stance width in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) both in the ON and OFF levodopa states and in healthy elderly subjects. Twenty-one subjects with idiopathic PD and 24 age-matched healthy control subjects took two steps starting with feet on a two-plate force-platform, from either narrow or wide stance width. We measured how the magnitude of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) and step characteristics scaled with stance width. Results showed that preparation for step initiation from wide stance was associated with a larger lateral and backward center of pressure (CoP) displacement than from narrow stance. Velocity and length of the first step were also sensitive to initial stance conditions, probably in relation with the differences in the corresponding APA. On the contrary, the duration of APA was not significantly affected by initial stance width, but it was longer in PD compared to healthy subjects, and speeded up by levodopa. Although subjects with PD did scale up the size of their APA with stance width, they had much more difficulty initiating a step from a wide stance than from a narrow stance, as shown by the greater differences from control subjects in the magnitude of the APA. Our results support the hypothesis that PD subjects maintain a narrow stance as a compensation for their inability to sufficiently increase the size of their lateral APA to allow fast step initiation in wide stance. PMID:16901637

  19. Stance, Navigation, and Reader Response in Expository Hypertext

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEneaney, John E.; Li, Ledong; Allen, Kris; Guzniczak, Lizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on two studies investigating reader stance, navigation, and response in expository hypertext. Subjects in the studies included 69 and 147 adult readers prompted to adopt either an efferent or aesthetic stance when reading a 36-node expository hypertext. Reading was followed by recall and essay writing tasks. Results of the…

  20. Assessing Muscle Stiffness from Quiet Stance in Parkinson's Disease

    E-print Network

    Assessing Muscle Stiffness from Quiet Stance in Parkinson's Disease Michael Lauk 1;2;4 , MSc­761­203­7700, email: lauk@fdm.uni­freiburg.de Running head: Assessing stiffness in parkinsonism. #12; Assessing Muscle Stiffness from Quiet Stance: Applicability to Parkinson's Disease Abstract In previous studies, we developed

  1. Are running speeds maximized with simple-spring stance mechanics?

    PubMed

    Clark, Kenneth P; Weyand, Peter G

    2014-09-15

    Are the fastest running speeds achieved using the simple-spring stance mechanics predicted by the classic spring-mass model? We hypothesized that a passive, linear-spring model would not account for the running mechanics that maximize ground force application and speed. We tested this hypothesis by comparing patterns of ground force application across athletic specialization (competitive sprinters vs. athlete nonsprinters, n = 7 each) and running speed (top speeds vs. slower ones). Vertical ground reaction forces at 5.0 and 7.0 m/s, and individual top speeds (n = 797 total footfalls) were acquired while subjects ran on a custom, high-speed force treadmill. The goodness of fit between measured vertical force vs. time waveform patterns and the patterns predicted by the spring-mass model were assessed using the R(2) statistic (where an R(2) of 1.00 = perfect fit). As hypothesized, the force application patterns of the competitive sprinters deviated significantly more from the simple-spring pattern than those of the athlete, nonsprinters across the three test speeds (R(2) <0.85 vs. R(2) ? 0.91, respectively), and deviated most at top speed (R(2) = 0.78 ± 0.02). Sprinters attained faster top speeds than nonsprinters (10.4 ± 0.3 vs. 8.7 ± 0.3 m/s) by applying greater vertical forces during the first half (2.65 ± 0.05 vs. 2.21 ± 0.05 body wt), but not the second half (1.71 ± 0.04 vs. 1.73 ± 0.04 body wt) of the stance phase. We conclude that a passive, simple-spring model has limited application to sprint running performance because the swiftest runners use an asymmetrical pattern of force application to maximize ground reaction forces and attain faster speeds. PMID:25080925

  2. Body stability and muscle and motor cortex activity during walking with wide stance

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Bulgakova, Margarita A.; Beloozerova, Irina N.; Sirota, Mikhail G.

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical and neural mechanisms of balance control during walking are still poorly understood. In this study, we examined the body dynamic stability, activity of limb muscles, and activity of motor cortex neurons [primarily pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs)] in the cat during unconstrained walking and walking with a wide base of support (wide-stance walking). By recording three-dimensional full-body kinematics we found for the first time that during unconstrained walking the cat is dynamically unstable in the forward direction during stride phases when only two diagonal limbs support the body. In contrast to standing, an increased lateral between-paw distance during walking dramatically decreased the cat's body dynamic stability in double-support phases and prompted the cat to spend more time in three-legged support phases. Muscles contributing to abduction-adduction actions had higher activity during stance, while flexor muscles had higher activity during swing of wide-stance walking. The overwhelming majority of neurons in layer V of the motor cortex, 82% and 83% in the forelimb and hindlimb representation areas, respectively, were active differently during wide-stance walking compared with unconstrained condition, most often by having a different depth of stride-related frequency modulation along with a different mean discharge rate and/or preferred activity phase. Upon transition from unconstrained to wide-stance walking, proximal limb-related neuronal groups subtly but statistically significantly shifted their activity toward the swing phase, the stride phase where most of body instability occurs during this task. The data suggest that the motor cortex participates in maintenance of body dynamic stability during locomotion. PMID:24790167

  3. Affective Conversational Models: Interpersonal Stance in a Police Interview Context

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    Interactive virtual agents can provide a means of learning social skills through experience. Autonomous to practice high stress interactions and situations only available through simulation. Another exampleAffective Conversational Models: Interpersonal Stance in a Police Interview Context Merijn Bruijnes

  4. EMG responses to maintain stance during multidirectional surface translations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, S. M.; Fung, J.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To characterize muscle synergy organization underlying multidirectional control of stance posture, electromyographic activity was recorded from 11 lower limb and trunk muscles of 7 healthy subjects while they were subjected to horizontal surface translations in 12 different, randomly presented directions. The latency and amplitude of muscle responses were quantified for each perturbation direction. Tuning curves for each muscle were examined to relate the amplitude of the muscle response to the direction of surface translation. The latencies of responses for the shank and thigh muscles were constant, regardless of perturbation direction. In contrast, the latencies for another thigh [tensor fascia latae (TFL)] and two trunk muscles [rectus abdominis (RAB) and erector spinae (ESP)] were either early or late, depending on the perturbation direction. These three muscles with direction-specific latencies may play different roles in postural control as prime movers or as stabilizers for different translation directions, depending on the timing of recruitment. Most muscle tuning curves were within one quadrant, having one direction of maximal activity, generally in response to diagonal surface translations. Two trunk muscles (RAB and ESP) and two lower limb muscles (semimembranosus and peroneus longus) had bipolar tuning curves, with two different directions of maximal activity, suggesting that these muscle can play different roles as part of different synergies, depending on translation direction. Muscle tuning curves tended to group into one of three regions in response to 12 different directions of perturbations. Two muscles [rectus femoris (RFM) and TFL] were maximally active in response to lateral surface translations. The remaining muscles clustered into one of two diagonal regions. The diagonal regions corresponded to the two primary directions of active horizontal force vector responses. Two muscles (RFM and adductor longus) were maximally active orthogonal to their predicted direction of maximal activity based on anatomic orientation. Some of the muscles in each of the synergic regions were not anatomic synergists, suggesting a complex central organization for recruitment of muscles. The results suggest that neither a simple reflex mechanism nor a fixed muscle synergy organization is adequate to explain the muscle activation patterns observed in this postural control task. Our results are consistent with a centrally mediated pattern of muscle latencies combined with peripheral influence on muscle magnitude. We suggest that a flexible continuum of muscle synergies that are modifiable in a task-dependent manner be used for equilibrium control in stance.

  5. Direct corticospinal pathways contribute to neuromuscular control of perturbed stance.

    PubMed

    Taube, Wolfgang; Schubert, Martin; Gruber, Markus; Beck, Sandra; Faist, Michael; Gollhofer, Albert

    2006-08-01

    The antigravity soleus muscle (Sol) is crucial for compensation of stance perturbation. A corticospinal contribution to the compensatory response of the Sol is under debate. The present study assessed spinal, corticospinal, and cortical excitability at the peaks of short- (SLR), medium- (MLR), and long-latency responses (LLR) after posterior translation of the feet. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and peripheral nerve stimulation were individually adjusted so that the peaks of either motor evoked potential (MEP) or H reflex coincided with peaks of SLR, MLR, and LLR, respectively. The influence of specific, presumably direct, corticospinal pathways was investigated by H-reflex conditioning. When TMS was triggered so that the MEP arrived in the Sol at the same time as the peaks of SLR and MLR, EMG remained unaffected. Enhanced EMG was observed when the MEP coincided with the LLR peak (P < 0.001). Similarly, conditioning of the H reflex by subthreshold TMS facilitated H reflexes only at LLR (P < 0.001). The earliest facilitation after perturbation occurred after 86 ms. The TMS-induced H-reflex facilitation at LLR suggests that increased cortical excitability contributes to the augmentation of the LLR peaks. This provides evidence that the LLR in the Sol muscle is at least partly transcortical, involving direct corticospinal pathways. Additionally, these results demonstrate that approximately 86 ms after perturbation, postural compensatory responses are cortically mediated. PMID:16601305

  6. A new method to assess passive and active ankle stiffness during quiet upright stance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Nussbaum, Maury A; Agnew, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Both passive and active ankle torque contribute to postural stability during quiet upright stance, yet directly measuring their relative contributions is difficult. Here, a new method was developed to estimate passive and active ankle stiffness (ST) and damping (DA). In contrast to earlier approaches, the proposed method does not require external mechanical or sensory perturbations. Instead, the method is based on the assumption that upright stance is intermittently controlled, and that active ankle torque is in-phase coherent with ankle angular acceleration. Thus, identifying the local maxima of ankle angular accelerations facilitates the identification of time windows that include substantial active ankle torque. After identifying these local maxima and associated windows, estimates of passive and active ankle ST and DA were obtained using linear regression analyses. Consistent with earlier work, passive ankle torque was estimated to account for 94-97% of the total ankle torque, and to have linear relationships with ankle angle and angular velocity. Predicted values of passive and active ankle stiffness were also consistent with earlier reports. This new approach may be a useful tool to efficiently investigate passive and active joint stiffness during quiet upright stance. PMID:26547842

  7. Organization of physiological tremors and coordination solutions to postural pointing on an uneven stance surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Chun; Yang, Jeng-Feng; Huang, Chien-Ting; Hwang, Ing-Shiou

    2012-08-01

    The study investigated the destabilization effect on multi-segment physiological tremors and coordinative control for a postural-suprapostural task under different stance conditions. Twenty volunteers executed postural pointing from a level surface and a seesaw balance board; meanwhile, physiological tremors of the whole postural system and fluctuation movements of fingertip/stance surface were recorded. In reference to level stance, seesaw stance led to much fewer tremor increments of the upper limb and less fluctuation movement of the fingertip than tremor increment of the lower limb and rolling movement of the stance surface. Tremor coupling between the adjacent segments organized differentially with stance surface. In reference to level stance, seesaw stance reinforced tremor coupling of the upper limb but enfeebled the coupling in the arm-lumbar and calf-foot complexes. Stance-related differences in physiological tremors could be explained by characteristic changes in the primary and secondary principal components (PC1 and PC2), with relatively high communality with segment tremors of the lower and upper limbs, respectively. Seesaw stance introduced a prominent 4-8Hz spectral peak in PC1 and potentiated 1-4Hz and 8-12Hz spectral peaks of PC2. Structural reorganization of physiological tremors with stance configuration suggests that seesaw stance involves distinct suprapostural and postural synergies for regulating degree of freedom in joint space. PMID:22503628

  8. Balance in Astronauts Performing Jumps, Walking and Quiet Stance Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Wood, S. J.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Both balance and locomotor ataxia is severe in astronauts returning from spaceflight with serious implications for unassisted landings. As a part of an ongoing effort to demonstrate the functional significance of the postflight ataxia problem our laboratory has evaluated jumping, walking heel-to-toe and quite stance balance immediately following spaceflight. Methods: Six astronauts from 12-16 day flights and three from 6-month flights were asked to perform three self-initiated two-footed jumps from a 30-cm-high platform, walking for 10 steps (three trials) placing the feet heel to toe in tandem, arms folded across the chest and the eyes closed, and lastly, recover from a simulated fall by standing from a prone position on the floor and with eyes open maintain a quiet stance for 3 min with arms relaxed along the side of the body and feet comfortably positioned on a force plate. Crewmembers were tested twice before flight, on landing day (short-duration), and days 1, 6, and 30 following all flight durations. Results/Conclusions: Many of astronauts tested fell on their first postflight jump but recovered by the third jump showing a rapid learning progression. Changes in take-off strategy were clearly evident in duration of time in the air between the platform and the ground (significant reduction in time to land), and also in increased asymmetry in foot latencies on take-off postflight. During the tandem heel-to-toe walking task there was a significant decrease in percentage of correct steps on landing day (short-duration crew) and on first day following landing (long-duration) with only partial recovery the following day. Astronauts for both short and long duration flight times appeared to be unaware of foot position relative to their bodies or the floor. During quite stance most of crewmembers tested exhibited increased stochastic activity (larger short-term COP diffusion coefficients postflight in all planes and increases in mean sway speed).

  9. Stance width changes how sensory feedback is used for multisegmental balance control

    PubMed Central

    Mellodge, Patricia; Peterka, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A multilink sensorimotor integration model of frontal plane balance control was developed to determine how stance width influences the use of sensory feedback in healthy adults. Data used to estimate model parameters came from seven human participants who stood on a continuously rotating surface with three different stimulus amplitudes, with eyes open and closed, and at four different stance widths. Dependent variables included lower body (LB) and upper body (UB) sway quantified by frequency-response functions. Results showed that stance width had a major influence on how parameters varied across stimulus amplitude and between visual conditions. Active mechanisms dominated LB control. At narrower stances, with increasing stimulus amplitude, subjects used sensory reweighting to shift reliance from proprioceptive cues to vestibular and/or visual cues that oriented the LB more toward upright. When vision was available, subjects reduced reliance on proprioception and increased reliance on vision. At wider stances, LB control did not exhibit sensory reweighting. In the UB system, both active and passive mechanisms contributed and were dependent on stance width. UB control changed across stimulus amplitude most in wide stance (opposite of the pattern found in LB control). The strong influence of stance width on sensory integration and neural feedback control implies that rehabilitative therapies for balance disorders can target different aspects of balance control by using different stance widths. Rehabilitative strategies designed to assess or modify sensory reweighting will be most effective with the use of narrower stances, whereas wider stances present greater challenges to UB control. PMID:24760788

  10. The cat vertebral column: stance configuration and range of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, J. M.; Ye, Y.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the configuration of the vertebral column of the cat during independent stance and in various flexed positions. The range of motion in the sagittal plane is similar across most thoracic and lumbar joints, with the exception of a lesser range at the transition region from thoracic-type to lumbar-type vertebrae. The upper thoracic column exhibits most of its range in dorsiflexion and the lower thoracic and lumbar in ventroflexion. Lateral flexion is limited to less than 5 degrees at all segments. The range in torsion is almost 180 degrees and occurs primarily in the midthoracic region, T4-T11. Contrary to the depiction in most atlases, the standing cat exhibits several curvatures, including a mild dorsiflexion in the lower lumbar segments, a marked ventroflexion in the lower thoracic and upper lumbar segments, and a profound dorsiflexion in the upper thoracic (above T9) and cervical segments. The curvatures are not significantly changed by altering stance distance but are affected by head posture. During stance, the top of the scapula lies well above the spines of the thoracic vertebrae, and the glenohumeral joint is just below the bodies of vertebrae T3-T5. Using a simple static model of the vertebral column in the sagittal plane, it was estimated that the bending moment due to gravity is bimodal with a dorsiflexion moment in the lower thoracic and lumbar region and a ventroflexion moment in the upper thoracic and cervical region. Given the bending moments and the position of the scapula during stance, it is proposed that two groups of scapular muscles provide the major antigravity support for the head and anterior trunk. Levator scapulae and serratus ventralis form the lateral group, inserting on the lateral processes of cervical vertebrae and on the ribs. The major and minor rhomboids form the medial group, inserting on the spinous tips of vertebrae from C4 to T4. It is also proposed that the hypaxial muscles, psoas major, minor, and quadratus lumborum could support the lumbar trunk during stance.

  11. How Joint Torques Affect Hamstring Injury Risk in Sprinting Swing–Stance Transition

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YULIANG; WEI, SHUTAO; ZHONG, YUNJIAN; FU, WEIJIE; LI, LI; LIU, YU

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The potential mechanisms of hamstring strain injuries in athletes are not well understood. The study, therefore, was aimed at understanding hamstring mechanics by studying loading conditions during maximum-effort overground sprinting. Methods Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction force data were collected from eight elite male sprinters sprinting at their maximum effort. Maximal isometric torques of the hip and knee were also collected. Data from the sprinting gait cycle were analyzed via an intersegmental dynamics approach, and the different joint torque components were calculated. Results During the initial stance phase, the ground reaction force passed anteriorly to the knee and hip, producing an extension torque at the knee and a flexion torque at the hip joint. Thus, the active muscle torque functioned to produce flexion torque at the knee and extension torque at the hip. The maximal muscle torque at the knee joint was 1.4 times the maximal isometric knee flexion torque. During the late swing phase, the muscle torque counterbalanced the motion-dependent torque and acted to flex the knee joint and extend the hip joint. The loading conditions on the hamstring muscles were similar to those of the initial stance phase. Conclusions During both the initial stance and late swing phases, the large passive torques at both the knee and hip joints acted to lengthen the hamstring muscles. The active muscle torques generated mainly by the hamstrings functioned to counteract those passive effects. As a result, during sprinting or high-speed locomotion, the hamstring muscles may be more susceptible to high risk of strain injury during these two phases. PMID:24911288

  12. The influence of ankle muscle activation on postural sway during quiet stance.

    PubMed

    Warnica, Meagan J; Weaver, Tyler B; Prentice, Stephen D; Laing, Andrew C

    2014-04-01

    Although balance during quiet standing is postulated to be influenced by multiple factors, including ankle stiffness, it is unclear how different mechanisms underlying increases in stiffness affect balance control. Accordingly, this study examined the influence of muscle activation and passive ankle stiffness increases on the magnitude and frequency of postural sway. Sixteen young adults participated in six quiet stance conditions including: relaxed standing, four muscle active conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)), and one passive condition wearing an ankle foot orthotic (AFO). Kinetics were collected from a force plate, while whole-body kinematics were collected with a 12-sensor motion capture system. Bilateral electromyographic signals were recorded from the tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles. Quiet stance sway amplitude (range and root mean square) and frequency (mean frequency and velocity) in the sagittal plane were calculated from time-varying centre of gravity (COG) and centre of pressure (COP) data. Compared to the relaxed standing condition, metrics of sway amplitude were significantly increased (between 37.5 and 63.2%) at muscle activation levels of 30% and 40% MVC. Similarly, frequency measures increased between 30.5 and 154.2% in the 20-40% MVC conditions. In contrast, passive ankle stiffness, induced through the AFO, significantly decreased sway amplitude (by 23-26%), decreased COG velocity by 13.8%, and increased mean COP frequency by 24.9%. These results demonstrate that active co-contraction of ankle musculature (common in Parkinson's Disease patients) may have differential effects on quiet stance balance control compared to the use of an ankle foot orthotic (common for those recovering from stroke). PMID:24613374

  13. The spectral content of postural sway during quiet stance: influences of age, vision and somatosensory inputs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navrag B; Taylor, William R; Madigan, Michael L; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2012-02-01

    Maintenance of human upright stance requires the acquisition and integration of sensory inputs. Conventional measures of sway have had success in identifying age- and some disease-related changes, but remain unable to address the complexities and dynamics associated with postural control. We investigated the effects of vision, surface compliance, age, and gender on the spectral content of center of pressure (COP) time series. Sixteen healthy young (age 18-24) and older participants (age 55-65) performed trials of quiet, upright stance under different vision (eyes open vs. closed) and surface (hard vs. compliant) conditions. Spectral analyses were conducted to describe COP mean normalized power in discretized bands. Effects of the two sensory modalities and age were distinct in the antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions, and a reorganization of spectral content was evident with increasing task difficulty (eyes open vs. closed and hard vs. compliant surface) and among older adults. These results indicate that vision and surface compliance are predominantly associated with responses from musculature associated with antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions of sway, respectively. Finally, distinguishing between the contributions of different afferent systems to the postural control system using the spectral content of sway bi-directionally may help in diagnosing individuals with balance impairments. PMID:22100720

  14. Climate Literacy for Kids: Finding Medium, Message, and Stance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D. K.; Leon, N.; Jackson, R.; Greene, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    As part of NASA's Global Climate Change (climate.nasa.gov) website (winner of the 2011Webby Award for Best Science Site), Climate Kids (climate.nasa.gov/kids) presents positive role models for green careers and encourages kids to be good climate citizens. But before they will care, they must understand. Climate Kids helps kids understand climate science by communicating at their own science awareness and maturity level, and by giving them concrete ways to start helping Earth now. Climate Kids, as informal education, speaks to upper-elementary-school-age kids in their own language and using some of their favorite media. In addition to simple, liberally illustrated text explanations of the basic science concepts, cartoons and games reinforce the concepts in a fun way. A growing section on green careers interviews enthusiastic individuals currently practicing their professions. In explaining what they do, these individuals reinforce the climate science concepts and "how to help" suggestions elsewhere on the site. The games also reinforce the green career choices. "Green Careers" currently features a "green" general contractor, a home energy auditor, a water-wise landscaper, a recycling program educator, and a renewable energy scientist. The message of the scientist, who designs wind energy farms and "architectural wind" arrays, is reinforced by the "Power-up" game. In this game, players move a wind turbine up or down to capture the wind and move a solar array back and forth to stay out of cloud shadows. Depending on how many "windows" of the game's "city" light up using these alternative energy sources, the player earns a bronze, silver, gold, or platinum "medal." A recycling game reinforces the messages of the recycling program educator about the importance of recycling in saving energy, what can and cannot be recycled, and how long trash items remain in a landfill before decomposing. In the game, a variety of throw-away objects rains down from the top of the screen. Various recycling bins (glass, plastic, metal, and paper) are lined up on the left and right sides of the screen, with a trash bin at the bottom. As an item drops, the player must quickly decide what kind of material it is made of and whether it is recyclable, then guide it into the appropriate bin. As the rate of items entering play increases, any missed items fall into the trash and stay there for a length of time proportional to their decomposition time. If the trash bin gets full, the game is over. While enjoying the increasing challenge of the game, players learn to identify many items as recyclable that they may not have recognized as recyclable before. Another feature on Climate Kids is "Climate Tales," a slightly edgy animated cartoon series (two episodes so far) about the adventures of a blundering polar bear, a chirpy tamarin monkey, and a grumpy old fish as "accidental tourists" around the planet, observing and dealing with the environmental conditions they encounter. Fairly complex concepts (such as reasons and implications of the declining abundance of phytoplankton) are woven into the tales. Climate Kids is a fun site for kids, educational and realistic, and yet positive and hopeful-the only reasonable stance to present to this young audience.

  15. Stance and swing phase costs in human walking

    PubMed Central

    Umberger, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Leg swing in human walking has historically been viewed as a passive motion with little metabolic cost. Recent estimates of leg swing costs are equivocal, covering a range from 10 to 33 per cent of the net cost of walking. There has also been a debate as to whether the periods of double-limb support during the stance phase dominate the cost of walking. Part of this uncertainty is because of our inability to measure metabolic energy consumption in individual muscles during locomotion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the metabolic cost of walking using a modelling approach that allowed instantaneous energy consumption rates in individual muscles to be estimated over the full gait cycle. At a typical walking speed and stride rate, leg swing represented 29 per cent of the total muscular cost. During the stance phase, the double-limb and single-limb support periods accounted for 27 and 44 per cent of the total cost, respectively. Performing step-to-step transitions, which encompasses more than just the double-support periods, represented 37 per cent of the total cost of walking. Increasing stride rate at a constant speed led to greater double-limb support costs, lower swing phase costs and no change in single-limb support costs. Together, these results provide unique insight as to how metabolic energy is expended over the human gait cycle. PMID:20356877

  16. Potential roles of force cues in human stance control.

    PubMed

    Cnyrim, Christian; Mergner, Thomas; Maurer, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    Human stance is inherently unstable. A small deviation from upright body orientation is enough to yield a gravitational component in the ankle joint torque, which tends to accelerate the body further away from upright ('gravitational torque'; magnitude is related to body-space lean angle). Therefore, to maintain a given body lean position, a corresponding compensatory torque must be generated. It is well known that subjects use kinematic sensory information on body-space lean from the vestibular system for this purpose. Less is known about kinetic cues from force/torque receptors. Previous work indicated that they are involved in compensating external contact forces such as a pull or push having impact on the body. In this study, we hypothesized that they play, in addition, a role when the vestibular estimate of the gravitational torque becomes erroneous. Reasons may be sudden changes in body mass, for instance by a load, or an impairment of the vestibular system. To test this hypothesis, we mimicked load effects on the gravitational torque in normal subjects and in patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss (VL) with eyes closed. We added/subtracted extra torque to the gravitational torque by applying an external contact force (via cable winches and a body harness). The extra torque was referenced to body-space lean, using different proportionality factors. We investigated how it affected body-space lean responses that we evoked using sinusoidal tilts of the support surface (motion platform) with different amplitudes and frequencies (normals +/-1 degrees, +/-2 degrees, and +/-4 degrees at 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 Hz; patients +/-1 degrees and +/-2 degrees at 0.05 and 0.1 Hz). We found that added/subtracted extra torque scales the lean response in a systematic way, leading to increase/decrease in lean excursion. Expressing the responses in terms of gain and phase curves, we compared the experimental findings to predictions obtained from a recently published sensory feedback model. For the trials in which the extra torque tended to endanger stance control, predictions in normals were better when the model included force cues than without these cues. This supports our notion that force cues provide an automatic 'gravitational load compensation' upon changes in body mass in normals. The findings in the patients support our notion that the presumed force cue mechanism provides furthermore vestibular loss compensation. Patients showed a body-space stabilization that cannot be explained by ankle angle proprioception, but must involve graviception, most likely by force cues. Our findings suggest that force cues contribute considerably to the redundancy and robustness of the human stance control system. PMID:19219426

  17. The Power of Practitioner Research and Development of an Inquiry Stance in Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolkenhauer, Rachel; Boynton, Sylvia; Dana, Nancy Fichtman

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a framework for establishing inquiry as a foundation of a teacher education program to help prospective and practicing teachers view inquiry not as a project but as a stance. Cochran-Smith and Lytle (2009) assert that "working from an inquiry stance involves a continual process of making current arrangements problematic,…

  18. "This Project Has Personally Affected Me": Developing a Critical Stance in Preservice English Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherff, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This study draws from a number of researchers who push for critical literacy and a critical stance to question power, inequality, and the status quo; to understand scholars' own participation in power structures; and to reframe and retheorize scholars' beliefs and understandings. In this article, the author uses the critical stance framework to…

  19. Linguistic Markers of Stance in Early and Advanced Academic Writing: A Corpus-Based Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aull, Laura L.; Lancaster, Zak

    2014-01-01

    This article uses corpus methods to examine linguistic expressions of stance in over 4,000 argumentative essays written by incoming first-year university students in comparison with the writing of upper-level undergraduate students and published academics. The findings reveal linguistic stance markers shared across the first-year essays despite…

  20. Risk Taking in Late Adolescence: Relations between Sociomoral Reasoning, Risk Stance, and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Leigh A.; Amsel, Eric; Schillo, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    This study explored relations among late adolescents' sociomoral reasoning about risk taking, risk stance, and behavior. One-hundred and thirty-two participants (18-20-year-olds) were surveyed about their own risk stance (Avoidant, Opportunistic, Curious, Risk Seeking) and behavior in three realms (Alcohol Use, Drug Use, Reckless Driving), and…

  1. A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Stance in Disaster News Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Lian; Stevenson, Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study examines stance in cross-cultural media discourse by comparing disaster news reports on the Sichuan earthquake of May 2008 in a Chinese, an Australian Chinese, and an Australian newspaper. The stance taken in the news reports is examined using the Attitude sub-system of Martin and White's (2005) Appraisal framework. The analysis…

  2. And some other uncontroversial words: the status of stance commitments in the lexicosyntactic variation of identity labels 

    E-print Network

    Candelas, Abigael

    2011-11-23

    Traditionally, formal linguistic approaches have assumed that a ective stance (Ochs 1992, Ja e 2009) is not part of a linguistic expression's semantics, although recent approaches have sought to integrate stance and other ...

  3. Ninth Grade Students' Negotiation of Aesthetic, Efferent, and Critical Stances in Response to a Novel Set in Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative, action research study was guided by two primary research questions. First, how do students negotiate aesthetic, efferent, and critical stances when reading a novel set in Afghanistan? Second, how do aesthetic and efferent stances contribute to or hinder the adoption of a critical stance? A large body of research exists that…

  4. Stance limb kinetics of older male athletes endurance running performance.

    PubMed

    Diss, Ceri; Gittoes, Marianne J; Tong, Richard; Kerwin, David G

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the age-based, lower limb kinetics of running performances of endurance athletes. Six running trials were performed by 24 male athletes, who were distinguished by three age groupings (S35: 26-32 years, M50: 50-54 years, M60+: 60-68 years). Lower limb coordinate and ground reaction force data were collected using a nine camera infra-red system synchronised with a force plate. A slower anteroposterior (M ± SD S35 = 4.13 ± 0.54 m/s: M60+ = 3.34 ± 0.40 m/s, p < 0.05) running velocity was associated with significant (p < 0.05) decreases in step length and discrete vertical ground contact force between M60+and S35 athletes. The M60+athletes simultaneously generated a 32% and 42% reduction (p < 0.05) in ankle joint moment when compared to the M50 and S35 athletes and 72% (p < 0.05) reduction in knee joint stiffness when compared to S35 athletes. Age-based declines in running performance were associated with reduced stance phase force tolerance and generation that may be accounted for due to an inhibited force-velocity muscular function of the lower limb. Joint-specific coaching strategies customised to athlete age are warranted to maintain/enhance athletes' dynamic performance. PMID:26208084

  5. Learning Effects Associated With the Least Stable Level of the Biodex® Stability System During Dual and Single Limb Stance

    PubMed Central

    Cug, Mutlu; Wikstrom, Erik A.

    2014-01-01

    The Biodex® Stability System (BSS) has high test-retest reliability when stable (high) resistance levels are used. However, reliability data for lower stability levels, associated with more pronounced learning curves, are rare in the existing literature. Thus, it is likely that BSS scores obtained from lower stability levels require greater familiarization (i.e. practice) to achieve a stable score both within and between test sessions. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to determine if a commonly reported 6 trial sequence (3 practice trials, 3 test trials) used with the BSS can achieve a stable within session score on the lowest stability level (i.e. level 1). The secondary purpose was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the lowest BSS resistance level over a 10-week period. Twenty sedentary university students (11 male, 9 female; age: 21.5 ± 1.9 years, height: 1.7 ± 0.1 m, weight: 66.3 ± 12.1 kg, BMI: 22.4 ± 2.3) voluntarily participated. Participants completed two test sessions separated by 10-weeks. Twelve, 20-second trials (six dual limb stance, six single limb stance on the dominant limb) on the lowest stability level were completed during both test sessions by all participants. A stable within session dual and single limb stance score was achieved with a maximum of 3 familiarization trials. Reliability ranged between poor and good across all outcomes but all outcomes had large minimal detectable change scores. At least 3 stance specific familiarization trials are needed to achieve a stable BSS score within a single test session on the lowest resistance level. However, the inconsistent reliability and high minimal detectable changes scores suggest that the lowest resistance level should not be used as an objective marker of rehabilitation progress over extended periods of time (e.g. 10-weeks). Key points Level 1 BSS scores should not be used as a test setting to assess rehabilitation. Familiarization trials should not be underestimated by researchers/clinicans. Lower stability levels on the BSS may not be appropriate for use as an objective marker of progression due to poor reliability of the scores over time. PMID:24790494

  6. A quasi-passive compliant stance control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Napolitano, Paul C; Dollar, Aaron M

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a novel quasi-passive stance-control orthosis that implements a natural amount of knee compliance during the weight acceptance phase and potentially the entire stance phase of the gait, and allows for free motion during the rest of the gait. We explain that the unaffected knee behaves close to a linear torsional spring in stance and hypothesize that an assistive device that places a linear spring of appropriate stiffness in parallel with the knee can help restore the natural behavior of the joint in stance. We present the design of a friction-based latching mechanism and a control algorithm that engages the spring in parallel with the knee in stance and disengages it during the swing phase of gait, and explain how this module is implemented into a brace in order to create a novel class of compliant stance control orthosis. The device is quasi-passive in that a small actuator serves to lock and unlock the spring module, but the device otherwise requires no actuation and very little power, computation, and control to operate. PMID:24187288

  7. The default mode of human brain function primes the intentional stance.

    PubMed

    Spunt, Robert P; Meyer, Meghan L; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2015-06-01

    Humans readily adopt an intentional stance to other people, comprehending their behavior as guided by unobservable mental states such as belief, desire, and intention. We used fMRI in healthy adults to test the hypothesis that this stance is primed by the default mode of human brain function present when the mind is at rest. We report three findings that support this hypothesis. First, brain regions activated by actively adopting an intentional rather than nonintentional stance to a social stimulus were anatomically similar to those demonstrating default responses to fixation baseline in the same task. Second, moment-to-moment variation in default activity during fixation in the dorsomedial PFC was related to the ease with which participants applied an intentional--but not nonintentional--stance to a social stimulus presented moments later. Finally, individuals who showed stronger dorsomedial PFC activity at baseline in a separate task were generally more efficient when adopting the intentional stance and reported having greater social skills. These results identify a biological basis for the human tendency to adopt the intentional stance. More broadly, they suggest that the brain's default mode of function may have evolved, in part, as a response to life in a social world. PMID:25603027

  8. Prediction of walking speed using single stance force or pressure measurements in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, N L W; Stolwijk, N M; Renzenbrink, G J; Duysens, J

    2016-01-01

    Walking speed is one of the best measures of overall walking capacity. In plantar pressure measurements, walking speed can be assessed using contact time, but it is only moderately correlated with walking speed. The center of pressure might be of more value to indicate walking speed since walking speed alters foot loading. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to assess walking speed using the velocity of the center of pressure (VCOP). Thirty-three subjects walked over a Footscan pressure plate at three speed conditions; slow, preferred, and fast. Walking speed was measured by a motion analysis system. (Multiple) linear regression analysis was used to indicate the relation between walking speed and independent variables derived from the pressure plate such as mean VCOP and stance time for all walking conditions separately and together. The mean VCOP had the highest correlation coefficient value with walking speed for all walking conditions combined (0.94) and for the preferred walking condition (0.80). The multiple regression analysis, based on a number of additional parameters, revealed a small to modest increase in the performance of predicting walking speed (r=0.98 for combined and r=0.93 for preferred). The mean VCOP was the best predictor for walking speed when using a plantar pressure plate. The mean VCOP predicts the walking speed with a 95% accuracy of 0.20m/s when healthy subjects walk at their preferred walking speed. PMID:26669958

  9. Single stance stability and proprioceptive control in older adults living at home: gender and age differences.

    PubMed

    Riva, Dario; Mamo, Carlo; Fanì, Mara; Saccavino, Patrizia; Rocca, Flavio; Momenté, Manuel; Fratta, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    In developed countries, falls in older people represent a rising problem. As effective prevention should start before the risk becomes evident, an early predictor is needed. Single stance instability would appear as a major risk factor. Aims of the study were to describe single stance stability, its sensory components, and their correlation with age and gender. A random sample of 597 older adults (319 men, 278 women) living at home, aged 65-84, was studied. Stability tests were performed with an electronic postural station. The single stance test showed the impairment of single stance stability in older individuals (75-84?yrs). The significant decline of stability in the older subjects may be explained by the impairment of proprioceptive control together with the decrease in compensatory visual stabilization and emergency responses. Younger subjects (65-74?yrs) exhibited better, but still inadequate, proprioceptive control with compensatory visual stabilization. Gender differences appeared in older subjects: women were significantly less stable than men. The measurement of the sensory components of single stance stability could aid in the early detection of a decay in antigravity movements many years before the risk of falling becomes evident. Adequate proprioceptive control could mitigate the effects of all other risks of falling. PMID:23984068

  10. Constructing Language Normativity through the Animation of Stance in Spanish Language Medical Consultations

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Caroline H.; Deckert, Sharon K.; Goble, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the construction of language normativity as medical providers interact with patients and animate stance within Spanish language medical consultations. The context of the study is a clinic in which providers use Spanish to communicate with monolingual Spanish-speaking patients. This clinic is in the United States, an English-speaking macro-societal context. Findings indicate that providers who are second language users of Spanish animate stance and interact with patients in ways that English is constructed as normative and Spanish as marked. Implications include the need to consider how the construction of language normativity within medical consultations affects health outcomes. PMID:24156518

  11. Controlling Posture and Vergence Eye Movements in Quiet Stance: Effects of Thin Plantar Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Foisy, A.; Gaertner, C.; Matheron, E.; Kapoula, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess properties of vergence and saccade eye movements as well as posture in quiet stance, and the effects of thin plantar inserts upon postural and oculomotor control. The performances of 36 young healthy subjects were recorded by a force platform and an eye tracker in three testing conditions: without plantar stimulation, with a 3 millimetre-thick plantar insert, either a Medial or a Lateral Arch Support (MAS / LAS). The results showed a decrease of the Surface and Variance of Speed and a more posterior position of the CoP with either stimulation compared with the control condition. The fractal analysis showed a decrease with MAS. Wavelet analysis in the time-frequency domain revealed an increase in the Cancelling Time of the low frequency band with MAS. These results suggest a better stability for a lower energy cost. Concerning eye movements, the inserts influenced only vergence (not saccades): MAS caused an increase of the phasic amplitude of divergence, and conversely a decrease of the tonic amplitude. In contrast, LAS caused an increase of the tonic amplitude of convergence. Thus, MAS renders divergence less visually driven, while LAS renders convergence more visually driven. We conclude that the CNS uses the podal signal for both postural and vergence control via specific mechanisms. Plantar inserts have an influence upon posture and vergence movements in a different way according to the part of the foot sole being stimulated. These results can be useful to clinicians interested in foot or eye. PMID:26637132

  12. EFL Doctoral Students' Conceptions of Authorial Stance in Academic Knowledge Claims and the Tie to Epistemic Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Peichin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Taking an effective authorial stance in research argumentation has been designated as both vitally important and challenging. The study investigated English as a foreign language (EFL) doctoral students' conceptions of authorial stance, the role of domains in affecting their conceptions, and the ties of the conceptions to the…

  13. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life.

    PubMed

    Haeny, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The present paper analyzes the subject of psychologists taking a public position on controversial public issues. Although the APA Ethics Code does not restrict how psychologists conduct themselves during their personal time, taking a public stance on a controversial issue could potentially strain professional relationships and inadvertently reflect negatively on the profession. The present paper examines ethical issues that a) should be taken into account before psychologists take a public position on a controversial issue, and b) are in conflict with APA's Ethics Code or current research. PMID:25342876

  14. Pedagogical Stances of High School ESL Teachers: "Huelgas" in High School ESL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Carmen Salazar, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative case study of the pedagogical stances of high school English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers, and the subsequent responses of resistance or conformity by their English Language Learners (ELLs). The participants include three high school ESL teachers and 60 high school ESL students of Mexican origin. Findings…

  15. Stance control knee mechanism for lower-limb support in hybrid neuroprosthesis.

    PubMed

    To, Curtis S; Kobetic, Rudi; Bulea, Thomas C; Audu, Musa L; Schnellenberger, John R; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J

    2011-01-01

    A hydraulic stance control knee mechanism (SCKM) was developed to fully support the knee against flexion during stance and allow uninhibited motion during swing for individuals with paraplegia using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) for gait assistance. The SCKM was optimized for maximum locking torque for body-weight support and minimum resistance when allowing for free knee motion. Ipsilateral and contralateral position and force feedback were used to control the SCKM. Through bench and nondisabled testing, the SCKM was shown to be capable of supporting up to 70 N-m, require no more than 13% of the torque achievable with FNS to facilitate free motion, and responsively and repeatedly unlock under an applied flexion knee torque of up to 49 N-m. Preliminary tests of the SCKM with an individual with paraplegia demonstrated that it could support the body and maintain knee extension during stance without the stimulation of the knee extensor muscles. This was achieved without adversely affecting gait, and knee stability was comparable to gait assisted by knee extensor stimulation during stance. PMID:21938668

  16. Temporal Resolution Requirements For The Double Stance Period Of Human Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Juerg U.; Procter, Philip; Schaer, Alex

    1983-07-01

    Study of transient force phenomena in the double stance period of normal gait suggests that high temporal resolution is required in concommittant movement analysis. The present study concludes that at least 300 pictures per second are necessary to resolve kinematic transients associated with heel strike.

  17. Argument or Evidence? Disciplinary Variation in the Use of the Noun "that" Pattern in Stance Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Maggie

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses a corpus approach to investigate disciplinary variation in the construction of stance using nouns which are followed by "that" and a complement clause, "e.g. the argument that the Justices exhibit strategic behaviour..." Two corpora of theses written in English are examined: approximately 190,000 words in politics/international…

  18. Elementary Students' Roles and Epistemic Stances during Document-Based History Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokes, Jeffery D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study that repositioned elementary students in new roles as active, critical participants in historical inquiry--roles that required a more mature epistemic stance. It reports 5th-grade students' responses to instructional methods intended to help them understand the nature of historical knowledge, appreciate the…

  19. Reported Thought as a Stance-Taking Device in Korean Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mary Shin

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of 34 cases of direct reported thought found in ordinary Korean conversations illustrate a routine practice in the use of reported thought-reenacting a prior thought to demonstrate how the speaker's current stance originated. Often, such thoughts are not simply momentary, isolated thoughts in passing but are consequential thoughts…

  20. Stance and Engagement in Pure Mathematics Research Articles: Linking Discourse Features to Disciplinary Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Lisa; Kuteeva, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Recent ESP research into academic writing has shown how writers convey their stance and interact with readers across different disciplines. However, little research has been carried out into the disciplinary writing practices of the pure mathematics academic community from an ESP genre analysis perspective. This study begins to address this gap by…

  1. Turkish Language Teachers' Stance Taking Movements in the Discourse on Globalization and Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coskun, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how Turkish teachers take and give stances in the discourse on globalization and language by using linguistic resources. According to the findings obtained through the discourse analysis of the corpus that consisted of 36 h of recording of the discussion among 4 teachers with 5 to 10 years of teaching experience, the…

  2. Effect of a Wide Stance on Block Start Performance in Sprint Running

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Mitsuo; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Isaka, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the effect of widened stance width at the set position during the block start phase in sprint running on kinematics and kinetics at the hip joint and block-induced power. Fourteen male sprinters volunteered to participate in this study. They performed three block-start trials with a normal stance width (25 ± 1 cm, normal condition) and a widened stance width (45 ± 2 cm, widened condition) at the set position. The block start movements were recorded at 250 Hz with high-speed cameras and the ground reaction forces at 1250 Hz with force plates. During the block phase in the widened condition, the hip abduction and external rotation angles in both legs were significantly larger and smaller, respectively, than those in the normal condition. The positive peak value of the hip power in the rear leg was significantly greater in the widened condition than that in the normal condition. However, no significant difference was seen in the normalized block-induced power between the widened and normal conditions. We conclude that a widened stance width at the set position affects the hip-joint kinematics and rear hip power generation during the block start phase, but no effect on the block-induced power when considering sprinting performance during the whole block start phase. PMID:26544719

  3. Changing and Changed Stance toward Norm Selection in Philippine Universities: Its Pedagogical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardo, Alejandro S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey which involved College English teachers from three leading universities in the Philippines. The results point to one conclusion--College English teachers now have a changing and changed stance toward norm selection in Philippine Universities. The results give the impression that a good number of College…

  4. Embodied Discourse: Using Tableau to Explore Preservice Teachers' Reflections and Activist Stances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branscombe, Margaret; Schneider, Jenifer Jasinski

    2013-01-01

    In the context of an arts-integration course in an elementary education program, preservice teachers used tableaux (i.e. frozen scenes) to portray field experience moments in two ways: (1) as remembered events, and (2) as projected possibilities. Using video and photographs of the tableaux, we traced the students' enactment of activist stances and…

  5. From Tununak to Beaufort: Taking a Critical Inquiry Stance as a First Year Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fecho, Bob; Price, Kim; Read, Chris

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors show how two first year teachers a continent apart--Kim in the village of Tununak on the Bering Sea in Alaska and Chris in Beaufort, South Carolina, on the Atlantic Ocean--were able to take inquiry stances on their classrooms. In particular, through analysis of e-mails written in Chris' and Kim's first years of…

  6. Stylizing Voices, Stances, and Identities Related to Medium of Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandhu, Priti

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the narrative-based interview data of three Indian women to examine the manner in which they utilize stylization to construct identity-rich, ideological stances related to discriminatory discourses of Hindi and English medium education in the linguistically rich, albeit complex, present-day context of India. Stylization is…

  7. Stance control knee mechanism for lower-limb support in hybrid neuroprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    To, Curtis S.; Kobetic, Rudi; Bulea, Thomas C.; Audu, Musa L.; Schnellenberger, John R.; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    A hydraulic stance control knee mechanism (SCKM) was developed to fully support the knee against flexion during stance and allow uninhibited motion during swing for individuals with paraplegia using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) for gait assistance. The SCKM was optimized for maximum locking torque for body-weight support and minimum resistance when allowing for free knee motion. Ipsilateral and contralateral position and force feedback were used to control the SCKM. Through bench and nondisabled testing, the SCKM was shown to be capable of supporting up to 70 N-m, require no more than 13% of the torque achievable with FNS to facilitate free motion, and responsively and repeatedly unlock under an applied flexion knee torque of up to 49 N-m. Preliminary tests of the SCKM with an individual with paraplegia demonstrated that it could support the body and maintain knee extension during stance without the stimulation of the knee extensor muscles. This was achieved without adversely affecting gait, and knee stability was comparable to gait assisted by knee extensor stimulation during stance. PMID:21938668

  8. The Construction of Stance in Reporting Clauses: A Cross-Disciplinary Study of Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Maggie

    2006-01-01

    Using a corpus-based approach, this paper investigates the construction of stance in finite reporting clauses with "that"-clause complementation. The data are drawn from two corpora of theses in contrasting disciplines: a social science--politics--and a natural science--materials science. A network for the analysis of reporting clauses is…

  9. Faith in Academia: Integrating Students' Faith Stance into Conceptions of Their Intellectual Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabri, Duna; Rowland, Christopher; Wyatt, Jonathan; Stavrakopoulou, Francesca; Cargas, Sarita; Hartley, Helenann

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the interaction between religious faith and academic study. It presents findings from a small-scale qualitative study of how first year theology undergraduates at Oxford experienced the relationship between academic study and their faith stance. The findings suggest varied developments in the extent to which students adapted to…

  10. 10/2/2014 SubStance Advertising Information http://uwpress.wisc.edu/journals/journals/sub_ads.html 1/2

    E-print Network

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    10/2/2014 SubStance Advertising Information http SubStance Advertising Rates and Deadlines (Click here to download a printable pdf document, 2015 November 18, 2015 Advertising Information For detailed print advertising information, download

  11. Speaking "Common Sense" about the Soviet Threat: Reagan's Rhetorical Stance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Robert L.

    Although for the 15 years preceding his election as President of the United States Ronald Reagan muted his anti-Soviet rhetoric in order to achieve political power, since his election he has returned to anti-Sovietism in an effort to redirect American foreign policy against the Soviets. At the same time, however, he employs a rhetorical strategy…

  12. A system for the analysis of posture and stance in quadrupeds.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J M; Lywood, D W; Van Eyken, A

    1987-05-01

    This paper describes a system for the quantitative analysis of posture and stance in the freely standing quadruped. The focal point of the system is a moving force platform operated by hydraulic servos under computer control. Cats are trained to stand on a support consisting of 4 force plates. Stance is perturbed by the controlled movement of the platform and the evoked postural responses are quantified in terms of the ground reaction forces, the activity of selected muscles, and the movements of the body segments. New developments that are described include: (1) the moving platform, (2) a miniature, triaxial force plate for detecting ground reaction forces under each paw, and (3) a new video camera capable of freezing rapid movements. PMID:3586705

  13. Obesity Impact on the Attentional Cost for Controlling Posture

    PubMed Central

    Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste; Olivier, Isabelle; Promayon, Emmanuel; Nougier, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects of obesity on attentional resources allocated to postural control in seating and unipedal standing. Methods Ten non obese adults (BMI?=?22.4±1.3, age?=?42.4±15.1) and 10 obese adult patients (BMI?=?35.2±2.8, age?=?46.2±19.6) maintained postural stability on a force platform in two postural tasks (seated and unipedal). The two postural tasks were performed (1) alone and (2) in a dual-task paradigm in combination with an auditory reaction time task (RT). Performing the RT task together with the postural one was supposed to require some attentional resources that allowed estimating the attentional cost of postural control. 4 trials were performed in each condition for a total of 16 trials. Findings (1) Whereas seated non obese and obese patients exhibited similar centre of foot pressure oscillations (CoP), in the unipedal stance only obese patients strongly increased their CoP sway in comparison to controls. (2) Whatever the postural task, the additional RT task did not affect postural stability. (3) Seated, RT did not differ between the two groups. (4) RT strongly increased between the two postural conditions in the obese patients only, suggesting that body schema and the use of internal models was altered with obesity. Interpretation Obese patients needed more attentional resources to control postural stability during unipedal stance than non obese participants. This was not the case in a more simple posture such as seating. To reduce the risk of fall as indicated by the critical values of CoP displacement, obese patients must dedicate a strong large part of their attentional resources to postural control, to the detriment of non-postural events. Obese patients were not able to easily perform multitasking as healthy adults do, reflecting weakened psycho-motor abilities. PMID:21187914

  14. Unilateral Stance Strategies of Athletes With ACL Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Hartigan, Erin H.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant movement strategies are characteristic of ACL-deficient athletes with recurrent knee instability (non-copers), and may instigate premature or accelerate joint degradation. Biomechanical evaluation of kinematic changes over time may elucidate noncopers’ responses to neuromuscular intervention and ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Forty noncopers were randomized into a perturbation group or a strength training only group. We evaluated the effects of perturbation training, and then gender on knee angle and tibial position during a unilateral standing task before and after ACLR. No statistically significant interactions were found. Before surgery, the strength training only group demonstrated knee angle asymmetry, but 6 months after ACLR, both groups presented with similar knee flexion between limbs. Aberrant and asymmetrical tibial position was found only in females following injury and ACLR. Neither treatment group showed distinct unilateral standing strategies following intervention; however, males and female noncopers appear to respond uniquely to physical therapy and surgery. PMID:22983931

  15. The influence of gait stance on pedestrian lower limb injury risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Guibing; Yang, Jikuang; Simms, Ciaran

    2015-12-01

    The effect of pedestrian gait on lower limb kinematics and injuries has not been analyzed. The purpose of this paper was therefore to investigate the effect of pedestrian gait on kinematics and injury risk to the lower limbs using the Total Human Model for Safety adult male pedestrian model together with FE models of vehicle front structures. The modeling results indicate that the tibia and femur cortical bone von-Mises stress and the lateral knee bending angle of an adult pedestrian are strongly dependent on the gait stance when struck by both a sedan car and an SUV at 40km/h. The gait analysis shows that generally the leg of an adult pedestrian has lower injury risk when the knee is flexed and linear regressions show high negative correlation between knee flexion angle during impact and knee lateral bending angle and also high negative correlation between lower leg axial rotation during impact and knee lateral bending angle. Furthermore, in some gait stances a self-contact between the legs occurs, and the peak bones stresses and knee shearing displacement in the leg are then increased. Assessment of pedestrian lower limb injury should take account of these gait stance effects. PMID:26397198

  16. From relational ontology to transformative activist stance on development and learning: expanding Vygotsky's (CHAT) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetsenko, Anna

    2008-07-01

    This paper offers steps towards overcoming current fragmentation within sociocultural approaches by expansively reconstructing a broad dialectical view on human development and learning (drawing on Vygotsky's project) underwritten by ideology of social justice. The common foundation for sociocultural approaches is developed by dialectically supplanting relational ontology with the notion that collaborative purposeful transformation of the world is the core of human nature and the principled grounding for learning and development. An activist transformative stance suggests that people come to know themselves and their world as well as ultimately come to be human in and through (not in addition to) the processes of collaboratively transforming the world in view of their goals. This means that all human activities (including psychological processes and the self) are instantiations of contributions to collaborative transformative practices that are contingent on both the past and the vision for the future and therefore are profoundly imbued with ideology, ethics, and values. And because acting, being, and knowing are seen from a transformative activist stance as all rooted in, derivative of, and instrumental within a collaborative historical becoming, this stance cuts across and bridges the gaps (a) between individual and social and (b) among ontological, epistemological, and moral-ethical (ideological) dimensions of activity.

  17. POSTGRADUATE FinAnciAl ASSiSTAncE AnD SchOlARShiPS 1 POSTGRADUATE

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Stephan

    POSTGRADUATE FinAnciAl ASSiSTAncE AnD SchOlARShiPS 1 POSTGRADUATE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SCHOLARSHIPS AT WITS #12;2 POSTGRADUATE FinAnciAl ASSiSTAncE AnD SchOlARShiPS Online Applications Application.wits.ac.za/financialaid/postgraduate/forms and online, www.wits.ac.za/mywits Postgraduate Bursaries and Scholarships Vinesha Singh / Andrea Ogle

  18. Effect of walking velocity on hindlimb kinetics during stance in normal horses.

    PubMed

    Khumsap, S; Clayton, H M; Lanovaz, J L

    2001-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to measure the effect of walking velocity on net joint moments and joint powers in the hindlimb during stance and to use the data to predict these variables at different walking velocities. Videographic and force data were collected synchronously from 5 sound horses walking over a force plate at a range of velocities. Force and kinematic data from 56 trials were combined using an inverse dynamic solution to determine net joint moments and joint powers. Analysis by simple regression and correlation (P < 0.05, r2 > or = 0.30, r > 0.50) showed that, in early stance, there were significant velocity-dependent increases in the peak magnitudes of the following variables: extensor moment and positive power at the hip, flexor moment and positive power at the stifle, extensor moment, negative and positive power at the tarsus, and flexor moment and negative power at the fetlock. In late stance, there were significant velocity-dependent increases in the peak magnitudes of the following variables: flexor moment at the hip, negative power at the stifle and flexor moment and positive power at the tarsus. As velocity increased, the hip showed an increase in energy generation, whereas the tarsus showed increases in both energy generation and absorption. It is concluded that an increase in walking velocity is associated with increases in peak magnitudes of the net joint moments and joint powers in the hindlimb; and that energy generation at the hip makes the largest contribution to the increase in velocity. PMID:11721562

  19. The intentional stance as structure learning: a computational perspective on mindreading.

    PubMed

    Dindo, Haris; Donnarumma, Francesco; Chersi, Fabian; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Recent theories of mindreading explain the recognition of action, intention, and belief of other agents in terms of generative architectures that model the causal relations between observables (e.g., observed movements) and their hidden causes (e.g., action goals and beliefs). Two kinds of probabilistic generative schemes have been proposed in cognitive science and robotics that link to a "theory theory" and "simulation theory" of mindreading, respectively. The former compares perceived actions to optimal plans derived from rationality principles and conceptual theories of others' minds. The latter reuses one's own internal (inverse and forward) models for action execution to perform a look-ahead mental simulation of perceived actions. Both theories, however, leave one question unanswered: how are the generative models - including task structure and parameters - learned in the first place? We start from Dennett's "intentional stance" proposal and characterize it within generative theories of action and intention recognition. We propose that humans use an intentional stance as a learning bias that sidesteps the (hard) structure learning problem and bootstraps the acquisition of generative models for others' actions. The intentional stance corresponds to a candidate structure in the generative scheme, which encodes a simplified belief-desire folk psychology and a hierarchical intention-to-action organization of behavior. This simple structure can be used as a proxy for the "true" generative structure of others' actions and intentions and is continuously grown and refined - via state and parameter learning - during interactions. In turn - as our computational simulations show - this can help solve mindreading problems and bootstrap the acquisition of useful causal models of both one's own and others' goal-directed actions. PMID:26168854

  20. Automatic postural responses in the cat: responses of distal hindlimb muscles to paired vertical perturbations of stance.

    PubMed

    Rushmer, D S; Dunbar, D C; Russell, C J; Windus, S L

    1987-01-01

    The active components of the quadrupedal diagonal stance response to rapid removal of the support from beneath a single limb were studied in cats to further define the mechanisms that trigger and generate the response. We recorded EMG activity from lateral gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles in awake, behaving cats while they stood on an hydraulic posture platform. By dropping the support from beneath a single limb, we evoked the diagonal stance response, with its characteristic changes in vertical force and EMG patterns. As the animal responded to this drop, a second perturbation of posture was then presented at intervals of 10 to 100 ms following the first. The second perturbation, which consisted of dropping the support from beneath the two limbs that were loaded as a result of the initial limb drop, made the first response biomechanically inappropriate. The EMG responses observed in both muscles during paired perturbations were triggered by the somatosensory events related to the perturbations. Muscle responses that were appropriate for the first perturbation always occurred with amplitudes and latencies similar to control trials. This was true even when the second perturbation occurred 10-20 ms after the first, that is, when this perturbation either preceded or was coincident with the response to the initial limb drop. The EMG responses that were normally associated with the second perturbation were delayed and/or reduced in amplitude when the time interval between perturbations was short. As the inter-perturbation interval was lengthened beyond 60-100 ms, however, EMG responses to the second perturbation were unaffected by the occurrence of the first perturbation. When the hindlimb containing the recording electrodes was dropped as part of the second perturbation, a myotatic latency response was observed in tibialis anterior. The amplitude of this response to the second perturbation was greater than controls when this displacement was presented during the period between initiation of the first perturbation and execution of the response to it. When the second displacement was presented after execution of the first response began, the amplitude of the myotatic response was reduced below control levels. While the results do not preclude the possibility that these "automatic" postural responses are segmental or suprasegmental reflexes, they support the hypothesis that the active component of the response to drop of the support beneath a single limb is centrally programmed and that the appropriate response can be triggered very rapidly by the somatosensory information signalling the perturbation. PMID:3691720

  1. Non-Gaussian center-of-pressure velocity distribution during quiet stance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, E. S. D.; Picoli, S.; Deprá, P. P.; Mendes, R. S.

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we investigate patterns in the postural sway that characterize the static balance in human beings. To measure the postural sway, sixteen healthy young subjects performed quiet stance tasks providing the center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories. From these trajectories, we obtained the COP velocities. We verified that the velocity distributions exhibit non-normal behavior and can be approximated by generalized Gaussians with fat tails. We also discuss possible implications of modeling COP velocity by using generalized Fokker-Planck equations related to Tsallis statistics and Richardson anomalous diffusion.

  2. Unexpected Fascicle Length Changes In Denervated Feline Soleus Muscle During Stance Phase Of Walking.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ricky; Maas, Huub; Gregor, Robert J; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2015-01-01

    After surgical repair of traumatically severed peripheral nerves, associated muscles are paralyzed for weeks. Little is known about fascicle length changes in paralyzed muscles during locomotion. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent, if any, muscle fascicles of denervated feline soleus (SO) change length during stance of walking when intact SO synergists are actively contracting. Hindlimb kinematics, SO fascicle and muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length, and EMG activity of SO, lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were measured during level and slope walking in adult cats. Measurements were taken before and 1-2 weeks following SO-LG denervation. Unexpectedly, SO fascicle lengthening and shortening during stance in all walking conditions were evident after denervation. The greatest SO fascicle shortening (17.3?±?2.2% of a reference length) and least fascicle lengthening (1.5?±?0.8%) after denervation were found during upslope walking, where MG EMG activity was greatest across slopes (P?

  3. Unexpected Fascicle Length Changes In Denervated Feline Soleus Muscle During Stance Phase Of Walking

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ricky; Maas, Huub; Gregor, Robert J.; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2015-01-01

    After surgical repair of traumatically severed peripheral nerves, associated muscles are paralyzed for weeks. Little is known about fascicle length changes in paralyzed muscles during locomotion. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent, if any, muscle fascicles of denervated feline soleus (SO) change length during stance of walking when intact SO synergists are actively contracting. Hindlimb kinematics, SO fascicle and muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length, and EMG activity of SO, lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were measured during level and slope walking in adult cats. Measurements were taken before and 1–2 weeks following SO-LG denervation. Unexpectedly, SO fascicle lengthening and shortening during stance in all walking conditions were evident after denervation. The greatest SO fascicle shortening (17.3?±?2.2% of a reference length) and least fascicle lengthening (1.5?±?0.8%) after denervation were found during upslope walking, where MG EMG activity was greatest across slopes (P?

  4. Estimation of Quasi-Stiffness of the Human Knee in the Stance Phase of Walking

    PubMed Central

    Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanical data characterizing the quasi-stiffness of lower-limb joints during human locomotion is limited. Understanding joint stiffness is critical for evaluating gait function and designing devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate biological properties of human legs. The knee joint moment-angle relationship is approximately linear in the flexion and extension stages of stance, exhibiting nearly constant stiffnesses, known as the quasi-stiffnesses of each stage. Using a generalized inverse dynamics analysis approach, we identify the key independent variables needed to predict knee quasi-stiffness during walking, including gait speed, knee excursion, and subject height and weight. Then, based on the identified key variables, we used experimental walking data for 136 conditions (speeds of 0.75–2.63 m/s) across 14 subjects to obtain best fit linear regressions for a set of general models, which were further simplified for the optimal gait speed. We found R2 > 86% for the most general models of knee quasi-stiffnesses for the flexion and extension stages of stance. With only subject height and weight, we could predict knee quasi-stiffness for preferred walking speed with average error of 9% with only one outlier. These results provide a useful framework and foundation for selecting subject-specific stiffness for prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological knee function during walking. PMID:23533662

  5. The Effect of Continuous and Discretized Presentations of Concurrent Augmented Visual Biofeedback on Postural Control in Quiet Stance

    PubMed Central

    D’Anna, Carmen; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Bertollo, Maurizio; Comani, Silvia; Conforto, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous and a discretized Visual Biofeedback (VBF) on balance performance in upright stance. The coordinates of the Centre of Pressure (CoP), extracted from a force plate, were processed in real-time to implement the two VBFs, administered to two groups of 12 healthy participants. In the first group, a representation of the CoP was continuously shown, while in the second group, the discretized VBF was provided at an irregular frequency (that depended on the subject's performance) by displaying one out of a set of five different emoticons, each corresponding to a specific area covered by the current position of the CoP. In the first case, participants were asked to maintain a white spot within a given square area, whereas in the second case they were asked to keep the smiling emoticon on. Trials with no VBF were administered as control. The effect of the two VBFs on balance was studied through classical postural parameters and a subset of stabilogram diffusion coefficients. To quantify the amount of time spent in stable conditions, the percentage of time during which the CoP was inside the stability area was calculated. Both VBFs improved balance maintainance as compared to the absence of any VBF. As compared to the continuous VBF, in the discretized VBF a significant decrease of sway path, diffusion and Hurst coefficients was found. These results seem to indicate that a discretized VBF favours a more natural postural behaviour by promoting a natural intermittent postural control strategy. PMID:26196518

  6. Knowing When to Doubt: Developing a Critical Stance When Learning From Others

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Candice M.

    2013-01-01

    Children may be biased towards accepting information as true, but the fact remains that children are exposed to misinformation from many sources, and mastering the intricacies of doubt is necessary. The current article examines this issue, focusing on understanding developmental changes and consistencies in children’s ability to take a critical stance towards information. Research is reviewed on children’s ability to detect ignorance, inaccuracy, incompetence, deception, and distortion. Particular emphasis is placed on what this research indicates about how children are reasoning about when to trust and when to doubt. The remainder of the article proposes a framework to evaluate preexisting research and encourage further research, closing with a discussion of several other overarching questions that need to be considered in order to develop a model to explain developmental, individual, and situational differences in children’s ability to evaluate information. PMID:22889395

  7. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  8. Design of an active stance-control knee-ankle-foot orthosis to assist the gait of incomplete spinal cord-injured subjects

    E-print Network

    Font, Josep Maria

    Design of an active stance-control knee-ankle-foot orthosis to assist the gait of incomplete spinal Stance-Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis (SCKAFO) aimed at assisting SCI subjects with levels C or D encoders (joint angles) Plantar sensors (foot-ground contact) Different orthosis prototypes for the right

  9. A longitudinal study of impact and early stance loads during gait following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Mills, Peter M; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Lloyd, David G; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-09-22

    People following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy (APM) are at increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis. High impact loading and peak loading early in the stance phase of gait may play a role in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis. This was a secondary analysis of longitudinal data to investigate loading-related indices at baseline in an APM group (3 months post-surgery) and a healthy control group, and again 2 years later (follow-up). At baseline, 82 participants with medial APM and 38 healthy controls were assessed, with 66 and 23 re-assessed at follow-up, respectively. Outcome measures included: (i) heel strike transient (HST) presence and magnitude, (ii) maximum loading rate, (iii) peak vertical force (Fz) during early stance. At baseline, maximum loading rate was lower in the operated leg (APM) and non-operated leg (non-APM leg) compared to controls (p ? 0.03) and peak Fz was lower in the APM leg compared to non-APM leg (p ? 0.01). Over 2 years, peak Fz increased in the APM leg compared to the non-APM leg and controls (p ? 0.01). Following recent APM, people may adapt their gait to protect the operated knee from excessive loads, as evidenced by a lower maximum loading rate in the APM leg compared to controls, and a reduced peak Fz in the APM leg compared to the non-APM leg. No differences at follow-up may suggest an eventual return to more typical gait. However, the increase in peak Fz in the APM leg may be of concern for long-term joint health given the compromised function of the meniscus. PMID:25169661

  10. Postflight Quiet Stance Stability of Astronauts Following Recovery From a Simulated Fall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Cerisano, J. M.; Lawrence, E. L.; Peters, B. T.; Harm, D. L.; Kulecz, W.; Mulavara, A. P.; Fiedler, M. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Astronauts returning from space flight universally present with postural ataxia. Throughout the Space Shuttle Program, measurement of ataxia has concentrated on sway in the anterior-posterior plane. Implementation of an interdisciplinary pre- and postflight study (Functional Task Test, FTT) designed to evaluate both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes has allowed the investigation of postural instability by characterizing dynamic stabilographic sway patterns. METHODS: Six astronauts from short-duration (Shuttle) and three from long-duration (ISS) flights were required to recover from a simulated fall. Subjects with eyes open, wearing running shoes lay prone on the floor for 2 minutes and then quickly stood up, maintained a quiet stance for 3 minutes, arms relaxed along the side of the body, and feet comfortably placed on the force plate. Crewmembers were tested twice before flight, on landing day (Shuttle only), and 1, 6, and 30 days after flight. Anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) center-of-pressure (COP) coordinates were calculated from the ground reaction forces collected at 500 Hz. The 3-minute quiet stance trial was broken into three 1-minute segments for stabilogram diffusion analysis. A mean sway speed (rate of change of COP displacement) was also calculated as an additional postural stability parameter. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: While there was considerable variation, most of crewmembers tested exhibited increased stochastic activity evidenced by larger short-term COP diffusion coefficients postflight in both the AP and ML planes, suggesting significant changes in postural control mechanisms, particularly control of lower limb muscle function. As expected, postural instability of ISS astronauts on the first day postflight was similar to that of Shuttle crewmembers on landing day. Recoveries of stochastic activity and mean sway speed to baseline levels were typically observed by the 30th day postflight for both long-duration and short-duration crewmembers. Dynamic postural stability characteristics obtained in this low-impact study complement the data measured with computerized dynamic posturography.

  11. Feet distance and static postural balance: implication on the role of natural stance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Won; Kwon, Yuri; Jeon, Hyung-Min; Bang, Min-Jung; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Lim, Do-Hyung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate 1) the effect of feet distance on static postural balance and 2) the location of natural feet distance and its possible role in the relationship of feet distance and postural balance. Static balance tests were performed on a force platform for 100 s with six different feet distances (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 cm). Measures of postural balance included mean amplitude of horizontal ground reaction force (GRF) as well as the mean distance and velocity of the center of pressure (COP). All measures were discomposed into anterioposterior and mediolateral directions. ANOVA and post-hoc comparison were performed for all measures with feet distance as an independent factor. Also measured was the feet distance at the natural stance preferred by each subject. All measures significantly varied with feet distance (p<0.001). Mean distance of COP showed monotonic decrease with feet distance. Mean amplitude of horizontal GRF as well as mean velocity of COP showed U-shaped pattern (decrease followed by increase) with the minimum at the feet distance of 15 cm or 20 cm, near which the natural feet distance of 16.5 (SD 3.8) cm was located. COP is regarded to be an approximation of the center of mass (hence the resultant performance of postural control) in an inverted pendulum model with the horizontal GRF ignored. On the other hand, horizontal GRF is the direct cause of horizontal acceleration of a center of mass. The present result on horizontal GRF shows that the effort of postural control is minimized around the feet distance of natural standing and implies why the natural stance is preferred. PMID:25226972

  12. Coordinated, multi-joint, fatigue-resistant feline stance produced with intrafascicular hind limb nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normann, R. A.; Dowden, B. R.; Frankel, M. A.; Wilder, A. M.; Hiatt, S. D.; Ledbetter, N. M.; Warren, D. A.; Clark, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The production of graceful skeletal movements requires coordinated activation of multiple muscles that produce torques around multiple joints. The work described herein is focused on one such movement, stance, that requires coordinated activation of extensor muscles acting around the hip, knee and ankle joints. The forces evoked in these muscles by external stimulation all have a complex dependence on muscle length and shortening velocities, and some of these muscles are biarticular. In order to recreate sit-to-stand maneuvers in the anesthetized feline, we excited the hind limb musculature using intrafascicular multielectrode stimulation (IFMS) of the muscular branch of the sciatic nerve, the femoral nerve and the main branch of the sciatic nerve. Stimulation was achieved with either acutely or chronically implanted Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) via subsets of electrodes (1) that activated motor units in the extensor muscles of the hip, knee and ankle joints, (2) that were able to evoke large extension forces and (3) that manifested minimal coactivation of the targeted motor units. Three hind limb force-generation strategies were investigated, including sequential activation of independent motor units to increase force, and interleaved or simultaneous IFMS of three sets of six or more USEA electrodes that excited the hip, knee and ankle extensors. All force-generation strategies evoked stance, but the interleaved IFMS strategy also reduced muscle fatigue produced by repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers compared with fatigue produced by simultaneous activation of different motor neuron pools. These results demonstrate the use of interleaved IFMS as a means to recreate coordinated, fatigue-resistant multi-joint muscle forces in the unilateral hind limb. This muscle activation paradigm could provide a promising neuroprosthetic approach for the restoration of sit-to-stand transitions in individuals who are paralyzed by spinal cord injury, stroke or disease.

  13. Connecting Learning and Identity Development through a Transformative Activist Stance: Application in Adolescent Development in a Child Welfare Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vianna, Eduardo; Stetsenko, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between identity and learning and how their integration in adolescence is an important part of short- and long-term developmental dynamics. We discuss how social practice theories can be expanded from a position termed "transformative activist stance" that puts emphasis on collaborative practice aimed at…

  14. Participation in Peer Response as Activity: An Examination of Peer Response Stances from an Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Wei; Mitchell, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports a case study that examined English as a Second Language students' peer response stances from an activity theory perspective. More specifically, the study was guided by the constructs of activity and motive/object in Leont'ev's theory. Multiple sources of data were collected from two native Spanish-speaking students enrolled in…

  15. Control of propulsion and body lift during the first two stances of sprint running: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Debaere, Sofie; Delecluse, Christophe; Aerenhouts, Dirk; Hagman, Friso; Jonkers, Ilse

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to relate the contribution of lower limb joint moments and individual muscle forces to the body centre of mass (COM) vertical and horizontal acceleration during the initial two steps of sprint running. Start performance of seven well-trained sprinters was recorded using an optoelectronic motion analysis system and two force plates. Participant-specific torque-driven and muscle-driven simulations were conducted in OpenSim to quantify, respectively, the contributions of the individual joints and muscles to body propulsion and lift. The ankle is the major contributor to both actions during the first two stances, with an even larger contribution in the second compared to the first stance. Biarticular gastrocnemius is the main muscle contributor to propulsion in the second stance. The contribution of the hip and knee depends highly on the position of the athlete: During the first stance, where the athlete runs in a forward bending position, the knee contributes primarily to body lift and the hip contributes to propulsion and body lift. In conclusion, a small increase in ankle power generation seems to affect the body COM acceleration, whereas increases in hip and knee power generation tend to affect acceleration less. PMID:25798644

  16. Kinematics and Kinetics of Squat and Deadlift Exercises with Varying Stance Widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John K.; Fincke, Renita S.; Logan, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    The primary motion of squat and deadlift exercise involves flexion and extension of the hips, knees, and ankles, but each exercise can be performed with variations in stance width. These variations may result in differing kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRF), which may in turn affect joint loading. PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to compare ankle, knee, and hip kinematics and kinetics of normal squat (NS), wide-stance squat (WS), normal deadlift (ND), and sumo deadlift (SD). We hypothesized that hip joint kinematics and work at each joint would differ between exercise variations. METHODS: Six subjects (3 m/3 f; 70.0 plus or minus 13.7 kg; 168 plus or minus 9.9 cm) performed each lift in normal gravity on the ground-based version of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) used on the International Space Station. The ARED provided resistance with a combination vacuum tube/flywheel mechanism designed to replicate the gravitational and inertial forces of free weights. Subjects completed each lift with their 10-repetition maximum load. Kinematic data were collected at 250 Hz by a 12-camera motion-capture system (Smart-D, BTS Bioengineering, Milan, Italy), and GRF data were collected at 1000 Hz with independent force platforms for each leg (Model 9261, Kistler Instruments AG, Winterhur, Switzerland). All data were captured simultaneously on a single workstation. The right leg of a single lift for each motion was analyzed. Modeling software (OpenSim 2.2.0, Simbios, Palo Alto, CA) determined joint kinematics and net positive and negative work at each lower extremity joint. Total work was found as the sum of work across all joints and was normalized by system mass. Effect sizes and their 95% confidence intervals were computed between conditions. RESULTS: Peak GRF were similar for each lift. There were no differences between conditions in hip flexion range of motion (ROM). For hip adduction ROM, there were no differences between the NS, WS, and SD. However, hip adduction ROM was greater during the NS and SD than during the ND. Hip rotation ROM was greater during the WS than during the NS and SD, and was greater during the SD than during the ND. For knee and ankle flexion ROM, the ND, WS, and SD were not different, but ROM was greater during the NS than the ND and greater during the WS than the SD. Total eccentric work was greater during the WS than the SD. Otherwise, there were no differences in eccentric or concentric work between conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Although squat and deadlift exercises consist of similar motions, there are kinematic differences between them that depend on stance width. Total eccentric and concentric work are similar for different lifts, but differing kinematics may require activation of different musculature for each variation. With respect to each condition, in the ND the ROM of each joint tended to be less, and the WS tended to trade knee motion for hip motion. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: Knowledge of differences in kinematics and kinetics between different squat and deadlift variations is important for coaches and rehabilitation personnel to understand when prescribing exercise. Our results suggest that each variation of the squat and deadlift should be considered a separate exercise that may induce different long-term training effects.

  17. Adopting the ritual stance: The role of opacity and context in ritual and everyday actions.

    PubMed

    Kapitány, Rohan; Nielsen, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Rituals are a pervasive and ubiquitous aspect of human culture, but when we naïvely observe an opaque set of ritual actions, how do we come to understand its significance? To investigate this, across two experiments we manipulated the degree to which actions were ritualistic or ordinary, and whether or not they were accompanied with context. In Experiment 1, 474 adult participants were presented with videos of novel rituals (causally opaque actions) or control actions (causally transparent) performed on a set of objects accompanied with neutral-valance written context. Experiment 2 presented the same video stimuli but with negative and aversive written context. In both experiments ritualized objects were rated as physically unchanged, but more 'special' and more 'desirable' than objects subjected to control actions, with context amplifying this effect. Results are discussed with reference to the Ritual Stance and the Social-Action hypothesis. Implications for both theories are discussed, as are methodological concerns regarding the empirical investigation of ritual cognition. We argue that causally opaque ritual actions guide the behavior of naïve viewers because such actions are perceived as socially normative, rather than with reference to supernatural intervention or causation. PMID:26298423

  18. Comparison of ISO Standard and TKR Patient Axial Force Profiles during the Stance Phase of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Hannah J.; Ngai, Valentina; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical endurance testing of total knee replacements (TKRs) is performed using International Organization for Standardization (ISO) load and motion protocols. The standards are based on data from normal subjects and may not sufficiently mimic in vivo implant conditions. In this study, a mathematical model was used to calculate the axial force profile of 30 TKR patients with two current implant types, 22 with NexGen and eight with Miller-Galante II Cruciate-Retaining TKRs, and statistically compare the axial force specified by the ISO standard to the TKR patients. Significant differences were found between the axial forces of both groups of TKR patients and the ISO standard at local maxima and minima points in the first half of stance. The force impulse (area under the axial force curve, representing cumulative loading) was smaller for the ISO standard than the TKR patients, but only for those with NexGen implants. Waveform analysis using the coefficient of multiple correlation showed that the ISO and TKR patient axial force profiles were similar. The combined effect of ISO standard compressive load and motion differences from TKR patients could explain some of the differences between the wear scars on retrieved tibial components and those tested in total joint simulators. PMID:22558837

  19. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Area Oscillations during Stance, Stepping and Freezing in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraix, Valerie; Bastin, Julien; David, Olivier; Goetz, Laurent; Ferraye, Murielle; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Chabardes, Stephan; Pollak, Pierre; Debû, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The pedunculopontine area (PPNa) including the pedunculopontine and cuneiform nuclei, belongs to the mesencephalic locomotor region. Little is known about the oscillatory mechanisms underlying the function of this region in postural and gait control. We examined the modulations of the oscillatory activity of the PPNa and cortex during stepping, a surrogate of gait, and stance in seven Parkinson’s disease patients who received bilateral PPNa implantation for disabling freezing of gait (FOG). In the days following the surgery, we recorded behavioural data together with the local field potentials of the PPNa during sitting, standing and stepping-in-place, under two dopaminergic medication conditions (OFF and ON levodopa). Our results showed that OFF levodopa, all subjects had FOG during step-in-place trials, while ON levodopa, stepping was effective (mean duration of FOG decreasing from 61.7±36.1% to 7.3±10.1% of trial duration). ON levodopa, there was an increase in PPNa alpha (5–12 Hz) oscillatory activity and a decrease in beta (13–35 Hz) and gamma (65–90 Hz) bands activity. PPNa activity was not modulated during quiet standing and sitting. Our results confirm the role of the PPNa in the regulation of gait and suggest that, in Parkinson disease, gait difficulties could be related to an imbalance between low and higher frequencies. PMID:24386308

  20. Pedunculopontine nucleus area oscillations during stance, stepping and freezing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fraix, Valerie; Bastin, Julien; David, Olivier; Goetz, Laurent; Ferraye, Murielle; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Chabardes, Stephan; Pollak, Pierre; Debû, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The pedunculopontine area (PPNa) including the pedunculopontine and cuneiform nuclei, belongs to the mesencephalic locomotor region. Little is known about the oscillatory mechanisms underlying the function of this region in postural and gait control. We examined the modulations of the oscillatory activity of the PPNa and cortex during stepping, a surrogate of gait, and stance in seven Parkinson's disease patients who received bilateral PPNa implantation for disabling freezing of gait (FOG). In the days following the surgery, we recorded behavioural data together with the local field potentials of the PPNa during sitting, standing and stepping-in-place, under two dopaminergic medication conditions (OFF and ON levodopa). Our results showed that OFF levodopa, all subjects had FOG during step-in-place trials, while ON levodopa, stepping was effective (mean duration of FOG decreasing from 61.7±36.1% to 7.3±10.1% of trial duration). ON levodopa, there was an increase in PPNa alpha (5-12 Hz) oscillatory activity and a decrease in beta (13-35 Hz) and gamma (65-90 Hz) bands activity. PPNa activity was not modulated during quiet standing and sitting. Our results confirm the role of the PPNa in the regulation of gait and suggest that, in Parkinson disease, gait difficulties could be related to an imbalance between low and higher frequencies. PMID:24386308

  1. Estimation of Quasi-Stiffness of the Human Hip in the Stance Phase of Walking

    PubMed Central

    Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a framework for selection of subject-specific quasi-stiffness of hip orthoses and exoskeletons, and other devices that are intended to emulate the biological performance of this joint during walking. The hip joint exhibits linear moment-angular excursion behavior in both the extension and flexion stages of the resilient loading-unloading phase that consists of terminal stance and initial swing phases. Here, we establish statistical models that can closely estimate the slope of linear fits to the moment-angle graph of the hip in this phase, termed as the quasi-stiffness of the hip. Employing an inverse dynamics analysis, we identify a series of parameters that can capture the nearly linear hip quasi-stiffnesses in the resilient loading phase. We then employ regression analysis on experimental moment-angle data of 216 gait trials across 26 human adults walking over a wide range of gait speeds (0.75–2.63 m/s) to obtain a set of general-form statistical models that estimate the hip quasi-stiffnesses using body weight and height, gait speed, and hip excursion. We show that the general-form models can closely estimate the hip quasi-stiffness in the extension (R2?=?92%) and flexion portions (R2?=?89%) of the resilient loading phase of the gait. We further simplify the general-form models and present a set of stature-based models that can estimate the hip quasi-stiffness for the preferred gait speed using only body weight and height with an average error of 27% for the extension stage and 37% for the flexion stage. PMID:24349136

  2. Reliability of the Achilles tendon tap reflex evoked during stance using a pendulum hammer.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Bent, Leah R

    2016-01-01

    The tendon tap reflex (T-reflex) is often evoked in relaxed muscles to assess spinal reflex circuitry. Factors contributing to reflex excitability are modulated to accommodate specific postural demands. Thus, there is a need to be able to assess this reflex in a state where spinal reflex circuitry is engaged in maintaining posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pendulum hammer could provide controlled stimuli to the Achilles tendon and evoke reliable muscle responses during normal stance. A second aim was to establish appropriate stimulus parameters for experimental use. Fifteen healthy young adults stood on a forceplate while taps were applied to the Achilles tendon under conditions in which postural sway was constrained (by providing centre of pressure feedback) or unconstrained (no feedback) from an invariant release angle (50°). Twelve participants repeated this testing approximately six months later. Within one experimental session, tap force and T-reflex amplitude were found to be reliable regardless of whether postural sway was constrained (tap force ICC=0.982; T-reflex ICC=0.979) or unconstrained (tap force ICC=0.968; T-reflex ICC=0.964). T-reflex amplitude was also reliable between experimental sessions (constrained ICC=0.894; unconstrained ICC=0.890). When a T-reflex recruitment curve was constructed, optimal mid-range responses were observed using a 50° release angle. These results demonstrate that reliable Achilles T-reflexes can be evoked in standing participants without the need to constrain posture. The pendulum hammer provides a simple method to allow researchers and clinicians to gather information about reflex circuitry in a state where it is involved in postural control. PMID:26454702

  3. Recalibration of somesthetic plantar information in the control of undisturbed upright stance maintenance.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Demanze, L; Burdet, C; Berger, L; Rougier, P

    2004-12-01

    To assess the effects of changes in somesthetic plantar information on upright quiet stance, a rotary plantar massage was applied under the feet of healthy subjects for ten minutes. The controlling variable, the centre of pressure (CP) displacements, were recorded, before and after massage, through a force platform and decomposed into two elementary motions: the vertical projection of the centre of gravity (CG(v)) and the difference between the latter and the CP (CP-CG(v)) along medio-lateral ML and antero-posterior AP directions. These motions were processed through frequency analysis and modelled as fractional Brownian motion. For CP-CG(v) motions, the frequency analysis shows that massage under the plantar soles induces a decrease of the amplitudes along the ML direction suggesting reduced overall muscular activity (abductor-adductor muscles of the hip according to Winter et al.). A general trend is that the CG(v) amplitudes are also diminished after massage especially in the ML direction, indicating a better distribution of the body weight on the two supports. On the other hand, the effects tend to vanish after about 8 minutes. Conversely, when the massage was given under the toes, no particular effect on any elementary motion was observed, suggesting that the plantar mechanoreceptors under the toes necessitate stronger stimulation to respond significantly and/or that the greater sensitivity obtained was not used by the CNS. Overall, this data emphasises the fact that a recalibration of somesthetic cues may occur when enhanced afferent information is fed to the postural system. PMID:15657978

  4. Postural stability of canoeing and kayaking young male athletes during quiet stance.

    PubMed

    Stambolieva, Katerina; Diafas, Vassilis; Bachev, Vichren; Christova, Lilia; Gatev, Plamen

    2012-05-01

    We studied the postural stability of 23 canoeing and kayaking young athletes and 15 healthy untrained age matched subjects during quiet and sensory conflicted stance (standing on stable and foam support with open and closed eyes). We measured with a force platform the center of pressure excursions and applied mean sway amplitude (MA), mean sway velocity (SV) and their Romberg ratios, and sway dispersion index to evaluate standing balance. During standing with eyes open, the athletes in comparison to non-athletes showed in sagittal and frontal plane greater MA and SV when the support was stable and smaller MA and SV when it was unstable. During standing with eyes closed, there were no differences between groups when the support was stable, however, the athletes sway faster and have smaller MA than controls while standing on the foam support. During standing on stable support, Romberg ratios for MA and SV revealed that unlike non-athletes the athletes' MA and SV were vision independent. However, while standing on unstable support the athletes' MA and SV became vision dependent and even greater for the medio-lateral sway. Canoeists' SV vision dependency in both planes was greater than for other groups. These results are in line with our hypothesis that young kayaking and canoeing athletes have a different from non-athletes model of sensory integration due to their specific sporting activity. One possible mechanism of this model may be a subtle re-adaptation deficit after disembarking to stable ground with diminished sensitivity of vision and vestibular apparatus. PMID:21909987

  5. Estimation of quasi-stiffness of the human hip in the stance phase of walking.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S; Dollar, Aaron M

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a framework for selection of subject-specific quasi-stiffness of hip orthoses and exoskeletons, and other devices that are intended to emulate the biological performance of this joint during walking. The hip joint exhibits linear moment-angular excursion behavior in both the extension and flexion stages of the resilient loading-unloading phase that consists of terminal stance and initial swing phases. Here, we establish statistical models that can closely estimate the slope of linear fits to the moment-angle graph of the hip in this phase, termed as the quasi-stiffness of the hip. Employing an inverse dynamics analysis, we identify a series of parameters that can capture the nearly linear hip quasi-stiffnesses in the resilient loading phase. We then employ regression analysis on experimental moment-angle data of 216 gait trials across 26 human adults walking over a wide range of gait speeds (0.75-2.63 m/s) to obtain a set of general-form statistical models that estimate the hip quasi-stiffnesses using body weight and height, gait speed, and hip excursion. We show that the general-form models can closely estimate the hip quasi-stiffness in the extension (R(2)?=?92%) and flexion portions (R(2)?=?89%) of the resilient loading phase of the gait. We further simplify the general-form models and present a set of stature-based models that can estimate the hip quasi-stiffness for the preferred gait speed using only body weight and height with an average error of 27% for the extension stage and 37% for the flexion stage. PMID:24349136

  6. Trains of electrical stimulation of the trapezius muscles redistribute the frequencies of body oscillations during stance.

    PubMed

    Nhouvannasak, V; Clément, S; Manto, M

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the postural effects of trains of electrical stimulation (TES) applied unilaterally or bilaterally on the trapezius muscle in 20 healthy subjects (mean age: 23.1?±?1.33?years; F/M: 8/12). The anterior-posterior (AP) displacements (AP axis), medio-lateral displacements (ML axis) and total travelled distances (TTW) of the centre of pressure (COP) remained unchanged with TES. However, detailed spectral analysis of COP oscillations revealed a marked decrease of the magnitudes of peak power spectral density (peak PSD) following application of TES. Peak PSD was highly correlated with the intensity of stimulation (P?0.30) and the integrals of the sub-band 8-10?Hz were significantly increased (P?stance. Previous studies have shown that patients with supra-tentorial stroke show an increased peak PSD in low frequencies of body oscillations. Therefore, our findings provide a rationale to assess neurostimulation of the trapezius muscle in the rehabilitation of postural deficits in supra-tentorial stroke. PMID:26004862

  7. Gait modification strategies of trunk over left stance phase in patients with right anterior cruciate ligament deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dongliang; Li, Nannan; Wang, Yubin; Jiang, Shuyun; Li, Jinglong; Zhu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the gait modification strategies of trunk over left stance phase in patients with right anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACL-D). Methods: Thirty-six patients with right ACL-D and thirty-six health subjects (control) were recruited to undergo a 3-dimensional (3D) gait analysis. Coordinate data from 26 reflective markers positioned on the body surface of participants were recorded with a 3D optical video motion capture system, as they walked on the ground, ascended and descended a custom-built staircase. Angle changes in the 3-planes under different walking conditions were analyzed. Results: There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the trunk at the transverse plane angle in most measurements. With the walk pattern of stair descent, the trunk at all 3-plane angles, at the maximum value of the left knee sagittal/coronal/transverse plane moment, was significantly different between the two groups (P ? 0.03). Conclusions: Our findings suggested that special gait modification of trunk is apparent over stance of left (healthy) side in patients with right ACL-D. The results of this study may supply more insight with respect to improving the diagnosis and rehabilitation of ACL-D. This information may also be helpful for a better use of walk and stair tasks as part of a rehabilitation program and provide a safe guideline for the patients. PMID:26550279

  8. Restoration of Stance Phase Knee Flexion during Walking after Spinal Cord Injury using a Variable Impedance Orthosis

    PubMed Central

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald. J.

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) combines lower extremity bracing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore walking function and enhance the efficiency of ambulation. This report details the development of a novel HNP containing a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM) capable of supporting the knee against collapse while allowing controlled stance phase knee flexion. The design of a closed loop, finite state controller for coordination of VIKM activity with FNS-driven gait is presented. The controller is verified in testing during able bodied gait. The improved functionality provided by this system has the potential to delay the onset of fatigue and to expand FNS driven gait to allow walking over uneven terrains and down stairs. PMID:22254383

  9. Origins of Children's Externalizing Behavior Problems in Low-Income Families: Toddlers’ Willing Stance toward their Mothers as the Missing Link

    PubMed Central

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Kim, Sanghag; Boldt, Lea J.

    2013-01-01

    Although children's active role in socialization has been long acknowledged, relevant research has typically focused on children's difficult temperament or negative behaviors that elicit coercive and adversarial processes, largely overlooking their capacity to act as positive, willing, even enthusiastic, active socialization agents. We studied the willing, receptive stance toward their mothers in 186 24-44-month-old children in a low-income sample. Confirmatory Factor Analysis supported a latent construct of willing stance, manifested as children's responsiveness to mothers in naturalistic interactions, responsive imitation in teaching contexts, and committed compliance with maternal prohibitions, all observed in the laboratory. Structural Equation Modeling analyses confirmed that ecological adversity undermined maternal responsiveness and responsiveness, in turn, was linked to children's willing stance. A compromised willing stance predicted externalizing behavior problems, assessed 10 months later, and fully mediated the links between maternal responsiveness and those outcomes. Ecological adversity had a direct, unmediated effect on internalizing behavior problems. Considering children's active role as willing, receptive agents capable of embracing parental influence can lead to a more complete understanding of detrimental mechanisms that link ecological adversity with antisocial developmental pathways. It can also inform research on the normative socialization process, consistent with the objectives of developmental psychopathology. PMID:24229537

  10. Taking an Effective Authorial Stance in Academic Writing: Making the Linguistic Resources Explicit for L2 Writers in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Peichin; Schleppegrell, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Taking an assertive stance toward research being reviewed or reported is a challenging task for second language writers. This aspect of interpersonal meaning is especially difficult to address through direct instruction, as attention to particular grammatical and lexical choices outside of contexts of use is not enough to help students develop the…

  11. "The Mystery . . .": A Corpus-based Study of the Use of Nouns To Construct Stance in Theses from Two Contrasting Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Maggie

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the construction of stance through nouns in two corpora of theses--200,000 words in politics and international relations and 300,000 words in materials science. Examines nouns that are preceded by sentence initial deicitic "This" and that serve to encapsulate earlier prepositions. (Author/VWL)

  12. Republicans change tune for Hispanic votes Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich are softening their stance on immigration issues in an attempt to be more

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    be detrimental to the Republican Party, according to former Florida governor Jeb Bush. "If we ignoreRepublicans change tune for Hispanic votes Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich are softening their stance, Florida - It is just three days before the crucial Florida Republican primary and former Massachusetts

  13. The Role of Knee Positioning and Range-of-Motion on the Closed-Stance Forehand Tennis Swing.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, Steven M; Serrano, Monika; Elzinga, Mike

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of knee positioning and range-of- motion on the closed-stance forehand tennis swing. The analyses of tennis swing mechanics were performed using a computer model comprised of a full-body model of a human and an inertial model of a racket. The model was driven by subject forehand swings (16 female college-level subjects) recorded with a high-speed digital motion analysis system. The study discovered that both initial knee positioning and range-of-motion were positively related to racket velocity and characteristic of more skilled players. The direct effects of knee positioning and range-of-motion on racket movement are minimal, however there are several indirect biomechanical effects on the forehand motion such as movement of the body mass center, work of the knee, hip and back joints, and the angular range-of-motion of the hips and torso. Some of these indirect effects were related to racket velocity and characteristic of more skilled players. Factors that influenced knee positioning and range-of-motion include years of playing, amount of coaching, and body style. Efforts to both increase and restrict the knee movements of the subjects resulted in substantially lower racket velocities (and other detrimental biomechanical effects) implying that there may be optimal knee positions and range-of-motion for a given subject. The most skilled subject exhibited a high degree of consistency of knee positioning and range-of-motion. This subject adjusted for varying ball height through modified initial knee positioning while maintaining fairly constant ranges-of-motion. Key pointsInitial knee positioning and range-of-motion were positively related to racket velocity and characteristic of more skilled players for the closed stance forehand motion.Knee positioning and range-of-motion had several indirect biomechanical effects on the forehand motion such as movement of the body mass center, work of the knee, hip and back joints, and the angular range-of-motion of the hips and torso.Efforts to both increase and restrict the knee movements resulted in substantially lower racket velocities implying that there may be optimal knee positions and range-of-motion for a given subject.The most skilled subject exhibited a high degree of consistency of knee positioning and range-of-motion. This subject adjusted for varying ball height through modified initial knee positioning while maintaining fairly constant ranges-of-motion. PMID:24150143

  14. Evaluative Decision-Making for High-Quality Professional Development: Cultivating an Evaluative Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumsion, Jennifer; Lunn Brownlee, Joanne; Ryan, Sharon; Walsh, Kerryann; Farrell, Ann; Irvine, Susan; Mulhearn, Gerry; Berthelsen, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented policy attention to early childhood education internationally has highlighted the crucial need for a skilled early years workforce. Consequently, professional development of early years educators has become a global policy imperative. At the same time, many maintain that professional development research has reached an impasse. In…

  15. Activation of the gluteus medius according to load during horizontal hip abduction in a one-leg stance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Woong; Kim, Yeong-Ju; Koo, Hyun-Mo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the influences of different loads on muscle activity of the posterior fibers of the gluteus medius in a one-leg standing position. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adult men participated in this study. [Methods] All participants performed the one-leg standing position under four conditions: the standard no-load condition, in which the non-weight-bearing leg was lifted and kept parallel to the back and then pelvic or lumbar rotation was performed without thorax rotation, and the 0?kg, 1?kg, and 3?kg load conditions, in which horizontal shoulder abduction was performed with a load of 0?kg, 1?kg, or 3?kg added to the hand. The electromyographic activity of the posterior fibers of the gluteus medius was measured using a wireless surface electromyography under all conditions. The electromyographic activity of each muscle under the four conditions during the one-leg stance was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. [Results] The electromyographic activity of the posterior fiber of the gluteus medius was significantly increased under the 3?kg load condition compared with the no-load, 0?kg load, and 1?kg load conditions. [Conclusion] These findings indicated that muscle activation is affected by increases in load in the one-leg standing position. The load on the upper extremity influences the muscle activity of the contralateral lower extremity. PMID:26356544

  16. Clarification of functional differences between the hallux and lesser toes during the single leg stance: immediate effects of conditioning contraction of the toe plantar flexion muscles

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Junya; Tojima, Michio; Torii, Suguru

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the functional differences of the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux and lesser toes during the single leg stance by comparing postural sway in different conditioning contraction interventions. [Subjects] Thirty-four healthy, young males and females participated in this study. [Methods] The front-back and right-left direction components of maximal displacement and postural sway velocity during the single leg stance were measured in various conditioning contraction interventions for the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux or lessor toes. [Results] The main findings of this study were as follows: 1) the front-back direction component of maximal displacement was reduced by conditioning contraction of the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux, and 2) the front-back direction component of the postural sway velocity was reduced by conditioning contraction of the plantar flexion muscles of the lesser toes during the single leg stance. [Conclusion] The plantar flexion muscles of the lesser toes control the postural sway velocity. Furthermore, the plantar flexion muscles of the hallux appear to control the amplitude of postural sway. PMID:26504272

  17. (Positive) power to the child: The role of children's willing stance toward parents in developmental cascades from toddler age to early preadolescence.

    PubMed

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Kim, Sanghag; Boldt, Lea J

    2015-11-01

    In a change from the once-dominant view of children as passive in the parent-led process of socialization, children are now seen as active agents who can considerably influence that process. However, these newer perspectives typically focus on the child's antagonistic influence, due either to a difficult temperament or aversive, resistant, negative behaviors that elicit adversarial responses from the parent and lead to future coercive cascades in the relationship. Children's capacity to act as receptive, willing, even enthusiastic, active socialization agents is largely overlooked. Informed by attachment theory and other relational perspectives, we depict children as able to adopt an active willing stance and to exert robust positive influence in the mutually cooperative socialization enterprise. A longitudinal study of 100 community families (mothers, fathers, and children) demonstrates that willing stance (a) is a latent construct, observable in diverse parent-child contexts, parallel at 38, 52, and 67 months and longitudinally stable; (b) originates within an early secure parent-child relationship at 25 months; and (c) promotes a positive future cascade toward adaptive outcomes at age 10. The outcomes include the parent's observed and child-reported positive, responsive behavior, as well as child-reported internal obligation to obey the parent and parent-reported low level of child behavior problems. The construct of willing stance has implications for basic research in typical socialization and in developmental psychopathology as well as for prevention and intervention. PMID:26439058

  18. (Positive) Power to the Child: The Role of Children's Willing Stance toward Parents in Developmental Cascades from Toddler Age to Early Preadolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Kim, Sanghag; Boldt, Lea J.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to once dominant views of children as passive in the parent-led process of socialization, they are now seen as active agents who can considerably influence that process. But those newer perspectives typically focus on the child's antagonistic influence, due either to a difficult temperament or aversive, resistant, negative behaviors that elicit adversarial responses from the parent and lead to future coercive cascades in the relationship. Children's capacity to act as receptive, willing, even enthusiastic, active socialization agents is largely overlooked. Informed by attachment theory and other relational perspectives, we depict children as able to adopt an active willing stance and to exert robust positive influence in the mutually cooperative socialization enterprise. A longitudinal study of 100 community families (mothers, fathers, and children) demonstrates that willing stance (a) is a latent construct, observable in diverse parent-child contexts parallel at 38, 52, and 67 months, and longitudinally stable, (b) originates within an early secure parent-child relationship at 25 months, and (c) promotes a positive future cascade toward adaptive outcomes at age 10. The outcomes include the parent's observed and child-reported positive, responsive behavior, as well as child-reported internal obligation to obey the parent and parent-reported low level of child behavior problems. The construct of willing stance has implications for basic research in typical socialization and in developmental psychopathology, and for prevention and intervention. PMID:26439058

  19. Influence of Electrotactile Tongue Feedback on Controlling Upright Stance during Rotational and/or Translational Sway-referencing with Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Bach-y-Rita, Paul; MacDougall, Hamish G.; Moore, Steven T.; Stallings, Valerie L.; Paloski, William H.; Black, F. Owen

    2007-01-01

    Integration of multi-sensory inputs to detect tilts relative to gravity is critical for sensorimotor control of upright orientation. Displaying body orientation using electrotactile feedback to the tongue has been developed by Bach-y-Rita and colleagues as a sensory aid to maintain upright stance with impaired vestibular feedback. MacDougall et al. (2006) recently demonstrated that unpredictably varying Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) significantly increased anterior-posterior (AP) sway during rotational sway referencing with eyes closed. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of electrotactile feedback on postural control performance with pseudorandom binaural bipolar GVS. Postural equilibrium was measured with a computerized hydraulic platform in 10 healthy adults (6M, 4F, 24-65 y). Tactile feedback (TF) of pitch and roll body orientation was derived from a two-axis linear accelerometer mounted on a torso belt and displayed on a 144-point electrotactile array held against the anterior dorsal tongue (BrainPort, Wicab, Inc., Middleton, WI). Subjects were trained to use TF by voluntarily swaying to draw figures on their tongue, both with and without GVS. Subjects were required to keep the intraoral display in their mouths on all trials, including those that did not provide TF. Subjects performed 24 randomized trials (20 s duration with eyes closed) including four support surface conditions (fixed, rotational sway-referenced, translating the support surface proportional to AP sway, and combined rotational-translational sway-referencing), each repeated twice with and without GVS, and with combined GVS and TF. Postural performance was assessed using deviations from upright (peak-to-peak and RMS sway) and convergence toward stability limits (time and distance to base of support boundaries). Postural stability was impaired with GVS in all platform conditions, with larger decrements in performance during trials with rotation sway-referencing. Electrotactile feedback improved performance with GVS toward non-GVS levels, again with the greatest improvement during trials with rotation sway-referencing. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of tongue electrotactile feedback in providing sensory substitution to maintain postural stability with distorted vestibular input.

  20. Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Circle, David

    2005-01-01

    When a teacher gives their time to a student, it is more significant to that student than anything else one could do for him or her. Music teachers deal with time all the time. Someone once said that "time is like money: we never have enough." This may seem true; however, time is not like money. One can make more money, but one cannot "make time."…

  1. US definitions, current use, and FDA stance on use of platelet-rich plasma in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Beitzel, Knut; Allen, Donald; Apostolakos, John; Russell, Ryan P; McCarthy, Mary Beth; Gallo, Gregory J; Cote, Mark P; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2015-02-01

    With increased utilization of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), it is important for clinicians to understand the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory role and stance on PRP. Blood products such as PRP fall under the prevue of FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER). CBER is responsible for regulating human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products. The regulatory process for these products is described in the FDA's 21 CFR 1271 of the Code of Regulations. Under these regulations, certain products including blood products such as PRP are exempt and therefore do not follow the FDA's traditional regulatory pathway that includes animal studies and clinical trials. The 510(k) application is the pathway used to bring PRP preparation systems to the market. The 510(k) application allows devices that are "substantially equivalent" to a currently marketed device to come to the market. There are numerous PRP preparation systems on the market today with FDA clearance; however, nearly all of these systems have 510(k) clearance for producing platelet-rich preparations intended to be used to mix with bone graft materials to enhance bone graft handling properties in orthopedic practices. The use of PRP outside this setting, for example, an office injection, would be considered "off label." Clinicians are free to use a product off-label as long as certain responsibilities are met. Per CBER, when the intent is the practice of medicine, clinicians "have the responsibility to be well informed about the product, to base its use on firm scientific rationale and on sound medical evidence, and to maintain records of the product's use and effects." Finally, despite PRP being exempted, the language in 21 CFR 1271 has caused some recent concern over activated PRP; however to date, the FDA has not attempted to regulate activated PRP. Clinicians using activated PRP should be mindful of these concerns and continued to stay informed. PMID:25268794

  2. Naturalness as an ethical stance: idea(l)s and practices of care in western herbal medicine in the UK.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    An association of non-biomedical healthcare with appeals to nature and naturalness, and an invocation of a rhetoric of gentleness, goodness, purity and moral power has been noted previously, and some scholars argue that nature has taken on a meaning broadly opposed to the rational scientific order of modernity. Drawing on an ethnographic study of women's practice and use of western herbal medicine (WHM) in the UK, the intertwining of the perceived naturalness of WHM with distinct care practices points to a further avenue for exploration. To examine patients' and herbalists' discourses of the naturalness of WHM and associated idea(l)s and practices of care, understandings of nature and a feminist ethics of care are utilized as analytical frameworks. The analysis presented suggests that, through WHM, patients and herbalists become embedded in a complex spatio-temporal wholeness and web of care that intertwines past, present and future, self and others, and local and global concerns. In the emerging 'ordinary ethics of care', naturalness constitutes a sign of goodness and of a shared humanity within the organic world, while care, underpinned by idea(l)s of natural and holistic care practices, links human and non-human others. Thus, the naturalness of WHM, as perceived by some patients and herbalists, engages and blends with a continually unfolding field of relationships in the lifeworld(s), where care practices, caring relations and collective wellbeing may constitute an ethical stance that raises deeper questions about the significance of relationality, the values of care/caring and the mutual involvement of nature and human being(s). PMID:26001272

  3. The effect of low-dye taping on rearfoot motion and plantar pressure during the stance phase of gait

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; Kennedy, Norelee; O'Neill, Emer; Ni Mhainin, Una

    2008-01-01

    Background Low-dye (LD) taping is commonly used to reduce rearfoot pronation. No studies have previously investigated the effectiveness of LD taping using both plantar pressure distribution (F-Scan) and 3-D (CODA) analysis of rearfoot motion. Methods 20 healthy subjects with a navicular drop test exceeding 10 mm participated in the study. T tests were used to determine whether significant (p < 0.05) differences in plantar pressure and rearfoot motion occurred with LD taping. Results LD taping resulted in statistically significant increases in peak plantar pressure in the lateral midfoot (p = 0.000), along with significant decreases in pressure in the medial forefoot (p = 0.014), and the medial (p = 0.000) and lateral hindfoot (p = 0.007). No significant changes occurred in the medial midfoot (p = 0.794) or lateral forefoot (p = 0.654). When assessed using motion analysis, taping resulted in a statistically significant decrease in rearfoot pronation (p = 0.006), supination (p = 0.025) and total rearfoot range of motion (p = 0.000). The mean rearfoot position during stance was not significantly different however (p = 0.188). Conclusion LD taping is associated with alterations in peak plantar pressure in the midfoot and forefoot that indicate reduced pronation with LD taping. However, LD taping appears to reduce both pronation and supination in the rearfoot, rather than simply reducing pronation, when assessed using 3D motion analysis. Therefore, it would appear that LD taping does indeed reduce pronation, by restricting rearfoot motion in general, rather than pronation specifically. The degree of change observed with LD taping was however very small, and further research is needed to clarify the clinical significance of these initial findings. PMID:18710520

  4. Estimation of quasi-stiffness and propulsive work of the human ankle in the stance phase of walking.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Sawicki, Gregory S; Dollar, Aaron M

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing the quasi-stiffness and work of lower extremity joints is critical for evaluating human locomotion and designing assistive devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate the biological behavior of human legs. This work aims to establish statistical models that allow us to predict the ankle quasi-stiffness and net mechanical work for adults walking on level ground. During the stance phase of walking, the ankle joint propels the body through three distinctive phases of nearly constant stiffness known as the quasi-stiffness of each phase. Using a generic equation for the ankle moment obtained through an inverse dynamics analysis, we identify key independent parameters needed to predict ankle quasi-stiffness and propulsive work and also the functional form of each correlation. These parameters include gait speed, ankle excursion, and subject height and weight. Based on the identified form of the correlation and key variables, we applied linear regression on experimental walking data for 216 gait trials across 26 subjects (speeds from 0.75-2.63 m/s) to obtain statistical models of varying complexity. The most general forms of the statistical models include all the key parameters and have an R(2) of 75% to 81% in the prediction of the ankle quasi-stiffnesses and propulsive work. The most specific models include only subject height and weight and could predict the ankle quasi-stiffnesses and work for optimal walking speed with average error of 13% to 30%. We discuss how these models provide a useful framework and foundation for designing subject- and gait-specific prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological ankle function during level ground walking. PMID:23555839

  5. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  6. On the text surface the transition from one communicative goal to another can, for in-stance, be observed from the text layout. Where a new goal sets in, the p;i.ragral)h structure

    E-print Network

    , be observed from the text layout. Where a new goal sets in, the p;i.ragral)h structure is often interrupted. . On the text surface the transition from one communicative goal to another can, for in- stance to the same communicative goal. Instead, a new lexeme expressing the new global :[bcus is usually preferred

  7. Philip Morris's website and television commercials use new language to mislead the public into believing it has changed its stance on smoking and disease

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lissy C

    2007-01-01

    Objectives This paper analyses Philip Morris's evolving website and the legal strategies employed in its creation and dissemination. Methods Internal tobacco documents were searched and examined and their substance verified and triangulated using media accounts, legal and public health research papers, and visits to Philip Morris's website. Various drafts of website language, as well as informal discussion of the website's creation, were located in internal Philip Morris documents. I compared website statements pertaining to Philip Morris's stance on cigarette smoking and disease with statements made in tobacco trials. Results Philip Morris created and disseminated its website's message that it agreed that smoking causes disease and is addictive in an effort to sway public opinion, while maintaining in a litigation setting its former position that it cannot be proved that smoking causes disease or is addictive. Conclusions Philip Morris has not changed its position on smoking and health or addiction in the one arena where it has the most to lose—in the courtroom, under oath. PMID:18048599

  8. Age-related changes in force and power associated with balance of women in quiet bilateral stance on a firm surface.

    PubMed

    Skurvidas, A; Cesnaitiene, V J; Mickeviciene, D; Gutnik, B; Nicholson, J; Hudson, G

    2012-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of the fluctuations of the body centre of mass (CM) while in a stationary bilateral stance on a firm surface is an important criterion of the functional state of human motor-vestibular and sensory apparatus. From analysis of the literature we conclude that more objective characteristics of human balance in quiet standing may be the amount of energy used to maintain the CM in a constant position. Further analysis of the references showed that these characteristics have not been investigated in neurological practice. In this study, the displacement of CM in participants standing in a normal anatomical position was analysed. Forty-five healthy women in three age groups: 18-24, 45-55 and over 60 years participated in the experiments, which consisted of recording changes in partial body weight on the force platform (under one leg) in situations with opened and closed eyes. The specific power of oscillation of body sway and force of lateral swing of CM were calculated. Results indicated that the maximum specific power of oscillation and force of lateral swing were observed in the group of women older than 60 years, especially in the absence of vision. Minimum values occurred in the group of 18-24 years. We also found a considerable variability in all indices in all age groups. This indicates that the stability of the vertical posture in humans depends also on the individual biological characteristics of the central nervous and muscular systems. PMID:22520438

  9. How does postural stability following a single leg drop jump landing task relate to postural stability during a single leg stance balance task?

    PubMed

    Fransz, Duncan P; Huurnink, Arnold; Kingma, Idsart; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2014-09-22

    We aimed to verify whether the static phase after a single leg drop jump (DJ) landing on a force plate may serve as a proxy for a single leg stance (SLS) balance task, as this would increase the application possibilities of landing tasks in the evaluation of sensorimotor function in relation to injury rehabilitation or performance assessment. Twenty-five healthy participants performed two sessions of five valid trials for both tasks in a reproducibility-agreement design. Three postural stability outcome measures ('COP speed', 'COP sway' and 'Horizontal GRF') were calculated for DJ (5-20s after landing) and for SLS (15s), and were averaged per session. Paired T-tests revealed a learning effect of SLS for postural stability (4.6-6.1%; P-values <0.03), in contrast to DJ (P-values >0.27). Only session 2 resulted in superior postural stability for SLS compared to DJ for 'COP speed' (5.0%; P=0.017) and 'Horizontal GRF' (8.2%; P=0.001). Bland and Altman methods demonstrated inter-session SD's of difference for DJ of 11-12% and for SLS of 10-12%, while inter-task SD's of difference ranged 10-17%. Precision ('SD within') was better for SLS concerning 'COP speed' (14-15% vs 13%) and 'Horizontal GRF' (18-20% vs 14-15%). In conclusion, postural stability during DJ and SLS cannot be considered interchangeable, due to a learning effect for SLS and inferior precision for DJ. However, a DJ task may be used as a proxy for static postural stability, although more than three trials are needed to achieve individual errors similar to SLS for 'COP speed' (4) and 'Horizontal GRF' (5). PMID:25016486

  10. NOAAINMFS Developments Japan Eases Stance

    E-print Network

    the distribution of brown and red seaweeds on which the microscopic unicellular alga, Gambierdiscus toxicus, grows as an epiphyte. (This alga has been im- plicated as a source of the ciguatoxin in the coral reef ecosystem which

  11. Customized Noise-Stimulation Intensity for Bipedal Stability and Unipedal Balance Deficits Associated With Functional Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Scott E.; Linens, Shelley W.; Wright, Cynthia J.; Arnold, Brent L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Stochastic resonance stimulation (SRS) administered at an optimal intensity could maximize the effects of treatment on balance. Objective: To determine if a customized optimal SRS intensity is better than a traditional SRS protocol (applying the same percentage sensory threshold intensity for all participants) for improving double- and single-legged balance in participants with or without functional ankle instability (FAI). Design: Case-control study with an embedded crossover design. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twelve healthy participants (6 men, 6 women; age = 22 ± 2 years, height = 170 ± 7 cm, mass = 64 ± 10 kg) and 12 participants (6 men, 6 women; age = 23 ± 3 years, height = 174 ± 8 cm, mass = 69 ± 10 kg) with FAI. Intervention(s): The SRS optimal intensity level was determined by finding the intensity from 4 experimental intensities at the percentage sensory threshold (25% [SRS25], 50% [SRS50], 75% [SRS75], 90% [SRS90]) that produced the greatest improvement in resultant center-of-pressure velocity (R-COPV) over a control condition (SRS0) during double-legged balance. We examined double- and single-legged balance tests, comparing optimal SRS (SRSopt1) and SRS0 using a battery of center-of-pressure measures in the frontal and sagittal planes. Main Outcome Measure(s): Anterior-posterior (A-P) and medial-lateral (M-L) center-of-pressure velocity (COPV) and center-of-pressure excursion (COPE), R-COPV, and 95th percentile center-of-pressure area ellipse (COPA-95). Results: Data were organized into bins that represented optimal (SRSopt1), second (SRSopt2), third (SRSopt3), and fourth (SRSopt4) improvement over SRS0. The SRSopt1 enhanced R-COPV (P ? .05) over SRS0 and other SRS conditions (SRS0 = 0.94 ± 0.32 cm/s, SRSopt1 = 0.80 ± 0.19 cm/s, SRSopt2 = 0.88 ± 0.24 cm/s, SRSopt3 = 0.94 ± 0.25 cm/s, SRSopt4 = 1.00 ± 0.28 cm/s). However, SRS did not improve R-COPV over SRS0 when data were categorized by sensory threshold. Furthermore, SRSopt1 improved double-legged balance over SRS0 from 11% to 25% in all participants for the center-of-pressure frontal- and sagittal-plane assessments (P ? .05). The SRSopt1 also improved single-legged balance over SRS0 from 10% to 17% in participants with FAI for the center-of-pressure frontal- and sagittal-plane assessments (P ? .05). The SRSopt1 did not improve single-legged balance in participants with stable ankles. Conclusions: The SRSopt1 improved double-legged balance and transfers to enhancing single-legged balance deficits associated with FAI. PMID:23724774

  12. Time-Limited Psychotherapy With Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shefler, Gaby

    2000-01-01

    Short-term dynamic therapies, characterized by abbreviated lengths (10–40 sessions) and, in many cases, preset termination dates, have become more widespread in the past three decades. Short-term therapies are based on rapid psychodynamic diagnosis, a therapeutic focus, a rapidly formed therapeutic alliance, awareness of termination and separation processes, and the directive stance of the therapist. The emotional storm of adolescence, stemming from both developmental and psychopathological sources, leaves many adolescents in need of psychotherapy. Many adolescents in need of therapy resist long-term attachment and involvement in an ambiguous relationship, which they experience as a threat to their emerging sense of independence and separateness. Short-term dynamic therapy can be the treatment of choice for many adolescents because it minimizes these threats and is more responsive to their developmental needs. The article presents treatment and follow-up of a 17-year-old youth, using James Mann's time-limited psychotherapy method. PMID:10793128

  13. Effect of patellar taping on vasti onset timing, knee kinematics, and kinetics in asymptomatic individuals with a delayed onset of vastus medialis oblique.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim; Duncan, Margaret; Cowan, Sallie

    2006-09-01

    This randomized within-subject study investigated the effects of patellar tape on the onset of electromyographic (EMG) activity of vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) relative to vastus lateralis (VL), knee kinematics, and kinetics in 12 currently asymptomatic individuals with a VMO timing deficit and a history of patellofemoral pain. Participants were required to complete stair stepping and normal-pace and fast-pace walking tasks under three experimental conditions; no tape, control tape and therapeutic tape. EMG onsets of VMO and VL were measured by surface electrodes, stance phase knee flexion by the PEAK movement analysis system and vertical ground reaction force by a force plate. A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that neither therapeutic tape nor control tape had any effect on the EMG VMO-VL onset timing difference. Therapeutic tape, but not control tape, led to significant increases in stance phase knee flexion. The first peak vertical ground reaction force was lowered by both control and therapeutic tape but only during fast walking. The results suggest that tape induced effects on neuromotor control of the vasti seen in other studies are related to reductions in pain rather than the presence of a baseline timing deficit. However, this cannot explain the improvements in stance phase knee flexion observed with tape. PMID:16838377

  14. Taking a Democratic Stance toward Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traugh, Cecelia

    2009-01-01

    One of the major priorities that should guide teacher education programs in preparing teachers for their work in a democratic society is to develop a commitment to knowledge that embraces complexity and to place this knowledge into competition with the mainstream vision, which results from a deep reliance on standardized testing and controls much…

  15. Phytol in a pharma-medico-stance.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Torequl; de Alencar, Marcus Vinícius Oliveira Barros; da Conceição Machado, Katia; da Conceição Machado, Keylla; de Carvalho Melo-Cavalcante, Ana Amélia; de Sousa, Damiao Pergentino; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to review phytol (PYT), through published articles, periodicals, magazines and patents, which were retrieved from the PM, SD, WS, SP; DII, WIPO, CIPO, USPTO and INPI databases. Among the 149 articles and 62 patents, 27.52% articles and 87.09% patients were found on the searched topic, PYT and its sources and synthesis and metabolism; then followed by 15.44% and 14.77% articles on PYT in cytotoxicity/cancer/mutagenicity/teratogenicity and PYT in neurological diseases, respectively. In the pharma-medico viewpoint, PYT and its derivatives have been evident to have antimicrobial, cytotoxic, antitumorous, antimutagenic, anti-teratogenic, antibiotic-chemotherapeutic, antidiabetic, lipid lowering, antispasmodic, anticonvulsant, antinociceptive, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anxiolytic, antidepressant, immunoadjuvancy, hair growth facilitator, hair fall defense and antidandruff activities. Otherwise, the important biometebolite of PYT is phytanic acid (PA). Evidence shows PA to have cytotoxic, anticancer, antidiabetic, lipid lowering and aniteratogenic activities. In addition, it may be considered as an important biomarker for some diseases such as Refsum's Disease (RD), Sjögren Larsson syndrome (SLS), rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RZCP), chronic polyneuropathy (CP), Zellweger's disease hyperpipecolic academia (ZDHA) and related diseases. Thus, phytol may be considered as a new drug candidate. PMID:26296761

  16. Asymmetric Sensory Reweighting in Human Upright Stance

    PubMed Central

    Logan, David; Kiemel, Tim; Jeka, John J.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate sensory reweighting as a fundamental property of sensor fusion during standing, we probed postural control with simultaneous rotations of the visual scene and surface of support. Nineteen subjects were presented with pseudo-random pitch rotations of visual scene and platform at the ankle to test for amplitude dependencies in the following conditions: low amplitude vision: high amplitude platform, low amplitude vision: low amplitude platform, and high amplitude vision: low amplitude platform. Gain and phase of frequency response functions (FRFs) to each stimulus were computed for two body sway angles and a single weighted EMG signal recorded from seven muscles. When platform stimulus amplitude was increased while visual stimulus amplitude remained constant, gain to vision increased, providing strong evidence for inter-modal reweighting between vision and somatosensation during standing. Intra-modal reweighting of vision was also observed as gains to vision decreased as visual stimulus amplitude increased. Such intra-modal and inter-modal amplitude dependent changes in gain were also observed in muscular activity. Gains of leg segment angle and muscular activity relative to the platform, on the other hand, showed only intra-modal reweighting. That is, changing platform motion amplitude altered the responses to both visual and support surface motion whereas changing visual scene motion amplitude did not significantly affect responses to support surface motion, indicating that the sensory integration scheme between somatosensation (at the support surface) and vision is asymmetric. PMID:24959665

  17. Herpes genitalis and the philosopher's stance.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Kilian

    2014-12-01

    For many people, living with genital herpes generates not just episodic physical discomfort but recurrent emotional distress, centred on concerns about how to live and love safely without passing infection to others. This article considers the evidence on herpes transmission, levels of sexual risk, when the law has intervened and to what extent health professionals should advise with respect to these issues. It proposes a mechanism by which moral philosophy might provide a rational basis on which to counsel concerning sexual behaviour. PMID:24429670

  18. A Study of relationship between frailty and physical performance in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Jeoung, Bog Ja; Lee, Yang Chool

    2015-08-01

    Frailty is a disorder of multiple inter-related physiological systems. It is unclear whether the level of physical performance factors can serve as markers of frailty and a sign. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between frailty and physical performance in elderly women. One hundred fourteen elderly women participated in this study, their aged was from 65 to 80. We were measured 6-min walk test, grip-strength, 30-sec arm curl test, 30-sec chair stand test, 8 foot Up- and Go, Back scratch, chair sit and reach, unipedal stance, BMI, and the frailty with questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, frequencies, correlation analysis, ANOVA, and simple liner regression using the IBM 21. SPSS program. In results, statistic tests showed that there were significant differences between frailty and 6-min walk test, 30-sec arm curl test, 30-sec chair stand test, grip-strength, Back scratch, and BMI. However, we did not find significant differences between frailty and 8 foot Up- and Go, unipedal stance. When the subjects were divided into five groups according to physical performance level, subjects with high 6-min walk, 30-sec arm curl test, chair sit and reach test, and high grip strength had low score frailty. Physical performance factors were strongly associated with decreased frailty, suggesting that physical performance improvements play an important role in preventing or reducing the frailty. PMID:26331137

  19. A Study of relationship between frailty and physical performance in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Jeoung, Bog Ja; Lee, Yang Chool

    2015-01-01

    Frailty is a disorder of multiple inter-related physiological systems. It is unclear whether the level of physical performance factors can serve as markers of frailty and a sign. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between frailty and physical performance in elderly women. One hundred fourteen elderly women participated in this study, their aged was from 65 to 80. We were measured 6-min walk test, grip-strength, 30-sec arm curl test, 30-sec chair stand test, 8 foot Up- and Go, Back scratch, chair sit and reach, unipedal stance, BMI, and the frailty with questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, frequencies, correlation analysis, ANOVA, and simple liner regression using the IBM 21. SPSS program. In results, statistic tests showed that there were significant differences between frailty and 6-min walk test, 30-sec arm curl test, 30-sec chair stand test, grip-strength, Back scratch, and BMI. However, we did not find significant differences between frailty and 8 foot Up- and Go, unipedal stance. When the subjects were divided into five groups according to physical performance level, subjects with high 6-min walk, 30-sec arm curl test, chair sit and reach test, and high grip strength had low score frailty. Physical performance factors were strongly associated with decreased frailty, suggesting that physical performance improvements play an important role in preventing or reducing the frailty. PMID:26331137

  20. Time scale dependence of the center of pressure entropy: What characteristics of the neuromuscular postural control system influence stabilographic entropic half-life?

    PubMed

    Federolf, Peter; Zandiyeh, Payam; von Tscharner, Vinzenz

    2015-12-01

    The center of pressure (COP) movement in studies of postural control reveals a highly regular structure (low entropy) over short time periods and a highly irregular structure over large time scales (high entropy). Entropic half-life (EnHL) is a novel measure that quantifies the time over which short-term temporal correlations in a time series deteriorate to an uncorrelated, random structure. The current study suggested and tested three hypotheses about how characteristics of the neuromuscular postural control system may affect stabilometric EnHL: (H1) control system activity hypothesis: EnHL decreases with increased frequency of control system interventions adjusting COP motion; (H2) abundance of states hypothesis: EnHL decreases with increased number of mechanically equivalent states available to the postural system; and (H3) neurologic process hierarchy hypothesis: EnHL increases if postural control functions shift from the spinal level to the motor cortex. Thirty healthy participants performed quiet stance tests for 90 s in 18 different conditions: stance (bipedal, one-legged, and tandem); footwear (bare foot, regular sports shoe, and rocker sole shoes); and simultaneous cognitive task (two-back working memory task, no challenge). A four-way repeated-measures ANOVA revealed significant changes in EnHL for the different stance positions and for different movement directions (medio-lateral, anterior-posterior). These changes support H1 and H2. Significant differences were also found between rocker sole shoes and normal or barefoot standing, which supports H3. This study contributes to the understanding of how and why EnHL is a useful measure to monitor neuromuscular control of balance. PMID:26303025

  1. Contribution of hind limb flexor muscle afferents to the timing of phase transitions in the cat step cycle.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, G W; Whelan, P J; Prochazka, A; Pearson, K G

    1996-03-01

    1. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindle afferents signaling the length of hind-leg flexor muscles are involved in terminating extensor activity and initiating flexion during walking. The hip flexor muscle iliopsoas (IP) and the ankle flexors tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were stretched or vibrated at various phases of the step cycle in spontaneously walking decerebrate cats. Changes in electromyogram amplitude, duration, and timing were then examined. The effects of electrically stimulating group I and II afferents in the nerves to TA and EDL also were examined. 2. Stretch of the individual flexor muscles (IP, TA, or EDL) during the stance phase reduced the duration of extensor activity and promoted the onset of flexor burst activity. The contralateral step cycle also was affected by the stretch, the duration of flexor activity being shortened and extensor activity occurring earlier. Therefore, stretch of the flexor muscles during the stance phase reset the locomotor rhythm to flexion ipsilaterally and extension contralaterally. 3. Results of electrically stimulating the afferents from the TA and EDL muscles suggested that different groups of afferents were responsible for the resetting of the step cycle. Stimulation of the TA nerve reset the locomotor step cycle when the stimulus intensity was in the group II range (2-5 xT). By contrast, stimulation of the EDL nerve generated strong resetting of the step cycle in the range of 1.2-1.4 xT, where primarily the group Ia afferents from the muscle spindles would be activated. 4. Vibration of IP or EDL during stance reduced the duration of the extensor activity by similar amounts to that produced by muscle stretch or by electrical stimulation of EDL at group Ia strengths. This suggests that the group Ia afferents from IP and EDL are capable of resetting the locomotor pattern generator. Vibration of TA did not affect the locomotor rhythm. 5. Stretch of IP or electrical stimulation of TA afferents (5 xT) during the flexion phase did not change the duration of the flexor activity. Stimulation of the EDL nerve at 1.8-5 xT during flexion increased the duration of the flexor activity. In none of our preparations did we observe resetting to extension when the flexor afferents were activated during flexion. 6. We conclude that as the flexor muscles lengthen during the stance phase of gait, their spindle afferents (group Ia afferents for EDL and IP, group II afferents for TA) act to inhibit the spinal center generating extensor activity thus facilitating the initiation of swing. PMID:8867123

  2. Time of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen Emerson, E.

    In his landmark 1977 paper "The Temporal Logic of Programs", Amir Pnueli gave a fundamental recognition that the ideally nonterminating behavior of ongoing concurrent programs, such as operating systems and protocols, was a vital aspect of program reasoning. As classical approaches to program correctness were based on initial-state/final-state semantics for terminating programs, these approaches were inapplicable to programs where infinite behavior was the norm. To address this shortcoming, Pnueli suggested the use of temporal logic, a formalism for reasoning about change over time originally studied by philosophers, to meaningfully describe and reason about the infinite behavior of programs. This suggestion turned out to be remarkably fruitful. It struck a resonant chord within the formal verification community, and it has had an enormous impact on the development of the area. It matured into an extremely effective mathematical tool for specifying and verifying a vast class of synchronization and coordination problems common in concurrency. Pnueli thus caused a sea-change in the field of program verification, founding the time of reasoning about time, which has been the most successful period in formal methods yet.

  3. SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable

    E-print Network

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable t = time now, T = target date T* = modeling limit (t=forever) Cost spent to build variation point i at time i = index over variation points #12;SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable t = time now, T = target date T* = modeling limit (t=forever) ...adjusted by a factor

  4. Flushing Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flushing time of an estuary is generally defined as the turnover time of fresh water in the estuary, that is, the time required to replace the fresh water contained in the estuary with freshwater inflow. Thus, the flushing time of an estuary is the ratio of the volume of fres...

  5. Reinventing Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    What do planet Earth, a swinging pendulum, a quartz crystal, and a Cesium atom have in common? They have all been used by humans to measure time. They represent humanity's progress through time in measuring time itself. But what is it, really, that humans set out to measure? Before time could be measured, somebody had to decide what to actually…

  6. Chua's Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the relationship between the idea of time of the philosopher Bergson and the concept of time recurrence in chaotic systems. By taking into account the Chua's circuit, we saw that the "Chua's time", i.e., the average recurrence time of trajectories in the Chua's circuit, is able to qualitatively represent the features of the Bergon's time. Numerical and experimental results are presented.

  7. Geologic Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, William L.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in geologic time with an introduction to the subject. Separate sections discuss the relative time scale, major divisions in geologic time, index fossils used as guides for telling the age of rocks, the atomic scale, and the age of the earth.…

  8. Time Honoured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Mora; Timmerman, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of literature and practices in environmental education focuses on places and spaces. Little attention has been paid to time and temporalities as elements of environments, and the ways in which how we experience time affects our experience of place. This paper is an examination of the ways in which reflection on time can be…

  9. Modelling Time

    E-print Network

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-09-03

    We briefly review two concepts of time - the usual time associated with "being" and more recent ideas, answering to the description of "becoming". The approximation involved in the former is examined. Finally we argue that it is (unpredictable) fluctuations that underlie time.

  10. A study of the relationship between depression symptom and physical performance in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang Chool

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a general public health problem; there is an association between regular exercise or vigorous physical activity and depression. Physical activity has positive physical, mental, and emotional effects. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between depression symptom and physical performance in elderly women. A total of 173 elderly women aged 65 to 80 participated in this study. We evaluated elderly women using the 6-min walk, grip-strength, 30-sec arm curl, 30-sec chair stand, 8-foot up and go, back scratch, and chair sit and reach, and unipedal stance, measured the body mass index (BMI), and depression symptom assessed using Korean version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-K). The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, paired t-tests, and simple linear regression using IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0. There were significant correlations between GDS-K and the 6-min walk, 30-sec chair stand, 30-sec arm curl, chair sit and reach, 8-foot up and go, and grip strength tests (P<0.05), but not BMI, back strength, and unipedal stance. When divided into two groups (GDS-K score?14 and GDS-K score<14), there was a difference between the two groups in the 6-min walk, 30-sec chair stand, 30-sec arm curl test, chair sit and reach, 8-foot up and go test, and grip strength test performances. Physical performance factors were strongly associated with depression symptom, suggesting that physical performance improvements may play an important role in preventing depression.

  11. Quantum Time

    E-print Network

    John Ashmead

    2010-05-05

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  12. Probabilistic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2012-11-01

    The concept of time emerges as an ordering structure in a classical statistical ensemble. Probability distributions p ? ( t) at a given time t obtain by integrating out the past and future. We discuss all-time probability distributions that realize a unitary time evolution as described by rotations of the real wave function q_{tau}(t)=± sqrt{p_{tau}(t)}. We establish a map to quantum physics and the Schrödinger equation. Suitable classical observables are mapped to quantum operators. The non-commutativity of the operator product is traced back to the incomplete statistics of the local-time subsystem. Our investigation of classical statistics is based on two-level observables that take the values one or zero. Then the wave functions can be mapped to elements of a Grassmann algebra. Quantum field theories for fermions arise naturally from our formulation of probabilistic time.

  13. Geologic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, William L.

    2000-01-01

    The Earth is very old 4 1/2 billion years or more according to recent estimates. This vast span of time, called geologic time by earth scientists, is difficult to comprehend in the familiar time units of months and years, or even centuries. How then do scientists reckon geologic time, and why do they believe the Earth is so old? A great part of the secret of the Earth's age is locked up in its rocks, and our centuries-old search for the key led to the beginning and nourished the growth of geologic science.

  14. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  15. Time Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoilov, Todor, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The time management is worthy goal of many human activities. It concerns variety problems related to goals definition, assessment of available resources, control of management policies, scheduling of decisions. This book is an attempt to illustrate the decision making process in time management for different success stories, which can be used as…

  16. Nurses' daily life: gender relations from the time spent in hospital1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Audrey Vidal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the everyday life of nurses through the sexual work division as well as through interdependence relations and the time in hospital. Method: quanti-qualitative study, based on the Time Use Survey and in Norbert Elias's Configuration Theory of Interdependencies. Daily shifts distribution record, directed by 42 participants - with self-confrontation - by interviews which drew dialogues on subjective aspects of the everyday experiences related to use of time, based on a job at a university hospital. The theoretical intake that founded data analysis was based on concepts of conflicts of interest, power struggles, sexual work division and polychronic-monochronic concepts - whether the work environment demands multitasking nurses or not. Results: time records allowed to observe differences between the groups studied, useful to identify conflicts, tensions, power struggles and gender inequalities in interviewees' everyday affairs that do not only affect physical and mental health, but also their way of life. Conclusion: the analytical path pointed out the need for public policies that promote equity in gender relations, keeping at sight the exercise of plural discourses and tolerant stances capable to respect differences between individual and collective time. PMID:26487146

  17. Time outs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Time-out technique for discipline. Children's Health Network web site. http://www.childrenshealthnetwork.org/CRS/CRS/pa_ ... a break from negative behavior. Massachusetts Medical Society web site. http://www.massmed.org/patient-care/health- ...

  18. Thrombin Time

    MedlinePLUS

    ... monitor unfractionated heparin therapy and to detect heparin contamination in a blood sample. While it is still ... thrombin time may sometimes be ordered when heparin contamination of a sample is suspected or when a ...

  19. Quantum time

    E-print Network

    Giovannetti, Vittorio

    We give a consistent quantum description of time, based on Page and Wootters’s conditional probabilities mechanism, which overcomes the criticisms that were raised against similar previous proposals. In particular we show ...

  20. About time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Time has historically been a measure of progress of recurrent physical processes. Coordination of future actions, prediction of future events, and assigning order to events are three practical reasons for implementing clocks and signalling mechanisms. In large networks of computers, these needs lead to the problem of synchronizing the clocks throughout the network. Recent methods allow this to be done in large networks with precision around 1 millisecond despite mean message exchange times near 5 milliseconds. These methods are discussed.

  1. Chow Time 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -1 THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to Texas A...

  2. Making the Turn: Fostering an Inquiry Stance in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulburt, Kevin J.; Knotts, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how an examination of teacher candidate inquiry projects led to an examination of their own experiences as teacher education practitioner-researchers and competing narratives about education research. They describe how in the process of doing research, they came to recognise how their experiences and…

  3. Classroom Assessment Tools and Students' Affective Stances: KFL Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byon, Andrew Sangpil

    2005-01-01

    The growth of KFL (Korean-as-a-Foreign-Language) programmes in the US college setting has been truly remarkable in the last three decades. However, despite the gradual and steady growth of the non-heritage student population, the predominant group has been heritage students in most KFL programmes. In addition, teaching these two groups of students…

  4. Urban Teacher Education in Partnership: An Inquiry Stance Sustains Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stairs, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between Brighton High School (BHS) and Boston College (BC) spans several decades. Professors from multiple departments at the university--not only teacher educators but professors of psychology, measurement, and arts and sciences--have walked, as regular parts of the school community, the halls of the gothic-style high school…

  5. Contemplating a Constructivist Stance for Active Learning within Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    This article examines constructivist philosophies for learning with an emphasis on student-centered environments in education and the active involvement of students in learning as they relate new understanding to what they already know and refine previous skills in terms of newly acquired proficiencies. Active learning is explored from a…

  6. Human Genetic Engineering: A Survey of Student Value Stances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sara McCormack; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Assesses the values of high school and college students relative to human genetic engineering and recommends that biology educators explore instructional strategies merging human genetic information with value clarification techniques. (LS)

  7. Teachers' Stances towards Chinese International Students: An Australian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Kristina; Arkoudis, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    The international marketing of school education has gathered momentum in the Asia Pacific region, where an English medium education is prized by many parents. This paper investigates the responses of a group of teachers in Australia to the needs of international students in their school. The analysis of a 1 h professional discussion between four…

  8. Dialogic Teaching: Talk in Service of a Dialogic Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Maureen Patricia; Markarian, William C.

    2011-01-01

    We consider what it means to be a dialogic teacher as characterized by Paulo Freire and Robin Alexander, and utilizing discourse analysis, we explicate how one elementary teacher's talk reflects these characteristics. We provide context for and analysis of a seven-minute discussion selected as a cumulative achievement the focal nine-year-olds are…

  9. Pleasure, Learning, Video Games, and Life: The Projective Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, James Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses three questions. First, what is the deep pleasure that humans take from video games? Second, what is the relationship between video games and real life? Third, what do the answers to these questions have to do with learning? Good commercial video games are deep technologies for recruiting learning as a form of profound…

  10. Illuminating a Dialectical Transformative Activist Stance in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    In this essay I comment on Stetsenko's (2008) essay that draws together the work of Vygotsky, Piaget and Dewey, as she attempts to counter the "new" reductionist synthesis in public educational policy. While this theoretical work is helpful, it could be enhanced further by illuminating everyday practices of learners. I pose some questions that…

  11. Assisted dying - should the UK change its stance?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Daniel; Raphael, Claire E; Vassiliou, Vassilios

    2015-04-01

    Along with an increasing interest in assisted dying by many European and North American countries, some of which have already modified their existing laws to accommodate this, the interest in assisted dying in the UK has increased once again following Lord Falconer's Assisted Dying for the Terminally Ill Bill. Drawing on examples from countries where similar assisted dying laws are already in place, this article analyses and contextualises the proposed bill and discusses its potential pitfalls and benefits for the UK. PMID:25628340

  12. Place-Based Education: A Transformative Activist Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, Christine A.; Kirch, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    The ethnography presented by van Eijck and Roth focuses on the activities of people involved in a government funded internship program in conservation and restoration, which was offered by a "multidisciplinary research center" through a local First Nation adult education center. The internship was designed, in partnership with a local non-profit…

  13. Reasons Given by UK Churchgoers for Their Stance on Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Village, Andrew; Baker, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    A sample of 661 churchgoers from a range of Christian denominations in the United Kingdom was asked about Darwinian evolution (defined as the common origin of all species, including humans). Respondents were categorised as those who accepted the idea, those who rejected it, and those who were unsure or neutral. People in each category were given a…

  14. Morality and Foreign Policy. A Symposium on President Carter's Stance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefever, Ernest W., Ed.

    This monograph contains a critical examination of President Carter's view on ethics and foreign policy as expressed in his commencement speech at Notre Dame University on May 22, 1977. The book is organized into three parts. Part 1 contains Mr. Carter's speech entitled, "Power for Humane Purposes." Part 2 contains nine responses to the speech:…

  15. [Nursing stance in the face of Jinn possession in Mayotte].

    PubMed

    Gillard-Berthod, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Caregivers and nursing students practising in Mayotte can find themselves in a difficult position when faced with patients believing themselves to be possessed by spirits called Jinn. Through a multidisciplinary roundtable, different perspectives and practices can be shared leading to a more enlightened treatment of patients which respects their beliefs, blending traditional and modern medicine. PMID:24245404

  16. Toward an Intercultural Stance: Teaching German and English through Telecollaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige D.; Kramsch, Claire

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the challenges of Web-based teaching for language teachers and then describe in detail an extended episode of misunderstanding that occurred between 2 students discussing their versions of history during a classroom-based, asynchronous telecollaborative project between learners of German in the United States and learners of English in…

  17. Investigating Asynchronous Online Communication: A Connected Stance Revealed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegmann, Susan J.; McCauley, Joyce K.

    2014-01-01

    This research project explores the effects of altering the structure of discussion board formats to increase students' engagement and participation. This paper will present the findings of a two-university, two-class research project in which asynchronous discussion board entries were analyzed for substance. By using oral discourse analysis…

  18. Illuminating a dialectical transformative activist stance in education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2008-07-01

    In this essay I comment on Stetsenko's (2008) essay that draws together the work of Vygotsky, Piaget and Dewey, as she attempts to counter the `new' reductionist synthesis in public educational policy. While this theoretical work is helpful, it could be enhanced further by illuminating everyday practices of learners. I pose some questions that might provoke ongoing discussions by researchers as they transform collaboratively cultural-historical activity theory.

  19. Links between Parents' Epistemological Stance and Children's Evidence Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luce, Megan R.; Callanan, Maureen A.; Smilovic, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental research highlights young children's selectivity in learning from others. Little is known, however, about the patterns of information that children actually encounter in conversations with adults. This study investigated variation in parents' tendency to focus on testable evidence as a way to answer science-related questions…

  20. Predicting Stance in Ideological Debate with Rich Linguistic Knowledge

    E-print Network

    Ng, Vincent

    that criminals won't have access to guns if the federal government bans guns? I don't think so. If guns cause will only cause deaths of innocent citizens. Post 2: You said that guns should not be banned. Do you really believe guns can protect citizens from criminals? I don't think so. It is clear that the author of Post 1

  1. Time warps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2010-01-01

    I reconsider asymmetrically warped compactifications, in which time and space have different warp factors. I call such compactifications time warps if the bulk geometry has neither entropy nor temperature. I provide an example starting from an asymptotically AdS 5 spacetime where the speed of light, measured in a fixed coordinate system, is larger near the boundary than it is deep in the interior. This example follows the general plan of earlier work on superconducting black holes. To obtain a normalizable, four-dimensional graviton, one can introduce a Planck brane whose action includes a wrong-sign Einstein-Hilbert term. The equation of state of the Planck brane has w < -1, which is a violation of the null energy condition. I show, in an almost dimension-independent fashion, that such a violation must occur in a static time warp geometry. Time warps of the type I describe provide an extra-dimensional description of boost invariance as an emergent symmetry in the infrared. High-energy violations of Lorentz symmetry, if confined to a strongly coupled unparticle sector dual to the time warp geometry, might manifest themselves through unusual kinematic constraints. As an example, I explain how modifications of unparticle phase space would affect the decay of a heavy particle into a light visible sector particle plus unparticle stuff.

  2. Timing & Time Code Reference REFERENCE GUIDE

    E-print Network

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    Timing & Time Code Reference REFERENCE GUIDE #12;i Time Scales of Measurement Introduction.....................................................................................................................1 Definition of Time ...........................................................................................................1 Universal Time (UT0

  3. Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) for alpha-based statistical analyses of multi-muscle EMG time-series.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark A; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Pataky, Todd C

    2015-02-01

    Multi-muscle EMG time-series are highly correlated and time dependent yet traditional statistical analysis of scalars from an EMG time-series fails to account for such dependencies. This paper promotes the use of SPM vector-field analysis for the generalised analysis of EMG time-series. We reanalysed a publicly available dataset of Young versus Adult EMG gait data to contrast scalar and SPM vector-field analysis. Independent scalar analyses of EMG data between 35% and 45% stance phase showed no statistical differences between the Young and Adult groups. SPM vector-field analysis did however identify statistical differences within this time period. As scalar analysis failed to consider the multi-muscle and time dependence of the EMG time-series it exhibited Type II error. SPM vector-field analysis on the other hand accounts for both dependencies whilst tightly controlling for Type I and Type II error making it highly applicable to EMG data analysis. Additionally SPM vector-field analysis is generalizable to linear and non-linear parametric and non-parametric statistical models, allowing its use under constraints that are common to electromyography and kinesiology. PMID:25465983

  4. Geologic Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albritton, Claude C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of the concept of geologic time. Develops the topic by using the major discoveries of geologists, beginning with Steno and following through to the discovery and use of radiometric dating. An extensive reference list is provided. (JM)

  5. Time out.

    PubMed

    Manji, I

    1994-08-01

    Earlier in this article, I emphasized that leisure and time away from work are not only important in and of themselves, but that they're important to our work. Again, I draw from my own recent experience of a few days vacation in Florida. The "time out" didn't just allow me to relax, it also gave me a healthy perspective on my work and a freshness in pursuing my goals, something that's very difficult to achieve when you're fully immersed in day to day business matters. Dr. Lagstein underscores this point: "I've recently begun using my time away from the office as a direct adjunct to the practice. It seems that my most creative thinking and planning for the practice occurs when I'm furthest from the operatory," he says. "My outlook is enhanced in a way that can't be emulated when I'm consumed with the day-to-day challenges of dentistry. And yes, this has a direct impact on my production; but contrary to what most people would expect, it has increased--not detracted from--my annual net revenue." Dentists who are already achieving this balance should be applauded, but for those who are not, I encourage you to find the way to start doing so. As Bruce O'Hara rightly says, "Prosperity/leisure is not an either/or choice: in the 1990s we must create the means to have them both, or we will wind up with neither." PMID:8087673

  6. Time Capsule

    E-print Network

    Barta, Timothy

    2012-04-01

    the world is. And the world is small and beautiful, good, but not the best. Certainly, though, our world is small. Our barriers are more synthetic than the bottle that holds your water. Those plastics form on a physical level; our barriers are often... be drawn to whatever else will follow in its wake. I feel obligated, for context's sake to list a few things that are worth knowing about my now, that you, the reader, may not have in your own. At the time of writing this, there is still wetlands...

  7. Evidence for a time-invariant phase variable in human ankle control.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Robert D; Rouse, Elliott J; Hargrove, Levi J; Sensinger, Jonathon W

    2014-01-01

    Human locomotion is a rhythmic task in which patterns of muscle activity are modulated by state-dependent feedback to accommodate perturbations. Two popular theories have been proposed for the underlying embodiment of phase in the human pattern generator: a time-dependent internal representation or a time-invariant feedback representation (i.e., reflex mechanisms). In either case the neuromuscular system must update or represent the phase of locomotor patterns based on the system state, which can include measurements of hundreds of variables. However, a much simpler representation of phase has emerged in recent designs for legged robots, which control joint patterns as functions of a single monotonic mechanical variable, termed a phase variable. We propose that human joint patterns may similarly depend on a physical phase variable, specifically the heel-to-toe movement of the Center of Pressure under the foot. We found that when the ankle is unexpectedly rotated to a position it would have encountered later in the step, the Center of Pressure also shifts forward to the corresponding later position, and the remaining portion of the gait pattern ensues. This phase shift suggests that the progression of the stance ankle is controlled by a biomechanical phase variable, motivating future investigations of phase variables in human locomotor control. PMID:24558485

  8. Evidence for a Time-Invariant Phase Variable in Human Ankle Control

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Robert D.; Rouse, Elliott J.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Sensinger, Jonathon W.

    2014-01-01

    Human locomotion is a rhythmic task in which patterns of muscle activity are modulated by state-dependent feedback to accommodate perturbations. Two popular theories have been proposed for the underlying embodiment of phase in the human pattern generator: a time-dependent internal representation or a time-invariant feedback representation (i.e., reflex mechanisms). In either case the neuromuscular system must update or represent the phase of locomotor patterns based on the system state, which can include measurements of hundreds of variables. However, a much simpler representation of phase has emerged in recent designs for legged robots, which control joint patterns as functions of a single monotonic mechanical variable, termed a phase variable. We propose that human joint patterns may similarly depend on a physical phase variable, specifically the heel-to-toe movement of the Center of Pressure under the foot. We found that when the ankle is unexpectedly rotated to a position it would have encountered later in the step, the Center of Pressure also shifts forward to the corresponding later position, and the remaining portion of the gait pattern ensues. This phase shift suggests that the progression of the stance ankle is controlled by a biomechanical phase variable, motivating future investigations of phase variables in human locomotor control. PMID:24558485

  9. Reaction times and anticipatory skills of karate athletes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shuji; Ohtani, Yoshio; Imanaka, Kuniyasu

    2002-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the reaction times (RTs) and anticipation of karate athletes. In Experiment 1, choice RTs and simple RTs were measured with two types of stimuli. One was videotaped scenes of opponent's offensive actions, which simulated the athletes' view in real situations, and the other was static filled circles, or dots. In the choice RT task, participants were required to indicate as soon as possible whether the offensive actions would be aimed at the upper or middle level of their body, or the dot was presented either at a higher or a lower position. In the simple RT task, they were required to respond as soon as possible when the offensive action started from a static display of the opponent's ready stance, or a dot appeared on the display. The results showed significant differences between the karate athletes and the novices in the choice RT task, the difference being more marked for the video stimuli than for the dot stimuli. There was no significant difference in simple RT between the two groups of participants, for either type of stimuli. In Experiment 2, the proportions of correct responses (PCRs) were measured for video stimuli which were cut off at the seventh frame from the onset of the opponent's offensive action. The athletes yielded significantly higher PCRs than the novices. Collectively the results of the two experiments demonstrate the superior anticipatory skills of karate athletes regarding the target area of an opponent's attack (Scott, Williams, & Davids, Studies in perception and action II: Posters presented at the VIIth International conference on Event Perception and Action, Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, 1993, p. 217; Wiiliams & Elliot, Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology 21 (1999) 362), together with their advantage over novices in non-specific sensory functions (e.g., vertical discrimination). PMID:12167300

  10. Yet another time about time

    E-print Network

    Simeonov, Plamen L

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents yet another personal reflection on one the most important concepts in both science and the humanities: time. This elusive notion has been not only bothering philosophers since Plato and Aristotle and goes throughout human history embracing all analytical and creative (anthropocentric) disciplines from mathematics through physical and life sciences to philosophy, psychology, music and art, with a vast body of knowledge across different theories and categories concerning its nature (rational, irrational, arational), appearances/qualia, degrees, dimensions and scales of conceptualization (internal, external, rational, irrational, fractal, discrete, continuous, mechanical, quantum, local, global, etc.), duration ranges, resolutions, modes (present, now, past, future), variety of tenses (e.g. present perfect, present progressive, etc.) and some intuitive, but also fancy phenomenological characteristics such as arrow, stream, texture, width, depth, and perhaps the most distinct one of them, the ...

  11. Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time?

    E-print Network

    Johnston, Alan

    Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time? Alan Johnston* and Shin'ya Nishida Recent experiments show that synchronous events can appear to an observer to occur at different times. Neural processing time delays are offered as an explanation of these temporal illusions, but equating perceived time

  12. Time Management Managing Time and Tasks

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Management Managing Time and Tasks What is time management? Time can't be managed ­ but you can manage the amount of time you use each day for fun, work, rest, and time spent with others. Why is time management important? You have responsibilities to yourself, to your family and friends, to your

  13. A robust real-time gait event detection using wireless gyroscope and its application on normal and altered gaits.

    PubMed

    Gouwanda, Darwin; Gopalai, Alpha Agape

    2015-02-01

    Gait events detection allows clinicians and biomechanics researchers to determine timing of gait events, to estimate duration of stance phase and swing phase and to segment gait data. It also aids biomedical engineers to improve the design of orthoses and FES (functional electrical stimulation) systems. In recent years, researchers have resorted to using gyroscopes to determine heel-strike (HS) and toe-off (TO) events in gait cycles. However, these methods are subjected to significant delays when implemented in real-time gait monitoring devices, orthoses, and FES systems. Therefore, the work presented in this paper proposes a method that addresses these delays, to ensure real-time gait event detection. The proposed algorithm combines the use of heuristics and zero-crossing method to identify HS and TO. Experiments involving: (1) normal walking; (2) walking with knee brace; and (3) walking with ankle brace for overground walking and treadmill walking were designed to verify and validate the identified HS and TO. The performance of the proposed method was compared against the established gait detection algorithms. It was observed that the proposed method produced detection rate that was comparable to earlier reported methods and recorded reduced time delays, at an average of 100 ms. PMID:25619613

  14. Characterization of static balance abilities in elite soccer players by playing position and age.

    PubMed

    Pau, Massimiliano; Ibba, Gianfranco; Leban, Bruno; Scorcu, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the static balance of adult and adolescent elite soccer players to understand how expertise and playing position influence postural control. Seventy-one national level players were tested using a force platform to acquire Center-of-Pressure (COP) data in uni- and bipedal stance and calculate sway area (SA), COP path length, velocity and displacements. The results show significant differences in postural sway related to age and playing position only for single-limb stance. In particular, midfielders exhibited significantly lower values of SA with respect to defenders (-48%, p = 0.001) and the under-15 players exhibited SA 42-64% higher than all the others (p = 0.001). In the light of planning training or rehabilitation programs specific for each player's role and age, sway measurements may supply useful, objective and reliable information only for the unipedal test as the bipedal standing appears not challenging enough to let differences in balance abilities emerge. PMID:25295474

  15. The influence of timing of knee recurvatum on surgical outcome in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Matthias C M; Heitzmann, Daniel W W; Wolf, Sebastian I; Niklasch, Mirjam; Maier, Michael W; Dreher, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that timing of genu recurvatum (GR) might be caused by different underlying factors and that equinus leads to GR especially during early stance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reduction of GR after surgical correction of equinus in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy and whether the children with early and late type GR show differences in reduction of knee hyperextension after a surgery. In 24 limbs (mean age 10.3 years, GMFCS I-III) showing equinus and GR the kinematics of the knee and ankle as well as the kinetics of the knee were evaluated before and one year (mean follow up period: 12.8 months) after surgical correction of equinus. The study was approved by the local ethical committee. Limbs with early type GR showed a reduction by 11.1° (p<0.001) and those with late type GR by 6.0° (p<0.049) in GR after surgery. Before surgery limbs with early type GR showed increased external extending moments, which decreased significantly after surgery. In contrast limbs with late GR did not show a significant reduction of those moments. The findings of this study underline the influence of equinus on early GR as an underlying factor. As equinus is attributed to early knee hyperextension and proximal factors are more important as underlying factors in late type GR, a classification into early and late onset GR is useful to identify underlying factors and to choose adequate treatment. PMID:26599296

  16. Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go Everyone starts the week with the same number of hours. So, why does your time go so fast? Let's find out! Number of hours of sleep each night ____ x 7 preparation/clean-up time) ____ x 7 = ____ Travel time to and from campus ___ x __ = ____ Number of hours per

  17. Babies Need Tummy Time

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sharing on social media links Babies Need Tummy Time! Share this: Page Content Tummy Time is not ... of your baby's normal growth. What Is Tummy Time? Tummy Time describes the times when you place ...

  18. Text + Time Search & Analytics

    E-print Network

    Waldmann, Uwe

    Text + Time Search & Analytics Klaus Berberich (kberberi@mpi-inf.mpg.de) #12;Text + Time Search & Analytics ­ Klaus Berberich / 40 Text + Time 2 The New York Times June 2nd, 1889 #12;Text + Time Search & Analytics ­ Klaus Berberich / 40 Text + Time 2 Wikipedia April 23rd, 2001 #12;Text + Time Search & Analytics

  19. Prothrombin time (PT)

    MedlinePLUS

    PT; Pro-time; Anticoagulant-prothrombin time; Clotting time: protime; INR; International normalized ratio ... PT is measured in seconds. Most of the time, results are given as what is called INR ( ...

  20. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    E-print Network

    Mir Faizal; Mohammed M. Khalil; Saurya Das

    2014-12-29

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  1. Lean Healthcare Takt time ()

    E-print Network

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    Lean Healthcare .. #12;Takt time () Available time / Customer demand (Available Time ) (/) 6 (=360 ) 20 Takt time = 360 / 20 = 18 18 18 #12;Cycle Time vs Takt Timey M ins 35 30 35 20 25 Takt Time 10 15 0 5 0 Registration Triage Consultation Billing Pharmacy #12;68 #12;Cycle

  2. Space time and the passage of time

    E-print Network

    George F. R. Ellis; Rituparno Goswami

    2012-08-26

    This paper examines the various arguments that have been put forward suggesting either that time does not exist, or that it exists but its flow is not real. I argue that (i) time both exists and flows; (ii) an Evolving Block Universe (`EBU') model of spacetime adequately captures this feature, emphasizing the key differences between the past, present, and future; (iii) the associated surfaces of constant time are uniquely geometrically and physically determined in any realistic spacetime model based in General Relativity Theory; (iv) such a model is needed in order to capture the essential aspects of what is happening in circumstances where initial data does not uniquely determine the evolution of spacetime structure because quantum uncertainty plays a key role in that development. Assuming that the functioning of the mind is based in the physical brain, evidence from the way that the mind apprehends the flow of time prefers this evolving time model over those where there is no flow of time.

  3. Intelligence, Inspection Time, and Decision Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Timothy C.; Eysenck, Hans J.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among Multidimensional Aptitude Battery scores, inspection time, choice reaction time, and the odd-man procedure were investigated for 63 female and 25 male adults. No significant relationships were found for these mental speed measures and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised dimensions of extraversion, neuroticism, and…

  4. Group Time: Building Language at Group Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Ellen Booth

    2004-01-01

    This article features energizing and surprising activities for children at group time. In the drawing activity, children are asked to give instructions on how to draw a picture using vocabulary and descriptive language. In the mailbox activity, children will be surprised to discover that they have mail at group time. Mailboxes can be used for…

  5. Fast Times and Digital Literacy: Participation Roles and Portfolio Construction within Instant Messaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Gloria E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of adolescent use of instant messaging. Grounded in the New Literacy Studies stance that literacy is a social practice embedded in local contexts and informed by global ideologies (Street, 1995), I argue that participation in digital literacies such as instant messaging has implications for…

  6. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  7. On Time. 6b: Quantum Mechanical Time

    E-print Network

    C. K. Raju

    2008-08-09

    The existence of small amounts of advanced radiation, or a tilt in the arrow of time, makes the basic equations of physics mixed-type functional differential equations. The novel features of such equations point to a microphysical structure of time. This corresponds to a change of logic at the microphysical level. We show that the resulting logic is a quantum logic. This provides a natural and rigorous explanation of quantum interference. This structured-time interpretation of quantum mechanics is briefly compared with various other interpretations of q.m.

  8. Review of time scales. [Universal Time-Ephemeris Time-International Atomic Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinot, B.

    1974-01-01

    The basic time scales are presented: International Atomic Time, Universal Time, and Universal Time (Coordinated). These scales must be maintained in order to satisfy specific requirements. It is shown how they are obtained and made available at a very high level of precision.

  9. Time Management for Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Ellen Hofstetter

    2005-01-01

    Time management is a skill. Like any new skill, it takes time and commitment to develop. A frequent complaint of center directors is not having enough time. Most work extremely long hours and still feel they are not getting enough done. This article presents ideas on how to manage time and work smarter, not harder. These ideas are the following:…

  10. Synchronized time stamp support

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalkowski, J.

    1994-02-16

    New software has been added to IOC core to maintain time stamps. The new software has the ability to maintain time stamps over all IOCs on a network. The purpose of this paper is to explain how EPICS will synchronize the time stamps. In addition, this paper will explain how to configure and use the new EPICS time stamp support software.

  11. Time and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Anna E.

    2012-01-01

    This essay invites reflection on the phenomena of time as it impacts the day-to-day life of teachers. It also explores assumptions about time and teaching in three areas: first, beliefs about the force of time and the teacher's struggle to control it; second, beliefs about the potential of time and the benefits of its passing for teachers and…

  12. Changes in cortical activity associated with adaptive behavior during repeated balance perturbation of unpredictable timing

    PubMed Central

    Mierau, Andreas; Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K.

    2015-01-01

    The compensation for a sudden balance perturbation, unpracticed and unpredictable in timing and magnitude is accompanied by pronounced postural instability that is suggested to be causal to falls. However, subsequent presentations of an identical perturbation are characterized by a marked decrease of the amplitude of postural reactions; a phenomenon called adaptation or habituation. This study aimed to identify cortical characteristics associated with adaptive behavior during repetitive balance perturbations based on single-trial analyses of the P1 and N1 perturbation-evoked potentials. Thirty-seven young men were exposed to ten transient balance perturbations while balancing on the dominant leg. Thirty two-channel electroencephalography (EEG), surface electromyography (EMG) of the ankle plantar flexor muscles and postural sway (i.e., Euclidean distance of the supporting platform) were recorded simultaneously. The P1 and N1 potentials were localized and the amplitude/latency was analyzed trial by trial. The best match sources for P1 and N1 potentials were located in the parietal (Brodmann area (BA) 5) and midline fronto-central cortex (BA 6), respectively. The amplitude and latency of the P1 potential remained unchanged over trials. In contrast, a significant adaptation of the N1 amplitude was observed. Similar adaptation effects were found with regard to postural sway and ankle plantarflexors EMG activity of the non-dominant (free) leg; i.e., an indicator for reduced muscular co-contraction and/or less temporary bipedal stance to regain stability. Significant but weak correlations were found between N1 amplitude and postural sway as well as EMG activity. These results highlight the important role of the midline fronto-central cortex for adaptive behavior associated with balance control. PMID:26528154

  13. Time domain reflectometry in time variant plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherner, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of time-dependent electron density fluctuations on a synthesized time domain reflectometry response of a one-dimensional cold plasma sheath are considered. Numerical solutions of the Helmholtz wave equation, which describes the electric field of a normally incident plane wave in a specified static electron density profile, are used. A study of the effects of Doppler shifts resulting from moving density fluctuations in the electron density profile of the sheath is included. Varying electron density levels corrupt time domain and distance measurements. Reducing or modulating the electron density levels of a given electron density profile affects the time domain response of a plasma and results in motion of the turning point, and the effective motion has a significant effect on measuring electron density locations.

  14. On Time-II: Newton's Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    A study of time in Newtonian physics is presented. Newton's laws of motion, falsifiability and physical theories, laws of motion and law of gravitation, and Laplace's demon are discussed. Short bibliographic sketches of Laplace and Karl Popper are included. (KR)

  15. Did time begin? Will time end?

    E-print Network

    Paul H. Frampton

    2007-05-14

    Did time begin at a Big Bang? Will the present expansion of the universe last for a finite or infinite time? These questions sound philosophical but are becoming, now in the twenty-first century, central to the scientific study of cosmology. The answers, which should become clarified in the next decade or two, could have profound implications for how we see our own role in the universe. Since the original publication of Stephen Hawking's {\\it A Brief History of Time} in 1988, the answers to these questions have progressed as a result of research by the community of active theoretical physicists including myself. To present the underlying ideas requires discussion of a wide range of topics in cosmology, especially the make up of the energy content of the universe. A brief summary of my conclusions, that of three different possibilities concerning the history and future of time, the least likely is the conventional wisdom (time began and will never end) and most likely is a cyclic model (time never begins or ends), is in the short final Chapter which could be read first. To understand the reasoning leading to my conclusions could encourage reading of my entire book. My hope in writing this, my first popular book, is that it will engender reflection about time. Many a non-scientist may already hold a philosophical opinion about whether time begins and ends. This book's aim is to present some recently discovered scientific facts which can focus the reader's consideration of the two short questions in my title.

  16. Yet another time about time - Part I

    E-print Network

    Plamen L. Simeonov

    2015-08-29

    This paper presents yet another personal reflection on one the most important concepts in both science and the humanities: time. This elusive notion has been not only bothering philosophers since Plato and Aristotle. It goes throughout human history embracing all analytical and creative (anthropocentric) disciplines. Time has been a central theme in physical and life sciences, philosophy, psychology, music, art and many more. This theme is known with a vast body of knowledge across different theories and categories. What has been explored concerns its nature (rational, irrational, arational), appearances/qualia, degrees, dimensions and scales of conceptualization (internal, external, fractal, discrete, continuous, mechanical, quantum, local, global, etc.). Of particular interest have been parameters of time such as duration ranges, resolutions, modes (present, now, past, future), varieties of tenses (e.g. present perfect, present progressive, etc.) and some intuitive, but also fancy phenomenological characteristics such as arrow, stream, texture, width, depth, density, even scent. Perhaps the most distinct characteristic of this fundamental concept is the absolute time constituting the flow of consciousness according to Husserl, the reflection of pure (human) nature without having the distinction between exo and endo. This essay is a personal reflection upon the meaning of time in modern physics and phenomenological philosophy.

  17. Universal Time Tunneling

    E-print Network

    Guenter Nimtz

    2009-01-26

    How much time does a tunneling wave packet spent in traversing a barrier? Quantum mechanical calculations result in zero time inside a barrier . In the nineties analogous tunneling experiments with microwaves were carried out. The results agreed with quantum mechanical calculations. Electron tunneling time is hard to measure being extremely short and parasitic effects due to the electric charge of electrons may be dominant. However, quite recently the atomic ionization tunneling time has been measured. Experimental data of photonic, phononic, and electronic tunneling time is available now and will be presented. It appears that the tunneling time is a universal property independent of the field in question.

  18. Time in Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shadlen, Michael N.; Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Nobre, Anna C.; Buonomano, Dean V.

    2015-01-01

    Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. This neural activity is linked to cognition that operates in the present or anticipates events or stimuli in the near future. We focus on deliberation and planning in the context of decision making as a cognitive process that integrates information across time. We progress to consider how temporal expectations of the future modulate perception. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Time is central to cognition. However, the neural basis for time-dependent cognition remains poorly understood. We explore how the temporal features of neural activity in cortical circuits and their capacity for plasticity can contribute to time-dependent cognition over short time scales. We propose that understanding the neural basis for how the brain tells time and operates in time will be necessary to develop general models of cognition. PMID:26468192

  19. Initial Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Data Acquired from Soyuz Landings: Establishing a Functional Performance Recovery Time Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Kofman, I. S.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Stenger, M. B.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Fisher, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Testing of crew responses following long-duration flights has not been previously possible until a minimum of more than 24 hours after landing. As a result, it has not been possible to determine the trend of the early recovery process, nor has it been possible to accurately assess the full impact of the decrements associated with long-duration flight. To overcome these limitations, both the Russian and U.S. programs have implemented joint testing at the Soyuz landing site. This International Space Station research effort has been identified as the functional Field Test, and represents data collect on NASA, Russian, European Space Agency, and Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency crews. RESEARCH The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities associated with long-duration space flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible on the day of landing (typically within 1 to 1.5 hours). This goal has both sensorimotor and cardiovascular elements. To date, a total of 15 subjects have participated in a 'pilot' version of the full 'field test'. The full version of the 'field test' will assess functional sensorimotor measurements included hand/eye coordination, standing from a seated position (sit-to-stand), walking normally without falling, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, discriminating different forces generated with the hands (both strength and ability to judge just noticeable differences of force), standing from a prone position, coordinated walking involving tandem heel-to-toe placement (tested with eyes both closed and open), walking normally while avoiding obstacles of differing heights, and determining postural ataxia while standing (measurement of quiet stance). Sensorimotor performance has been obtained using video records, and data from body worn inertial sensors. The cardiovascular portion of the investigation has measured blood pressure and heart rate during a timed stand test in conjunction with postural ataxia testing (quiet stance sway) as well as cardiovascular responses during sensorimotor testing on all of the above measures. We have also collected motion sickness data associated with each of the postflight tests. When possible rudimentary cerebellar assessment was undertaken. In addition to the immediate post-landing collection of data, postflight data has been acquired twice more within 24 hours after landing and measurements continue until sensorimotor and cardiovascular responses have returned to preflight normative values (approximately 60 days postflight). SUMMARY The level of functional deficit observed in the crew tested to date is more severe than expected, clearly triggered by the acquisition of gravity loads immediately after landing when the demands for crew intervention in response to emergency operations will be greatest. Measureable performance parameters such as ability to perform a seat egress, recover from a fall or the ability to see clearly when walking, and related physiologic data (orthostatic responses) are required to provide an evidence base for characterizing programmatic risks and the degree of variability among crewmembers for exploration missions where the crew will be unassisted after landing. Overall, these early functional and related physiologic measurements will allow the estimation of nonlinear sensorimotor and cardiovascular recovery trends that have not been previously captured.

  20. Time for Bed Game

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Abusive Relationships Life After High School Confidence Babysitting: Time for Bed Game KidsHealth > Teens > Babysitting Center > Fun With Kids > Babysitting: Time for Bed Game Print A A A Text ...

  1. Timing system observations

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, J.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to augment Synchronized Time Stamp Support authored by Jim Kowalkowski. This document provides additional documentation to clarify and explain software involved in timing operations of the accelerator.

  2. Screen time and children

    MedlinePLUS

    "Screen time" is a term used for activities done in front of a screen, such as watching TV, working on a computer, or playing video games. Screen time is sedentary activity, meaning you are being physically ...

  3. Accelerator Timing Systems Overview

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, P; Lipinski, M M; W?ostowski, T

    2011-01-01

    Timing systems are crucial ingredients for the successful operation of any particle accelerator complex. They are used not only to synchronize different processes but also to time-stamp and ensure overall coherency of acquired data. We describe fundamental time and frequency figures of merit and methods to measure them, and continue with a description of current synchronization solutions for different applications, precisions and geographical coverage, and some examples. Finally, we describe new trends in timing technology and applications.

  4. Noncommutative Two Time Physics

    E-print Network

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-05-10

    We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

  5. Time for Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most abstract concepts that teachers will introduce to students is the concept of time. Usually introduced at the beginning of the school year, the concept of time is taught along with measurements and scientific units such as length, mass, and volume (NRC 1996). However, unlike length, mass, and volume, time can be a very confusing…

  6. Astronomical Time Series Analysis

    E-print Network

    Pelt, Jaan

    Astronomical Time Series Analysis Lecture Notes by Jaan Pelt Tartu Observatory Oulu University 23 October - 18 November, 2003 #12;ii #12;Introduction Astronomical time series are somewhat different if to compare with stan- dard time series often used in other branches of science and businesses. The random

  7. Notes on Time's Enigma

    E-print Network

    L. Mersini-Houghton

    2009-09-12

    Scientists continue to wrestle with the enigma of time. Is time a dynamic or a fundamental property of spacetime? Why does it have an arrow pointing from past to future? Why are physical laws time-symmetric in a universe with broken time-reversal symmetry? These questions remain a mystery. The hope has been that an understanding of the selection of the initial state for our universe would solve such puzzles, especially that of time's arrow. In this article, I discuss how the birth of the universe from the multiverse helps to unravel the nature of time and the reasons behind the time-reversal symmetry of our physical laws. I make the distinction between a local emerging arrow of time in the nucleating universe and the fundamental time with no arrow in the multiverse. The very event of nucleation of the universe from the multiverse breaks time-reversal symmetry, inducing a locally emergent arrow. But, the laws of physics imprinted on this bubble are not processed at birth. Time-reversal symmetry of laws in our universe is inherited from its birth in the multiverse, since these laws originate from the arrowless multiversal time.

  8. The End of Time?

    E-print Network

    J. N. Butterfield

    2001-03-15

    I discuss J. Barbour's Machian theories of dynamics, and his proposal that a Machian perspective enables one to solve the problem of time in quantum geometrodynamics (by saying that there is no time). I concentrate on his recent book 'The End of Time' (1999).

  9. The End of Time?

    E-print Network

    Butterfield, J N

    2001-01-01

    I discuss J. Barbour's Machian theories of dynamics, and his proposal that a Machian perspective enables one to solve the problem of time in quantum geometrodynamics (by saying that there is no time). I concentrate on his recent book 'The End of Time' (1999).

  10. Time Is Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Diana; Baete, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    One has heard it before: time is money, especially when it comes to adding time for instruction to the school day. When budgets are tight and relief is nowhere in sight, how can schools afford to implement a reform as costly as adding instructional time? It's a daunting task, yet current federal educational priorities tied to federal funding…

  11. Euglobulin lysis time

    MedlinePLUS

    Euglobulin lysis time (ELT) is a blood test that looks at how fast clots break down in the blood. ... A longer-than-normal ELT time may be due to: Diabetes Prematurity A shorter-than-normal ELT time may be due to: Blood vessel injury or surgery ...

  12. Time Change No Smoking!

    E-print Network

    Sin, Peter

    Highlights · Time Change · No Smoking! · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Set Your Clocks Daylight week's Weekly. Smoking An extra reminder this week, folks. From time to time, there are people smoking in areas where they shouldn't be. We want to be good neighbors! Smoking is NOT permitted in the following

  13. Time Domain Angelo Montanari

    E-print Network

    Chomicki, Jan

    Time Domain Angelo Montanari and Jan Chomicki+ Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universit at Buffalo, SUNY, USA Synonyms Temporal domain, temporal structure Definition In its full generality, a time on- tologies. In the database context, the most common temporal ontology takes time in- stants

  14. Time-periodic universes

    E-print Network

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  15. Absolute Time Derivatives

    E-print Network

    T. Matolcsi; P. Van

    2006-10-23

    A four dimensional treatment of nonrelativistic space-time gives a natural frame to deal with objective time derivatives. In this framework some well known objective time derivatives of continuum mechanics appear as Lie-derivatives. Their coordinatized forms depends on the tensorial properties of the relevant physical quantities. We calculate the particular forms of objective time derivatives for scalars, vectors, covectors and different second order tensors from the point of view of a rotating observer. The relation of substantial, material and objective time derivatives is treated.

  16. Time scales in LISA

    E-print Network

    S. Pireaux

    2007-03-23

    The LISA mission is a space interferometer aiming at the detection of gravitational waves in the [$10^{-4}$,$10^{-1}$] Hz frequency band. In order to reach the gravitational wave detection level, a Time Delay Interferometry (TDI) method must be applied to get rid of (most of) the laser frequency noise and optical bench noise. This TDI analysis is carried out in terms of the coordinate time corresponding to the Barycentric Coordinate Reference System (BCRS), TCB, whereas the data at each of the three LISA stations is recorded in terms of each station proper time. We provide here the required proper time versus BCRS time transformation. We show that the difference in rate of station proper time versus TCB is of the order of $5 10^{-8}$. The difference between station proper times and TCB exhibits an oscillatory trend with a maximum amplitude of about $10^{-3}$ s.

  17. SNS TIMING SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON,J.R.; OERTER,B.; SHEA,T.; SIBLEY,C.

    2001-11-27

    A modern physics facility must synchronize the operation of equipment over a wide area. The primary purpose of the site wide SNS synchronization and timing system is to synchronize the operation of the LINAC, accumulator ring and neutron choppers and to distribute appropriate timing signals to accelerator systems, including the Injector, LINAC, Accumulator Ring and Experimental Facilities. Signals to be distributed include the ring RF clock, real-time timing triggers, machine mode and other informational events. Timing triggers and clocks from the SNS synchronization and timing system are used to synchronize hardware operations including the MEBT beam chopper, RF turn on, synchronous equipment state changes, as well as data acquisition for power supplies and beam diagnostics equipment. This paper will describe the timing equipment being designed for the SNS facility and discuss the tradeoffs between conflicting demands of the accelerator and neutron chopper performance due to AC power grid frequency fluctuations.

  18. An ensemble pulsar time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petit, Gerard; Thomas, Claudine; Tavella, Patrizia

    1993-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars are galactic objects that exhibit a very stable spinning period. Several tens of these celestial clocks have now been discovered, which opens the possibility that an average time scale may be deduced through a long-term stability algorithm. Such an ensemble average makes it possible to reduce the level of the instabilities originating from the pulsars or from other sources of noise, which are unknown but independent. The basis for such an algorithm is presented and applied to real pulsar data. It is shown that pulsar time could shortly become more stable than the present atomic time, for averaging times of a few years. Pulsar time can also be used as a flywheel to maintain the accuracy of atomic time in case of temporary failure of the primary standards, or to transfer the improved accuracy of future standards back to the present.

  19. On Time Performance Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael

    2013-01-01

    Within many operations, the pressures for on-time performance are high. Each month, on-time statistics are reported to the Department of Transportation and made public. There is a natural tendency for employees under pressure to do their best to meet these objectives. As a result, pressure to get the job done within the allotted time may cause personnel to deviate from procedures and policies. Additionally, inadequate or unavailable resources may drive employees to work around standard processes that are seen as barriers. However, bypassing practices to enable on-time performance may affect more than the statistics. ASRS reports often highlight on-time performance pressures which may result in impact across all workgroups in an attempt to achieve on-time performance. Reporters often provide in-depth insights into their experiences which can be used by industry to identify and focus on the implementation of systemic fixes.

  20. It's About Time!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Everything we do in VLBI is connected to time. In this contribution, we review 28 orders of magnitude of the spectrum of time ranging from a few hundred femtoseconds (i.e. one degree of phase at X-band - Pi x 10(exp -13) seconds) upwards to tens of millions of years (i.e. ten million years Pi x 10(exp 14) seconds). In this discussion, we will pay special attention to the relation between the underlying oscillator (the frequency standard that defines a clock's rate) and the time kept by the clock (which counts the oscillations of the frequency standard). We will consider two different types of time - time kept by counting an atomic frequency standard (Hydrogen Maser or Cesium), and time reckoned by the rotation of the Earth underneath the stars and sun.

  1. Biomarker time out.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Bowser, Robert; Calabresi, Paolo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J

    2014-10-01

    The advancement of knowledge relies on scientific investigations. The timing between asking a question and data collection defines if a study is prospective or retrospective. Prospective studies look forward from a point in time, are less prone to bias and are considered superior to retrospective studies. This conceptual framework conflicts with the nature of biomarker research. New candidate biomarkers are discovered in a retrospective manner. There are neither resources nor time for prospective testing in all cases. Relevant sources for bias are not covered. Ethical questions arise through the time penalty of an overly dogmatic concept. The timing of sample collection can be separated from testing biomarkers. Therefore the moment of formulating a hypothesis may be after sample collection was completed. A conceptual framework permissive to asking research questions without the obligation to bow to the human concept of calendar time would simplify biomarker research, but will require new safeguards against bias. PMID:24557857

  2. Time card entry system

    SciTech Connect

    Montierth, B.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Time Card Entry System was developed to interface with the DOE Headquarters Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure Numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills US Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two week payroll cycle using ETA. Tours of Duty (e.g. ten hour day, four day week with Friday through Sunday off), established in the ETA system, are imported into the Time Card Entry System by the Timekeepers. An individual`s Tour of Duty establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two week cycle, data is exported by the Timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA data files.

  3. Matter: Space without Time

    E-print Network

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  4. Making Time for Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Ask any teacher what he or she needs more of, and it is a good bet that time will top the list. Anything that promises to recoup a little bit of their workday time is sure to be a best seller. One overlooked time-saver is in how they use feedback. Teachers know that feedback is important for teaching and learning. Unfortunately, most secondary…

  5. Manage Your Time 

    E-print Network

    White, Lynn

    2000-06-27

    when important tasks go undone. Remember that effective time management focuses less on getting more things done, and more on doing the right things at the right time. Choose ways to schedule your time that fit your management style. You may do best... and be productive? Is more time used for some activities than you thought? Start at the center of the chart with the blocks numbered (1). Cross out the (1) square for the first hour used for any of the four types of activities. Cross out (2) for the second hour...

  6. Time out: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Kimberly Anne

    2008-09-01

    Ensuring patient safety in the OR includes performing a time out to help prevent wrong site surgery. The circulating nurse, in the role of patient advocate, usually is the OR team member who initiates the time out. A correctly performed time out includes verifying the correct patient; procedure; site (eg, organ, limb, vertebral level, laterality); surgeon; and position, as well as that proper equipment, instrumentation, and implants are available. Unacceptable time outs can be categorized as borderline, contrary, related, illegitimate, or invented cases. Health care systems should follow the Joint Commission's Universal Protocol and should have tools in place to ensure that patients will undergo correct site surgery. PMID:18790103

  7. Intrinsic time quantum geometrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ita, Eyo Eyo; Soo, Chopin; Yu, Hoi-Lai

    2015-08-01

    Quantum geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl curvature hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational "arrows of time" point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's general relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of gravitation and quantum mechanics.

  8. Passage of time judgements.

    PubMed

    Wearden, J H

    2015-12-15

    The article discusses passage of time judgements (POTJs), judgements about how fast time seems to pass in some situation or during some event. It is argued that POTJs should be distinguished from duration judgements, and that the relation between the two remains to be identified. The article discusses (a) POTJs in laboratory situations and in the real world, (b) "feel judgements", the statement that a duration "feels longer" than a person knows it to be, (c) distortions of passage of time in emergency situations, (d) passage of time and ageing, and (e) determinants of POTJs, particularly the roles of information-processing/attention and arousal. PMID:26115594

  9. Stresses in the plantar region for long- and short-range throws in women basketball players.

    PubMed

    Pau, Massimiliano; Ciuti, Carla

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess plantar pressure pattern modifications caused by short- and long-distance shots in women basketball players. To this end, 24 experienced national- and regional-level basketball players performed 3 trials of 4 technical gestures (free throw, jump stop shot, three-point shot and lay-up) barefoot on a pressure platform placed in fixed positions on the court. Raw data were processed to calculate location and magnitude of pressure peaks in three sub-regions (forefoot, midfoot and rearfoot), and the increase ratio was calculated relative to plantar pressure measured during a static bipedal and unipedal upright stance. The results showed significant increases (p<0.001) in plantar pressure peaks in forefoot (but not midfoot and rearfoot) for all the gestures that involved the use of both legs. Particularly large increases were detected for the three-point shot. All three sub-regions underwent significant changes of the pressure peak in the case of lay-up (forefoot and rearfoot: p<0.001, midfoot: p=0.002). The high levels of contact stress detected for routinely performed technical gestures suggest that a detailed knowledge of changes in the physiological patterns of plantar stresses that take place during play is crucial in reducing the risk of foot injuries and establishing proper training and rehabilitation protocols. PMID:24050476

  10. Time Functions as Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2010-09-01

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K + relation (Seifert’s relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg’s and Levin’s theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K + (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin’s theorem and smoothing techniques.

  11. Time functions as utilities

    E-print Network

    E. Minguzzi

    2009-09-04

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K^+ relation (Seifert's relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg's and Levin's theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K^+ (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin's theorem and smoothing techniques.

  12. Time for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, J. Howard

    2009-01-01

    The amount of time allocated for learning and the way that time is used is one of the few variables that can be influenced rather directly by school leaders. Fortunately, it is also a variable that has shown consistent links to student performance. Now that schools are focused directly, and in some cases exclusively, on student achievement, there…

  13. Tips for Taming Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBelle, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    This article shares seven easy ideas to help teachers tame their time-management problems. To reduce the amount of mail that makes it to one's desk, the author suggests using the "Chicken Pox" technique to limit the number of times a piece of mail is handled. With this technique, it is not necessary to make an immediate decision regarding the…

  14. Prisoners of Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Commission on Time and Learning, Washington, DC.

    The Education Council Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-62) established the National Education Commission on Time and Learning as an independent advisory body charged to do a comprehensive review of the relationship between time and learning in U.S. schools. Based on its 24-month investigation, the Commission found that American students spend an…

  15. Time and Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Theresa Julia; Brooks, David W.; Crippen, Kent J.; March, Joe L.

    2001-06-01

    Time management is an important issue for teachers and students. This article discusses teachers' use of time from the perspective of curriculum and instruction. Average high school students spend fewer than 5 hours per week in outside-of-class study; average college students spend about 20 hours. Procrastination, often viewed in a negative light by teachers, usually pays off so well for college students that seniors become better at it than freshmen. Three suggestions for designing instruction are: test early and often; do not waste the best students' time in an effort to improve overall performance; and use engaging activities that motivate students to give of their time. The impact of computers on curricula is a double-edged sword. Time must be devoted to teaching the use of applications, but the programs reduce busywork. Will this turn out to be a simple tradeoff, or will the programs make us much more efficient so that less time is required? Will computer programs ultimately lead to an expanded criterion for expertise, thus demanding even more time to become an expert? These issues are described and suggestions for controlling time during instruction are provided.

  16. Time Here, Time There, Time Everywhere: Teaching Young Children Time through Daily Routine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joohi; Lee, Joo Ok; Fox, Jill

    2009-01-01

    According to Piaget, 5- or 6-year-old children gradually acquire the concept of time based on events (Piaget, 1969). In his experiment of investigating children's time concepts, Piaget found that children of these ages were able to place pictures based on sequential events with some errors; the younger children made more errors. The National…

  17. Time - A Traveler's Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1999-09-01

    "Bucky Fuller thought big," Wired magazine recently noted, "Arthur C. Clarke thinks big, but Cliff Pickover outdoes them both." In his newest book, Cliff Pickover outdoes even himself, probing a mystery that has baffled mystics, philosophers, and scientists throughout history--What is the nature of time?In Time: A Traveler's Guide , Pickover takes readers to the forefront of science as he illuminates the most mysterious phenomenon in the universe--time itself. Is time travel possible? Is time real? Does it flow in one direction only? Does it have a beginning and an end? What is eternity? Pickover's book offers a stimulating blend of Chopin, philosophy, Einstein, and modern physics, spiced with diverting side-trips to such topics as the history of clocks, the nature of free will, and the reason gold glitters. Numerous diagrams ensure readers will have no trouble following along.By the time we finish this book, we understand a wide variety of scientific concepts pertaining to time. And most important, we will understand that time travel is, indeed, possible.

  18. In Our Time

    E-print Network

    Gold, Eli Kabir

    2014-05-31

    In Our Time is an installation and performance. If you are viewing it outside of a performance time then you are only seeing the installation and the residue of the performers' work. Each performance runs for the duration of 10,000 heartbeats...

  19. More Recess Time, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Rong; Coward, Fanni Liu

    2015-01-01

    Students in Shanghai, China, get much more recess time than their U.S. counterparts throughout their education. As U.S. education reform efforts seek ways of raising achievement, they have begun replacing recess with academic time. The lesson from Shanghai is that this may not be the best strategy. But whether the Shanghai system of more and…

  20. Survivability Versus Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2014-01-01

    Develop Survivability vs Time Model as a decision-evaluation tool to assess various emergency egress methods used at Launch Complex 39B (LC 39B) and in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) on NASAs Kennedy Space Center. For each hazard scenario, develop probability distributions to address statistical uncertainty resulting in survivability plots over time and composite survivability plots encompassing multiple hazard scenarios.

  1. Time in quantum mechanics 

    E-print Network

    Chapin, Kimberly R.

    1997-01-01

    The role of time in quantum mechanics has been and is still very controversial. The purpose of this paper was to explore the historical interpretation of time in quantum mechanics, to determine the current status of this problem-L and to investigate...

  2. The Measurement of Time

    E-print Network

    A. Boyarsky; P Gora

    2007-05-07

    We present a definition of time measurement based on high energy photons and the fundamental length scale, and show that, for macroscopic time, it is in accord with the Lorentz transformation of special relativity. To do this we define observer in a different way than in special relativity.

  3. Task Time Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-24

    This client-side web app tracks the amount of time spent on arbitrary tasks. It allosw the creation of an unlimited number of arbitrarily named tasks ans via simple interactions, tracks the amount of time spent working on the drfined tasks.

  4. Changing time and emotions.

    PubMed

    Geoffard, Pierre-Yves; Luchini, Stéphane

    2010-01-27

    In this paper, we consider that our experience of time (to come) depends on the emotions we feel when we imagine future pleasant or unpleasant events. A positive emotion such as relief or joy associated with a pleasant event that will happen in the future induces impatience. Impatience, in our context, implies that the experience of time up to the forthcoming event expands. A negative emotion such as grief or frustration associated with an unpleasant event that will happen in the future triggers anxiety. This will give the experience of time contraction. Time, therefore, is not exogeneously given to the individual and emotions, which link together events or situations, are a constitutive ingredient of the experience of time. Our theory can explain experimental evidence that people tend to prefer to perform painful actions earlier than pleasurable ones, contrary to the predictions yielded by the standard exponential discounting framework. PMID:20026465

  5. Constructing Time Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, G. M.

    The existence of time machines, understood as space time constructions exhibiting physically realised closed timelike curves (CTC's), would raise fundamental problems with causality and challenge our current understanding of classical and quantum theories of gravity. In this paper, we investigate three proposals for time machines which share some common features: cosmic strings in relative motion, where the conical space time appears to allow CTC's; colliding gravitational shock waves, which in Aichelburg Sexl coordinates imply discontinuous geodesics; and the superluminal propagation of light in gravitational radiation metrics in a modified electrodynamics featuring violations of the strong equivalence principle. While we show that ultimately none of these constructions creates a working time machine, their study illustrates the subtle levels at which causal self-consistency imposes itself, and we consider what intuition can be drawn from these examples for future theories.

  6. Modelling bursty time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajna, Szabolcs; Tóth, Bálint; Kertész, János

    2013-10-01

    Many human-related activities show power-law decaying interevent time distribution with exponents usually varying between 1 and 2. We study a simple task-queuing model, which produces bursty time series due to the non-trivial dynamics of the task list. The model is characterized by a priority distribution as an input parameter, which describes the choice procedure from the list. We give exact results on the asymptotic behaviour of the model and we show that the interevent time distribution is power-law decaying for any kind of input distributions that remain normalizable in the infinite list limit, with exponents tunable between 1 and 2. The model satisfies a scaling law between the exponents of interevent time distribution (?) and autocorrelation function (?): ? + ? = 2. This law is general for renewal processes with power-law decaying interevent time distribution. We conclude that slowly decaying autocorrelation function indicates long-range dependence only if the scaling law is violated.

  7. Time synchronized video systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Ron

    1994-01-01

    The idea of synchronizing multiple video recordings to some type of 'range' time has been tried to varying degrees of success in the past. Combining this requirement with existing time code standards (SMPTE) and the new innovations in desktop multimedia however, have afforded an opportunity to increase the flexibility and usefulness of such efforts without adding costs over the traditional data recording and reduction systems. The concept described can use IRIG, GPS or a battery backed internal clock as the master time source. By converting that time source to Vertical Interval Time Code or Longitudinal Time Code, both in accordance with the SMPTE standards, the user will obtain a tape that contains machine/computer readable time code suitable for use with editing equipment that is available off-the-shelf. Accuracy on playback is then determined by the playback system chosen by the user. Accuracies of +/- 2 frames are common among inexpensive systems and complete frame accuracy is more a matter of the users' budget than the capability of the recording system.

  8. Parallel time integration software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-07-01

    This package implements an optimal-scaling multigrid solver for the (non) linear systems that arise from the discretization of problems with evolutionary behavior. Typically, solution algorithms for evolution equations are based on a time-marching approach, solving sequentially for one time step after the other. Parallelism in these traditional time-integrarion techniques is limited to spatial parallelism. However, current trends in computer architectures are leading twards system with more, but not faster. processors. Therefore, faster compute speeds mustmore »come from greater parallelism. One approach to achieve parallelism in time is with multigrid, but extending classical multigrid methods for elliptic poerators to this setting is a significant achievement. In this software, we implement a non-intrusive, optimal-scaling time-parallel method based on multigrid reduction techniques. The examples in the package demonstrate optimality of our multigrid-reduction-in-time algorithm (MGRIT) for solving a variety of parabolic equations in two and three sparial dimensions. These examples can also be used to show that MGRIT can achieve significant speedup in comparison to sequential time marching on modern architectures.« less

  9. Parallel time integration software

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    This package implements an optimal-scaling multigrid solver for the (non) linear systems that arise from the discretization of problems with evolutionary behavior. Typically, solution algorithms for evolution equations are based on a time-marching approach, solving sequentially for one time step after the other. Parallelism in these traditional time-integrarion techniques is limited to spatial parallelism. However, current trends in computer architectures are leading twards system with more, but not faster. processors. Therefore, faster compute speeds must come from greater parallelism. One approach to achieve parallelism in time is with multigrid, but extending classical multigrid methods for elliptic poerators to this setting is a significant achievement. In this software, we implement a non-intrusive, optimal-scaling time-parallel method based on multigrid reduction techniques. The examples in the package demonstrate optimality of our multigrid-reduction-in-time algorithm (MGRIT) for solving a variety of parabolic equations in two and three sparial dimensions. These examples can also be used to show that MGRIT can achieve significant speedup in comparison to sequential time marching on modern architectures.

  10. Digital time delay

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  11. Environment Induced Time Arrow

    E-print Network

    Janos Polonyi

    2012-06-25

    The spread of the time arrows from the environment to an observed subsystem is followed within a harmonic model. A similarity is pointed out between irreversibility and a phase with spontaneously broken symmetry. The causal structure of interaction might be lost in the irreversible case, as well. The Closed Time Path formalism is developed for classical systems and shown to handle the time arrow problem in a clear and flexible manner. The quantum case is considered, as well, and the common origin of irreversibility and decoherence is pointed out.

  12. Effective Quantum Time Travel

    E-print Network

    Svetlichny, George

    2009-01-01

    The quantum teleportation protocol can be used to probabilistically simulate a quantum circuit with backward-in-time connections. This allows us to analyze some conceptual problems of time travel in the context of physically realizable situations, to realize encrypted measurements of future states for which the decryption key becomes available only after the state is created, and to probabilistically realize a multistage quantum state processing within the time needed to complete only one stage. The probabilistic nature of the process resolves any paradox.

  13. Paradoxes of time travel

    E-print Network

    Krasnikov, S V

    1997-01-01

    Paradoxes that can supposedly occur if a time machine is created are discussed. It is shown that the existence of trajectories of ``multiplicity zero'' (i.e. trajectories that describe a ball hitting its younger self so that the latter cannot fall into the time machine) is not paradoxical by itself. This {\\em apparent paradox} can be resolved (at least sometimes) without any harm to local physics or to the time machine. Also a simple model is adduced for which the absence of {\\em true} paradoxes caused by self-interaction is proved.

  14. Effective Quantum Time Travel

    E-print Network

    George Svetlichny

    2009-02-27

    The quantum teleportation protocol can be used to probabilistically simulate a quantum circuit with backward-in-time connections. This allows us to analyze some conceptual problems of time travel in the context of physically realizable situations, to realize encrypted measurements of future states for which the decryption key becomes available only after the state is created, and to probabilistically realize a multistage quantum state processing within the time needed to complete only one stage. The probabilistic nature of the process resolves any paradox.

  15. Paradoxes of time travel

    E-print Network

    S. Krasnikov

    1996-03-25

    Paradoxes that can supposedly occur if a time machine is created are discussed. It is shown that the existence of trajectories of ``multiplicity zero'' (i.e. trajectories that describe a ball hitting its younger self so that the latter cannot fall into the time machine) is not paradoxical by itself. This {\\em apparent paradox} can be resolved (at least sometimes) without any harm to local physics or to the time machine. Also a simple model is adduced for which the absence of {\\em true} paradoxes caused by self-interaction is proved.

  16. Timing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A. (inventor); Wells, George H., Jr. (inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not over shoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  17. Timing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A. (Inventor); Wells, Jr., George H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not overshoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  18. Sublinear Time Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Rubinfeld, Ronitt

    Sublinear time algorithms represent a new paradigm in computing, where an algorithm must give some sort of an answer after inspecting only a very small portion of the input. We discuss the types of answers that one can ...

  19. The Nature of Time

    E-print Network

    Julian Barbour

    2009-03-20

    A review of some basic facts of classical dynamics shows that time, or precisely duration, is redundant as a fundamental concept. Duration and the behaviour of clocks emerge from a timeless law that governs change.

  20. Kairoscope : coordinating time socially

    E-print Network

    Martin, Reed Eric

    2010-01-01

    If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

  1. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  2. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  3. Time, energy & form

    E-print Network

    McInnis, Martha Jane

    1982-01-01

    Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

  4. Mathematics, time, and confirmation

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Ulrich, 1968-

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation discusses two issues about abstract objects: their role in scientific theories, and their relation to time. Chapter 1, "Why Apply Mathematics?" argues that scientific theories are not about the mathematics ...

  5. The Williston time capsule

    E-print Network

    Moses, David (David Patrick)

    2015-01-01

    This project is a time capsule of the oil economy, created by entombing everyday objects made from and powered by petroleum into a landscape that spatially recreates the processes of drilling and fracking a contemporary ...

  6. Gravitation with Two Times

    E-print Network

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-04-10

    We investigate the possibility of constructing a covariant Newtonian gravitational theory and find that the action describing a massless relativistic particle in a background Newtonian gravitodynamic field has a higher-dimensional extension with two times.

  7. Time to Go Local!

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Time to Go Local! Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... MedlinePlus.gov health topic pages, you will find "Go Local" links that take you to information about ...

  8. Independent Study & Time Management

    E-print Network

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Development Service Communication Skills Listening and presenting in lectures Seeking clarification, portfolios or exams Feedback and academic support Continual Academic Development #12;Academic Skills LearningIndependent Study & Time Management Learning Development Service 8th of October 2015 Leonie Maria

  9. Shape-Time Photography

    E-print Network

    Freeman, William T.

    2002-01-10

    We introduce a new method to describe, in a single image, changes in shape over time. We acquire both range and image information with a stationary stereo camera. From the pictures taken, we display a composite image ...

  10. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  11. Time dependence of ICD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    We will discuss experimental studies of ICD in van der Vaals dimers of rare gas atoms and small molecules using the COLTRIMS technique. The talk will cover ICD after resonant Auger excitation (Nature 505, 664 (2014)) and two studies unveiling the time dependence of ICD in the energy (PRL 111, 233004 (2013)) and in the time domain (PRL 111, 093401 (2013)). A new technique to make ultrafast movies without the use of short pulses will be discussed.

  12. Classical Time Crystals

    E-print Network

    Alfred Shapere; Frank Wilczek

    2012-07-12

    We consider the possibility that classical dynamical systems display motion in their lowest energy state, forming a time analogue of crystalline spatial order. Challenges facing that idea are identified and overcome. We display arbitrary orbits of an angular variable as lowest-energy trajectories for nonsingular Lagrangian systems. Dynamics within orbits of broken symmetry provide a natural arena for formation of time crystals. We exhibit models of that kind, including a model with traveling density waves.

  13. Timing using temporal context

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Karthik H.; Howard, Marc W.

    2010-01-01

    We present a memory model that explicitly constructs and stores the temporal information about when a stimulus was encountered in the past. The temporal information is constructed from a set of temporal context vectors adapted from the temporal context model (TCM). These vectors are leaky integrators that could be constructed from a population of persistently-firing cells. An array of temporal context vectors with different decay rates calculates the Laplace transform of real time events. Simple bands of feedforward excitatory and inhibitory connections from these temporal context vectors enable another population of cells, timing cells. These timing cells approximately reconstruct the entire temporal history of past events. The temporal representation of events farther in the past is less accurate than for more recent events. This history-reconstruction procedure, which we refer to as timing from inverse Laplace transform (TILT), displays a scalar property with respect to the accuracy of reconstruction. When incorporated into a simple associative memory framework, we show that TILT predicts well-timed peak responses and the Weber law property, like that observed in interval timing tasks and classical conditioning experiments. PMID:20654587

  14. Spectral Eclipse Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Agol, Eric; Deming, Drake

    2015-12-01

    We utilize multi-dimensional simulations of varying equatorial jet strength to predict wavelength-dependent variations in the eclipse times of gas-giant planets. A displaced hot spot introduces an asymmetry in the secondary eclipse light curve that manifests itself as a measured offset in the timing of the center of eclipse. A multi-wavelength observation of secondary eclipse, one probing the timing of barycentric eclipse at short wavelengths and another probing at longer wavelengths, will reveal the longitudinal displacement of the hot spot and break the degeneracy between this effect and that associated with the asymmetry due to an eccentric orbit. The effect of time offsets was first explored in the IRAC wavebands by Williams et al. Here we improve upon their methodology, extend to a broad range of wavelengths, and demonstrate our technique on a series of multi-dimensional radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of HD 209458b with varying equatorial jet strength and hot-spot displacement. Simulations with the largest hot-spot displacement result in timing offsets of up to 100 s in the infrared. Though we utilize a particular radiative hydrodynamical model to demonstrate this effect, the technique is model independent. This technique should allow a much larger survey of hot-spot displacements with the James Webb Space Telescope than currently accessible with time-intensive phase curves, hopefully shedding light on the physical mechanisms associated with thermal energy advection in irradiated gas giants.

  15. Time Card Entry System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-05-07

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two weekmore »payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual''s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.« less

  16. Time Asymmetric Quantum Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Arno R. Bohm; Manuel Gadella; Piotr Kielanowski

    2011-09-03

    The meaning of time asymmetry in quantum physics is discussed. On the basis of a mathematical theorem, the Stone--von Neumann theorem, the solutions of the dynamical equations, the Schr\\"odinger equation (1) for states or the Heisenberg equation (6a) for observables are given by a unitary group. Dirac kets require the concept of a RHS (rigged Hilbert space) of Schwartz functions; for this kind of RHS a mathematical theorem also leads to time symmetric group evolution. Scattering theory suggests to distinguish mathematically between states (defined by a preparation apparatus) and observables (defined by a registration apparatus (detector)). If one requires that scattering resonances of width $\\Gamma$ and exponentially decaying states of lifetime $\\tau=\\frac{\\hbar}{\\Gamma}$ should be the same physical entities (for which there is sufficient evidence) one is led to a pair of RHS's of Hardy functions and connected with it, to a semigroup time evolution $t_{0}\\leq tbig bang time for the universe, when it was a quantum system. The decay of quasi-stable particles is used to illustrate this quantum mechanical time asymmetry. From the analysis of these processes, we show that the properties of rigged Hilbert spaces of Hardy functions are suitable for a formulation of time asymmetry in quantum mechanics.

  17. GABA Predicts Time Perception

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Sonia; Near, Jamie; Stagg, Charlotte J.; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2014-01-01

    Our perception of time constrains our experience of the world and exerts a pivotal influence over a myriad array of cognitive and motor functions. There is emerging evidence that the perceived duration of subsecond intervals is driven by sensory-specific neural activity in human and nonhuman animals, but the mechanisms underlying individual differences in time perception remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that elevated visual cortex GABA impairs the coding of particular visual stimuli, resulting in a dampening of visual processing and concomitant positive time-order error (relative underestimation) in the perceived duration of subsecond visual intervals. Participants completed psychophysical tasks measuring visual interval discrimination and temporal reproduction and we measured in vivo resting state GABA in visual cortex using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Time-order error selectively correlated with GABA concentrations in visual cortex, with elevated GABA associated with a rightward horizontal shift in psychometric functions, reflecting a positive time-order error (relative underestimation). These results demonstrate anatomical, neurochemical, and task specificity and suggest that visual cortex GABA contributes to individual differences in time perception. PMID:24647956

  18. On Race and Time.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Gordon B; Olcaysoy Okten, Irmak; Gooch, Cynthia M

    2015-11-01

    Arousal is known to shape time perception, and heightened arousal causes one to perceive that time has slowed (i.e., a given length of time feels longer than it actually is). The current experiments illustrate that among White people who experience arousal when contemplating race (specifically those for whom appearing biased is an ongoing concern), time perception slows when they observe faces of Black men. We asked participants to judge the duration of presentation for faces of White and Black men (shown for periods ranging from 300 to 1,200 ms) relative to a standard duration of 600 ms. Evidence of bias emerged when White participants concerned with bias saw faces of Black men (e.g., durations of less than 600 ms were perceived as being greater than 600 ms). The current findings have implications for intergroup interactions in which timing is essential-for example, length of job interviews, police officers' perception of the length of an encounter and when force should be initiated, and doctors' perception of the length of medical encounters. Racially biased time perception is a new form of implicit bias, one exerted at the perceptual level. PMID:26423460

  19. The thermodynamics of time

    E-print Network

    Dries Sels; Michiel Wouters

    2015-01-22

    The problem of time is a deep paradox in our physical description of the world. According to Aristotle's relational theory, time is a measure of change and does not exist on its own. In contrast, quantum mechanics, just like Newtonian mechanics, is equipped with a master clock that dictates the evolution of a system. This clock is infinitely precise and tacitly supplied free of charge from outside physics. Not only does this absolute time make it notoriously difficult to make a consistent theory of quantum gravity, it is also the underlying problem in establishing the second law. Indeed, contrary to our experience, the Wheeler-deWitt equation --a canonical quantization of general relativity-- predicts a static universe. Similarly, when simply concerned with the dynamics of a closed quantum system, there is no second law because the Von Neumann entropy is invariant under unitary transformations. Here we are mainly concerned with the latter problem and we show that it can be resolved by attributing a minimal amount of resources to the measurement of time. Although there is an absolute time in quantum mechanics, an observer can only establish a time by measuring a clock. For a local measurement, the minimal entropy production is equal to the number of ticks. This lower bound is attained by a black hole.

  20. Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is a method of ambient noise imaging using the solar oscillations. The basic realization that led to time-distance helioseismology was that the temporal cross correlation of the signals at two 'surface' (or photospheric) locations should show a feature at the time lag corresponding to the subsurface travel time between the locations. The temporal cross correlation, as a function of the location separation, is the Fourier transform of the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the solar oscillations, a commonly used function in helioseismology. It is therefore likely the characteristic ridge structure of the correlation function had been seen before without appreciation of its significance. Travel times are measured from the cross correlations. The times are sensitive to a number of important subsurface solar phenomena. These include sound speed variations, flows, and magnetic fields. There has been much interesting progress in the 17 years since the first paper on this subject (Duvall et al., Nature, 1993, 362, 430-432). This progress will be reviewed in this paper.

  1. Time-domain imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolliver, C. L.

    1989-01-01

    The quest for the highest resolution microwave imaging and principle of time-domain imaging has been the primary motivation for recent developments in time-domain techniques. With the present technology, fast time varying signals can now be measured and recorded both in magnitude and in-phase. It has also enhanced our ability to extract relevant details concerning the scattering object. In the past, the interface of object geometry or shape for scattered signals has received substantial attention in radar technology. Various scattering theories were proposed to develop analytical solutions to this problem. Furthermore, the random inversion, frequency swept holography, and the synthetic radar imaging, have two things in common: (1) the physical optic far-field approximation, and (2) the utilization of channels as an extra physical dimension, were also advanced. Despite the inherent vectorial nature of electromagnetic waves, these scalar treatments have brought forth some promising results in practice with notable examples in subsurface and structure sounding. The development of time-domain techniques are studied through the theoretical aspects as well as experimental verification. The use of time-domain imaging for space robotic vision applications has been suggested.

  2. Time and moral judgment.

    PubMed

    Suter, Renata S; Hertwig, Ralph

    2011-06-01

    Do moral judgments hinge on the time available to render them? According to a recent dual-process model of moral judgment, moral dilemmas that engage emotional processes are likely to result in fast deontological gut reactions. In contrast, consequentialist responses that tot up lives saved and lost in response to such dilemmas would require cognitive control to override the initial response. Cognitive control, however, takes time. In two experiments, we manipulated the time available to arrive at moral judgments in two ways: by allotting a fixed short or large amount of time, and by nudging people to answer swiftly or to deliberate thoroughly. We found that faster responses indeed lead to more deontological responses among those moral dilemmas in which the killing of one to save many necessitates manhandling an innocent person and in which this action is depicted as a means to an end. Thus, our results are the first demonstration that inhibiting cognitive control through manipulations of time alters moral judgments. PMID:21354557

  3. Real-Time Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Coryphaeus Software, founded in 1989 by former NASA electronic engineer Steve Lakowske, creates real-time 3D software. Designer's Workbench, the company flagship product, is a modeling and simulation tool for the development of both static and dynamic 3D databases. Other products soon followed. Activation, specifically designed for game developers, allows developers to play and test the 3D games before they commit to a target platform. Game publishers can shorten development time and prove the "playability" of the title, maximizing their chances of introducing a smash hit. Another product, EasyT, lets users create massive, realistic representation of Earth terrains that can be viewed and traversed in real time. Finally, EasyScene software control the actions among interactive objects within a virtual world. Coryphaeus products are used on Silican Graphics workstation and supercomputers to simulate real-world performance in synthetic environments. Customers include aerospace, aviation, architectural and engineering firms, game developers, and the entertainment industry.

  4. Agency, time, and causality

    PubMed Central

    Widlok, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive Scientists interested in causal cognition increasingly search for evidence from non-Western Educational Industrial Rich Democratic people but find only very few cross-cultural studies that specifically target causal cognition. This article suggests how information about causality can be retrieved from ethnographic monographs, specifically from ethnographies that discuss agency and concepts of time. Many apparent cultural differences with regard to causal cognition dissolve when cultural extensions of agency and personhood to non-humans are taken into account. At the same time considerable variability remains when we include notions of time, linearity and sequence. The article focuses on ethnographic case studies from Africa but provides a more general perspective on the role of ethnography in research on the diversity and universality of causal cognition. PMID:25414683

  5. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  6. Trauma resuscitation time.

    PubMed

    van Olden, Ger D J; van Vugt, Arie B; Biert, Jan; Goris, R Jan A

    2003-03-01

    Documenting the timing and organisation of trauma resuscitation can be utilised to assess performance standards, and to ensure a high quality of trauma resuscitation procedures. Since there is no European literature available on trauma resuscitation time (TRT) in the emergency room, the aim of this descriptive study is to evaluate TRT in the Netherlands. The introduction of an ATLS-trained prehospital mobile medical team (MMT) in the Nijmegen area initiated the on-site advanced trauma life-support for the prehospital management of trauma patients. We studied TRT in two groups of patients, one with, the other without on-site care by a MMT. In the emergency room the use of videotape recording was chosen to document trauma resuscitation (22 actions) and TRT. A specially flow-chart was used to define the TRT-procedures. We studied 43 patients; 27 without MMT treatment and 16 with MMT treatment. The activities were divided into the ABCDE's of trauma care. Significant more patients of the MMT group were intubated before arrival in the hospital (12/16 (75%) versus 2/27 (2%), P<0.05). Eleven definitive airway management interventions (intubation) and one thoracic drainage in the non-MMT group were demanded by the protocol, but not performed before arrival in the hospital. Sixteen out of 22 actions that were documented were carried out at an earlier stage in the MMT group. There was no significant difference between the resuscitation times; in both groups the recorded median time was approximately 43 min. This prospective analysis demonstrates the timing of resuscitation procedures in a resuscitation room and provides some insight into the timing of ATLS initial assessment. PMID:12623249

  7. Funding Full-Time Study through Part-Time Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2009-01-01

    Full-time students engaged in part-time studies have been a subject of increasing academic attention. This study extends work in this area by examining: the extent to which full-time undergraduate students undertake part-time employment, the reasons for working whilst studying full-time and the extent to which students relate their part-time

  8. Time as an Illusion

    E-print Network

    Paul S. Wesson

    2009-05-01

    We review the idea, due to Einstein, Eddington, Hoyle and Ballard, that time is a subjective label, whose primary purpose is to order events, perhaps in a higher-dimensional universe. In this approach, all moments in time exist simultaneously, but they are ordered to create the illusion of an unfolding experience by some physical mechanism. This, in the language of relativity, may be connected to a hypersurface in a world that extends beyond spacetime. Death in such a scenario may be merely a phase change.

  9. Times for interplanetary trips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The times required to travel to the various planets at an acceleration of one g are calculated. Surrounding gravitational fields are neglected except for a relatively short distance near take-off or landing. The orbit consists of an essentially straight line with the thrust directed toward the destination up to the halfway point, but in the opposite direction for the remainder so that the velocity is zero on arrival. A table lists the approximate times required, and also the maximum velocities acquired in light units v/c for the various planets.

  10. Geologic time scale bookmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    This bookmark, designed for use with U.S. Geological Survey activities at the 2nd USA Science and Engineering Festival (April 26–29, 2012), is adapted from the more detailed Fact Sheet 2010–3059 "Divisions of Geologic Time." The information that it presents is widely sought by educators and students.

  11. Where in Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecore, John; Sacks, David

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an activity developed to assist students with constructing their own understanding of Earth's history and provide questions to help teach the geologic time scale. The lesson is aligned to the following National Science Education Standards: Science as Inquiry, Earth's History, and Nature of Science. While…

  12. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  13. The Pollution of Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, John R.

    1972-01-01

    The triumph of science has brought with it a quasi-religious scientism. Science, which focuses on the rational ordering of events, has disregarded the process or passage between them. By concentrating on the pattern and ignoring the transition, science has in part caused and in part abetted a corruption of time. (Author)

  14. Saving Time with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullen, Kristine; Zimmerman, Holly

    2013-01-01

    In order to help teachers envision digital products in action in classrooms, the authors look at three examples of how teachers they know enhance learning time by employing technology efficiently. The examples include: (1) a social studies teacher who begins each class period with a three-question formative assessment using the website…

  15. Equal Time for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1984-01-01

    Examines social influences which discourage women from pursuing studies in computer science, including monopoly of computer time by boys at the high school level, sexual harassment in college, movies, and computer games. Describes some initial efforts to encourage females of all ages to study computer science. (JM)

  16. Time and Geometric Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikosov, A. A.; Gozzi, E.; Mauro, D.

    In this paper we briefly review the functional version of the Koopman-von Neumann operatorial approach to classical mechanics. We then show that its quantization can be achieved by freezing to zero two Grassmannian partners of time. This method of quantization presents many similarities with the one known as Geometric Quantization.

  17. Time is Life

    E-print Network

    Domingos S. L. Soares

    2001-08-10

    The affirmative statement of the existence of extraterrestrial life is tentatively raised to the status of a principle. Accordingly, Fermi's question is answered and the anthropic principle is shown to be falsifiable. The time-scale for the development of life on Earth and the age of the universe are the fundamental quantities upon which the arguments are framed.

  18. This Time It's Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Educators have known for some time now that a one-size-fits-all approach to learning does not lead to the level of student engagement and academic success that schools strive to achieve. In their search for a more customized approach to delivering instruction, they've explored project-based learning, addressed different learning styles, and…

  19. Bootstrapping Time Dilation Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Cisco; Unruh, William G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a general relativistic model of a spherical shell of matter with a perfect fluid on its surface coupled to an internal oscillator, which generalizes a model recently introduced by the authors to construct a self-gravitating interferometer (Gooding and Unruh in Phys Rev D 90:044071, 2014). The internal oscillator evolution is defined with respect to the local proper time of the shell, allowing the oscillator to serve as a local clock that ticks differently depending on the shell's position and momentum. A Hamiltonian reduction is performed on the system, and an approximate quantum description is given to the reduced phase space. If we focus only on the external dynamics, we must trace out the clock degree of freedom, and this results in a form of intrinsic decoherence that shares some features with a proposed "universal" decoherence mechanism attributed to gravitational time dilation (Pikovski et al in Nat Phys, 2015). We note that the proposed decoherence remains present in the (gravity-free) limit of flat spacetime, emphasizing that the effect can be attributed entirely to proper time differences, and thus is not necessarily related to gravity. Whereas the effect described in (Pikovski et al in Nat Phys, 2015) vanishes in the absence of an external gravitational field, our approach bootstraps the gravitational contribution to the time dilation decoherence by including self-interaction, yielding a fundamentally gravitational intrinsic decoherence effect.

  20. Video time encoding machines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value. PMID:21296708

  1. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  2. Time for Reading?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William R.

    1989-01-01

    Reading for pleasure and enlightenment is a critical, and endangered, element in a well-informed citizenry. As a basis for intellectual growth, reading is threatened by media misuse and lack of encouragement of recreational reading. Solutions include emphasis on integrated skills, improved time allocation, and cooperation among parents, teachers,…

  3. Leadership in Challenging Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of tough financial times, resourceful school leaders devise ways to overcome challenges and improve education. To do this, they make strategic use of the resources they have. And they also cultivate learning communities. In this article, Elizabeth A. City describes how school leaders can make more strategic use of three essential…

  4. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  5. Bootstrapping Time Dilation Decoherence

    E-print Network

    Cisco Gooding; William G. Unruh

    2015-07-07

    We present a general relativistic model of a spherical shell of matter with a perfect fluid on its surface coupled to an internal oscillator, which generalizes a model recently introduced by the authors to construct a self-gravitating interferometer [1]. The internal oscillator evolution is defined with respect to the local proper time of the shell, allowing the oscillator to serve as a local clock that ticks differently depending on the shell's position and momentum. A Hamiltonian reduction is performed on the system, and an approximate quantum description is given to the reduced phase space. If we focus only on the external dynamics, we must trace out the clock degree of freedom, and this results in a form of intrinsic decoherence that shares some features with a proposed "universal" decoherence mechanism attributed to gravitational time dilation [2]. We note that the proposed decoherence remains present in the (gravity-free) limit of flat spacetime, emphasizing that the effect can be attributed entirely to proper time differences, and thus is not necessarily related to gravity. Whereas the effect described in [2] vanishes in the absence of an external gravitational field, our approach bootstraps the gravitational contribution to the time dilation decoherence by including self-interaction, yielding a fundamentally gravitational intrinsic decoherence effect.

  6. Time in Cosmology

    E-print Network

    R. Brout; R. Parentani

    1999-02-05

    The notion of time in cosmology is revealed through an examination of transition matrix elements of radiative processes occurring in the cosmos. To begin with, the very concept of time is delineated in classical physics in terms of correlations between the succession of configurations which describe a process and a standard trajectory called the clock. The total is an isolated system of fixed energy. This is relevant for cosmology in that the universe is an isolated system which we take to be homogeneous and isotropic. Furthermore, in virtue of the constraint which arises from reparametrization invariance of time, it has total energy zero. Therefore the momentum of the scale factor is determined from the energy of matter. In the quantum theory this is exploited through use of the WKB approximation for the wave function of the scale factor, justified for a large universe. The formalism then gives rise to matrix elements describing matter processes. These are shown to take on the form of usual time dependent quantum amplitudes wherein the temporal dependence is given by a background which is once more fixed by the total energy of matter.

  7. Scored Timed Writings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerl, Sister Marion Joseph

    1974-01-01

    The procedures and advantages of the gross speed--two percent-of-error method in scoring typewriting timed writings are presented. The method makes allowance for errors according to the number of opportunities for error. A mailing address for the typing scoring chart and further information on the method is included. (AG)

  8. The time travel paradox

    E-print Network

    Krasnikov, S

    2001-01-01

    We define the time travel paradox in physical terms and prove its existence by constructing an explicit example. We argue further that in the theories --- such as general relativity --- where the spacetime geometry is subject to nothing but differential equations and initial data no paradoxes arise.

  9. Time travel paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnikov, S.

    2002-03-01

    We define the time travel paradox in physical terms and prove its existence by constructing an explicit example. We argue further that in theories-such as general relativity-where the spacetime geometry is subject to nothing but differential equations and initial data no paradoxes arise.

  10. The time travel paradox

    E-print Network

    S. Krasnikov

    2002-03-27

    We define the time travel paradox in physical terms and prove its existence by constructing an explicit example. We argue further that in theories -- such as general relativity -- where the spacetime geometry is subject to nothing but differential equations and initial data no paradoxes arise.

  11. Time and Moral Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Renata S.; Hertwig, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Do moral judgments hinge on the time available to render them? According to a recent dual-process model of moral judgment, moral dilemmas that engage emotional processes are likely to result in fast deontological gut reactions. In contrast, consequentialist responses that tot up lives saved and lost in response to such dilemmas would require…

  12. Spectral Eclipse Timing

    E-print Network

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Deming, Drake

    2015-01-01

    We utilize multi-dimensional simulations of varying equatorial jet strength to predict wavelength dependent variations in the eclipse times of gas-giant planets. A displaced hot-spot introduces an asymmetry in the secondary eclipse light curve that manifests itself as a measured offset in the timing of the center of eclipse. A multi-wavelength observation of secondary eclipse, one probing the timing of barycentric eclipse at short wavelengths and another probing at longer wavelengths, will reveal the longitudinal displacement of the hot-spot and break the degeneracy between this effect and that associated with the asymmetry due to an eccentric orbit. The effect of time offsets was first explored in the IRAC wavebands by Williams et. al (2006). Here we improve upon their methodology, extend to a broad ranges of wavelengths, and demonstrate our technique on a series of multi-dimensional radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of HD 209458b with varying equatorial jet strength and hot-spot displacement. Simulations...

  13. Lessons: Math. It's Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krech, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use a one-handed clock for teaching time telling: make a one-handed clock (hour hand only); discuss clock history; have students use approximate language to describe where the hour hand is; have students practice with their own clocks; introduce the minute hand; have students compare the clocks; and have students add minute hands…

  14. Timing and throttle linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Wenstadt, T.D.; Hagen, M.W.

    1986-11-18

    This patent describes a timing throttle control for a spark ignition internal combustion engine having a fuel/air mixing device and a spark timing device. The control comprises a first pivot on the engine, a first lever mounted on the pivot and including a cam slot having a first portion which has a substantially uniform radius about the pivot and a second portion which has a non-constant radii about the first pivot. A control means is connected to the first lever to actuate the first lever about the first pivot, a second pivot on the engine in non-parallel relation to the first pivot. A second lever is mounted on the second pivot and operative to control the timing of the spark timing device, a spherical cam follower is mounted on the second lever and engaged with the cam slot. A third lever is mounted on the third pivot and operatively connected to the fuel/air mixing device. A link interconnects the first level and the third lever.

  15. Fundamentals of Time and Frequency

    E-print Network

    17 Fundamentals of Time and Frequency 17.1 Introduction Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) 17.2 Time and Frequency Measurement Accuracy · Stability 17.3 Time and Frequency Standards Quartz Oscillators · Rubidium Oscillators · Cesium Oscillators 17.4 Time and Frequency Transfer Fundamentals of Time and Frequency Transfer

  16. Time Dependent Volcano Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segall, P.

    2006-12-01

    Time varying deformation can arise due to changes in magma pressure, evolution of the source geometry (e.g., dike propagation), or time dependent response of the surrounding crust. It is important to understand the signatures of these processes in order to distinguish between them. Here I explore time dependent surface deformation due to viscoelastic and poroelastic relaxation of the crust surrounding simplified magma chambers. Viscoelastic deformation is considered in a shell surrounding a spherical magma chamber in a half-space (as analyzed numerically by Newman et al, 2001). The full space solution for a Maxwell rheology was given by Dragoni and Magnanensi (PEPI, 1989). An approximate half-space solution is simply constructed following the approach of McTigue (JGR, 1987) as long as the outer radius R2 is small compared to the depth d. The surface displacements are scaled, time-dependent versions of the Mogi solution in an elastic half-space. For a step increase in magma pressure (other source histories are also simply constructed) uz (?, z=0, t) = (1 - ?) p0 R13 / ? d2 [ e-t/tR + R23 / R13 ( 1 - e-t/tR ) ] 1 / (1 + ?2)3/2 where R1 is the magma chamber radius, ? is the normalized radial distance from the center of the source, and the characteristic relaxation time is tR = (3?/?)(1-?)/(1+?)(R2/R1)3, where ? is viscosity and ? is shear modulus. The post-intrusion displacements scale with (R2/R1)3 - 1 and can be significant. For example, a viscoelastic shell of only 20% the radius of the magma chamber leads to time dependent displacements that are 70% of the instantaneous elastic displacements. An approximate fully time-dependent solution for a cylindrical (plane strain) magma chamber in a homogeneous poro-elastic half-space is constructed as the superposition of the solution due to an expanding chamber in a full plane, and distributed shear and normal loads on a poroelastic half-space. The full-space solution is pure shear and thus induces no change in pore pressure. Consequently, the distributed loads necessary to cancel the imposed tractions on the free surface are time invariant. The surface displacements due to the applied surface loads are found using displacement potentials in the Fourier-Laplace domain; the Laplace transforms are inverted analytically. The vertical velocity resulting from the instantaneous inflation of the magma chamber is 2 ? vz(z=0,t) = ? (1-?) [ N? - i sgn(k) T? ] ? c/? t e- c k2 t - c k ?1-? e-? c k2 terfc( ?c (1-?) k2 t) where k is horizontal wavenumber, c is hydraulic diffusivity, ?{1-?} = 1-2?2, ?2 = ?u - ?/1-? , ?u is the undrained Poisson's ratio, and N? and T? are the Fourier transformed normal N and shear T tractions acting on the plane z = 0, N = (? ? V/? ) (x2- d2) /(d2 + x2)2, T = (2? ? V/ ? )dx/(d2 + x2)2. The displacement immediately above the source increases monotonically, however the flanking regions subside for some time following the initial elastic uplift before further uplifting. This arises because pore fluid flows from the flanking region to the center of uplift. The final uplift is identical to the initial elastic uplift but increased by a factor of ?u-?.

  17. Classification of the Entangled States of $2\\times L\\times M\\times N\\times H$

    E-print Network

    Kang-Kang Jia; Jun-Li Li; Cong-Feng Qiao

    2015-05-08

    In this work we propose a practical entanglement classification scheme for pure states of $2\\times L\\times M\\times N\\times H$, under the stochastic local operation and classical communication (SLOCC), which generalizes the method explored in the entanglement classification of $2\\times L\\times M\\times N$ to the five-partite system. The entangled states of $2\\times L\\times M\\times N\\times H$ system are first classified into different coarse-grained standard forms using matrix decompositions, and then fine-grained identification of two inequivalent entangled states with the same standard form are completed by using the matrix realignment technique. As an practical example, entanglement classes of the five-qubit system of $2\\times 2\\times 2\\times 2\\times 2$ are presented.

  18. A Critical Stance in Language Education: A Reply to Alan Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James

    2009-01-01

    In his recent Forum article on ideology in applied linguistics, Alan Waters (2009) takes up arms against what he perceives as a damaging critical tendency. Ideas about language teaching, he claims, are promoted (e.g. learner centredness) or proscribed (e.g. artificial texts) "on the basis of ideological belief rather than pedagogical value". By…

  19. November 16, 2010 Rep.-Elect West's Drilling Stance --and Refusal to Back Down --

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    left" for chasing Kaufman from the capital. "I guarantee you, if I was a black Democratic congressman punished for fairly Republican stands on issues. ... In a funny way, having a position that's for oil

  20. John Tooby & Leda Cosmides6 SubStance # 94/95, 2001

    E-print Network

    Cosmides, Leda

    , inhuman, and enormously successful as an explanatory system. It has successfully explained why a great). Nevertheless, unlike the case for nonhumans, there are large realms of human behavior and experience that have an evolutionary perspective. Chief among these are the human attraction to fictional experience (in all media

  1. "By the Rivers of Babylon": Deterritorialization and the Jewish Rhetorical Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard-Donals, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The position of the excluded other, it seems to the author, is the position that has characterized Jews since antiquity: exiled from the nation and dispersed to other nations, Jewish participation in civic life has been defined, even in modernity, by its marginalization and precariousness. The Jew, in other words, provides a salient example of the…

  2. Using a Video-Based Curriculum to Develop a Reflective Stance in Prospective Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockero, Shari L.

    2008-01-01

    Although video cases are increasingly being used in teacher education as a means of situating learning and developing habits of reflection, there has been little evidence of the outcomes of such use. This study investigates the effects of using a coherent video-case curriculum in a university mathematics methods course by addressing two issues:…

  3. Teachers' Stances on Cell Phones in the ESL Classroom: Toward a "Theoretical" Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    In the ongoing and constantly expanding discussion surrounding cell phones in the classroom, a theoretical complement to the practical side of the issue is generally lacking. This is perhaps understandable. Many teachers are still trying to deal with the simple presence of cell phones in the class, and managing a classroom in which the presence…

  4. Experimental verification of a computational technique for determining ground reactions in human bipedal stance.

    PubMed

    Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) biomechanical model of human standing that enables us to study the mechanisms of posture and balance simultaneously in various directions in space. Since the two feet are on the ground, the system defines a kinematically closed-chain which has redundancy problems that cannot be resolved using the laws of mechanics alone. We have developed a computational (optimization) technique that avoids the problems with the closed-chain formulation thus giving users of such models the ability to make predictions of joint moments, and potentially, muscle activations using more sophisticated musculoskeletal models. This paper describes the experimental verification of the computational technique that is used to estimate the ground reaction vector acting on an unconstrained foot while the other foot is attached to the ground, thus allowing human bipedal standing to be analyzed as an open-chain system. The computational approach was verified in terms of its ability to predict lower extremity joint moments derived from inverse dynamic simulations performed on data acquired from four able-bodied volunteers standing in various postures on force platforms. Sensitivity analyses performed with model simulations indicated which ground reaction force (GRF) and center of pressure (COP) components were most critical for providing better estimates of the joint moments. Overall, the joint moments predicted by the optimization approach are strongly correlated with the joint moments computed using the experimentally measured GRF and COP (0.78 < or = r(2) < or = 0.99,median,0.96) with a best-fit that was not statistically different from a straight line with unity slope (experimental=computational results) for postures of the four subjects examined. These results indicate that this model-based technique can be relied upon to predict reasonable and consistent estimates of the joint moments using the predicted GRF and COP for most standing postures. PMID:16797023

  5. Linguistics vs Philology: Self-Definition of a Field or Rhetorical Stance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koerner, Konrad

    1997-01-01

    Explores the relationship between philology and linguistics and the meanings associated with the two terms at different periods in the development of language study as a science. Chronicles the emergence of different perspectives since the early nineteenth century, particularly in Britain and Europe, and argues that the debate has not been…

  6. Paper presented at AERA 2007, Chicago, IL Modeling Manifold Epistemological Stances with

    E-print Network

    Wilensky, Uri

    -Boltzmann distribution. Rather, each element ("agent") follows its local rules, and the overall pattern arises started to realize that agent-based modeling could have a significant impact in education (Resnick in classrooms (Abrahamson, Blikstein & Wilensky, 2007). We, too, propose to use ABM to simulate human reasoning

  7. "Working with" as a Methodological Stance: Collaborating with Students in Teaching, Writing, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siry, Christina A.; Zawatski, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Using critical ethnography guided by cultural sociology, this paper examines the role of "co" in teacher education; coresearching, coteaching, and cogenerating dialogue. The authors are a pre-service teacher and a college instructor, and through our multiple perspectives and positionings, we explore how collaboration served to dismantle…

  8. Figure 1. A striped skunk in a defense stance, and ready to

    E-print Network

    which they use for defense against predators. Skunks are omnivores and feed on a wide variety of plant during the winter. Skunks have poor to fair senses of hearing and smelling. They also tend to be somewhat

  9. Lethality and Autonomous Robots: An Ethical Stance Ronald C. Arkin and Lilia Moshkina

    E-print Network

    , the production of field manuals to guide appropriate activity for the warfighter in the battlefield Robots As the Army's Future Combat System (FCS) moves closer to deployment, including weapons or weaponized extension of the warfighter. In this case, it appears clear that conventional ethical decision

  10. Leaving Mango Street: Speech, Action and the Construction of Narrative in Britton's Spectator Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford-Garrett, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to unite "The House on Mango Street" by Sandra Cisneros with the participant and spectator theories of James Britton and D. W. Harding in the hopes that such a union will provide new insights into each. In particular, this article explores how the speech acts of Esperanza, the novel's protagonist, are indicative of a shifting…

  11. Emotions in the Cross-Fire: Structuralist vs. Post-Structuralist Stances in Bilingualism Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramsch, Claire

    2008-01-01

    What Aneta Pavlenko discusses in this fascinating article is so widely researched, so cogently conceptualized and so richly reflected upon, that one feels like a spoilsport to bring up a debate which the author herself claims to have avoided, namely the "universalist/relativist debate about basic emotions". If I do so in this Commentary, it is not…

  12. Socializing Children to Honorifics in Japanese: Identity and Stance in Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdelski, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines socialization of honorifics in Japanese. Drawing upon audiovisual recordings of interaction in households and a preschool, the paper details ways caregivers use honorifics with children and ways children use honorifics with caregivers and peers. The analysis shows ways caregivers use referent and addressee honorifics within…

  13. Taking a Stance through Visual Texts: Novice Teachers as Educational Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orland-Barak, Lily; Maskit, Ditza

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on qualitative methodologies that integrate verbal and non-verbal texts, this study investigated novice teachers' attributions of their experiences of internship, as conveyed through a visual text. Novices were invited to design a visual text that represented their experience during internship, as part of a national call entitled…

  14. Effect of equinus foot placement and intrinsic muscle response on knee extension during stance

    E-print Network

    Delp, Scott

    by augmenting ankle plantarflexion by 108 at initial contact. The subsequent effect on knee extension and intrinsic force­length­velocity properties. We found that an increase in ankle plantarflexion at initial alone, causing the abnormal knee extension to be less pronounced. We conclude that the effect of ankle

  15. Taking an Investigative Stance in Using the Professional Standards in the Languages Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Kylie

    2009-01-01

    The Professional Standards Project (PSP) is a nationally coordinated professional learning program for languages teachers, to improve the quality of languages teaching and, thereby, improve student learning. It is based on the use of the "Professional standards for accomplished teaching of languages and cultures" (hereafter, "the Standards") as a…

  16. Countering Asocial Justice: Consumer Culture, Stance and a Cartography of Encounter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Matthew Dean

    2013-01-01

    In Social Foundations classrooms, social justice approaches to questions of difference are certainly part of the curriculum. After teaching numerous Social Foundations courses, I encountered several issues related to the way rigid identity categories were complemented by neoliberal narratives that seemed to limit class conversation in troubling…

  17. The Knowledgeable Parenting Style: Stance Takings and Subject Positions in Media Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarsand, Liselott

    2014-01-01

    In today's media-saturated societies it can be assumed that encounters with therapists and other experts may have implications for adult learning. Taking the point of departure in the idea of public pedagogy, and by using a close-up analysis of interview talk, the pedagogical agency the media may have on parenting is investigated. Drawing…

  18. Reasoning about Artifacts at 24 Months: The Developing Teleo-Functional Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casler, Krista; Kelemen, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    From the age of 2.5, children use social information to rapidly form enduring function-based artifact categories. The present study asked whether even younger children likewise constrain their use of objects according to teleo-functional beliefs that artifacts are "for" particular purposes, or whether they use objects as means to any desired end.…

  19. From Relational Ontology to Transformative Activist Stance on Development and Learning: Expanding Vygotsky's (CHAT) Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetsenko, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers steps towards overcoming current fragmentation within sociocultural approaches by expansively reconstructing a broad dialectical view on human development and learning (drawing on Vygotsky's project) underwritten by ideology of social justice. The common foundation for sociocultural approaches is developed by dialectically…

  20. Athlete support personnel and anti-doping: Knowledge, attitudes, and ethical stance.

    PubMed

    Mazanov, J; Backhouse, S; Connor, J; Hemphill, D; Quirk, F

    2014-10-01

    Athlete support personnel (ASP) failing to meet responsibilities under the World Anti-Doping Code risk sanction. It is unclear whether the poor knowledge of responsibilities seen in sports physicians and coaches applies to other ASP (e.g., administrators, chiropractors, family, nutritionists, physiotherapists, psychologists, and trainers). A purposive sample of Australian ASP (n?=?292) responded to a survey on knowledge of anti-doping rules (35 true/false questions), ethical beliefs and practice, and attitudes toward performance enhancement. Some ASP declined to participate, claiming doping was irrelevant to their practice. Physicians were most knowledgeable (30.8/35), with family and trainers the least (26.0/35). ASP reported that improvements were needed to support anti-doping education (e.g., basis for anti-doping) and practice (e.g., rules). ASP also had a slightly negative attitude toward performance enhancement. Linear regression showed that being a sports physician, providing support at the elite level, and 15 years of experience influenced knowledge. The results confirm gaps in knowledge, suggesting that stronger engagement with ASP anti-doping education and practice is needed. Applying the principles of andragogy could help foster active engagement through emphasis on active inquiry, rather than passive reception of content. Future work on the context within which ASP experience anti-doping is needed, exploring acquisition and translation of knowledge into practice. PMID:23692367

  1. Laterality of Stance during Optic Flow Stimulation in Male and Female Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Persiani, Michela; Piras, Alessandro; Squatrito, Salvatore; Raffi, Milena

    2015-01-01

    During self-motion, the spatial and temporal properties of the optic flow input directly influence the body sway. Men and women have anatomical and biomechanical differences that influence the postural control during visual stimulation. Given that recent findings suggest a peculiar role of each leg in the postural control of the two genders, we investigated whether the body sway during optic flow perturbances is lateralized and whether anteroposterior and mediolateral components of specific center of pressure (COP) parameters of the right and left legs differ, reexamining a previous experiment (Raffi et al. (2014)) performed with two, side-by-side, force plates. Experiments were performed on 24 right-handed and right-footed young subjects. We analyzed five measures related to the COP of each foot and global data: anteroposterior and mediolateral range of oscillation, anteroposterior and mediolateral COP velocity, and sway area. Results showed that men consistently had larger COP parameters than women. The values of the COP parameters were correlated between the two feet only in the mediolateral axis of women. These findings suggest that optic flow stimulation causes asymmetry in postural balance and different lateralization of postural controls in men and women. PMID:26539509

  2. Ideologies of Violence: A Corpus and Discourse Analytic Approach to Stance in Threatening Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gales, Tammy Angela

    2010-01-01

    This authentic threat asserts impending fatal injury. Because of the dangerous nature of threats, investigators must immediately ask: Is the intent real? Is the threatener likely to act? With real lives at risk, using the linguistic information available to answer these questions quickly and accurately is of great importance. Yet, because most…

  3. Defining an "Anti" Stance: Key Pedagogical Questions about Engaging Anti-Racism in College Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebollo-Gil, Guillermo; Moras, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws from social science literature on Whiteness and anti-racism as well as personal classroom experience to examine the obstacles educators face in teaching anti-racism to White college students. Emphasis is placed on popular perceptions and common definitions of the word "racism" as it is used in mainstream American society. The…

  4. Extensive expertise in endocrinology: UK stance on adult GH replacement: the economist vs the endocrinologist.

    PubMed

    Shalet, S M

    2013-10-01

    In the UK, through the use of a forced economic model, endocrinologists are in the curious position of offering GH replacement to some patients with severe GH deficiency (GHD) but withholding it from other patients with even more severe GHD. This approach is counter-intuitive to endocrine practice in treating endocrine deficiency states. For all other endocrine deficiencies, one would opt for treating those with the most severe biochemical evidence of deficiency first. If this endocrine approach was applied to adult GH replacement in an era of rationing, one would start with the GHD patients with a pathologically low IGF1 level. Given that the prevalence of subnormal IGF1 levels in a GHD population is age-dependent, this would result in GH replacement being offered to more young adult onset (AO) GHD and childhood onset GHD adults, and less often to middle-aged and elderly AO GHD adults. This in itself has the added advantage that the skeletal benefits appear more real in the former cohort of patients. PMID:23904274

  5. "Does Broca's Area Exist?:" Christofredo Jakob's 1906 Response to Pierre Marie's Holistic Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsapkini, Kyrana; Vivas, Ana B.; Triarhou, Lazaros C.

    2008-01-01

    In 1906, Pierre Marie triggered a heated controversy and an exchange of articles with Jules Dejerine over the localization of language functions in the human brain. The debate spread internationally. One of the timeliest responses, that appeared in print 1 month after Marie's paper, came from Christofredo Jakob, a Bavarian-born neuropathologist…

  6. Teachers' Emerging Stances and Repertoires towards Reconciliation: Potential and Challenges in Greek-Cypriot Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos; Charalambous, Panayiota; Charalambous, Constadina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine Greek-Cypriot teachers' positions towards the--largely unfamiliar--concept of reconciliation within the Greek-Cypriot community. Looking at a set of 40 interviews conducted in spring 2009, this study is set against the broader historical context of the continuing Cyprus Problem and the development of ethnic rivalry between…

  7. Developing Inquiry-as-Stance and Repertoires of Practice: Teacher Learning across Two Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braaten, Melissa L.

    2011-01-01

    Sixteen science educators joined a science teacher video club for one school year to collaboratively inquire into each other's classroom practice through the use of records of practice including classroom video clips and samples of student work. This group was focused on developing ambitious, equitable science teaching that capitalizes on…

  8. Time and Citation Networks

    E-print Network

    Clough, James R

    2015-01-01

    Citation networks emerge from a number of different social systems, such as academia (from published papers), business (through patents) and law (through legal judgements). A citation represents a transfer of information, and so studying the structure of the citation network will help us understand how knowledge is passed on. What distinguishes citation networks from other networks is time; documents can only cite older documents. We propose that existing network measures do not take account of the strong constraint imposed by time. We will illustrate our approach with two types of causally aware analysis. We apply our methods to the citation networks formed by academic papers on the arXiv, to US patents and to US Supreme Court judgements. We show that our tools can reveal that citation networks which appear to have very similar structure by standard network measures turn out to have significantly different properties. We interpret our results as indicating that many papers in a bibliography were not directly...

  9. Disaggregating times series data

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, S.B.; Burr, T.; Scovel, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes our experiences with disaggregating time series data. Suppose we have gathered data every two seconds and want to guess the data at one-second intervals. Under certain assumptions, there are several reasonable disaggregation methods as well as several performance measures to judge their performance. Here we present results for both simulated and real data for two methods using several performance criteria.

  10. Timing, Remembering, and Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargisson, Rebecca J.; White, K. Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Four pigeons were first trained in a timing procedure. In one condition, each trial began with the presentation of an X on the center key, followed by a delay (short or long), after which two side keys were lit. If the delay was short, pecks to the red side key were reinforced. If the delay was long, pecks to the green side key were reinforced. In…

  11. Real Time Baseball Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Yasuhiro

    The author describes the system outline, features and operations of "Nikkan Sports Realtime Basaball Database" which was developed and operated by Nikkan Sports Shimbun, K. K. The system enables to input numerical data of professional baseball games as they proceed simultaneously, and execute data updating at realtime, just-in-time. Other than serving as supporting tool for prepareing newspapers it is also available for broadcasting media, general users through NTT dial Q2 and others.

  12. Gravity, Time, and Lagrangians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    Feynman mentioned to us that he understood a topic in physics if he could explain it to a college freshman, a high school student, or a dinner guest. Here we will discuss two topics that took us a while to get to that level. One is the relationship between gravity and time. The other is the minus sign that appears in the Lagrangian. (Why would one…

  13. Time at the beginning

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Turner

    2002-10-11

    Age consistency for the Universe today has been an important cosmological test. Even more powerful consistency tests at times as early as 10{sup -32} sec lie ahead in the precision era of cosmology. I outline tests based upon cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy, big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), particle dark matter, phase transitions, and inflation. The ultimate cosmic timescale--the fate of the Universe--will be in doubt until the mystery of the dark energy is unraveled.

  14. Improving Hospital Discharge Time

    PubMed Central

    El-Eid, Ghada R.; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2?hours during the preintervention period to 1.7?hours post-intervention (P?time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific. PMID:25816029

  15. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  16. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  17. Metacognition of time perception.

    PubMed

    Keane, Brendan; Yarrow, Kielan; Arnold, Derek

    2015-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that people have insight into the accuracy of their own decision-making processes. This is evident from correlations between decisional confidence and objective task performance, and is often described as a form of metacognition, as it requires that the brain has formed an accurate reportable estimate of the precision with which it has encoded information. Metacognitive insight has been demonstrated for judgments concerning diverse visual properties, including orientation (de Gardelle & Mamassian, 2014), contrast discrimination (Fleming, Weil, Nagy, Dolan, & Rees, 2010), and direction (Ratcliff? & Starns, 2013). Here we report that the human brain also forms reportable estimates of the precision with which it has encoded temporal relationships. We examined metacognitive insight into precision during a subjective timing task (audio-visual temporal order judgments), and into accuracy during an objective timing task (a three alternative audio-visual odd-one-out task varying audio-visual temporal offset). In both tasks we found that people expressed levels of confidence that were well correlated with performance. This cannot be attributed to low confidence on trials wherein people simply missed the stimulus presentation, or suffered a lapse in concentration, as participants were required to indicate when this happened, and such trials were repeated. Our data indicate that the human brain accurately estimates the precision with which it has encoded audio-visual timing relationships on a trial-by-trial basis. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326502

  18. Date of Injury Date Time In Time Out

    E-print Network

    Date of Injury Date Time In Time Out Total time worked medical appt no work within restrictions: 9704914804; phone: 9704916745 # of hours worked TOTAL HOURS *Time off work MUST be documented by a medical note in order to be paid through injury leave *Attach lost time documentation to the report and turn

  19. Mixing times are hitting times of large sets Yuval Peres

    E-print Network

    Sousi, Perla

    Mixing times are hitting times of large sets Yuval Peres Perla Sousi April 21, 2013 Abstract We and hitting times are fundamental parameters of the chain. We relate them by showing that the mixing time of the lazy chain is equivalent to the maximum over initial states x and large sets A of the hitting time

  20. Hippocampus, time, and memory.

    PubMed

    Meck, Warren H; Church, Russell M; Olton, David S

    2013-10-01

    Five experiments were conducted to determine the effects of hippocampal damage on timing and the memory for temporal events. In Experiments 1-3, rats were trained to discriminate between auditory signals that differed in both duration (2 or 8 s) and rate (2 or 16 cycles/s). Half of the rats were trained to discriminate duration, and half were trained to discriminate rate. After rats acquired the relevant discrimination, signals with intermediate durations and rates were presented to obtain psychophysical functions that related signal duration and/or rate to response choice. Rats then received either lesions of the fimbria-fornix or control operations. Postoperatively, the accuracy of duration and rate discriminations as measured by the difference limen (DL) was unaffected by the lesion, but the point of subjective equality (PSE) was shifted to a shorter duration and a slower rate by the lesion in Experiment 1. Both rats with lesions and rats with control operations showed cross-modal transfer of duration and rate from the auditory signals used in training to visual signals used in testing in Experiment 2. A 5-s delay was imposed between the end of a signal and the opportunity to respond in Experiment 3. The delay served as a retention interval for the rats trained in the rate discrimination, and the rats with fimbria-fornix lesions were selectively impaired by the addition of the delay as measured by an increase in the DL. The delay did not serve as a retention interval for rats trained in the duration discrimination because they were able to continue timing through the delay. A peak procedure was employed in Experiment 4. The maximum response rate of control rats was approximately at the time of scheduled reinforcement (20 s), but the maximum response rate of rats with fimbria-fornix lesions was reliably earlier than the time of scheduled reinforcement. When a 5-s gap was imposed in the signal, control rats summed the signal durations before and after the gap, whereas rats with fimbria-fornix lesions showed no retention of the signal duration prior to the gap. Experiment 5 continued the testing of the rats used in Experiments 1-4 and showed that rats with lesions had an impairment in a test of spatial working memory in an eight-arm radial maze. Taken together, these results demonstrate that a fimbria-fornix lesion interferes with temporal and spatial working memory, reduces the remembered time of reinforcement stored in reference memory, and has no effect on the animal's sensitivity to stimulus duration. PMID:24128355

  1. QUADRENNIAL MCNP TIMING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    E. C. SELCOW; B. D. LANSRUD

    2000-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, is widely used around the world for many radiation protection and shielding applications. As a well-known standard it is also an excellent vehicle for assessing the relative performance of scientific computing platforms. Every three-to-four years a new version of MCNP is released internationally by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For each of the past few releases, we have also done a timing study to assess the progress of scientific computing platforms and software. These quadrennial timing studies are valuable to the radiation protection and shielding community because (a) they are performed by a recognized scientific team, not a computer vendor, (b) they use an internationally recognized code for radiation protection and shielding calculations, (c) they are eminently reproducible since the code and the test problems are internationally distributed. Further, if one has a computer platform, operating system, or compiler not presented in our results, its performance is directly comparable to the ones we report because it can use the same code, data, and test problems as we used. Our results, using a single processor per platform, indicate that hardware advances during the past three years have improved performance by less than a factor of two and software improvements have had a marginal effect on performance. The most significant impacts on performance have resulted from developments in multiprocessing and multitasking. The other most significant advance in the last three years has been the accelerated improvements in personal computers. In the last timing study, the tested personal computer was approximately a factor of four slower that the fastest machine tested, a DEC Alphastation 500. In the present study, the fastest PC tested was less than a factor of two slower than the fastest platform, which is a Compaq (previously DEC) Alpha XP1000.

  2. TIMED Doppler Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killeen, Timothy L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The Timed Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) will accurately and precisely determine the global vector MLTI (Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere) wind, temperature, and density profiles. It will measure characteristics of the gravity wave and planetary wave spectra. The tidal characteristics of temperature, density, and wind in the MLTI will be determined. The neutral and ion winds will be measured to characterize the electrodynamical behavior of the MLTI. Oxygen and O2 abundances and nocticulent cloud activity will be measured. This review goes into the calibration and error sources, optical design, mechanisms design, detector design, electronics design, microprocessor and flight software design, and quality assurance and parts.

  3. “Signs of the Times

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Pratik

    2009-01-01

    Medical practice and research in colonial India historically had been an imperial preserve, dominated by the elite members of the Indian Medical Service. This was contested from the 1900s on by the emerging Indian nationalism. This essay studies debates about the establishment of a medical research institution and how actors imposed the political identities of nationalism on British colonial practices of medical science. At the same time, Indian nationalism was also drawing from other emerging ideas around health and social welfare. The Indian nationalists and doctors sought to build the identities of the new nation and its medicine around their own ideas of its geography, people, and welfare. PMID:20027771

  4. Space-time diamonds

    E-print Network

    Daiqin Su; T. C. Ralph

    2015-07-02

    We show that the particle number distribution of diamond modes, modes that are localised in a finite space-time region, are thermal for the Minkowski vacuum state of a massless scalar field, an analogue to the Unruh effect. The temperature of the diamond is inversely proportional to its size. An inertial observer can detect this thermal radiation by coupling to the diamond modes using an appropriate energy scaled detector. We further investigate the correlations between various diamonds and find that entanglement between adjacent diamonds dominates.

  5. Space-time qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Pienaar, J. L.; Myers, C. R.; Ralph, T. C.

    2011-08-15

    We construct a qubit algebra from field creation and annihilation operators acting on a global vacuum state. Particles to be used as qubits are created from the vacuum by a near-deterministic single-particle source. Our formulation makes the space-time dependence of the qubits explicit, preparing the way for quantum computation within a field framework. The method can be generalized to deal with interacting qubits whose wave packets are not perfectly matched to each other. We give an example of how to calculate the Heisenberg evolution of a simple two-qubit circuit, taking expectation values in the field vacuum state.

  6. Telescope Time Allocation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, J.

    2005-03-01

    TaToo is ESO's new Time Allocation Tool. This software scheduler is a combination of a user-friendly graphical user interface and an intelligent constraint-programming engine fine-tuned to ESO's scheduling problem. TaToo is able to produce a high quality and reliable schedule taking into consideration all constraints of the recommended programs for all telescopes in about 15 minutes. This performance allows schedulers at ESO-VISAS to simulate and evaluate different scenarios, optimize the scheduling of engineering activities at the observatories, and in the end construct the most science efficient schedule possible.

  7. Cosmic Time Dilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, I. E.

    1997-06-01

    The observed apparent time dilation of supernovae light curves claimed recently by Leibundgut et al. to establish directly the ``expansion of the universe'' is, rather, a general implication of fundamental physics. In particular, it applies to chronometric cosmology, in which it appears explicitly as a generalized Lorentz-Fitzgerald contraction. The dilation effect was earlier shown in the proper motion-to-redshift relation of superluminal sources, as analyzed in the frame of chronometric cosmology by Segal, providing an estimate of the cosmic distance scale.

  8. Space-time programming.

    PubMed

    Beal, Jacob; Viroli, Mirko

    2015-07-28

    Computation increasingly takes place not on an individual device, but distributed throughout a material or environment, whether it be a silicon surface, a network of wireless devices, a collection of biological cells or a programmable material. Emerging programming models embrace this reality and provide abstractions inspired by physics, such as computational fields, that allow such systems to be programmed holistically, rather than in terms of individual devices. This paper aims to provide a unified approach for the investigation and engineering of computations programmed with the aid of space-time abstractions, by bringing together a number of recent results, as well as to identify critical open problems. PMID:26078346

  9. A Matter of Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    16 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the south polar residual cap where the effects of sublimation are apparent. Over extended periods of time, sublimation 'eats' away at the smoother appearing material (largely composed of frozen carbon dioxide), darkening the scarps and creating the irregularly shaped depressions that are present throughout much of the scene.

    Location near: 87.1oS, 69.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  10. The Sun in Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Bero, Elizabeth; Sever, Thomas L.

    1999-01-01

    Leveraging funds from NASA's Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS) program, we combined the expertise of an archaeoastronomer, a solar scientist, and a teacher to trace humankind's view of the Sun and how that has changed, from the time of Stonehenge in about 1800 B.C.E., to the time of the Maya in 700 C.E., up to the modem era. Our program was aimed at middle-school students in an attempt to explain not only how science is done today, but how science has evolved from the observations of ancient societies. From these varied cultures, we touched on methods of observing the Sun, ideas of the composition of the Sun, and the relationship of the Sun to everyday life. Further, using the von Braun Astronomical Society's Planetarium in Huntsville, Alabama as a test-bed for the program, we illustrated concepts such as solstices, equinoxes, and local noon with approximately 800 eighth grade students from the local area. Our presentation to SEPA will include a description of NASA's IDEAS program and how to go about partnering with a NASA astronomer, some slides from our planetarium program and web-site, and some hands-on activities.

  11. Physics Back in TIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsunsky, Boris

    2014-03-01

    Recently, I came into possession of an unusual item: a collection of 1928 TIME magazines. I began flipping through the pages out of sheer curiosity—and was soon astonished by the scale and the depth of their physics coverage. Back then, TIME had a special "Science" section in almost every issue and devoted quite a bit of space to the events that would hardly be mentioned in any popular magazine these days. Some of them were fleeting and merely curious, some truly timeless. Many of the articles and notes were devoted to physics: the people, the discoveries, the inventions, the conventions. I found the reading both entertaining and enlightening and would like to offer a sampler here. I hope that these little tidbits of history will lighten up the classroom discussions and help inspire your students by reminding them that physics is a dynamic, ever-changing field to which they may well contribute one day. I have found that my own students love it when a little bit of history is brought up; it always generates interesting questions and seems to spark the students' interest in the topic.

  12. Bootstrapping Time Dilation Decoherence

    E-print Network

    Gooding, Cisco

    2015-01-01

    We present a general relativistic model of a spherical shell of matter with a perfect fluid on its surface coupled to an internal oscillator, which generalizes a model recently introduced by the authors to construct a self-gravitating interferometer [1]. The internal oscillator evolution is defined with respect to the local proper time of the shell, allowing the oscillator to serve as a local clock that ticks differently depending on the shell's position and momentum. A Hamiltonian reduction is performed on the system, and an approximate quantum description is given to the reduced phase space. If we focus only on the external dynamics, we must trace out the clock degree of freedom, and this results in a form of intrinsic decoherence that shares some features with a proposed "universal" decoherence mechanism attributed to gravitational time dilation [2]. We show that the proposed decoherence remains present in the (gravity-free) limit of flat spacetime, indicating that the effect can be attributed entirely to ...

  13. Timing of cyber conflict.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Robert; Iliev, Rumen

    2014-01-28

    Nations are accumulating cyber resources in the form of stockpiles of zero-day exploits as well as other novel methods of engaging in future cyber conflict against selected targets. This paper analyzes the optimal timing for the use of such cyber resources. A simple mathematical model is offered to clarify how the timing of such a choice can depend on the stakes involved in the present situation, as well as the characteristics of the resource for exploitation. The model deals with the question of when the resource should be used given that its use today may well prevent it from being available for use later. The analysis provides concepts, theory, applications, and distinctions to promote the understanding strategy aspects of cyber conflict. Case studies include the Stuxnet attack on Iran's nuclear program, the Iranian cyber attack on the energy firm Saudi Aramco, the persistent cyber espionage carried out by the Chinese military, and an analogous case of economic coercion by China in a dispute with Japan. The effects of the rapidly expanding market for zero-day exploits are also analyzed. The goal of the paper is to promote the understanding of this domain of cyber conflict to mitigate the harm it can do, and harness the capabilities it can provide. PMID:24474752

  14. Timing of cyber conflict

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Robert; Iliev, Rumen

    2014-01-01

    Nations are accumulating cyber resources in the form of stockpiles of zero-day exploits as well as other novel methods of engaging in future cyber conflict against selected targets. This paper analyzes the optimal timing for the use of such cyber resources. A simple mathematical model is offered to clarify how the timing of such a choice can depend on the stakes involved in the present situation, as well as the characteristics of the resource for exploitation. The model deals with the question of when the resource should be used given that its use today may well prevent it from being available for use later. The analysis provides concepts, theory, applications, and distinctions to promote the understanding strategy aspects of cyber conflict. Case studies include the Stuxnet attack on Iran’s nuclear program, the Iranian cyber attack on the energy firm Saudi Aramco, the persistent cyber espionage carried out by the Chinese military, and an analogous case of economic coercion by China in a dispute with Japan. The effects of the rapidly expanding market for zero-day exploits are also analyzed. The goal of the paper is to promote the understanding of this domain of cyber conflict to mitigate the harm it can do, and harness the capabilities it can provide. PMID:24474752

  15. Real time automated inspection

    DOEpatents

    Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

    1985-05-21

    A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

  16. Time encoded radiation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  17. Cell complexes through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klette, Reinhard

    2000-10-01

    The history of cell complexes is closely related to the birth and development of topology in general. Johann Benedict Listing (1802 - 1882) introduced the term 'topology' into mathematics in a paper published in 1847, and he also defined cell complexes for the first time in a paper published in 1862. Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777 - 1855) is often cited as the one who initiated these ideas, but he did not publish either on topology or on cell complexes. The pioneering work of Leonhard Euler (1707 - 1783) on graphs is also often cited as the birth of topology, and Euler's work was cited by Listing in 1862 as a stimulus for his research on cell complexes. There are different branches in topology which have little in common: point set topology, algebraic topology, differential topology etc. Confusion may arise if just 'topology' is specified, without clarifying the used concept. Topological subjects in mathematics are often related to continuous models, and therefore quite irrelevant to computer based solutions in image analysis. Compared to this, only a minority of topology publications in mathematics addresses discrete spaces which are appropriate for computer-based image analysis. In these cases, often the notion of a cell complex plays a crucial role. This paper briefly reports on a few of these publications. This paper is not intended to cover the very lively progress in cell complex studies within the context of image analysis during the last two decades. Basically it stops its historic review at the time when this subject in image analysis research gained speed in 1980 - 1990. As a general point of view, the paper indicates that image analysis contributes to a fusion of topological concepts, the geometric and the abstract cell structure approach and point set topology, which may lead towards new problems for the study of topologies defined on geometric or abstract cell complexes.

  18. Group Time: Taking a "Humor Break" at Group Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Ellen Booth

    2005-01-01

    January is a perfect time to insert a strong dose of humor into group time gatherings. Oftentimes, children have tired of the predictable pattern of group meetings and need some change. Humor-filled group time activities can be the best secret remedy. Not only will children become more interested in the group time meetings (and therefore listen…

  19. Setting Time Limits on Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how the time limit on a test can be set to control the probability of a test taker running out of time before completing it. The probability is derived from the item parameters in the lognormal model for response times. Examples of curves representing the probability of running out of time on a test with given parameters as a function…

  20. Time's Ontic Voltage Craig Callender

    E-print Network

    Callender, Craig

    Time's Ontic Voltage Craig Callender Philosophy of time, as practiced throughout the last hundred venue for attacking questions about the nature of time--in sharp contrast to the primary venue slowly in philosophy of time.1 Since twentieth-century analytic philosophy as a whole often drew

  1. Happiness in texting times

    PubMed Central

    Hevey, David; Hand, Karen; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Assessing national levels of happiness has become an important research and policy issue in recent years. We examined happiness and satisfaction in Ireland using phone text messaging to collect large-scale longitudinal data from 3,093 members of the general Irish population. For six consecutive weeks, participants’ happiness and satisfaction levels were assessed. For four consecutive weeks (weeks 2–5) a different random third of the sample got feedback on the previous week’s mean happiness and satisfaction ratings. Text messaging proved a feasible means of assessing happiness and satisfaction, with almost three quarters (73%) of participants completing all assessments. Those who received feedback on the previous week’s mean ratings were eight times more likely to complete the subsequent assessments than those not receiving feedback. Providing such feedback data on mean levels of happiness and satisfaction did not systematically bias subsequent ratings either toward or away from these normative anchors. Texting is a simple and effective means to collect population level happiness and satisfaction data. PMID:26441804

  2. Time-Reversal Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Martínez-Vidal, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The violation of CP symmetry between matter and antimatter in the neutral K and B meson systems is well established, with a high degree of consistency between all available experimental measurements and with the Standard Model of particle physics. On the basis of the up-to-now-unbroken CPT symmetry, the violation of CP symmetry strongly suggests that the behavior of these particles under weak interactions must also be asymmetric under time reversal T. Many searches for T violation have been performed and proposed using different observables and experimental approaches. These include T-odd observables, such as triple products in weak decays, and genuine observables, such as permanent electric dipole moments of nondegenerate stationary states and the breaking of the reciprocity relation. We discuss the conceptual basis of the required exchange of initial and final states with unstable particles, using quantum entanglement and the decay as a filtering measurement, for the case of neutral B and K mesons. Using this method, the BaBar experiment at SLAC has clearly observed T violation in B mesons.

  3. Time to redefine Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Guy; Bowcock, Stella; Chantry, Andrew; Cook, Gordon; Jackson, Graham; Lai, Maggie; Low, Eric; Mulholland, Nicola; Owen, Roger; Rabin, Neil; Ramasamy, Karthik; Snowden, John A; Streetly, Matthew; Wechalekar, Ashutosh; Yong, Kwee; Bird, Jenny

    2015-10-01

    In November 2014 the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) revised the definition of multiple myeloma, such that asymptomatic patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma without any of the traditional 'CRAB' (hypercalcaemia, renal impairment, anaemia, bone disease) end organ damage criteria but with one of three new criteria would be recommended to start treatment. Previously, the standard of care for such patients was expectant management. These three new criteria are: greater than 60% clonal plasma cells on bone marrow biopsy, a serum free light chain (sFLC) ratio of >100 (the involved sFLC must be >100 mg/l) and greater than one unequivocal focal lesion on advanced imaging (low dose whole body computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, (18) F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography). Although this would appear to affect a small number of patients, the impact of these changes are broad, leading to an increased use of advanced imaging, a debate around the management of patients previously diagnosed with smouldering myeloma, changed terminology and clinical trial design and an extension of the use of biomarkers. For the first time the philosophy of treatment in myeloma will change from treatment initiation only being triggered by overt end organ damage to an era where sub clinical risk factors will also be taken into account. PMID:26221971

  4. The Length of Time's Arrow

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-08-21

    An unresolved problem in physics is how the thermodynamic arrow of time arises from an underlying time reversible dynamics. We contribute to this issue by developing a measure of time-symmetry breaking, and by using the work fluctuation relations, we determine the time asymmetry of recent single molecule RNA unfolding experiments. We define time asymmetry as the Jensen-Shannon divergencebetween trajectory probability distributions of an experiment and its time-reversed conjugate. Among other interesting properties, the length of time's arrow bounds the average dissipation and determines the difficulty of accurately estimating free energy differences in nonequilibrium experiments.

  5. Flow of Time: Perceiving the passage of time: neural possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Timothy; Nobre, Anna C

    2014-01-01

    Although the study of time has been central to physics and philosophy for millennia, questions of how time is represented in the brain and how this representation is related to time perception have only recently started to be addressed. Emerging evidence subtly yet profoundly challenges our intuitive notions of time over short scales, offering insight into the nature of the brain's representation of time. Numerous different models, specified at the neural level, of how the brain may keep track of time have been proposed. These models differ in various ways, such as whether time is represented by a centralized or distributed neural system, or whether there are neural systems dedicated to the problem of timing. This paper reviews the insight offered by behavioral experiments and how these experiments refute and guide some of the various models of the brain's representation of time. PMID:25257798

  6. Measures of time in astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Astronomically-important measures of time are discussed with their definitions, their intended purposes, and areas of viability or obsolescence. Several different kinds of year are defined. Earth rotation time is described in terms of sidereal and solar time and in terms of universal time (UT) for which four different levels are defined corresponding to different approximations of 'uniform' time. The formal definition of ephemeris time, consisting of a defined rate and epoch, is discussed and some unorthodox criticisms are presented. Uses of broadcast time are noted. In the discussion of what measure of time should be used in astronomical applications, it is stated that, at present, all dynamical applications should use a measure of time based on atomic clock time.

  7. Improving time resolution in time-of-flight PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    The last ten years have seen the development of the present generation of commercial time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, based on LSO and LYSO scintillators and characterized by a time resolution in the 500-600 ps range. This is far from the intrinsic timing limits of such scintillators, which is in the order of 150-200 ps. Great benefits can be obtained from improved time resolution, given the direct effect of such a resolution on the image quality of TOF PET. The different contributions to the system time resolution of a TOF PET scanner are discussed, and some possible avenues for achieving better timing are presented.

  8. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine?, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon-#12;fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning a timing-belt based hydroEngine ?powertrain: 1. Can a belt handle the high torques and power loads demanded by the SLH? (Yes.) 2. Can the SLH blades be mounted to belt with a connection that can withstand the loads encountered in operation? (Yes.) 3. Can the belt, with blade attachments, live through the required cyclic loading? (Yes.) The research adds to the general understanding of sustainable small hydropower systems by using innovative system testing to develop and demonstrate performance of a novel powertrain solution, enabling a new type of hydroelectric turbine to be commercially developed. The technical effectiveness of the methods investigated has been shown to be positive through an extensive design and testing process accommodating many constraints and goals, with a major emphasis on high cycle fatigue life. Economic feasibility of the innovations has been demonstrated through many iterations of design for manufacturability and cost reduction. The project is of benefit to the public because it has helped to develop a solution to a major problem -- despite the large available potential for new low-head hydropower, high capital costs and high levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) continue to be major barriers to project development. The hydroEngine? represents a significant innovation, leveraging novel fluid mechanics and mechanical configuration to allow lower-cost turbine manufacture and development of low head hydropower resources.

  9. Dead-time optimized time-correlated photon counting instrument with synchronized, independent timing channels

    E-print Network

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Dead-time optimized time-correlated photon counting instrument with synchronized, independent with high resolution and very short dead time. Subsequent event processing in programmable logic permits processing resulting in the dead time of the electronics, during which processing of further detection events

  10. First-passage-time problems in time-aware networks

    E-print Network

    Suwansantisuk, Watcharapan, 1978-

    2012-01-01

    First passage time or the first time that a stochastic process crosses a boundary is a random variable whose probability distribution is sought in engineering, statistics, finance, and other disciplines. The probability ...

  11. 51. LINES AT TIME OFFICE NO. 13 AT CHECKOUT TIME. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. LINES AT TIME OFFICE NO. 13 AT CHECKOUT TIME. SEAPLANE HANGARS (BLDGS. 1-2) IN BACKGROUND. USN PHOTO, JULY 11, 1941. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  12. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing.

    PubMed

    Moses, W W; Peng, Q

    2014-11-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator.All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the 'optimal' method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization. PMID:25321885

  13. Artifacts in digital coincidence timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.

    2014-11-01

    Digital methods are becoming increasingly popular for measuring time differences, and are the de facto standard in PET cameras. These methods usually include a master system clock and a (digital) arrival time estimate for each detector that is obtained by comparing the detector output signal to some reference portion of this clock (such as the rising edge). Time differences between detector signals are then obtained by subtracting the digitized estimates from a detector pair. A number of different methods can be used to generate the digitized arrival time of the detector output, such as sending a discriminator output into a time to digital converter (TDC) or digitizing the waveform and applying a more sophisticated algorithm to extract a timing estimator. All measurement methods are subject to error, and one generally wants to minimize these errors and so optimize the timing resolution. A common method for optimizing timing methods is to measure the coincidence timing resolution between two timing signals whose time difference should be constant (such as detecting gammas from positron annihilation) and selecting the method that minimizes the width of the distribution (i.e. the timing resolution). Unfortunately, a common form of error (a nonlinear transfer function) leads to artifacts that artificially narrow this resolution, which can lead to erroneous selection of the ‘optimal’ method. The purpose of this note is to demonstrate the origin of this artifact and suggest that caution should be used when optimizing time digitization systems solely on timing resolution minimization.

  14. GALAXIES: SNAPSHOTS IN TIME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This sequence of NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of remote galaxies offers tantalizing initial clues to the evolution of galaxies in the universe. [far left column] These are traditional spiral and elliptical-shaped galaxies that make up the two basic classes of island star cities that inhabit the universe we see in our current epoch (14 billion years after the birth of the universe in the Big Bang). Elliptical galaxies contain older stars, while spirals have vigorous ongoing star formation in their dusty, pancake-shaped disks. Our Milky Way galaxy is a typical spiral, or disk-shaped galaxy, on the periphery of the great Virgo cluster. Both galaxies in this column are a few tens of millions of light-years away, and therefore represent our current stage of the universe s evolution. [center left column] These galaxies existed in a rich cluster when the universe was approximately two-thirds its present age. Elliptical galaxies (top) appear fully evolved because they resemble today's descendants. By contrast, some spirals have a frothier appearance, with loosely shaped arms of young star formation. The spiral population appears more disrupted due to a variety of possible dynamical effects that result from dwelling in a dense cluster. [center right column] Distinctive spiral structure appears more vague and disrupted in galaxies that existed when the universe was nearly one-third its present age. These objects do not have the symmetry of current day spirals and contain irregular lumps of starburst activity. However, even this far back toward the beginning of time, the elliptical galaxy (top) is still clearly recognizable. However, the distinction between ellipticals and spirals grows less certain with increasing distance. [far right column] These extremely remote, primeval objects existed with the universe was nearly one-tenth its current age. The distinction between spiral and elliptical galaxies may well disappear at this early epoch. However, the object in the top frame has the light profile of a mature elliptical galaxy. This implies that ellipticals formed remarkably early in the universe while spiral galaxies took much longer to form. Credit: A. Dressler (Carnegie Institutions of Washington), M. Dickinson (STScI), D. Macchetto (ESA/STScI), M. Giavalisco (STScI), and NASA

  15. Continuous time random walks with Erlangian pausing time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongler, M.-O.

    1992-03-01

    We discuss a class of non-Markovian continuous time random walks on the infinite one-dimensional lattice. The pausing time distribution which governs the dynamics is chosen to be of the Erlang type (i.e. gamma of integer order). We derive a generalized master equation which exhibits high-order time derivatives. The first moments of the position of the walker are explicitly calculated for asymptotically large time.

  16. Fourteen Times the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    ESO HARPS Instrument Discovers Smallest Ever Extra-Solar Planet Summary A European team of astronomers [1] has discovered the lightest known planet orbiting a star other than the sun (an "exoplanet"). The new exoplanet orbits the bright star mu Arae located in the southern constellation of the Altar. It is the second planet discovered around this star and completes a full revolution in 9.5 days. With a mass of only 14 times the mass of the Earth, the new planet lies at the threshold of the largest possible rocky planets, making it a possible super Earth-like object. Uranus, the smallest of the giant planets of the Solar System has a similar mass. However Uranus and the new exoplanet differ so much by their distance from the host star that their formation and structure are likely to be very different. This discovery was made possible by the unprecedented accuracy of the HARPS spectrograph on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, which allows radial velocities to be measured with a precision better than 1 m/s. It is another clear demonstration of the European leadership in the field of exoplanet research. PR Photo 25a/04: The HARPS Spectrograph and the 3.6m Telescope PR Photo 25b/04: Observed Velocity Variation of mu Arae (3.6m/HARPS, 1.2m Swiss/CORALIE, AAT/UCLES) PR Photo 25c/04: Velocity Variation of mu Arae Observed by HARPS (3.6m/HARPS) PR Photo 25d/04: "Velocity Curve" of mu Arae A unique planet hunting machine ESO PR Photo 25a/04 ESO PR Photo 25a/04 The HARPS Spectrograph and the 3.6m Telescope [Preview - JPEG: 602 x 400 pix - 211k] [Normal - JPEG: 1202 x 800 pix - 645k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 25a/04 represents a montage of the HARPS spectrograph and the 3.6m telescope at La Silla. The upper left shows the dome of the telescope, while the upper right illustrates the telescope itself. The HARPS spectrograph is shown in the lower image during laboratory tests. The vacuum tank is open so that some of the high-precision components inside can be seen. Since the first detection in 1995 of a planet around the star 51 Peg by Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz from the Geneva Observatory (Switzerland), astronomers have learned that our Solar System is not unique, as more than 120 giant planets orbiting other stars were discovered mostly by radial-velocity surveys (cf. ESO PR 13/00, ESO PR 07/01, and ESO PR 03/03). This fundamental observational method is based on the detection of variations in the velocity of the central star, due to the changing direction of the gravitational pull from an (unseen) exoplanet as it orbits the star. The evaluation of the measured velocity variations allows to deduce the planet's orbit, in particular the period and the distance from the star, as well as a minimum mass [2]. The continued quest for exoplanets requires better and better instrumentation. In this context, ESO undoubtedly took the leadership with the new HARPS spectrograph (High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher) of the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (see ESO PR 06/03). Offered in October 2003 to the research community in the ESO member countries, this unique instrument is optimized to detect planets in orbit around other stars ("exoplanets") by means of accurate (radial) velocity measurements with an unequalled precision of 1 metre per second. HARPS was built by a European Consortium [3] in collaboration with ESO. Already from the beginning of its operation, it has demonstrated its very high efficiency. By comparison with CORALIE, another well known planet-hunting optimized spectrograph installed on the Swiss-Euler 1.2-m telescope at La Silla (cf ESO PR 18/98, 12/99, 13/00), the typical observation times have been reduced by a factor one hundred and the accuracy of the measurements has been increased by a factor ten. These improvements have opened new perspectives in the search for extra-solar planets and have set new standards in terms of instrumental precision. The planetary system around mu Arae The star mu Arae is about 50 light years away. This solar-like star is located in the sout

  17. More ScreenTime Equals Less ActivityTime

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    to 13 spend nearly six hours watching TV, playing video games or on the computer. Two-thirds of youth tips: · Agree to limit screen time to no more than two hours a day. · Don't put a TV in your child video games or on the computer. /// More Screen Time Equals Less Activity Time #12;

  18. April 2008 BEE CULTURE 43 Package timePackage time

    E-print Network

    Delaplane, Keith S.

    April 2008 BEE CULTURE 43 Package timePackage time Jennifer Berry It of March. This month bees are being shook by the millions into packages (weather dependent of course then you should be first in line for your bees. If you haven't placed an order you may have a hard time

  19. Probe timing optimization for time-reversal underwater communications

    E-print Network

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), the Inter- Symbolic Interference (ISI) and the detection rate of passive and passive Time Reversal (a-pTR) [2], [3] appeared as a viable alternative for simple and robust underwaterProbe timing optimization for time-reversal underwater communications Ant´onio Silva and S´ergio M

  20. Time in the Mind: Using Space to Think about Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casasanto, Daniel; Boroditsky, Lera

    2008-01-01

    How do we construct abstract ideas like justice, mathematics, or time-travel? In this paper we investigate whether mental representations that result from physical experience underlie people's more abstract mental representations, using the domains of space and time as a testbed. People often talk about time using spatial language (e.g., a "long"…

  1. Has the Marital Time Cost of Parenting Changed over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative research has suggested that married couples handle the increasing demands of intensive parenting norms and work expectations by reducing spousal time (e.g., the time that spouses spend alone with each other). Using nationally representative time-diary data, this study examined whether married individuals with children…

  2. In Search of Lost Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Robert A.

    Time is our most familiar means of organizing thought and action, yet it is also the most illusive. Awareness of time as a perceptible one-way flow is a central facet of human consciousness. Everyone knows what time is but anyone would be hard pressed to define it. Is time unidirectional? Does it tick by at a constant rate? How do we measure it? How do we make sense of time before human experience? These are some of the mind-bending questions that Derek York introduces in his short and very readable collection of vignettes about time.

  3. Nagios Down-Time scripts

    SciTech Connect

    Buddeberg, Patrick

    2014-11-11

    The Nagios Down-Time scripts are a set of Python scripts that create a commandline interface to Nagios' scheduled down-times. This allows for large-scale management of down-times, beyond what is feasible with the default web interface. Additionally, one of the scripts can be setup to periodically send emails of down-times that are scheduled to end within a specified amount of time after the script has been run; for example, it could run once a day and send an email including down-times ending within the next 24 hours.

  4. Nagios Down-Time scripts

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-11

    The Nagios Down-Time scripts are a set of Python scripts that create a commandline interface to Nagios' scheduled down-times. This allows for large-scale management of down-times, beyond what is feasible with the default web interface. Additionally, one of the scripts can be setup to periodically send emails of down-times that are scheduled to end within a specified amount of time after the script has been run; for example, it could run once a day andmore »send an email including down-times ending within the next 24 hours.« less

  5. The time–emotion paradox

    PubMed Central

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Gil, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    The present manuscript discusses the time–emotion paradox in time psychology: although humans are able to accurately estimate time as if they possess a specific mechanism that allows them to measure time (i.e. an internal clock), their representations of time are easily distorted by the context. Indeed, our sense of time depends on intrinsic context, such as the emotional state, and on extrinsic context, such as the rhythm of others' activity. Existing studies on the relationships between emotion and time suggest that these contextual variations in subjective time do not result from the incorrect functioning of the internal clock but rather from the excellent ability of the internal clock to adapt to events in one's environment. Finally, the fact that we live and move in time and that everything, every act, takes more or less time has often been neglected. Thus, there is no unique, homogeneous time but instead multiple experiences of time. Our subjective temporal distortions directly reflect the way our brain and body adapt to these multiple time scales. PMID:19487196

  6. Time and timing in the acoustic recognition system of crickets

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, R. Matthias; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Clemens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The songs of many insects exhibit precise timing as the result of repetitive and stereotyped subunits on several time scales. As these signals encode the identity of a species, time and timing are important for the recognition system that analyzes these signals. Crickets are a prominent example as their songs are built from sound pulses that are broadcast in a long trill or as a chirped song. This pattern appears to be analyzed on two timescales, short and long. Recent evidence suggests that song recognition in crickets relies on two computations with respect to time; a short linear-nonlinear (LN) model that operates as a filter for pulse rate and a longer integration time window for monitoring song energy over time. Therefore, there is a twofold role for timing. A filter for pulse rate shows differentiating properties for which the specific timing of excitation and inhibition is important. For an integrator, however, the duration of the time window is more important than the precise timing of events. Here, we first review evidence for the role of LN-models and integration time windows for song recognition in crickets. We then parameterize the filter part by Gabor functions and explore the effects of duration, frequency, phase, and offset as these will correspond to differently timed patterns of excitation and inhibition. These filter properties were compared with known preference functions of crickets and katydids. In a comparative approach, the power for song discrimination by LN-models was tested with the songs of over 100 cricket species. It is demonstrated how the acoustic signals of crickets occupy a simple 2-dimensional space for song recognition that arises from timing, described by a Gabor function, and time, the integration window. Finally, we discuss the evolution of recognition systems in insects based on simple sensory computations. PMID:25161622

  7. Time and International Relations Theory

    E-print Network

    Hom, Andrew R.

    2008-07-22

    In this thesis, I promote the relevance of time to International Relations theory, arguing that the meaning and character of time often taken as given or natural is actually the result of material, historical, and ...

  8. Microcomputer logarithmic time base generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, L. J.; Ly, Nhan G.

    1985-11-01

    A new circuit is introduced to generate the logarithmic time base function with good resolution. By using a single-chip microcomputer with EPROM program storage, the circuitry is simplified and can be easily reproduced. The output function covers more than six decades of time and has 590 discrete points per decade with an accuracy of one discrete point per decade or ±0.16%. The design overcomes two well-known problems in using the logarithmic time base. First because the time increments are derived from a real-time register there is a precise reference for zero time, and second a series of time base interval marks are output for correctly calibrating the time axis.

  9. Time, Calendars, and the Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a list of resources that focus on the concept of time, telling time, and calendars. Includes nonfiction books for librarians, teachers and older readers; books for younger readers; poems; trivia; Web sites; and search sites. (AEF)

  10. A brief study of time

    E-print Network

    Chappell, James M; Iqbal, Azhar; Iannella, Nicolangelo; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the nature of time has become one of the key unsolved problems in science. Newton in his Principia proposed an absolute universal time that `flows equably without relation to anything external'. Hamilton also proposed a representation of time within the mathematical framework of the quaternions before the Minkowski space-time unification in 1908 using four-vectors. This framework is found to provide a versatile mathematical framework for relativistic physics, which replaces Newtonian concepts of absolute time, but nevertheless the framework has not been convincingly derived from first principles and so fails to provide deeper physical insight into the nature of space and time. We approach this question regarding the proper definition of time with the algebraic description of three-dimensional space provided by the Clifford multivector. This then allows us to provide a definition of time that is effectively based on the geometrical properties of three-dimensional space. This new approach indicate...

  11. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  12. Streak camera time calibration procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, J.; Jackson, I.

    1978-01-01

    Time calibration procedures for streak cameras utilizing a modulated laser beam are described. The time calibration determines a writing rate accuracy of 0.15% with a rotating mirror camera and 0.3% with an image converter camera.

  13. Time Circular Birefringence in Time-Dependent Magnetoelectric Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhai, Yan-Wang; Lin, Shi-Rong; Zhao, Qing; Wen, Weijia; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2015-09-01

    Light traveling in time-dependent media has many extraordinary properties which can be utilized to convert frequency, achieve temporal cloaking, and simulate cosmological phenomena. In this paper, we focus on time-dependent axion-type magnetoelectric (ME) media, and prove that light in these media always has two degenerate modes with opposite circular polarizations corresponding to one wave vector , and name this effect “time circular birefringence” (TCB). By interchanging the status of space and time, the pair of TCB modes can appear simultaneously via “time refraction” and “time reflection” of a linear polarized incident wave at a time interface of ME media. The superposition of the two TCB modes causes the “time Faraday effect”, namely the globally unified polarization axes rotate with time. A circularly polarized Gaussian pulse traversing a time interface is also studied. If the wave-vector spectrum of a pulse mainly concentrates in the non-traveling-wave band, the pulse will be trapped with nearly fixed center while its intensity will grow rapidly. In addition, we propose an experimental scheme of using molecular fluid with external time-varying electric and magnetic fields both parallel to the direction of light to realize these phenomena in practice.

  14. Time Circular Birefringence in Time-Dependent Magnetoelectric Media

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhai, Yan-Wang; Lin, Shi-Rong; Zhao, Qing; Wen, Weijia; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Light traveling in time-dependent media has many extraordinary properties which can be utilized to convert frequency, achieve temporal cloaking, and simulate cosmological phenomena. In this paper, we focus on time-dependent axion-type magnetoelectric (ME) media, and prove that light in these media always has two degenerate modes with opposite circular polarizations corresponding to one wave vector , and name this effect “time circular birefringence” (TCB). By interchanging the status of space and time, the pair of TCB modes can appear simultaneously via “time refraction” and “time reflection” of a linear polarized incident wave at a time interface of ME media. The superposition of the two TCB modes causes the “time Faraday effect”, namely the globally unified polarization axes rotate with time. A circularly polarized Gaussian pulse traversing a time interface is also studied. If the wave-vector spectrum of a pulse mainly concentrates in the non-traveling-wave band, the pulse will be trapped with nearly fixed center while its intensity will grow rapidly. In addition, we propose an experimental scheme of using molecular fluid with external time-varying electric and magnetic fields both parallel to the direction of light to realize these phenomena in practice. PMID:26329928

  15. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  16. Fractal and natural time analysis of geoelectrical time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Rojas, A.; Moreno-Torres, L. R.; Cervantes, F.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we show the analysis of geoelectric time series linked with two earthquakes of M=6.6 and M=7.4. That time series were monitored at the South Pacific Mexican coast, which is the most important active seismic subduction zone in México. The geolectric time series were analyzed by using two complementary methods: a fractal analysis, by means of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) in the conventional time, and the power spectrum defined in natural time domain (NTD). In conventional time we found long-range correlations prior to the EQ-occurrences and simultaneously in NTD, the behavior of the power spectrum suggest the possible existence of seismo electric signals (SES) similar with the previously reported in equivalent time series monitored in Greece prior to earthquakes of relevant magnitude.

  17. Time Dependence in Plasma Codes

    E-print Network

    S. Seager

    2001-06-12

    Time-dependent plasma codes are a natural extension of static nonequilibrium plasma codes. Comparing relevant timescales will determine whether or not time-dependent treatment is necessary. In this article I outline the ingredients for a time-dependent plasma code in a homogeneous medium and discuss the computational method. In the second half of the article I describe recombination in the early Universe as a detailed example of a problem whose solution requires a time-dependent plasma code.

  18. Time Costs of Mastery Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlin, Marshall; Webster, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Eighty-eight seventh grade students were randomly assigned to mastery or nonmastery approaches to learning four hierarchical chapters about sailing. The price of increased achievement benefits of group-based mastery learning seems to be increased time costs of (1) extra remedial time and (2) "wasted time" of faster learners. (Author/PN)

  19. Dust time in quantum cosmology

    E-print Network

    Viqar Husain; Tomasz Pawlowski

    2013-06-20

    We give a formulation of quantum cosmology with a pressureless dust and arbitrary additional matter fields. The dust provides a natural time gauge corresponding to a cosmic time, yielding a physical time independent Hamiltonian. The approach simplifies the analysis of both Wheeler-deWitt and loop quantum cosmology models, broadening the applicability of the latter.

  20. CONTINUOUS TIME AND MIXEDSIGNAL SIMULATION

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    CONTINUOUS TIME AND MIXED­SIGNAL SIMULATION IN PTOLEMY II UCB/ERL Memorandum M98/74 Jie Liu #12; #12; Continuous Time and Mixed­Signal Simulation in Ptolemy II i Abstract This report studies the continuous time and mixed­signal simulation techniques in the Ptolemy II environment. Unlike the nodal

  1. Synchronizing Time Servers Leslie Lamport

    E-print Network

    Lamport ,Leslie

    Synchronizing Time Servers Leslie Lamport June 1, 1987 #12; c #Digital Equipment Corporation 1987 with payment of fee to the Systems Research Center. All rights reserved. #12; Author's Abstract A time service in a distributed system may be used both for multiprocess synchronization and for simply finding out what time

  2. Time Management of Educational Inspectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Göksoy, Süleyman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to determine the fields that Educational Inspectors have to spare time for and the fields that Educational Inspectors demand to make time for. The data collected by review form was analyzed by content analysis method. According to research results: Educational Inspectors want to make time mostly for counselling and…

  3. The quantum measurement of time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Scott R.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, in non-relativistic Quantum Mechanics, time is considered to be a parameter, rather than an observable quantity like space. In relativistic Quantum Field Theory, space and time are treated equally by reducing space to also be a parameter. Herein, after a brief review of other measurements, we describe a third possibility, which is to treat time as a directly observable quantity.

  4. Establishing Time for Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Time for collaborative learning is an essential resource for educators working to implement college- and career-ready standards. The pages in this article include tools from the workbook "Establishing Time for Professional Learning." The tools support a complete process to help educators effectively find and use time. The following…

  5. Time machines and quantum theory

    E-print Network

    Hadley, M J

    2008-01-01

    There is a deep structural link between acausal spacetimes and quantum theory. As a consequence quantum theory may resolve some "paradoxes" of time travel. Conversely, non-time-orientable spacetimes naturally give rise to electric charges and spin half. If an explanation of quantum theory is possible, then general relativity with time travel could be it.

  6. Time Machines and Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Mark J.

    2008-09-01

    There is a deep structural link between acausal spacetimes and quantum theory. As a consequence quantum theory may resolve some "paradoxes" of time travel. Conversely, non-time-orientable spacetimes naturally give rise to electric charges and spin half. If an explanation of quantum theory is possible, then general relativity with time travel could it.

  7. Time machines and quantum theory

    E-print Network

    Mark J Hadley

    2006-12-02

    There is a deep structural link between acausal spacetimes and quantum theory. As a consequence quantum theory may resolve some "paradoxes" of time travel. Conversely, non-time-orientable spacetimes naturally give rise to electric charges and spin half. If an explanation of quantum theory is possible, then general relativity with time travel could be it.

  8. Time translation of quantum properties

    E-print Network

    L. Vanni; R. Laura

    2008-12-03

    Based on the notion of time translation, we develop a formalism to deal with the logic of quantum properties at different times. In our formalism it is possible to enlarge the usual notion of context to include composed properties involving properties at different times. We compare our results with the theory of consistent histories.

  9. Timing of spacecraft date: Time accuracy requirements and timing facilities of the European Space Agency (ESA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworak, H. P.

    1985-04-01

    The time accuracy requirements for various European Space Agency (ESA) missions are analyzed; the requirements are grouped by the type of mission. The evolution of satellite timing techniques since 1968 is shown, and the requirements for future ESA missions (until the late 1980's) are assessed. Timing systems and their configuration at various ESA ground stations and the operations control centers are described. Two studies on future techniques in the field of time dissemination and time synchronization conclude this paper: The LASSO mission (Laser Synchronization from Stationary Orbit) and a low-cost time dissemination technique using METEOSAT, the European meteorological satellites, are briefly outlined.

  10. Timing in multitasking: memory contamination and time pressure bias.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jungaa; Anderson, John R

    2013-01-01

    There can be systematic biases in time estimation when it is performed in complex multitasking situations. In this paper we focus on the mechanisms that cause participants to tend to respond too quickly and underestimate a target interval (250-400 ms) in a complex, real-time task. We hypothesized that two factors are responsible for the too-early bias: (1) Memory contamination from an even shorter time interval in the task, and (2) time pressure to take appropriate actions in time. In a simpler experiment that was focused on just these two factors, we found a strong too-early bias when participants estimated the target interval in alternation with a shorter interval and when they had little time to perform the task. The too-early bias was absent when they estimated the target interval in isolation without contamination and time pressure. A strong too-late bias occurred when the target interval alternated with a longer interval and there was no time pressure to respond. The effects were captured by incorporating the timing model of Taatgen and van Rijn (2011) into the ACT-R model for the Space Fortress task (Bothell, 2010). The results show that to properly understand time estimation in a dynamic task one needs to model the multiple influences that are occurring from the surrounding context. PMID:23892230

  11. Tempo: Pulsar timing data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R.; Taylor, J.; Peters, W.; Weisberg, J.; Irwin, A.; Wex, N.; Stairs, I.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D.

    2015-09-01

    Tempo analyzes pulsar timing data. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs), pulsar model parameters, and coded instructions are read from one or more input files. The TOAs are fitted by a pulse timing model incorporating transformation to the solar-system barycenter, pulsar rotation and spin-down and, where necessary, one of several binary models. Program output includes parameter values and uncertainties, residual pulse arrival times, chi-squared statistics, and the covariance matrix of the model. In prediction mode, ephemerides of pulse phase behavior (in the form of polynomial expansions) are calculated from input timing models. Tempo is the basis for the Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) code.

  12. Toward the End of Time

    E-print Network

    Emil J. Martinec; Daniel Robbins; Savdeep Sethi

    2006-04-27

    The null-brane space-time provides a simple model of a big crunch/big bang singularity. A non-perturbative definition of M-theory on this space-time was recently provided using matrix theory. We derive the fermion couplings for this matrix model and study the leading quantum effects. These effects include particle production and a time-dependent potential. Our results suggest that as the null-brane develops a big crunch singularity, the usual notion of space-time is replaced by an interacting gluon phase. This gluon phase appears to constitute the end of our conventional picture of space and time.

  13. The LCLS Timing Event System

    SciTech Connect

    Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

  14. The NIST Internet time service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Judah

    1994-01-01

    We will describe the NIST Network Time Service which provides time and frequency information over the Internet. Our first time server is located in Boulder, Colorado, a second backup server is under construction there, and we plan to install a third server on the East Coast later this year. The servers are synchronized to UTC(NIST) with an uncertainty of about 0.8 ms RMS and they will respond to time requests from any client on the Internet in several different formats including the DAYTIME, TIME and NTP protocols. The DAYTIME and TIME protocols are the easiest to use and are suitable for providing time to PC's and other small computers. In addition to UTC(NIST), the DAYTIME message provides advance notice of leap seconds and of the transitions to and from Daylight Saving Time. The Daylight Saving Time notice is based on the US transition dates of the first Sunday in April and the last one in October. The NTP is a more complex protocol that is suitable for larger machines; it is normally run as a 'daemon' process in the background and can keep the time of the client to within a few milliseconds of UTC(NIST). We will describe the operating principles of various kinds of client software ranging from a simple program that queries the server once and sets the local clock to more complex 'daemon' processes (such as NTP) that continuously correct the time of the local clock based on periodic calibrations.

  15. Sensory adaptation for timing perception.

    PubMed

    Roseboom, Warrick; Linares, Daniel; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-04-22

    Recent sensory experience modifies subjective timing perception. For example, when visual events repeatedly lead auditory events, such as when the sound and video tracks of a movie are out of sync, subsequent vision-leads-audio presentations are reported as more simultaneous. This phenomenon could provide insights into the fundamental problem of how timing is represented in the brain, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that the effect of recent experience on timing perception is not just subjective; recent sensory experience also modifies relative timing discrimination. This result indicates that recent sensory history alters the encoding of relative timing in sensory areas, excluding explanations of the subjective phenomenon based only on decision-level changes. The pattern of changes in timing discrimination suggests the existence of two sensory components, similar to those previously reported for visual spatial attributes: a lateral shift in the nonlinear transducer that maps relative timing into perceptual relative timing and an increase in transducer slope around the exposed timing. The existence of these components would suggest that previous explanations of how recent experience may change the sensory encoding of timing, such as changes in sensory latencies or simple implementations of neural population codes, cannot account for the effect of sensory adaptation on timing perception. PMID:25788590

  16. The NIST Internet time service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Judah

    1994-05-01

    We will describe the NIST Network Time Service which provides time and frequency information over the Internet. Our first time server is located in Boulder, Colorado, a second backup server is under construction there, and we plan to install a third server on the East Coast later this year. The servers are synchronized to UTC(NIST) with an uncertainty of about 0.8 ms RMS and they will respond to time requests from any client on the Internet in several different formats including the DAYTIME, TIME and NTP protocols. The DAYTIME and TIME protocols are the easiest to use and are suitable for providing time to PC's and other small computers. In addition to UTC(NIST), the DAYTIME message provides advance notice of leap seconds and of the transitions to and from Daylight Saving Time. The Daylight Saving Time notice is based on the US transition dates of the first Sunday in April and the last one in October. The NTP is a more complex protocol that is suitable for larger machines; it is normally run as a 'daemon' process in the background and can keep the time of the client to within a few milliseconds of UTC(NIST). We will describe the operating principles of various kinds of client software ranging from a simple program that queries the server once and sets the local clock to more complex 'daemon' processes (such as NTP) that continuously correct the time of the local clock based on periodic calibrations.

  17. Time activities at the BIPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Claudine

    1995-01-01

    The generation and dissemination of International Atomic Time, TAI, and of Coordinated Universal Time, UTC, are explicitly mentioned in the list of the principal tasks of the BIPM, recalled in the Comptes Rendus of the 18th Conference Generale des Poids et Mesures, in 1987. These tasks are fulfilled by the BIPM Time Section, thanks to international cooperation with national timing centers, which maintain, under metrological conditions, the clocks used to generate TAI. Besides the current work of data collection and processing, research activities are carried out in order to adapt the computation of TAI to the most recent improvements occurring in the time and frequency domains. Studies concerning the application of general relativity and pulsar timing to time metrology are also actively pursued. This paper summarizes the work done in all these fields and outlines future projects.

  18. Correlated continuous time random walks

    E-print Network

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Xiao, Yimin

    2008-01-01

    Continuous time random walks impose a random waiting time before each particle jump. Scaling limits of heavy tailed continuous time random walks are governed by fractional evolution equations. Space-fractional derivatives describe heavy tailed jumps, and the time-fractional version codes heavy tailed waiting times. This paper develops scaling limits and governing equations in the case of correlated jumps. For long-range dependent jumps, this leads to fractional Brownian motion or linear fractional stable motion, with the time parameter replaced by an inverse stable subordinator in the case of heavy tailed waiting times. These scaling limits provide an interesting class of non-Markovian, non-Gaussian self-similar processes.

  19. Finite-time stability and finite-time stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Sanjay Purushottam

    While non-Lipschitzian effects such as Coulomb friction abound in nature, most of the available techniques for feedback stabilization yield closed-loop systems with Lipschitzian dynamics. The convergence in such systems is at best exponential with infinite settling time. In this dissertation, we are interested in finite-settling-time behavior, that is, finite-time stability. The object of this dissertation is to provide a rigorous foundation for the theory of finite-time stability of continuous autonomous systems and motivate a closer examination of finite-time stability as a possible objective in control design. Accordingly, the notion of finite-time stability is precisely formulated and properties of the settling-time function are studied. Lyapunov and converse Lyapunov results involving scalar differential inequalities are obtained. It is shown that, under certain conditions, finite-time-stable systems possess better disturbance rejection and robustness properties. As an application of these ideas, we consider the finite-time stabilization of the translational and rotational double integrators. In the case of the rotational double integrator, the topology of the cylindrical state space renders continuous global stabilization impossible and hence the closed-loop system possesses saddle points. Because of the non-Lipschitzian character of the feedback law, these saddle points are, in fact, finite-time repellers--equilibria from which solutions can spontaneously and unpredictably depart. It is generally believed that models obtained from classical dynamics are completely deterministic. We present a counterexample to this widely held notion. The counterexample consists of a particle moving along a nonsmooth (once, but not twice, differentiable) constraint in a uniform gravitational field. The equation of motion obtained by applying classical Lagrangian dynamics contains non-Lipschitzian terms and, consequently, the dynamics of the system exhibit a finite-time saddle. The system possesses multiple solutions starting at the finite-time saddle. Every such solution corresponds to the particle spontaneously departing from the equilibrium position. Homogeneity is introduced as a tool for analyzing finite-time stability of higher dimensional systems. For this purpose a coordinate-free notion of homogeneity is formulated. Our main result is that a homogeneous system is finite-time stable if and only if it is asymptotically stable and has negative degree of homogeneity. Under the assumption of homogeneity, results related to finite-time stability can be strengthened. Finally, homogeneity is exploited to obtain a finite-time stabilizing controller for a chain of integrators and hence prove that every controllable linear control system can be finite-time stabilized through a continuous feedback law.

  20. Phase Time and Envelope Time in Time-Distance Analysis and Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Jimenez, Antonio; Rabello-Soares, Maria Cristina; Ai, Guoxiang; Wang, Gwo-Ping; Goode Philip; Marquette, William; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Landenkov, Oleg

    1999-01-01

    Time-distance analysis and acoustic imaging are two related techniques to probe the local properties of solar interior. In this study, we discuss the relation of phase time and envelope time between the two techniques. The location of the envelope peak of the cross correlation function in time-distance analysis is identified as the travel time of the wave packet formed by modes with the same w/l. The phase time of the cross correlation function provides information of the phase change accumulated along the wave path, including the phase change at the boundaries of the mode cavity. The acoustic signals constructed with the technique of acoustic imaging contain both phase and intensity information. The phase of constructed signals can be studied by computing the cross correlation function between time series constructed with ingoing and outgoing waves. In this study, we use the data taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) instrument and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument. The analysis is carried out for the quiet Sun. We use the relation of envelope time versus distance measured in time-distance analyses to construct the acoustic signals in acoustic imaging analyses. The phase time of the cross correlation function of constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is twice the difference between the phase time and envelope time in time-distance analyses as predicted. The envelope peak of the cross correlation function between constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is located at zero time as predicted for results of one-bounce at 3 mHz for all four data sets and two-bounce at 3 mHz for two TON data sets. But it is different from zero for other cases. The cause of the deviation of the envelope peak from zero is not known.

  1. Commentary: the right time to rethink part-time careers.

    PubMed

    Palda, Valerie A; Levinson, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    The demand for part-time academic positions is bound to increase because of the changing demographics of medicine and the needs of both women and men faculty. One of the main benefits of working part-time is the freedom to shape a career that is tailored to one's individualized life needs. Studies indicate that part-time faculty may enhance quality of care, patient satisfaction, resource utilization, and productivity. Division chiefs and department chairs who have flexible hiring policies to meet the needs of part-time faculty are likely to be more successful in recruitment and retention. The authors describe some of the benefits and drawbacks of part-time work, and they offer advice for faculty members seeking part-time careers and for leaders seeking to employ them. PMID:19116469

  2. Time Investment and Time Management: An Analysis of Time Students Spend Working at Home for School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the time students spend working at home for school. In Study 1, we investigated amount and regulation of time. Study 2 serves to validate the results of Study 1 and, in addition, investigates the duration of the time units students used and their relation to scholastic success. In Study 1, the participants were 332 students…

  3. Local-time effect on small space-time scale

    E-print Network

    V. A. Panchelyuga; V. A. Kolombet; M. S. Panchelyuga; S. E. Shnoll

    2006-10-18

    The paper presents an investigation of local-time effect - one of the manifestations of macroscopic fluctuations phenomena. Was shown the existence of the named effect for longitudinal distance between locations of measurements up to 500 meters. Also a structure of intervals distribution in neighborhood of local-time peak was studied and splitting of the peak was found out. Obtained results lead to conclusion about sharp anisotropy of space-time.

  4. Pathophysiological distortions in time perception and timed performance

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Melissa J.

    2012-01-01

    Distortions in time perception and timed performance are presented by a number of different neurological and psychiatric conditions (e.g. Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism). As a consequence, the primary focus of this review is on factors that define or produce systematic changes in the attention, clock, memory and decision stages of temporal processing as originally defined by Scalar Expectancy Theory. These findings are used to evaluate the Striatal Beat Frequency Theory, which is a neurobiological model of interval timing based upon the coincidence detection of oscillatory processes in corticostriatal circuits that can be mapped onto the stages of information processing proposed by Scalar Timing Theory. PMID:21921020

  5. Timing Calibration in PET Using a Time Alignment Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Thompson, Christopher J.

    2006-05-05

    We evaluate the Scanwell Time Alignment Probe for performing the timing calibration for the LBNL Prostate-Specific PET Camera. We calibrate the time delay correction factors for each detector module in the camera using two methods--using the Time Alignment Probe (which measures the time difference between the probe and each detector module) and using the conventional method (which measures the timing difference between all module-module combinations in the camera). These correction factors, which are quantized in 2 ns steps, are compared on a module-by-module basis. The values are in excellent agreement--of the 80 correction factors, 62 agree exactly, 17 differ by 1 step, and 1 differs by 2 steps. We also measure on-time and off-time counting rates when the two sets of calibration factors are loaded into the camera and find that they agree within statistical error. We conclude that the performance using the Time Alignment Probe and conventional methods are equivalent.

  6. Continuous time Bayesian network classifiers.

    PubMed

    Stella, F; Amer, Y

    2012-12-01

    The class of continuous time Bayesian network classifiers is defined; it solves the problem of supervised classification on multivariate trajectories evolving in continuous time. The trajectory consists of the values of discrete attributes that are measured in continuous time, while the predicted class is expected to occur in the future. Two instances from this class, namely the continuous time naive Bayes classifier and the continuous time tree augmented naive Bayes classifier, are introduced and analyzed. They implement a trade-off between computational complexity and classification accuracy. Learning and inference for the class of continuous time Bayesian network classifiers are addressed, in the case where complete data are available. A learning algorithm for the continuous time naive Bayes classifier and an exact inference algorithm for the class of continuous time Bayesian network classifiers are described. The performance of the continuous time naive Bayes classifier is assessed in the case where real-time feedback to neurological patients undergoing motor rehabilitation must be provided. PMID:22846170

  7. On the Flow of Time

    E-print Network

    George F R Ellis

    2008-12-01

    Current theoretical physics suggests the flow of time is an illusion: the entire universe just is, with no special meaning attached to the present time. This paper points out that this view, in essence represented by usual space-time diagrams, is based on time-reversible microphysical laws, which fail to capture essential features of the time-irreversible nature of decoherence and the quantum measurement process, as well as macro-physical behaviour and the development of emergent complex systems, including life, which exist in the real universe. When these are taken into account, the unchanging block universe view of spacetime is best replaced by an evolving block universe which extends as time evolves, with the potential of the future continually becoming the certainty of the past; spacetime itself evolves, as do the entities within it. However this time evolution is not related to any preferred surfaces in spacetime; rather it is associated with the evolution of proper time along families of world lines. The default state of fundamental physics should not be taken to be a time irreversible evolution of physical states: it is an ongoing irreversible development of time itself.

  8. Timed Processes: Models, Axioms and Decidability 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Liang

    This thesis presents and studies a timed computational model of parallelism, a Timed Calculus of Communicating Systems or Timed CCS for short. Timed CCS is an extension of Milner's CCS with time. We allow time to be discrete, ...

  9. Pulsar timing noise and the minimum observation time to detect gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasky, Paul D.; Melatos, Andrew; Ravi, Vikram; Hobbs, George

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays to gravitational waves is, at some level, limited by timing noise. Red timing noise - the stochastic wandering of pulse arrival times with a red spectrum - is prevalent in slow-spinning pulsars and has been identified in many millisecond pulsars. Phenomenological models of timing noise, such as from superfluid turbulence, suggest that the timing noise spectrum plateaus below some critical frequency, fc, potentially aiding the hunt for gravitational waves. We examine this effect for individual pulsars by calculating minimum observation times, Tmin(fc), over which the gravitational wave signal becomes larger than the timing noise plateau. We do this in two ways: (1) in a model-independent manner, and (2) by using the superfluid turbulence model for timing noise as an example to illustrate how neutron star parameters can be constrained. We show that the superfluid turbulence model can reproduce the data qualitatively from a number of pulsars observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array. We further show how a value of fc, derived either through observations or theory, can be related to Tmin. This provides a diagnostic whereby the usefulness of timing array pulsars for gravitational-wave detection can be quantified.

  10. Pulsar timing noise and the minimum observation time to detect gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    E-print Network

    Paul D. Lasky; Andrew Melatos; Vikram Ravi; George Hobbs

    2015-03-11

    The sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays to gravitational waves is, at some level, limited by timing noise. Red timing noise - the stochastic wandering of pulse arrival times with a red spectrum - is prevalent in slow-spinning pulsars and has been identified in many millisecond pulsars. Phenomenological models of timing noise, such as from superfluid turbulence, suggest that the timing noise spectrum plateaus below some critical frequency, $f_c$, potentially aiding the hunt for gravitational waves. We examine this effect for individual pulsars by calculating minimum observation times, $T_{\\rm min}(f_c)$, over which the gravitational wave signal becomes larger than the timing noise plateau. We do this in two ways: 1) in a model-independent manner, and 2) by using the superfluid turbulence model for timing noise as an example to illustrate how neutron star parameters can be constrained. We show that the superfluid turbulence model can reproduce the data qualitatively from a number of pulsars observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array. We further show how a value of $f_c$, derived either through observations or theory, can be related to $T_{\\rm min}$. This provides a diagnostic whereby the usefulness of timing array pulsars for gravitational-wave detection can be quantified.

  11. [Mathematical model of mental time].

    PubMed

    Glasko, A V; Sadykhova, L G

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of Ernst Mach's ideas and developed before the mathematical theory of mental processes, mathematical definition of duration of an interval of mental time, all over again for perception (experience) of separate event, and then--generally, i.e. for perception (experience) of sequence of events is entered. Its dependence on duration of an appropriating interval of physical time is investigated. Communication of mental time with perception of time (for two cases: "greater" and "small" intervals) is investigated. Comparison of theoretical formulas with results of experimental measurements is spent. Is defined process time which can be used, in particular, as a measure of work. The effect of the inverse of the psychological time, described in works of the Mach is analyzed and modelled. PMID:25723024

  12. Bayesian optimization of time perception.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuanghua; Church, Russell M; Meck, Warren H

    2013-11-01

    Precise timing is crucial to decision-making and behavioral control, yet subjective time can be easily distorted by various temporal contexts. Application of a Bayesian framework to various forms of contextual calibration reveals that, contrary to popular belief, contextual biases in timing help to optimize overall performance under noisy conditions. Here, we review recent progress in understanding these forms of temporal calibration, and integrate a Bayesian framework with information-processing models of timing. We show that the essential components of a Bayesian framework are closely related to the clock, memory, and decision stages used by these models, and that such an integrated framework offers a new perspective on distortions in timing and time perception that are otherwise difficult to explain. PMID:24139486

  13. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  14. Time is not the problem

    E-print Network

    Olaf Dreyer

    2009-04-22

    Attempts to quantize general relativity encounter an odd problem. The Hamiltonian that normally generates time evolution vanishes in the case of general relativity as a result of diffeomorphism invariance. The theory seems to be saying that time does not exist. The most obvious feature of our world, namely that time seems to progress and that the world changes accordingly becomes a problem in this presumably fundamental theory. This is called the problem of time. In this essay we argue that this problem is the result of an unphysical idealization. We are caught in this "problem of time" trap because we took a wrong turn in the early days of relativity by permanently including a split of geometry and matter into our physical theories. We show that another possibility exists that circumvents the problem of time and also sheds new light on other problems like the cosmological constant problem and the horizon problem in early universe cosmology.

  15. Random time series in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Simon

    2013-02-13

    Progress in astronomy comes from interpreting the signals encoded in the light received from distant objects: the distribution of light over the sky (images), over photon wavelength (spectrum), over polarization angle and over time (usually called light curves by astronomers). In the time domain, we see transient events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and other powerful explosions; we see periodic phenomena such as the orbits of planets around nearby stars, radio pulsars and pulsations of stars in nearby galaxies; and we see persistent aperiodic variations ('noise') from powerful systems such as accreting black holes. I review just a few of the recent and future challenges in the burgeoning area of time domain astrophysics, with particular attention to persistently variable sources, the recovery of reliable noise power spectra from sparsely sampled time series, higher order properties of accreting black holes, and time delays and correlations in multi-variate time series. PMID:23277606

  16. Start Date End Date Start Time End Time

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    in advance of the event. A $50 administration fee will be assessed to any event submitted less than 10 days prior to the event. hh:mm mm/dd/yyyy Est # of Vehicles Submit Form Clear Fields 000 - None Enter #s onlyEvent Name Start Date End Date Start Time End Time Event Location Building Room Other Est

  17. First Passage Times, Lifetimes, and Relaxation Times of Unfolded Proteins.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Sengupta, Anirvan M; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-07-24

    The dynamics of proteins in the unfolded state can be quantified in computer simulations by calculating a spectrum of relaxation times which describes the time scales over which the population fluctuations decay to equilibrium. If the unfolded state space is discretized, we can evaluate the relaxation time of each state. We derive a simple relation that shows the mean first passage time to any state is equal to the relaxation time of that state divided by the equilibrium population. This explains why mean first passage times from state to state within the unfolded ensemble can be very long but the energy landscape can still be smooth (minimally frustrated). In fact, when the folding kinetics is two-state, all of the unfolded state relaxation times within the unfolded free energy basin are faster than the folding time. This result supports the well-established funnel energy landscape picture and resolves an apparent contradiction between this model and the recently proposed kinetic hub model of protein folding. We validate these concepts by analyzing a Markov state model of the kinetics in the unfolded state and folding of the miniprotein NTL9 (where NTL9 is the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9), constructed from a 2.9 ms simulation provided by D. E. Shaw Research. PMID:26252709

  18. Measuring Time: The Stability of Special Education Teacher Time Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannest, Kimberly J.; Parker, Richard I.

    2010-01-01

    Instructional time use is an intervention without equal. The measure of such has clear and important implications for special education practice and research. Although exhortations to maximize instruction and thereby student engagement exist throughout the literature, few studies discuss how special education teachers use their time, and none…

  19. 49 Stress-timed vs. Syllable-timed Languages

    E-print Network

    Mehler, Jacques

    49 Stress-timed vs. Syllable- timed Languages Marina Nespor Mohinish Shukla Jacques Mehler 1; Prince 1983; Nespor & Vogel 1989; chapter 43: representations of word stress), the element that "establishes order" in the flow of speech is stress: universally, stressed and unstressed positions alternate

  20. Spouse "Together Time": Quality Time within the Household

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glorieux, Ignace; Minnen, Joeri; van Tienoven, Theun Pieter

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade more and more time-use data were gathered on a household level in stead of on an individual level. The time-use information of all members of the household provides much more insight in research fields that until now largely used data gathered at the individual level. One of these research fields is the study of quality of…

  1. Continuous time random walk with correlated waiting times

    E-print Network

    A. V. Chechkin; M. Hofmann; I. M. Sokolov

    2009-08-06

    Based on the Langevin description of the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW), we consider a generalization of CTRW in which the waiting times between the subsequent jumps are correlated. We discuss the cases of exponential and slowly decaying persistent power-law correlations between the waiting times as two generic examples and obtain the corresponding mean squared displacements as functions of time. In the case of exponential-type correlations the (sub)diffusion at short times is slower than in the absence of correlations. At long times the behavior of the mean squared displacement is the same as in uncorrelated CTRW. For power-law correlations we find subdiffusion characterized by the same exponent at all times, which appears to be smaller than the one in uncorrelated CTRW. Interestingly, in the limiting case of an extremely long power-law correlations, the (sub)diffusion exponent does not tend to zero, but is bounded from below by the subdiffusion exponent corresponding to a short time behavior in the case of exponential correlations.

  2. Time-Orthogonal-Waveform-Space-Time Adaptive Processing for Distributed

    E-print Network

    Adve, Raviraj

    for distributed apertures. The system under consideration is a very sparse array of sub-apertures placed thousandsTime-Orthogonal-Waveform-Space-Time Adaptive Processing for Distributed Aperture Radars Luciano Email: rsadve@comm.utoronto.ca Abstract-- Distributed aperture radars represent an interesting solution

  3. Later Education Start Times in Adolescence: Time for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Paul; Lee, Clark

    2015-01-01

    School start times for adolescents in the United States are typically too early to be healthy for this age group. There is significant evidence from the research literature that early starts have serious negative impacts on students. In particular, early education start times in adolescence cause chronic sleep deprivation, which damages both…

  4. Smart Times: A Parent's Guide to Quality Time with Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burtt, Kent Garland

    Containing over 200 quality time activities for preschool-age children and their parents, "Smart Times" is designed to promote the development of children's physical, social, and cognitive skills and to help parents and children enjoy each other's company more. Recipes for fun and learning are provided to stimulate imagination, promote close…

  5. Pathophysiological Distortions in Time Perception and Timed Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allman, Melissa J.; Meck, Warren H.

    2012-01-01

    Distortions in time perception and timed performance are presented by a number of different neurological and psychiatric conditions (e.g. Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism). As a consequence, the primary focus of this review is on factors that define or produce systematic changes in the…

  6. Metamaterial model of fractal time

    E-print Network

    Igor I. Smolyaninov

    2012-03-02

    While numerous examples of fractal spaces may be found in various fields of science, the flow of time is typically assumed to be one-dimensional and smooth. Here we present a metamaterial-based physical system, which can be described by effective three-dimensional (2+1) Minkowski spacetime. The peculiar feature of this system is that its time-like variable has fractal character. The fractal dimension of the time-like variable appears to be D=2.

  7. FRACTIONAL DYNAMICS AT MULTIPLE TIMES.

    PubMed

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Straka, Peter

    2012-11-01

    A continuous time random walk (CTRW) imposes a random waiting time between random particle jumps. CTRW limit densities solve a fractional Fokker-Planck equation, but since the CTRW limit is not Markovian, this is not sufficient to characterize the process. This paper applies continuum renewal theory to restore the Markov property on an expanded state space, and compute the joint CTRW limit density at multiple times. PMID:23378670

  8. Time and maps Menno-Jan Kraak

    E-print Network

    Time and maps Menno-Jan Kraak Time and maps ! · Why interested in time? · What is time and · How is time perceived? · How is time represented? Why interested in time? GIScience perspective) - analysis of changes over time - analysis of patterns of change over time ! · Development of methods

  9. A monolithic time stretcher for precision time recording

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, Gary S.

    2007-04-20

    Identifying light mesons which contain only up/down quarks (pions) from those containing a strange quark (kaons) over the typical meter length scales of a particle physics detector requires instrumentation capable of measuring flight times with a resolution on the order of 20ps. In the last few years a large number of inexpensive, multi-channel Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) chips have become available. These devices typically have timing resolution performance in the hundreds of ps regime. A technique is presented that is a monolithic version of ``time stretcher'' solution adopted for the Belle Time-Of-Flight system to address this gap between resolution need and intrinsic multi-hit TDC performance.

  10. Quantum Gravity, the Origin of Time and Time's Arrow

    E-print Network

    J. W. Moffat

    1992-09-02

    The local Lorentz and diffeomorphism symmetries of Einstein's gravitational theory are spontaneously broken by a Higgs mechanism by invoking a phase transition in the early Universe, at a critical temperature $T_c$ below which the symmetry is restored. The spontaneous breakdown of the vacuum state generates an external time and the wave function of the Universe satisfies a time dependent Schrodinger equation, which reduces to the Wheeler-deWitt equation in the classical regime for $T T_c$ and matter is created fractions of seconds after the big bang, generating the matter in the Universe. The time direction of the vacuum expectation value of the scalar Higgs field generates a time asymmetry, which defines the cosmological arrow of time and the direction of increasing entropy as the Lorentz symmetry is restored at low temperatures.

  11. Timing jitter of Raman solitons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gengji; Xin, Ming; Kaertner, Franz X; Chang, Guoqing

    2015-11-01

    We study the relative intensity noise (RIN) and timing jitter of a Raman soliton. We demonstrate that the RIN of an excitation pulse causes center-wavelength fluctuations of the resulting Raman soliton which translates by fiber dispersion into relative timing jitter (RTJ) between the Raman soliton and the excitation pulse. The Raman soliton's absolute timing jitter is dominated by the excitation pulse's timing jitter at low frequency and by the RTJ at high frequency. The experimental study reveals that RTJ can be significantly reduced by reducing the accumulated fiber dispersion (e.g., using less dispersive fibers with shorter length) experienced by the Raman soliton. PMID:26512530

  12. Time scale independent signal transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltin, L.

    1980-05-01

    The paper presents a method which permits the conversion of time scale variations occurring during signal transmission into time shifts proportionally related to these variations. It is demonstrated that the method can be used to reject the adverse effects of the time scale variations (such as wow and flutter in magnetic tape recordings) and/or to determine the scale change exactly (such as would be required in Doppler signal processing). Finally, it is noted that since the system performance degrades with rising frequency of the time scale distortions, an upper bound for this frequency is derived.

  13. FROG: Time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Alasdair

    2014-06-01

    FROG performs time series analysis and display. It provides a simple user interface for astronomers wanting to do time-domain astrophysics but still offers the powerful features found in packages such as PERIOD (ascl:1406.005). FROG includes a number of tools for manipulation of time series. Among other things, the user can combine individual time series, detrend series (multiple methods) and perform basic arithmetic functions. The data can also be exported directly into the TOPCAT (ascl:1101.010) application for further manipulation if needed.

  14. Time Travel: Deutsch vs. Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichny, George

    2011-12-01

    The quantum teleportation protocol can be used to probabilistically simulate a quantum circuit with backward-in-time connections. This allows us to analyze some conceptual problems of time travel in the context of physically realizable situations free of paradoxes. As an example one can perform encrypted measurements of future states for which the decryption key becomes available in the future. Likewise, the gauge-like freedom of locally changing the direction of time flow in quantum circuits can lead to conceptual and computational simplifications. I contrast this situation with Deutsch's treatment of quantum mechanics in the presence of closed time-like curves pointing out some of its deficiencies and problems.

  15. It's About Time: Opportunities & Challenges

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    It's About Time: Opportunities & Challenges for U.S. Geochronology #12;Cover photo:The Grand Canyon ...................................................................................................................6 SIDEBAR: Grand challenges in geochronology

  16. A brief study of time

    E-print Network

    James M. Chappell; John G. Hartnett; Azhar Iqbal; Nicolangelo Iannella; Derek Abbott

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the nature of time remains a key unsolved problem in science. Newton in the Principia asserted an absolute universal time that {\\it `flows equably'}. Hamilton then proposed a mathematical unification of space and time within the framework of the quaternions that ultimately lead to the famous Minkowski formulation in 1908 using four-vectors. The Minkowski framework is found to provide a versatile formalism for describing the relationship between space and time in accordance with relativistic principles, but nevertheless fails to provide deeper insights into the physical origin of time and its properties. In this paper we begin with a recognition of the fundamental role played by three-dimensional space in physics that we model using the Clifford algebra multivector. From this geometrical foundation we are then able to identify a plausible origin for our concept of time. This geometrical perspective also allows us to make a key topological distinction between time and space, with time being a point-like quantity. The multivector then allows a generalized unification of time and space within a Minkowski-like description.

  17. The Universal Arrow of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupervasser, Oleg; Nikoli?, Hrvoje; Zlati?, Vinko

    2012-09-01

    Statistical physics cannot explain why a thermodynamic arrow of time exists, unless one postulates very special and unnatural initial conditions. Yet, we argue that statistical physics can explain why the thermodynamic arrow of time is universal, i.e., why the arrow points in the same direction everywhere. Namely, if two subsystems have opposite arrow-directions at a particular time, the interaction between them makes the configuration statistically unstable and causes a decay towards a system with a universal direction of the arrow of time. We present general qualitative arguments for that claim and support them by a detailed analysis of a toy model based on the baker's map.

  18. The Time Is Ripe (Again)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Roland S.

    2013-01-01

    "It's always been a promising time for teacher leadership. It's just never been a successful time," writes noted educator Roland Barth. Why? Barth points to five obstacles: administrator resistance, the taboo in teaching against elevating oneself higher than one's peers, the fact that teachers' plates are full, the…

  19. Time Analysis for Probabilistic Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Czejdo, Bogdan; Ferragut, Erik M

    2012-01-01

    There are many theoretical and practical results in the area of workflow modeling, especially when the more formal workflows are used. In this paper we focus on probabilistic workflows. We show algorithms for time computations in probabilistic workflows. With time of activities more precisely modeled, we can achieve improvement in the work cooperation and analyses of cooperation including simulation and visualization.

  20. Deformed Space-Time Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertini, Gianni; Kostro, Ludwik; Cardone, Fabio

    Recent experimental results, which are not easy to explain at the light of the current commonly accepted theories, can find an explanation in the framework of a theory of locally deformed space-time. Small cavities inside pressed solids and bubbles inside cavitated liquids are assumed as micro-reactors where deformed space-time reactions can take place.